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Sample records for groupings usingbranched dna

  1. Directed assembly of discrete gold nanoparticle groupings usingbranched DNA scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Claridge, Shelley A.; Goh, Sarah L.; Frechet, Jean M.J.; Williams, Shara C.; Micheel, Christine M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2004-09-14

    The concept of self-assembled dendrimers is explored for the creation of discrete nanoparticle assemblies. Hybridization of branched DNA trimers and nanoparticle-DNA conjugates results in the synthesis of nanoparticle trimer and tetramer complexes. Multiple tetramer architectures are investigated, utilizing Au-DNA conjugates with varying secondary structural motifs. Hybridization products are analyzed by gel electrophoresis, and discrete bands are observed corresponding to structures with increasing numbers of hybridization events. Samples extracted from each band are analyzed by transmission electron microscopy, and statistics compiled from micrographs are used to compare assembly characteristics for each architecture. Asymmetric structures are also produced in which both 5 and 10 nm Au particles are assembled on branched scaffolds.

  2. DNA Topoisomerase/Integrase Group, LMP

    Cancer.gov

    Welcome to the DNA Topoisomerase/Integrase Group's Wiki Home page. This web site provides additional information on the research performed by the DNA Topoisomerase/Integrase Group, LMP, which focuses on Topoisomerase, HIV-1 integrase and Tdp1 inhibitors.

  3. DNA homology among diverse spiroplasma strains representing several serological groups.

    PubMed

    Lee, I M; Davis, R E

    1980-11-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) homology among 10 strains of spiroplasma associated with plants and insects was assessed by analysis of DNA-DNA hybrids with single strand specific S1 nuclease. Based on DNA homology, the spiroplasmas could be divided into three genetically distinct groups (designated I, II, and III), corresponding to three separate serogroups described previously. DNA sequence homology between the three groups was less than or equal to 5%. Based on DNA homology, group I could be divided into three subgroups (A, B, and C) that corresponded to three serological subgroups of serogroup I. Subgroup A contained Spiroplasma citri strains Maroc R8A2 and C 189; subgroup B contained strains AS 576 from honey bee and G 1 from flowers; subgroup C contained corn stunt spiroplasma strains I-747 and PU 8-17. There was 27-54% DNA sequence homology among these three subgroups. Group II contained strains 23-6 and 27-31 isolated from flowers of tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera L.). Group III contained strains SR 3 and SR 9, other isolates from flowers of tulip tree. Based on thermal denaturation, guanine plus cytosine contents of DNA from five type strains representing all groups and subgroups were estimated to be close to 26 mol% for group I strains, close to 25 mol% for group II strains, and close to 29 mol% for group III strains. The genome molecular weights of these five type strains were all estimated to bae about 10(9). PMID:7214225

  4. Group II Introns: Mobile Ribozymes that Invade DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lambowitz, Alan M.; Zimmerly, Steven

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Group II introns are mobile ribozymes that self-splice from precursor RNAs to yield excised intron lariat RNAs, which then invade new genomic DNA sites by reverse splicing. The introns encode a reverse transcriptase that stabilizes the catalytically active RNA structure for forward and reverse splicing, and afterwards converts the integrated intron RNA back into DNA. The characteristics of group II introns suggest that they or their close relatives were evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns, the spliceosome, and retrotransposons in eukaryotes. Further, their ribozyme-based DNA integration mechanism enabled the development of group II introns into gene targeting vectors (targetrons), which have the unique feature of readily programmable DNA target specificity. PMID:20463000

  5. Group C adenovirus DNA sequences in human lymphoid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.; Palkonyay, L.; Weber, J.

    1986-07-01

    Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from healthy adults, cord blood lymphocytes, and lymphoblastoid cell lines were screened by hybridization for the presence of group C adenovirus DNA sequences. In 13 of 17 peripheral blood lymphocyte samples from adults, 1 of 10 cord blood samples, and seven of seven lymphoblastoid cell lines tested, results were positive for Group C adenovirus DNA (adenovirus 1 (Ad1), Ad2, Ad5, or Ad6). About 1 to 2% of the lymphocytes carried 50 to 100 viral genome copies per positive cell, as estimated by in situ hybridization. Infectious virus representing all members of group C were recovered, but cultivation in the presence of adenovirus antibody did not cure the cells of free viral genomes. Viral DNA was found in B, T, and N cells but only in 1 of 10 cord blood samples. The results suggest that group C adenovirus infectious in childhood result in the persistence of the viral genome in circulating lymphocytes.

  6. Human xeroderma pigmentosum group G gene encodes a DNA endonuclease.

    PubMed Central

    Habraken, Y; Sung, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1994-01-01

    Because of defective nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet damaged DNA, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers. Cell fusion studies have identified seven XP complementation groups, A to G. Previous studies have implicated the products of these seven XP genes in the recognition of ultraviolet-induced DNA damage and in incision of the damage-containing DNA strand. Here, we express the XPG-encoded protein in Sf9 insect cells and purify it to homogeneity. We demonstrate that XPG is a single-strand specific DNA endonuclease, thus identifying the catalytic role of the protein in nucleotide excision repair. We suggest that XPG nuclease acts on the single-stranded region created as a result of the combined action of the XPB helicase and XPD helicase at the DNA damage site. Images PMID:8078765

  7. Xenorhabdus luminescens (DNA hybridization group 5) from human clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, J J; Jorgensen, J H; Grimont, P A; Akhurst, R J; Poinar, G O; Ageron, E; Pierce, G V; Smith, J A; Carter, G P; Wilson, K L

    1989-01-01

    An unusual isolate from a human leg wound was identified as Xenorhabdus luminescens. This finding led to the discovery or isolation of four additional strains, two from blood and two from wounds. Three of the five strains were from patients in San Antonio, Tex. Three strains were studied by DNA-DNA hybridization (S1 nuclease-trichloroacetic acid method) and were 77 to 100% related to each other, 34% related to the type strain of X. luminescens, 35 to 40% related to three of Grimont's other DNA hybridization groups of X. luminescens, and 9% related to the type strain of Xenorhabdus nematophilus. The new group of five strains was designated X. luminescens DNA hybridization group 5. All five strains were very inactive biochemically and fermented only D-glucose and D-mannose. The key reactions for recognizing this new organism are yellow pigment production, negative test for nitrate reduction to nitrite, weak bioluminescence (10 to 15 min of dark adaptation is required to see the weak light produced), and a unique hemolytic reaction on sheep blood agar plates incubated at 25 degrees C. Two case histories of strains from wounds are given; these suggest that X. luminescens DNA hybridization group 5 may be a new bacterial agent that causes wound infections. The two cases of wound infection, along with the two blood isolates, suggest that the new organism is clinically significant. Images PMID:2768446

  8. Flexible automated platform for blood group genotyping on DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Paris, Sandra; Rigal, Dominique; Barlet, Valérie; Verdier, Martine; Coudurier, Nicole; Bailly, Pascal; Brès, Jean-Charles

    2014-05-01

    The poor suitability of standard hemagglutination-based assay techniques for large-scale automated screening of red blood cell antigens severely limits the ability of blood banks to supply extensively phenotype-matched blood. With better understanding of the molecular basis of blood antigens, it is now possible to predict blood group phenotype by identifying single-nucleotide polymorphisms in genomic DNA. Development of DNA-typing assays for antigen screening in blood donation qualification laboratories promises to enable blood banks to provide optimally matched donations. We have designed an automated genotyping system using 96-well DNA microarrays for blood donation screening and a first panel of eight single-nucleotide polymorphisms to identify 16 alleles in four blood group systems (KEL, KIDD, DUFFY, and MNS). Our aim was to evaluate this system on 960 blood donor samples with known phenotype. Study data revealed a high concordance rate (99.92%; 95% CI, 99.77%-99.97%) between predicted and serologic phenotypes. These findings demonstrate that our assay using a simple protocol allows accurate, relatively low-cost phenotype prediction at the DNA level. This system could easily be configured with other blood group markers for identification of donors with rare blood types or blood units for IH panels or antigens from other systems. PMID:24726279

  9. Affine reflection groups for tiling applications: Knot theory and DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodner, M.; Patera, J.; Peterson, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present in this paper some non-conventional applications of affine Weyl groups Waff of rank 2, the symmetry group of the tiling/lattice. We first develop and present the tools for applications requiring tilings of a real Euclidean plane {R}^2. We then elucidate the equivalence of these tilings with 2D projections of knots. The resulting mathematical structure provides a framework within which is encompassed recent work utilizing knot theory for modeling the structure and function of genetic molecules, specifically the action of particular enzymes in altering the topology of DNA in site-specific recombination.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA evolution in the Anaxyrus boreas species group

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goebel, A.M.; Ranker, T.A.; Corn, P.S.; Olmstead, R.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Anaxyrus boreas species group currently comprises four species in western North America including the broadly distributed A. boreas, and three localized species, Anaxyrus nelsoni, Anaxyrus exsul and Anaxyrus canorus. Phylogenetic analyses of the mtDNA 12S rDNA, cytochrome oxidase I, control region, and restriction sites data, identified three major haplotype clades. The Northwest clade (NW) includes both subspecies of A. boreas and divergent minor clades in the middle Rocky Mountains, coastal, and central regions of the west and Pacific Northwest. The Southwest (SW) clade includes A. exsul, A. nelsoni, and minor clades in southern California. Anaxyrus canorus, previously identified as paraphyletic, has populations in both the NW and SW major clades. The Eastern major clade (E) includes three divergent lineages from southern Utah, the southern Rocky Mountains, and north of the Great Basin at the border of Utah and Nevada. These results identify new genetic variation in the eastern portion of the toad's range and are consistent with previous regional studies from the west coast. Low levels of control region sequence divergence between major clades (2.2-4.7% uncorrected pair-wise distances) are consistent with Pleistocene divergence and suggest that the phylogeographic history of the group was heavily influenced by dynamic Pleistocene glacial and climatic changes, and especially pluvial changes, in western North America. Results reported here may impact conservation plans in that the current taxonomy does not reflect the diversity in the group. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  11. Genetic Kinship Investigation from Blood Groups to DNA Markers

    PubMed Central

    Geserick, Gunther; Wirth, Ingo

    2012-01-01

    The forensic application of hereditary characteristics became possible after the discovery of human blood groups by Karl Landsteiner in 1901. The foundation for their use in kinship investigation was laid by Emil von Dungern and Ludwig Hirschfeld in 1910 by clarification of the inheritance of the ABO groups. Up to the middle of the 20th century further red cell membrane systems were discovered. From the 1920s Fritz Schiff and Georg Strassmann fought for the introduction of blood groups into forensic kinship investigation. A new era of hemogenetics was opened from 1955 as genetic polymorphisms were described in serum proteins. Starting in 1958 there followed the complex HLA system of white blood cells, which from 1963 was joined by polymophisms in erythrocyte enzymes. Therefore, from the 1980s, it was possible to clarify the majority of kinship cases with a combination of conventional markers. From 1990 to 2000 the conventional markers were gradually replaced by the more effective DNA markers. Simultaneously typing shifted from the phenotype level to the genotype level. The genomic structure of conventional genetic markers could also now be explained. As a reflection of scientific progress the legal situation also changed, particularly in the form of the official guidelines for kinship investigation. PMID:22851931

  12. A chloroplast DNA phylogeny of lilacs (Syringa, Oleaceae): plastome groups show a strong correlation with crossing groups.

    PubMed

    Kim, K J; Jansen, R K

    1998-09-01

    Phylogenetic relationships and genomic compatibility were compared for 60 accessions of Syringa using chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) and nuclear ribosomal DNA (rDNA) markers. A total of 669 cpDNA variants, 653 of which were potentially phylogenetically informative, was detected using 22 restriction enzymes. Phylogenetic analyses reveal four strongly supported plastome groups that correspond to four genetically incompatible crossing groups. Relationships of the four plastome groups (I(II(III,IV))) correlate well with the infrageneric classification except for ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae. Group I, which includes subg. Ligustrina, forms a basal lineage within Syringa. Group II includes ser. Syringa and Pinnatifoliae and the two series have high compatibility and low sequence divergence. Group III consists of three well-defined species groups of ser. Pubescentes. Group IV comprises all members of ser. Villosae and has the lowest interspecific cpDNA sequence divergences. Comparison of cpDNA sequence divergence with crossability data indicates that hybrids have not been successfully generated between species with divergence greater than 0.7%. Hybrid barriers are strong among the four major plastome groups, which have sequence divergence estimates ranging from 1.096 to 1.962%. In contrast, fully fertile hybrids occur between species pairs with sequence divergence below 0.4%. Three regions of the plastome have length variants of greater than 100 bp, and these indels identify 12 different plastome types that correlate with phylogenetic trees produced from cpDNA restriction site data. Biparentally inherited nuclear rDNA and maternally inherited cpDNA length variants enable the identification of the specific parentage of several lilac hybrids. PMID:21685019

  13. Short-step chemical synthesis of DNA by use of MMTrS group for protection of 5'-hydroxyl group.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Miyuki; Utagawa, Eri; Ohkubo, Akihiro; Sekine, Mitsuo; Seio, Kohji

    2007-01-01

    4-methoxytrithylthio (MMTrS) group was applied for the appropriately protected four canonical nucleosides. We prepared the phosphoroamidite units by use of these nucleosides and developed the synthesis of oligodeoxynucleotides without any acidic treatment. Moreover, the new DNA synthesis protocol was applied to an automated DNA synthesizer for the synthesis of longer oligodeoxynucleotides. PMID:18029620

  14. Hands on Group Work Paper Model for Teaching DNA Structure, Central Dogma and Recombinant DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altiparmak, Melek; Nakiboglu Tezer, Mahmure

    2009-01-01

    Understanding life on a molecular level is greatly enhanced when students are given the opportunity to visualize the molecules. Especially understanding DNA structure and function is essential for understanding key concepts of molecular biology such as DNA, central dogma and the manipulation of DNA. Researches have shown that undergraduate…

  15. The Leaving Group Strongly Affects H2O2-Induced DNA Cross-Linking by Arylboronates

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Sheng; Wang, Yibin; Peng, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of the benzylic leaving group and core structure of arylboronates on H2O2-induced formation of bisquinone methides for DNA interstrand cross-linking. The mechanism of DNA cross-linking induced by these arylboronates involves generation of phenol intermediates followed by departure of benzylic leaving group leading to QMs which directly cross-link DNA via alkylation. The QM formation is the rate-determining step for DNA cross-linking. A better leaving group (Br) and stepwise bisquinone methide formation increased interstrand cross-linking efficiency. These findings provide essential guidelines for designing novel anticancer prodrugs. PMID:24378073

  16. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Sánchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J.; Malarkey, C. S.; Saperas, N.; Churchill, M. E. A.; Campos, J. L.

    2015-06-30

    The crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an unmodified AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. A new mode of DNA recognition for HMG box proteins is found in which two box A domains bind in an unusual configuration generating a highly kinked DNA structure. High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1–DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2 Å. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA.

  17. [Mitochondrial DNA variability in populations and ethnic groups of Tatars of the Tobol-Irtysh basin].

    PubMed

    Naumova, O Iu; Rychkov, S Iu; Zhukova, O V

    2009-09-01

    The data on mitochondrial DNA diversity in seven local populations (villages) and four territorial groups of Tatars of the Tobol-Irtysh basin are presented. In the Turkic-speaking populations from the Tobol and Irtysh river basins, high levels of intergroup and interpopulation mtDNA variation were observed. It was demonstrated that genetic diversity of the territorial groups of Tatars of the Tobol-Irtysh basin resulted from various interethnic relationships and different ethnic components integrated into these groups. PMID:19824547

  18. Synthesis of branched DNA using oxidatively cleavable tritylsulfenyl as a hydroxy protecting group.

    PubMed

    Seio, Kohji; Kanamori, Takashi; Sekine, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The application of oxidatively cleavable tritylsulfenyl (TrS) group to the synthesis of branched DNA is described. The TrS protecting group can be removed by treatment with 1M aqueous iodine, while it is stable toward an oxaziridine-type oxidant. At the same time, the sulfur-oxygen linkage showed sufficient stability under the acidic and basic conditions used in oligonucleotide synthesis. These properties of the TrS group enabled the synthesis of branched DNA using a branched phosphoramidite in which the two hydroxy groups are protected by a 4,4'-dimethoxytrityl (DMTr) group or a TrS group. In this unit, we describe an example of the synthesis of a three-way branched DNA using a branched phosphoramidite. Curr. Protoc. Nucleic Acid Chem. 58:2.18.1-2.18.19. 2014 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:25199636

  19. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA

    PubMed Central

    Snchez-Giraldo, R.; Acosta-Reyes, F. J.; Malarkey, C. S.; Saperas, N.; Churchill, M. E. A.; Campos, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2?. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA. PMID:26143914

  20. Two high-mobility group box domains act together to underwind and kink DNA.

    PubMed

    Snchez-Giraldo, R; Acosta-Reyes, F J; Malarkey, C S; Saperas, N; Churchill, M E A; Campos, J L

    2015-07-01

    High-mobility group protein 1 (HMGB1) is an essential and ubiquitous DNA architectural factor that influences a myriad of cellular processes. HMGB1 contains two DNA-binding domains, box A and box B, which have little sequence specificity but have remarkable abilities to underwind and bend DNA. Although HMGB1 box A is thought to be responsible for the majority of HMGB1-DNA interactions with pre-bent or kinked DNA, little is known about how it recognizes unmodified DNA. Here, the crystal structure of HMGB1 box A bound to an AT-rich DNA fragment is reported at a resolution of 2?. Two box A domains of HMGB1 collaborate in an unusual configuration in which the Phe37 residues of both domains stack together and intercalate the same CG base pair, generating highly kinked DNA. This represents a novel mode of DNA recognition for HMGB proteins and reveals a mechanism by which structure-specific HMG boxes kink linear DNA. PMID:26143914

  1. Preferential Inhibition of Herpes-Group Viruses by Phosphonoacetic Acid: Effect on Virus DNA Synthesis and Virus-Induced DNA Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Eng-Shang; Huang, Chien-Hui; Huong, Shu-Mei; Selgrade, Maryjane

    1976-01-01

    In tissue culture phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) specifically inhibited DNA synthesis of human cytomegalovirus (CMV), murine CMV, simian CMV, Epstein-Barr virus, and Herpesvirus saimiri. Fifty to one hundred micrograms per milliliter PAA completely inhibited viral DNA synthesis with no significant damage to host cell DNA synthesis. In vitro DNA polymerization assays showed that 10 μg/ml of PAA specifically inhibited partially purified human CMV-induced DNA polymerase, while little inhibition of host-cell DNA polymerase activity was found. The specific inhibition of herpes-group virus DNA synthesis with little toxicity to host cells suggests that PAA has great potential as an antiherpesvirus therapeutic agent. PMID:960726

  2. Phylogenetic grouping and identification of Rhizobium isolates on the basis of random amplified polymorphic DNA profiles.

    PubMed

    Dooley, J J; Harrison, S P; Mytton, L R; Dye, M; Cresswell, A; Skot, L; Beeching, J R

    1993-07-01

    Through the use of a single, random 15mer as a primer, between 1 and 12 DNA amplification products were obtained per strain from a selection of 84 Rhizobium and Bradyrhizobium isolates. A principal-coordinate analysis was used to analyse the resulting amplified DNA profiles and it was possible to assign isolates to specific groupings. Within the species Rhizobium leguminosarum, the biovar phaseoli formed a distinct group from the other biovars of the species, viciae and trifolii, which grouped together. Isolates of Rhizobium meliloti and Bradyrhizobium species formed their own clear, specific groups. Although it was possible to identify individual isolates on the basis of differences in their amplified DNA profiles, there was evidence that some amplified segments were conserved among individuals at the biovar and species levels. PMID:8364802

  3. A mitochondrial DNA based phylogeny of weakfish species of the Cynoscion group (Pisces: Sciaenidae).

    PubMed

    Vergara-Chen, Carlos; Aguirre, Windsor E; Gonzlez-Wangemert, Mercedes; Bermingham, Eldredge

    2009-11-01

    We infer the phylogeny of fishes in the New World Cynoscion group (Cynoscion, Isopisthus, Macrodon, Atractoscion, Plagioscion) using 1603bp of DNA sequence data from three mitochondrial genes. With the exception of Plagioscion, whose position was ambiguous, the Cynoscion group is monophyletic. However, several genera examined are not monophyletic. Atlantic and Pacific species of Cynoscion are interspersed in the tree and geminate species pairs are identified. Intergeneric relationships in the group are clarified. Our analysis is the first comprehensive phylogeny for the Cynoscion group based on molecular data and provides a baseline for future comparative studies of this important group. PMID:19573613

  4. Y-STR analysis on DNA mixture samples--results of a collaborative project of the ENFSI DNA Working Group.

    PubMed

    Parson, Walther; Niedersttter, Harald; Lindinger, Alexandra; Gill, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The ENFSI (European Network of Forensic Science Institutes) DNA Working Group undertook a collaborative project on Y-STR typing of DNA mixture samples that were centrally prepared and thoroughly tested prior to the shipment. Four commercial Y-STR typing kits (Y-Filer, Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA; Argus Y Nonaplex, Biotype, Dresden, Germany; Powerplex Y, Promega, Madison, WI, USA; and DYSplex-3, SERAC, Bad Homburg, Germany) were used for the amplification of the mixture samples. The results of the study showed a striking inter-laboratory difference of kit performance as determined from the peak heights of the obtained Y-STR genotypes. Variation in quantity and quality of the shipped DNA can be excluded as reason for the observed differences because both samples and shipping conditions were found to be reproducible in an earlier study. The results suggest that in some cases a laboratory-specific optimization process is indicated to reach a comparable sensitivity for the analysis of minute amounts of DNA. PMID:19083827

  5. The statistical evaluation of DNA mixtures with contributors from different ethnic groups.

    PubMed

    Fung, Wing K; Hu, Yue-Qing

    2002-04-01

    The effect of a structured population on the evaluation of forensic mixed stains has been considered by the authors and others. However, in countries with multiple racial or ethnic groups, it is not uncommon that contributors to a DNA mixture are of different ethnic groups. A famous example is the OJ Simpson case in which the suspect was an African-American, the victims were Caucasian Americans and the true perpetrator(s) could be from any ethnic group(s). In this paper six common mixture cases are considered and the formulae for likelihood ratios are derived. These formulae can help forensic DNA scientists acquire a better understanding of the problem. The effect of different ethnic groups is illustrated using a case in Hong Kong. PMID:12056525

  6. Spy: a new group of eukaryotic DNA transposons without target site duplications.

    PubMed

    Han, Min-Jin; Xu, Hong-En; Zhang, Hua-Hao; Feschotte, Cédric; Zhang, Ze

    2014-07-01

    Class 2 or DNA transposons populate the genomes of most eukaryotes and like other mobile genetic elements have a profound impact on genome evolution. Most DNA transposons belong to the cut-and-paste types, which are relatively simple elements characterized by terminal-inverted repeats (TIRs) flanking a single gene encoding a transposase. All eukaryotic cut-and-paste transposons so far described are also characterized by target site duplications (TSDs) of host DNA generated upon chromosomal insertion. Here, we report a new group of evolutionarily related DNA transposons called Spy, which also include TIRs and DDE motif-containing transposase but surprisingly do not create TSDs upon insertion. Instead, Spy transposons appear to transpose precisely between 5'-AAA and TTT-3' host nucleotides, without duplication or modification of the AAATTT target sites. Spy transposons were identified in the genomes of diverse invertebrate species based on transposase homology searches and structure-based approaches. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Spy transposases are distantly related to IS5, ISL2EU, and PIF/Harbinger transposases. However, Spy transposons are distinct from these and other DNA transposon superfamilies by their lack of TSD and their target site preference. Our findings expand the known diversity of DNA transposons and reveal a new group of eukaryotic DDE transposases with unusual catalytic properties. PMID:24966181

  7. Spy: A New Group of Eukaryotic DNA Transposons without Target Site Duplications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min-Jin; Xu, Hong-En; Zhang, Hua-Hao; Feschotte, Cédric; Zhang, Ze

    2014-01-01

    Class 2 or DNA transposons populate the genomes of most eukaryotes and like other mobile genetic elements have a profound impact on genome evolution. Most DNA transposons belong to the cut-and-paste types, which are relatively simple elements characterized by terminal-inverted repeats (TIRs) flanking a single gene encoding a transposase. All eukaryotic cut-and-paste transposons so far described are also characterized by target site duplications (TSDs) of host DNA generated upon chromosomal insertion. Here, we report a new group of evolutionarily related DNA transposons called Spy, which also include TIRs and DDE motif-containing transposase but surprisingly do not create TSDs upon insertion. Instead, Spy transposons appear to transpose precisely between 5′-AAA and TTT-3′ host nucleotides, without duplication or modification of the AAATTT target sites. Spy transposons were identified in the genomes of diverse invertebrate species based on transposase homology searches and structure-based approaches. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that Spy transposases are distantly related to IS5, ISL2EU, and PIF/Harbinger transposases. However, Spy transposons are distinct from these and other DNA transposon superfamilies by their lack of TSD and their target site preference. Our findings expand the known diversity of DNA transposons and reveal a new group of eukaryotic DDE transposases with unusual catalytic properties. PMID:24966181

  8. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Suppresses Mutagenesis Caused by Clustered Oxidative DNA Adducts in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Akira; Kamoshita, Nagisa; Kanemaru, Yuki; Honma, Masamitsu; Yasui, Manabu

    2015-01-01

    Clustered DNA damage is defined as multiple sites of DNA damage within one or two helical turns of the duplex DNA. This complex damage is often formed by exposure of the genome to ionizing radiation and is difficult to repair. The mutagenic potential and repair mechanisms of clustered DNA damage in human cells remain to be elucidated. In this study, we investigated the involvement of nucleotide excision repair (NER) in clustered oxidative DNA adducts. To identify the in vivo protective roles of NER, we established a human cell line lacking the NER gene xeroderma pigmentosum group A (XPA). XPA knockout (KO) cells were generated from TSCER122 cells derived from the human lymphoblastoid TK6 cell line. To analyze the mutagenic events in DNA adducts in vivo, we previously employed a system of tracing DNA adducts in the targeted mutagenesis (TATAM), in which DNA adducts were site-specifically introduced into intron 4 of thymidine kinase genes. Using the TATAM system, one or two tandem 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG) adducts were introduced into the genomes of TSCER122 or XPA KO cells. In XPA KO cells, the proportion of mutants induced by a single 8-oxoG (7.6%) was comparable with that in TSCER122 cells (8.1%). In contrast, the lack of XPA significantly enhanced the mutant proportion of tandem 8-oxoG in the transcribed strand (12%) compared with that in TSCER122 cells (7.4%) but not in the non-transcribed strand (12% and 11% in XPA KO and TSCER122 cells, respectively). By sequencing the tandem 8-oxoG-integrated loci in the transcribed strand, we found that the proportion of tandem mutations was markedly increased in XPA KO cells. These results indicate that NER is involved in repairing clustered DNA adducts in the transcribed strand in vivo. PMID:26559182

  9. Interactions of the high-mobility-group-like Ceratitis capitata C1 proteins with DNA.

    PubMed

    Marquez, G; Rodriguez, A T; Fernandez, B A; Montero, F

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the interactions of the high-mobility-group-like proteins (C1a1, C1a2 and C1b) from the fruit fly Ceratitis capitata with DNA. Nitrocellulose filter binding assays, thermal denaturation studies and spectrofluorimetry of the complexes revealed the existence of specific and nonspecific interactions. Thermal denaturation curves showed that the three proteins stabilized the DNA, thus suggesting a preferential binding to double-stranded DNA. The calculation of the thermodynamic parameters of the interactions showed that the nonspecific bindings were characterized by low association constants (Ka) with values ranging from 2.7 X 10(4) M-1 to 2.0 X 10(6) M-1. Also, the cooperativity of these interactions was relatively high (cooperativity factor, w, values ranging over 20-35), and the number of nucleotides involved was low (1-3 base pairs). On the other hand, the existence of specific interactions between C1 proteins and DNA was suggested by two facts: the retention of C. capitata [3H]DNA in nitrocellulose filters was only a low percentage of total input DNA and there was a marked size dependence of the binding (25% retention of a 40-kb DNA and only 3% retention with a DNA of 1 kb). The specific bindings had higher Ka values than the nonspecific ones, and they also were cooperative. Some differences were observed between C1b and the C1a proteins about the way they interact with C. capitata DNA. PMID:3595593

  10. Coumestan inhibits radical-induced oxidation of DNA: is hydroxyl a necessary functional group?

    PubMed

    Xi, Gao-Lei; Liu, Zai-Qun

    2014-06-18

    Coumestan is a natural tetracycle with a C?C bond shared by a coumarin moiety and a benzofuran moiety. In addition to the function of the hydroxyl group on the antioxidant activity of coumestan, it is worth exploring the influence of the oxygen-abundant scaffold on the antioxidant activity as well. In this work, seven coumestans containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups were synthesized to evaluate the abilities to trap 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) cationic radical (ABTS(+)), 2,2'-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (DPPH), and galvinoxyl radical, respectively, and to inhibit the oxidations of DNA mediated by ()OH, Cu(2+)/glutathione (GSH), and 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH), respectively. It was found that all of the coumestans used herein can quench the aforementioned radicals and can inhibit ()OH-, Cu(2+)/GSH-, and AAPH-induced oxidations of DNA. In particular, substituent-free coumestan exhibits higher ability to quench DPPH and to inhibit AAPH-induced oxidation of DNA than Trolox. In addition, nonsubstituted coumestan shows a similar ability to inhibit ()OH- and Cu(2+)/GSH-induced oxidations of DNA relative to that of Trolox. The antioxidant effectiveness of the coumestan can be attributed to the lactone in the coumarin moiety and, therefore, a hydroxyl group may not be a necessary functional group for coumestan to be an antioxidant. PMID:24911109

  11. ssDNA Pairing Accuracy Increases When Abasic Sites Divide Nucleotides into Small Groups

    PubMed Central

    Peacock-Villada, Alexandra; Coljee, Vincent; Danilowicz, Claudia; Prentiss, Mara

    2015-01-01

    Accurate sequence dependent pairing of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) molecules plays an important role in gene chips, DNA origami, and polymerase chain reactions. In many assays accurate pairing depends on mismatched sequences melting at lower temperatures than matched sequences; however, for sequences longer than ~10 nucleotides, single mismatches and correct matches have melting temperature differences of less than 3C. We demonstrate that appropriately grouping of 35 bases in ssDNA using abasic sites increases the difference between the melting temperature of correct bases and the melting temperature of mismatched base pairings. Importantly, in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites mismatches near one end of a long dsDNA destabilize the annealing at the other end much more effectively than in systems without the abasic sites, suggesting that the dsDNA melts more uniformly in the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites. In sum, the presence of appropriately spaced abasic sites allows temperature to more accurately discriminate correct base pairings from incorrect ones. PMID:26115175

  12. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Rck, Alexander W; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-11-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks). PMID:25051224

  13. Mitochondrial DNA control region analysis of three ethnic groups in the Republic of Macedonia

    PubMed Central

    Jankova-Ajanovska, Renata; Zimmermann, Bettina; Huber, Gabriela; Rck, Alexander W.; Bodner, Martin; Jakovski, Zlatko; Janeska, Biljana; Duma, Aleksej; Parson, Walther

    2014-01-01

    A total of 444 individuals representing three ethnic groups (Albanians, Turks and Romanies) in the Republic of Macedonia were sequenced in the mitochondrial control region. The mtDNA haplogroup composition differed between the three groups. Our results showed relatively high frequencies of haplogroup H12 in Albanians (8.8%) and less in Turks (3.3%), while haplogroups M5a1 and H7a1a were dominant in Romanies (13.7% and 10.3%, respectively) but rare in the former two. This highlights the importance of regional sampling for forensic mtDNA databasing purposes. These population data will be available on EMPOP under accession numbers EMP00644 (Albanians), EMP00645 (Romanies) and EMP00646 (Turks). PMID:25051224

  14. Effect of the head-group geometry of amino acid-based cationic surfactants on interaction with plasmid DNA.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Vaibhav; Maiti, Souvik; Dasgupta, Antara; Das, Prasanta Kumar; Dias, Rita S; Miguel, Maria G; Lindman, Bjrn

    2008-07-01

    The interaction between DNA and different types of amino acid-based cationic surfactants was investigated. Particular attention was directed to determine the extent of influence of surfactant head-group geometry toward tuning the interaction behavior of these surfactants with DNA. An overview is obtained by gel retardation assay, isothermal titration calorimetry, fluorescence spectroscopy, and circular dichroism at different mole ratios of surfactant/DNA; also, cell viability was assessed. The studies show that the surfactants with more complex/bulkier hydrophobic head group interact more strongly with DNA but exclude ethidium bromide less efficiently; thus, the accessibility of DNA to small molecules is preserved to a certain extent. The presence of more hydrophobic groups surrounding the positive amino charge also gave rise to a significantly lower cytotoxicity. The surfactant self-assembly pattern is quite different without and with DNA, illustrating the roles of electrostatic and steric effects in determining the effective shape of a surfactant molecule. PMID:18517250

  15. Conservation of DNA photolyase genes in group II nucleopolyhedroviruses infecting plusiine insects.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fang; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2008-09-01

    DNA photolyase genes (phr) encode photoreactive enzymes, which are involved in the repair of UV-damaged DNA. Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) specific photolyase genes are present in nucleopolyhedroviruses isolated from Chrysodeixis chalcites (ChchNPV) and Trichoplusia ni (TnSNPV), insects belonging to the Plusiinae (Noctuidae). To better understand the occurrence and evolution of these genes in baculoviruses, we investigated their possible conservation in other group II NPVs, which infect plusiine insects. A PCR based strategy using degenerate phr-specific primers was designed to detect and analyze possible photolyase genes. Six additional Plusiinae-infecting NPVs were analyzed and all, except Thysanoplusia oricalcea NPV A28-1, which is a group I NPV, contained one or more phr-like sequences. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all photolyase genes of the tested Plusiinae-infecting baculoviruses group in a single clade, separated into three subgroups. The phylogeny of the polyhedrin sequences of these viruses confirmed that the analyzed viruses also formed a single clade in group II NPVs. We hypothesize that all plusiine group II NPVs contain one or more photolyase genes and that these have a common ancestor. PMID:18513819

  16. DNA barcodes from four loci provide poor resolution of taxonomic groups in the genus Crataegus

    PubMed Central

    Zarrei, Mehdi; Talent, Nadia; Kuzmina, Maria; Lee, Jeanette; Lund, Jensen; Shipley, Paul R.; Stefanović, Saša; Dickinson, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcodes can facilitate identification of organisms especially when morphological characters are limited or unobservable. To what extent this potential is realized in specific groups of plants remains to be determined. Libraries of barcode sequences from well-studied authoritatively identified plants represented by herbarium voucher specimens are needed in order for DNA barcodes to serve their intended purpose, where this is possible, and to understand the reasons behind their failure to do so, when this occurs. We evaluated four loci, widely regarded as universal DNA barcodes for plants, for their utility in hawthorn species identification. Three plastid regions, matK, rbcLa and psbA-trnH, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA discriminate only some of the species of Crataegus that can be recognized on the basis of their morphology etc. This is, in part, because in Rosaceae tribe Maleae most individual plastid loci yield relatively little taxonomic resolution and, in part, because the effects of allopolyploidization have not been eliminated by concerted evolution of the ITS regions. Although individual plastid markers provided generally poor resolution of taxonomic groups in Crataegus, a few species were notable exceptions. In contrast, analyses of concatenated sequences of the 3 plastid barcode loci plus 11 additional plastid loci gave a well-resolved maternal phylogeny. In the ITS2 tree, different individuals of some species formed groups with taxonomically unrelated species. This is a sign of lineage sorting due to incomplete concerted evolution in ITS2. Incongruence between the ITS2 and plastid trees is best explained by hybridization between different lineages within the genus. In aggregate, limited between-species variation in plastid loci, hybridization and a lack of concerted evolution in ITS2 all combine to limit the utility of standard barcoding markers in Crataegus. These results have implications for authentication of hawthorn materials in natural health products. PMID:25926325

  17. DNA barcodes from four loci provide poor resolution of taxonomic groups in the genus Crataegus.

    PubMed

    Zarrei, Mehdi; Talent, Nadia; Kuzmina, Maria; Lee, Jeanette; Lund, Jensen; Shipley, Paul R; Stefanović, Saša; Dickinson, Timothy A

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcodes can facilitate identification of organisms especially when morphological characters are limited or unobservable. To what extent this potential is realized in specific groups of plants remains to be determined. Libraries of barcode sequences from well-studied authoritatively identified plants represented by herbarium voucher specimens are needed in order for DNA barcodes to serve their intended purpose, where this is possible, and to understand the reasons behind their failure to do so, when this occurs. We evaluated four loci, widely regarded as universal DNA barcodes for plants, for their utility in hawthorn species identification. Three plastid regions, matK, rbcLa and psbA-trnH, and the internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA discriminate only some of the species of Crataegus that can be recognized on the basis of their morphology etc. This is, in part, because in Rosaceae tribe Maleae most individual plastid loci yield relatively little taxonomic resolution and, in part, because the effects of allopolyploidization have not been eliminated by concerted evolution of the ITS regions. Although individual plastid markers provided generally poor resolution of taxonomic groups in Crataegus, a few species were notable exceptions. In contrast, analyses of concatenated sequences of the 3 plastid barcode loci plus 11 additional plastid loci gave a well-resolved maternal phylogeny. In the ITS2 tree, different individuals of some species formed groups with taxonomically unrelated species. This is a sign of lineage sorting due to incomplete concerted evolution in ITS2. Incongruence between the ITS2 and plastid trees is best explained by hybridization between different lineages within the genus. In aggregate, limited between-species variation in plastid loci, hybridization and a lack of concerted evolution in ITS2 all combine to limit the utility of standard barcoding markers in Crataegus. These results have implications for authentication of hawthorn materials in natural health products. PMID:25926325

  18. Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group A Protein Loads as a Separate Factor onto DNA Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rademakers, Suzanne; Volker, Marcel; Hoogstraten, Deborah; Nigg, Alex L.; Mon, Martijn J.; van Zeeland, Albert A.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H. J.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Vermeulen, Wim

    2003-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main DNA repair pathway in mammals for removal of UV-induced lesions. NER involves the concerted action of more than 25 polypeptides in a coordinated fashion. The xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein (XPA) has been suggested to function as a central organizer and damage verifier in NER. How XPA reaches DNA lesions and how the protein is distributed in time and space in living cells are unknown. Here we studied XPA in vivo by using a cell line stably expressing physiological levels of functional XPA fused to green fluorescent protein and by applying quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The majority of XPA moves rapidly through the nucleoplasm with a diffusion rate different from those of other NER factors tested, arguing against a preassembled XPA-containing NER complex. DNA damage induced a transient (?5-min) immobilization of maximally 30% of XPA. Immobilization depends on XPC, indicating that XPA is not the initial lesion recognition protein in vivo. Moreover, loading of replication protein A on NER lesions was not dependent on XPA. Thus, XPA participates in NER by incorporation of free diffusing molecules in XPC-dependent NER-DNA complexes. This study supports a model for a rapid consecutive assembly of free NER factors, and a relatively slow simultaneous disassembly, after repair. PMID:12897146

  19. Specialization of the DNA-Cleaving Activity of a Group I Ribozyme Through In Vitro Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, Joyce; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1996-01-01

    In an earlier study, an in vitro evolution procedure was applied to a large population of variants of the Tetrahymena group 1 ribozyme to obtain individuals with a 10(exp 5)-fold improved ability to cleave a target single-stranded DNA substrate under simulated physiological conditions. The evolved ribozymes also showed a twofold improvement, compared to the wild-type, in their ability to cleave a single-stranded RNA substrate. Here, we report continuation of the in vitro evolution process using a new selection strategy to achieve both enhanced DNA and diminished RNA-cleavage activity. Our strategy combines a positive selection for DNA cleavage with a negative selection against RNA binding. After 36 "generations" of in vitro evolution, the evolved population showed an approx. 100-fold increase in the ratio of DNA to RNA-cleavage activity. Site-directed mutagenesis experiment confirmed the selective advantage of two covarying mutations within the catalytic core of ribozyme that are largely responsible for this modified behavior. The population of ribozymes has now undergone a total of 63 successive generations of evolution, resulting in an average 28 mutations relative to the wild-type that are responsible for the altered phenotype.

  20. High mobility group protein-mediated transcription requires DNA damage marker ?-H2AX.

    PubMed

    Singh, Indrabahadur; Ozturk, Nihan; Cordero, Julio; Mehta, Aditi; Hasan, Diya; Cosentino, Claudia; Sebastian, Carlos; Krger, Marcus; Looso, Mario; Carraro, Gianni; Bellusci, Saverio; Seeger, Werner; Braun, Thomas; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Barreto, Guillermo

    2015-07-01

    The eukaryotic genome is organized into chromatins, the physiological template for DNA-dependent processes including replication, recombination, repair, and transcription. Chromatin-mediated transcription regulation involves DNA methylation, chromatin remodeling, and histone modifications. However, chromatin also contains non-histone chromatin-associated proteins, of which the high-mobility group (HMG) proteins are the most abundant. Although it is known that HMG proteins induce structural changes of chromatin, the processes underlying transcription regulation by HMG proteins are poorly understood. Here we decipher the molecular mechanism of transcription regulation mediated by the HMG AT-hook 2 protein (HMGA2). We combined proteomic, ChIP-seq, and transcriptome data to show that HMGA2-induced transcription requires phosphorylation of the histone variant H2AX at S139 (H2AXS139ph; ?-H2AX) mediated by the protein kinase ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). Furthermore, we demonstrate the biological relevance of this mechanism within the context of TGF?1 signaling. The interplay between HMGA2, ATM, and H2AX is a novel mechanism of transcription initiation. Our results link H2AXS139ph to transcription, assigning a new function for this DNA damage marker. Controlled chromatin opening during transcription may involve intermediates with DNA breaks that may require mechanisms that ensure the integrity of the genome. PMID:26045162

  1. SUMOylation of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein regulates DNA damage recognition during nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Akita, Masaki; Tak, Yon-Soo; Shimura, Tsutomu; Matsumoto, Syota; Okuda-Shimizu, Yuki; Shimizu, Yuichiro; Nishi, Ryotaro; Saitoh, Hisato; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    The xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC) protein complex is a key factor that detects DNA damage and initiates nucleotide excision repair (NER) in mammalian cells. Although biochemical and structural studies have elucidated the interaction of XPC with damaged DNA, the mechanism of its regulation in vivo remains to be understood in more details. Here, we show that the XPC protein undergoes modification by small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) proteins and the lack of this modification compromises the repair of UV-induced DNA photolesions. In the absence of SUMOylation, XPC is normally recruited to the sites with photolesions, but then immobilized profoundly by the UV-damaged DNA-binding protein (UV-DDB) complex. Since the absence of UV-DDB alleviates the NER defect caused by impaired SUMOylation of XPC, we propose that this modification is critical for functional interactions of XPC with UV-DDB, which facilitate the efficient damage handover between the two damage recognition factors and subsequent initiation of NER. PMID:26042670

  2. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphisms in Gelao ethnic group residing in Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Wang, Sha-Yan; Zhao, Mian; Xu, Zhi-Yong; Hu, Yu-Hua; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Ruan-Zhang; Gao, Guo-Feng; Yu, Yue-Sheng; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2011-01-01

    Gelao ethnic group, an aboriginal population residing in southwest China, has undergone a long and complex evolutionary process. To investigate the genetic structure of this ancient ethnic group, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphisms of 102 Gelao individuals were collected and analyzed in this study. With the aid of the information extracted from control-region hypervariable segments (HVSs) I and II as well as some necessary coding-region segments, phylogenetic status of all mtDNAs under study were determined by means of classifying into various defined haplogroups. The southern-prevalent haplogroups B, R9, and M7 account for 45.1% of the gene pool, whereas northern-prevalent haplogroups A, D, G, N9, and M8 consist of 39.2%. Haplogroup distribution indicates that the Gelao bears signatures of southern populations and possesses some regional characters. In the PC map, Gelao clusters together with populations with Bai-Yue tribe origin as well as the local Han and the Miao. The results demonstrate the complexity of Gelao population and the data can well supplement the China mtDNA database. PMID:20494640

  3. An unusual case of Streptococcus anginosus group pyomyositis diagnosed using direct 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Walkty, Andrew; Embil, John M; Nichol, Kim; Karlowsky, James

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the Streptococcus anginosus group (Streptococcus intermedius, Streptococcus constellatus and Streptococcus anginosus) are capable of causing serious pyogenic infections, with a tendency for abscess formation. The present article reports a case of S anginosus group pyomyositis in a 47-year-old man. The pathogen was recovered from one of two blood cultures obtained from the patient, but speciation was initially not performed because the organism was considered to be a contaminant (viridans streptococci group). The diagnosis was ultimately confirmed using 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing of purulent fluid obtained from a muscle abscess aspirate. The present case serves to emphasize that finding even a single positive blood culture of an organism belonging to the S anginosus group should prompt careful evaluation of the patient for a pyogenic focus of infection. It also highlights the potential utility of 16S ribosomal DNA amplification and sequencing in direct pathogen detection from aspirated fluid in cases of pyomyositis in which antimicrobial therapy was initiated before specimen collection. PMID:24634686

  4. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  5. Increased levels of chromosomal aberrations and DNA damage in a group of workers exposed to formaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Costa, Solange; Carvalho, Sandra; Costa, Carla; Coelho, Patrcia; Silva, Susana; Santos, Lus S; Gaspar, Jorge F; Porto, Beatriz; Laffon, Blanca; Teixeira, Joo P

    2015-07-01

    Formaldehyde (FA) is a commonly used chemical in anatomy and pathology laboratories as a tissue preservative and fixative. Because of its sensitising properties, irritating effects and cancer implication, FA accounts probably for the most important chemical-exposure hazard concerning this professional group. Evidence for genotoxic effects and carcinogenic properties in humans is insufficient and conflicting, particularly in regard to the ability of inhaled FA to induce toxicity on other cells besides first contact tissues, such as buccal and nasal cells. To evaluate the effects of exposure to FA in human peripheral blood lymphocytes, a group of 84 anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed occupationally to FA and 87 control subjects were tested for chromosomal aberrations (CAs) and DNA damage (comet assay). The level of exposure to FA in the workplace air was evaluated. The association between genotoxicity biomarkers and polymorphic genes of xenobiotic-metabolising and DNA repair enzymes were also assessed. The estimated mean level of FA exposure was 0.380.03 ppm. All cytogenetic endpoints assessed by CAs test and comet assay % tail DNA (%TDNA) were significantly higher in FA-exposed workers compared with controls. Regarding the effect of susceptibility biomarkers, results suggest that polymorphisms in CYP2E1 and GSTP1 metabolic genes, as well as, XRCC1 and PARP1 polymorphic genes involved in DNA repair pathways are associated with higher genetic damage in FA-exposed subjects. Data obtained in this study show a potential health risk situation of anatomy pathology laboratory workers exposed to FA (0.38 ppm). Implementation of security and hygiene measures may be crucial to decrease risk. The obtained information may also provide new important data to be used by health care programs and by governmental agencies responsible for occupational health and safety. PMID:25711496

  6. Capture-recapture of white-tailed deer using DNA from fecal pellet-groups

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goode, Matthew J; Beaver, Jared T; Muller, Lisa I; Clark, Joseph D.; van Manen, Frank T.; Harper, Craig T; Basinger, P Seth

    2014-01-01

    Traditional methods for estimating white-tailed deer population size and density are affected by behavioral biases, poor detection in densely forested areas, and invalid techniques for estimating effective trapping area. We evaluated a noninvasive method of capture—recapture for white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus) density estimation using DNA extracted from fecal pellets as an individual marker and for gender determination, coupled with a spatial detection function to estimate density (spatially explicit capture—recapture, SECR). We collected pellet groups from 11 to 22 January 2010 at randomly selected sites within a 1-km2 area located on Arnold Air Force Base in Coffee and Franklin counties, Tennessee. We searched 703 10-m radius plots and collected 352 pellet-group samples from 197 plots over five two-day sampling intervals. Using only the freshest pellets we recorded 140 captures of 33 different animals (15M:18F). Male and female densities were 1.9 (SE = 0.8) and 3.8 (SE = 1.3) deer km-2, or a total density of 5.8 deer km-2 (14.9 deer mile-2). Population size was 20.8 (SE = 7.6) over a 360-ha area, and sex ratio was 1.0 M: 2.0 F (SE = 0.71). We found DNA sampling from pellet groups improved deer abundance, density and sex ratio estimates in contiguous landscapes which could be used to track responses to harvest or other management actions.

  7. A Dynamic Combinatorial Approach for Identifying Side Groups that Stabilize DNA-Templated Supramolecular Self-Assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Paolantoni, Delphine; Cantel, Sonia; Dumy, Pascal; Ulrich, Sébastien

    2015-01-01

    DNA-templated self-assembly is an emerging strategy for generating functional supramolecular systems, which requires the identification of potent multi-point binding ligands. In this line, we recently showed that bis-functionalized guanidinium compounds can interact with ssDNA and generate a supramolecular complex through the recognition of the phosphodiester backbone of DNA. In order to probe the importance of secondary interactions and to identify side groups that stabilize these DNA-templated self-assemblies, we report herein the implementation of a dynamic combinatorial approach. We used an in situ fragment assembly process based on reductive amination and tested various side groups, including amino acids. The results reveal that aromatic and cationic side groups participate in secondary supramolecular interactions that stabilize the complexes formed with ssDNA. PMID:25667976

  8. Complex evolutionary history of the Aeromonas veronii group revealed by host interaction and DNA sequence data.

    PubMed

    Silver, Adam C; Williams, David; Faucher, Joshua; Horneman, Amy J; Gogarten, J Peter; Graf, Joerg

    2011-01-01

    Aeromonas veronii biovar sobria, Aeromonas veronii biovar veronii, and Aeromonas allosaccharophila are a closely related group of organisms, the Aeromonas veronii Group, that inhabit a wide range of host animals as a symbiont or pathogen. In this study, the ability of various strains to colonize the medicinal leech as a model for beneficial symbiosis and to kill wax worm larvae as a model for virulence was determined. Isolates cultured from the leech out-competed other strains in the leech model, while most strains were virulent in the wax worms. Three housekeeping genes, recA, dnaJ and gyrB, the gene encoding chitinase, chiA, and four loci associated with the type three secretion system, ascV, ascFG, aexT, and aexU were sequenced. The phylogenetic reconstruction failed to produce one consensus tree that was compatible with most of the individual genes. The Approximately Unbiased test and the Genetic Algorithm for Recombination Detection both provided further support for differing evolutionary histories among this group of genes. Two contrasting tests detected recombination within aexU, ascFG, ascV, dnaJ, and gyrB but not in aexT or chiA. Quartet decomposition analysis indicated a complex recent evolutionary history for these strains with a high frequency of horizontal gene transfer between several but not among all strains. In this study we demonstrate that at least for some strains, horizontal gene transfer occurs at a sufficient frequency to blur the signal from vertically inherited genes, despite strains being adapted to distinct niches. Simply increasing the number of genes included in the analysis is unlikely to overcome this challenge in organisms that occupy multiple niches and can exchange DNA between strains specialized to different niches. Instead, the detection of genes critical in the adaptation to specific niches may help to reveal the physiological specialization of these strains. PMID:21359176

  9. Genetic polymorphism of six DNA loci in six population groups of India.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Shazia; Seshadri, M

    2007-08-01

    The genetic profile based on autosomal markers, four microsatellite DNA markers (D8S315, FES, D8S592, and D2S1328) and two minisatellite DNA markers (TPMT and PDGFA), were analyzed in six endogamous populations to examine the effect of geographic and linguistic affiliation on the genetic affinities among the groups. The six populations are from three different states of India and are linguistically different. Marathas from western India speak Marathi, an Indo-European language. Arayas, Muslims, Ezhavas, and Nairs from Kerala state of South India speak Malayalam, and Iyers from Tamil Nadu state speak Tamil. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood samples of random, normal, healthy individuals. Locus-specific PCR amplification was carried out, followed by electrophoresis of the amplicons and genotyping. All the loci were highly polymorphic and followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, except for loci D8S315 and PDGFA in Iyers and Marathas, respectively. All six loci had high heterozygosity (average heterozygosity ranged from 0.73 to 0.76) and high polymorphism information content (0.57-0.90). The extent of gene differentiation among the six populations (G(ST) = 0.030) was greater than that for four Kerala populations (G(ST) = 0.011), suggesting proximity between the four Kerala populations. This result conforms with the cultural and linguistic background of the populations. The extent of diversity found among the populations probably resulted from the strict endogamous practices that they follow. PMID:18075006

  10. Role of Polycomb Group Proteins in the DNA Damage Response A Reassessment

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Hollie; Patel, Harshil; Palermo, Richard; Brookes, Sharon; Matthews, Nik; Peters, Gordon

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that Polycomb group (PcG) proteins, key regulators of lineage specific gene expression, also participate in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) but evidence for direct recruitment of PcG proteins at specific breaks remains limited. Here we explore the association of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) components with DSBs generated by inducible expression of the AsiSI restriction enzyme in normal human fibroblasts. Based on immunofluorescent staining, the co-localization of PRC1 proteins with components of the DNA damage response (DDR) in these primary cells is unconvincing. Moreover, using chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq), which detects PRC1 proteins at common sites throughout the genome, we did not find evidence for recruitment of PRC1 components to AsiSI-induced DSBs. In contrast, the S2056 phosphorylated form of DNA-PKcs and other DDR proteins were detected at a subset of AsiSI sites that are predominantly at the 5? ends of transcriptionally active genes. Our data question the idea that PcG protein recruitment provides a link between DSB repairs and transcriptional repression. PMID:25057768

  11. Adsorption and desorption of DNA tuned by hydroxyl groups in graphite oxides-based solid extraction material.

    PubMed

    Akceoglu, Garbis Atam; Li, Oi Lun; Saito, Nagahiro

    2015-12-01

    The extraction of DNA is the most crucial method used in molecular biology. Up to date silica matrices has been widely applied as solid support for selective DNA adsorption and extraction. However, since adsorption force of SiOH functional groups is much greater than that of desorption force, the DNA extraction efficiency of silica surfaces is limited. In order to increase the DNA extraction yield, a new surface with different functional groups which possess of greater desorption property is required. In this study, we proposed cellulose/graphite oxide (GO) composite as an alternative material for DNA adsorption and extraction. GO/Cellulose composite provides the major adsorption and desorption of DNA by COH, which belongs to alkyl or phenol type of OH functional group. Compared to SiOH, COH is less polarized and reactive, therefore the composite might provide a higher desorption of DNA during the elution process. The GO/cellulose composite were prepared in spherical structure by mixing urea, cellulose, NaOH, Graphite oxide and water. The concentration of GO within the composites were controlled to be 0-4.15wt.%. The extraction yield of DNA increased with increasing weight percentage of GO. The highest yield was achieved at 4.15wt.% GO, where the extraction efficiency was reported as 660.4ng/?l when applying 2M GuHCl as the binding buffer. The absorbance ratios between 260nm and 280nm (A260/A280) of the DNA elution was demonstrated as 1.86, indicating the extracted DNA consisted of high purity. The results proved that GO/cellulose composite provides a simple method for selective DNA extraction with high extraction efficiency of pure DNA. PMID:26355811

  12. Genetic Variation Among Vegetative Compatibility Groups of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense Analyzed by DNA Fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Bentley, S; Pegg, K G; Moore, N Y; Davis, R D; Buddenhagen, I W

    1998-12-01

    ABSTRACT Genetic variation within a worldwide collection of 208 isolates of Fu-sarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense, representing physiological races 1, 2, 3, and 4 and the 20 reported vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), was analyzed using modified DNA amplification fingerprinting. Also characterized were 133 isolates that did not belong to any of the reported VCGs of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense including race 3 isolates from a Heliconia species and isolates from a symptomatic wild banana species growing in the jungle in peninsular Malaysia. The DNA fingerprint patterns were generally VCG specific, irrespective of geographic or host origin. A total of 33 different genotypes were identified within F. oxysporum f. sp. cu-bense; 19 genotypes were distinguished among the isolates that belonged to the 20 reported VCGs, and 14 new genotypes were identified among the isolates that did not belong to any of the existing VCGs. DNA fingerprinting analysis also allowed differentiation of nine clonal lineages within F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense. Five of these lineages each contained numerous closely related VCGs and genotypes, and the remaining four lineages each contained a single genotype. The genetic diversity and geographic distribution of several of these lineages of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense suggests that they have coevolved with edible bananas and their wild diploid progenitors in Asia. DNA fingerprinting analysis of isolates from the wild pathosystem provides further evidence for the coevolution hypothesis. The genetic isolation and limited geographic distribution of four of the lineages of F. oxysporum f. sp. cubense suggests that the pathogen has also arisen independently, both within and outside of the center of origin of the host. PMID:18944830

  13. Identification of a group-I intron within the 25S rDNA from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans.

    PubMed

    Rsel, H; Kunze, G

    1996-09-30

    The 25S rDNA of the yeast Arxula adeninivorans LS3 has been closed from a genomic library and sequenced. This DNA could be localized on chromosome 1 from A. adeninivorans and comprised 3790 bp. The DNA sequence from this rDNA of the strain LS3 is very similar to the 25S rDNA of Candida albicans (91.7%), Saccharomyces cerevisiae (90.5%), Schizosaccharomyces pombe (83.8%) and Mucor racemosus (79.2%). Additionally a 411 bp insertion could be localized within the 25S rDNA. This intervening sequence, which is devoid of any long open reading frame, is a group-IC intron as revealed from its site of insertion, predicted secondary structure, and its self-splicing capability. The Arxula intron is intermediate in structure and sequence between the ribosomal introns of Tetrahymena thermophila and C. albicans. PMID:8905924

  14. Structural and biochemical analyses of DNA and RNA binding by a bifunctional homing endonuclease and group I intron splicing factor

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Jill M.; Spiegel, P. Clint; Chatterjee, Piyali; Brady, Kristina L.; Downing, Maureen E.; Caprara, Mark G.; Waring, Richard B.; Stoddard, Barry L.

    2003-01-01

    We determined the crystal structure of a bifunctional group I intron splicing factor and homing endonuclease, termed the I-AniI maturase, in complex with its DNA target at 2.6 resolution. The structure demonstrates the remarkable structural conservation of the ?-sheet DNA-binding motif between highly divergent enzyme subfamilies. DNA recognition by I-AniI was further studied using nucleoside deletion and DMS modification interference analyses. Correlation of these results with the crystal structure provides information on the relative importance of individual nucleotide contacts for DNA recognition. Alignment and modeling of two homologous maturases reveals conserved basic surface residues, distant from the DNA-binding surface, that might be involved in RNA binding. A point mutation that introduces a single negative charge in this region uncouples the maturase and endonuclease functions of the protein, inhibiting RNA binding and splicing while maintaining DNA binding and cleavage. PMID:14633971

  15. A Reduced Number of mtSNPs Saturates Mitochondrial DNA Haplotype Diversity of Worldwide Population Groups

    PubMed Central

    Salas, Antonio; Amigo, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Background The high levels of variation characterising the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule are due ultimately to its high average mutation rate; moreover, mtDNA variation is deeply structured in different populations and ethnic groups. There is growing interest in selecting a reduced number of mtDNA single nucleotide polymorphisms (mtSNPs) that account for the maximum level of discrimination power in a given population. Applications of the selected mtSNP panel range from anthropologic and medical studies to forensic genetic casework. Methodology/Principal Findings This study proposes a new simulation-based method that explores the ability of different mtSNP panels to yield the maximum levels of discrimination power. The method explores subsets of mtSNPs of different sizes randomly chosen from a preselected panel of mtSNPs based on frequency. More than 2,000 complete genomes representing three main continental human population groups (Africa, Europe, and Asia) and two admixed populations (African-Americans and Hispanics) were collected from GenBank and the literature, and were used as training sets. Haplotype diversity was measured for each combination of mtSNP and compared with existing mtSNP panels available in the literature. The data indicates that only a reduced number of mtSNPs ranging from six to 22 are needed to account for 95% of the maximum haplotype diversity of a given population sample. However, only a small proportion of the best mtSNPs are shared between populations, indicating that there is not a perfect set of universal mtSNPs suitable for all population contexts. The discrimination power provided by these mtSNPs is much higher than the power of the mtSNP panels proposed in the literature to date. Some mtSNP combinations also yield high diversity values in admixed populations. Conclusions/Significance The proposed computational approach for exploring combinations of mtSNPs that optimise the discrimination power of a given set of mtSNPs is more efficient than previous empirical approaches. In contrast to precedent findings, the results seem to indicate that only few mtSNPs are needed to reach high levels of discrimination power in a population, independently of its ancestral background. PMID:20454657

  16. Conducting polymer based DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus group species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Arshak, Khalil; Korostynska, Olga; Oliwa, Kamila; Adley, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Biosensor designs are emerging at a significant rate and play an increasingly important role in foodborne pathogen detection. Conducting polymers are excellent tools for the fabrication of biosensors and polypyrrole has been used in the detection of biomolecules due to its unique properties. The prime intention of this paper was to pioneer the design and fabrication of a single-strand (ss) DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus (B.cereus) group species. Growth of B. cereus, results in production of several highly active toxins. Therefore, consumption of food containing >106 bacteria/gm may results in emetic and diarrhoeal syndromes. The most common source of this bacterium is found in liquid food products, milk powder, mixed food products and is of particular concern in the baby formula industry. The electrochemical deposition technique, such as cyclic voltammetry, was used to develop and test a model DNA-based biosensor on a gold electrode electropolymerized with polypyrrole. The electrically conducting polymer, polypyrrole is used as a platform for immobilizing DNA (1μg) on the gold electrode surface, since it can be more easily deposited from neutral pH aqueous solutions of pyrrolemonomers. The average current peak during the electrodeposition event is 288μA. There is a clear change in the current after hybridization of the complementary oligonucleotide (6.35μA) and for the noncomplementary oligonucleotide (5.77μA). The drop in current after each event was clearly noticeable and it proved to be effective.

  17. Genetic analysis of 15 mtDNA SNP loci in Chinese Yi ethnic group using SNaPshot minisequencing.

    PubMed

    Hu, Chun-Ting; Yan, Jiang-Wei; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Qing-Xia; Wang, Hong-Dan; Yin, Cai-Yong; Fan, Han-Ting; Hu, Ling-Li; Shen, Chun-Mei; Meng, Hao-Tian; Zhang, Yu-Dang; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Bo-Feng

    2016-01-15

    SNaPshot minisequencing is a rapid and robust methodology based on a single base extension with a labeled ddNTP. The present study detected 15 selected SNPs in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control and coding regions by minisequencing methodology using SNaPshot for forensic purpose. The samples were collected from 99 unrelated individuals of the Yi ethnic minority group in Yunnan Province. We have predominantly found high-frequency transitions (91.7%) and a significantly lower frequency of transversions (8.3%). The nt152, 489, 8701, 10,398, 16,183, and 16,362 loci were highly polymorphic, while the nt231, 473 and 581 loci were not polymorphic in the studied population. Based on these 15 SNPs, a total of 28 mtDNA haplotypes were defined in 99 individuals with the haplotype diversity of 0.9136. Also, we compared the mtDNA sequences of Yi group and other 9 populations worldwide and drew a Neighbor-Joining tree based on the shared 12 mtDNA SNP loci, which demonstrated a close relationship between Yi and Bai groups. In conclusion, the analysis of the 15 selected SNPs increases considerably the discrimination power of mtDNA. Moreover, the SNaPshot minisequencing method could quickly detect mtDNA SNPs, and is economical and sensitive. The set of selected 15 SNPs is highly informative and is capable for anthropology genetic analysis. PMID:26432004

  18. DNA barcoding for effective biodiversity assessment of a hyperdiverse arthropod group: the ants of Madagascar

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. Alex; Fisher, Brian L; Hebert, Paul D.N

    2005-01-01

    The role of DNA barcoding as a tool to accelerate the inventory and analysis of diversity for hyperdiverse arthropods is tested using ants in Madagascar. We demonstrate how DNA barcoding helps address the failure of current inventory methods to rapidly respond to pressing biodiversity needs, specifically in the assessment of richness and turnover across landscapes with hyperdiverse taxa. In a comparison of inventories at four localities in northern Madagascar, patterns of richness were not significantly different when richness was determined using morphological taxonomy (morphospecies) or sequence divergence thresholds (Molecular Operational Taxonomic Unit(s); MOTU). However, sequence-based methods tended to yield greater richness and significantly lower indices of similarity than morphological taxonomy. MOTU determined using our molecular technique were a remarkably local phenomenon—indicative of highly restricted dispersal and/or long-term isolation. In cases where molecular and morphological methods differed in their assignment of individuals to categories, the morphological estimate was always more conservative than the molecular estimate. In those cases where morphospecies descriptions collapsed distinct molecular groups, sequence divergences of 16% (on average) were contained within the same morphospecies. Such high divergences highlight taxa for further detailed genetic, morphological, life history, and behavioral studies. PMID:16214741

  19. Molecular Renormalization Group Coarse-Graining of Polymer Chains: Application to Double-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexey; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2009-01-01

    Coarse-graining of atomistic force fields allows us to investigate complex biological problems, occurring at long timescales and large length scales. In this work, we have developed an accurate coarse-grained model for double-stranded DNA chain, derived systematically from atomistic simulations. Our approach is based on matching correlators obtained from atomistic and coarse-grained simulations, for observables that explicitly enter the coarse-grained Hamiltonian. We show that this requirement leads to equivalency of the corresponding partition functions, resulting in a one-step renormalization. Compared to prior works exploiting similar ideas, the main novelty of this work is the introduction of a highly compact set of Hamiltonian basis functions, based on molecular interaction potentials. We demonstrate that such compactification allows us to reproduce many-body effects, generated by one-step renormalization, at low computational cost. In addition, compact Hamiltonians greatly increase the likelihood of finding unique solutions for the coarse-grained force-field parameter values. By successfully applying our molecular renormalization group coarse-graining technique to double-stranded DNA, we solved, for the first time, a long-standing problem in coarse-graining polymer systems, namely, how to accurately capture the correlations among various polymeric degrees of freedom. Excellent agreement is found among atomistic and coarse-grained distribution functions for various structural observables, including those not included in the Hamiltonian. We also suggest higher-order generalization of this method, which may allow capturing more subtle correlations in biopolymer dynamics. PMID:19450476

  20. The Fanconi anemia complementation group C protein corrects DNA interstrand cross-link-specific apoptosis in HSC536N cells.

    PubMed

    Marathi, U K; Howell, S R; Ashmun, R A; Brent, T P

    1996-09-15

    Fanconi anemia (FA) cells are hypersensitive to cytotoxicity, cell cycle arrest, and chromosomal aberrations induced by DNA cross-linking agents, such as mitomycin C (MMC) and nitrogen mustard (HN2). Although MMC hypersensitivity is complemented in a subset of FA cells (complementation group C [FA-C]) by wild-type FAC cDNA, the cytoprotective mechanism is unknown. In the current study, we tested the hypothesis that FAC protein functions in the suppression of DNA interstand cross-link (ISC)-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Comparison of HN2-induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis with those of its non-cross-linking analogs, diethylaminoethyl chloride and 2-dimethylaminoethyl chloride, delineated the DNA ISC specificity of FAC-mediated cytoprotection. Overexpression of wild-type FAC cDNA in FA-C lymphoblasts (HSC536N cell line) prevented HN2-induced growth inhibition, G2 arrest, and DNA fragmentation that is characteristic of apoptosis. In contrast cytoprotection was not conferred against the effects of the non-cross-linking mustards. Our data show that DNA ISCs induce apoptosis more potently than do DNA monoadducts and suggest that FAC suppresses specifically DNA ISC-induced apoptosis in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. PMID:8822951

  1. Chloroplast DNA variation and geographical structure of the Aristolochia kaempferi group (Aristolochiaceae).

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kana; Kajita, Tadashi; Murata, Jin

    2006-03-01

    The present study documents cpDNA variation in the Aristolochia kaempferi group (Aristolochiaceae), which consists of one Chinese and all Japanese and Taiwanese species of the subgenus Siphisia. In a phylogenetic analysis based on the nucleotide sequences of the matK gene, and the atpB-rbcL and trnS-trnG intergenic spacer regions, 38 haplotypes were recognized in the A. kaempferi group and as many as 24 within A. kaempferi. This is the most haplotypes reported for a single species to date. Although six highly significant major clades were identified in the phylogenetic analysis, they were not congruent with previous classifications. This might be attributed to the specific speciation process, such as convergent evolution, incomplete lineage sorting, and/or reticulate evolution. The six major clades had a clear geographical distribution pattern and were significantly associated with geographical distribution of haplotypes in a nested clade analysis and AMOVA. The results allow us to deduce a scenario in which multiple contractions and expansions of the geographical ranges brought about by Quaternary climatic oscillations affected the patterns of genetic diversity. The present geographic patterns of haplotype distribution within the A. kaempferi group can be explained by the last postglacial range expansion from different refugia, and the boundaries may be suture zones. PMID:21646203

  2. Doping Level of Boron-Doped Diamond Electrodes Controls the Grafting Density of Functional Groups for DNA Assays.

    PubMed

    vorc, ?ubomr; Jambrec, Daliborka; Vojs, Marian; Barwe, Stefan; Clausmeyer, Jan; Michniak, Pavol; Marton, Marin; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    The impact of different doping levels of boron-doped diamond on the surface functionalization was investigated by means of electrochemical reduction of aryldiazonium salts. The grafting efficiency of 4-nitrophenyl groups increased with the boron levels (B/C ratio from 0 to 20,000 ppm). Controlled grafting of nitrophenyldiazonium was used to adjust the amount of immobilized single-stranded DNA strands at the surface and further on the hybridization yield in dependence on the boron doping level. The grafted nitro functions were electrochemically reduced to the amine moieties. Subsequent functionalization with a succinic acid introduced carboxyl groups for subsequent binding of an amino-terminated DNA probe. DNA hybridization significantly depends on the probe density which is in turn dependent on the boron doping level. The proposed approach opens new insights for the design and control of doped diamond surface functionalization for the construction of DNA hybridization assays. PMID:26285076

  3. Folic acid, polymorphism of methyl-group metabolism genes, and DNA methylation in relation to GI carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing Yuan; Xiao, Shu Dong

    2003-01-01

    DNA methylation is the main epigenetic modification after replication in humans. DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase (DNMT) catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to C5 of cytosine within CpG dinucleotide sequences in the genomic DNA of higher eukaryotes. There is considerable evidence that aberrant DNA methylation plays an integral role in carcinogenesis. Folic acid or folate is crucial for normal DNA synthesis and can regulate DNA methylation, and through this, it affects cellular SAM levels. Folate deficiency results in DNA hypomethylation. Epidemiological studies have indicated that folic acid protects against gastrointestinal (GI) cancers. Methylene-tetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) and methionine synthase (MS) are the enzymes involved in folate metabolism and are thought to influence DNA methylation. MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level. Two common MTHFR polymorphisms, 677CT (or 677TT) and A1298C, and an MS polymorphism, A-->G at 2756, have been identified. Most studies support an inverse association between folate status and the rate of colorectal adenomas and carcinomas. During human GI carcinogenesis, MTHFR is highly polymorphic, and the variant genotypes result in decreased MTHFR enzyme activity and lower plasma folate level, as well as aberrant methylation. PMID:14564626

  4. Group-specific differentiation of Rhizobium from clover species by PCR amplification of 23S rDNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Tesfaye, M; Holl, F B

    1998-11-01

    Two 20-bp primers that provide group-specific detection of Rhizobium spp. by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have been used to differentiate strains that belong to different effectiveness groups within the Rhizobium-Trifolium cross-inoculation group. The target for DNA amplification was a 370-bp fragment of the 23S rDNA region. Analysis of additional root-nodule forming, as well as root-associated bacterial species by PCR-primer assay revealed that variability within this 20-bp segment of the 23S rDNA region may be widespread and provide an effective identification tool. Our data suggest that strains of Rhizobium isolated from the perennial clover Trifolium semipilosum may be phylogenetically more closely related to Rhizobium etli. PMID:10030005

  5. Characterization of polymorphisms in the mitochondrial DNA of twelve ethnic groups in the Guizhou province of China.

    PubMed

    He, Yan; Ren, Ling-Yan; Shan, Ke-Ren; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Chan-Juan; Guan, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the genetic profiles and relationships between ancient ethnic populations, we analyzed polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) isolated from the blood of 753 members of 12 ethnic groups (Buyi, Dong, Gelao, Hui, Man, Miao, Menggu, Mulao, Maonan, Qiang, She and Zhuang) living in the Guizhou Province of China. The 9-bp deletion of mtDNA was detected by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-PAGE, and 11 SNPs by restriction fragment length polymorphism and mini-sequencing. Thereafter, these genotyping results were verified by PCR-DNA sequencing. The mtDNA of these populations exhibited considerable diversity, both with respect to the haplogroups M and N, and subgroups thereof. The differences between the major ethnic groups reflected the maternal inheritance. These ethnic groups in Guizhou demonstrated a genetic profile that differed considerably from that of other Asian populations. Our findings indicate that the matrilineal genetic profiles of Guizhou groups are relatively complex and distinct, showing relationships that reflect national history and geography. PMID:24660920

  6. mtDNA variation in East Africa unravels the history of Afro-Asiatic groups.

    PubMed

    Boattini, Alessio; Castr, Loredana; Sarno, Stefania; Useli, Antonella; Cioffi, Manuela; Sazzini, Marco; Garagnani, Paolo; De Fanti, Sara; Pettener, Davide; Luiselli, Donata

    2013-03-01

    East Africa (EA) has witnessed pivotal steps in the history of human evolution. Due to its high environmental and cultural variability, and to the long-term human presence there, the genetic structure of modern EA populations is one of the most complicated puzzles in human diversity worldwide. Similarly, the widespread Afro-Asiatic (AA) linguistic phylum reaches its highest levels of internal differentiation in EA. To disentangle this complex ethno-linguistic pattern, we studied mtDNA variability in 1,671 individuals (452 of which were newly typed) from 30 EA populations and compared our data with those from 40 populations (2970 individuals) from Central and Northern Africa and the Levant, affiliated to the AA phylum. The genetic structure of the studied populations--explored using spatial Principal Component Analysis and Model-based clustering--turned out to be composed of four clusters, each with different geographic distribution and/or linguistic affiliation, and signaling different population events in the history of the region. One cluster is widespread in Ethiopia, where it is associated with different AA-speaking populations, and shows shared ancestry with Semitic-speaking groups from Yemen and Egypt and AA-Chadic-speaking groups from Central Africa. Two clusters included populations from Southern Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania. Despite high and recent gene-flow (Bantu, Nilo-Saharan pastoralists), one of them is associated with a more ancient AA-Cushitic stratum. Most North-African and Levantine populations (AA-Berber, AA-Semitic) were grouped in a fourth and more differentiated cluster. We therefore conclude that EA genetic variability, although heavily influenced by migration processes, conserves traces of more ancient strata. PMID:23283748

  7. Yeast high mobility group protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin and is evicted during repair of DNA double strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Panday, Arvind; Xiao, LiJuan; Grove, Anne

    2015-07-13

    DNA is packaged into condensed chromatin fibers by association with histones and architectural proteins such as high mobility group (HMGB) proteins. However, this DNA packaging reduces accessibility of enzymes that act on DNA, such as proteins that process DNA after double strand breaks (DSBs). Chromatin remodeling overcomes this barrier. We show here that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HMGB protein HMO1 stabilizes chromatin as evidenced by faster chromatin remodeling in its absence. HMO1 was evicted along with core histones during repair of DSBs, and chromatin remodeling events such as histone H2A phosphorylation and H3 eviction were faster in absence of HMO1. The facilitated chromatin remodeling in turn correlated with more efficient DNA resection and recruitment of repair proteins; for example, inward translocation of the DNA-end-binding protein Ku was faster in absence of HMO1. This chromatin stabilization requires the lysine-rich C-terminal extension of HMO1 as truncation of the HMO1 C-terminal tail phenocopies hmo1 deletion. Since this is reminiscent of the need for the basic C-terminal domain of mammalian histone H1 in chromatin compaction, we speculate that HMO1 promotes chromatin stability by DNA bending and compaction imposed by its lysine-rich domain and that it must be evicted along with core histones for efficient DSB repair. PMID:25979266

  8. Pyramidal and Chiral Groupings of Gold Nanocrystals Assembled Using DNA Scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroianni, Alexander; Claridge, Shelley; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2009-03-30

    Nanostructures constructed from metal and semiconductor nanocrystals conjugated to, and organized by DNA are an emerging class of material with collective optical properties. We created discrete pyramids of DNA with gold nanocrystals at the tips. By taking small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurments from solutions of these pyramids we confirmed that this pyramidal geometry creates structures which are more rigid in solution than linear DNA. We then took advantage of the tetrahedral symmetry to demonstrate construction of chiral nanostructures.

  9. Additional data for nuclear DNA give new insights into the phylogenetic position of Sorex granarius within the Sorex araneus group.

    PubMed

    Yannic, G; Dubey, S; Hausser, J; Basset, P

    2010-12-01

    Many species contain genetic lineages that are phylogenetically intermixed with those of other species. In the Sorex araneus group, previous results based on mtDNA and Y chromosome sequence data showed an incongruent position of Sorex granarius within this group. In this study, we explored the relationship between species within the S. araneus group, aiming to resolve the particular position of S. granarius. In this context, we sequenced a total of 2447 base pairs (bp) of X-linked and nuclear genes from 47 individuals of the S. araneus group. The same taxa were also analyzed within a Bayesian framework with nine autosomal microsatellites. These analyses revealed that all markers apart from mtDNA showed similar patterns, suggesting that the problematic position of S. granarius is best explained by an incongruent behavior by mtDNA. Given their close phylogenetic relationship and their close geographic distribution, the most likely explanation for this pattern is past mtDNA introgression from S. araneus race Carlit to S. granarius. PMID:20883802

  10. DNA Barcoding Will Frequently Fail in Complicated Groups: An Example in Wild Potatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA barcoding has been proposed as a rapid and practical molecular tool to identify species using short orthologous DNA sequences from one or a small number of universal regions. It seeks to overcome the taxonomic impediment of a greater need to identify organisms than the availability of competen...

  11. DNA FINGERPRINTING ANALYSIS OF VEGETATIVE COMPATIBILITY GROUPS IN ASPERGILLUS FLAVUS FROM A PEANUT FEILD IN GEORGIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability of a species specific DNA probe pAF28 to correctly match 75 strains of A. flavus isolated from a peanut field in Georgia with one of 44 distinct VCGs was assessed. Multiple strains belonging to the same VCG typically produced identical DNA fingerprints with the exception of VCG 17 and V...

  12. DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Felsenfeld, Gary

    1985-01-01

    Structural form, bonding scheme, and chromatin structure of and gene-modification experiments with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are described. Indicates that DNA's double helix is variable and also flexible as it interacts with regulatory and other molecules to transfer hereditary messages. (DH)

  13. Crystal structure of the trithorax group protein ASH2L reveals a forkhead-like DNA binding domain

    SciTech Connect

    Sarvan, Sabina; Avdic, Vanja; Tremblay, Véronique; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Blais, Alexandre; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Brand, Marjorie; Couture, Jean-François

    2012-05-02

    Absent, small or homeotic discs-like 2 (ASH2L) is a trithorax group (TrxG) protein and a regulatory subunit of the SET1 family of lysine methyltransferases. Here we report that ASH2L binds DNA using a forkhead-like helix-wing-helix (HWH) domain. In vivo, the ASH2L HWH domain is required for binding to the {beta}-globin locus control region, histone H3 Lys4 (H3K4) trimethylation and maximal expression of the {beta}-globin gene (Hbb-1), validating the functional importance of the ASH2L DNA binding domain.

  14. Aeromonas jandaei (formerly genospecies DNA group 9 A. sobria), a new sucrose-negative species isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed

    Carnahan, A; Fanning, G R; Joseph, S W

    1991-03-01

    A large numerical taxonomy study conducted in 1988 of 165 mostly clinical Aeromonas strains from diverse geographic sources produced a cluster (S = 84%, SSM) of four sucrose-negative strains that included the DNA definition strain for DNA group 9 A. sobria (CDC 0787-80). These four strains, together with five additional strains received in 1989, were subjected to DNA-DNA hybridization (hydroxyapatite, 32P, 60 and 75 degrees C), and all eight strains were closely related to the ninth labeled DNA group 9 definition strain CDC 0787-80 (73 to 86% relatedness at 60 degrees C and 68 to 80% relatedness at 75 degrees C; percent divergence, 2.0 to 3.5). Type strains and DNA definition strains for all other established Aeromonas species were only 35 to 72% related (60 degrees C) to CDC 0787-80. We propose the name Aeromonas jandaei for this highly related group of nine strains, formerly known as DNA group 9 A. sobria. The type strain was designated ATCC 49568 (CDC 0787-80). The nine strains were examined at 36 degrees C and were found to be resistant to 0/129 (vibriostatic agent) and uniformly positive for oxidase, gas production from glucose, indole, lysine decarboxylase, arginine dihydrolase, o-nitrophenyl-beta-D-galactopyranoside, motility (25 degrees C), nitrate reduction, citrate utilization, hemolysis on sheep blood agar, and growth in Trypticase soy broth with no added NaCl. They all fermented D-glucose, D-mannitol, and mannose but did not ferment sucrose, cellobiose, L-arabinose, inositol, salicin, or D-sorbitol. They were uniformly negative for esculin and urea hydrolysis, elastase production, ornithine decarboxylation, and the string test. The antibiogram of A. jandaei resembled that of other aeromonads (resistance to ampicillin and cephalothin), but it differed from most other aeromonads because of resistance to single dilution of colistin and differed from clinical A. veronii biogroup sorbria (formerly A. sobria) by its nearly uniform resistance to cephalothin. The esculin-, sucrose-, and cellobiose-negative and colistin-resistant profile distinguished A. jandaei from other Aeromonas species. These A. jandaei strains were isolated from blood (two strains), wounds (two strains), diarrheal stools (four strains), and a prawn (one strain). The blood and wound isolates, in particular, suggest that there is a possible clinical significance for this species and justify identification of and further research on this group of motile aeromonads. PMID:2037673

  15. Efimov-like phase of a three-stranded DNA and the renormalization-group limit cycle.

    PubMed

    Pal, Tanmoy; Sadhukhan, Poulomi; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M

    2015-04-01

    A three-stranded DNA with short range base pairings only is known to exhibit a classical analog of the quantum Efimov effect, viz., a three-chain bound state at the two-chain melting point where no two are bound. By using a nonperturbative renormalization-group method for a rigid duplex DNA and a flexible third strand, with base pairings and strand exchange, we show that the Efimov-DNA is associated with a limit cycle type behavior of the flow of an effective three-chain interaction. The analysis also shows that thermally generated bubbles play an essential role in producing the effect. A toy model for the flow equations shows the limit cycle in an extended three-dimensional parameter space of the two-chain coupling and a complex three-chain interaction. PMID:25974437

  16. Efimov-like phase of a three-stranded DNA and the renormalization-group limit cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Sadhukhan, Poulomi; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2015-04-01

    A three-stranded DNA with short range base pairings only is known to exhibit a classical analog of the quantum Efimov effect, viz., a three-chain bound state at the two-chain melting point where no two are bound. By using a nonperturbative renormalization-group method for a rigid duplex DNA and a flexible third strand, with base pairings and strand exchange, we show that the Efimov-DNA is associated with a limit cycle type behavior of the flow of an effective three-chain interaction. The analysis also shows that thermally generated bubbles play an essential role in producing the effect. A toy model for the flow equations shows the limit cycle in an extended three-dimensional parameter space of the two-chain coupling and a complex three-chain interaction.

  17. Design and testing of a functional group-specific DNA probe for the study of natural populations of acetogenic bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Lovell, C R; Hui, Y

    1991-01-01

    The acetogens, although phylogenetically diverse, can be characterized by their possession of the acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) pathway for autotrophic CO2 fixation. The gene encoding formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, a key enzyme of the acetyl-CoA pathway, was previously cloned from the thermophilic acetogen Clostridium thermoaceticum and has now been tested as a group-specific probe for acetogens. Stable hybrids were formed between the probe and single DNA fragments from eight known acetogens representing six genera. A hybrid was also formed between the probe and a DNA fragment from one sulfate reducer known to be capable of both autotrophic CO2 fixation and acetate catabolism. No such hybrid was formed between the probe and DNA from a homoacetate fermenter not known to use the acetyl-CoA pathway, with two known formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase-producing purine fermenters, or with DNA from 27 other species representing 16 genera of organisms that do not use the acetyl-CoA pathway. DNA purified from cells extracted from horse manure was also screened with the acetogen probe. Six hybrids, indicating at least six detectable acetogen "strains," were observed. Images PMID:1768134

  18. A New Epistasis Group for the Repair of DNA Damage in Bacteriophage T4: Replication Repair

    PubMed Central

    Wachsman, Joseph T.; Drake, John W.

    1987-01-01

    The gene 32 mutation amA453 sensitizes bacteriophage T4 to the lethal effects of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, methyl methanesulfonate and angelicin-mediated photodynamic irradiation when treated particles are plated on amber-suppressing host cells. The increased UV sensitivity caused by amA453 is additive to that caused by mutations in both the T4 excision repair (denV) and recombination repair (uvsWXY) systems, suggesting the operation of a third kind of repair system. The mutation uvs79, with many similarities to amA453 but mapping in gene 41, is largely epistatic to amA453. The mutation mms1, also with many similarities to amA453, maps close to amA453 within gene 32 and is largely epistatic to uvs79. Neither amA453 nor uvs79 affect the ratio of UV-induced mutational to lethal hits, nor does amA453 affect spontaneous or UV-enhanced recombination frequencies. Gene 32 encodes the major T4 ssDNA-binding protein (the scaffolding of DNA replication) and gene 41 encodes a DNA helicase, both being required for T4 DNA replication. We conclude that a third repair process operates in phage T4 and suggest that it acts during rather than before or after DNA replication. PMID:3552872

  19. Nuclear Quadrupole Interaction Study as a Probe of Interaction between Nucleobases and Suger Rings and Phosphate Groups in DNA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, T. P.; Dubey, Archana; Scheicher, R. H.; Badu, S. R.; Pink, R. H.; Nagamine, K.; Torikai, E.; Saha, H. P.; Chow, Lee; Huang, M. B.

    2008-03-01

    We have been investigating the influence of the interaction between the nucleobases and sugar rings and phosphate groups in DNA using Nuclear Quadrupole interactions (NQI) of ^14N and ^17O and ^2H nuclei as probes. We have first simulated the influence of the interaction between a nucleobase and a sugar ring using a CH3 group attached to the former. For our electronic structure investigations, we have employed the Hartree-Fock-Roothaan procedure using the Gaussian set of programs. Our preliminary investigations have shown that there are comparable indirect and direct effects on the NQI parameters, the former effect referring to the influence of changes in molecular geometries produced by the CH3 group and the direct effect is due to the electronic interaction between the CH3 group and the nucleobase. More quantitative results from our current investigations using the actual sugar rings and phosphate groups will be presented as in earlier work by our group[1] for hyperfine interactions of trapped muonium atoms in DNA.[1] R.H. Scheicher et al Physica B 374-375, 448(2006)

  20. A Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA Marker Specific for the Bacillus cereus Group Is Diagnostic for Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Daffonchio, Daniele; Borin, Sara; Frova, Giuseppe; Gallo, Romina; Mori, Elena; Fani, Renato; Sorlini, Claudia

    1999-01-01

    Aiming to develop a DNA marker specific for Bacillus anthracis and able to discriminate this species from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus thuringiensis, and Bacillus mycoides, we applied the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprinting technique to a collection of 101 strains of the genus Bacillus, including 61 strains of the B. cereus group. An 838-bp RAPD marker (SG-850) specific for B. cereus, B. thuringiensis, B. anthracis, and B. mycoides was identified. This fragment included a putative (366-nucleotide) open reading frame highly homologous to the ypuA gene of Bacillus subtilis. The restriction analysis of the SG-850 fragment with AluI distinguished B. anthracis from the other species of the B. cereus group. PMID:10049896

  1. The DNA polymerase genes of several HMU-bacteriophages have similar group I introns with highly divergent open reading frames.

    PubMed Central

    Goodrich-Blair, H; Shub, D A

    1994-01-01

    A previous report described the discovery of a group I, self-splicing intron in the DNA polymerase gene of the Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage SPO1 (1). In this study, the DNA polymerase genes of three close relatives of SPO1: SP82, 2C and phi e, were also found to be interrupted by an intron. All of these introns have group I secondary structures that are extremely similar to one another in primary sequence. Each is interrupted by an open reading frame (ORF) that, unlike the intron core or exon sequences, are highly diverged. Unlike the relatives of Escherichia coli bacteriophage T4, most of which do not have introns (2), this intron seems to be common among the relatives of SPO1. Images PMID:7937082

  2. A novel virus genome discovered in an extreme environment suggests recombination between unrelated groups of RNA and DNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Viruses are known to be the most abundant organisms on earth, yet little is known about their collective origin and evolutionary history. With exceptionally high rates of genetic mutation and mosaicism, it is not currently possible to resolve deep evolutionary histories of the known major virus groups. Metagenomics offers a potential means of establishing a more comprehensive view of viral evolution as vast amounts of new sequence data becomes available for comparative analysis. Results Bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic sequences derived from a hot, acidic lake revealed a circular, putatively single-stranded DNA virus encoding a major capsid protein similar to those found only in single-stranded RNA viruses. The presence and circular configuration of the complete virus genome was confirmed by inverse PCR amplification from native DNA extracted from lake sediment. The virus genome appears to be the result of a RNA-DNA recombination event between two ostensibly unrelated virus groups. Environmental sequence databases were examined for homologous genes arranged in similar configurations and three similar putative virus genomes from marine environments were identified. This result indicates the existence of a widespread but previously undetected group of viruses. Conclusions This unique viral genome carries implications for theories of virus emergence and evolution, as no mechanism for interviral RNA-DNA recombination has yet been identified, and only scant evidence exists that genetic exchange occurs between such distinct virus lineages. Reviewers This article was reviewed by EK, MK (nominated by PF) and AM. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section. PMID:22515485

  3. Multiple Group I Introns in the Small-Subunit rDNA of Botryosphaeria dothidea: Implication for Intraspecific Genetic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chao; Wang, Chunsheng; Sun, Xinyao; Zhang, Rong; Gleason, Mark L.; Eiji, Tanaka; Sun, Guangyu

    2013-01-01

    Botryosphaeria dothidea is a widespread and economically important pathogen on various fruit trees, and it often causes die-back and canker on limbs and fruit rot. In characterizing intraspecies genetic variation within this fungus, group I introns, rich in rDNA of fungi, may provide a productive region for exploration. In this research, we analysed complete small subunit (SSU) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences of 37 B. dothidea strains, and found four insertions, designated Bdo.S943, Bdo.S1199-A, Bdo.S1199-B and Bdo.S1506, at three positions. Sequence analysis and structure prediction revealed that both Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506 belonged to subgroup IC1 of group I introns, whereas Bdo.S1199-A and Bdo.S1199-B corresponded to group IE introns. Moreover, Bdo.S1199-A was found to host an open reading frame (ORF) for encoding the homing endonuclease (HE), whereas Bdo.S1199-B, an evolutionary descendant of Bdo.S1199-A, included a degenerate HE. The above four introns were novel, and were the first group I introns observed and characterized in this species. Differential distribution of these introns revealed that all strains could be separated into four genotypes. Genotype III (no intron) and genotype IV (Bdo.S1199-B) were each found in only one strain, whereas genotype I (Bdo.S1199-A) and genotype II (Bdo.S943 and Bdo.S1506) occurred in 95% of the strains. There is a correlation between B. dothidea genotypes and hosts or geographic locations. Thus, these newly discovered group I introns can help to advance understanding of genetic differentiation within B. dothidea. PMID:23844098

  4. DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stent, Gunther S.

    1970-01-01

    This history for molecular genetics and its explanation of DNA begins with an analysis of the Golden Jubilee essay papers, 1955. The paper ends stating that the higher nervous system is the one major frontier of biological inquiry which still offers some romance of research. (Author/VW)

  5. DNA strand bias in the repair of the p53 gene in normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum group C fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Evans, M K; Taffe, B G; Harris, C C; Bohr, V A

    1993-11-15

    We have measured the gene-specific and strand-specific DNA repair of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers in the p53 tumor suppressor gene in a normal, repair-proficient human fibroblast strain and in fibroblasts from a patient with the repair deficient disorder xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XP-C). In both cell strains, repair was measured in the p53 gene and in its individual DNA strands. For comparison, the repair also was measured in other genomic regions in these human fibroblast strains, including the housekeeping gene dihydrofolate reductase, and two inactive genomic regions, the delta globin gene, and the 754 locus of the X chromosome. In both cell strains, we find that the p53 gene is repaired faster than the dihydrofolate reductase gene and much more efficiently than the inactive genomic regions. Selective repair of the transcribed DNA strand of p53 is observed in both human cell strains; the strand bias of repair is particularly distinct in XP-C. Mutations specific to the nontranscribed strand may occur due to replication errors at the sites of unrepaired DNA damage. Therefore, our results predict that the majority of mutations in skin cancers, especially those from patients with XP-C, would occur on the nontranscribed strand of the p53 gene. Indeed, Dumasz et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, in press, 1993) report such a strand bias of p53 mutation in skin cancers from XP-C patients. PMID:8221675

  6. The electrokinetic characterization of gold nanoparticles, functionalized with cationic functional groups, and its' interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Lazarus, Geraldine Genevive; Revaprasadu, Neerish; Lpez-Viota, Julin; Singh, Moganavelli

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted strong biomedical interest for drug delivery due to their low toxic nature, surface plasmon resonance and capability of increasing the stability of the payload. However, gene transfection represents another important biological application. Considering that cellular barriers keep enclosed their secret to deliver genes using nanoparticles, an important step can be achieved by studying the functionalization of nanoparticles with DNA. In the present contribution the synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a gold core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (l-lysine), and cationic polyelectrolytes (poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine) is reported. All nanoparticles were subjected to dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility measurements, UV-vis optical spectrophotometry analysis and transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, the adsorption of DNA plasmid (pSGS) with linear and supercoiled configurations was studied for those gold nanoparticles under the most suitable surface modifications. Preliminary results showed that the gold nanoparticles functionalized with poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine, respectively, and bound to linear DNA configurations, present in absolute value a higher electrophoretic mobility irrespective of the pH of the media, compared to the supercoiled and nicked configuration. The findings from this study suggest that poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine functionalized gold nanoparticles are biocompatible and may be promising in the chemical design and future optimization of nanostructures for biomedical applications such as gene and drug delivery. PMID:25009100

  7. Cockayne syndrome group B protein regulates DNA double-strand break repair and checkpoint activation.

    PubMed

    Batenburg, Nicole L; Thompson, Elizabeth L; Hendrickson, Eric A; Zhu, Xu-Dong

    2015-05-12

    Mutations of CSB account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome (CS), a devastating hereditary disorder characterized by physical impairment, neurological degeneration and segmental premature aging. Here we report the generation of a human CSB-knockout cell line. We find that CSB facilitates HR and represses NHEJ. Loss of CSB or a CS-associated CSB mutation abrogating its ATPase activity impairs the recruitment of BRCA1, RPA and Rad51 proteins to damaged chromatin but promotes the formation of 53BP1-Rif1 damage foci in S and G2 cells. Depletion of 53BP1 rescues the formation of BRCA1 damage foci in CSB-knockout cells. In addition, knockout of CSB impairs the ATM- and Chk2-mediated DNA damage responses, promoting a premature entry into mitosis. Furthermore, we show that CSB accumulates at sites of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in a transcription-dependent manner. The kinetics of DSB-induced chromatin association of CSB is distinct from that of its UV-induced chromatin association. These results reveal novel, important functions of CSB in regulating the DNA DSB repair pathway choice as well as G2/M checkpoint activation. PMID:25820262

  8. Three Group-I introns in 18S rDNA of Endosymbiotic Algae of Paramecium bursaria from Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshina, Ryo; Kamako, Shin-ichiro; Imamura, Nobutaka

    2004-08-01

    In the nuclear encoded small subunit ribosomal DNA (18S rDNA) of symbiotic alga of Paramecium bursaria (F36 collected in Japan) possesses three intron-like insertions (Hoshina et al., unpubl. data, 2003). The present study confirmed these exact lengths and insertion sites by reverse transcription-PCR. Two of them were inserted at Escherichia coli 16S rRNA genic position 943 and 1512 that are frequent intron insertion positions, but another insertion position (nearly 1370) was the first finding. Their secondary structures suggested they belong to Group-I intron; one belongs to subgroup IE, others belong to subgroup IC1. Similarity search indicated these introns are ancestral ones.

  9. 28s rDNA group-I introns: a powerful tool for identifying strains of Beauveria brongniartii.

    PubMed

    Neuvéglise, C; Brygoo, Y; Riba, G

    1997-04-01

    The nuclear ribosomal DNA of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria brongniartii is polymorphic in terms of both restriction site and length. Insertions of 350-450 bp long, identified as group-I introns, were detected in the 28s rDNA. A panel of 47 strains of B. brongniartii, two B. bassiana and one Metarhizium anisopliae of various geographical and biological origins were found to contain 14 variant forms of intron differing in size and restriction pattern, at four different positions. Twelve types of ribosomal large subunit were defined on the basis of variant distribution and compared with strain clustering based on internal transcribed spacers analysis. There was a correlation between the characteristic introns and isolates collected from the sugar cane pest Hoplochelus marginalis. Primers for polymerase chain reaction amplification were chosen from these variants, and used to develop a specific method for detecting strains pathogenic towards Hoplochelus. PMID:9131812

  10. Complete mtDNA genomes of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups: a melting pot of recent and ancient lineages in the Asia-Pacific region

    PubMed Central

    Delfin, Frederick; Min-Shan Ko, Albert; Li, Mingkun; Gunnarsdóttir, Ellen D; Tabbada, Kristina A; Salvador, Jazelyn M; Calacal, Gayvelline C; Sagum, Minerva S; Datar, Francisco A; Padilla, Sabino G; De Ungria, Maria Corazon A; Stoneking, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The Philippines is a strategic point in the Asia-Pacific region for the study of human diversity, history and origins, as it is a cross-road for human migrations and consequently exhibits enormous ethnolinguistic diversity. Following on a previous in-depth study of Y-chromosome variation, here we provide new insights into the maternal genetic history of Filipino ethnolinguistic groups by surveying complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genomes from a total of 14 groups (11 groups in this study and 3 groups previously published) including previously published mtDNA hypervariable segment (HVS) data from Filipino regional center groups. Comparison of HVS data indicate genetic differences between ethnolinguistic and regional center groups. The complete mtDNA genomes of 14 ethnolinguistic groups reveal genetic aspects consistent with the Y-chromosome, namely: diversity and heterogeneity of groups, no support for a simple dichotomy between Negrito and non-Negrito groups, and different genetic affinities with Asia-Pacific groups that are both ancient and recent. Although some mtDNA haplogroups can be associated with the Austronesian expansion, there are others that associate with South Asia, Near Oceania and Australia that are consistent with a southern migration route for ethnolinguistic group ancestors into the Asia-Pacific, with a timeline that overlaps with the initial colonization of the Asia-Pacific region, the initial colonization of the Philippines and a possible separate post-colonization migration into the Philippine archipelago. PMID:23756438

  11. Rapid plant identification using species- and group-specific primers targeting chloroplast DNA.

    PubMed

    Wallinger, Corinna; Juen, Anita; Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  12. Rapid Plant Identification Using Species- and Group-Specific Primers Targeting Chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Staudacher, Karin; Schallhart, Nikolaus; Mitterrutzner, Evi; Steiner, Eva-Maria; Thalinger, Bettina; Traugott, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Plant identification is challenging when no morphologically assignable parts are available. There is a lack of broadly applicable methods for identifying plants in this situation, for example when roots grow in mixture and for decayed or semi-digested plant material. These difficulties have also impeded the progress made in ecological disciplines such as soil- and trophic ecology. Here, a PCR-based approach is presented which allows identifying a variety of plant taxa commonly occurring in Central European agricultural land. Based on the trnT-F cpDNA region, PCR assays were developed to identify two plant families (Poaceae and Apiaceae), the genera Trifolium and Plantago, and nine plant species: Achillea millefolium, Fagopyrum esculentum, Lolium perenne, Lupinus angustifolius, Phaseolus coccineus, Sinapis alba, Taraxacum officinale, Triticum aestivum, and Zea mays. These assays allowed identification of plants based on size-specific amplicons ranging from 116 bp to 381 bp. Their specificity and sensitivity was consistently high, enabling the detection of small amounts of plant DNA, for example, in decaying plant material and in the intestine or faeces of herbivores. To increase the efficacy of identifying plant species from large number of samples, specific primers were combined in multiplex PCRs, allowing screening for multiple species within a single reaction. The molecular assays outlined here will be applicable manifold, such as for root- and leaf litter identification, botanical trace evidence, and the analysis of herbivory. PMID:22253728

  13. Are clownfish groups composed of close relatives? An analysis of microsatellite DNA variation in Amphiprion percula.

    PubMed

    Buston, Peter M; Bogdanowicz, Steven M; Wong, Alex; Harrison, Richard G

    2007-09-01

    A central question of evolutionary ecology is: why do animals live in groups? Answering this question requires that the costs and benefits of group living are measured from the perspective of each individual in the group. This, in turn, requires that the group's genetic structure is elucidated, because genetic relatedness can modulate the individuals' costs and benefits. The clown anemonefish, Amphiprion percula, lives in groups composed of a breeding pair and zero to four nonbreeders. Both breeders and nonbreeders stand to gain by associating with relatives: breeders might prefer to tolerate nonbreeders that are relatives because there is little chance that relatives will survive to breed elsewhere; nonbreeders might prefer to associate with breeders that are relatives because of the potential to accrue indirect genetic benefits by enhancing anemone and, consequently, breeder fitness. Given the potential benefits of associating with relatives, we use microsatellite loci to investigate whether or not individuals within groups of A. percula are related. We develop seven polymorphic microsatellite loci, with a number of alleles (range 2-24) and an observed level of heterozygosity (mean = 0.5936) sufficient to assess fine-scale genetic structure. The mean coefficient of relatedness among group members is 0.00 +/- 0.10 (n = 9 groups), and there are no surprising patterns in the distribution of pairwise relatedness. We conclude that A. percula live in groups of unrelated individuals. This study lays the foundation for further investigations of behavioural, population and community ecology of anemonefishes which are emerging as model systems for evolutionary ecology in the marine environment. PMID:17845439

  14. Tissue distribution of blood group membrane proteins beyond red cells: evidence from cDNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Rojewski, Markus T; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Flegel, Willy A

    2006-08-01

    The proteins of blood group systems are expressed on red blood cells (RBC) by definition. We searched nucleotide databases of human expressed sequence tags (EST) to collate the distribution of 22 distinct membrane proteins in cells and tissues other than RBC. The documented blood group genes are: MNS, Rh, Lutheran, Kell, Duffy, Kidd, Diego, Yt, Xg, Scianna, Dombrock, Colton, Landsteiner-Wiener, Kx, Gerbich, Cromer, Knops, Indian, Ok, Raph, John-Milton-Hagen and Gill. The genes were grouped according to their overall and their relative expression in embryo and adults. We describe the distribution of EST in cells, tissues and cell lines with a focus on non-RBC tissues. PMID:16956794

  15. Complementation of DNA repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group C by the transfer of human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, G.P.; Athwal, R.S. )

    1993-01-01

    Complementation of DNA excision repair defect in xeroderma pigmentosum cells of group C (XP-C) has been achieved by the transfer of human chromosome 5. Individual human chromosomes tagged with a selectable marker were transferred to XP-C cells by microcell fusion from mouse-human hybrid cell lines each bearing a single different human chromosome. Analysis of the chromosome transfer clones revealed that introduction of chromosome 5 into XP-C cells corrected the DNA repair defect as well as UV-sensitive phenotypes, while chromosomes 2, 6, 7, 9, 13, 15, 17, and 21 failed to complement. The introduced chromosome 5 in complemented UV[sup r] clones was distinguished from the parental XP-C chromosomes by polymorphism for dinucleotide (CA)[sub n] repeats at two loci, D5S117 and D5S209. In addition, an intact marked chromosome 5 was rescued into mouse cells from a complemented UV[sup r] clone by microcell fusion. Five subclones of a complemented clone that had lost the marked chromosome 5 exhibited UV-sensitive and repair-deficient phenotypes identical to parental XP-C cells. Concordant loss of the transferred chromosome and reappearance of XP-C phenotype further confirmed the presence of a DNA repair gene on human chromosome 5. 38 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Identification of group-I introns in the 28s rDNA of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria brongniartii.

    PubMed

    Neuvéglise, C; Brygoo, Y

    1994-12-01

    The length of the 28s ribosomal DNA differs significantly between two strains (Bt102 and Bt114) of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria brongniartii. RFLP analysis on PCR products revealed the presence of three insertional elements of 350-450 bp in strain Bt114. One of the insertions has been cloned and sequenced and shown to possess all the characteristic sequences and secondary structures of a group-IC intron. Its length is 428 bp and it is devoid of any long open reading frame. The distribution of this intron elsewhere in the genome of Bt114, as well as in the chromosomal ribosomal DNA, was studied. It seems to be present as seven copies in different genes not corresponding to the mitochondrial DNA. The presence of the intron in other strains of B. brongniartii was examined by the hybridization method. Some of them seemed to possess introns with a similar core although others presented no homology with the cloned fragment. PMID:7750145

  17. Testing the validity of Northern European species in the Chrysis ignita species group (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae) with DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Soon, Villu; Budrys, Eduardas; Orlovskyt?, Svetlana; Paukkunen, Juho; Odegaard, Frode; Ljubomirov, Toshko; Saarma, Urmas

    2014-01-01

    Containing more than a hundred species, the Chrysis ignita species group is the largest and one of the most taxonomically challenging groups in its genus. It has not been possible to resolve the taxonomy of the group using traditional methods due to the lack of robust diagnostic morphological characters. Here we present the results of a molecular analysis designed to delimit species in the Chrysis ignita group for the first time; using mitochondrial sequence data for 364 in-group specimens consisting of all 18 species known to occur in Northern Europe. Two mitochondrial loci were analysed: a COI gene fragment, and a continuous DNA sequence consisting of 16S rRNA, tRNAVal, 12S rRNA and ND4. Two approaches were employed for delimiting species: (1) genetic distance analysis based on the standard COI barcode sequences and; (2) phylogenetic analysis of the COI fragment together with rRNA genes. Both analyses yielded trees with similar topology, but support values for nodes were higher using the second approach. Fifteen species were distinguished in all analyses: Chrysis angustula Schenck, 1856, C. brevitarsis Thomson, 1870, C. clarinicollis Linsenmaier, 1951, C. corusca Valkeila, 1971, C. fulgida Linnaeus, 1761, C. ignita (Linnaeus, 1758), C. impressa Schenck, 1856, C. iris Christ, 1791, C. leptomandibularis Niehuis, 2000, C. longula Abeille de Perrin, 1879, C. ruddii Shuckard, 1837, C. schencki Linsenmaier, 1968, C. subcoriacea Linsenmaier, 1959, C. terminata Dahlbom, 1854 and C. vanlithi Linsenmaier, 1959. The specific status of C. mediata Linsenmaier, 1951 and C. solida Haupt, 1957 was not resolved. Included unidentified specimens grouped in three clusters, two of which are distinctly delimited and apparently represent cryptic species. The specific status of the unidentified samples in the third cluster remained unclear. Moreover, our data suggest the existence of additional cryptic species currently lumped under the names C. pseudobrevitarsis Linsenmaier, 1951 and C. schencki Linsenmaier, 1968. In conclusion, our results derived from analysis of mitochondrial loci strongly support the specific status of the majority of currently recognised species in the Chrysis ignita species group, and suggest the existence of additional cryptic species in Northern Europe. Thus, considering the difficulties that often arise during species determination based on morphological characters, the mtDNA loci used here appear highly suitable for assisting species delimitation in this group as well as identification of specimens. PMID:24869539

  18. Species discrimination in the subfamily Ostertagiinae of Northern China: assessment of DNA barcode in a taxonomically challenging group.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jizhou; Zhang, Yongning; Feng, Chunyan; Yuan, Xiangfen; Sun, Degang; Deng, Junhua; Wang, Caixia; Wu, Shaoqiang; Lin, Xiangmei

    2016-03-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes within the subfamily Ostertagiinae (Teladorsagia, Ostertagia, and Marshallagia et al.) are among the most common infections of domesticated livestock. These parasites are of particular interest, as many of the species within this group are of economic importance worldwide. Traditionally, nematode species designations have been based on morphological criteria. However, this group possesses poorly defined species. There is an urgent need to develop a reliable technique that can distinguish species of Ostertagiinae. DNA barcoding has been proved to be a powerful tool to identify species of birds, mammals, and arthropods, but this technique has not yet been examined for identifying species of Ostertagiinae. In this study, a total of 138 mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) sequences from individuals representing 11 species of Ostertagiinae were acquired by PCR for the first time. The specimens were collected from pastoral area of northern China. Genetic divergence analyses showed that mean interspecific Kimura two-parameter distances of COI (13.61 %) were about four times higher than the mean value of the intraspecific divergence (3.69 %). Then, the performance of the COI to identify species of Ostertagiinae was evaluated by identification success rates using nearest neighbor (NN) and BLASTn. The results indicated that the rates of correct sequence identification for COI were high (>80 %) when using the NN and BLASTn methods. Besides, the deep lineage divergences are detected in Teladorsagia circumcincta. Meanwhile, the analyses also detected no genetic differentiation between some species such as Ostertagia hahurica and Ostertagia buriatica. These results indicate that the traditional status of species within Ostertagiinae should be closely examined based on the molecular data. PMID:26584827

  19. Group I introns in small subunit ribosomal DNA of several Phaeosphaeria species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a study of small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) gene sequences in Phaeosphaeria species, group I introns were found in 9 of 10 P. avenaria f.sp. avenaria (Paa) isolates, 1 of 2 Phaeosphaeria sp. (P-rye) isolates from Polish rye (Sn48-1), 1 Phaeosphaeria sp. from dallis grass (P-dg) (S-93-48) an...

  20. Japanese Wolves are Genetically Divided into Two Groups Based on an 8-Nucleotide Insertion/Deletion within the mtDNA Control Region.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Naotaka; Inoshima, Yasuo; Yanai, Tokuma; Sasaki, Motoki; Matsui, Akira; Kikuchi, Hiroki; Maruyama, Masashi; Hongo, Hitomi; Vostretsov, Yuri E; Gasilin, Viatcheslav; Kosintsev, Pavel A; Quanjia, Chen; Chunxue, Wang

    2016-02-01

    The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region (198- to 598-bp) of four ancient Canis specimens (two Canis mandibles, a cranium, and a first phalanx) was examined, and each specimen was genetically identified as Japanese wolf. Two unique nucleotide substitutions, the 78-C insertion and the 482-G deletion, both of which are specific for Japanese wolf, were observed in each sample. Based on the mtDNA sequences analyzed, these four specimens and 10 additional Japanese wolf samples could be classified into two groups- Group A (10 samples) and Group B (4 samples)-which contain or lack an 8-bp insertion/deletion (indel), respectively. Interestingly, three dogs (Akita-b, Kishu 25, and S-husky 102) that each contained Japanese wolf-specific features were also classified into Group A or B based on the 8-bp indel. To determine the origin or ancestor of the Japanese wolf, mtDNA control regions of ancient continental Canis specimens were examined; 84 specimens were from Russia, and 29 were from China. However, none of these 113 specimens contained Japanese wolf-specific sequences. Moreover, none of 426 Japanese modern hunting dogs examined contained these Japanese wolf-specific mtDNA sequences. The mtDNA control region sequences of Groups A and B appeared to be unique to grey wolf and dog populations. PMID:26853868

  1. DNA polymerase gene sequences indicate western and forest tent caterpillar viruses form a new taxonomic group within baculoviruses.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Cydney B; Cooper, Dawn; Short, Steven M; Myers, Judith H; Suttle, Curtis A

    2002-11-01

    Baculoviruses infect larval lepidopterans, and thus have potential value as microbial controls of agricultural and forest pests. Understanding their genetic relatedness and host specificity is relevant to the risk assessment of viral insecticides if non-target impacts are to be avoided. DNA polymerase gene sequences have been demonstrated to be useful for inferring genetic relatedness among dsDNA viruses. We have adopted this approach to examine the relatedness among natural isolates of two uncharacterized caterpillar-infecting baculoviruses, Malacosoma californicum pluviale nucleopolyhedrovirus (McplMNPV) and Malacosoma disstria nucleopolyhedrovirus (MadiMNPV), which infect two closely related host species with little to no cross-infectivity. We designed two degenerate primers (BVP1 and BVP2) based on protein motifs conserved among baculoviruses. McplMNPV and MadiMNPV viral DNA was obtained from naturally infected caterpillars collected from geographically distinct sites in the Southern Gulf Islands and Prince George regions of British Columbia, Canada. Sequencing of 0.9 kb PCR amplicons from six McplMNPV and six MadiMNPV isolates obtained from a total of eight sites, revealed very low nucleotide variation among McplMNPV isolates (99.2-100% nucleotide identity) and among MadiMNPV isolates (98.9-100% nucleotide identity). Greater nucleotide variation was observed between viral isolates from the two different caterpillar species (only 84.7-86.1% nucleotide identity). Both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood phylogenetic analyses support placement of McplMNPV and MadiMNPV in a clade that is distinct from other groups of baculoviruses. PMID:12507483

  2. Detection of Bovine Group A Rotavirus Using Rapid Antigen Detection Kits, RT-PCR and Next-Generation DNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    MINAMI-FUKUDA, Fujiko; NAGAI, Makoto; TAKAI, Hikaru; MURAKAMI, Toshiaki; OZAWA, Tadashi; TSUCHIAKA, Shinobu; OKAZAKI, Sachiko; KATAYAMA, Yukie; OBA, Mami; NISHIURA, Naomi; SASSA, Yukiko; OMATSU, Tsutomu; FURUYA, Tetsuya; KOYAMA, Satoshi; SHIRAI, Junsuke; TSUNEMITSU, Hiroshi; FUJII, Yoshiki; KATAYAMA, Kazuhiko; MIZUTANI, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the sensitivity of human rotavirus rapid antigen detection (RAD) kits, RT-PCR and next-generation DNA sequencing (NGS) for detection of bovine group A rotavirus (RVA). The Dipstick Eiken Rota (Dipstick) showed the highest sensitivity out of the seven RAD kits against all selected strains in limited dilution analyses, which was consistent with the results for equine rotavirus previously reported. RT-PCR had 100103-fold higher sensitivity than the Dipstick. NGS using thirteen RT-PCR-negative fecal samples revealed that all samples yielded RVA reads and especially that two of them covered all 11 genome segments. Moreover, mapping reads to reference sequences allowed genotyping. The NGS would be sensitive and useful for analysis of less dependent on specific primers and screening of genotypes. PMID:23912876

  3. Mitochondrial DNA diversity in two ethnic groups in southeastern Kenya: perspectives from the northeastern periphery of the Bantu expansion.

    PubMed

    Batai, Ken; Babrowski, Kara B; Arroyo, Juan Pablo; Kusimba, Chapurukha M; Williams, Sloan R

    2013-03-01

    The Bantu languages are widely distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Genetic research supports linguists and historians who argue that migration played an important role in the spread of this language family, but the genetic data also indicates a more complex process involving substantial gene flow with resident populations. In order to understand the Bantu expansion process in east Africa, mtDNA hypervariable region I variation in 352 individuals from the Taita and Mijikenda ethnic groups was analyzed, and we evaluated the interactions that took place between the Bantu- and non-Bantu-speaking populations in east Africa. The Taita and Mijikenda are Bantu-speaking agropastoralists from southeastern Kenya, at least some of whose ancestors probably migrated into the area as part of Bantu migrations that began around 3,000 BCE. Our analyses indicate that they show some distinctive differences that reflect their unique cultural histories. The Taita are genetically more diverse than the Mijikenda with larger estimates of genetic diversity. The Taita cluster with other east African groups, having high frequencies of haplogroups from that region, while the Mijikenda have high frequencies of central African haplogroups and cluster more closely with central African Bantu-speaking groups. The non-Bantu speakers who lived in southeastern Kenya before Bantu speaking groups arrived were at least partially incorporated into what are now Bantu-speaking Taita groups. In contrast, gene flow from non-Bantu speakers into the Mijikenda was more limited. These results suggest a more complex demographic history where the nature of Bantu and non-Bantu interactions varied throughout the area. PMID:23382080

  4. Mitochondrial DNA diversity in two ethnic groups in southeastern Kenya: perspectives from the northeastern periphery of the Bantu expansion

    PubMed Central

    Batai, Ken; Babrowski, Kara B.; Arroyo, Juan Pablo; Kusimba, Chapurukha M.; Williams, Sloan R.

    2013-01-01

    The Bantu languages are widely distributed throughout sub-Saharan Africa. Genetic research supports linguists and historians who argue that migration played an important role in the spread of this language family, but the genetic data also indicates a more complex process involving substantial gene flow with resident populations. In order to understand the Bantu expansion process in east Africa, mtDNA hypervariable region I variation in 352 individuals from the Taita and Mijikenda ethnic groups was analyzed, and we evaluated the interactions that took place between the Bantu- and non-Bantu-speaking populations in east Africa. The Taita and Mijikenda are Bantu-speaking agropastoralists from southeastern Kenya, at least some of whose ancestors probably migrated into the area as part of Bantu migrations that began around 3,000 BCE. Our analyses indicate that they show some distinctive differences that reflect their unique cultural histories. The Taita are genetically more diverse than the Mijikenda with larger estimates of genetic diversity. The Taita cluster with other east African groups, having high frequencies of haplogroups from that region, while the Mijikenda have high frequencies of central African haplogroups and cluster more closely with central African Bantu-speaking groups. The non-Bantu speakers who lived in southeastern Kenya before Bantu speaking groups arrived were at least partially incorporated into what are now Bantu-speaking Taita groups. In contrast, gene flow from non-Bantu speakers into the Mijikenda was more limited. These results suggest a more complex demographic history where the nature of Bantu and non-Bantu interactions varied throughout the area. PMID:23382080

  5. MtDNA phylogeny and biogeography of Copelatinae, a highly diverse group of tropical diving beetles (Dytiscidae).

    PubMed

    Balke, Michael; Ribera, Ignacio; Vogler, Alfried P

    2004-09-01

    Copelatinae is a diverse lineage of diving beetles (Dytiscidae) frequently encountered in wet tropical and subtropical forests, but phylogenetic relationships are very poorly understood. We performed a phylogenetic and biogeographic analysis of this worldwide distributed group based on 50 species including a representative sample of major taxonomic groups and biogeographical regions. DNA sequences were obtained for the mitochondrial genes cytochrome oxidase I, cytochrome b, and 16S rRNA, for a total of 1575 aligned nucleotide positions. We found Copelatinae to be monophyletic, placed in a derived position and not sister to all remaining dytiscids, as had been suggested by earlier authors. The largest genus, Copelatus with some 460 known species was paraphyletic with respect to the smaller genera Lacconectus and Aglymbus. Among the major lineages of Copelatus, the subgenus Papuadytes was consistently recovered as sister to all other species (including Lacconectus and Aglymbus) with the possible exception of two western Palearctic taxa. We propose that the subgenus Papuadytes is removed from Copelatus and assigned generic status. Likewise, the two western Palearctic Copelatus are removed from this genus, and assigned the available genus name Liopterus. Our best phylogenetic hypothesis retrieved Afrotropical and New Guinean plus Australian species of Copelatus as monophyletic. Asian species were paraphyletic with respect to a species from Sulawesi which grouped with the species from New Guinea. Asian species were also paraphyletic with respect to Oriental Lacconectus, which was grouped with a clade of Neotropical species. Neotropical Copelatus form at least two separate lineages. The biogeographical evolution of Papuadytes is consistent with the relative age of the landmasses in the Austral region. Basal species are Australian, and successively derived ones are from New Caledonia and New Guinea. One species apparently dispersed from New Caledonia to China. Assuming a molecular clock and using a standard calibration of 2% divergence/MY the origin of Copelatinae is estimated to be between 85 and 95 MY. PMID:15288062

  6. Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinase 1 in dermal fibroblasts from DNA repair-deficient/cancer-prone xeroderma pigmentosum group C patients.

    PubMed

    Frchet, M; Warrick, E; Vioux, C; Chevallier, O; Spatz, A; Benhamou, S; Sarasin, A; Bernerd, F; Magnaldo, T

    2008-09-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a rare, recessively inherited genetic disease characterized by skin cancer proneness and premature aging in photoexposed area. The disease results from defective nucleotide excision repair of ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions. Reconstruction of group C (XP-C) skin in vitro previously suggested that patients' dermal fibroblasts might be involved in promoting skin cancer development, as they elicited microinvasions of both control and XP-C keratinocytes within dermal equivalents. Here we show that in the absence of UV exposure XP-C fibroblasts exhibit aged-like features such as an elongated and dendritic shape. We analysed the repertoire of expression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) involved in skin aging and cancer. All XP-C fibroblasts tested in this study overexpressed specifically and significantly MMP1. MMP1 expression was also found increased in the dermis of XP-C skin sections suggesting the active contribution of XP-C mesenchymal cells to skin aging and exacerbated carcinogenesis. Increased MMP1 expression in cultured XP-C fibroblasts resulted from MMP1 mRNA accumulation and enhanced transcriptional activity of the MMP1 gene promoter. Deletion analysis revealed the essential role of AP-1 activation in constitutive MMP1 overexpression in XP-C primary fibroblasts. In parallel, levels of reactive oxygen species and FOSB DNA-binding activity were found increased in XP-C fibroblasts. Altogether, these observations suggest that beyond its role in nucleotide excision repair the XPC protein may be important in cell metabolism and fate in the absence of UV. PMID:18469853

  7. High mobility group protein-B1 interacts with sterol regulatory element-binding proteins to enhance their DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Najima, Yuho; Yahagi, Naoya; Takeuchi, Yoshinori; Matsuzaka, Takashi; Sekiya, Motohiro; Nakagawa, Yoshimi; Amemiya-Kudo, Michiyo; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Okazaki, Sachiko; Tamura, Yoshiaki; Iizuka, Yoko; Ohashi, Ken; Harada, Kenji; Gotoda, Takanari; Nagai, Ryozo; Kadowaki, Takashi; Ishibashi, Shun; Yamada, Nobuhiro; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Shimano, Hitoshi

    2005-07-29

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that are predominately involved in the regulation of lipogenic and cholesterogenic enzyme gene expression. To identify unknown proteins that interact with SREBP, we screened nuclear extract proteins with 35S-labeled SREBP-1 bait in Far Western blotting analysis. Using this approach, high mobility group protein-B1 (HMGB1), a chromosomal protein, was identified as a novel SREBP interacting protein. In vitro glutathione S-transferase pull-down and in vivo coimmunoprecipitation studies confirmed an interaction between HMGB1 and both SREBP-1 and -2. The protein-protein interaction was mediated through the helix-loop-helix domain of SREBP-1, residues 309-344, and the A box of HMGB1. Furthermore, an electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated that HMGB1 enhances SREBPs binding to their cognate DNA sequences. Moreover, luciferase reporter analyses, including RNA interference technique showed that HMGB1 potentiates the transcriptional activities of SREBP in cultured cells. These findings raise the intriguing possibility that HMGB1 is potentially involved in the regulation of lipogenic and cholesterogenic gene transcription. PMID:16040616

  8. Previously unknown evolutionary groups dominate the ssDNA gokushoviruses in oxic and anoxic waters of a coastal marine environment

    PubMed Central

    Labonté, Jessica M.; Hallam, Steven J.; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic studies have revealed that ssDNA phages from the family Microviridae subfamily Gokushovirinae are widespread in aquatic ecosystems. It is hypothesized that gokushoviruses occupy specialized niches, resulting in differences among genotypes traversing water column gradients. Here, we use degenerate primers that amplify a fragment of the gene encoding the major capsid protein to examine the diversity of gokushoviruses in Saanich Inlet (SI), a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, BC, Canada. Amplicon sequencing of samples from the mixed oxic surface (10 m) and deeper anoxic (200 m) layers indicated a diverse assemblage of gokushoviruses, with greater richness at 10 m than 200 m. A comparison of amplicon sequences with sequences selected on the basis of RFLP patterns from eight surface samples collected over a 1-year period revealed that gokushovirus diversity was higher in spring and summer during stratification and lower in fall and winter after deep-water renewal, consistent with seasonal variability within gokushovirus populations. Our results provide persuasive evidence that, while specific gokushovirus genotypes may have a narrow host range, hosts for gokushoviruses in SI consist of a wide range of bacterial taxa. Indeed, phylogenetic analysis of clustered amplicons revealed at least five new phylogenetic groups of previously unknown sequences, with the most abundant group associated with viruses infecting SUP05, a ubiquitous and abundant member of marine oxygen minimum zones. Relatives of SUP05 dominate the anoxic SI waters where they drive coupled carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur transformations along the redoxline; thus, gokushoviruses are likely important mortality agents of these bacteria with concomittant influences on biogeochemical cycling in marine oxygen minimum zones. PMID:25954254

  9. Divergent DNA-binding specificities of a group of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR transcription factors involved in plant defense.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Mishima, Masaki; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-06-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) recognize target DNA sequences with distinct DNA-binding domains (DBDs). The DBD of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 (AtERF1) uses three consecutive ?-strands to recognize a GCC-containing sequence, but tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) ERF189 and periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) Octadecanoid-derivative Responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein3 (ORCA3) of the same TF subgroup appear to target similar but divergent DNA sequences. Here, we examined how DNA-binding specificities of these TFs have diverged in each plant lineage to regulate distinct defense metabolisms. Extensive mutational analyses of these DBDs suggest that two modes of protein-DNA interactions independently contribute to binding specificity and affinity. Substitution of a conserved arginine to lysine in the first ?-strand of ERF189 relaxes its interaction with the second GC pair of the GCC DNA sequence. By contrast, an increased number of basic amino acids in the first two ?-strands of ORCA3 allows this TF to recognize more than one GCC-related target, presumably via increased electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged phosphate backbone of DNA. Divergent DNA-binding specificities of the ERFs may have arisen through mutational changes of these amino acid residues. PMID:23629834

  10. DNA repair in human xeroderma pigmentosum group C cells involves a different distribution of damaged sites in confluent and growing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cleaver, J E

    1986-01-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum is a human disease consisting of several complementation groups that are deficient in excision repair. Group C is one in which excision repair occurs at about 20-30% of normal levels. The distribution of mended sites in relation to unrepaired sites has been determined by cutting remaining unrepaired pyrimidine dimers with Microccocus luteus UV endonuclease. The mended sites have been found clustered together in a fashion that depended on cell proliferation. In confluent group C cells, the mended sites were clustered in regions where dimer excision was as efficient as excision in the DNA of normal cells. In proliferating group C cells, however, mended sites were randomly dispersed. The total amount of repair replication was the same in confluent and proliferating cells. Since previous work has shown that confluent group C cells show more extensive recovery from the lethal effects of UV irradiation than some other groups, clustered repair may correlate with a more efficient mechanism of restoring cell viability. The different distribution of repaired sites during DNA replication may be the result of changes in the state of the substrate for repair or changes in the metabolic priorities of DNA polymerases. PMID:3774554

  11. Spectroscopic study on the interaction of ct-DNA with manganese Salen complex containing triphenyl phosphonium groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehkordi, Maryam Nejat; Bordbar, Abdol-Khalegh; Lincoln, Per; Mirkhani, Valiollah

    2012-05-01

    The DNA binding properties of a bulky and hydrophobic Schiff base complex of manganese(III) [N,N'-bis(5-(triphenyl phosphonium methyl)salicylidene)-1,2-ethylene diamine chloride Mn(III) acetate] was examined by spectroscopic techniques. UV-vis titration data indicate both hypo and hyperchromic effect with addition of DNA to complex. A competitive binding study showed that the enhanced emission intensity of ethidium bromide (EB) in the presence of DNA was quenched by adding Mn Salen complex. This finding indicates that Mn Salen complex displaces EB from its binding site in DNA. Helix melting studies indicate improvement in the helix stability, and an increase in the melting temperature. The analysis of CD spectra represents the structural changes in DNA due to the binding of Mn Salen complex. The binding constant has been calculated using absorbance and fluorescence data. The results also represent that the binding process proceeds by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

  12. Phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain of nonhistone high-mobility group I protein by cdc2 kinase: reduction of binding affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, R; Langan, T A; Nissen, M S

    1991-01-01

    Mammalian high-mobility group I nonhistone protein (HMG-I) is a DNA-binding chromatin protein that has been demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo to be localized to the A + T-rich sequences of DNA. Recently an unusual binding domain peptide, "the A.T-hook" motif, that mediates specific interaction of HMG-I with the minor groove of DNA in vitro has been described. Inspection of the A.T-hook region of the binding domain showed that it matches the consensus sequence for phosphorylation by cdc2 kinase. Here we demonstrate that HMG-I is a substrate for phosphorylation by purified mammalian cdc2 kinase in vitro. The site of phosphorylation by this enzyme is a threonine residue at the amino-terminal end of the principal binding-domain region of the protein. Labeling of mitotically blocked mouse cells with [32P]phosphate demonstrates that this same threonine residue in HMG-I is also preferentially phosphorylated in vivo. Competition binding studies show that cdc2 phosphorylation of a synthetic binding-domain peptide significantly weakens its interaction with A + T-rich DNA in vitro, and a similar weakening of DNA binding has been observed for intact murine HMG-I protein phosphorylated by the kinase in vitro. These findings indicate that cdc2 phosphorylation may significantly alter the DNA-binding properties of the HMG-I proteins. Because many cdc2 substrates are DNA-binding proteins, these results further suggest that alteration of the DNA-binding affinity of a variety of proteins is an important general component of the mechanism by which cdc2 kinase regulates cell cycle progression. Images PMID:2000376

  13. Conjugative plasmids of enteric bacteria from many different incompatibility groups have similar genes for single-stranded DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Golub, E I; Low, K B

    1985-01-01

    Among 30 conjugative plasmids of enteric bacteria from 23 incompatibility (Inc) groups, we found 19 (from 12 Inc groups) which can complement defects caused by a defective single-stranded DNA-binding protein of Escherichia coli K-12. The genes which are responsible for the complementation from three of these plasmids (Inc groups I1, Y, and 9) were cloned. These genes showed extensive homology with each other and with the E. coli F factor ssb gene (formerly denoted ssf), which codes for a single-stranded DNA binding protein. The proteins coded for by the cloned genes bound tightly to single-stranded DNA. Six other ssb- -complementing plasmids were tested for homology to the F factor ssb gene, and all of these showed homology, as did one of the ssb- -noncomplementing plasmids. Plasmids from a total of 13 different Inc groups of enteric bacteria were found to be likely to have genes with some homology to the ssb gene of the F factor. For plasmids from several different Inc groups, we found no evidence for strong homology with ssb of the F factor. Images PMID:3884590

  14. UVs syndrome, a new general category of photosensitive disorder with defective DNA repair, is distinct from xeroderma pigmentosum variant and rodent complementation group I.

    PubMed Central

    Itoh, T; Fujiwara, Y; Ono, T; Yamaizumi, M

    1995-01-01

    Previously, we reported two DNA repair-defective siblings who did not belong to any complementation group of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) or Cockayne syndrome (CS). By surveying other photosensitive patients whose fibroblasts showed similar biochemical phenotypes, we found another nonconsanguineous Japanese patient belonging to the same complementation group as our previous cases. Postreplication repair of the cells derived from these patients was normal, indicating that they cannot be classified as XP variant. Neither transfection nor microinjection of the cells with the human DNA repair gene ERCC1, which is known not to correct any complementation groups of XP or CS, failed to correct the defect of these cells, indicating that they do not belong to the rodent complementation group 1. However, the defect in recovery of RNA synthesis (RRS) after UV irradiation was restored by microinjection of HeLa cell extract. Although clinical manifestations of these patients--such as acute sunburn, dryness, freckling, pigmentation anomalies on sun-exposed skin, and teleangiectasia without neurological abnormalities or tumors--are similar to a mild XP phenotype, cellular characteristics such as UV sensitivity and defective RRS after UV irradiation with normal unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) are reminiscent of CS. On the basis of these results, we propose that these patients be included under a general category designated "UV-sensitive" (UVs) syndrome. Images Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:7539208

  15. Polyphyletic origin of the genus Physarum (Physarales, Myxomycetes) revealed by nuclear rDNA mini-chromosome analysis and group I intron synapomorphy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Physarales represents the largest taxonomic order among the plasmodial slime molds (myxomycetes). Physarales is of particular interest since the two best-studied myxomycete species, Physarum polycephalum and Didymium iridis, belong to this order and are currently subjected to whole genome and transcriptome analyses. Here we report molecular phylogeny based on ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sequences that includes 57 Physarales isolates. Results The Physarales nuclear rDNA sequences were found to be loaded with 222 autocatalytic group I introns, which may complicate correct alignments and subsequent phylogenetic tree constructions. Phylogenetic analysis of rDNA sequences depleted of introns confirmed monophyly of the Physarales families Didymiaceae and Physaraceae. Whereas good correlation was noted between phylogeny and taxonomy among the Didymiaceae isolates, significant deviations were seen in Physaraceae. The largest genus, Physarum, was found to be polyphyletic consisting of at least three well supported clades. A synapomorphy, located at the highly conserved G-binding site of L2449 group I intron ribozymes further supported the Physarum clades. Conclusions Our results provide molecular relationship of Physarales genera, species, and isolates. This information is important in further interpretations of comparative genomics nd transcriptomics. In addition, the result supports a polyphyletic origin of the genus Physarum and calls for a reevaluation of current taxonomy. PMID:22938158

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA recombination and repair functions of the RAD52 epistasis group inhibit Ty1 transposition.

    PubMed Central

    Rattray, A J; Shafer, B K; Garfinkel, D J

    2000-01-01

    RNA transcribed from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae retrotransposon Ty1 accumulates to a high level in mitotically growing haploid cells, yet transposition occurs at very low frequencies. The product of reverse transcription is a linear double-stranded DNA molecule that reenters the genome by either Ty1-integrase-mediated insertion or homologous recombination with one of the preexisting genomic Ty1 (or delta) elements. Here we examine the role of the cellular homologous recombination functions on Ty1 transposition. We find that transposition is elevated in cells mutated for genes in the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway, such as RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, or RAD57, or in the DNA ligase I gene CDC9, but is not elevated in cells mutated in the DNA repair functions encoded by the RAD1, RAD2, or MSH2 genes. The increase in Ty1 transposition observed when genes in the RAD52 recombinational pathway are mutated is not associated with a significant increase in Ty1 RNA or proteins. However, unincorporated Ty1 cDNA levels are markedly elevated. These results suggest that members of the RAD52 recombinational repair pathway inhibit Ty1 post-translationally by influencing the fate of Ty1 cDNA. PMID:10655210

  17. Synthesis of deoxynucleoside triphosphates that include proline, urea, or sulfonamide groups and their polymerase incorporation into DNA.

    PubMed

    Hollenstein, Marcel

    2012-10-15

    To expand the chemical array available for DNA sequences in the context of in vitro selection, I present herein the synthesis of five nucleoside triphosphate analogues containing side chains capable of organocatalysis. The synthesis involved the coupling of L-proline-containing residues (dU(tP)TP and dU(cP)TP), a dipeptide (dU(FP)TP), a urea derivative (dU(Bpu)TP), and a sulfamide residue (dU(Bs)TP) to a suitably protected common intermediate, followed by triphosphorylation. These modified dNTPs were shown to be excellent substrates for the Vent (exo(-)) and Pwo DNA polymerases, as well as the Klenow fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I, although they were only acceptable substrates for the 9N(m) polymerase. All of the modified dNTPs, with the exception of dU(Bpu)TP, were readily incorporated into DNA by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Modified oligonucleotides efficiently served as templates for PCR for the regeneration of unmodified DNA. Thermal denaturation experiments showed that these modifications are tolerated in the major groove. Overall, these heavily modified dNTPs are excellent candidates for SELEX. PMID:22996052

  18. Synthesis of S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine Analogs with Extended Transferable Groups for Methyltransferase-Directed Labeling of DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Masevi?ius, Viktoras; Nainyt?, Milda; Klimaauskas, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet) is a ubiquitous methyl donor for a variety of biological methylation reactions catalyzed by methyltransferases (MTases). AdoMet analogs with extended propargylic chains replacing the sulfonium-bound methyl group can serve as surrogate cofactors for many DNA and RNA MTases enabling covalent deposition of these linear chains to their cognate targets sites in DNA or RNA. Here we describe synthetic procedures for the preparation of two representative examples of AdoMet analogs with a transferable hex-2-ynyl group carrying a terminal azide or amine functionality. Our approach is based on direct chemoselective alkylation of S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine at sulfur with corresponding nosylates under acidic conditions. We also describe synthetic routes to 6-substituted hex-2-yn-1-ols and their conversion to the corresponding nosylates. Using these protocols, synthetic AdoMet analogs can be prepared within 1 to 2 weeks. 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26967468

  19. Identification of a group of cryptic marine limpet species, Cellana karachiensis (Mollusca: Patellogastropoda) off Veraval coast, India, using mtDNA COI sequencing.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sneha; Poriya, Paresh; Vakani, Bhavik; Singh, S P; Kundu, Rahul

    2016-03-01

    Present communication reports the phylogenetic relationship between three groups of a marine limpet having different color banding patterns using COI sequencing. Samples were sequenced for mtDNA COI gene using universal primer. Comparative BLAST revealed that all three types were around 99.59% identical with Cellana karachiensis, first record of this species from Indian coasts. Apart from the morphological variations, the mtDNA COI gene analysis revealed around 1% nucleotide variations between these three types. The observed dissimilarity in COI sequences was possibly too little to consider these types as three different species. The derivation of amino acid positions indicated that these types could possibly be a complex of three cryptic species of C. karachiensis. The study proposes that the Oman and Indian populations of C. karachiensis might have derived by allopatric speciation due to geographical isolation. The group of these three cryptic species, sharing same habitat between themselves, possibly showed sympatric speciation. PMID:25109628

  20. [Genetic diversity and relatives of the goitered gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa) groups from Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Azerbaijan: analysis of the D-loop of mitochondrial DNA].

    PubMed

    Sorokin, P A; Soldatova, N V; Lukarevski?, V S; Kholodova, M V

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphism of the nucleotide sequence of a hypervariable fragment of the D-loop (985 bp) of mtDNA in 76 Goitered gazelles of subspecies Gazella subgutturosa subgutturosa from Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, and Azerbaijan was studied. The genetic similarity of gazelles from Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan has been identified. The population of gazelles from Shirvanskaya steppe reserve (Azerbaijan) is unique and strictly isolated from other groups studied. A high haplotypic (H = 0.9649 +/- 0.0091) and relatively low nucleotide diversity (pi = 0.0212 +/- 0.0105) were noted for all investigated groups of gazelle based on this mtDNA fragment, which is probably related to ecological peculiarities of the species and the history of formation of regional populations. PMID:22292288

  1. [Genomic fingerprints of organisms from different taxonomic groups: the use of phage M13 DNA as a hybridization probe].

    PubMed

    Ryskov, A P; Dzhincharadze, A G; Prosnik, M I; Ivanov, P L; Limborskaia, S A

    1988-02-01

    Hypervariable polymorphic patterns were detected using wild-type M13 DNA as a probe in genomic DNAs of very different organisms ranging from procaryotes and lower eucaryotes to upper plants and animals, including human beings. Due to somatic stability of highly polymorphic patterns and their discrete inheritance, individual-specific restriction pattern analysis ("DNA fingerprinting") with this test probe was found to be useful in applied human genetics, in particular, for identifying paternity and maternity, and mapping of human genomes. The data obtained also demonstrate some possibilities of the DNA fingerprinting technology in genetics and selection of agricultural plants and animals, such as variety analysis, classification and registration of individual inbred lines and strains, as well as identification of bacterial strains. PMID:3282990

  2. Efficient Condensation of DNA into Environmentally Responsive Polyplexes Produced from Block Catiomers Carrying Amine or Diamine Groups.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Lindomar J C; Annes, Kelly; Milazzotto, Marcella P; Mattei, Bruno; Riske, Karin A; Jäger, Eliézer; Pánek, Jiří; Štěpánek, Petr; Kapusta, Peter; Muraro, Paulo I R; De Freitas, Augusto G O; Schmidt, Vanessa; Giacomelli, Cristiano; Bonvent, Jean-Jacques; Giacomelli, Fernando C

    2016-01-19

    The intracellular delivery of nucleic acids requires a vector system as they cannot diffuse across lipid membranes. Although polymeric transfecting agents have been extensively investigated, none of the proposed gene delivery vehicles fulfill all of the requirements needed for an effective therapy, namely, the ability to bind and compact DNA into polyplexes, stability in the serum environment, endosome-disrupting capacity, efficient intracellular DNA release, and low toxicity. The challenges are mainly attributed to conflicting properties such as stability vs efficient DNA release and toxicity vs efficient endosome-disrupting capacity. Accordingly, investigations aimed at safe and efficient therapies are still essential to achieving gene therapy clinical success. Taking into account the mentioned issues, herein we have evaluated the DNA condensation ability of poly(ethylene oxide)113-b-poly[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate]50 (PEO113-b-PDPA50), poly(ethylene oxide)113-b-poly[2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]50 (PEO113-b-PDEA50), poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate]70-b-poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate10-co-2-(diethylamino)ethyl methacrylate47-co-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl methacrylate47] (POEGMA70-b-P(OEGMA10-co-DEA47-co-DPA47), and poly[oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate]70-b-poly{oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate10-co-2-methylacrylic acid 2-[(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl)methylamino]ethyl ester44} (POEGMA70-b-P(OEGMA10-co-DAMA44). Block copolymers PEO113-b-PDEA50 and POEGMA70-b-P(OEGMA10-co-DEA47-co-DPA47) were evidenced to properly condense DNA into particles with a desirable size for cellular uptake via endocytic pathways (RH ≈ 65-85 nm). The structure of the polyplexes was characterized in detail by scattering techniques and atomic force microscopy. The isothermal titration calorimetric data revealed that the polymer/DNA binding is endothermic; therefore, the process in entropically driven. The combination of results supports that POEGMA70-b-P(OEGMA10-co-DEA47-co-DPA47) condenses DNA more efficiently and with higher thermodynamic outputs than does PEO113-b-PDEA50. Finally, circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the conformation of DNA remained the same after complexation and that the polyplexes are very stable in the serum environment. PMID:26677726

  3. Structure-function relationships in human testis-determining factor SRY: an aromatic buttress underlies the specific DNA-bending surface of a high mobility group (HMG) box.

    PubMed

    Racca, Joseph D; Chen, Yen-Shan; Maloy, James D; Wickramasinghe, Nalinda; Phillips, Nelson B; Weiss, Michael A

    2014-11-21

    Human testis determination is initiated by SRY, a Y-encoded architectural transcription factor. Mutations in SRY cause 46 XY gonadal dysgenesis with female somatic phenotype (Swyer syndrome) and confer a high risk of malignancy (gonadoblastoma). Such mutations cluster in the SRY high mobility group (HMG) box, a conserved motif of specific DNA binding and bending. To explore structure-function relationships, we constructed all possible substitutions at a site of clinical mutation (W70L). Our studies thus focused on a core aromatic residue (position 15 of the consensus HMG box) that is invariant among SRY-related HMG box transcription factors (the SOX family) and conserved as aromatic (Phe or Tyr) among other sequence-specific boxes. In a yeast one-hybrid system sensitive to specific SRY-DNA binding, the variant domains exhibited reduced (Phe and Tyr) or absent activity (the remaining 17 substitutions). Representative nonpolar variants with partial or absent activity (Tyr, Phe, Leu, and Ala in order of decreasing side-chain volume) were chosen for study in vitro and in mammalian cell culture. The clinical mutation (Leu) was found to markedly impair multiple biochemical and cellular activities as respectively probed through the following: (i) in vitro assays of specific DNA binding and protein stability, and (ii) cell culture-based assays of proteosomal degradation, nuclear import, enhancer DNA occupancy, and SRY-dependent transcriptional activation. Surprisingly, however, DNA bending is robust to this or the related Ala substitution that profoundly impairs box stability. Together, our findings demonstrate that the folding, trafficking, and gene-regulatory function of SRY requires an invariant aromatic "buttress" beneath its specific DNA-bending surface. PMID:25258310

  4. European Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroups and Metabolic Changes during Antiretroviral Therapy in AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5142

    PubMed Central

    Hulgan, Todd; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon A.; Tebas, Pablo; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; McComsey, Grace A.; Haas, David W.; Canter, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) influences metabolic diseases and perhaps antiretroviral therapy (ART) complications. We explored associations between European mtDNA haplogroups and metabolic changes among A5142 participants. Methods 757 ART-naïve subjects were randomized to one of three class-sparing ART regimens including efavirenz and/or lopinavir/ritonavir with or without nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). Non-randomized NRTIs included stavudine, tenofovir, or zidovudine, each with lamivudine. Fasting lipid profiles and whole-body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) were performed. Nine European mtDNA haplogroups were determined for 231 self-identified non-Hispanic white subjects. Metabolic changes from baseline to 96 weeks were analyzed by haplogroup. Results Median age was 39 years, 9% were female, and 37%, 32%, and 30% were randomized to NRTI-containing regimens with either efavirenz or lopinavir/ritonavir, and an NRTI-sparing regimen respectively. Among NRTI-containing regimens, 51% included zidovudine, 28% tenofovir, and 21% stavudine. Compared with other haplogroups, mtDNA haplogroup I (N=10) had higher baseline non-HDL cholesterol (160 mg/dL [interquartile range 137–171] vs. 120 mg/dL [104–136]; p=0.005), a decrease in non-HDL cholesterol over 96 weeks (−14% [−20-+6] vs. +25% [+8-+51]; p<0.001), tended to have more baseline extremity fat, and had more extremity fat loss by DEXA (−13% [−31-+12] vs. +9% [−13-+26]; p=0.08) and lipoatrophy (50% vs. 20%; p=0.04). Haplogroup W (N=5; all randomized to NRTI-sparing regimens) had the greatest increase in extremity fat (+35.5% [+26.8 - +54.9]; P=0.02). Conclusions Lipids and extremity fat were associated with European mtDNA haplogroups in this HIV-infected population. These preliminary results suggest that mitochondrial genomics may influence metabolic parameters before and during ART. PMID:20871389

  5. A novel regulation mechanism of DNA repair by damage-induced and RAD23-dependent stabilization of xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jessica M.Y.; Vermeulen, Wim; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T.J.; Bergink, Steven; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Vrieling, Harry; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Primary DNA damage sensing in mammalian global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) is performed by the xeroderma pigmentosum group C (XPC)/HR23B protein complex. HR23B and HR23A are human homologs of the yeast ubiquitin-domain repair factor RAD23, the function of which is unknown. Knockout mice revealed that mHR23A and mHR23B have a fully redundant role in NER, and a partially redundant function in embryonic development. Inactivation of both genes causes embryonic lethality, but appeared still compatible with cellular viability. Analysis of mHR23A/B double-mutant cells showed that HR23 proteins function in NER by governing XPC stability via partial protection against proteasomal degradation. Interestingly, NER-type DNA damage further stabilizes XPC and thereby enhances repair. These findings resolve the primary function of RAD23 in repair and reveal a novel DNA-damage-dependent regulation mechanism of DNA repair in eukaryotes, which may be part of a more global damage-response circuitry. PMID:12815074

  6. Both the folate cycle and betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase contribute methyl groups for DNA methylation in mouse blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baohua; Denomme, Michelle M; White, Carlee R; Leung, Kit-Yi; Lee, Martin B; Greene, Nicholas D E; Mann, Mellissa R W; Trasler, Jacquetta M; Baltz, Jay M

    2015-03-01

    The embryonic pattern of global DNA methylation is first established in the inner cell mass (ICM) of the mouse blastocyst. The methyl donor S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) is produced in most cells through the folate cycle, but only a few cell types generate SAM from betaine (N,N,N-trimethylglycine) via betaine-homocysteine methyltransferase (BHMT), which is expressed in the mouse ICM. Here, mean ICM cell numbers decreased from 18-19 in controls to 11-13 when the folate cycle was inhibited by the antifolate methotrexate and to 12-14 when BHMT expression was knocked down by antisense morpholinos. Inhibiting both pathways, however, much more severely affected ICM development (7-8 cells). Total SAM levels in mouse blastocysts decreased significantly only when both pathways were inhibited (from 3.1 to 1.6 pmol/100 blastocysts). DNA methylation, detected as 5-methylcytosine (5-MeC) immunofluorescence in isolated ICMs, was minimally affected by inhibition of either pathway alone but decreased by at least 45-55% when both BHMT and the folate cycle were inhibited simultaneously. Effects on cell numbers and 5-MeC levels in the ICM were completely rescued by methionine (immediate SAM precursor) or SAM. Both the folate cycle and betaine/BHMT appear to contribute to a methyl pool required for normal ICM development and establishing initial embryonic DNA methylation. PMID:25466894

  7. Evidence for chromosome and Pst I satellite DNA family evolutionary stasis in the Bufo viridis group (Amphibia, Anura).

    PubMed

    Odierna, Gaetano; Aprea, Gennaro; Capriglione, Teresa; Castellano, Sergio; Balletto, Emilio

    2004-01-01

    The West Palearctic green toads, Bufo viridis , represent a species complex. Apart from tetraploid populations, which form at least one separate species, evidence exists for relevant differentiation among diploid populations. We present the results of a chromosomal (C-, Ag-NOR-, Replication pattern, DAPI and CMA3 banding) and molecular study (isolation and characterization of a satellite DNA family) carried out on a number of Central Asian, European and North African populations. For comparative purposes, our molecular analysis was also extended to specimens of three additional Bufo species (B. bufo, B. mauritanicus and B. cf. regularis ), as well as two rare African bufonids (Werneria mertensis and Wolterstoffina sp.). Our results demonstrate a remarkable karyological and molecular evolutionary stasis in the Bufo viridis complex. In fact, all chromatinic markers showed the same pattern and/or composition in all specimens, independently of their origin and ploidy levels. Even the NOR loci were invariably two and located on the telomeric regions of two chromosomes of the sixth pair, or quartet. Furthermore, very similar patterns of genomic hybridization of a monomeric unit of the Pst I satellite DNA family (named pBv) were observed in all diploid and tetraploid populations, as well as in B. bufo and B. mauritanicus . Finally, pBv hybridizes with monomeric units of Pst I satellite DNA in all species studied, including Werneria and Wolterstorffina, which are thought to have separated from Bufo as early as in the Mesozoic. PMID:15505402

  8. DNA barcoding of Rhodiola (crassulaceae): a case study on a group of recently diversified medicinal plants from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Meng, Shi-Yong; Wen, Jun; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding, the identification of species using one or a few short standardized DNA sequences, is an important complement to traditional taxonomy. However, there are particular challenges for barcoding plants, especially for species with complex evolutionary histories. We herein evaluated the utility of five candidate sequences - rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA, trnL-F and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) - for barcoding Rhodiola species, a group of high-altitude plants frequently used as adaptogens, hemostatics and tonics in traditional Tibetan medicine. Rhodiola was suggested to have diversified rapidly recently. The genus is thus a good model for testing DNA barcoding strategies for recently diversified medicinal plants. This study analyzed 189 accessions, representing 47 of the 55 recognized Rhodiola species in the Flora of China treatment. Based on intraspecific and interspecific divergence and degree of monophyly statistics, ITS was the best single-locus barcode, resolving 66% of the Rhodiola species. The core combination rbcL+matK resolved only 40.4% of them. Unsurprisingly, the combined use of all five loci provided the highest discrimination power, resolving 80.9% of the species. However, this is weaker than the discrimination power generally reported in barcoding studies of other plant taxa. The observed complications may be due to the recent diversification, incomplete lineage sorting and reticulate evolution of the genus. These processes are common features of numerous plant groups in the high-altitude regions of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. PMID:25774915

  9. DNA Barcoding of Rhodiola (Crassulaceae): A Case Study on a Group of Recently Diversified Medicinal Plants from the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian-Qiang; Meng, Shi-Yong; Wen, Jun; Rao, Guang-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding, the identification of species using one or a few short standardized DNA sequences, is an important complement to traditional taxonomy. However, there are particular challenges for barcoding plants, especially for species with complex evolutionary histories. We herein evaluated the utility of five candidate sequences rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA, trnL-F and the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) for barcoding Rhodiola species, a group of high-altitude plants frequently used as adaptogens, hemostatics and tonics in traditional Tibetan medicine. Rhodiola was suggested to have diversified rapidly recently. The genus is thus a good model for testing DNA barcoding strategies for recently diversified medicinal plants. This study analyzed 189 accessions, representing 47 of the 55 recognized Rhodiola species in the Flora of China treatment. Based on intraspecific and interspecific divergence and degree of monophyly statistics, ITS was the best single-locus barcode, resolving 66% of the Rhodiola species. The core combination rbcL+matK resolved only 40.4% of them. Unsurprisingly, the combined use of all five loci provided the highest discrimination power, resolving 80.9% of the species. However, this is weaker than the discrimination power generally reported in barcoding studies of other plant taxa. The observed complications may be due to the recent diversification, incomplete lineage sorting and reticulate evolution of the genus. These processes are common features of numerous plant groups in the high-altitude regions of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. PMID:25774915

  10. Thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase fusion proteins and their use in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing.

    PubMed

    Mohr, Sabine; Ghanem, Eman; Smith, Whitney; Sheeter, Dennis; Qin, Yidan; King, Olga; Polioudakis, Damon; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Swamy, Sajani; Kuersten, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M

    2013-07-01

    Mobile group II introns encode reverse transcriptases (RTs) that function in intron mobility ("retrohoming") by a process that requires reverse transcription of a highly structured, 2-2.5-kb intron RNA with high processivity and fidelity. Although the latter properties are potentially useful for applications in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), group II intron RTs have been difficult to purify free of the intron RNA, and their utility as research tools has not been investigated systematically. Here, we developed general methods for the high-level expression and purification of group II intron-encoded RTs as fusion proteins with a rigidly linked, noncleavable solubility tag, and we applied them to group II intron RTs from bacterial thermophiles. We thus obtained thermostable group II intron RT fusion proteins that have higher processivity, fidelity, and thermostability than retroviral RTs, synthesize cDNAs at temperatures up to 81C, and have significant advantages for qRT-PCR, capillary electrophoresis for RNA-structure mapping, and next-generation RNA sequencing. Further, we find that group II intron RTs differ from the retroviral enzymes in template switching with minimal base-pairing to the 3' ends of new RNA templates, making it possible to efficiently and seamlessly link adaptors containing PCR-primer binding sites to cDNA ends without an RNA ligase step. This novel template-switching activity enables facile and less biased cloning of nonpolyadenylated RNAs, such as miRNAs or protein-bound RNA fragments. Our findings demonstrate novel biochemical activities and inherent advantages of group II intron RTs for research, biotechnological, and diagnostic methods, with potentially wide applications. PMID:23697550

  11. Thermostable group II intron reverse transcriptase fusion proteins and their use in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, Sabine; Ghanem, Eman; Smith, Whitney; Sheeter, Dennis; Qin, Yidan; King, Olga; Polioudakis, Damon; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Hunicke-Smith, Scott; Swamy, Sajani; Kuersten, Scott; Lambowitz, Alan M.

    2013-01-01

    Mobile group II introns encode reverse transcriptases (RTs) that function in intron mobility (retrohoming) by a process that requires reverse transcription of a highly structured, 22.5-kb intron RNA with high processivity and fidelity. Although the latter properties are potentially useful for applications in cDNA synthesis and next-generation RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), group II intron RTs have been difficult to purify free of the intron RNA, and their utility as research tools has not been investigated systematically. Here, we developed general methods for the high-level expression and purification of group II intron-encoded RTs as fusion proteins with a rigidly linked, noncleavable solubility tag, and we applied them to group II intron RTs from bacterial thermophiles. We thus obtained thermostable group II intron RT fusion proteins that have higher processivity, fidelity, and thermostability than retroviral RTs, synthesize cDNAs at temperatures up to 81C, and have significant advantages for qRT-PCR, capillary electrophoresis for RNA-structure mapping, and next-generation RNA sequencing. Further, we find that group II intron RTs differ from the retroviral enzymes in template switching with minimal base-pairing to the 3? ends of new RNA templates, making it possible to efficiently and seamlessly link adaptors containing PCR-primer binding sites to cDNA ends without an RNA ligase step. This novel template-switching activity enables facile and less biased cloning of nonpolyadenylated RNAs, such as miRNAs or protein-bound RNA fragments. Our findings demonstrate novel biochemical activities and inherent advantages of group II intron RTs for research, biotechnological, and diagnostic methods, with potentially wide applications. PMID:23697550

  12. RAD25 (SSL2), the yeast homolog of the human xeroderma pigmentosum group B DNA repair gene, is essential for viability

    SciTech Connect

    Park, E.; Prakash, L. ); Guzder, S.N.; Prakash, S. ); Koken, M.H.M.; Jaspers-Dekker, I.; Weeda, G.; Hoeijmakers, H.J. )

    1992-12-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) patients are extremely sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) light and suffer from a high incidence of skin cancers, due to a defect in nucleotide excision repair. The disease is genetically heterogeneous, and seven complementation groups, A-G, have been identified. Homologs of human excision repair genes ERCC1, XPDC/ERCC2, and XPAC have been identified in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Since no homolog of human XPBC/ERCC3 existed among the known yeast genes, we cloned the yeast homolog by using XPBC cDNA as a hybridization probe. The yeast homolog, RAD25 (SSL2), encodes a protein of 843 amino acids (M[sub r] 95,356). The RAD25 (SSL2)- and XPCX-encoded proteins share 55% identical and 72% conserved amino acid residues, and the two proteins resemble one another in containing the conserved DNA helicase sequence motifs. A nonsense mutation at codon 799 that deletes the 45 C-terminal amino acid residues in RAD25 (SSL2) confers UV sensitivity. This mutation shows epistasis with genes in the excision repair group, whereas a synergistic increase in UN sensitivity occurs when it is combined with mutations in genes in other DNA repair pathways, indicating that RAD25 (SSL2) functions in excision repair but not in other repair pathways. We also show that RAD25 (SSL2) is an essential gene. A mutation of the Lys[sup 392] residue to arginine in the conserved Walker type A nucleotide-binding motif is lethal, suggesting an essential role of the putative RAD 25 (SSL2) ATPase/DNA helicase activity in viability. 40 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Allelic frequency distributions of 21 non-combined DNA index system STR loci in a Russian ethnic minority group from Inner Mongolia, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-dan; Shen, Chun-mei; Liu, Wen-juan; Zhang, Yu-dang; Yang, Guang; Yan, Jiang-wei; Qin, Hai-xia; Zhu, Bo-feng

    2013-06-01

    We studied the allelic frequency distributions and statistical forensic parameters of 21 new short tandem repeat (STR) loci and the amelogenin locus, which are not included in the combined DNA index system (CODIS), in a Russian ethnic minority group from the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, China. A total of 114 bloodstain samples from unrelated individuals were extracted and co-amplified with four fluorescence-labeled primers in a multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) system. Using capillary electrophoresis, the PCR products of the 21 STR loci were separated and genotyped. A total of 161 alleles were observed in the Russian ethnic minority group, and corresponding allelic frequencies ranged from 0.0044 to 0.5965. The 21 non-CODIS STR loci of the Russian ethnic minority group were characterized by high genetic diversity and therefore may be useful for elucidating the population's genetic background, for individual identification, and for paternity testing in forensic practice. PMID:23733431

  14. Ampelomyces mycoparasites from apple powdery mildew identified as a distinct group based on single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis of the rDNA ITS region.

    PubMed

    Szentiványi, Orsolya; Kiss, Levente; Russell, John C; Kovács, Gábor M; Varga, Krisztina; Jankovics, Tünde; Lesemann, Silke; Xu, Xiang-Ming; Jeffries, Peter

    2005-04-01

    Pycnidial fungi belonging to the genus Ampelomyces are the most common natural antagonists of powdery mildews worldwide. During a study of the interactions between apple powdery mildew (Podosphaera leucotricha) and Ampelomyces mycoparasites, 52 new Ampelomyces isolates were obtained from P. leucotricha and, in addition, 13 new isolates from other species of the Erysiphaceae in four European countries. Their genetic diversity was screened using single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). For comparison, 24 isolates obtained from genetic resource collections or other sources were included in this study. Based on the ITS-SSCP patterns, the isolates were placed in eight groups. The isolates belonged to two types based on their growth in culture. The faster-growing and the slower-growing isolates were included in different SSCP groups. A phylogenetic analysis of the ITS sequences of representatives of these groups confirmed the results obtained with the SSCP method, and showed that the faster-growing isolates do not belong to Ampelomyces as suggested by earlier studies. All the isolates from P. leucotricha fell into a distinct SSCP group of genetically homogeneous isolates. This suggests that Ampelomyces mycoparasites which occur in apple powdery mildew are slightly different from the other Ampelomyces groups which contain mycoparasites from various powdery mildew species. This may be because the main growth period of Ampelomyces mycoparasites in apple powdery mildew is isolated in time from that of Ampelomyces isolates that occur in other species of the Erysiphaceae. P. leucotricha starts its life-cycle early in the season, usually in March-April, while most powdery mildews are active in the same environments only late in the year. PMID:15912930

  15. Adjusting the DNA Interaction and Anticancer Activity of Pt(II) N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes by Steric Shielding of the Trans Leaving Group.

    PubMed

    Muenzner, Julienne K; Rehm, Tobias; Biersack, Bernhard; Casini, Angela; de Graaf, Inge A M; Worawutputtapong, Pawida; Noor, Awal; Kempe, Rhett; Brabec, Viktor; Kasparkova, Jana; Schobert, Rainer

    2015-08-13

    Five platinum(II) complexes bearing a (1,3-dibenzyl)imidazol-2-ylidene ligand but different leaving groups trans to it were examined for cytotoxicity, DNA and cell cycle interference, vascular disrupting properties, and nephrotoxicity. The cytotoxicity of complexes 3a-c increased with the steric shielding of their leaving chloride ligand, and complex 3c, featuring two triphenylphosphanes, was the most efficacious, with submicromolar IC50 concentrations. Complexes 3a-c interacted with DNA in electrophoretic mobility shift and ethidium bromide binding assays. The cationic complex 3c did not bind coordinatively to DNA but led to its aggregation, damage that is not amenable to the usual repair mechanisms. Accordingly, it arrested the cell cycle of melanoma cells in G1 phase, whereas cis-dichlorido[(1,3-dibenzyl)imidazol-2-ylidene](dimethyl sulfoxide) platinum(II) 3a induced G2/M phase arrest. Complex 3c also disrupted the blood vessels in the chorioallantoic membrane of fertilized chicken eggs. Ex vivo studies using precision-cut tissue slices suggested the nephrotoxicities of 3a-c to be clinically manageable. PMID:26182125

  16. HPV E6/E7 mRNA versus HPV DNA biomarker in cervical cancer screening of a group of Macedonian women.

    PubMed

    Duvlis, Sotirija; Popovska-Jankovic, Katerina; Arsova, Zorica Sarafinovska; Memeti, Shaban; Popeska, Zaneta; Plaseska-Karanfilska, Dijana

    2015-09-01

    High risk types of human papillomaviruses E6/E7 oncogenes and their association with tumor suppressor genes products are the key factors of cervical carcinogenesis. This study proposed them as specific markers for cervical dysplasia screening. The aim of the study is to compare the clinical and prognostic significance of HPV E6/E7 mRNA as an early biomarker versus HPV DNA detection and cytology in triage of woman for cervical cancer. The study group consists of 413 women: 258 NILM, 26 ASC-US, 81 LSIL, 41 HSIL, and 7 unsatisfactory cytology. HPV4AACE screening, real-time multiplex PCR and MY09/11 consensus PCR primers methods were used for the HPV DNA detection. The real-time multiplex nucleic acid sequence-based assay (NucliSENS EasyQ HPV assay) was used for HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection of the five most common high risk HPV types in cervical cancer (16, 18, 31, 33, and 45). The results show that HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing had a higher specificity 50% (95% CI 32-67) and positive predictive value (PPV) 62% (95% CI 46-76) for CIN2+ compared to HPV DNA testing that had specificity of 18% (95% CI 7-37) and PPV 52% (95% CI 39-76) respectively. The higher specificity and PPV of HPV E6/E7 mRNA testing are valuable in predicting insignificant HPV DNA infection among cases with borderline cytological finding. It can help in avoiding aggressive procedures (biopsies and over-referral of transient HPV infections) as well as lowering patient's anxiety and follow up period. PMID:25880030

  17. Repair of damaged DNA by extracts from a xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A revertant and expression of a protein absent in its parental cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C J; Cleaver, J E; Wood, R D

    1992-01-01

    Cells derived from individuals with mutations in the xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group A gene (XP-A gene) are hypersensitive to UV light and have a severe defect in nucleotide excision repair of damaged DNA. UV-resistant revertant cell lines can arise from XP-A cells in culture. Cells of one such revertant, XP129, were previously shown to remove (6-4) photoproducts from irradiated DNA, but to have poor repair of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. To analyze the biochemical nature of the reversion, whole cell extracts were prepared from the SV40-immortalized fibroblast cell lines XP12RO (an XP-A cell line), the revertant XP129 (derived from XP12RO), and 1BR.3N (from a normal individual). The ability of extracts to carry out repair synthesis in UV-irradiated DNA was examined, and immunoblots were performed using antiserum that recognizes XP-A protein. XP12RO extracts exhibited a very low level of repair and no detectable XP-A protein, but repair activity could be conferred by adding purified XP-A protein to the reaction mixture. XP129 extracts have essentially normal repair synthesis consistent with the observation that most repair of UV-irradiated DNA by extracts appears to occur at (6-4) photoproducts. An XP-A polypeptide of normal size was present in XP129, but in reduced amounts. The results indicate that in XP129 a mutational event has converted the inactive XP12RO XP-A gene into a form which expresses an active XP-A protein. Images PMID:1549511

  18. Ancient DNA from Hunter-Gatherer and Farmer Groups from Northern Spain Supports a Random Dispersion Model for the Neolithic Expansion into Europe

    PubMed Central

    Hervella, Montserrat; Izagirre, Neskuts; Alonso, Santos; Fregel, Rosa; Alonso, Antonio; Cabrera, Vicente M.; de la Ra, Concepcin

    2012-01-01

    Background/Principal Findings The phenomenon of Neolithisation refers to the transition of prehistoric populations from a hunter-gatherer to an agro-pastoralist lifestyle. Traditionally, the spread of an agro-pastoralist economy into Europe has been framed within a dichotomy based either on an acculturation phenomenon or on a demic diffusion. However, the nature and speed of this transition is a matter of continuing scientific debate in archaeology, anthropology, and human population genetics. In the present study, we have analyzed the mitochondrial DNA diversity in hunter-gatherers and first farmers from Northern Spain, in relation to the debate surrounding the phenomenon of Neolithisation in Europe. Methodology/Significance Analysis of mitochondrial DNA was carried out on 54 individuals from Upper Paleolithic and Early Neolithic, which were recovered from nine archaeological sites from Northern Spain (Basque Country, Navarre and Cantabria). In addition, to take all necessary precautions to avoid contamination, different authentication criteria were applied in this study, including: DNA quantification, cloning, duplication (51% of the samples) and replication of the results (43% of the samples) by two independent laboratories. Statistical and multivariate analyses of the mitochondrial variability suggest that the genetic influence of Neolithisation did not spread uniformly throughout Europe, producing heterogeneous genetic consequences in different geographical regions, rejecting the traditional models that explain the Neolithisation in Europe. Conclusion The differences detected in the mitochondrial DNA lineages of Neolithic groups studied so far (including these ones of this study) suggest different genetic impact of Neolithic in Central Europe, Mediterranean Europe and the Cantabrian fringe. The genetic data obtained in this study provide support for a random dispersion model for Neolithic farmers. This random dispersion had a different impact on the various geographic regions, and thus contradicts the more simplistic total acculturation and replacement models proposed so far to explain Neolithisation. PMID:22563371

  19. Analysis of the distribution and evolution of the ATP-dependent DNA ligases of bacteria delineates a distinct phylogenetic group 'Lig E'.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Hjerde, Erik; Kahlke, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Prior to the discovery of a minimal ATP-dependent DNA ligase in Haemophilus influenzae, bacteria were thought to only possess a NAD-dependent ligase, which was involved in sealing of Okazaki fragments. We now know that a diverse range of bacterial species possess up to six of these accessory bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligases (b-ADLs), which vary in size and enzymatic domain associations. Here we compare the domain structure of different types of b-ADLs and investigate their distribution among the bacterial domain to describe possible evolutionary trajectories that gave rise to the sequence and structural diversity of these enzymes. Previous biochemical and genetic analyses have delineated three main classes of these enzymes: Lig B, Lig C and Lig D, which appear to have descended from a common ancestor within the bacterial domain. In the present study, we delineate a fourth group of b-ADLs, Lig E, which possesses a number of unique features at the primary and tertiary structural levels. The biochemical characteristics, domain structure and inferred extracellular location sets this group apart from the other b-ADLs. The results presented here indicate that the Lig E type ligases were horizontally transferred into bacteria in a separate event from other b-ADLs possibly from a bacteriophage. PMID:26412580

  20. MtDNA Haplogroup A10 Lineages in Bronze Age Samples Suggest That Ancient Autochthonous Human Groups Contributed to the Specificity of the Indigenous West Siberian Population

    PubMed Central

    Pilipenko, Aleksandr S.; Trapezov, Rostislav O.; Zhuravlev, Anton A.; Molodin, Vyacheslav I.; Romaschenko, Aida G.

    2015-01-01

    Background The craniometric specificity of the indigenous West Siberian human populations cannot be completely explained by the genetic interactions of the western and eastern Eurasian groups recorded in the archaeology of the area from the beginning of the 2nd millennium BC. Anthropologists have proposed another probable explanation: contribution to the genetic structure of West Siberian indigenous populations by ancient human groups, which separated from western and eastern Eurasian populations before the final formation of their phenotypic and genetic features and evolved independently in the region over a long period of time. This hypothesis remains untested. From the genetic point of view, it could be confirmed by the presence in the gene pool of indigenous populations of autochthonous components that evolved in the region over long time periods. The detection of such components, particularly in the mtDNA gene pool, is crucial for further clarification of early regional genetic history. Results and Conclusion We present the results of analysis of mtDNA samples (n = 10) belonging to the A10 haplogroup, from Bronze Age populations of West Siberian forest-steppe (VI millennium BC), that were identified in a screening study of a large diachronic sample (n = 96). A10 lineages, which are very rare in modern Eurasian populations, were found in all the Bronze Age groups under study. Data on the A10 lineages phylogeny and phylogeography in ancient West Siberian and modern Eurasian populations suggest that A10 haplogroup underwent a long-term evolution in West Siberia or arose there autochthonously; thus, the presence of A10 lineages indicates the possible contribution of early autochthonous human groups to the genetic specificity of modern populations, in addition to contributions of later interactions of western and eastern Eurasian populations. PMID:25950581

  1. DNA fingerprinting and anastomosis grouping reveal similar genetic diversity in Rhizoctonia species infecting turfgrasses in the transition zone of USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rhizoctonia blight (sensu lato) is a common and serious disease of many turfgrass species. The most widespread causal agent, R. solani, consists of several genetically different subpopulations. Though hyphal anastomosis reactions have been used to group Rhizoctonia species, they are time consuming a...

  2. Phosphate-group of DNA as a potential target for RSU-1069, a nitroimidazole-aziridine radiosensitizer

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, A.R.; O'Neill, P.; Jenkins, T.C.; McNeil, S.S.

    1986-07-01

    Strand breakage of plasmid DNA by parent and radiation-reduced RSU-1069 (2.0-8.0 mmol dm-3) has been measured in air over 4 hr at 310K. Reduced RSU-1069 was shown to be approximately 4 times as efficient as the parent compound at causing strand breakage. The aziridine moiety of both parent and reduced RSU-1069 is required for strand break production and, furthermore, is capable of alkylating inorganic phosphate (k = 1.0 X 10(-3) dm3 mol-1 s-1) and a series of nucleotides (k = 0.8 - 2.1 X 10(-3) dm3 mol-1 s-1) at pH 7.0. From the determined rate constants and the nature of the adducts observed, it was shown that phosphate is a target on nucleotides, although additional sites probably exist particularly, on dGMP and dAMP. The mechanism of action of RSU-1069 is discussed in terms of its ability to act as a cytotoxic agent, radiosensitizer and bioreductive drug.

  3. Phylogenetic analysis of LSU and SSU rDNA group I introns of lichen photobionts associated with the genera Xanthoria and Xanthomendoza (Teloschistaceae, lichenized Ascomycetes).

    PubMed

    Nyati, Shyam; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Werth, Silke; Honegger, Rosmarie

    2013-12-01

    We studied group I introns in sterile cultures of selected groups of lichen photobionts, focusing on Trebouxia species associated with Xanthoria s. lat. (including Xanthomendoza spp.; lichen-forming ascomycetes). Group I introns were found inserted after position 798 (Escherichia coli numbering) in the large subunit (LSU) rRNA in representatives of the green algal genera Trebouxia and Asterochloris. The 798 intron was found in about 25% of Xanthoria photobionts including several reference strains obtained from algal culture collections. An alignment of LSU-encoded rDNA intron sequences revealed high similarity of these sequences allowing their phylogenetic analysis. The 798 group I intron phylogeny was largely congruent with a phylogeny of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS), indicating that the insertion of the intron most likely occurred in the common ancestor of the genera Trebouxia and Asterochloris. The intron was vertically inherited in some taxa, but lost in others. The high sequence similarity of this intron to one found in Chlorella angustoellipsoidea suggests that the 798 intron was either present in the common ancestor of Trebouxiophyceae, or that its present distribution results from more recent horizontal transfers, followed by vertical inheritance and loss. Analysis of another group I intron shared by these photobionts at small subunit (SSU) position 1512 supports the hypothesis of repeated lateral transfers of this intron among some taxa, but loss among others. Our data confirm that the history of group I introns is characterized by repeated horizontal transfers, and suggests that some of these introns have ancient origins within Chlorophyta. PMID:24415800

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of LSU and SSU rDNA group I introns of lichen photobionts associated with the genera Xanthoria and Xanthomendoza (Teloschistaceae, lichenized Ascomycetes)

    PubMed Central

    Nyati, Shyam; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Werth, Silke; Honegger, Rosmarie

    2013-01-01

    We studied group I introns in sterile cultures of selected groups of lichen photobionts, focusing on Trebouxia species associated with Xanthoria s. lat. (including Xanthomendoza spp.; lichen-forming ascomycetes). Group I introns were found inserted after position 798 (Escherichia coli numbering) in the large subunit (LSU) rRNA in representatives of the green algal genera Trebouxia and Asterochloris. The 798 intron was found in about 25% of Xanthoria photobionts including several reference strains obtained from algal culture collections. An alignment of LSU-encoded rDNA intron sequences revealed high similarity of these sequences allowing their phylogenetic analysis. The 798 group I intron phylogeny was largely congruent with a phylogeny of the Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS), indicating that the insertion of the intron most likely occurred in the common ancestor of the genera Trebouxia and Asterochloris. The intron was vertically inherited in some taxa, but lost in others. The high sequence similarity of this intron to one found in Chlorella angustoellipsoidea suggests that the 798 intron was either present in the common ancestor of Trebouxiophyceae, or that its present distribution results from more recent horizontal transfers, followed by vertical inheritance and loss. Analysis of another group I intron shared by these photobionts at small subunit (SSU) position 1512 supports the hypothesis of repeated lateral transfers of this intron among some taxa, but loss among others. Our data confirm that the history of group I introns is characterized by repeated horizontal transfers, and suggests that some of these introns have ancient origins within Chlorophyta. PMID:24415800

  5. High-Mobility Group 1/2 Proteins Are Essential for Initiating Rolling-Circle-Type DNA Replication at a Parvovirus Hairpin Origin

    PubMed Central

    Cotmore, Susan F.; Tattersall, Peter

    1998-01-01

    Rolling-circle replication is initiated by a replicon-encoded endonuclease which introduces a single-strand nick into specific origin sequences, becoming covalently attached to the 5? end of the DNA at the nick and providing a 3? hydroxyl to prime unidirectional, leading-strand synthesis. Parvoviruses, such as minute virus of mice (MVM), have adapted this mechanism to amplify their linear single-stranded genomes by using hairpin telomeres which sequentially unfold and refold to shuttle the replication fork back and forth along the genome, creating a continuous, multimeric DNA strand. The viral initiator protein, NS1, then excises individual genomes from this continuum by nicking and reinitiating synthesis at specific origins present within the hairpin sequences. Using in vitro assays to study ATP-dependent initiation within the right-hand (5?) MVM hairpin, we have characterized a HeLa cell factor which is absolutely required to allow NS1 to nick this origin. Unlike parvovirus initiation factor (PIF), the cellular complex which activates NS1 endonuclease activity at the left-hand (3?) viral origin, the host factor which activates the right-hand hairpin elutes from phosphocellulose in high salt, has a molecular mass of around 25 kDa, and appears to bind preferentially to structured DNA, suggesting that it might be a member of the high-mobility group 1/2 (HMG1/2) protein family. This prediction was confirmed by showing that purified calf thymus HMG1 and recombinant human HMG1 or murine HMG2 could each substitute for the HeLa factor, activating the NS1 endonuclease in an origin-specific nicking reaction. PMID:9765384

  6. Molecular phylogeny of the subgenus Ceratotropis (genus Vigna, Leguminosae) reveals three eco-geographical groups and Late PliocenePleistocene diversification: evidence from four plastid DNA region sequences

    PubMed Central

    Javadi, Firouzeh; Tun, Ye Tun; Kawase, Makoto; Guan, Kaiyun; Yamaguchi, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims The subgenus Ceratotropis in the genus Vigna is widely distributed from the Himalayan highlands to South, Southeast and East Asia. However, the interspecific and geographical relationships of its members are poorly understood. This study investigates the phylogeny and biogeography of the subgenus Ceratotropis using chloroplast DNA sequence data. Methods Sequence data from four intergenic spacer regions (petA-psbJ, psbD-trnT, trnT-trnE and trnT-trnL) of chloroplast DNA, alone and in combination, were analysed using Bayesian and parsimony methods. Divergence times for major clades were estimated with penalized likelihood. Character evolution was examined by means of parsimony optimization and MacClade. Key Results Parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic analyses on the combined data demonstrated well-resolved species relationships in which 18 Vigna species were divided into two major geographical clades: the East AsiaSoutheast Asian clade and the Indian subcontinent clade. Within these two clades, three well-supported eco-geographical groups, temperate and subtropical (the East AsiaSoutheast Asian clade) and tropical (the Indian subcontinent clade), are recognized. The temperate group consists of V. minima, V. nepalensis and V. angularis. The subtropical group comprises the V. nakashimaeV. riukiuensisV. minima subgroup and the V. hirtellaV. exilisV. umbellata subgroup. The tropical group contains two subgroups: the V. trinerviaV. reflexo-pilosaV. trilobata subgroup and the V. mungoV. grandiflora subgroup. An evolutionary rate analysis estimated the divergence time between the East AsiaSoutheast Asia clade and the Indian subcontinent clade as 362 03 million years, and that between the temperate and subtropical groups as 20 02 million years. Conclusions The findings provide an improved understanding of the interspecific relationships, and ecological and geographical phylogenetic structure of the subgenus Ceratotropis. The quaternary diversification of the subgenus Ceratotropis implicates its geographical dispersal in the south-eastern part of Asia involving adaptation to climatic condition after the collision of the Indian subcontinent with the Asian plate. The phylogenetic results indicate that the epigeal germination is plesiomorphic, and the germination type evolved independently multiple times in this subgenus, implying its limited taxonomic utility. PMID:21725064

  7. Synthesis and structure of a new tetracopper(II) complex bridged both by oxamido and phenolato groups: Cytotoxic activity, and reactivity towards DNA and BSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiao-Wen; Li, Xue-Jie; Zhan, Shu-Hui; Li, Yan-Tuan; Wu, Zhi-Yong; Yan, Cui-Wei

    2013-05-01

    A new tetracopper(II) complex bridged both by oxamido and phenolato groups, namely [Cu4(chmpoxd)2(dabt)2](ClO4)2, where H3chmpoxd and dabt stand for N-(5-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-N'-[3-(methylamino)propyl]oxamide and 2,2'-diamino-4,4'-bithiazole, respectively, has been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, molar conductance measurements, IR and electronic spectra studies, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The crystal structure reveals a centrosymmetric circular tetranuclear cation [Cu4(chmpoxd)2(dabt)2]2+ assembled by a pair of cis-oxamido-bridged bicopper(II) units via ?2-phenolato bridges, in which one copper(II) atom is located in a slightly distorted square-planar environment, while the other is in a square-pyramidal geometry. The Cu⋯Cu separations through the oxamido and the phenolato bridges are 5.2217(12) and 3.7042(11) , respectively. In vitro cytotoxicity experiment shows that the tetracopper(II) complex exhibits cytotoxic activity against the SMMC7721 and A549 cell lines. The reactivities towards HS-DNA and protein BSA revealed that the tetracopper(II) complex can interact with HS-DNA in the mode of intercalation, and the complex binds to BSA responsible for quenching of tryptophan fluorescence by static quenching mechanism.

  8. Antigenic analysis of group I house dust mite allergens using random fragments of Der p I expressed by recombinant DNA libraries.

    PubMed

    Greene, W K; Chua, K Y; Stewart, G A; Thomas, W R

    1990-01-01

    Antigenic regions of a major house dust mite allergen, Der p I, were identified by a recombinant DNA strategy employing the technique of random fragmentation. Fragments of cDNA coding for Der p I were produced by sonication and used to construct lambda gt 11 expression libraries. Analyses of recombinant fragments reactive with a rabbit anti-Der p I antiserum showed that the B cell determinants expressed in Escherichia coli were limited, with the majority (86%) of antigenic clones isolated mapping to the region comprising amino acid sequence position 60-80. To define antigenic regions of Der p I more precisely, selected overlapping fragments were subcloned into the expression vector pGEX-1. Dot blot immunoassay and immunoabsorption studies using individual fusion proteins revealed five regions - 34-47, 60-72, 82-99, 112-140, and 166-194 - to contain B cell determinants responsible for the antigenicity of recombinant Der p I. Absorption of the antiserum with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus extract removed reactivity to all fragments, whereas absorption with an extract from the related mite Dermatophagoides farinae removed reactivity to peptides containing residues 34-47, 60-72, and 166-194, but not 82-99 and 112-140. Similarly, rabbit anti-D.farinae reacted strongly with peptides containing residues 34-47, 60-72, and 166-194, but not residues 82-99 and 112-140 which again showed antigenic differences in these residues between the group I allergens. PMID:2246073

  9. Phylogenetic classification of serotype III group B streptococci on the basis of hylB gene analysis and DNA sequences specific to restriction digest pattern type III-3.

    PubMed

    Bohnsack, J F; Takahashi, S; Detrick, S R; Pelinka, L R; Hammitt, L L; Aly, A A; Whiting, A A; Adderson, E E

    2001-06-01

    Previous work divided serotype III group B streptococci (GBS) into 3 major phylogenetic lineages (III-1, III-2, and III-3) on the basis of bacterial DNA restriction digest patterns (RDPs). Most neonatal invasive disease was caused by III-3 strains, which implies that III-3 strains are more virulent than III-2 or III-1 strains. In the current studies, all RDP III-3 and III-1 strains expressed hyaluronate lysase activity; however, all III-2 strains lack hyaluronate lysase activity, because the gene that encodes hyaluronate lysase, hylB, is inactivated by IS1548. Subtractive hybridization was used to identify 9 short DNA sequences that are present in all the III-3 strains but not in any of the III-2 or III-1 strains. With 1 exception, these III-3-specific sequences were not detected in nonserotype III GBS. These data further validate the RDP-based subclassification of GBS and suggest that lineage-specific genes will be identified, which account for the differences in virulence among the lineages. PMID:11343222

  10. Structural studies on two high-mobility-group proteins from calf thymus, HMG-14 and HMG-20 (ubiquitin), and their interaction with DNA.

    PubMed

    Cary, P D; King, D S; Crane-Robinson, C; Bradbury, E M; Rabbani, A; Goodwin, G H; Johns, E W

    1980-12-01

    High mobility group (HMG) protein 14, which, like HMG-17, has been implicated in the structure of 'active chromatin' is shown by 270-MHz NMR and by circular dichroism to be in a disordered conformation in free solution. At low ionic strength protein HMG-14 binds to DNA by weak attachment of the N-terminal half of the molecule and is released by 0.3 M NaCl, the ionic strength at which the protein is extracted from chromatin. The protein HMG-20 (ubiquitin), a constituent of the conjugate protein A 24, is shown to be a highly stable compact globular protein that remains folded over a pH range of 1--13 and has a half-denaturation temperature of 85 degrees C when thermally denatured. Circular dichroism indicates 28% helix and 12% beta sheet. Despite having 15% basic residues it binds only very weakly to DNA. A detailed study of the folding of ubiquitin has been made by a combination of several NMR approaches, including decoupling, nuclear Overhauser enhancement and titration. Several line assignments have been made and it is shown that, although the tyrosine and histidine are buried residues, they are not adjacent to one another nor are they close to either of the phenylalanines, of which at least one is also a buried residue. PMID:6257511

  11. Review of the Eulamprotes wilkella species-group based on morphology and DNA barcodes, with descriptions of new taxa (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae).

    PubMed

    Huemer, Peter; Elsner, Gustav; Karsholt, Ole

    2013-01-01

    The Eulamprotes wilkella species-group is revised based on morphological characters and on DNA barcodes of the mtCOI (Cytochrome c Oxidase 1) gene. Adult morphology combined with sequence information for 9 species supports the existence of 12 species, 7 of which are described as new to science: E. mirusella Huemer & Karsholt sp. nov. (France), E. baldizzonei Karsholt & Huemer sp. nov. (Italy, Slovenia, Croatia), E. atrifrontella Karsholt & Huemer sp. nov. (Turkey), E. wieseri Huemer & Karsholt sp. nov. (Kyrgizia), E. altaicella Huemer & Karsholt sp. nov. (Russia: Altai, Buryatia, Tuva Republic), E. kailai Karsholt & Huemer sp. nov. (Kazakhstan, Kyrgizia, Russia: Buryatia, Tuva Republic) and E. gemerensis Elsner sp. nov. (Slovakia). E. buvati Leraut, 1991 syn. nov. is synonymized with E. ochricapilla (Rebel, 1903). PMID:25113469

  12. Functional constraints and evolutionary dynamics of the repeats in the rDNA internal transcribed spacer 2 of members of the Anopheles barbirostris group

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Anopheles barbirostris group is widely distributed in Southeast Asia. Although seven species have been formally described, a molecular analysis of the rDNA ITS2 and the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I gene suggests that the group includes species that are morphologically very similar or identical. We have previously shown that species in the Anopheles barbirostris Subgroup have an exceptionally large ITS2 (>1.5kb), greater than in any other Anopheline group. However, the molecular processes responsible for generating such a large ITS2 have not previously been explored. Methods To determine the processes by which this large ITS2 is generated, we examined the sequence and secondary structure of the ITS2 of 51 specimens from five species of the Anopheles barbirostris Subgroup. These include the anthropophilic species An. campestris and three morphospecies of the Barbirostris Complex: An. vanderwulpi, An. barbirostris I and III, together with a previously undescribed member of this group (Clade IV). Results and conclusions All the specimens were found to have an ITS2 greater than 1.5kb in length. The possibility that the spacer sequences amplified were pseudogenes was examined and discarded. The large size of ITS2 in the species studied is due to the presence of internal repeats of approximately 110bp in length, confined to the central region of the spacer. Repeats varied markedly between the species examined, with respect to their organization, number and sequence similarity. The nucleotide diversity increased in direct relation to size variation and the presence of non-repeated elements. A secondary structure analysis showed that the repeats form hairpin structures with a wide range of free energy values. These hairpin structures are known to facilitate the subsequent processing of mature rRNA. An analysis of the repeats from the different species suggests they originate from a common ancestor, with the repeats appearing before speciation of the Barbirostris Group. PMID:24646478

  13. Design, synthesis, and DNA binding characteristics of a group of orthogonally positioned diamino, N-formamido, pyrrole- and imidazole-containing polyamides.

    PubMed

    Chavda, Sameer; Babu, Balaji; Patil, Pravin; Plaunt, Adam; Ferguson, Amanda; Lee, Megan; Tzou, Samuel; Sjoholm, Robert; Rice, Toni; Mackay, Hilary; Ramos, Joseph; Wang, Shuo; Lin, Shicai; Kiakos, Konstantinos; Wilson, W David; Hartley, John A; Lee, Moses

    2013-07-01

    Orthogonally positioned diamino/dicationic polyamides (PAs) have good water solubility and enhanced binding affinity, whilst retaining DNA minor groove and sequence specificity compared to their monoamino/monocationic counterparts. The synthesis and DNA binding properties of the following diamino PAs: f-IPI (3a), f-IPP (4), f-PIP (5), and f-PPP (6) are described. P denotes the site where a 1-propylamino group is attached to the N1-position of the heterocycle. Binding of the diamino PAs to DNA was assessed by DNase I footprinting, thermal denaturation, circular dichroism titration, biosensor surface plasmon resonance (SPR), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) studies. According to SPR studies, f-IPI (3a) bound more strongly (K(eq)=2.4×10(8) M(-1)) and with comparable sequence selectivity to its cognate sequence 5'-ACGCGT-3' when compared to its monoamino analog f-IPI (1). The binding of f-IPI (3a) to 5'-ACGCGT-3' via the stacked dimer motif was balanced between enthalpy and entropy, and that was quite different from the enthalpy-driven binding of its monoamino parent f-IPI (1). f-IPP (4) also bound more strongly to its cognate sequence 5'-ATGCAT-3' (K(eq)=7.4×10(6) M(-1)) via the side-by-side stacked motif than its monoamino analog f-IPP (2a). Although f-PPP (6) bound via a 1:1 motif, it bound strongly to its cognate sequence 5'-AAATTT-3' (K(eq)=4.8×10(7) M(-1)), 15-times higher than the binding of its monoamino analog f-PPP (2c), albeit f-PPP bound via the stacked motif. Finally, f-PIP (5) bound to its target sequence 5'-ATCGAT-3' as a stacked dimer and it has the lowest affinity among the diamino PAs tested (Keq <1×10(5) M(-1)). This was about two times lower in affinity than the binding of its monoamino analog f-PIP (2b). The results further demonstrated that the 'core rules' of DNA recognition by monoamino PAs also apply to their diamino analogs. Specifically, PAs that contain a stacked IP core structure bind most strongly (highest binding constants) to their cognate GC doublet, followed by the binding of PAs with a stacked PP structure to two degenerate AT base pairs, and finally the binding of PAs with a PI core to their cognate CG doublet. PMID:23647824

  14. Characterization of polybacterial clinical samples using a set of group-specific broad-range primers targeting the 16S rRNA gene followed by DNA sequencing and RipSeq analysis.

    PubMed

    Kommedal, Oyvind; Lekang, Katrine; Langeland, Nina; Wiker, Harald G

    2011-07-01

    The standard use of a single universal broad-range PCR in direct 16S rDNA sequencing from polybacterial samples leaves the minor constituents at risk of remaining undetected because all bacterial DNA will be competing for the same reagents. In this article we introduce a set of three broad-range group-specific 16S rDNA PCRs that together cover the clinically relevant bacteria and apply them in the investigation of 25 polybacterial clinical samples. Mixed DNA chromatograms from samples containing more than one species per primer group were analysed using RipSeq Mixed (iSentio, Norway), a web-based application for the interpretation of chromatograms containing up to three different species. The group-specific PCRs reduced complexity in the resulting DNA chromatograms and made the assay more sensitive in situations with unequal species concentrations. Together this allowed for identification of a significantly higher number of bacterial species than did standard direct sequencing with a single universal primer pair and RipSeq analysis (95 vs 51). The method could improve microbiological diagnostics for important groups of patients and can be established in any laboratory with experience in direct 16S rDNA sequencing. PMID:21436365

  15. A study of genetic polymorphisms in mitochondrial DNA hypervariable regions I and II of the five major ethnic groups and Vedda population in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Ruwandi; Tennekoon, Kamani H; Karunanayake, Eric H; Lembring, Maria; Allen, Marie

    2015-11-01

    Diversity of the hypervariable regions (HV) I and II of the mitochondrial genome was studied in maternally unrelated Sri Lankans (N=202) from six ethnic groups (i.e.: Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamil, Muslim, Malay, Indian Tamil and Vedda). DNA was extracted from blood and buccal swabs and HVI and HVII regions were PCR amplified and sequenced. Resulting sequences were aligned and edited between 16024-16365 and 73-340 regions and compared with revised Cambridge reference sequences (rCRS). One hundred and thirty-five unique haplotypes and 22 shared haplotypes were observed. A total of 145 polymorphic sites and 158 polymorphisms were observed. Hypervariable region I showed a higher polymorphic variation than hypervariable region II. Nucleotide diversities were quite low and similar for all ethnicities apart from a slightly higher value for Indian Tamils and a much lower value for the Vedda population compared to the other groups. When the total population was considered South Asian (Indian) haplogroups were predominant, but there were differences in the distribution of phylo-geographical haplogroups between ethnic groups. Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamil and Vedda populations had a considerable presence of West Eurasian haplogroups. About 2/3rd of the Vedda population comprised of macro-haplogroup N or its subclades R and U, whereas macro-haplogroup M was predominant in all other populations. The Vedda population clustered separately from other groups and Sri Lankan Tamils showed a closer genetic affiliation to Sinhalese than to Indian Tamils. Thus this study provides useful information for forensic analysis and anthropological studies of Sri Lankans. PMID:26065620

  16. SOXE transcription factors form selective dimers on non-compact DNA motifs through multifaceted interactions between dimerization and high-mobility group domains

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yong-Heng; Jankowski, Aleksander; Cheah, Kathryn S. E.; Prabhakar, Shyam; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The SOXE transcription factors SOX8, SOX9 and SOX10 are master regulators of mammalian development directing sex determination, gliogenesis, pancreas specification and neural crest development. We identified a set of palindromic SOX binding sites specifically enriched in regulatory regions of melanoma cells. SOXE proteins homodimerize on these sequences with high cooperativity. In contrast to other transcription factor dimers, which are typically rigidly spaced, SOXE group proteins can bind cooperatively at a wide range of dimer spacings. Using truncated forms of SOXE proteins, we show that a single dimerization (DIM) domain, that precedes the DNA binding high mobility group (HMG) domain, is sufficient for dimer formation, suggesting that DIM : HMG rather than DIM:DIM interactions mediate the dimerization. All SOXE members can also heterodimerize in this fashion, whereas SOXE heterodimers with SOX2, SOX4, SOX6 and SOX18 are not supported. We propose a structural model where SOXE-specific intramolecular DIM:HMG interactions are allosterically communicated to the HMG of juxtaposed molecules. Collectively, SOXE factors evolved a unique mode to combinatorially regulate their target genes that relies on a multifaceted interplay between the HMG and DIM domains. This property potentially extends further the diversity of target genes and cell-specific functions that are regulated by SOXE proteins. PMID:26013289

  17. DNA content analysis of colorectal cancer defines a distinct microsatellite and chromosome stable group but does not predict response to radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fadhil, Wakkas; Kindle, Karin; Jackson, Darryl; Zaitoun, Abed; Lane, Nina; Robins, Adrian; Ilyas, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancers (CRC) are thought to have genetic instability in the form of either microsatellite instability (MSI) or chromosomal instability (CIN). Recently, tumours have been described without either MSI or CIN, that is, microsatellite and chromosome stable (MACS) CRCs. We investigated the (i) frequency of the MACS-CRCs and (ii) whether this genotype predicted responsiveness to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. To examine the frequency of MACS-CRCs, DNA content (ploidy) was examined in 89 sporadic microsatellite-stable CRCs using flow cytometry. The tumours were also screened for mutations in KRAS/BRAF/TP53/PIK3CA by QMC-PCR. To examine the value of tumour ploidy in predicting response to chemoradiotherapy, DNA content was tested in a separate group of 62 rectal cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy. Fifty-one of 89 CRCs (57%) were aneuploid and 38 (43%) were diploid. There was no significant association between mutations in TP53/KRAS/BRAF/PIK3CA and ploidy. Testing of association between mutations revealed only mutual exclusivity of KRAS/BRAF mutation (P?

  18. Molecular cloning, sequence, and expression of a human GDP-L-fucose:. beta. -D-galactoside 2-. alpha. -L-fucosyltransferase cDNA that can form the H blood group antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, R.D.; Ernst, L.K.; Nair, R.P.; Lowe, J.B. )

    1990-09-01

    The authors have previously used a gene-transfer scheme to isolate a human genomic DNA fragment that determines expression of a GDP-L-fucose:{beta}D-galactoside 2-{alpha}-L-fucosyltransferase. Although this fragment determined expression of an {alpha}(1,2)FT whose kinetic properties mirror those of the human H blood group {alpha}(1,2)FT, their precise nature remained undefined. They describe here the molecular cloning, sequence, and expression of a human of cDNA corresponding to these human genomic sequences. When expressed in COS-1 cells, the cDNA directs expression of cell surface H structures and a cognate {alpha}(1,2)FT activity with properties analogous to the human H blood group {alpha}(1,2)FT. The cDNA sequence predicts a 365-amino acid polypeptide characteristic of a type II transmembrane glycoprotein with a domain structure analogous to that of other glycosyltransferases but without significant primary sequence similarity to these or other known proteins. To directly demonstrate that the cDNA encodes an {alpha}(1,2)FT, the COOH-terminal domain predicted to be Golgi-resident was expressed in COS-1 cells as a catalytically active, secreted, and soluble protein A fusion peptide. Southern blot analysis showed that this cDNA identified DNA sequences syntenic to the human H locus on chromosome 19. These results strongly suggest that this cloned {alpha}(1,2)FT cDNA represents the product of the human H blood group locus.

  19. A novel trimeric Zn (II) complex based on 8-hydroxyquinoline with trifluoromethylbenzene group: Synthesis, crystal structure, photophysical properties and DNA binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yanping; Wang, Chunquan; Lu, Jiguo; Hu, Sheng; Li, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Li

    2015-10-01

    A novel 2-substituted-8-hydroxyquinoline ligand (E)-2-[2-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)ethenyl]-8-hydroxyquinoline (3, HL) was synthesized and characterized by ESI-MS, NMR spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Using solvothermal method, a trimeric complex [Zn3L6] (4) was fabricated by self-assembly of Zn(II) ions with 3. X-ray structural analysis shows that 4 exhibits a trinuclear core, which was bridged and encapsulated by six 8-hydroxyquinolinate-based ligands. The supramolecular structure of 4 features a lamellar solid constructed by aromatic stacking interactions and nonclassical C-H···F hydrogen bonds derived from 4-trifluoromethylphenyl group of the 3. The coordination behavior of zinc salt and 3 in solution was performed by 1H NMR, UV-vis and Photoluminescence (PL). The experimental results show that the complex 4 emits yellow luminescence in the solid state. To investigate its properties further, we also studied the thermal stability, photophysical properties (fluorescent emission, lifetime) of complex 4, and the interactions between 4 and C60 or EtBr-DNA system.

  20. Maturase and endonuclease functions depend on separate conserved domains of the bifunctional protein encoded by the group I intron aI4 alpha of yeast mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Henke, R M; Butow, R A; Perlman, P S

    1995-01-01

    Intron 4 alpha (aI4 alpha) of the yeast mitochondrial COXI gene is a mobile group I intron that contains a reading frame encoding both the homing endonuclease I-SceII and a latent maturase capable of splicing both aI4 alpha and the fourth intron of the cytochrome b (COB) gene (bI4). The aI4 alpha reading frame is a member of a large gene family recognized by the presence of related dodecapeptide sequence motifs called P1 and P2. In this study, missense mutations of P1 and P2 were placed in mitochondrial DNA by biolistic transformation. The effects of the mutations on intron mobility, endonuclease I-SceII activity and maturase function were tested. The mutations of P1 strongly affected mobility and endonuclease I-SceII activity, but had little or no effect on maturase function; mutations of P2 affected splicing but not mobility or endonuclease I-SceII activity. Surprisingly, the conditional (temperature-sensitive) mutations at P1 and P2 block one or the other function of the protein but not both. This study indicates that the two functions depend on separate domains of the intron-encoded protein. Images PMID:7588637

  1. Sperm DNA oxidative damage and DNA adducts.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Hueiwang Anna; Pan, Chih-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Lin, Wen-Yi

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate DNA damage and adducts in sperm from coke oven workers who have been exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. A longitudinal study was conducted with repeated measurements during spermatogenesis. Coke-oven workers (n=112) from a coke-oven plant served the PAH-exposed group, while administrators and security personnel (n=67) served the control. Routine semen parameters (concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology) were analyzed simultaneously; the assessment of sperm DNA integrity endpoints included DNA fragmentation, bulky DNA adducts, and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dGuo). The degree of sperm DNA fragmentation was measured using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay and sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). The PAH-exposed group had a significant increase in bulky DNA adducts and 8-oxo-dGuo compared to the control subjects (Ps=0.002 and 0.045, respectively). Coke oven workers' percentages of DNA fragmentation and denaturation from the PAH-exposed group were not significantly different from those of the control subjects (Ps=0.232 and 0.245, respectively). Routine semen parameters and DNA integrity endpoints were not correlated. Concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo were positively correlated with percentages of DNA fragmentation measured by both TUNEL and SCSA (Ps=0.045 and 0.034, respectively). However, the concentrations of 8-oxo-dGuo and percentages of DNA fragmentation did not correlate with concentrations of bulky DNA adducts. In summary, coke oven workers with chronic exposure to PAHs experienced decreased sperm DNA integrity. Oxidative stress could contribute to the degree of DNA fragmentation. Bulky DNA adducts may be independent of the formation of DNA fragmentation and oxidative adducts in sperm. Monitoring sperm DNA integrity is recommended as a part of the process of assessing the impact of occupational and environmental toxins on sperm. PMID:26653986

  2. Divergent DNA-Binding Specificities of a Group of ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR Transcription Factors Involved in Plant Defense1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Shoji, Tsubasa; Mishima, Masaki; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) recognize target DNA sequences with distinct DNA-binding domains (DBDs). The DBD of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR1 (AtERF1) uses three consecutive ?-strands to recognize a GCC-containing sequence, but tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) ERF189 and periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) Octadecanoid-derivative Responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein3 (ORCA3) of the same TF subgroup appear to target similar but divergent DNA sequences. Here, we examined how DNA-binding specificities of these TFs have diverged in each plant lineage to regulate distinct defense metabolisms. Extensive mutational analyses of these DBDs suggest that two modes of protein-DNA interactions independently contribute to binding specificity and affinity. Substitution of a conserved arginine to lysine in the first ?-strand of ERF189 relaxes its interaction with the second GC pair of the GCC DNA sequence. By contrast, an increased number of basic amino acids in the first two ?-strands of ORCA3 allows this TF to recognize more than one GCC-related target, presumably via increased electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged phosphate backbone of DNA. Divergent DNA-binding specificities of the ERFs may have arisen through mutational changes of these amino acid residues. PMID:23629834

  3. DNA extraction for short tandem repeat typing from mixed samples using anti-human leukocyte CD45 and ABO blood group antibodies.

    PubMed

    Yano, Shizue; Honda, Katsuya; Kaminiwa, Junko; Nishi, Takeki; Iwabuchi, Yayoi; Sugano, Yukiko; Kurosu, Akira; Suzuki, Yasuhito

    2014-05-01

    DNA testing from mixed cell samples can be difficult to use successfully in criminal investigations. Here, we present a method for the extraction of DNA from mixed bloodstains involving plural contributors, after antibody-microbead captured cell separation. This method, together with the multiplex short tandem repeat typing presented, has proven highly successful in the recovery of DNA profiles corresponding to the ABO blood type. Methodological steps include magnetic separation using leukocyte specific CD45 antibody-coated microbeads and centrifugal separation of leukocyte agglutination by ABO antibody. The detection results of variable mixed ratio showed that the target DNA was detected accurately as low as 1:512 mixed ratio, regardless of the large amount of the background DNA present. The method presented here is applicable to PCR-based identification for various kinds of mixed samples. PMID:24680125

  4. The N-terminal Region of Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 4 (CHD4) Is Essential for Activity and Contains a High Mobility Group (HMG) Box-like-domain That Can Bind Poly(ADP-ribose).

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana P G; Ryan, Daniel P; Galanty, Yaron; Low, Jason K K; Vandevenne, Marylene; Jackson, Stephen P; Mackay, Joel P

    2016-01-01

    Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is a chromatin-remodeling enzyme that has been reported to regulate DNA-damage responses through its N-terminal region in a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-dependent manner. We have identified and determined the structure of a stable domain (CHD4-N) in this N-terminal region. The-fold consists of a four-?-helix bundle with structural similarity to the high mobility group box, a domain that is well known as a DNA binding module. We show that the CHD4-N domain binds with higher affinity to poly(ADP-ribose) than to DNA. We also show that the N-terminal region of CHD4, although not CHD4-N alone, is essential for full nucleosome remodeling activity and is important for localizing CHD4 to sites of DNA damage. Overall, these data build on our understanding of how CHD4-NuRD acts to regulate gene expression and participates in the DNA-damage response. PMID:26565020

  5. Phosphorus-nitrogen compounds: Part 28. Syntheses, structural characterizations, antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities, and DNA interactions of new phosphazenes bearing vanillinato and pendant ferrocenyl groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tümer, Yasemin; Asmafiliz, Nuran; Kılıç, Zeynel; Hökelek, Tuncer; Yasemin Koç, L.; Açık, Leyla; Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Solak, Ali Osman; Öner, Yağmur; Dündar, Devrim; Yavuz, Makbule

    2013-10-01

    The gradually Cl replacement reactions of spirocyclic mono (1 and 2) and bisferrocenyl cyclotriphosphazenes (3-5) with the potassium salt of 4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde (potassium vanillinate) gave mono (1a-5a), geminal (gem-1b-5b), non-geminal (cis-1b, cis-5b and trans-2b-5b), tri (1c-5c) and tetra-substituted phosphazenes (1d-5d). Some phosphazenes have stereogenic P-center(s). The chirality of 4c was verified using chiral HPLC column. Electrochemical behaviors were influenced only by the number of ferrocene groups, but not the length of the amine chains and the substituent(s). The structures of the new phosphazenes were determined by FTIR, MS, 1H, 13C and 31P NMR, HSQC and HMBC spectral data. The solid-state structures of cis-1b and 4d were examined by single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. The twelve phosphazene derivatives were screened for antimicrobial activity and the compounds 5a, cis-1b and 2c exhibited the highest antibacterial activity against G(+) and G(-) bacteria. In addition, it was found that overall gem-1b inhibited the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The compounds 1d, 2d and 4d were tested in HeLa cancer cell lines. Among these compounds, 2d had cytotoxic effect on HeLa cell in the first 48 h. Moreover, interactions between compounds 2a, gem-1b, gem-2b, cis-1b, 2c, 3c, 4c, 5c, 1d, 2d and 4d, and pBR322 plasmid DNA were investigated.

  6. Reactions of 5-methylcytosine cation radicals in DNA and model systems: thermal deprotonation from the 5-methyl group vs. excited state deprotonation from sugar

    PubMed Central

    Adhikary, Amitava; Kumar, Anil; Palmer, Brian J.; Todd, Andrew D.; Heizer, Alicia N.; Sevilla, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To study the formation and subsequent reactions of the 5-methyl-2?-deoxycytidine cation radical (5-Me-2?-dC+) in nucleosides and DNA-oligomers and compare to one electron oxidized thymidine. Materials and methods Employing electron spin resonance (ESR), cation radical formation and its reactions were investigated in 5-Me-2?-dC, thymidine (Thd) and their derivatives, in fully double stranded (ds) d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and in the 5-Me-C/A mismatched, d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], where C* = 5-Me-C. Results We report 5-Me-2?-dC+ production by one-electron oxidation of 5-Me-2?-dC by Cl2? via annealing in the dark at 155 K. Progressive annealing of 5-Me-2?-dC+ at 155 K produces the allylic radical (C-CH2). However, photoexcitation of 5-Me-2?-dC+ by 405 nm laser or by photoflood lamp leads to only C3? formation. Photoexcitation of N3-deprotonated thyminyl radical in Thd and its 5?-nucleotides leads to C3? formation but not in 3?-TMP which resulted in the allylic radical (U-CH2) and C5? production. For excited 5-Me-2?,3?-ddC+, absence of the 3?-OH group does not prevent C3? formation. For d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 and d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG], intra-base paired proton transferred form of G cation radical (G(N1-H):C(+H+)) is found with no observable 5-Me-2?-dC+ formation. Photoexcitation of (G(N1-H):C(+H+)) in d[GC*GC*GC*GC*]2 produced only C1? and not the expected photoproducts from 5-Me-2?-dC+. However, photoexcitation of (G(N1-H):C(+H+)) in d[GGAC*AAGC:CCTAATCG] led to C5? and C1? formation. Conclusions C-CH2 formation from 5-Me-2?-dC+ occurs via ground state deprotonation from C5-methyl group on the base. In the excited 5-Me-2?-dC+ and 5-Me-2?,3?-ddC+, spin and charge localization at C3? followed by deprotonation leads to C3? formation. Thus, deprotonation from C3? in the excited cation radical is kinetically controlled and sugar C-H bond energies are not the only controlling factor in these deprotonations. PMID:24428230

  7. DNA Barcoding the Dioscorea in China, a Vital Group in the Evolution of Monocotyledon: Use of matK Gene for Species Discrimination

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiao-Qin; Zhu, Ying-Jie; Guo, Jian-Lin; Peng, Bin; Bai, Ming-Ming; Hang, Yue-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Background Dioscorea is an important plant genus in terms of food supply and pharmaceutical applications. However, its classification and identification are controversial. DNA barcoding is a recent aid to taxonomic identification and uses a short standardized DNA region to discriminate plant species. In this study, the applicability of three candidate DNA barcodes (rbcL, matK, and psbA-trnH) to identify species within Dioscorea was tested. Methodology/Principal Findings One-hundred and forty-eight individual plant samples of Dioscorea, encompassing 38 species, seven varieties and one subspecies, representing majority species distributed in China of this genus, were collected from its main distributing areas. Samples were assessed by PCR amplification, sequence quality, extent of specific genetic divergence, DNA barcoding gap, and the ability to discriminate between species. matK successfully identified 23.26% of all species, compared with 9.30% for rbcL and 11.63% for psbA-trnH. Therefore, matK is recommended as the best DNA barcoding candidate. We found that the combination of two or three loci achieved a higher success rate of species discrimination than one locus alone. However, experimental cost would be much higher if two or three loci, rather than a single locus, were assessed. Conclusions We conclude that matK is a strong, although not perfect, candidate as a DNA barcode for Dioscorea identification. This assessment takes into account both its ability for species discrimination and the cost of experiments. PMID:22363795

  8. Performance Characteristics and Utilization of Rapid Antigen Test, DNA Probe, and Culture for Detection of Group A Streptococci in an Acute Care Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, Kimberle C.; Blake, Patricia; Wilson, Claire D.

    2002-01-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) antigen testing has become a routine point-of-care (POC) test in acute care settings. Concern about performance parameters (PP) of these tests as well as inappropriate antibiotic use has resulted in various recommendations regarding diagnosis of GAS. There were two objectives in this study. The first was to evaluate the rapid GAS antigen test presently in use (Thermo BioStar, Boulder, Colo.) and the GAS Direct probe test (Gen-Probe, San Diego, Calif.) compared to culture. The second was to define the optimal use of these technologies in a large acute care pediatric clinic. A total of 520 consecutive pediatric patients presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis at any of three Lahey Clinic acute care facilities were evaluated. Pharyngeal specimens were collected using a double-swab collection device (Copan, Corona, Calif.). One swab was used for the antigen test, the second was used for the probe test, and the pledget was placed in the collection device for culture on 5% sheep blood agar, incubated for 48 h anaerobically, and subsequently placed in Todd-Hewitt broth. After discrepant analysis, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were as follows: 94.8, 100, 100, and 96.9% for the probe test and 86.1, 97.1, 93.7, and 93.4% for the antigen test, respectively. Sensitivity using an enhanced culture technique was 99.4% (163 of 164). False-positive (FP) antigen results were often seen from patients previously diagnosed and/or treated for GAS. No FP results were seen with the probe test. Colony counts for the false-negative (FN) antigen tests were higher than those for the FN probe tests. Compared to culture and DNA probe, the rapid antigen test (RAT) offered a result at the time of the patient's visit, with acceptable PP when prevalence of disease is high. Follow-up testing with the RAT of GAS patients who previously tested as positive should be avoided due to increased FP results. The probe test was comparable to culture in performance. Results indicate the probe test can be used as the primary test or as a backup to negative antigen tests. The probe test offers the advantage over culture of same-day reporting of a final result but, in contrast to a POC test, necessitates follow-up communication to the patient. Preliminary data show the specificity of the probe test to be greater than that of the RAT for patients previously diagnosed with GAS. PMID:12409399

  9. Evolution of eukaryotic single-stranded DNA viruses of the Bidnaviridae family from genes of four other groups of widely different viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krupovic, Mart; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2014-06-01

    Single-stranded (ss)DNA viruses are extremely widespread, infect diverse hosts from all three domains of life and include important pathogens. Most ssDNA viruses possess small genomes that replicate by the rolling-circle-like mechanism initiated by a distinct virus-encoded endonuclease. However, viruses of the family Bidnaviridae, instead of the endonuclease, encode a protein-primed type B DNA polymerase (PolB) and hence break this pattern. We investigated the provenance of all bidnavirus genes and uncover an unexpected turbulent evolutionary history of these unique viruses. Our analysis strongly suggests that bidnaviruses evolved from a parvovirus ancestor from which they inherit a jelly-roll capsid protein and a superfamily 3 helicase. The radiation of bidnaviruses from parvoviruses was probably triggered by integration of the ancestral parvovirus genome into a large virus-derived DNA transposon of the Polinton (polintovirus) family resulting in the acquisition of the polintovirus PolB gene along with terminal inverted repeats. Bidnavirus genes for a receptor-binding protein and a potential novel antiviral defense modulator are derived from dsRNA viruses (Reoviridae) and dsDNA viruses (Baculoviridae), respectively. The unusual evolutionary history of bidnaviruses emphasizes the key role of horizontal gene transfer, sometimes between viruses with completely different genomes but occupying the same niche, in the emergence of new viral types.

  10. Evolution of eukaryotic single-stranded DNA viruses of the Bidnaviridae family from genes of four other groups of widely different viruses

    PubMed Central

    Krupovic, Mart; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded (ss)DNA viruses are extremely widespread, infect diverse hosts from all three domains of life and include important pathogens. Most ssDNA viruses possess small genomes that replicate by the rolling-circle-like mechanism initiated by a distinct virus-encoded endonuclease. However, viruses of the family Bidnaviridae, instead of the endonuclease, encode a protein-primed type B DNA polymerase (PolB) and hence break this pattern. We investigated the provenance of all bidnavirus genes and uncover an unexpected turbulent evolutionary history of these unique viruses. Our analysis strongly suggests that bidnaviruses evolved from a parvovirus ancestor from which they inherit a jelly-roll capsid protein and a superfamily 3 helicase. The radiation of bidnaviruses from parvoviruses was probably triggered by integration of the ancestral parvovirus genome into a large virus-derived DNA transposon of the Polinton (polintovirus) family resulting in the acquisition of the polintovirus PolB gene along with terminal inverted repeats. Bidnavirus genes for a receptor-binding protein and a potential novel antiviral defense modulator are derived from dsRNA viruses (Reoviridae) and dsDNA viruses (Baculoviridae), respectively. The unusual evolutionary history of bidnaviruses emphasizes the key role of horizontal gene transfer, sometimes between viruses with completely different genomes but occupying the same niche, in the emergence of new viral types. PMID:24939392

  11. Methylation of Histone H3 on Lysine 79 Associates with a Group of Replication Origins and Helps Limit DNA Replication Once per Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiqing; Maunakea, Alika K.; Martin, Melvenia M.; Huang, Liang; Zhang, Ya; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Lin, Chii Meil; Zhao, Keji; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian DNA replication starts at distinct chromosomal sites in a tissue-specific pattern coordinated with transcription, but previous studies have not yet identified a chromatin modification that correlates with the initiation of DNA replication at particular genomic locations. Here we report that a distinct fraction of replication initiation sites in the human genome are associated with a high frequency of dimethylation of histone H3 lysine K79 (H3K79Me2). H3K79Me2-containing chromatin exhibited the highest genome-wide enrichment for replication initiation events observed for any chromatin modification examined thus far (23.39% of H3K79Me2 peaks were detected in regions adjacent to replication initiation events). The association of H3K79Me2 with replication initiation sites was independent and not synergistic with other chromatin modifications. H3K79 dimethylation exhibited wider distribution on chromatin during S-phase, but only regions with H3K79 methylation in G1 and G2 were enriched in replication initiation events. H3K79 was dimethylated in a region containing a functional replicator (a DNA sequence capable of initiating DNA replication), but the methylation was not evident in a mutant replicator that could not initiate replication. Depletion of DOT1L, the sole enzyme responsible for H3K79 methylation, triggered limited genomic over-replication although most cells could continue to proliferate and replicate DNA in the absence of methylated H3K79. Thus, prevention of H3K79 methylation might affect regulatory processes that modulate the order and timing of DNA replication. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that dimethylated H3K79 associates with some replication origins and marks replicated chromatin during S-phase to prevent re-replication and preserve genomic stability. PMID:23754963

  12. The complete mitochondrial DNA sequence of the green alga Pseudendoclonium akinetum (Ulvophyceae) highlights distinctive evolutionary trends in the chlorophyta and suggests a sister-group relationship between the Ulvophyceae and Chlorophyceae.

    PubMed

    Pombert, Jean-Franois; Otis, Christian; Lemieux, Claude; Turmel, Monique

    2004-05-01

    The mitochondrial genome has undergone radical changes in both the Chlorophyta and Streptophyta, yet little is known about the dynamics of mtDNA evolution in either of these lineages. In the Chlorophyta, which comprises four of the five recognized classes of green algae (Prasinophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Chlorophyceae), the mitochondrial genome varies from 16 to 55 kb. This genome has retained a compact gene organization and a relatively complex gene repertoire ("ancestral" pattern) in the basal lineages represented by the Trebouxiophyceae and Prasinophyceae, whereas it has been reduced in size and gene complement and tends to evolve much more rapidly at the sequence level ("reduced-derived" pattern of evolution) in the Chlorophyceae and the lineage leading to the enigmatic chlorophyte Pedinomonas. To gain information about the evolutionary trends of mtDNA in the Ulvophyceae and also to gain insights into the phylogenetic relationships between ulvophytes and other chlorophytes, we have determined the mtDNA sequence of Pseudendoclonium akinetum. At 95,880 bp, Pseudendoclonium mtDNA is the largest green-algal mitochondrial genome sequenced to date and has the lowest gene density. These derived features are reminiscent of the "expanded" pattern exhibited by embryophyte mtDNAs, indicating that convergent evolution towards genome expansion has occurred independently in the Chlorophyta and Streptophyta. With 57 conserved genes, the gene repertoire of Pseudendoclonium mtDNA is slightly smaller than those of the prasinophyte Nephroselmis olivacea and the trebouxiophyte Prototheca wickerhamii. This ulvophyte mtDNA contains seven group I introns, four of which have homologs in green-algal mtDNAs displaying an "ancestral" or a "reduced-derived" pattern of evolution. Like its counterpart in the chlorophycean green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, it features numerous small, dispersed repeats in intergenic regions and introns. Its overall rate of sequence evolution appears to be accelerated to an intermediary level as compared with the rates observed in "ancestral" and "reduced-derived" mtDNAs. In agreement with the finding that Pseudendoclonium mtDNA exhibits features typical of both the "ancestral" and "reduced-derived" patterns of evolution, phylogenetic analyses of seven mtDNA-encoded proteins revealed a sister-group relationship between this ulvophyte and chlorophytes displaying "reduced-derived" mtDNAs. PMID:15014170

  13. Functional regulation of the DNA damage-recognition factor DDB2 by ubiquitination and interaction with xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Syota; Fischer, Eric S.; Yasuda, Takeshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Nishi, Ryotaro; Yoshino, Ken-ichi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Thom, Nicolas H.; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian nucleotide excision repair, the DDB1DDB2 complex recognizes UV-induced DNA photolesions and facilitates recruitment of the XPC complex. Upon binding to damaged DNA, the Cullin 4 ubiquitin ligase associated with DDB1DDB2 is activated and ubiquitinates DDB2 and XPC. The structurally disordered N-terminal tail of DDB2 contains seven lysines identified as major sites for ubiquitination that target the protein for proteasomal degradation; however, the precise biological functions of these modifications remained unknown. By exogenous expression of mutant DDB2 proteins in normal human fibroblasts, here we show that the N-terminal tail of DDB2 is involved in regulation of cellular responses to UV. By striking contrast with behaviors of exogenous DDB2, the endogenous DDB2 protein was stabilized even after UV irradiation as a function of the XPC expression level. Furthermore, XPC competitively suppressed ubiquitination of DDB2 in vitro, and this effect was significantly promoted by centrin-2, which augments the DNA damage-recognition activity of XPC. Based on these findings, we propose that in cells exposed to UV, DDB2 is protected by XPC from ubiquitination and degradation in a stochastic manner; thus XPC allows DDB2 to initiate multiple rounds of repair events, thereby contributing to the persistence of cellular DNA repair capacity. PMID:25628365

  14. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy = 2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip = 2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6]4-, DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.5 1.4) 105 M-1 in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived.

  15. The effects of linear assembly of two carbazole groups on acid-base and DNA-binding properties of a ruthenium(II) complex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xue, Long-Xin; Ju, Chun-Chuan; Wang, Ke-Zhi

    2013-07-01

    A novel Ru(II) complex of [Ru(bpy)2(Hbcpip)](ClO4)2 {where bpy=2,2-bipyridine, Hbcpip=2-(4-(9H-3,9'-bicarbazol-9-yl)phenyl)-1H-imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline} is synthesized and characterized. Calf-thymus DNA-binding properties of the complex were studied by UV-vis absorption and luminescence titrations, steady-state emission quenching by [Fe(CN)6](4-), DNA competitive binding with ethidium bromide, thermal denaturation and DNA viscosity measurements. The results indicate that the complex partially intercalated into the DNA with a binding constant of (5.51.4)10(5) M(-1) in buffered 50 mM NaCl. The acid-base properties of the complex were also studied by UV-visible and luminescence spectrophotometric pH titrations, and ground- and excited-state acidity ionization constant values were derived. PMID:23639737

  16. Functional regulation of the DNA damage-recognition factor DDB2 by ubiquitination and interaction with xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Syota; Fischer, Eric S; Yasuda, Takeshi; Dohmae, Naoshi; Iwai, Shigenori; Mori, Toshio; Nishi, Ryotaro; Yoshino, Ken-ichi; Sakai, Wataru; Hanaoka, Fumio; Thom, Nicolas H; Sugasawa, Kaoru

    2015-02-18

    In mammalian nucleotide excision repair, the DDB1-DDB2 complex recognizes UV-induced DNA photolesions and facilitates recruitment of the XPC complex. Upon binding to damaged DNA, the Cullin 4 ubiquitin ligase associated with DDB1-DDB2 is activated and ubiquitinates DDB2 and XPC. The structurally disordered N-terminal tail of DDB2 contains seven lysines identified as major sites for ubiquitination that target the protein for proteasomal degradation; however, the precise biological functions of these modifications remained unknown. By exogenous expression of mutant DDB2 proteins in normal human fibroblasts, here we show that the N-terminal tail of DDB2 is involved in regulation of cellular responses to UV. By striking contrast with behaviors of exogenous DDB2, the endogenous DDB2 protein was stabilized even after UV irradiation as a function of the XPC expression level. Furthermore, XPC competitively suppressed ubiquitination of DDB2 in vitro, and this effect was significantly promoted by centrin-2, which augments the DNA damage-recognition activity of XPC. Based on these findings, we propose that in cells exposed to UV, DDB2 is protected by XPC from ubiquitination and degradation in a stochastic manner; thus XPC allows DDB2 to initiate multiple rounds of repair events, thereby contributing to the persistence of cellular DNA repair capacity. PMID:25628365

  17. DNA Nanotechnology-- Architectures Designed with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Dongran

    As the genetic information storage vehicle, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules are essential to all known living organisms and many viruses. It is amazing that such a large amount of information about how life develops can be stored in these tiny molecules. Countless scientists, especially some biologists, are trying to decipher the genetic information stored in these captivating molecules. Meanwhile, another group of researchers, nanotechnologists in particular, have discovered that the unique and concise structural features of DNA together with its information coding ability can be utilized for nano-construction efforts. This idea culminated in the birth of the field of DNA nanotechnology which is the main topic of this dissertation. The ability of rationally designed DNA strands to self-assemble into arbitrary nanostructures without external direction is the basis of this field. A series of novel design principles for DNA nanotechnology are presented here, from topological DNA nanostructures to complex and curved DNA nanostructures, from pure DNA nanostructures to hybrid RNA/DNA nanostructures. As one of the most important and pioneering fields in controlling the assembly of materials (both DNA and other materials) at the nanoscale, DNA nanotechnology is developing at a dramatic speed and as more and more construction approaches are invented, exciting advances will emerge in ways that we may or may not predict.

  18. Detection of potentially valuable polymorphisms in four group I intron insertion sites at the 3'-end of the LSU rDNA genes in biocontrol isolates of Metarhizium anisopliae

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Marcela; Iturriaga, Enrique A; Quesada-Moraga, Enrique; Santiago-Álvarez, Cándido; Monte, Enrique; Hermosa, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    Background The entomopathogenic anamorphic fungus Metarhizum anisopliae is currently used as a biocontrol agent (BCA) of insects. In the present work, we analyzed the sequence data obtained from group I introns in the large subunit (LSU) of rDNA genes with a view to determining the genetic diversity present in an autochthonous collection of twenty-six M. anisopliae isolates selected as BCAs. Results DNA fragments corresponding to the 3'-end of the nuclear LSU rDNA genes of 26 M. anisopliae isolates were amplified by PCR. The amplicon sizes ranged from 0.8 to 3.4-kb. Four intron insertion sites, according to Escherichia coli J01695 numbering, were detected- Ec1921, Ec2066, Ec2449 and Ec2563- after sequencing and analysis of the PCR products. The presence/absence of introns allowed the 26 isolates to be distributed into seven genotypes. Nine of the isolates tested showed no introns, 4 had only one, 3 two, and 10 displayed three introns. The most frequent insertion sites were Ec1921 and Ec2449. Of the 26 isolates, 11 showed insertions at Ec2563 and a 1754-bp sequence was observed in ten of them. The most-parsimonious (MP) tree obtained from parsimony analysis of the introns revealed a main set containing four-groups that corresponded to the four insertion sites. Conclusion Four insertion sites of group I introns in the LSU rDNA genes allowed the establishment of seven genotypes among the twenty-six biocontrol isolates of M. anisopliae. Intron insertions at the Ec2563 site were observed for first time in this species. PMID:16978412

  19. DNA-barcoding of perch-like fishes (Actinopterygii: Perciformes) from far-eastern seas of Russia with taxonomic remarks for some groups.

    PubMed

    Turanov, S V; Kartavtsev, Yu Ph; Lipinsky, V V; Zemnukhov, V V; Balanov, A A; Lee, Y-H; Jeong, D

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of variation among 203 nucleotide sequences of Co-1 gene (DNA-barcode) for 45 species, 31 genera and 7 families of the order Perciformes from the Far Eastern seas of Russia has been performed. As a result, 42 species (93.3%) can be unambiguously identified using molecular DNA-barcode at Co-1, whereas more variable markers are required for other species (6.7%): Stichaeus grigorjewi, S. nozawae, and Lumpenus sagitta. The latter includes as well 2 morphologically distinct (by number of vertebrae) but genetically unresolved species, L. sagitta (Sea of Okhotsk) and L. fabricii (Bering Sea). In addition, within this genus morphologically poorly characterized but genetically well-distinguished cryptic species has been detected. Amphi-Pacific distribution is in question relative to L. sagitta. Cryptic diversity was observed in the genus Ammodytes. PMID:25121832

  20. Interactions of the RAD7 and RAD23 excision repair genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with DNA repair genes in different epistasis groups.

    PubMed

    Schiestl, R H; Prakash, S

    1989-10-01

    The RAD7 and RAD23 genes of S. cerevisiae affect the efficiency of excision repair of UV-damaged DNA. We have examined the UV survival of strains carrying the rad7 and rad23 deletion mutation in combination with deletion mutations in genes affecting different DNA repair pathways. As expected, the rad7 delta and rad23 delta mutations interact epistatically with the excision repair defective rad1 delta mutation, and synergistically with the rad6 delta and rad52 delta mutations that affect the postreplication repair and recombinational repair pathways, respectively. However, the rad7 delta rad6 delta and the rad23 delta rad6 delta mutants exhibit the same level of UV sensitivity as the rad1 delta rad6 delta mutant. This observation is of interest since, in contrast to the rad7 delta or the rad23 delta mutations, the rad1 delta mutant is very UV sensitive and highly excision defective. This observation suggest that RAD6 and RAD7 and RAD23 genes complete for the same substrate during DNA repair. PMID:2697464

  1. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups

    PubMed Central

    Licursi, Valerio; Brito, Catarina; La Torre, Mattia; Alves, Paula M.; Simao, Daniel; Mottini, Carla; Salinas, Sara; Negri, Rodolfo; Tagliafico, Enrico; Kremer, Eric J.; Saggio, Isabella

    2015-01-01

    Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD) canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2) are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR. PMID:26207738

  2. Circular DNA by "Bis-Click" Ligation: Template-Independent Intramolecular Circularization of Oligonucleotides with Terminal Alkynyl Groups Utilizing Bifunctional Azides.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haozhe; Seela, Frank

    2016-01-01

    A highly effective and convenient "bis-click" strategy was developed for the template-independent circularization of single-stranded oligonucleotides by employing copper(I)-assisted azide-alkyne cycloaddition. Terminal triple bonds were incorporated at both ends of linear oligonucleotides. Alkynylated 7-deaza-2'-deoxyadenosine and 2'-deoxyuridine residues with different side chains were used in solid-phase synthesis with phosphoramidite chemistry. The bis-click ligation of linear 9- to 36-mer oligonucleotides with 1,4-bis(azidomethyl)benzene afforded circular DNA in a simple and selective way; azido modification of the oligonucleotide was not necessary. Short ethynyl side chains were compatible with the circularization of longer oligonucleotides, whereas octadiynyl residues were used for short 9-mers. Compared with linear duplexes, circular bis-click constructs exhibit a significantly increased duplex stability over their linear counterparts. The intramolecular bis-click ligation protocol is not limited to DNA, but may also be suitable for the construction of other macrocycles, such as circular RNAs, peptides, or polysaccharides. PMID:26685101

  3. DNA barcoding for plants.

    PubMed

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing. PMID:25373752

  4. The mitochondrial LSU rDNA of the brown alga Pylaiella littoralis reveals alpha-proteobacterial features and is split by four group IIB introns with an atypical phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, J M; Rousvoal, S; Leblanc, C; Kloareg, B; Loiseaux-de Gor, S

    1995-08-18

    The mitochondrial DNA region coding for the large ribosomal RNA subunit from the brown alga Pylaiella littoralis (L.) Kjellm was sequenced. The LSU rRNA was folded into a secondary structure and aligned with homologous, mitochondrial and eubacterial sequences. Taking into account the primary and secondary structure levels, the mitochondrial LSU rRNA of P. littoralis shares more structural features with alpha-proteobacterial genes than do those of the green alga Prototheca wickerhamii and land plants. In phylogenetic trees, branches leading to brown algae, red algae, the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii and land plants, respectively, emerge approximately at the same time, as they do in nuclear-gene based phylogenies. This suggests that there is only one origin for the mitochondrial rRNA genes found in these lineages. The LSU rDNA is split by four group IIB introns. The first two introns each contain one open reading frame which encodes a reverse transcriptase-like protein. Comparison of their amino acid sequences with those of other reverse transcriptase-like genes contained in group II introns shows that these genes are more closely related to plastid and cyanobacterial homologous genes than to any known mitochondrial intronic reverse transcriptase. PMID:7544414

  5. Nuclear DNA PCR-RFLPs that distinguish African and European honey bee groups of subspecies. II: Conversion of long PCR markers to standard PCR.

    PubMed

    Suazo, Alonso; Hall, H Glenn

    2002-08-01

    Nuclear DNA PCR-RFLPs previously found in amplifications of three long (> 5 kbp) anonymous regions of DNA were made analyzable using standard PCR procedures. RFLP analyses were simplified by restricting the amplifications to sections, within each locus, that contained most of the informative polymorphic sites. AluI digests of locus L-1 section 2 (L-1S2) revealed three suballeles of which one was African-specific (Apis mellifera scutellata Lepeletier) and one was east European-predominant (A. m. ligustica Spinola, A. m. carnica Pollman, and A. m. caucasica Gorbachev). Alleles found originally at locus L-2 with AvaI were determined in RFLP analysis of two sections, L-2S1int and L-2S2, resulting in two African-specific and two east European-predominant suballeles. Suballele identity was determined by the combination of banding patterns from both fragments. Polymorphisms revealed by HaeIII in locus L-2 were analyzed in amplifications and digests of L-2SM1int. an 830 bpfragment within L-2S1. Seven suballeles were found of which two were African-specific and three were east European-specific or predominant, including one suballele specific to the east European subspecies A. m. caucasica. In locus L-5, RFLPs were detected with HaeIII, DdeI, and SpeI. HaeIII polymorphisms were analyzed by amplification and digestion offragments L-5S1xt and L-5S1ter: Five suballeles were found of which three were African-specific and one east European-predominant. For DdeI, all five alleles originally found with long PCR could be identified in RFLP analyses of three sections. Two African-specific, one east European-specific, and one west European-predominant (A. m. mellifera L. and A. m. iberica Goetze) suballeles were found. A west European-predominant suballele was also found in RFLP analysis of L-5S3 with SpeI. Allele frequency data from Old World and US. populations are presented. PMID:12296627

  6. DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Friedberg, E.C.; Hanawalt, P.C. )

    1988-01-01

    Topics covered in this book included: Eukaryote model systems for DNA repair study; Sensitive detection of DNA lesions and their repair; and Defined DNA sequence probes for analysis of mutagenesis and repair.

  7. Genetic variation and demographic history of the Haplochromis laparogramma group of Lake Victoria-An analysis based on SINEs and mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Mzighani, Semvua I; Nikaido, Masato; Takeda, Miyuki; Seehausen, Ole; Budeba, Yohana L; Ngatunga, Benjamin P; Katunzi, Egid F B; Aibara, Mitsuto; Mizoiri, Shinji; Sato, Tetsu; Tachida, Hidenori; Okada, Norihiro

    2010-01-15

    More than 500 endemic haplochromine cichlid species inhabit Lake Victoria. This striking species diversity is a classical example of recent explosive adaptive radiation thought to have happened within the last approximately 15,000 years. In this study, we examined the population structure and historical demography of 3 pelagic haplochromine cichlid species that resemble in morphology and have similar niche, Haplochromis (Yssichromis) laparogramma, Haplochromis (Y.) pyrrhocephalus, and Haplochromis (Y.) sp. "glaucocephalus". We investigated the sequences of the mitochondrial DNA control region and the insertion patterns of short interspersed elements (SINEs) of 759 individuals. We show that sympatric forms are genetically differentiated in 4 of 6 cases, but we also found apparent weakening of the genetic differentiation in areas with turbid water. We estimated the timings of population expansion and species divergence to coincide with the refilling of the lake at the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary. We also found that estimates can be altered significantly by the choice of the shape of the molecular clock. If we employ the nonlinear clock model of evolutionary rates in which the rates are higher towards the recent, the population expansion was dated at around the event of desiccation of the lake ca. 17,000 YBP. Thus, we succeeded in clarifying the species and population structure of closely related Lake Victoria cichlids and in showing the importance of applying appropriate clock calibrations in elucidating recent evolutionary events. PMID:19837145

  8. Comparison between vaginal tampon and cervicovaginal lavage specimen collection for detection of human papillomavirus DNA by the polymerase chain reaction. The Canadian Women's HIV Study Group.

    PubMed

    Coutlée, F; Hankins, C; Lapointe, N

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of self-administered vaginal tampon (VT) specimens for the detection of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) with that of cervicovaginal lavage specimens (CVL). Two hundred seventy-four paired VT and CVL specimens were collected prospectively from women at risk of sexually transmitted diseases. Specimens were treated and amplified with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Each woman served as her own control. One hundred and forty-four of 272 (52.9%) CVLs and 159 of 271 (58.7%) VTs contained HPV DNA sequences (correlation of 88%). The sensitivity and specificity of vaginal tampons reached 93.9% (138/147) and 80.5% (99/123), respectively. HPV typing results were concordant for 99 negative paired samples and 114 paired samples positive for the same type(s) (correlation of 78.9%). It is concluded that these sampling methods collect cells from different areas of the genital epithelium, highlighting the importance of further assessment of the comparative predictive value of HPV detection in each sample. PMID:8986948

  9. Using DNA-barcoding for sorting out protist species complexes: a case study of the Nebela tincta-collaris-bohemica group (Amoebozoa; Arcellinida, Hyalospheniidae).

    PubMed

    Kosakyan, Anush; Gomaa, Fatma; Mitchell, Edward A D; Heger, Thierry J; Lara, Enrique

    2013-05-01

    Species identification by means of morphology is often problematic in protists. Nebela tincta-collaris-bohemica (Arcellinida) is a species complex of small to medium-sized (ca.100 ?m) testate amoebae common in peat bogs and forest soils. The taxonomic validity of characters used to define species within this group is debated and causes confusion in studies of biogeography, and applications in palaeoecology. We examined the relationship between morphological and genetic diversity within this species complex by combined analyses of light microscopy imaging and Cytochrome Oxidase Subunit 1(COI) sequences obtained from the same individual amoeba cells. Our goals were (1) to clarify the taxonomy and the phylogenetic relationships within this group, and (2) to evaluate if individual genotypes corresponded to specific morphotypes and the extent of phenotypic plasticity. We show here that small variations in test morphology that have been often overlooked by traditional taxonomy correspond to distinct haplotypes. We therefore revise the taxonomy of the group. We redefine Nebela tincta (Leidy) Kosakyan et Lara and N. collaris (Ehrenberg 1848) Kosakyan et Gomaa, change N. tincta var. rotunda Penard to N. rotunda (Penard 1890), describe three new species: N. guttata n. sp. Kosakyan et Lara, N. pechorensis n. sp. Kosakyan et Mitchell, and N. aliciae n. sp. Mitchell et Lara. PMID:23092639

  10. The 1998-1999 collaborative exercises and proficiency testing program on DNA typing of the Spanish and Portuguese Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GEP-ISFG).

    PubMed

    Gmez, J; Carracedo, A

    2000-10-01

    A total of 28 laboratories (labs) submitted results for the 1998 collaborative exercise and the proficiency testing program of the Spanish and Portuguese Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (GEP-ISFG) group. This number increased to 46 labs in 1999. Six bloodstains were submitted, each one with 200 microl soaked in cotton except the sample no. 6 submitted for DNA quantification which had 2 microl. One of the samples was a mixed stain. A paternity testing case and a criminal case in the 1998 trial (GEP'98) and two paternity testing cases in 1999 (GEP'99) were included and the statistical evaluation of the evidence was requested in both cases. In the GEP'99 trial, a theoretical paternity testing case was included. A total of 52 DNA genetic markers were used by the participants in the GEP'98 trial, which increased to 101 in GEP'99. Despite this increasing number of participating labs, results remained quite satisfactory. All the labs used PCR-based DNA polymorphisms with an increasing number of markers, obtaining good results. SLPs were used by a decreasing number of labs but the results indicated a good level of expertise despite the different protocols used. Good results were also obtained for mtDNA despite the difficulties presented by the samples due to the presence of length heteroplasmy in some samples in both trials. The detection of heteroplasmy should, however, be improved. Similar conclusions were reached for both, the paternity and the criminal case by all the labs. Common methodologies for the statistical evaluation of the paternity case were used and the paternity index and the probability of paternity (with an a priori value of 0.5) reported by most of the labs. Also, a great uniformity was found in the evaluation of the criminal case despite the lack of a specific hypothesis in the design of the exercise. Some errors in statistical programs or in calculations were detected in a theoretical paternity case included in the GEP'99 trial for statistical analysis. PMID:10924847

  11. Choline monooxygenase, an unusual iron-sulfur enzyme catalyzing the first step of glycine betaine synthesis in plants: prosthetic group characterization and cDNA cloning.

    PubMed

    Rathinasabapathi, B; Burnet, M; Russell, B L; Gage, D A; Liao, P C; Nye, G J; Scott, P; Golbeck, J H; Hanson, A D

    1997-04-01

    Plants synthesize the osmoprotectant glycine betaine via the route choline --> betaine aldehyde --> glycine betaine. In spinach, the first step is catalyzed by choline monooxygenase (CMO), a ferredoxin-dependent stromal enzyme that has been hypothesized to be an oligomer of identical subunits and to be an Fe-S protein. Analysis by HPLC and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization MS confirmed that native CMO contains only one type of subunit (Mr 42,864). Determination of acid-labile sulfur and nonheme iron demonstrated that there is one [2Fe-2S] cluster per subunit, and EPR spectral data indicated that this cluster is of the Rieske type--i.e., coordinated by two Cys and two His ligands. A full-length CMO cDNA (1,622 bp) was cloned from spinach using a probe generated by PCR amplification for which the primers were based on internal peptide sequences. The ORF encoded a 440-amino acid polypeptide that included a 60-residue transit peptide. The deduced amino acid sequence included two Cys-His pairs spaced 16 residues apart, a motif characteristic of Rieske-type Fe-S proteins. Larger regions that included this motif also showed some sequence similarity (approximately 40%) to Rieske-type proteins, particularly bacterial oxygenases. Otherwise there was very little similarity between CMO and proteins from plants or other organisms. RNA and immunoblot analyses showed that the expression of CMO in leaves increased several-fold during salinization. We conclude that CMO is a stress-inducible representative of a new class of plant oxygenases. PMID:9096415

  12. DNA methylation and cancer.

    PubMed

    Kulis, Marta; Esteller, Manel

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most intensely studied epigenetic modifications in mammals. In normal cells, it assures the proper regulation of gene expression and stable gene silencing. DNA methylation is associated with histone modifications and the interplay of these epigenetic modifications is crucial to regulate the functioning of the genome by changing chromatin architecture. The covalent addition of a methyl group occurs generally in cytosine within CpG dinucleotides which are concentrated in large clusters called CpG islands. DNA methyltransferases are responsible for establishing and maintenance of methylation pattern. It is commonly known that inactivation of certain tumor-suppressor genes occurs as a consequence of hypermethylation within the promoter regions and a numerous studies have demonstrated a broad range of genes silenced by DNA methylation in different cancer types. On the other hand, global hypomethylation, inducing genomic instability, also contributes to cell transformation. Apart from DNA methylation alterations in promoter regions and repetitive DNA sequences, this phenomenon is associated also with regulation of expression of noncoding RNAs such as microRNAs that may play role in tumor suppression. DNA methylation seems to be promising in putative translational use in patients and hypermethylated promoters may serve as biomarkers. Moreover, unlike genetic alterations, DNA methylation is reversible what makes it extremely interesting for therapy approaches. The importance of DNA methylation alterations in tumorigenesis encourages us to decode the human epigenome. Different DNA methylome mapping techniques are indispensable to realize this project in the future. PMID:20920744

  13. Towards Multi-fueled DNA walker on DNA trails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Akio; Ohtake, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Hagiya, Masami

    2008-10-01

    Basic idea and preliminary experimental results for photo-controllable DNA tiles are described. Although self-assembly of DNA cross tiles is an established technique, it only results in a static structure controlled by sequence design of sticky ends. For realizing dynamic control of DNA nanostructures, multi-fueled approach to self-assembly of DNA cross tiles is introduced. It is based on thermal-fuel, pH-fuel and photo-fuel. We already verified their basic behaviors in test tubes. In addition, we started to examine them for DNA walker on DNA trails made of DNA cross tiles. Especially, azobenzene intercalation groups for the sticky ends in DNA cross tiles are useful for photo-fuel, as they can control the assembly process with irradiation of UV/visible light. Preliminary results concerning the DNA cross tiles with azobenzene are also described briefly.

  14. Development of a DNA vaccine for chicken infectious anemia and its immunogenicity studies using high mobility group box 1 protein as a novel immunoadjuvant indicated induction of promising protective immune responses.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Pradeep Mahadev; Dhama, Kuldeep; Rawool, Deepak Bhiva; Wani, Mohd Yaqoob; Tiwari, Ruchi; Singh, Shambhu Dayal; Singh, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Chicken infectious anaemia (CIA) is an economically important and emerging poultry disease reported worldwide. Current CIA vaccines have limitations like, the inability of the virus to grow to high titres in embryos/cell cultures, possession of residual pathogenicity and a risk of reversion to virulence. In the present study, a DNA vaccine, encoding chicken infectious anaemia virus (CIAV) VP1 and VP2 genes, was developed and co-administered with truncated chicken high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1ΔC) protein in young chicks for the evaluation of vaccine immune response. CIAV VP1 and VP2 genes were cloned in pTARGET while HMGB1ΔC in PET32b vector. In vitro expression of these gene constructs was evaluated by Western blotting. Further, recombinant HMGB1ΔC was evaluated for its biological activity. The CIAV DNA vaccine administration in specific pathogen free chicks resulted in moderately protective ELISA antibody titres in the range of 4322.87 ± 359.72 to 8288.19 ± 136.38, increased CD8(+) cells, and a higher titre was observed by co-administration of novel adjuvant (HMGB1ΔC) and booster immunizations. The use of vaccine with adjuvant showed achieving antibody titres nearly 8500, titre considered as highly protective, which indicates that co-immunization of HMGB1ΔC may have a strong adjuvant activity on CIAV DNA vaccine induced immune responses. The able potential of HMGB1 protein holding strong adjuvant activity could be exploited further with trials with vaccines for other important pathogens for achieving the required protective immune responses. PMID:25448094

  15. Functional α-fragment of β-galactosidase can be expressed from the mobile group I intron PpLSU3 embedded in yeast pre-ribosomal RNA derived from the chromosomal rDNA locus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jue; Vogt, Volker M.

    2000-01-01

    PpLSU3, a mobile group I intron found in the ribosomal RNA genes of Physarum polycephalum, encodes the I-PpoI homing endonuclease. This enzyme represents one of the rare cases in nature where a protein is expressed from an RNA polymerase I transcript. Our previous results showed that the full length intron, but not a further processed species, is the messenger for I-PpoI, implying a role of the untranslated region (UTR) in gene expression. To study the function of the 3′-UTR in expression of the endonuclease and in splicing of the intron, we replaced the I-PpoI gene in PpLSU3 with the gene for the α-fragment of Escherichia coli β-galactosidase, and then integrated this chimeric intron into all the chromosomal rDNA repeats of yeast. The resulting cells synthesized functional α-fragment, as evidenced by a complementation assay analogous to that used in E.coli. The β-galactosidase activity thus provides an unusual and potentially valuable readout for Pol I transcription from chromosomal rDNA. This is the first example in which a eucaryotic homing endonuclease gene has been successfully replaced by a heterologous gene. Using deletion mutagenesis and a novel randomization approach with the α-fragment as a reporter, we found that a small segment of the 3′-UTR dramatically influences both splicing and protein expression. PMID:10684939

  16. Ten polymorphic DNA loci, including five in the rat MHC (RT1) region, form a single linkage group on rat chromosome 20

    SciTech Connect

    Remmers, E.F.; Du, Y.; Zha, H.; Goldmuntz, E.A.; Wilder, R.L.

    1995-03-01

    We have described ten markers for polymorphic loci on rat chromosome 20, including five in the rat MHC (RT1) region. These markers formed a single linkage group spanning a recombination distance of 0.40. The markers identified five expressed gene loci - RT1.N1 (thymus leukemia antigen 1), Tnfa (tumor necrosis factor {alpha}), Hspa1 (heat shock protein 70), Ggt1 ({gamma} glutamyl-transferase 1), and Prkacn2 (protein kinase C catalytic subunit binding inhibitor 2), two loci with sequences that are related to expressed genes - RT1.Aw2 (sequence related to a non-RT1A class I {alpha} chain) and Mt21 (sequence related to metallothionein 2), and three anonymous loci - D20Arb548, D20Arb234, and D20Arb249. These polymorphic markers should facilitate mapping studies and genetic monitoring of inbred rat strains. 18 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. DNA book.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-06-01

    We propose herein a new method of DNA distribution, whereby DNA clones or PCR products are printed directly onto the pages of books and delivered to users along with relevant scientific information. DNA sheets, comprising water-soluble paper onto which DNA is spotted, can be bound into books. Readers can easily extract the DNA fragments from DNA sheets and amplify them using PCR. We show that DNA sheets can withstand various conditions that may be experienced during bookbinding and delivery, such as high temperatures and humidity. Almost all genes (95%-100% of randomly selected RIKEN mouse cDNA clones) were recovered successfully by use of PCR. Readers can start their experiments after a 2-h PCR amplification without waiting for the delivery of DNA clones. The DNA Book thus provides a novel method for delivering DNA in a timely and cost-effective manner. A sample DNA sheet (carrying RIKEN mouse cDNA clones encoding genes of enzymes for the TCA cycle) is included in this issue for field-testing. We would greatly appreciate it if readers could attempt to extract DNA and report the results and whether the DNA sheet was shipped to readers in good condition. PMID:12819147

  18. DNA Book

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Jun; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2003-01-01

    We propose herein a new method of DNA distribution, whereby DNA clones or PCR products are printed directly onto the pages of books and delivered to users along with relevant scientific information. DNA sheets, comprising water-soluble paper onto which DNA is spotted, can be bound into books. Readers can easily extract the DNA fragments from DNA sheets and amplify them using PCR. We show that DNA sheets can withstand various conditions that may be experienced during bookbinding and delivery, such as high temperatures and humidity. Almost all genes (95%100% of randomly selected RIKEN mouse cDNA clones) were recovered successfully by use of PCR. Readers can start their experiments after a 2-h PCR amplification without waiting for the delivery of DNA clones. The DNA Book thus provides a novel method for delivering DNA in a timely and cost-effective manner. A sample DNA sheet (carrying RIKEN mouse cDNA clones encoding genes of enzymes for the TCA cycle) is included in this issue for field-testing. We would greatly appreciate it if readers could attempt to extract DNA and report the results and whether the DNA sheet was shipped to readers in good condition. PMID:12819147

  19. The Association of the Xeroderma Pigmentosum Group D DNA Helicase (XPD) with Transcription Factor IIH Is Regulated by the Cytosolic Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Pathway.

    PubMed

    Vashisht, Ajay A; Yu, Clarissa C; Sharma, Tanu; Ro, Kevin; Wohlschlegel, James A

    2015-05-29

    Xeroderma pigmentosum group D (XPD) helicase is a component of the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) transcription complex and plays essential roles in transcription and nucleotide excision repair. Although iron-sulfur (Fe-S) cluster binding by XPD is required for activity, the process mediating Fe-S cluster assembly remains poorly understood. We recently identified a cytoplasmic Fe-S cluster assembly (CIA) targeting complex composed of MMS19, CIAO1, and FAM96B that is required for the biogenesis of extramitochondrial Fe-S proteins including XPD. Here, we use XPD as a prototypical Fe-S protein to further characterize how Fe-S assembly is facilitated by the CIA targeting complex. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that this process occurs in a stepwise fashion in which XPD acquires a Fe-S cluster from the CIA targeting complex before assembling into TFIIH. First, XPD was found to associate in a mutually exclusive fashion with either TFIIH or the CIA targeting complex. Second, disrupting Fe-S cluster assembly on XPD by either 1) depleting cellular iron levels or 2) utilizing XPD mutants defective in either Fe-S cluster or CIA targeting complex binding blocks Fe-S cluster assembly and prevents XPD incorporation into TFIIH. Finally, subcellular fractionation studies indicate that the association of XPD with the CIA targeting complex occurs in the cytoplasm, whereas its association with TFIIH occurs largely in the nucleus where TFIIH functions. Together, these data establish a sequential assembly process for Fe-S assembly on XPD and highlight the existence of quality control mechanisms that prevent the incorporation of immature apoproteins into their cellular complexes. PMID:25897079

  20. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskild, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03235c

  1. Mitochondrial DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  2. DNA Banking

    SciTech Connect

    Reilly, P.R. )

    1992-11-01

    The author is involved in the ethical, legal, and social issues of banking of DNA and data from DNA analysis. In his attempt to determine the extent of DNA banking in the U.S., the author surveyed some commercial companies performing DNA banking services. This article summarizes the results of that survey, with special emphasis on the procedures the companies use to protect the privacy of individuals. 4 refs.

  3. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes producing human phospholipase inhibitor polypeptides

    SciTech Connect

    Wallner, B.P.; Pepinsky, R.B.; Garwin, J.L.

    1989-11-07

    This patent describes a recombinant DNA molecule. In comprises a DNA sequence coding for a phospholopase inhibitor polypeptide and being selected from the group consisting of: the cDNA insert of ALC, DNA sequences which code on expression for a phospholopase inhibitor, and DNA sequences which are degenerate as a result of the genetic code to either of the foregoing DNA sequences and which code on expression for a phospholipase inhibitor.

  4. DNA Translocation by Human Uracil DNA Glycosylase: Role of DNA Phosphate Charge

    PubMed Central

    Schonhoft, Joseph D.; Kosowicz, John; Stivers, James T.

    2013-01-01

    Human DNA repair glycosylases must encounter and inspect each DNA base in the genome in order to discover damaged bases that may be present at a density of less than one in ten million normal base pairs. This remarkable example of specific molecular recognition requires a reduced dimensionality search process (facilitated diffusion) that involves both hopping and sliding along the DNA chain. Despite the widely accepted importance of facilitated diffusion in protein-DNA interactions, the molecular features of DNA that influence hopping and sliding are poorly understood. Here we explore the role of the charged DNA phosphate backbone in sliding and hopping by human uracil DNA glycosylase (hUNG), which is an exemplar that efficiently locates rare uracil bases in both dsDNA and ssDNA. Substitution of neutral methylphosphonate groups for anionic DNA phosphate groups weakened nonspecific DNA binding affinity by 0.40.5 kcal/mole per substitution. In contrast, sliding of hUNG between uracil sites embedded in duplex and single stranded DNA substrates persisted unabated when multiple methylphosphonate linkages were inserted between the sites. Thus a continuous phosphodiester backbone negative charge is not essential for sliding over nonspecific DNA binding sites. We consider several alternative mechanisms for these results. A model consistent with previous structural and NMR dynamic results invokes the presence of open and closed conformational states of hUNG. The open state is short-lived and has weak or nonexistent interactions with the DNA backbone that are conducive for sliding, and the populated closed state has stronger interactions with the phosphate backbone. These data suggest that the fleeting sliding form of hUNG is a distinct weakly interacting state that facilitates rapid movement along the DNA chain and resembles the transition state for DNA dissociation. PMID:23506309

  5. Dna Sequencing

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  6. DNA vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Coban, Cevayir; Kobiyama, Kouji; Jounai, Nao; Tozuka, Miyuki; Ishii, Ken J

    2013-01-01

    Since the introduction of DNA vaccines two decades ago, this attractive strategy has been hampered by its low immunogenicity in humans. Studies conducted to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines have shown that understanding the mechanism of action of DNA vaccines might be the key to successfully improving their immunogenicity. Our current understanding is that DNA vaccines induce innate and adaptive immune responses in two ways: (1) encoded protein (or polypeptide) antigen(s) by the DNA plasmid can be expressed in stromal cells (i.e., muscle cells) as well as DCs, where these antigens are processed and presented to naïve CD4 or CD8 T cells either by direct or cross presentation, respectively; and (2) the transfected DNA plasmid itself may bind to an un-identified cytosolic DNA sensor and activate the TBK1-STING pathway and the production of type I interferons (IFNs) which function as an adjuvant. Recent studies investigating double-stranded cytosolic DNA sensor(s) have highlighted new mechanisms in which cytosolic DNA may release secondary metabolites, which are in turn recognized by a novel DNA sensing machinery. Here, we discuss these new metabolites and the possibilities of translating this knowledge into improved immunogenicity for DNA vaccines. PMID:23912600

  7. Cinnamate-based DNA photolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Lang; Romulus, Joy; Li, Minfeng; Sha, Ruojie; Royer, John; Wu, Kun-Ta; Xu, Qin; Seeman, Nadrian C.; Weck, Marcus; Chaikin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    As demonstrated by means of DNA nanoconstructs, as well as DNA functionalization of nanoparticles and micrometre-scale colloids, complex self-assembly processes require components to associate with particular partners in a programmable fashion. In many cases the reversibility of the interactions between complementary DNA sequences is an advantage. However, permanently bonding some or all of the complementary pairs may allow for flexibility in design and construction. Here, we show that the substitution of a cinnamate group for a pair of complementary bases provides an efficient, addressable, ultraviolet light-based method to bond complementary DNA covalently. To show the potential of this approach, we wrote micrometre-scale patterns on a surface using ultraviolet light and demonstrated the reversible attachment of conjugated DNA and DNA-coated colloids. Our strategy enables both functional DNA photolithography and multistep, specific binding in self-assembly processes.

  8. Cinnamate-based DNA photolithography

    PubMed Central

    Romulus, Joy; Li, Minfeng; Sha, Ruojie; Royer, John; Wu, Kun-Ta; Xu, Qin

    2013-01-01

    As demonstrated by means of DNA nanoconstructs[1], as well as DNA functionalization of nanoparticles[2-4] and micrometre-scale colloids[5-8], complex self-assembly processes require components to associate with particular partners in a programmable fashion. In many cases the reversibility of the interactions between complementary DNA sequences is an advantage[9]. However, permanently bonding some or all of the complementary pairs may allow for flexibility in design and construction[10]. Here, we show that the substitution of a pair of complementary bases by a cinnamate group provides an efficient, addressable, UV light-based method to covalently bond complementary DNA. To show the potential of this approach, we wrote micrometre-scale patterns on a surface via UV light and demonstrate the reversible attachment of conjugated DNA and DNA-coated colloids. Our strategy enables both functional DNA photolithography and multi-step, specific binding in self-assembly processes. PMID:23685865

  9. Physical origin of DNA unzipping.

    PubMed

    Amnuanpol, Sitichoke

    2016-01-01

    In DNA transcription, the base pairs are unzipped in response to the enzymatic forces, separating apart two intertwined nucleotide strands. Consequently, the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), in which two nucleotide strands wind about each other, transits structurally to the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) in which two nucleotide strands are completely unwound and separated. The large interstrand separation is intimately related to the softening nucleotide strands. This conceptual framework is reinforced with the flow of the bending modulus toward zero under recursion relations derived from the momentum shell renormalization group. Interestingly, the stretch modulus remains the same under recursion relations. The renormalization of the bending modulus to zero has a profound implication that ssDNA has the shorter bending persistence length than does dsDNA in accordance with experiments. PMID:26306533

  10. Radiation damage to DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.

    1992-04-01

    Our goal is to calculate the probability to eject electrons from DNA by charged particles that pass near the macromolecule as they slow down in an aqueous medium that contains DNA in low concentration. This process is illustrated for a particle of charge Ze and velocity v, where impact parameters b{sub 1}, b{sub 2}, and b{sub 3} indicate the distances between the trajectory and a phosphate group, a base, and a sugar moiety, respectively. In the present state of our theoretical development, we must treat each of these components of DNA as an independent impurity site occupied by electrons in a Slater-type orbital with a characteristic orbital radius and band gap. Determination of these parameters will be discussed below; however, before we turn to that part of the discussion, it is interesting to address the question of multiple ionizations of DNA by the passage of a single charged particle.

  11. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  12. [Ancient DNA].

    PubMed

    Chelomina, G N

    2006-03-01

    The review is devoted to molecular genetic studies of ancient DNA. The problems of DNA preservation and modification after cell death, as well as techniques of working with ancient DNA, including its retrieval, removal of inhibitors, PCR amplification, and phylogenetic analysis, are discussed in detail. The possibilities are considered of using ancient DNA in resolving issues of systematics and evolution of various animal taxa, population genetics of humans and rare species, taxonomic identification and paleontological reconstructions, geographic origin of populations, microbiological analysis of paleontological and archeological finds, as well as some humanitarian aspects of its use. PMID:16649656

  13. Electronic effect of different positions of the -NO2 group on the DNA-intercalator of chiral complexes [Ru(bpy)2L]2+ (L =o-npip, m-npip and p-npip).

    PubMed

    Shi, Shuo; Liu, Jie; Li, Jun; Zheng, Kang C; Tan, Cai P; Chen, Lan M; Ji, Liang N

    2005-06-01

    New chiral Ru(II) complexes with intercalators L (L =o-npip, m-npip and p-npip) containing -NO2 at different positions on the phenyl ring were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, 1H NMR, ESI-MS and CD spectra. The DNA binding properties of these complexes have been investigated with UV-Vis, emission spectra, CD spectra and viscosity measurements. A subtle but detectable difference was observed in the interaction of these isomers with CT-DNA. Absorption spectroscopy experiments indicated that each of these complexes can interact with the DNA. The DNA-binding of the Delta-isomer is stronger than that of Lambda-isomer. DNA-viscosity experiments provided evidence that both Delta- and Lambda-[Ru(bpy)2(o-npip)](PF6)2 bind to DNA with partial intercalation, and both Delta- and Lambda-[Ru(bpy)(2)(p-npip)](PF6)2 fully intercalate with DNA. However, Delta- and Lambda- [Ru(bpy)2(m-npip)](PF6)2 bind to DNA through different modes, i.e., the Delta isomer by intercalation and Lambda isomer by partial intercalation. Under irradiation with UV light, Ru(II) complexes showed different efficiency of cleaving DNA. The most interesting feature is that neither 1 (Delta-1 and Lambda-1) nor 3 (Delta-3 and Lambda-3) emit luminescence either alone in aqueous solution or in the presence of DNA, whereas both Delta-2 and Lambda-2 emit luminescence under the same conditions. In addition, theoretical calculations for these three isomer complexes have been carried out applying the density functional theory (DFT) method at the level of the B3LYP/LanL2DZ basis set, and the calculated results can reasonably explain the obtained experimental trends in the DNA-binding affinities or binding constants (Kb) and some spectral properties of the complexes. PMID:15909056

  14. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices to a length greater than 20 {micro}m, and collecting atomic force microscopy (AFM) images up to 30 {micro}m. We found the lattices' requirement of divalent magnesium cations to stabilize Holliday junctions to be incompatible with the stability of charge-stabilized gold nanoparticles used for the experiments here, and gold particles added indiscriminately to the lattice surface through non-specific binding. Redesigning the lattices to avoid magnesium may improve results.

  15. DNA ALTERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The exposure of an organism to genotoxic chemicals may induce a cascade of genetic events. nitially, structural alterations to DNA are formed. ext, the DNA damage is processed and subsequently expressed in mutant gene products. inally, diseases result from the genetic damage. he ...

  16. Recombinant DNA means and method

    SciTech Connect

    Alford, B.L.; Mao, J.I.; Moir, D.T.; Taunton-Rigby, A.; Vovis, G.F.

    1987-05-19

    This patent describes a transformed living cell selected from the group consisting of fungi, yeast and bacteria, and containing genetic material derived from recombinant DNA material and coding for bovine rennin.

  17. The action of DNA ligase at abasic sites in DNA.

    PubMed

    Bogenhagen, D F; Pinz, K G

    1998-04-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites occur frequently in DNA as a result of spontaneous base loss or following removal of a damaged base by a DNA glycosylase. The action of many AP endonuclease enzymes at abasic sites in DNA leaves a 5'-deoxyribose phosphate (dRP) residue that must be removed during the base excision repair process. This 5'-dRP group may be removed by AP lyase enzymes that employ a beta-elimination mechanism. This beta-elimination reaction typically involves a transient Schiff base intermediate that can react with sodium borohydride to trap the DNA-enzyme complex. With the use of this assay as well as direct 5'-dRP group release assays, we show that T4 DNA ligase, a representative ATP-dependent DNA ligase, contains AP lyase activity. The AP lyase activity of T4 DNA ligase is inhibited in the presence of ATP, suggesting that the adenylated lysine residue is part of the active site for both the ligase and lyase activities. A model is proposed whereby the AP lyase activity of DNA ligase may contribute to the repair of abasic sites in DNA. PMID:9525883

  18. Differentiation of spotted fever group rickettsiae by sequencing and analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphism of PCR-amplified DNA of the gene encoding the protein rOmpA.

    PubMed Central

    Roux, V; Fournier, P E; Raoult, D

    1996-01-01

    Currently, the genotypic identification of the spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsiae is based on restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR-amplified genes coding for the enzyme citrate synthase and the surface proteins rOmpA and rOmpB. A set of useful restriction endonucleases was found following comparison of Rickettsia rickettsii and R. prowazekii sequences. However, by using three PCR amplifications and four enzyme digestions with this set, it was impossible to differentiate between all of the known serotypes of the SFG rickettsiae. We amplified by PCR and sequenced using an automated laser fluorescent DNA sequencer a fragment of the gene encoding the protein rOmpA from 21 serotypes of the SFG rickettsiae. A 632-bp amplification product was obtained for most of the strains, although no product could be obtained by using R. akari, R. australis, R. helvetica, and R. bellii DNAs. We found a characteristic sequence for all strains studied except the two isolates of R. massiliae, isolates GS and Mtul. Using the software package BISANCE, we determined the restriction map of this fragment and identified five potentially useful endonucleases, RsaI, AluI, PstI, XbaI, and AvaII. We confirmed the computer analysis-derived profiles by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The combination of the profiles obtained after digestion of the PCR product by RsaI and PstI allowed for the differentiation of 16 strains. The use of AluI and XbaI allowed for the characterization of R. parkeri and strain HA-91, respectively. R. africae and strain S were differentiated by AvaII digestion. Thus, using a single PCR amplification, we were able to differentiate all of the SFG rickettsiae whose ompA gene was amplified by PCR. PMID:8862558

  19. Chilean Pitavia more closely related to Oceania and Old World Rutaceae than to Neotropical groups: evidence from two cpDNA non-coding regions, withanew subfamilial classification of the family

    PubMed Central

    Groppo, Milton; Kallunki, Jacquelyn A.; Pirani, Jos Rubens; Antonelli, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The position of the plant genus Pitavia within an infrafamilial phylogeny of Rutaceae (rue, or orange family) was investigated with the use of two non-coding regions from cpDNA, the trnL-trnF region and the rps16 intron. The only species of the genus, Pitavia punctata Molina, is restricted to the temperate forests of the Coastal Cordillera of Central-Southern Chile and threatened by loss of habitat. The genus traditionally has been treated as part of tribe Zanthoxyleae (subfamily Rutoideae) where it constitutes the monogeneric tribe Pitaviinae. This tribe and genus are characterized by fruits of 1 to 4 fleshy drupelets, unlike the dehiscent fruits typical of the subfamily. Fifty-five taxa of Rutaceae, representing 53 genera (nearly one-third of those in the family) and all subfamilies, tribes, and almost all subtribes of the family were included. Parsimony and Bayesian inference were used to infer the phylogeny; six taxa of Meliaceae, Sapindaceae, and Simaroubaceae, all members of Sapindales, were also used as out-groups. Results from both analyses were congruent and showed Pitavia as sister to Flindersia and Lunasia, both genera with species scattered through Australia, Philippines, Moluccas, New Guinea and the Malayan region, and phylogenetically far from other Neotropical Rutaceae, such as the Galipeinae (Galipeeae, Rutoideae) and Pteleinae (Toddalieae, former Toddalioideae). Additionally, a new circumscription of the subfamilies of Rutaceae is presented and discussed. Only two subfamilies (both monophyletic) are recognized: Cneoroideae (including Dictyolomatoideae, Spathelioideae, Cneoraceae, and Ptaeroxylaceae) and Rutoideae (including not only traditional Rutoideae but also Aurantioideae, Flindersioideae, and Toddalioideae). As a consequence, Aurantioideae (Citrus and allies) is reduced to tribal rank as Aurantieae. PMID:23717188

  20. [DNA computing].

    PubMed

    B?asiak, Janusz; Krasi?ski, Tadeusz; Pop?awski, Tomasz; Sakowski, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Biocomputers can be an alternative for traditional "silicon-based" computers, which continuous development may be limited due to further miniaturization (imposed by the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle) and increasing the amount of information between the central processing unit and the main memory (von Neuman bottleneck). The idea of DNA computing came true for the first time in 1994, when Adleman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using short DNA oligomers and DNA ligase. In the early 2000s a series of biocomputer models was presented with a seminal work of Shapiro and his colleguas who presented molecular 2 state finite automaton, in which the restriction enzyme, FokI, constituted hardware and short DNA oligomers were software as well as input/output signals. DNA molecules provided also energy for this machine. DNA computing can be exploited in many applications, from study on the gene expression pattern to diagnosis and therapy of cancer. The idea of DNA computing is still in progress in research both in vitro and in vivo and at least promising results of these research allow to have a hope for a breakthrough in the computer science. PMID:21735816

  1. Training Groups, Encounter Groups, Sensitivity Groups and Group Psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Louis A.; Pattison, E. Mansell; Schafer, Donald W.

    1971-01-01

    Descriptions and comparison of group therapies and the new group procedures (training groups and sensitivity groupsan outgrowth of the so-called Laboratory Movement methods of the mid-1930's) have been provided for the better understanding of non-psychiatric physicians. A group leader must have proper training and must help his group in its search for its avowed goals, whether he is a group therapist, a sensitivity trainer, or anyone else interested in utilizing group processes. Those goals are either the therapeutic benefit of the individual, as defined in group psychotherapy, or a better understanding of how one functions in groups, as in T-groups or the other group processes in the area of sensitive living. All group situations contain powerful tools which must be handled with proper respect. When so handled by experienced leaders, the individuals involved can achieve their goals in these group experiences. PMID:18730582

  2. DNA nanodevices.

    PubMed

    Simmel, Friedrich C; Dittmer, Wendy U

    2005-03-01

    The molecular recognition properties of DNA molecules combined with the distinct mechanical properties of single and double strands of DNA can be utilized for the construction of nanodevices, which can perform ever more tasks with possible applications ranging from nanoconstruction to intelligent drug delivery. With the help of DNA it is possible to construct machinelike devices that are capable of rotational motion, pulling and stretching, or even unidirectional motion. It is possible to devise autonomous nanodevices, to grab and release molecules, and also to perform simple information-processing tasks. PMID:17193445

  3. Deciphering the Positional Influence of the Hydroxyl Group in the Cinnamoyl Part of 3-Hydroxy Flavonoids for Structural Modification and Their Interaction with the Protonated and B Form of Calf Thymus DNA Using Spectroscopic and Molecular Modeling Studies.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Ankur Bikash; Haque, Lucy; Bhuiya, Sutanwi; Ganguly, Aniruddha; Das, Suman

    2015-06-11

    Studies on the interaction of naturally occurring flavonoids with different polymorphic forms of nucleic acid are helpful for understanding the molecular aspects of binding mode and providing direction for the use and design of new efficient therapeutic agents. However, much less information is available on the interactions of these compounds with different polymorphic forms of DNA at the molecular level. In this report we investigated the interaction of two widely abundant dietary flavonoids quercetin (Q) and morin (M) with calf thymus (CT) DNA. Spectrophotometric, spectropolarimetric, viscosity measurement, and molecular docking simulation methods are used as tools to delineate the binding mode and probable location of the flavonoids and their effects on the stability and conformation of DNA. It is observed that in the presence of the protonated form of DNA the dual fluorescence of Q and M resulting from the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) is modified significantly. Structural analysis showed Q and M binds weakly to the B form (groove binding) compared to the protonated form of CT DNA (electrostatic interaction). In both cases, Q binds strongly to both forms of DNA compared to M. PMID:25978104

  4. Dancing DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennisi, Elizabeth

    1991-01-01

    An imaging technique that uses fluorescent dyes and allows scientists to track DNA as it moves through gels or in solution is described. The importance, opportunities, and implications of this technique are discussed. (KR)

  5. DNA fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Cawood, A H

    1989-09-01

    Hypervariable tandem-repetitive minisatellite regions of human DNA can be used to generate individual-specific DNA fingerprints. Validation studies have demonstrated the reliability of the analysis, the mode of inheritance of the minisatellites, and the unparalleled degree of individual specificity. The uses of hypervariable probes in forensic biology, paternity testing, and the resolution of a wide range of problems in genetics, molecular biology, population biology, and medicine are illustrated. PMID:2570651

  6. DNA repair.

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, Nigel; Rose, Ann

    2006-01-01

    The integrity of the genome is essential to the health of the individual and to the reproductive success of a species. Transmission of genetic information is in a selective balance between two opposing forces, the maintenance of genetic stability versus elimination of mutational change and loss of evolutionary potential. Caenorhabditis elegans provides many advantages for the study of DNA surveillance and repair in a multicellular organism. Several genes have been identified by mutagenesis and RNA interference that affect DNA damage checkpoint and repair functions. Many of these DNA damage response genes also play essential roles in DNA replication, cell cycle control, development, meiosis and mitosis. To date, no obvious DNA damage-induced checkpoint has been described in C. elegans somatic cells. In contrast, the DNA damage response in the germ line is characterized by two spatially separate checkpoints; mitotic germ nuclei proliferation arrest and apoptosis of damaged meiotic nuclei. Both of these responses are regulated by checkpoint genes including mrt-2, hus-1, rad-5 and cep-1, the C. elegans ortholog of the human tumour suppressor p53. The germ line DNA damage checkpoints in C. elegans provide an excellent model in which to study the genes required to maintain genomic stability and to test compounds which might have tumor suppressing properties. In addition to single gene studies, integration of data from high-throughput screens has identified genes not previous implicated in the DNA damage response and elucidated novel connections between the different repair pathways. Most of the genes involved are conserved between worms and humans, and in humans, are associated with either oncogenesis or tumor-suppression. Thus, studies of the physical and functional interactions of the components of the repair pathways in C. elegans will provide information about human repair disorders and cancer predisposition. PMID:18050489

  7. Unravelling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Rs; Danilowicz, C.

    2004-04-01

    The forces involved in the biology of life are carefully balanced between stopping thermal fluctuations ripping our DNA apart and having bonds weak enough to allow enzymes to function. The application of recently developed techniques for measuring piconewton forces and imaging at the nanometre scale on a molecule-by-molecule basis has dramatically increased the impact of single-molecule biophysics. This article describes the most commonly used techniques for imaging and manipulating single biomolecules. Using these techniques, the mechanical properties of DNA can be investigated, for example through measurements of the forces required to stretch and unzip the DNA double helix. These properties determine the ease with which DNA can be folded into the cell nucleus and the size and complexity of the accompanying cellular machinery. Part of this cellular machinery is enzymes, which manipulate, repair and transcribe the DNA helix. Enzymatic function is increasingly being investigated at the single molecule level to give better understanding of the forces and processes involved in the genetic cycle. One of the challenges is to transfer this understanding of single molecules into living systems. Already there have been some notable successes, such as the development of techniques for gene expression through the application of mechanical forces to cells, and the imaging and control of viral infection of a cell. This understanding and control of DNA has also been used to design molecules, which can self-assemble into a range of structures.

  8. DNA Adductomics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the 32P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LCMSn), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LCMSn instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology. PMID:24437709

  9. Comparison of Immunogenicity in Rhesus Macaques of Transmitted-Founder, HIV-1 Group M Consensus, and Trivalent Mosaic Envelope Vaccines Formulated as a DNA Prime, NYVAC, and Envelope Protein Boost

    PubMed Central

    Hulot, Sandrine L.; Korber, Bette; Giorgi, Elena E.; Vandergrift, Nathan; Saunders, Kevin O.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Mach, Linh V.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Tartaglia, Jim; Phogat, Sanjay; Jacobs, Bertram; Kibler, Karen; Perdiguero, Beatriz; Gomez, Carmen E.; Esteban, Mariano; Rosati, Margherita; Felber, Barbara K.; Pavlakis, George N.; Parks, Robert; Lloyd, Krissey; Sutherland, Laura; Scearce, Richard; Letvin, Norman L.; Seaman, Michael S.; Alam, S. Munir; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT An effective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccine must induce protective antibody responses, as well as CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, that can be effective despite extraordinary diversity of HIV-1. The consensus and mosaic immunogens are complete but artificial proteins, computationally designed to elicit immune responses with improved cross-reactive breadth, to attempt to overcome the challenge of global HIV diversity. In this study, we have compared the immunogenicity of a transmitted-founder (T/F) B clade Env (B.1059), a global group M consensus Env (Con-S), and a global trivalent mosaic Env protein in rhesus macaques. These antigens were delivered using a DNA prime-recombinant NYVAC (rNYVAC) vector and Env protein boost vaccination strategy. While Con-S Env was a single sequence, mosaic immunogens were a set of three Envs optimized to include the most common forms of potential T cell epitopes. Both Con-S and mosaic sequences retained common amino acids encompassed by both antibody and T cell epitopes and were central to globally circulating strains. Mosaics and Con-S Envs expressed as full-length proteins bound well to a number of neutralizing antibodies with discontinuous epitopes. Also, both consensus and mosaic immunogens induced significantly higher gamma interferon (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay (ELISpot) responses than B.1059 immunogen. Immunization with these proteins, particularly Con-S, also induced significantly higher neutralizing antibodies to viruses than B.1059 Env, primarily to tier 1 viruses. Both Con-S and mosaics stimulated more potent CD8-T cell responses against heterologous Envs than did B.1059. Both antibody and cellular data from this study strengthen the concept of using in silico-designed centralized immunogens for global HIV-1 vaccine development strategies. IMPORTANCE There is an increasing appreciation for the importance of vaccine-induced anti-Env antibody responses for preventing HIV-1 acquisition. This nonhuman primate study demonstrates that in silico-designed global HIV-1 immunogens, designed for a human clinical trial, are capable of eliciting not only T lymphocyte responses but also potent anti-Env antibody responses. PMID:25855741

  10. Linking two DNA duplexes with a rigid linker for DNA nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Ryu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Morinaga, Hironobu; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-08-18

    DNA has recently emerged as a promising material for the construction of nanosized architectures. Chemically modified DNA has been suggested to be an important component of such architectural building blocks. We have designed and synthesized a novel H-shaped DNA oligonucleotide dimer that is cross-linked with a structurally rigid linker composed of phenylene and ethynylene groups. A rotatable DNA unit was constructed through the self-assembly of this H-shaped DNA component and two complementary DNA oligonucleotides. In addition to the rotatable unit, a locked DNA unit containing two H-shaped DNA components was also constructed. As an example of an extended locked structure, a hexagonal DNA origami dimer and oligomer were constructed by using H-shaped DNA as linkers. PMID:26130712

  11. Linking two DNA duplexes with a rigid linker for DNA nanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Tashiro, Ryu; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Morinaga, Hironobu; Emura, Tomoko; Hidaka, Kumi; Endo, Masayuki; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    DNA has recently emerged as a promising material for the construction of nanosized architectures. Chemically modified DNA has been suggested to be an important component of such architectural building blocks. We have designed and synthesized a novel H-shaped DNA oligonucleotide dimer that is cross-linked with a structurally rigid linker composed of phenylene and ethynylene groups. A rotatable DNA unit was constructed through the self-assembly of this H-shaped DNA component and two complementary DNA oligonucleotides. In addition to the rotatable unit, a locked DNA unit containing two H-shaped DNA components was also constructed. As an example of an extended locked structure, a hexagonal DNA origami dimer and oligomer were constructed by using H-shaped DNA as linkers. PMID:26130712

  12. RNA-guided DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    Angeleska, Angela; Jonoska, Natasa; Saito, Masahico; Landweber, Laura F

    2007-10-21

    We propose molecular models for homologous DNA recombination events that are guided by either double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) or single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) templates. The models are applied to explain DNA rearrangements in some groups of ciliates, such as Stylonychia or Oxytricha, where extensive gene rearrangement occurs during differentiation of a somatic macronucleus from a germline micronucleus. We describe a model for RNA template guided DNA recombination, such that the template serves as a catalyst that remains unchanged after DNA recombination. This recombination can be seen as topological braiding of the DNA, with the template-guided alignment proceeding through DNA branch migration. We show that a virtual knot diagram can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. Schematically, the braiding process can be represented as a crossing in the virtual knot diagram. The homologous recombination corresponds to removal of the crossings in the knot diagram (called smoothing). We show that if all recombinations are performed at the same time (i.e., simultaneous smoothings of the crossings) then one of the resulting DNA molecules will always contain all of the gene segments in their correct, linear order, which produces the mature DNA sequence. PMID:17669433

  13. Ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the past two decades, ancient DNA research has progressed from the retrieval of small fragments of mitochondrial DNA from a few late Holocene specimens, to large-scale studies of ancient populations, phenotypically important nuclear loci, and even whole mitochondrial genome sequences of extinct species. However, the field is still regularly marred by erroneous reports, which underestimate the extent of contamination within laboratories and samples themselves. An improved understanding of these processes and the effects of damage on ancient DNA templates has started to provide a more robust basis for research. Recent methodological advances have included the characterization of Pleistocene mammal populations and discoveries of DNA preserved in ancient sediments. Increasingly, ancient genetic information is providing a unique means to test assumptions used in evolutionary and population genetics studies to reconstruct the past. Initial results have revealed surprisingly complex population histories, and indicate that modern phylogeographic studies may give misleading impressions about even the recent evolutionary past. With the advent and uptake of appropriate methodologies, ancient DNA is now positioned to become a powerful tool in biological research and is also evolving new and unexpected uses, such as in the search for extinct or extant life in the deep biosphere and on other planets. PMID:15875564

  14. DNA vaccines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  15. Group X

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  16. Benzophenone photosensitized DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Cuquerella, M Consuelo; Lhiaubet-Vallet, Virginie; Cadet, Jean; Miranda, Miguel A

    2012-09-18

    Although the carcinogenic potential of ultraviolet radiation is well-known, UV light may interact with DNA by direct absorption or through photosensitization by endogenous or exogenous chromophores. These chromophores can extend the "active" fraction of the solar spectrum to the UVA region and beyond, which means that photosensitizers increase the probability of developing skin cancer upon exposure to sunlight. Therefore researchers would like to understand the mechanisms involved in photosensitized DNA damage both to anticipate possible photobiological risks and to design tailor-made photoprotection strategies. In this context, photosensitized DNA damage can occur through a variety of processes including electron transfer, hydrogen abstraction, triplet-triplet energy transfer, or generation of reactive oxygen species. In this Account, we have chosen benzophenone (BP) as a classical and paradigmatic chromophore to illustrate the different lesions that photosensitization may prompt in nucleosides, in oligonucleotides, or in DNA. Thus, we discuss in detail the accumulated mechanistic evidence of the BP-photosensitized reactions of DNA or its building blocks obtained by our group and others. We also include ketoprofen (KP), a BP-derivative that possesses a chiral center, to highlight the stereodifferentiation in the key photochemical events, revealed through the dynamics of the reactive triplet excited state ((3)KP*). Our results show that irradiation of the BP chromophore in the presence of DNA or its components leads to nucleobase oxidations, cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer formation, single strand breaks, DNA-protein cross-links, or abasic sites. We attribute the manifold photoreactivity of BP to its well established photophysical properties: (i) it absorbs UV light, up to 360 nm; (ii) its intersystem crossing quantum yield (?(ISC)) is almost 1; (iii) the energy of its n?* lowest triplet excited state (E(T)) is ca. 290 kJ mol(-1); (iv) it produces singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) with a quantum yield (?(?)) of ca. 0.3. For electron transfer and singlet oxygen reactions, we focused on guanine, the nucleobase with the lowest oxidation potential. Among the possible oxidative processes, electron transfer predominates. Conversely, triplet-triplet energy transfer occurs mainly from (3)BP* to thymine, the base with the lowest lying triplet state in DNA. This process results in the formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers, but it also competes with the Patern-Bchi reaction in nucleobases or nucleosides, giving rise to oxetanes as a result of crossed cycloadditions. Interestingly, we have found significant stereodifferentiation in the quenching of the KP triplet excited state by both 2'-deoxyguanosine and thymidine. Based on these results, this chromophore shows potential as a (chiral) probe for the investigation of electron and triplet energy transport in DNA. PMID:22698517

  17. Isopermutation group

    SciTech Connect

    Muktibodh, A. S.

    2015-03-10

    The concept of ‘Isotopy’ as formulated by Ruggero Maria Santilli [1, 2, 3] plays a vital role in the development of Iso mathematics. Santilli defined iso-fields of characteristic zero. In this paper we extend this definition to define Iso-Galois fields [4] which are essentially of non-zero characteristic. Isotopically isomorphic realizations of a group define isopermutation group which gives a clear cut distinction between automorphic groups and isotopic groups.

  18. DNA Investigations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Ellen S.; Bertino, Anthony J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a simulation activity that allow students to work through the exercise of DNA profiling and to grapple with some analytical and ethical questions involving a couple arranging with a surrogate mother to have a baby. Can be used to teach the principles of restriction enzyme digestion, gel electrophoresis, and probe hybridization. (MDH)

  19. DNA photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Joshua A.; Grote, James G.; Ogata, Naoya; Zetts, John S.; Nelson, Robert L.; Diggs, Darnell E.; Hopkins, Frank K.; Yaney, Perry P.; Dalton, Larry R.; Clarson, Stephen J.

    2004-06-01

    Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) extracted and purified from salmon sperm was investigated for use in electro-optic devices as a cladding layer. The 500,000 molecular weight material has a refractive index less than that of common core materials such as poly(methyl)methacrylate (PMMA) and amorphous polycarbonates, shows a resistivity two orders of magnitude lower than common core materials, and shows no signs of degradation within 100C of the host poling temperature. DNA was analyzed as a cladding material for two different chromophore systems, Disperse Red 1 (DR1), and Cheng-Larry Dalton 1 (CLD1) in a PMMA guest/host system. A baseline device, comprised only of a 1.7?m layer of PMMA, was tested for non-linearity with each chromophore, with the r33 value increasing with increasing temperature and voltage. Doublestack devices included a 1?m thick DNA film as the cladding layer with the baseline core layer above. Based on the dielectric properties of DNA, values of r33 were calculated for the theoretical behavior of the devices. The recorded r33 values were accurate within 5% of the calculated values with the DR1 chromophore, and within 20% with the CLD1 chromophore, hence showing good device reproducibility.

  20. Synthetic DNA

    PubMed Central

    O Driscoll, Aisling; Sleator, Roy D.

    2013-01-01

    With world wide data predicted to exceed 40 trillion gigabytes by 2020, big data storage is a very real and escalating problem. Herein, we discuss the utility of synthetic DNA as a robust and eco-friendly archival data storage solution of the future. PMID:23514938

  1. DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Marinus, M.G.; Lbner-Olesen, A.

    2014-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication errors, controlling the frequency of initiation of chromosome replication at oriC, and regulation of transcription initiation at promoters containing GATC sequences. In contrast, there is no known function for Dcm methylation although Dcm recognition sites constitute sequence motifs for Very Short Patch repair of T/G base mismatches. In certain bacteria (e.g., Vibrio cholerae, Caulobacter crescentus) adenine methylation is essential and in C. crescentus, it is important for temporal gene expression which, in turn, is required for coordinating chromosome initiation, replication and division. In practical terms, Dam and Dcm methylation can inhibit restriction enzyme cleavage; decrease transformation frequency in certain bacteria; decrease the stability of short direct repeats; are necessary for site-directed mutagenesis; and to probe eukaryotic structure and function. PMID:26442938

  2. DNA Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Carol; della Villa, Paula

    1997-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students reverse-translate proteins from their amino acid sequences back to their DNA sequences then assign musical notes to represent the adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine bases. Data is obtained from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) on the Internet. (DDR)

  3. Home Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stahler, Theresa M.

    All students enrolled in the entry level foundations course in the College of Education of Kutztown University (Pennsylvania) participate in home groups, a cooperative learning strategy. Each student is assigned to a five- or six-person home group on the first day of class. Although group placements are made on the basis of class lists, every

  4. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ?} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of ?{sub matter}?0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  5. Packaged DNA. An elastic model.

    PubMed

    Manning, G S

    1985-03-01

    We review and deepen a theory of elastic bending of DNA on a persistence length scale. In a regime of extensive charge neutralization the axis of the double helix is elastically unstable when straight. Its stable bent conformation allows nucleation of DNA toruses and in principle could direct the supercoiled (solenoid) form of a polynucleosome. The Euler theory of elastic instability of macroscopic rods gives a partial description of the intrinsic ability of DNA to form locally stable bends. A different, quasi-Eulerian theory can be based on what is probably the dominant bending mechanism of DNA in solution-flexible kinking at the sites of open base pairs. This predictive theory is in quantitative agreement with the observed value (about 16 nm) for the minimum radius of torus holes. Stability of the inner torus ring is achieved when DNA phosphate groups are about 90% neutralized by trivalent cations, another prediction that is consistent with the observed formation of toruses in these conditions. The predicted stable radius of curvature of charge-neutralized DNA is also equal to the radial dimension of a maximally contracted polynucleosome supercoil as measured by neutron scattering (17 nm), but further experimental investigation of the geometrical disposition of the spacer DNA regions in the solenoid will be necessary to rule out the possibility of accidental agreement for this complex system. We stress again the experimental reality and probable importance of open base pairs in the equilibrium solution conformation of DNA. PMID:2408756

  6. DNA phosphorothioate modifications influence the global transcriptional response and protect DNA from double-stranded breaks

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Rui; Wu, Xiaolin; He, Wei; Liu, Zhenhua; Wu, Shuangju; Chen, Chao; Chen, Si; Xiang, Qianrong; Deng, Zixin; Liang, Dequan; Chen, Shi; Wang, Lianrong

    2014-01-01

    The modification of DNA by phosphorothioate (PT) occurs when the non-bridging oxygen in the sugar-phosphate backbone of DNA is replaced with sulfur. This DNA backbone modification was recently discovered and is governed by the dndABCDE genes in a diverse group of bacteria and archaea. However, the biological function of DNA PT modifications is poorly understood. In this study, we employed the RNA-seq analysis to characterize the global transcriptional changes in response to PT modifications. Our results show that DNA without PT protection is susceptible to DNA damage caused by the dndFGHI gene products. The DNA double-stranded breaks then trigger the SOS response, cell filamentation and prophage induction. Heterologous expression of dndBCDE conferring DNA PT modifications at GPSA and GPST prevented the damage in Salmonella enterica. Our data provide insights into the physiological role of the DNA PT system. PMID:25319634

  7. Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron unwind negatively supercoiled DNA and lengthen linear DNA.

    PubMed

    Verebov, Valria; Adamcik, Jozef; Danko, Patrik; Podhradsk, Duan; Mikovsk, Pavol; Stani?ov, Jana

    2014-01-31

    The intercalating drugs possess a planar aromatic chromophore unit by which they insert between DNA bases causing the distortion of classical B-DNA form. The planar tricyclic structure of anthraquinones belongs to the group of chromophore units and enables anthraquinones to bind to DNA by intercalating mode. The interactions of simple derivatives of anthraquinone, quinizarin (1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone) and danthron (1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone), with negatively supercoiled and linear DNA were investigated using a combination of the electrophoretic methods, fluorescence spectrophotometry and single molecule technique an atomic force microscopy. The detection of the topological change of negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA, unwinding of negatively supercoiled DNA, corresponding to appearance of DNA topoisomers with the low superhelicity and an increase of the contour length of linear DNA in the presence of quinizarin and danthron indicate the binding of both anthraquinones to DNA by intercalating mode. PMID:24434150

  8. Mitochondrial DNA deletions and differential mitochondrial DNA content in Rhesus monkeys: implications for aging.

    PubMed

    Mao, Peizhong; Gallagher, Patience; Nedungadi, Samira; Manczak, Maria; Shirendeb, Ulziibat P; Kohama, Steven G; Ferguson, Betsy; Park, Byung S; Reddy, P Hemachandra

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletions, mtDNA content and aging in rhesus monkeys. Using 2 sets of specific primers, we amplified an 8 kb mtDNA fragment covering a common 5.7 kb deletion and the entire 16.5 kb mitochondrial genome in the brain and buffy-coats of young and aged monkeys. We studied a total of 66 DNA samples: 39 were prepared from a buffy-coat and 27 were prepared from occipital cortex tissues. The mtDNA data were assessed using a permutation test to identify differences in mtDNA, in the different monkey groups. Using real-time RT-PCR strategy, we also assessed both mtDNA and nuclear DNA levels for young, aged and male and female monkeys. We found a 5.7 kb mtDNA deletion in 81.8% (54 of 66) of the total tested samples. In the young group of buffy-coat DNA, we found 5.7 kb deletions in 7 of 17 (41%), and in the aged group, we found 5.7 kb deletions in 12 of 22 (54%), suggesting that the prevalence of mtDNA deletions is related to age. We found decreased mRNA levels of mtDNA in aged monkeys relative to young monkeys. The increases in mtDNA deletions and mtDNA levels in aged rhesus monkeys suggest that damaged DNA accumulates as rhesus monkeys age and these altered mtDNA changes may have physiological relevance to compensate decreased mitochondrial function. PMID:22056405

  9. GROUP INEQUALITY

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Samuel; Loury, Glenn C.; Sethi, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    We explore the combined effect of segregation in social networks, peer effects, and the relative size of a historically disadvantaged group on the incentives to invest in market-rewarded skills and the dynamics of inequality between social groups. We identify conditions under which group inequality will persist in the absence of differences in ability, credit constraints, or labor market discrimination. Under these conditions, group inequality may be amplified even if initial group differences are negligible. Increases in social integration may destabilize an unequal state and make group equality possible, but the distributional and human capital effects of this depend on the demographic composition of the population. When the size of the initially disadvantaged group is sufficiently small, integration can lower the long-run costs of human capital investment in both groups and result in an increase the aggregate skill share. In contrast, when the initially disadvantaged group is large, integration can induce a fall in the aggregate skill share as the costs of human capital investment rise in both groups. We consider applications to concrete cases and policy implications. PMID:25554727

  10. Whitehead Groups of Spinor Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monastyrny?, A. P.; Yanchevski?, V. I.

    1991-02-01

    The Whitehead groups of spinor groups are studied. The known Kneser-Tits conjecture for spinor groups is reduced to a spinor analogue of the Tannaka-Artin problem, namely, to the question of whether the group K1Spin(D), where D is a division ring of exponent 2 , is trivial. A counterexample to the Kneser-Tits problem is constructed in the class of spinor groups. The group K1Spin(D) is computed. The stability of the Whitehead groups of spinor groups under purely transcendental extensions of the ground field is established. The R-equivalence on the k-points of spinor groups and the weak approximation problem are considered. The study of spinor group completes the study of the Whitehead groups of algebraic groups of classical type, that was started in studying reduced K-theory (V.P. Platonov) and was continued for reduced unitary K-theory (V.I. Yanchevski?) and Hermitian K-theory (Platonov and Yanchevski?). Bibliography: 50 titles.

  11. Inhibition of DNA methyltransferase inhibits DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Knox, J D; Araujo, F D; Bigey, P; Slack, A D; Price, G B; Zannis-Hadjopoulos, M; Szyf, M

    2000-06-16

    Ectopic expression of DNA methyltransferase transforms vertebrate cells, and inhibition of DNA methyltransferase reverses the transformed phenotype by an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that the presence of an active DNA methyltransferase is required for DNA replication in human non-small cell lung carcinoma A549 cells. We show that the inhibition of DNA methyltransferase by two novel mechanisms negatively affects DNA synthesis and progression through the cell cycle. Competitive polymerase chain reaction of newly synthesized DNA shows decreased origin activity at three previously characterized origins of replication following DNA methyltransferase inhibition. We suggest that the requirement of an active DNA methyltransferase for the functioning of the replication machinery has evolved to coordinate DNA replication and inheritance of the DNA methylation pattern. PMID:10849434

  12. Recombinant dna technical bulletin. Volume 12, Number 3, September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    The Recombinant DNA Technical Bulletin is a publication of the Office of Recombinant DNA Activities (ORDA), National Institutes of Health (NIH). The Bulletin attempts to link investigators involved in recombinant DNA research with organizations active in this area. It is sent to the chairmen of Institutional Biosafety Committees registered with ORDA, to principal investigators of NIH grants and contracts involving recombinant DNA, to the chairmen of genetic manipulation advisory committees, and to other individuals and groups interested in recombinant DNA activities.

  13. Leo Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The constellation LEO contains a rich concentration of galaxies, including five Messier objects. The Leo Group is the nearest group of galaxies with both giant ellipticals and spirals, which makes it valuable for tests of the extragalactic distance scale. The region also harbors two remarkable intergalactic features: a long stream of stars and gas that has been pulled from a SPIRAL GALAXY by grav...

  14. Group Theatre.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Brian

    The group interpretation approach to theatre production is defined as a method that will lead to production of plays that will appeal to "all the layers of the conscious and unconscious mind." In practice, it means that the group will develop and use resources of the theatre that orthodox companies too often ignore. The first two chapters of this

  15. Comparison of three DNA extraction methods for recovery of soil protist DNA.

    PubMed

    Santos, Susana S; Nielsen, Tue Kjærgaard; Hansen, Lars H; Winding, Anne

    2015-08-01

    The use of molecular methods to investigate protist communities in soil is in rapid development this decade. Molecular analysis of soil protist communities is usually dependant on direct genomic DNA extraction from soil and inefficient or differential DNA extraction of protist DNA can lead to bias in downstream community analysis. Three commonly used soil DNA extraction methods have been tested on soil samples from three European Long-Term Observatories (LTOs) with different land-use and three protist cultures belonging to different phylogenetic groups in different growth stages. The methods tested were: ISOm-11063 (a version of the ISO-11063 method modified to include a FastPrep ®-24 mechanical lysis step), GnS-GII (developed by the GenoSol platform to extract soil DNA in large-scale soil surveys) and a commercial DNA extraction kit - Power Lyzer™ PowerSoil® DNA Isolation Kit (MoBio). DNA yield and quality were evaluated along with DNA suitability for amplification of 18S rDNA fragments by PCR. On soil samples, ISOm-11063 yields significantly higher DNA for two of the three soil samples, however, MoBio extraction favors DNA quality. This method was also more effective to recover copies of 18S rDNA numbers from all soil types. In addition and despite the lower yields, higher DNA quality was observed with DNA extracted from protist cultures with the MoBio method. Likewise, a bead-beating step shows to be a good solution for DNA extraction of soil protists, since the recovery of DNA from protist cultures and from the different soil samples with the ISOm method proved to be efficient in recovering PCR-amplifiable DNA. This study showed that soil DNA extraction methods provide biased results towards the cyst stages of protist organism. PMID:25966645

  16. DNA Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, C.; Gidrol, X.

    Genomics has revolutionised biological and biomedical research. This revolution was predictable on the basis of its two driving forces: the ever increasing availability of genome sequences and the development of new technology able to exploit them. Up until now, technical limitations meant that molecular biology could only analyse one or two parameters per experiment, providing relatively little information compared with the great complexity of the systems under investigation. This gene by gene approach is inadequate to understand biological systems containing several thousand genes. It is essential to have an overall view of the DNA, RNA, and relevant proteins. A simple inventory of the genome is not sufficient to understand the functions of the genes, or indeed the way that cells and organisms work. For this purpose, functional studies based on whole genomes are needed. Among these new large-scale methods of molecular analysis, DNA microarrays provide a way of studying the genome and the transcriptome. The idea of integrating a large amount of data derived from a support with very small area has led biologists to call these chips, borrowing the term from the microelectronics industry. At the beginning of the 1990s, the development of DNA chips on nylon membranes [1, 2], then on glass [3] and silicon [4] supports, made it possible for the first time to carry out simultaneous measurements of the equilibrium concentration of all the messenger RNA (mRNA) or transcribed RNA in a cell. These microarrays offer a wide range of applications, in both fundamental and clinical research, providing a method for genome-wide characterisation of changes occurring within a cell or tissue, as for example in polymorphism studies, detection of mutations, and quantitative assays of gene copies. With regard to the transcriptome, it provides a way of characterising differentially expressed genes, profiling given biological states, and identifying regulatory channels.

  17. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Almeida, M. L.; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  18. Group Grammar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  19. DNA typing of isolates associated with the 1988 sporotrichosis epidemic.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, C R; Breslin, B J; Dixon, D M; Salkin, I F

    1992-01-01

    DNA typing techniques were used to examine selected clinical and environmental isolates of Sporothorix spp. recovered from the 1988 sporotrichosis epidemic in multiple states of the United States. Previous studies indicated that isolates in one of the six morphologically or physiologically distinct groups (group I) obtained from environmental sources were Sporothrix schenckii and were the possible etiologic agents responsible for the epidemic. To assess this hypothesis at the genetic level, whole-cell DNA was extracted from selected clinical isolates and representative members of each of the six environmental groups subjected to endonuclease digestion and then analyzed by gel electrophresis. DNA types were assigned on the basis of restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns. One DNA type was common to clinical and group I isolates but was dissimilar from the DNA types exhibited by groups II to VI. In contrast, a variety of DNA types were associated with isolates in groups II to VI. The latter groups appeared to make up a heterogeneous collection of fungi, with some members of the same group having different DNA types but with others from different groups possessing identical DNA types. Thus, DNA typing studies confirmed that group I environmental isolates are indistinguishable from clinical isolates and that group II to VI isolates represent a complex of related fungi with similar Sporothrix anamorphs. Images PMID:1352783

  20. T5 DNA polymerase: structural--functional relationships to other DNA polymerases.

    PubMed Central

    Leavitt, M C; Ito, J

    1989-01-01

    T5 DNA polymerase, a highly processive single-polypeptide enzyme, has been analyzed for its primary structural features. The amino acid sequence of T5 DNA polymerase has a high degree of homology with that of DNA polymerase I from Escherichia coli and retains many of the amino acid residues that have been implicated in the 3'----5' exonuclease and DNA polymerase activities of that enzyme. Alignment with sequences of polymerase I and T7 DNA polymerase was used to identify regions possibly involved in the high processivity of this enzyme. Further, amino acid sequence comparisons of T5 DNA polymerase with a large group of DNA polymerases previously shown to exhibit little similarity to polymerase I indicate certain sequence segments are shared among distantly related DNA polymerases. These shared regions have been implicated in the 3'----5' exonuclease function of polymerase I, which suggests that the proofreading domains of all these enzymes may be evolutionarily related. PMID:2660138

  1. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

    1992-05-12

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

  2. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOEpatents

    Caldwell, Karin D.; Chu, Tun-Jen; Pitt, William G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

  3. Optical DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaywargi, Deepak; Lewis, Dave; Kirovski, Darko

    A certificate of authenticity (COA) is an inexpensive physical object with a random and unique structure S which is hard to near-exactly replicate. An inexpensive device should be able to scan object’s physical “fingerprint,” a set of features that represents S. In this paper, we explore one set of requirements that optical media such as DVDs should satisfy, to be considered as COAs. As manufacturing of such media produces inevitable errors, we use the locations and count of these errors as a “fingerprint” for each optical disc: its optical DNA. The “fingerprint” is signed using publisher’s private-key and the resulting signature is stored onto the optical medium using a post-production process. Standard DVD players with altered firmware that includes publisher’s public-key, should be able to verify the authenticity of DVDs protected with optical DNA. Our key finding is that for the proposed protocol, only DVDs with exceptional wear-and-tear characteristics would result in an inexpensive and viable anti-counterfeiting technology.

  4. Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron unwind negatively supercoiled DNA and lengthen linear DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Verebová, Valéria; Adamcik, Jozef; Danko, Patrik; Podhradský, Dušan; Miškovský, Pavol; Staničová, Jana

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron unwind negatively supercoiled DNA. • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron lengthen linear DNA. • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron possess middle binding affinity to DNA. • Anthraquinones quinizarin and danthron interact with DNA by intercalating mode. - Abstract: The intercalating drugs possess a planar aromatic chromophore unit by which they insert between DNA bases causing the distortion of classical B-DNA form. The planar tricyclic structure of anthraquinones belongs to the group of chromophore units and enables anthraquinones to bind to DNA by intercalating mode. The interactions of simple derivatives of anthraquinone, quinizarin (1,4-dihydroxyanthraquinone) and danthron (1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone), with negatively supercoiled and linear DNA were investigated using a combination of the electrophoretic methods, fluorescence spectrophotometry and single molecule technique an atomic force microscopy. The detection of the topological change of negatively supercoiled plasmid DNA, unwinding of negatively supercoiled DNA, corresponding to appearance of DNA topoisomers with the low superhelicity and an increase of the contour length of linear DNA in the presence of quinizarin and danthron indicate the binding of both anthraquinones to DNA by intercalating mode.

  5. Conformational features of distamycin-DNA and netropsin-DNA complexes by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J C; Wartell, R M; O'Shea, D C

    1978-01-01

    The binding of distamycin and netropsin to duplex DNA has been studied by Raman spectroscopy. Several changes occur in the Raman spectra of these drugs upon binding DNA. These changes were analyzed by assigning specific motions to the observed Raman bands through the use of molecular subunits of the drugs and normal mode calculations. Our analysis indicates that pyrrole ring and peptide group vibrations are altered upon binding to DNA. The environments of the pyrrole ring methyl groups are not affected by the binding. These data provide physical evidence consistent with a binding model in which the methyl groups on the pyrroles project away from the DNA and the peptide N-H groups form hydrogen bonds with the DNA. PMID:281697

  6. Simulation of Adsorption of DNA on Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, X.; Johnson, J.K.

    2007-08-29

    We report molecular dynamics simulations of DNA adsorption on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) in an aqueous environment. We have modeled a DNA segment with 12 base pairs (Dickerson dodecamer) and a (8,8) SWNT in water, with counterions to maintain total charge neutrality. Simulations show that DNA binds to the external surface of an uncharged or positively charged SWNT on a time scale of a few hundred picoseconds. The hydrophobic end groups of DNA are attracted to the hydrophobic SWNT surface of uncharged SWNTs, while the hydrophilic backbone of DNA does not bind to the uncharged SWNT. The binding mode of DNA to charged SWNTs is qualitatively different from uncharged SWNTs. The phosphodiester groups of the DNA backbone are attracted to a positively charged SWNT surface while DNA does not adsorb on negatively charged SWNTs. There is no evidence for canonical doublestranded DNA wrapping around either charged or uncharged SWNTs on the very short time scales of the simulations. The adsorption process appears to have negligible effect on the internal stacking structure of the DNA molecule but significantly affects the A to B form conversion of A-DNA. The adsorption of A-DNA onto an uncharged SWNT inhibits the complete relaxation of A-DNA to B-DNA within the time scale of the simulations. In contrast, binding of the A-DNA onto a positively charged SWNT may promote slightly the A to B conversion.

  7. Photosensitive interaction of RSU 1069 with DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.I.; Knox, R.J.; Skolimowski, I.M.; Zahoor, A.; Knight, R.C.

    1984-08-01

    RSU 1069 is a 2-nitroimidazole radiosensitizer with an aziridine-containing side chain. In light (360 nm) the absorbance maximum of the nitro group at 325 nm disappears, which is accompanied by expulsion of the nitro group as the nitrite ion. This photosensitive effect was used to determine separately the damage of DNA induced by the reduced nitro group and the alkylating property of the aziridine. The aziridine-induced DNA damage is maximized in the dark when the nitro group is either absent (electrolytically reduced prior to the addition of DNA) or non functional (unreduced). In the light, damage is reduced. Typical DNA damage includes helix disruption leading to single strand breaks and the release of thymidine. Alkaline filter elution studies show evidence only for strand breakage and none for cross-linking indicating the drug is capable of mono-functional alkylation only.

  8. Magnetic tweezers for DNA micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haber, Charbel; Wirtz, Denis

    2000-12-01

    We detail the design of an electromagnetic assembly capable of generating a constant magnetic field superimposed to a large magnetic field gradient (between 40 and 100 T/m), which was uniform over a large gap (between 1.5 and 2 cm). Large gaps allowed the use of wide high numerical-aperture lenses to track microspheres attached to DNA molecules with an inverted light microscope. Given the geometric constraints of the microscope, computer-aided design was used to optimize the magnetic field gradient linearity, homogeneity, and amplitude, as well as the arrangement of the magnetic coils, the currents, and the mechanical stability of the assembly. The assembly was used to apply forces of controlled amplitude, direction, and time dependence on superparamagnetic microspheres by using magnetic coils instead of permanent magnets. A streptavidin-coated microsphere was attached to the 3' end of a ?-phage DNA molecule through a single biotin molecule. The 5' end of the ?-phage DNA molecule was tethered to a glass coverslip by conjugating the DNA's overhang to a complementary 12 base-pair primer, which was itself cross-linked to a heterobifunctional group placed on the glass coverslip. By tracking the centroid of this microsphere, the mechanical response of a single ?-phage DNA molecule was measured as a function of the applied magnetic force. The resulting force-extension curve was fitted with the worm-like-chain model to obtain ?-phage DNA's persistence length and contour length, which were in agreement with previous reports.

  9. HMGNs, DNA Repair and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gerlitz, Gabi

    2009-01-01

    DNA lesions threaten the integrity of the genome and are a major factor in cancer formation and progression. Eukaryotic DNA is organized in nucleosome-based higher order structures, which form the chromatin fiber. In recent years, considerable knowledge has been gained on the importance of chromatin dynamics for the cellular response to DNA damage and for the ability to repair DNA lesions. High Mobility Group N 1 (HMGN1) protein is an emerging factor that is important for chromatin alterations in response to DNA damage originated from both ultra violet light (UV) and ionizing irradiation (IR). HMGN1 is a member in the HMGN family of chromatin architectural proteins. HMGNs bind directly to nucleosomes and modulate the structure of the chromatin fiber in a highly dynamic manner. This review focuses mainly on the roles of HMGN1 in the cellular response pathways to different types of DNA lesions and in transcriptional regulation of cancer-related genes. In addition, emerging roles for HMGN5 in cancer progression and for HMGN2 as a potential tool in cancer therapy will be discussed. PMID:20004154

  10. DNA modifications: Another stable base in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brazauskas, Pijus; Kriaucionis, Skirmantas

    2014-12-01

    Oxidation of 5-methylcytosine has been proposed to mediate active and passive DNA demethylation. Tracking the history of DNA modifications has now provided the first solid evidence that 5-hydroxymethylcytosine is a stable epigenetic modification.

  11. GROUP DECISIONS

    PubMed Central

    Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Farine, Damien R.; Couzin, Iain D.; Crofoot, Margaret C.

    2016-01-01

    Conflicts of interest about where to go and what to do are a primary challenge of group living. However, it remains unclear how consensus is achieved in stable groups with stratified social relationships. Tracking wild baboons with a high-resolution global positioning system and analyzing their movements relative to one another reveals that a process of shared decision-making governs baboon movement. Rather than preferentially following dominant individuals, baboons are more likely to follow when multiple initiators agree. When conflicts arise over the direction of movement, baboons choose one direction over the other when the angle between them is large, but they compromise if it is not. These results are consistent with models of collective motion, suggesting that democratic collective action emerging from simple rules is widespread, even in complex, socially stratified societies. PMID:26089514

  12. Underrepresented groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, David A.

    1990-01-01

    The problem with the shortage of under represented groups in science and engineering is absolutely crucial, especially considering that U.S. will experience a shortage of 560,000 science and engineering personnel by the year 2010. Most studies by the National Science Foundation also concluded that projected shortages cannot be alleviated without significant increases in the involvement of Blacks, Hispanics, Native Americans, handicapped persons, and women.

  13. Synthesis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  14. Relaxed specificity of prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases results in DNA site-specific modification of RNA/DNA heteroduplexes.

    PubMed

    Wons, Ewa; Mruk, Iwona; Kaczorowski, Tadeusz

    2015-11-01

    RNA/DNA hybrid duplexes regularly occur in nature, for example in transcriptional R loops. Their susceptibility to modification by DNA-specific or RNA-specific enzymes is, thus, a biologically relevant question, which, in addition, has possible biotechnological implications. In this study, we investigated the activity of four isospecific DNA methyltransferases (M.EcoVIII, M.LlaCI, M.HindIII, M.BstZ1II) toward an RNA/DNA duplex carrying one 5'-AAGCUU-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5' target sequence. The analyzed enzymes belong to the β-group of adenine N6-methyltransferases and recognize the palindromic DNA sequence 5'-AAGCTT-3'/3'-TTCGAA-5'. Under standard conditions, none of these isospecific enzymes could detectibly methylate the RNA/DNA duplex. However, the addition of agents that generally relax specificity, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and glycerol, resulted in substantial methylation of the RNA/DNA duplex by M.EcoVIII and M.LlaCI. Only the DNA strand of the RNA/DNA duplex was methylated. The same was not observed for M.HindIII or M.BstZ1II. This is, to our knowledge, the first report that demonstrates such activity by prokaryotic DNA methyltransferases. Possible applications of these findings in a laboratory practice are also discussed. PMID:25787880

  15. DNA systematics. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, S.K.

    1986-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: PLANTS: PLANT DNA: Contents and Systematics. Repeated DNA Sequences and Polyploidy in Cereal Crops. Homology of Nonrepeated DNA Sequences in Phylogeny of Fungal Species. Chloropast DNA and Phylogenetic Relationships. rDNA: Evolution Over a Billion Years. 23S rRNA-derived Small Ribosomal RNAs: Their Structure and Evolution with Reference to Plant Phylogeny. Molecular Analysis of Plant DNA Genomes: Conserved and Diverged DNA Sequences. A Critical Review of Some Terminologies Used for Additional DNA in Plant Chromosomes and Index.

  16. DNA encoding a DNA repair protein

    DOEpatents

    Petrini, John H.; Morgan, William Francis; Maser, Richard Scott; Carney, James Patrick

    2006-08-15

    An isolated and purified DNA molecule encoding a DNA repair protein, p95, is provided, as is isolated and purified p95. Also provided are methods of detecting p95 and DNA encoding p95. The invention further provides p95 knock-out mice.

  17. Energy transport in crystalline DNA composites

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zaoli; Xu, Shen; Tang, Xiaoduan; Wang, Xinwei

    2014-01-15

    This work reports on the synthesis of crystalline DNA-composited films and microfibers, and details the study of thermal energy transport in them. The transient electro-thermal technique is used to characterize the thermal transport in DNA composite microfibers, and the photothermal technique is used to explore the thermal transport in the thickness direction of DNA films. Compared with microfibers, the DNA films are found to have a higher thermal transport capacity, largely due to the carefully controlled crystallization process in film synthesis. In high NaCl concentration solutions, the bond of the Na{sup +} ion and phosphate group aligns the DNA molecules with the NaCl crystal structure during crystallization. This results in significant enhancement of thermal transport in the DNA films with aligned structure.

  18. DNA/RNA Detection Using DNA-Templated Few-Atom Silver Nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Obliosca, Judy M.; Liu, Cong; Batson, Robert Austin; Babin, Mark C.; Werner, James H.; Yeh, Hsin-Chih

    2013-01-01

    DNA-templated few-atom silver nanoclusters (DNA/Ag NCs) are a new class of organic/inorganic composite nanomaterials whose fluorescence emission can be tuned throughout the visible and near-IR range by simply programming the template sequences. Compared to organic dyes, DNA/Ag NCs can be brighter and more photostable. Compared to quantum dots, DNA/Ag NCs are smaller, less prone to blinking on long timescales, and do not have a toxic core. The preparation of DNA/Ag NCs is simple and there is no need to remove excess precursors as these precursors are non-fluorescent. Our recent discovery of the fluorogenic and color switching properties of DNA/Ag NCs have led to the invention of new molecular probes, termed NanoCluster Beacons (NCBs), for DNA detection, with the capability to differentiate single-nucleotide polymorphisms by emission colors. NCBs are inexpensive, easy to prepare, and compatible with commercial DNA synthesizers. Many other groups have also explored and taken advantage of the environment sensitivities of DNA/Ag NCs in creating new tools for DNA/RNA detection and single-nucleotide polymorphism identification. In this review, we summarize the recent trends in the use of DNA/Ag NCs for developing DNA/RNA sensors. PMID:25586126

  19. Electronic Structure of Wet DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gervasio, Francesco Luigi; Carloni, Paolo; Parrinello, Michele

    2002-08-01

    The electronic properties of a Z-DNA crystal synthesized in the laboratory are investigated by means of density-functional theory Car-Parrinello calculations. The electronic structure has a gap of only 1.28eV. This separates a manifold of 12 occupied states which came from the ? guanine orbitals from the lowest empty states in which the electron is transferred to the Na+ from PO-4 groups and water molecules. We have evaluated the anisotropic optical conductivity. At low frequency the conductivity is dominated by the ?-->Na+ transitions. Our calculation demonstrates that the cost of introducing electron holes in wet DNA strands could be lower than previously anticipated.

  20. Nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of cDNA coding for the variable regions of the light and heavy chains of mouse hybridoma antibodies to blood group A and B substances.

    PubMed

    Chen, H T; Kabat, E A; Lundblad, A; Ratcliffe, R M

    1987-10-01

    This is the first report of nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the variable region light (VL) and heavy (VH) chains of mouse monoclonal hybridoma anti-blood group A and B substances, the combining sites of which have been mapped. Monoclonal hybridoma anti-A and anti-B produced in BALB/c mice by immunization with A or B blood group substances, with A1 erythrocytes, and water-soluble blood group A substance or with synthetic B determinants coupled to bovine serum albumin or to O erythrocytes have been characterized immunochemically. To relate the immunochemical properties of the monoclonals to their primary structures, we have cloned and sequenced cDNAs of variable regions of light and heavy chains of two anti-A and two anti-B. The anti-A hybridomas have very similar combining site specificities and have almost identical VH sequences belonging to the J558 germ-line family, but their VL are from different germ-line VK gene families. The two anti-B hybridomas have different combining site specificities and use the same VL which differs completely from the anti-A VL; their VH are derived from different VH germ-line genes belonging to the J606 family. The results suggest that the heavy chains play a major role in determining the specificities of the antibody combining sites, with only minor contribution of VL. Additional sequence data on monoclonal antibodies of defined specificity for blood group substances are needed for further insights into the genetic and structural basis for their specificities. PMID:3115981

  1. The centipede genus Eupolybothrus Verhoeff, 1907 (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Lithobiidae) in North Africa, a cybertaxonomic revision, with a key to all species in the genus and the first use of DNA barcoding for the group

    PubMed Central

    Stoev, Pavel; Akkari, Nesrine; Zapparoli, Marzio; Porco, David; Enghoff, Henrik; Edgecombe, Gregory D.; Georgiev, Teodor; Penev, Lyubomir

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The centipede genus Eupolybothrus Verhoeff, 1907 in North Africa is revised. A new cavernicolous species, Eupolybothrus kahfi Stoev & Akkari, sp. n., is described from a cave in Jebel Zaghouan, northeast Tunisia. Morphologically, it is most closely related to Eupolybothrus nudicornis (Gervais, 1837) from North Africa and Southwest Europe but can be readily distinguished by the long antennae and leg-pair 15, a conical dorso-median protuberance emerging from the posterior part of prefemur 15, and the shape of the male first genital sternite. Molecular sequence data from the cytochrome c oxidase I gene (mtDNA5 COI-barcoding fragment) exhibit 19.19% divergence between Eupolybothrus kahfi and Eupolybothrus nudicornis, an interspecific value comparable to those observed among four other species of Eupolybothrus which, combined with a low intraspecific divergence (0.31.14%), supports the morphological diagnosis of Eupolybothrus kahfi as a separate species. This is the first troglomorphic myriapod to be found in Tunisia, and the second troglomorph lithobiomorph centipede known from North Africa. Eupolybothrus nudicornis is redescribed based on abundant material from Tunisia and its post-embryonic development, distribution and habitat preferences recorded. Eupolybothrus cloudsley-thompsoni Turk, 1955, a nominal species based on Tunisian type material, is placed in synonymy with Eupolybothrus nudicornis. To comply with the latest technological developments in publishing of biological information, the paper implements new approaches in cybertaxonomy, such as fine granularity XML tagging validated against the NLM DTD TaxPub for PubMedCentral and dissemination in XML to various aggregators (GBIF, EOL, Wikipedia), vizualisation of all taxa mentioned in the text via the dynamically created Pensoft Taxon Profile (PTP) page, data publishing, georeferencing of all localities via Google Earth, and ZooBank, GenBank and MorphBank registration of datasets. An interactive key to all valid species of Eupolybothrus is made with DELTA software. PMID:21594115

  2. The centipede genus Eupolybothrus Verhoeff, 1907 (Chilopoda: Lithobiomorpha: Lithobiidae) in North Africa, a cybertaxonomic revision, with a key to all species in the genus and the first use of DNA barcoding for the group.

    PubMed

    Stoev, Pavel; Akkari, Nesrine; Zapparoli, Marzio; Porco, David; Enghoff, Henrik; Edgecombe, Gregory D; Georgiev, Teodor; Penev, Lyubomir

    2010-01-01

    The centipede genus Eupolybothrus Verhoeff, 1907 in North Africa is revised. A new cavernicolous species, Eupolybothruskahfi Stoev & Akkari, sp. n., is described from a cave in Jebel Zaghouan, northeast Tunisia. Morphologically, it is most closely related to Eupolybothrusnudicornis (Gervais, 1837) from North Africa and Southwest Europe but can be readily distinguished by the long antennae and leg-pair 15, a conical dorso-median protuberance emerging from the posterior part of prefemur 15, and the shape of the male first genital sternite. Molecular sequence data from the cytochrome c oxidase I gene (mtDNA-5' COI-barcoding fragment) exhibit 19.19% divergence between Eupolybothruskahfi and Eupolybothrusnudicornis, an interspecific value comparable to those observed among four other species of Eupolybothrus which, combined with a low intraspecific divergence (0.3-1.14%), supports the morphological diagnosis of Eupolybothruskahfi as a separate species. This is the first troglomorphic myriapod to be found in Tunisia, and the second troglomorph lithobiomorph centipede known from North Africa. Eupolybothrusnudicornis is redescribed based on abundant material from Tunisia and its post-embryonic development, distribution and habitat preferences recorded. Eupolybothruscloudsley-thompsoni Turk, 1955, a nominal species based on Tunisian type material, is placed in synonymy with Eupolybothrusnudicornis. To comply with the latest technological developments in publishing of biological information, the paper implements new approaches in cybertaxonomy, such as fine granularity XML tagging validated against the NLM DTD TaxPub for PubMedCentral and dissemination in XML to various aggregators (GBIF, EOL, Wikipedia), vizualisation of all taxa mentioned in the text via the dynamically created Pensoft Taxon Profile (PTP) page, data publishing, georeferencing of all localities via Google Earth, and ZooBank, GenBank and MorphBank registration of datasets. An interactive key to all valid species of Eupolybothrus is made with DELTA software. PMID:21594115

  3. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  4. Sirtuins, Metabolism, and DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jee-Eun; Mostoslavsky, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Cells evolve to actively coordinate nutrient availability with cellular activity in order to maintain metabolic homeostasis. In addition, active pathways to repair DNA damage are crucial to avoid deleterious genomic instability. In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that availability of intermediate metabolites may play an important role in DNA repair, suggesting that these two seemingly distant cellular activities may be highly coordinated. The sirtuin family of proteins now described as deacylases (they can also remove acyl groups other than acetyl moieties), it appears to have evolved to control both metabolism and DNA repair. In this review, we discuss recent advances that lay the foundation to understanding the role of sirtuins in these two biological processes, and the potential crosstalk to coordinate them. PMID:25005742

  5. DNA Binding Hydroxyl Radical Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Vicky J; Konigsfeld, Katie M; Aguilera, Joe A; Milligan, Jamie R

    2011-01-01

    The hydroxyl radical is the primary mediator of DNA damage by the indirect effect of ionizing radiation. It is a powerful oxidizing agent produced by the radiolysis of water and is responsible for a significant fraction of the DNA damage associated with ionizing radiation. There is therefore an interest in the development of sensitive assays for its detection. The hydroxylation of aromatic groups to produce fluorescent products has been used for this purpose. We have examined four different chromophores which produce fluorescent products when hydroxylated. Of these, the coumarin system suffers from the fewest disadvantages. We have therefore examined its behavior when linked to a cationic peptide ligand designed to bind strongly to DNA. PMID:22125376

  6. Cardiovascular group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blomqvist, Gunnar

    1989-01-01

    As a starting point, the group defined a primary goal of maintaining in flight a level of systemic oxygen transport capacity comparable to each individual's preflight upright baseline. The goal of maintaining capacity at preflight levels would seem to be a reasonable objective for several different reasons, including the maintenance of good health in general and the preservation of sufficient cardiovascular reserve capacity to meet operational demands. It is also important not to introduce confounding variables in whatever other physiological studies are being performed. A change in the level of fitness is likely to be a significant confounding variable in the study of many organ systems. The principal component of the in-flight cardiovascular exercise program should be large-muscle activity such as treadmill exercise. It is desirable that at least one session per week be monitored to assure maintenance of proper functional levels and to provide guidance for any adjustments of the exercise prescription. Appropriate measurements include evaluation of the heart-rate/workload or the heart-rate/oxygen-uptake relationship. Respiratory gas analysis is helpful by providing better opportunities to document relative workload levels from analysis of the interrelationships among VO2, VCO2, and ventilation. The committee felt that there is no clear evidence that any particular in-flight exercise regimen is protective against orthostatic hypotension during the early readaptation phase. Some group members suggested that maintenance of the lower body muscle mass and muscle tone may be helpful. There is also evidence that late in-flight interventions to reexpand blood volume to preflight levels are helpful in preventing or minimizing postflight orthostatic hypotension.

  7. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W.; Weier, Heinz-Ulrich G.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention relates generally to the DNA mapping and sequencing technologies. In particular, the present invention provides enhanced methods and compositions for the physical mapping and positional cloning of genomic DNA. The present invention also provides a useful analytical technique to directly map cloned DNA sequences onto individual stretched DNA molecules.

  8. Origin and differentiation of human mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Excoffier, L; Langaney, A

    1989-01-01

    A recent study of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) polymorphism has generated much debate about modern human origins by proposing the existence of an "African Eve" living 200,000 years ago somewhere in Africa. In an attempt to synthesize information concerning human mtDNA genetic polymorphism, all available data on mtDNA RFLP have been gathered. A phylogeny of the mtDNA types found in 10 populations reveals that all types could have issued from a single common ancestral type. The distribution of shared types between continental groups indicates that caucasoid populations could be the closest to an ancestral population from which all other continental groups would have diverged. A partial phylogeny of the types found in five other populations also demonstrates that the myth of an African Eden was based on an incorrect "genealogical tree" of mtDNA types. Two measures of molecular diversity have been computed on all samples on the basis of mtDNA type frequencies, on one hand, and on the basis of the number of polymorphic sites in the samples, on the other. A large discrepancy is found between the two measures except in African populations; this suggests the existence of some differential selective mechanisms. The lapse of time necessary for creating the observed molecular diversity from an ancestral monomorphic population has been calculated and is found generally greater in Oriental and caucasoid populations. Implications concerning human mtDNA evolution are discussed. PMID:2562823

  9. Active DNA demethylation mediated by DNA glycosylases.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2009-01-01

    Active DNA demethylation is involved in many vital developmental and physiological processes of plants and animals. Recent genetic and biochemical studies in Arabidopsis have demonstrated that a subfamily of DNA glycosylases function to promote DNA demethylation through a base excision-repair pathway. These specialized bifunctional DNA glycosylases remove the 5-methylcytosine base and then cleave the DNA backbone at the abasic site, resulting in a gap that is then filled with an unmethylated cytosine nucleotide by as yet unknown DNA polymerase and ligase enzymes. Evidence suggests that active DNA demethylation in mammalian cells is also mediated at least in part by a base excision repair pathway where the AID/Apobec family of deaminases convert 5-methylcytosine to thymine followed by G/T mismatch repair by the DNA glycosylase MBD4 or TDG. This review also discusses other possible mechanisms of active DNA demethylation, how genome DNA methylation status might be sensed to regulate the expression of demethylase genes, and the targeting of demethylases by small RNAs. PMID:19659441

  10. Developmental validation of the ParaDNA() Intelligence System-A novel approach to DNA profiling.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Stephen; Dawnay, Nick; Ball, Glyn; Stafford-Allen, Beccy; Tribble, Nicholas; Rendell, Paul; Neary, Kelsey; Hanson, Erin K; Ballantyne, Jack; Kallifatidis, Beatrice; Mendel, Julian; Mills, DeEtta K; Wells, Simon

    2015-07-01

    DNA profiling through the analysis of STRs remains one of the most widely used tools in human identification across the world. Current laboratory STR analysis is slow, costly and requires expert users and interpretation which can lead to instances of delayed investigations or non-testing of evidence on budget grounds. The ParaDNA() Intelligence System has been designed to provide a simple, fast and robust way to profile DNA samples in a lab or field-deployable manner. The system analyses 5-STRs plus amelogenin to deliver a DNA profile that enables users to gain rapid investigative leads and intelligent prioritisation of samples in human identity testing applications. Utilising an innovative sample collector, minimal training is required to enable both DNA analysts and nonspecialist personnel to analyse biological samples directly, without prior processing, in approximately 75min. The test uses direct PCR with fluorescent HyBeacon() detection of STR allele lengths to provide a DNA profile. The developmental validation study described here followed the Scientific Working Group on DNA Analysis Methods (SWGDAM) guidelines and tested the sensitivity, reproducibility, accuracy, inhibitor tolerance, and performance of the ParaDNA Intelligence System on a range of mock evidence items. The data collected demonstrate that the ParaDNA Intelligence System displays useful DNA profiles when sampling a variety of evidence items including blood, saliva, semen and touch DNA items indicating the potential to benefit a number of applications in fields such as forensic, military and disaster victim identification (DVI). PMID:25980941

  11. Attitudes on DNA ancestry tests.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jennifer K; Weiss, Kenneth M

    2012-01-01

    The DNA ancestry testing industry is more than a decade old, yet details about it remain a mystery: there remain no reliable, empirical data on the number, motivations, and attitudes of customers to date, the number of products available and their characteristics, or the industry customs and standard practices that have emerged in the absence of specific governmental regulations. Here, we provide preliminary data collected in 2009 through indirect and direct participant observation, namely blog post analysis, generalized survey analysis, and targeted survey analysis. The attitudes include the first available data on attitudes of those of individuals who have and have not had their own DNA ancestry tested as well as individuals who are members of DNA ancestry-related social networking groups. In a new and fluid landscape, the results highlight the need for empirical data to guide policy discussions and should be interpreted collectively as an invitation for additional investigation of (1) the opinions of individuals purchasing these tests, individuals obtaining these tests through research participation, and individuals not obtaining these tests; (2) the psychosocial and behavioral reactions of individuals obtaining their DNA ancestry information with attention given both to expectations prior to testing and the sociotechnical architecture of the test used; and (3) the applications of DNA ancestry information in varying contexts. PMID:21698460

  12. Group evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Hayley H.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid fuel combustion process is greatly affected by the rate of droplet evaporation. The heat and mass exchanges between gas and liquid couple the dynamics of both phases in all aspects: mass, momentum, and energy. Correct prediction of the evaporation rate is therefore a key issue in engineering design of liquid combustion devices. Current analytical tools for characterizing the behavior of these devices are based on results from a single isolated droplet. Numerous experimental studies have challenged the applicability of these results in a dense spray. To account for the droplets' interaction in a dense spray, a number of theories have been developed in the past decade. Herein, two tasks are examined. One was to study how to implement the existing theoretical results, and the other was to explore the possibility of experimental verifications. The current theoretical results of group evaporation are given for a monodispersed cluster subject to adiabatic conditions. The time evolution of the fluid mechanic and thermodynamic behavior in this cluster is derived. The results given are not in the form of a subscale model for CFD codes.

  13. Retroviral Integrase Structure and DNA Recombination Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Cherepanov, Peter

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Due to the importance of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase as a drug target, the biochemistry and structural aspects of retroviral DNA integration have been the focus of intensive research during the past three decades. The retroviral integrase enzyme acts on the linear double-stranded viral DNA product of reverse transcription. Integrase cleaves specific phosphodiester bonds near the viral DNA ends during the 3? processing reaction. The enzyme then uses the resulting viral DNA 3?-OH groups during strand transfer to cut chromosomal target DNA, which simultaneously joins both viral DNA ends to target DNA 5?-phosphates. Both reactions proceed via direct transesterification of scissile phosphodiester bonds by attacking nucleophiles: a water molecule for 3? processing, and the viral DNA 3?-OH for strand transfer. X-ray crystal structures of prototype foamy virus integrase-DNA complexes revealed the architectures of the key nucleoprotein complexes that form sequentially during the integration process and explained the roles of active site metal ions in catalysis. X-ray crystallography furthermore elucidated the mechanism of action of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors, which are currently used to treat AIDS patients, and provided valuable insights into the mechanisms of viral drug resistance. PMID:25705574

  14. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine nucleotides is usually pH dependent (pH < 6) four different TFOs were examined: TFO-1 was unmodified while TFOs 2-4 contained additional stabilizing analogues capable of extending triplex formation to pH 7. In addition, each of the TFOs contained a Cy5 dye at the 5'-end of the oligonucleotide to aid in characterization of TFO binding - crystals were obtained with all four variations of TFOs. Formation of DNA triplex in the motif was characterized by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), UV melting studies and FRET. Crystals containing TFO-1 (unmodified) and TFO-2 (with 2'-amino ethoxy modification) were isolated and flash-frozen in liquid nitrogen for X-ray data collection at beam line NSLS-X25. X-ray data was also collected for crystals of the 3-turn triangle without any TFO bound to it. Difference maps were done between the crystals with TFO against the one without to identify any additional electron density corresponding to the third strand in the triplex binding region. The data from the crystal containing TFO-2 was used to further analyze if the additional density can match the expected position of the TFO on the triangle motif. Since the additional density did not correspond to the entire binding region, 2Fo-Fc, 3Fo-2Fc and 4Fo-3Fc maps were done to check for missing pieces of the electron density. From the resulting 2Fo-Fc map, the asymmetric unit from the 3-turn triangle (31-bp duplex model based on previous structure 3UBI) was inserted into the density as a reference. However, the electron density corresponding to the TFO was still not continuous throughout the 13-nt triplex binding region and allowed only a partial fit of the TFO. The third nucleotide in positions 1, 3, 4, 6, 7 were fit into the density in the major groove of the underlying duplex with proper triplex configuration. The third chapter describes the triplex approach to position a functional group (the UV cross-linking agent psoralen) within a pre-formed DNA motif. Triplex formation and psoralen cross-linking of the motif were analyzed by native and denaturing gel electrophoresis respectively. Motifs containing the Psoralen-TFO were also successfully crystallized and the crosslinking shown by analyzing the denatured crystals on a gel. The end goal would be to form a crosslinked designed DNA crystal that can diffract to a higher resolution. The fourth chapter describes the use of serial femtosecond crystallography for structure determination of designed DNA lattices. X-ray diffraction data from self-assembled 3D DNA microcrystals were collected from a stream of crystals in solution. Serial femtosecond crystallography eliminates the need for large crystals and the need for freezing, thus overcoming any associated crystal defects and radiation damage. Self-assembled nano/microcrystals were successfully made and were diffracted at room temperature. The best diffraction was from the 1-nt SE motif to an extent of 3.5 A in resolution.

  15. Antibodies against DNA hydrolyze DNA and RNA.

    PubMed

    Krasnorutskii, M A; Buneva, V N; Nevinsky, G A

    2008-11-01

    In this work, rabbits were immunized with a high polymer DNA complexed with methylated BSA (mBSA) and by mBSA. It is shown that electrophoretically homogeneous preparations of polyclonal antibodies (Ab) from non-immunized rabbits and animals immunized by mBSA do not exhibit catalytic activity. Ab from the blood of rabbits immunized with the DNA-mBSA complex hydrolyzed poly(C) and different RNAs with efficiency exceeding that towards DNA by approximately 3-4 orders of magnitude. Affinity chromatography of the IgG on DNA cellulose separated the Ab into fractions hydrolyzing both RNA and DNA, and for the first time fractions that hydrolyze only RNA were found. Kinetic parameters that characterize the RNA and DNA hydrolysis by initial Ab preparations and their fractions obtained by separation on an affinity sorbent are compared. PMID:19120029

  16. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  17. Managing DNA polymerases: coordinating DNA replication, DNA repair, and DNA recombination.

    PubMed

    Sutton, M D; Walker, G C

    2001-07-17

    Two important and timely questions with respect to DNA replication, DNA recombination, and DNA repair are: (i) what controls which DNA polymerase gains access to a particular primer-terminus, and (ii) what determines whether a DNA polymerase hands off its DNA substrate to either a different DNA polymerase or to a different protein(s) for the completion of the specific biological process? These questions have taken on added importance in light of the fact that the number of known template-dependent DNA polymerases in both eukaryotes and in prokaryotes has grown tremendously in the past two years. Most notably, the current list now includes a completely new family of enzymes that are capable of replicating imperfect DNA templates. This UmuC-DinB-Rad30-Rev1 superfamily of DNA polymerases has members in all three kingdoms of life. Members of this family have recently received a great deal of attention due to the roles they play in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), the potentially mutagenic replication over DNA lesions that act as potent blocks to continued replication catalyzed by replicative DNA polymerases. Here, we have attempted to summarize our current understanding of the regulation of action of DNA polymerases with respect to their roles in DNA replication, TLS, DNA repair, DNA recombination, and cell cycle progression. In particular, we discuss these issues in the context of the Gram-negative bacterium, Escherichia coli, that contains a DNA polymerase (Pol V) known to participate in most, if not all, of these processes. PMID:11459973

  18. Reconfiguration of DNA methylation in aging.

    PubMed

    Zampieri, Michele; Ciccarone, Fabio; Calabrese, Roberta; Franceschi, Claudio; Brkle, Alexander; Caiafa, Paola

    2015-11-01

    A complex interplay between multiple biological effects shapes the aging process. The advent of genome-wide quantitative approaches in the epigenetic field has highlighted the effective impact of epigenetic deregulation, particularly of DNA methylation, on aging. Age-associated alterations in DNA methylation are commonly grouped in the phenomenon known as "epigenetic drift" which is characterized by gradual extensive demethylation of genome and hypermethylation of a number of promoter-associated CpG islands. Surprisingly, specific DNA regions show directional epigenetic changes in aged individuals suggesting the importance of these events for the aging process. However, the epigenetic information obtained until now in aging needs a re-consideration due to the recent discovery of 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, a new DNA epigenetic mark present on genome. A recapitulation of the factors involved in the regulation of DNA methylation and the changes occurring in aging will be described in this review also considering the data available on 5 hmC. PMID:25708826

  19. Parvovirus infection-induced DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yong; Qiu, Jianming

    2014-01-01

    Parvoviruses are a group of small DNA viruses with ssDNA genomes flanked by two inverted terminal structures. Due to a limited genetic resource they require host cellular factors and sometimes a helper virus for efficient viral replication. Recent studies have shown that parvoviruses interact with the DNA damage machinery, which has a significant impact on the life cycle of the virus as well as the fate of infected cells. In addition, due to special DNA structures of the viral genomes, parvoviruses are useful tools for the study of the molecular mechanisms underlying viral infection-induced DNA damage response (DDR). This review aims to summarize recent advances in parvovirus-induced DDR, with a focus on the diverse DDR pathways triggered by different parvoviruses and the consequences of DDR on the viral life cycle as well as the fate of infected cells. PMID:25429305

  20. Strategies for RNA-Guided DNA Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeleska, Angela; Jonoska, Nataa; Saito, Masahico; Landweber, Laura F.

    We present a model for homologous DNA recombination events guided by double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) templates, and apply this model to DNA rearrangements in some groups of ciliates, such as Stylonychia or Oxytricha. In these organisms, differentiation of a somatic macronucleus from a germline micronucleus involves extensive gene rearrangement, which can be modeled as topological braiding of the DNA, with the template-guided alignment proceeding through DNA branch migration. We show that a graph structure, which we refer to as an assembly graph, containing only 1- and 4-valent vertices can provide a physical representation of the DNA at the time of recombination. With this representation, 4-valent vertices correspond to the alignment of the recombination sites, and we model the actual recombination event as smoothing of these vertices.

  1. DNA demethylation by TDG.

    PubMed

    Dalton, Shannon R; Bellacosa, Alfonso

    2012-08-01

    DNA methylation has long been considered a very stable DNA modification in mammals that could only be removed by replication in the absence of remethylation - that is, by mere dilution of this epigenetic mark (so-called passive DNA demethylation). However, in recent years, a significant number of studies have revealed the existence of active processes of DNA demethylation in mammals, with important roles in development and transcriptional regulation, allowing the molecular mechanisms of active DNA demethylation to be unraveled. In this article, we review the recent literature highlighting the prominent role played in active DNA demethylation by base excision repair and especially by TDG. PMID:22920184

  2. Ex vivo DNA Assembly.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Adam B; Canfield, Zachary B; Hayward, Laura C; Fong, Stephen S; McArthur, George H

    2013-01-01

    Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid, and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods. PMID:25024067

  3. Chemical method for introducing haptens on to DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, G.H.; Cumming, C.U.; Huang, D.P.; Manak, M.M.; Ting, R.

    1988-05-01

    The authors developed a versatile chemical method of attaching hapten moieties onto DNA, for the construction of nonisotopic DNA probes. The DNA is reacted with N-bromosuccinimide at alkaline pH, resulting in bromination of a fraction of the thymine, guanine, and cytosine residues, with adenine modified to a lesser extent. The bromine is subsequently displaced by a primary amino group, attached to a linker arm. The other end of the linker arm has a detectable group preattached to it. They have labeled cloned hepatitis B viral (HBV) DNA with the hapten 2,4-dinitrophenyl (DNP) and used it in combination with a high affinity rabbit anti-DNP antibody, for the detection of hepatitis B DNA by slot blotting. This probe was sensitive enough to specifically detect 1 x 10/sup -17/ mol (1 x 10/sup 6/ copies) of HBV DNA in total DNA from human serum.

  4. Effect of DNA type on response of DNA biosensor for carcinogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sani, Nor Diyana bt. Md.; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Lazim, Azwani Mat

    2013-11-01

    Carcinogens are cancer causing chemicals that can bind to DNA and cause damage to the DNA. These chemicals are available everywhere including in water, air, soil and food. Therefore, a sensor that can detect the presence of these chemicals will be a very useful tool. Since carcinogens bind to DNA, DNA can be used as the biological element in a biosensor. This study has utilized different types of DNA in a biosensor for carcinogen detection. The DNAs include double stranded calf thymus DNA, single stranded calf thymus DNA and guanine rich single stranded DNA. The modified SPE was exposed to a carcinogen followed by interaction with methylene blue which acts as the electroactive indicator. The SPE was then analysed using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Optimization studies were conducted for MB concentration and accumulation time, DNA concentration, as well as effect of buffer concentration, buffer pH and ionic strength. The performance of the biosensor was tested on a group 1 carcinogen, formaldehyde. The results indicated that the usage of guanine rich single stranded DNA also gives higher response as carcinogens prefer to bind with guanine compared to other bases.

  5. DNA damage and autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Aracely-Garcia-Garcia; Panayiotidis, Mihalis I.; Franco, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as the ultraviolet (UV), ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response. PMID:21419786

  6. DNA Methylation: Bisulphite Modification and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wenjia; Clark, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics describes the heritable changes in gene function that occur independently to the DNA sequence. The molecular basis of epigenetic gene regulation is complex, but essentially involves modifications to the DNA itself or the proteins with which DNA associates. The predominant epigenetic modification of DNA in mammalian genomes is methylation of cytosine nucleotides (5-MeC). DNA methylation provides instruction to gene expression machinery as to where and when the gene should be expressed. The primary target sequence for DNA methylation in mammals is 5'-CpG-3' dinucleotides (Figure 1). CpG dinucleotides are not uniformly distributed throughout the genome, but are concentrated in regions of repetitive genomic sequences and CpG "islands" commonly associated with gene promoters (Figure 1). DNA methylation patterns are established early in development, modulated during tissue specific differentiation and disrupted in many disease states including cancer. To understand the biological role of DNA methylation and its role in human disease, precise, efficient and reproducible methods are required to detect and quantify individual 5-MeCs. This protocol for bisulphite conversion is the "gold standard" for DNA methylation analysis and facilitates identification and quantification of DNA methylation at single nucleotide resolution. The chemistry of cytosine deamination by sodium bisulphite involves three steps (Figure 2). (1) Sulphonation: The addition of bisulphite to the 5-6 double bond of cytosine (2) Hydrolic Deamination: hydrolytic deamination of the resulting cytosine-bisulphite derivative to give a uracil-bisulphite derivative (3) Alkali Desulphonation: Removal of the sulphonate group by an alkali treatment, to give uracil. Bisulphite preferentially deaminates cytosine to uracil in single stranded DNA, whereas 5-MeC, is refractory to bisulphite-mediated deamination. Upon PCR amplification, uracil is amplified as thymine while 5-MeC residues remain as cytosines, allowing methylated CpGs to be distinguished from unmethylated CpGs by presence of a cytosine "C" versus thymine "T" residue during sequencing. DNA modification by bisulphite conversion is a well-established protocol that can be exploited for many methods of DNA methylation analysis. Since the detection of 5-MeC by bisulphite conversion was first demonstrated by Frommer et al.1 and Clark et al.2, methods based around bisulphite conversion of genomic DNA account for the majority of new data on DNA methylation. Different methods of post PCR analysis may be utilized, depending on the degree of specificity and resolution of methylation required. Cloning and sequencing is still the most readily available method that can give single nucleotide resolution for methylation across the DNA molecule. PMID:22042230

  7. DNA methylation: bisulphite modification and analysis.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Kate; Molloy, Laura; Qu, Wenjia; Clark, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetics describes the heritable changes in gene function that occur independently to the DNA sequence. The molecular basis of epigenetic gene regulation is complex, but essentially involves modifications to the DNA itself or the proteins with which DNA associates. The predominant epigenetic modification of DNA in mammalian genomes is methylation of cytosine nucleotides (5-MeC). DNA methylation provides instruction to gene expression machinery as to where and when the gene should be expressed. The primary target sequence for DNA methylation in mammals is 5'-CpG-3' dinucleotides (Figure 1). CpG dinucleotides are not uniformly distributed throughout the genome, but are concentrated in regions of repetitive genomic sequences and CpG "islands" commonly associated with gene promoters (Figure 1). DNA methylation patterns are established early in development, modulated during tissue specific differentiation and disrupted in many disease states including cancer. To understand the biological role of DNA methylation and its role in human disease, precise, efficient and reproducible methods are required to detect and quantify individual 5-MeCs. This protocol for bisulphite conversion is the "gold standard" for DNA methylation analysis and facilitates identification and quantification of DNA methylation at single nucleotide resolution. The chemistry of cytosine deamination by sodium bisulphite involves three steps (Figure 2). (1) Sulphonation: The addition of bisulphite to the 5-6 double bond of cytosine (2) Hydrolic Deamination: hydrolytic deamination of the resulting cytosine-bisulphite derivative to give a uracil-bisulphite derivative (3) Alkali Desulphonation: Removal of the sulphonate group by an alkali treatment, to give uracil. Bisulphite preferentially deaminates cytosine to uracil in single stranded DNA, whereas 5-MeC, is refractory to bisulphite-mediated deamination. Upon PCR amplification, uracil is amplified as thymine while 5-MeC residues remain as cytosines, allowing methylated CpGs to be distinguished from unmethylated CpGs by presence of a cytosine "C" versus thymine "T" residue during sequencing. DNA modification by bisulphite conversion is a well-established protocol that can be exploited for many methods of DNA methylation analysis. Since the detection of 5-MeC by bisulphite conversion was first demonstrated by Frommer et al. and Clark et al., methods based around bisulphite conversion of genomic DNA account for the majority of new data on DNA methylation. Different methods of post PCR analysis may be utilized, depending on the degree of specificity and resolution of methylation required. Cloning and sequencing is still the most readily available method that can give single nucleotide resolution for methylation across the DNA molecule. PMID:22042230

  8. Crossing borders: the DNA of physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beijerinck, H. C. W.

    2015-01-01

    In cell culture, the physical environment plays an important role: "Everything is everywhere, but the environment selects"[1]. The education of physicists can be viewed within this framework. The Petri dish for the reproduction of physicists is a university research group. The full professor is its DNA. The selection process of new professors - new DNA - is a determining step in creating the right culture. [1] M.W. Beijerinck and L.G.M. Baas Becking, en.wikipedia.org.

  9. Identification of Phytophthora citrophthora with Cloned DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Goodwin, P. H.; Kirkpatrick, B. C.; Duniway, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    Two different DNA fragments, one of 2.9 kilobases and the other of 5.1 kilobases, were cloned from Phytophthora citrophthora and showed no homology with DNA from plants and other related fungi. These DNA probes hybridized with DNA from 12 different P. citrophthora isolates obtained from a variety of hosts but did not hybridize with DNA from 6 P. citrophthora isolates obtained from cacao. Southern blot analysis revealed that the probes contained repetitive DNA, and restriction fragment length polymorphisms were identified among several P. citrophthora isolates. Of the isolates tested, two major groups were observed whose genetic similarity correlated with geographical distribution. One of the DNA probes was used to detect P. citrophthora growing from infected citrus roots incubated on semiselective medium. P. citrophthora was not detected by a hybridization assay of total DNA extracted directly from infected roots. Images PMID:16348140

  10. Ancient DNA is thirteen years old.

    PubMed

    Audic, S; Braud-Colomb, E

    1997-09-01

    The first successful recovery of ancient DNA, from quagga and human mummies inspired significant enough interest to open an entire field of research. Efforts from many research groups, often in a hunt for the oldest sequences, showed that ancient DNA was a poor substrate for the enzymes used in molecular biology; it is present in tiny amounts, hard to purify, and frequently damaged. These obstacles have been partially overcome by the use of drastic laboratory precautions and by the introduction of polymerase chain reaction and phylogenetic studies. Ancient DNA analysis now finds applications in many research domains. PMID:9306399

  11. Structural Organization of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    1986-01-01

    Explains the structural organization of DNA by providing information on the primary, secondary, tertiary, and higher organization levels of the molecule. Also includes illustrations and descriptions of sign-inversion and rotating models for supercoiling of DNA. (ML)

  12. HPV DNA test

    MedlinePLUS

    The HPV DNA test is used to check for high-risk HPV infection in women. HPV infection around the genitals is ... warts spread when you have sex. The HPV-DNA test is generally not recommended for detecting low- ...

  13. DNA tagged microparticles

    DOEpatents

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  14. Modeling DNA Replication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  15. Plasmid DNA hydrogels for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Costa, Diana; Valente, Artur J M; Miguel, M Graça; Queiroz, João

    2014-03-01

    In the last few years, our research group has focused on the design and development of plasmid DNA (pDNA) based systems as devices to be used therapeutically in the biomedical field. Biocompatible macro and micro plasmid DNA gels were prepared by a cross-linking reaction. For the first time, the pDNA gels have been investigated with respect to their swelling in aqueous solution containing different additives. Furthermore, we clarified the fundamental and basic aspects of the solute release mechanism from pDNA hydrogels and the significance of this information is enormous as a basic tool for the formulation of pDNA carriers for drug/gene delivery applications. The co-delivery of a specific gene and anticancer drugs, combining chemical and gene therapies in the treatment of cancer was the main challenge of our research. Significant progresses have been made with a new p53 encoding pDNA microgel that is suitable for the loading and release of pDNA and doxorubicin. This represents a strong valuable finding in the strategic development of systems to improve cancer cure through the synergetic effect of chemical and gene therapy. PMID:24011472

  16. Is DNA a language?

    PubMed

    Tsonis, A A; Elsner, J B; Tsonis, P A

    1997-01-01

    DNA sequences usually involve local construction rules that affect different scales. As such their "dictionary" may not follow Zipf's law (a power law) which is followed in every natural language. Indeed, analysis of many DNA sequences suggests that no linguistics connections to DNA exist and that even though it has structure DNA is not a language. Computer simulations and a biological approach to this problem further support these results. PMID:9039397

  17. Nanopores: Flossing with DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasianowicz, John J.

    2004-06-01

    Passing a DNA strand many times back-and-forth through a protein nanopore would enable the interaction between them to be studied more closely. This may now be possible, using a dumbbell-shaped DNA-polymer complex, which may lead to a more reliable analysis of DNA sequences using nanopores.

  18. Photoelectrochemical synthesis of DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Brian Y.; Emig, Christopher J.; Jacobson, Joseph M.

    2009-01-01

    Optical addressing of semiconductor electrodes represents a powerful technology that enables the independent and parallel control of a very large number of electrical phenomena at the solid-electrolyte interface. To date, it has been used in a wide range of applications including electrophoretic manipulation, biomolecule sensing, and stimulating networks of neurons. Here, we have adapted this approach for the parallel addressing of redox reactions, and report the construction of a DNA microarray synthesis platform based on semiconductor photoelectrochemistry (PEC). An amorphous silicon photoconductor is activated by an optical projection system to create virtual electrodes capable of electrochemically generating protons; these PEC-generated protons then cleave the acid-labile dimethoxytrityl protecting groups of DNA phosphoramidite synthesis reagents with the requisite spatial selectivity to generate DNA microarrays. Furthermore, a thin-film porous glass dramatically increases the amount of DNA synthesized per chip by over an order of magnitude versus uncoated glass. This platform demonstrates that PEC can be used toward combinatorial bio-polymer and small molecule synthesis. PMID:19706433

  19. Small Molecules, Inhibitors of DNA-PK, Targeting DNA Repair, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Panasci, Lawrence; Aloyz, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Many current chemotherapies function by damaging genomic DNA in rapidly dividing cells ultimately leading to cell death. This therapeutic approach differentially targets cancer cells that generally display rapid cell division compared to normal tissue cells. However, although these treatments are initially effective in arresting tumor growth and reducing tumor burden, resistance and disease progression eventually occur. A major mechanism underlying this resistance is increased levels of cellular DNA repair. Most cells have complex mechanisms in place to repair DNA damage that occurs due to environmental exposures or normal metabolic processes. These systems, initially overwhelmed when faced with chemotherapy induced DNA damage, become more efficient under constant selective pressure and as a result chemotherapies become less effective. Thus, inhibiting DNA repair pathways using target specific small molecule inhibitors may overcome cellular resistance to DNA damaging chemotherapies. Non-homologous end joining a major mechanism for the repair of double-strand breaks (DSB) in DNA is regulated in part by the serine/threonine kinase, DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). The DNA-PK holoenzyme acts as a scaffold protein tethering broken DNA ends and recruiting other repair molecules. It also has enzymatic activity that may be involved in DNA damage signaling. Because of its’ central role in repair of DSBs, DNA-PK has been the focus of a number of small molecule studies. In these studies specific DNA-PK inhibitors have shown efficacy in synergizing chemotherapies in vitro. However, compounds currently known to specifically inhibit DNA-PK are limited by poor pharmacokinetics: these compounds have poor solubility and have high metabolic lability in vivo leading to short serum half-lives. Future improvement in DNA-PK inhibition will likely be achieved by designing new molecules based on the recently reported crystallographic structure of DNA-PK. Computer based drug design will not only assist in identifying novel functional moieties to replace the metabolically labile morpholino group but will also facilitate the design of molecules to target the DNA-PKcs/Ku80 interface or one of the autophosphorylation sites. PMID:23386830

  20. The Many Sides of DNA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannery, Maura C.

    1997-01-01

    Explores the meaning of DNA. Discusses histories of DNA, literature on DNA, the contributions of Max Delbruck and Barbara McClintock, life, views of control, current research, and the language of DNA. Contains 24 references. (JRH)

  1. Protection of DNA against Direct Radiation Damage by Complex Formation with Positively Charged Polypeptides

    PubMed Central

    Roginskaya, Marina; Bernhard, William A.; Razskazovskiy, Yuriy

    2007-01-01

    Radioprotection of DNA from direct-type radiation damage by histones has been studied in model systems using complexes of positively charged polypeptides (PCPs) with DNA. PCPs bind to DNA via ionic interactions mimicking the mode of DNA-histone binding. Direct radiation damage to DNA in films of DNA-PCP complexes was quantified as unaltered base release, which correlates closely with DNA strand breaks. All types of PCPs tested protected DNA from radiation, with the maximum radioprotection being approximately 2.5-fold compared with non-complexed DNA. Conformational changes of the DNA induced by PCPs or repair of free radical damage on the DNA sugar moiety by PCPs are considered the most feasible mechanisms of radioprotection of DNA. The degree of radioprotection of DNA by polylysine (PL) increased dramatically on going from pure DNA to a molar ratio of PL monomer:DNA nucleotide ~1:2, while a further increase in the PL:DNA ratio did not offer more radioprotection. This concentration dependence is in agreement with the model of PCP binding to DNA that assumes preferential binding of positively charged side groups to DNA phosphates in the minor groove, so that the maximum occupancy of all minor-groove PCP binding sites is at a molar ratio of PCP:DNA = 1:2. PMID:16808625

  2. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes and dysfunctions in presbyacusis.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, H; Saad, M; El-Attar, A; Ahmed, G; Berrettini, S; Forli, F; Siciliano, G; Mancuso, M

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) alterations and metabolic dysfunctions in patients with presbyacusis, and to discover correlations between presbyacusis and the degree of hearing loss and mitochondrial damage. Seventy patients with presbyacusis were examined, including 40 Egyptian patients and 30 Italian patients. Forty eight normal subjects were included as control group, including 24 Egyptians and 24 Italians. There was no common point mutation, and A1555G, A3243G, A7445G not were detected in any patients or controls. Haplogroup U was significantly common in patients in comparison to controls. Mutation of antioxidant genes (GSTT1, GSTM1) were significantly present in only Italian patients compared to Italian controls. PMID:24711684

  3. DNA gyrase stimulates transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Akrigg, A; Cook, P R

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear DNA of HeLa cells can now be isolated unbroken and supercoiled. Using DNA gyrase and the untwisting enzyme, we have prepared an allomorphic series of templates derived from this nuclear DNA, and also from the circular DNA of the bacterial virus, PM2. We have then transcribed these templates using 2 different RNA polymerases--from wheat germ and Escherichia coli. Relaxed DNA is transcribed slowly by both polymerases. Supertwisting the naturally-supercoiled templates with gyrase slightly inhibits transcription by the bacterial polymerase but stimulates dramatically transcription by RNA polymerase II from wheat germ. PMID:6253926

  4. Thermal degradation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Karni, Moshe; Zidon, Dolev; Polak, Pazit; Zalevsky, Zeev; Shefi, Orit

    2013-06-01

    In this article, we investigate the thermal degradation of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). We find that under dry conditions, complete DNA degradation occurs at above 190C. In addition, as the boiling temperature of water is pressure dependent, we have investigated the thermal degradation of the DNA in water for different applied partial pressures. This information is important for fundamental understanding of DNA structure and energetics, and can be useful for biomedical applications such as thermal targeting of DNA in cancer cells, as well as for basic research. PMID:23621849

  5. DNA Sequencing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1992-01-01

    An automated DNA sequencing apparatus having a reactor for providing at least two series of DNA products formed from a single primer and a DNA strand, each DNA product of a series differing in molecular weight and having a chain terminating agent at one end; separating means for separating the DNA products to form a series bands, the intensity of substantially all nearby bands in a different series being different, band reading means for determining the position an This invention was made with government support including a grant from the U.S. Public Health Service, contract number AI-06045. The U.S. government has certain rights in the invention.

  6. DNA Repair Gene Polymorphisms and Their Relation With DNA Damage, DNA Repair, and Total Antioxidant Capacity in Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors.

    PubMed

    Dincer, Yildiz; Yksel, Selin; Batar, Bahadir; Gven, Mehmet; Onaran, Ilhan; Celkan, Tiraje

    2015-07-01

    Oxidative stress and defective DNA repair are major contributory factors in the initiation and progression of carcinogenesis. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy cause oxidative DNA damage, consume antioxidant capacity, and impair DNA repair activity. These effects of chemotherapy and radiotherapy may be contributory factors in the development of secondary malignancy in cancer survivors. Basal, H2O2-induced, and postrepair DNA damage; urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine level as a marker of oxidatively damaged DNA; and serum total antioxidant capacity were measured; XPD Lys751Gln, XRCC1 Arg399Gln, and XRCC1 Arg194Trp polymorphisms were analyzed in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. Basal and H2O2-induced DNA damage were found to be higher in the ALL survivor group versus the control group, however, there was no significant difference between the other parameters. No association was found between the examined parameters and polymorphisms of XPD 751 and XRCC1 399 and both the groups. XRCC1 194Trp allele was found to be associated with a low level of postrepair DNA damage in the ALL survivors. In conclusion, basal DNA damage and susceptibility to oxidation are high in childhood ALL survivors. This situation which may easily lead to occurrence of a secondary cancer does not seem to be a result of deficient DNA repair. PMID:24577548

  7. Electronic Transport in DNA

    PubMed Central

    Klotsa, Daphne; Rmer, Rudolf A.; Turner, Matthew S.

    2005-01-01

    We study the electronic properties of DNA by way of a tight-binding model applied to four particular DNA sequences. The charge transfer properties are presented in terms of localization lengths (crudely speaking, the length over which electrons travel). Various types of disorder, including random potentials, are employed to account for different real environments. We have performed calculations on poly(dG)-poly(dC), telomeric-DNA, random-ATGC DNA, and ?-DNA. We find that random and ?-DNA have localization lengths allowing for electron motion among a few dozen basepairs only. A novel enhancement of localization lengths is observed at particular energies for an increasing binary backbone disorder. We comment on the possible biological relevance of sequence-dependent charge transfer in DNA. PMID:16040753

  8. Impacts of degraded DNA on restriction enzyme associated DNA sequencing (RADSeq).

    PubMed

    Graham, Carly F; Glenn, Travis C; McArthur, Andrew G; Boreham, Douglas R; Kieran, Troy; Lance, Stacey; Manzon, Richard G; Martino, Jessica A; Pierson, Todd; Rogers, Sean M; Wilson, Joanna Y; Somers, Christopher M

    2015-11-01

    Degraded DNA from suboptimal field sampling is common in molecular ecology. However, its impact on techniques that use restriction site associated next-generation DNA sequencing (RADSeq, GBS) is unknown. We experimentally examined the effects of in situDNA degradation on data generation for a modified double-digest RADSeq approach (3RAD). We generated libraries using genomic DNA serially extracted from the muscle tissue of 8 individual lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) following 0-, 12-, 48- and 96-h incubation at room temperature posteuthanasia. This treatment of the tissue resulted in input DNA that ranged in quality from nearly intact to highly sheared. All samples were sequenced as a multiplexed pool on an Illumina MiSeq. Libraries created from low to moderately degraded DNA (12-48 h) performed well. In contrast, the number of RADtags per individual, number of variable sites, and percentage of identical RADtags retained were all dramatically reduced when libraries were made using highly degraded DNA (96-h group). This reduction in performance was largely due to a significant and unexpected loss of raw reads as a result of poor quality scores. Our findings remained consistent after changes in restriction enzymes, modified fold coverage values (2- to 16-fold), and additional read-length trimming. We conclude that starting DNA quality is an important consideration for RADSeq; however, the approach remains robust until genomic DNA is extensively degraded. PMID:25783180

  9. Comparative studies of UV-induced DNA cleavage by structural isomers of an iodinated DNA ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.F.; Green, A.; Denison, L.; Pardee, M.; Kelly, D.P.; Roberts, M.; Rose, M.; Reum, M.

    1994-06-15

    The purpose was to evaluate the importance of the position of the halogen atom in iodinated DNA-binding bibenzimidazoles, with respect to sensitization of UV-A-induced DNA breakage. Three analogues of iodoHoechst 33258, denoted ortho-, meta- and paraiodoHoechst, according to the site of iodine substitution, were synthesized. Plasmid DNA (pBR322) was used to assay UV-A-induced DNA single-strand breaks (ssbs). The location of the sites of strand breakage was determined by DNA sequencing gel analysis, using a [sup 32]P-endlabelled oligoDNA with a single binding site for the ligands. A clear trend in decreasing activity of sensitization of UV-induced DNA ssbs was established: Ortho- > meta-, para- > iodoHoechst 33258. The sequencing gel studies showed that orthoiodoHoechst was distinct from the other three compounds, with respect to the sites of DNA strand breakage and the chemistry of the cleavage reaction. The position of iodine substitution in iodinated bibenzimidazoles determines the location of the carbon-centered radical on the ligand in the minor groove of DNA. DNA strand cleavage is mediated by abstraction of a nearby deoxyribosyl H-atom. Hence, the position of the radical species determines: which deoxyribosyl group is attacked (i.e., site of cleavage relative to the ligand binding site); which H-atom is abstracted, more specifically which of the five deoxyribosyl carbons is involved (i.e., the chemistry of the cleavage reaction), and the stereochemistry of the transition state for the H-atom abstraction (and hence the efficiency or extent of strand breakage). The ortho-compound represents the best example to date of iodinated DNA ligands designed as potential radiation sensitizers, as an extension of the well-established sensitization by halogenated DNA precursors. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  10. DNA hybridization activity of single-stranded DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticles used as probes for DNA detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kira, Atsushi; Matsuo, Kosuke; Nakajima, Shin-ichiro

    2016-02-01

    Colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) have potential applications in bio-sensing technologies as labels or signal enhancers. In order to meet demands for a development of biomolecular assays by a quantitative understanding of single-molecule, it is necessary to regulate accuracy of the NPs probes modified with biomolecules to optimize the characteristics of NPs. However, to our knowledge, there is little information about the structural effect of conjugated biomolecules to the NPs. In this study, we investigated the contribution of a density of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugating gold NP to hybridization activity. Hybridization activity decreased in accordance with increases in the density of attached ssDNAs, likely due to electrostatic repulsion generated by negatively charged phosphate groups in the ssDNA backbone. These results highlight the importance of controlling the density of ssDNAs attached to the surface of NPs used as DNA detection probes.

  11. Photocrosslinking of XPC-Rad23B to cisplatin-damaged DNA reveals contacts with both strands of the DNA duplex and spans the DNA adduct

    PubMed Central

    Neher, Tracy M.; Rechkunova, Nadejda I.; Lavrik, Olga I.; Turchi, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the main pathway used for the repair of bulky DNA adducts such as those caused by UV light exposure and the chemotherapeutic drug cisplatin. The Xeroderma Pigmentosum group C (XPC)-Rad23B complex is involved in the recognition of these bulky DNA adducts and initiates the global genomic nucleotide excision repair pathway (GG-NER). Photocrosslinking experiments revealed that the human XPC-Rad23B complex makes direct contact with both the cisplatin-damaged DNA strand and the complementary undamaged strand of a duplex DNA substrate. Coupling photocrosslinking with denaturation and immunoprecipitation of protein-DNA complexes, the XPC subunit was identified in complex with damaged DNA. While the interaction of the XPC subunit with DNA was direct, studies revealed that although Rad23B was found in complex with DNA, the Rad23B-DNA interaction was largely indirect via its interaction with XPC. Using site specific crosslinking we determined that XPC-Rad23B is preferentially crosslinked to the damaged DNA when the photoreactive FAP-dCMP (exo-N-{2-[N-(4-azido-2,5-difluoro-3-chloropyridine-6-yl)-3-aminopropionyl]-aminoethyl}-2?-deoxycytidine-5?-monophosphate) analogue is located 5? of the cisplatin-DNA adduct. When the FAP-dCMP analogue is located 3? of the adduct, no difference in binding was detected between undamaged and damaged DNA. Collectively, these data suggest a model whereby XPC-DNA interactions drive the damage recognition process contacting both the damaged and undamaged DNA strand. Preferential crosslinking 5? of the cisplatin-damaged site suggests that XPC-Rad23B displays orientation specific binding to eventually impart directionality to the downstream binding and incision events relative to the site of DNA damage. PMID:20028083

  12. Syndromes associated with mitochondrial DNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for a large group of inherited metabolic disorders most of which are due to a dysfunctional mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) and, consequently, deficient energy production. MRC function depends on the coordinated expression of both nuclear (nDNA) and mitochondrial (mtDNA) genomes. Thus, mitochondrial diseases can be caused by genetic defects in either the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome, or in the cross-talk between the two. This impaired cross-talk gives rise to so-called nuclear-mitochondrial intergenomic communication disorders, which result in loss or instability of the mitochondrial genome and, in turn, impaired maintenance of qualitative and quantitative mtDNA integrity. In children, most MRC disorders are associated with nuclear gene defects rather than alterations in the mtDNA itself. The mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes (MDSs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders with an autosomal recessive pattern of transmission that have onset in infancy or early childhood and are characterized by a reduced number of copies of mtDNA in affected tissues and organs. The MDSs can be divided into least four clinical presentations: hepatocerebral, myopathic, encephalomyopathic and neurogastrointestinal. The focus of this review is to offer an overview of these syndromes, listing the clinical phenotypes, together with their relative frequency, mutational spectrum, and possible insights for improving diagnostic strategies. PMID:24708634

  13. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Openshaw, Mark R.; Harvey, Richard A.; Sebire, Neil J.; Kaur, Baljeet; Sarwar, Naveed; Seckl, Michael J.; Fisher, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA) in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26981554

  14. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Openshaw, Mark R; Harvey, Richard A; Sebire, Neil J; Kaur, Baljeet; Sarwar, Naveed; Seckl, Michael J; Fisher, Rosemary A

    2016-02-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a "liquid biopsy" in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA) in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26981554

  15. Ultrasonic degradation of DNA.

    PubMed

    Elsner, H I; Lindblad, E B

    1989-12-01

    Different results are obtained when DNA in aqueous solution and DNA in biological tissue are exposed to ultrasound. At intensities of ultrasound comparable to those applied clinically, ultrasonication is able to degrade purified DNA in aqueous solution, making ultrasonication a useful tool for preparing DNA fragments in vitro. Ultrasonic degradation of DNA in solution occurs by breaking hydrogen bonds and by single-strand and double-strand ruptures of the DNA helix. Two mechanisms are mainly responsible: cavitation and a thermal or mechanical effect. Stable cavitation is seen at low intensities of ultrasound. Increasing the intensity of the ultrasound above 2 W/cm2 is followed by increases in single-strand ruptures due to the creation of free radicals by transient cavitation. Following sonication, the distribution of the resulting DNA fragments approaches a lower size limit of 100-500 bp. Breaks in the DNA helix occur mainly between oxygen and carbon atoms, resulting in DNA fragments with a phosphorylated 5' end and a free alcohol at the 3' end. The relative lack of specificity in degrading the DNA helix makes ultrasonication a complementary alternative to the highly specific fragmentation obtained by restriction endonucleases. PMID:2693020

  16. Functional DNA Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhao

    The discovery of DNA helical structure opened the door of modern molecular biology. Ned Seeman utilized DNA as building block to construct different nanoscale materials, and introduced a new field, know as DNA nanotechnology. After several decades of development, different DNA structures had been created, with different dimension, different morphology and even with complex curvatures. In addition, after construction of enough amounts DNA structure candidates, DNA structure template, with excellent spatial addressability, had been used to direct the assembly of different nanomaterials, including nanoparticles and proteins, to produce different functional nanomaterials. However there are still many challenges to fabricate functional DNA nanostructures. The first difficulty is that the present finite sized template dimension is still very small, usually smaller than 100nm, which will limit the application for large amount of nanomaterials assembly or large sized nanomaterials assembly. Here we tried to solve this problem through developing a new method, superorigami, to construct finite sized DNA structure with much larger dimension, which can be as large as 500nm. The second problem will be explored the ability of DNA structure to assemble inorganic nanomaterials for novel photonic or electronic properties. Here we tried to utilize DNA Origami method to assemble AuNPs with controlled 3D spacial position for possible chiral photonic complex. We also tried to assemble SWNT with discrete length for possible field effect transistor device. In addition, we tried to mimic in vivo compartment with DNA structure to study internalized enzyme behavior. From our results, constructed DNA cage origami can protect encapsulated enzyme from degradation, and internalized enzyme activity can be boosted for up to 10 folds. In summary, DNA structure can serve as an ideal template for construction of functional nanomaterials with lots of possibilities to be explored.

  17. PCR Techniques in Characterizing DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Wani, Khalida; Aldape, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation was the first epigenetic mark to be discovered, involving the addition of a methyl group to the 5' position of cytosine by DNA methyltransferases, and can be inherited through cell division. DNA methylation plays an important role in normal human development and is associated with the regulation of gene expression, tumorigenesis, and other genetic and epigenetic diseases. Differential methylation is now known to play a central role in the development and outcome of most if not all human malignancies.Bisulfite conversion is a commonly used approach for gene-specific DNA methylation analysis. Treatment of DNA with bisulfite converts cytosine to uracil while leaving 5-methylcytosine intact, allowing for single-nucleotide resolution information about the methylated areas of DNA. PCR-based methods are routinely used to study DNA methylation on a gene-specific basis, after bisulfite treatment. Variations of this method include bisulfite sequencing, methylation-specific PCR, real-time PCR-based MethyLight, and methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting PCR. Several whole-epigenome profiling technologies such as MethylC-seq reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) and the Infinium Human methylation 450 K bead chip are now available allowing for the identification of epigenetic drivers of disease processes as well as biomarkers that could potentially be integrated into clinical practice. PMID:26843056

  18. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus. gamma. endonuclease

    SciTech Connect

    Hentosh, P.; Henner, W.D.; Reynolds, R.J.

    1985-04-01

    DNA fragments of defined sequence have been used to determine the sites of cleavage by ..gamma..-endonuclease activity in extracts prepared from Micrococcus luteus. End-labeled DNA restriction fragments of pBR322 DNA that had been irradiated under nitrogen in the presence of potassium iodide or t-butanol were treated with M. luteus ..gamma.. endonuclease and analyzed on irradiated DNA preferentially at the positions of cytosines and thymines. DNA cleavage occurred immediately to the 3' side of pyrimidines in irradiated DNA and resulted in fragments that terminate in a 5'-phosphoryl group. These studies indicate that both altered cytosines and thymines may be important DNA lesions requiring repair after exposure to ..gamma.. radiation.

  19. DNA as a dietary biomarker in Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba.

    PubMed

    Passmore, A J; Jarman, S N; Swadling, K M; Kawaguchi, S; McMinn, A; Nicol, S

    2006-01-01

    The diet of Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) has been studied using a variety of techniques, but current methods still suffer from problems that are difficult to solve. This study examined an alternative approach utilizing DNA as a prey biomarker. Methods were developed for the preservation, extraction, and identification of prey DNA from krill collected in the field. Group-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify diatom prey (Phylum: Bacillariophyta) and the results from DNA clone libraries were compared with microscopic diet analysis. DNA analysis was superior to microscopy for prey detection. However, differences in prey relative abundance estimates between the two techniques suggested some bias in the DNA-based estimates. Quantification showed that large amounts of prey DNA had been successfully preserved and extracted. Overall the results suggest that the application of DNA-based diet analysis to krill warrants further investigation, particularly for prey that are difficult to study using other methods. PMID:16924375

  20. DNA-Based Methods in the Immunohematology Reference Laboratory

    PubMed Central

    Denomme, Gregory A

    2010-01-01

    Although hemagglutination serves the immunohematology reference laboratory well, when used alone, it has limited capability to resolve complex problems. This overview discusses how molecular approaches can be used in the immunohematology reference laboratory. In order to apply molecular approaches to immunohematology, knowledge of genes, DNA-based methods, and the molecular bases of blood groups are required. When applied correctly, DNA-based methods can predict blood groups to resolve ABO/Rh discrepancies, identify variant alleles, and screen donors for antigen-negative units. DNA-based testing in immunohematology is a valuable tool used to resolve blood group incompatibilities and to support patients in their transfusion needs. PMID:21257350

  1. Nanomaterials and nanoclusters based on DNA modulation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yan; Wang, Xian; Zhang, Jinli; Li, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Besides the inherent chirality, DNA is enriched by nitrogen and oxygen functional groups that are preferential to coordinate with transition metal ions, and its self-assembled structures, including the G-quadruplex, the i-motif, and the conventional Watson-Crick duplex, etc., can be adjusted via different base pairings. Recently biotemplating on the basis of DNA self-assembly has been considered as an attractive method to construct switchable nanomaterials, to direct crystal growth and to design enantioselective selectors/catalysts. This review briefly covers the recent progress relevant to DNA modulated nano/subnano materials. The long-term goal of this area of research is to explore novel promisingly environmental-benign approaches to construct switchable nanomachines, nano/subnano clusters and enantioselective recognition platforms respectively, through DNA-based modulation. PMID:24832072

  2. Cationic porphyrins as probes of DNA structure.

    PubMed Central

    Bromley, S D; Ward, B W; Dabrowiak, J C

    1986-01-01

    The DNA binding specificity of a group of cationic manganese porphyrin complexes has been examined using DNase I footprinting methodology and by observing the sites of porphyrin-induced DNA strand scission in the presence of potassium superoxide. The compounds, which possess systematic changes in total charge, its distribution on the periphery on the macrocycle and ligand shape, bind in the minor groove of AT rich regions of DNA. While changes in total charge and charge arrangement do not significantly influence specificity, a shape change which blocks close ligand contact with the minor groove relaxes the original AT specificity causing the compound to cleave at both AT and GC sites. The observed changes in binding sequence specificity were interpreted in terms of electrostatic and steric factors associated with both the compounds and DNA. PMID:3786148

  3. Mitochondrial DNA abnormalities in ophthalmological disease

    PubMed Central

    Gorman, Grainne S.; Taylor, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are a group of clinically heterogeneous diseases, commonly defined by lack of cellular energy due to genetic defects of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). Ocular involvement is a prominent clinical feature of mitochondrial disease. This can manifest as optic nerve dysfunction specifically involving retinal ganglion cells as typified by Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON), or progressive external ophthalmoplegia (PEO) and ptosis involving the extraocular muscles which is commonly associated with either primary mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or acquired mtDNA defects secondary to a nuclear genetic disorder of mtDNA maintenance. In this short review, we will outline the unique characteristics of mitochondrial genetic disease and its investigation with reference to the clinical features and molecular genetic abnormalities underlying mitochondrial ophthalmological disease. PMID:23960954

  4. Engineering Clostridium Strain to Accept Unmethylated DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hongjun; Zhang, Yanping; Dai, Zongjie; Li, Yin

    2010-01-01

    It is difficult to genetically manipulate the medically and biotechnologically important genus Clostridium due to the existence of the restriction and modification (RM) systems. We identified and engineered the RM system of a model clostridial species, C. acetobutylicum, with the aim to allow the host to accept the unmethylated DNA efficiently. A gene CAC1502 putatively encoding the type II restriction endonuclease Cac824I was identified from the genome of C. acetobutylicum DSM1731, and disrupted using the ClosTron system based on group II intron insertion. The resulting strain SMB009 lost the type II restriction endonuclease activity, and can be transformed with unmethylated DNA as efficiently as with methylated DNA. The strategy reported here makes it easy to genetically modify the clostridial species using unmethylated DNA, which will help to advance the understanding of the clostridial physiology from the molecular level. PMID:20161730

  5. Evaluation of DNAstable for DNA storage at ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Howlett, Susanne E; Castillo, Hilda S; Gioeni, Lora J; Robertson, James M; Donfack, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Preserving DNA is important for validation of prospective and retrospective analyses, requiring many expensive types of equipment (e.g., freezers and back-up generators) and energy. While freezing is the most common method for storing extracted DNA evidence or well-characterized DNA samples for validation studies, DNAstable (Biomatrica), a commercially available medium for room temperature storage of DNA extracts was evaluated in this study. Two groups of samples consisting of different DNA quantities were investigated, one ranging from 20 to 400 ng (group 1) and the other one ranging from 1.4 to 20 ng (group 2). The DNA samples with and without DNAstable were stored at four different temperatures [∼25 °C (room temperature), -20 °C, 37 °C or 50 °C]. DNA degradation over several months was monitored by SYBR Green-based qPCR assays and by PCR amplification of the core CODIS STR markers for group 1 and 2 DNA samples, respectively. For the time points tested in this study (up to 365 days), the findings indicate that the -20 °C controls and the DNAstable protected samples at room temperature provided similar DNA recoveries that were higher compared to the unprotected controls kept at RT, 37 °C or 50 °C. These results suggest that DNAstable can protect DNA samples with effectiveness similar to that of the traditional -20 °C freezing method. In addition, extrapolations from accelerated aging experiments conducted at high temperatures support that DNAstable is an effective technology for preserving purified DNA at room temperature with a larger protective impact on DNA samples of low quantity (<20 ng). PMID:24315605

  6. Detection and quantitation of single nucleotide polymorphisms, DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    DNA mutation binding proteins alone and as chimeric proteins with nucleases are used with solid supports to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. The solid supports may be flow cytometry beads, DNA chips, glass slides or DNA dips sticks. DNA molecules are coupled to solid supports to form DNA-support complexes. Labeled DNA is used with unlabeled DNA mutation binding proteins such at TthMutS to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by binding which gives an increase in signal. Unlabeled DNA is utilized with labeled chimeras to detect DNA sequence variations, DNA mutations and single nucleotide length polymorphisms by nuclease activity of the chimera which gives a decrease in signal.

  7. Markovian language model of the DNA and its information content.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, S; Baptista, M S

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a Markovian memoryless model for the DNA that simplifies enormously the complexity of it. We encode nucleotide sequences into symbolic sequences, called words, from which we establish meaningful length of words and groups of words that share symbolic similarities. Interpreting a node to represent a group of similar words and edges to represent their functional connectivity allows us to construct a network of the grammatical rules governing the appearance of groups of words in the DNA. Our model allows us to predict the transition between groups of words in the DNA with unprecedented accuracy, and to easily calculate many informational quantities to better characterize the DNA. In addition, we reduce the DNA of known bacteria to a network of only tens of nodes, show how our model can be used to detect similar (or dissimilar) genes in different organisms, and which sequences of symbols are responsible for most of the information content of the DNA. Therefore, the DNA can indeed be treated as a language, a Markovian language, where a 'word' is an element of a group, and its grammar represents the rules behind the probability of transitions between any two groups. PMID:26909179

  8. Markovian language model of the DNA and its information content

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, S.; Baptista, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    This work proposes a Markovian memoryless model for the DNA that simplifies enormously the complexity of it. We encode nucleotide sequences into symbolic sequences, called words, from which we establish meaningful length of words and groups of words that share symbolic similarities. Interpreting a node to represent a group of similar words and edges to represent their functional connectivity allows us to construct a network of the grammatical rules governing the appearance of groups of words in the DNA. Our model allows us to predict the transition between groups of words in the DNA with unprecedented accuracy, and to easily calculate many informational quantities to better characterize the DNA. In addition, we reduce the DNA of known bacteria to a network of only tens of nodes, show how our model can be used to detect similar (or dissimilar) genes in different organisms, and which sequences of symbols are responsible for most of the information content of the DNA. Therefore, the DNA can indeed be treated as a language, a Markovian language, where a ‘word’ is an element of a group, and its grammar represents the rules behind the probability of transitions between any two groups. PMID:26909179

  9. DNA topology and transcription

    PubMed Central

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  10. Electrocatalysis in DNA Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Furst, Ariel; Hill, Michael G.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2014-01-01

    Electrocatalysis is often thought of solely in the inorganic realm, most often applied to energy conversion in fuel cells. However, the ever-growing field of bioelectrocatalysis has made great strides in advancing technology for both biofuel cells as well as biological detection platforms. Within the context of bioelectrocatalytic detection systems, DNA-based platforms are especially prevalent. One subset of these platforms, the one we have developed, takes advantage of the inherent charge transport properties of DNA. Electrocatalysis coupled with DNA-mediated charge transport has enabled specific and sensitive detection of lesions, mismatches and DNA-binding proteins. Even greater signal amplification from these platforms is now being achieved through the incorporation of a secondary electrode to the platform both for patterning DNA arrays and for detection. Here, we describe the evolution of this new DNA sensor technology. PMID:25435647

  11. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success. PMID:25391915

  12. Elasticity of DNA nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev K.; McEwan, Andrew; Lukačević, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, using a theoretical model we bring forth the Young modulus of DNA nanowire (NWs) as a function of diameter considering both equilibrium strain and surface stress effects. A good trend between the present calculated and the available theoretical size-dependent Young modulus of different metallic and semiconducting NWs is found, which supports the DNA NWs mechanical strength. We have extended our view of studied materials to predict the behavior of the DNA NWs and ascertain their resemblance to the behavior of either metallic or semiconducting nature of NWs. We have also demonstrated the variation in Young modulus of the DNA NWs with the variation of relaxed material property of DNA NWs. This study extrapolates key factors in modeling DNA NWs for the electronic device applications.

  13. Simulation of DNA Catenanes

    PubMed Central

    Vologodskii, Alexander; Rybenkov, Valentin V.

    2010-01-01

    Summary DNA catenanes are important objects in biology, foremost as they appear during replication of circular DNA molecules. In this review we analyze how conformational properties of DNA catenanes can be studied by computer simulation. We consider classification of catenanes, their topological invariants and the methods of calculation of these invariants. We briefly analyze the DNA model and the simulation procedure used to sample the equilibrium conformational ensemble of catenanes with a particular topology. We consider how to avoid direct simulation of many DNA molecules when we need to account for the linking-unlinking process. The simulation methods and their comparisons with experiments are illustrated by some examples. We also describe an approach that allows simulating the steady state fraction of DNA catenanes created by type II topoisomerases. PMID:20145800

  14. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H?/OH?), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications. PMID:24647836

  15. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  16. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and

  17. Metal complexes as DNA intercalators.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong-Ke; Sadler, Peter J

    2011-05-17

    DNA has a strong affinity for many heterocyclic aromatic dyes, such as acridine and its derivatives. Lerman in 1961 first proposed intercalation as the source of this affinity, and this mode of DNA binding has since attracted considerable research scrutiny. Organic intercalators can inhibit nucleic acid synthesis in vivo, and they are now common anticancer drugs in clinical therapy. The covalent attachment of organic intercalators to transition metal coordination complexes, yielding metallointercalators, can lead to novel DNA interactions that influence biological activity. Metal complexes with σ-bonded aromatic side arms can act as dual-function complexes: they bind to DNA both by metal coordination and through intercalation of the attached aromatic ligand. These aromatic side arms introduce new modes of DNA binding, involving mutual interactions of functional groups held in close proximity. The biological activity of both cis- and trans-diamine Pt(II) complexes is dramatically enhanced by the addition of σ-bonded intercalators. We have explored a new class of organometallic "piano-stool" Ru(II) and Os(II) arene anticancer complexes of the type [(η(6)-arene)Ru/Os(XY)Cl](+). Here XY is, for example, ethylenediamine (en), and the arene ligand can take many forms, including tetrahydroanthracene, biphenyl, or p-cymene. Arene-nucleobase stacking interactions can have a significant influence on both the kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA binding. In particular, the cytotoxic activity, conformational distortions, recognition by DNA-binding proteins, and repair mechanisms are dependent on the arene. A major difficulty in developing anticancer drugs is cross-resistance, a phenomenon whereby a cell that is resistant to one drug is also resistant to another drug in the same class. These new complexes are non-cross-resistant with cisplatin towards cancer cells: they constitute a new class of anticancer agents, with a mechanism of action that differs from the anticancer drug cisplatin and its analogs. The Ru-arene complexes with dual functions are more potent towards cancer cells than their nonintercalating analogs. In this Account, we focus on recent studies of dual-function organometallic Ru(II)- and Os(II)-arene complexes and the methods used to detect arene-DNA intercalation. We relate these interactions to the mechanism of anticancer activity and to structure-activity relationships. The interactions between these complexes and DNA show close similarities to those of covalent polycyclic aromatic carcinogens, especially to N7-alkylating intercalation compounds. However, Ru-arene complexes exhibit some new features. Classical intercalation and base extrusion next to the metallated base is observed for {(η(6)-biphenyl)Ru(ethylenediamine)}(2+) adducts of a 14-mer duplex, while penetrating arene intercalation occurs for adducts of the nonaromatic bulky intercalator {(η(6)-tetrahydroanthracene)Ru(ethylenediamine)}(2+) with a 6-mer duplex. The introduction of dual-function Ru-arene complexes introduces new mechanisms of antitumor activity, novel mechanisms for attack on DNA, and new concepts for developing structure- activity relationships. We hope this discussion will stimulate thoughtful and focused research on the design of anticancer chemotherapeutic agents using these unique approaches. PMID:21446672

  18. DNA Demethylation Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Bhutani, Nidhi; Burns, David M.; Blau, Helen M.

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of cytosine hydroxymethylation (5hmC) suggested a simple means of demethylating DNA and activating genes. Further experiments, however, unearthed an unexpectedly complex process, entailing both passive and active mechanisms of DNA demethylation by the ten-eleven translocation (TET) and AID/APOBEC families of enzymes. The consensus emerging from these studies is that removal of cytosine methylation in mammalian cells can occur by DNA repair. These reports highlight that in certain contexts DNA methylation is not fixed, but dynamic, requiring continuous regulation. PMID:21925312

  19. Immune sensing of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Paludan, Søren R.; Bowie, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Although it has been appreciated for some years that cytosolic DNA is immune-stimulatory, it is only in the past five years that the molecular basis of DNA sensing by the innate immune system has begun to be revealed. In particular it has been described how DNA induces type I interferon, central in anti-viral responses and a mediator of autoimmunity. While to date more than 10 cytosolic receptors of DNA have been proposed, STING is a key adaptor protein for most DNA sensing pathways, and we are now beginning to understand the signaling mechanisms for STING. In this review we describe the recent progress in understanding signaling mechanisms activated by DNA and the relevance of DNA sensing to pathogen responses and autoimmunity. We highlight new insights gained into how and why the immune system responds to both pathogen and self DNA, and define important questions that now need to be addressed in the field of innate immune activation by DNA. PMID:23706668

  20. DNA Damage Response

    PubMed Central

    Giglia-Mari, Giuseppina; Zotter, Angelika; Vermeulen, Wim

    2011-01-01

    Structural changes to DNA severely affect its functions, such as replication and transcription, and play a major role in age-related diseases and cancer. A complicated and entangled network of DNA damage response (DDR) mechanisms, including multiple DNA repair pathways, damage tolerance processes, and cell-cycle checkpoints safeguard genomic integrity. Like transcription and replication, DDR is a chromatin-associated process that is generally tightly controlled in time and space. As DNA damage can occur at any time on any genomic location, a specialized spatio-temporal orchestration of this defense apparatus is required. PMID:20980439

  1. Bisulfite Sequencing of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Darst, Russell P.; Pardo, Carolina E.; Ai, Lingbao; Brown, Kevin D.; Kladde, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Exact positions of 5-methylcytosine (m5C) on a single strand of DNA can be determined by bisulfite genomic sequencing (BGS). Treatment with bisulfite ion preferentially deaminates unmethylated cytosines, which then convert to uracil upon desulfonation. Amplifying regions of interest from deaminated DNA and sequencing products cloned from amplicons permits determination of methylation at single nucleotide resolution along single DNA molecules, which is not possible with other methylation analysis techniques. This unit describes a BGS technique suitable for most DNA sources, including formaldehyde-fixed tissue. Considerations for experimental design and common sources of error are discussed. PMID:20583099

  2. Phytoplasma plasmid DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mark T; Liefting, Lia W

    2013-01-01

    Phytoplasma plasmids have generally been detected from DNA extracted from plants and insects using methods designed for the purification of total phytoplasma DNA. Methods include extraction from tissues that are high in phytoplasma titre, such as the phloem of plants, with the use of CsCl-bisbenzimide gradients that exploit the low G+C content of phytoplasma DNA. Many of the methods employed for phytoplasma purification have been described elsewhere in this book. Here we describe in detail two methods that are specifically aimed at isolating plasmid DNA. PMID:22987431

  3. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    SciTech Connect

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  4. Replication protein A interactions with DNA. III. Molecular basis of recognition of damaged DNA.

    PubMed

    Lao, Y; Gomes, X V; Ren, Y; Taylor, J S; Wold, M S

    2000-02-01

    Human replication protein A (RPA) is a heterotrimeric single-stranded DNA-binding protein (subunits of 70, 32, and 14 kDa) that is required for cellular DNA metabolism. RPA has been reported to interact specifically with damaged double-stranded DNA and to participate in multiple steps of nucleotide excision repair (NER) including the damage recognition step. We have examined the mechanism of RPA binding to both single-stranded and double-stranded DNA (ssDNA and dsDNA, respectively) containing damage. We show that the affinity of RPA for damaged dsDNA correlated with disruption of the double helix by the damaged bases and required RPAs ssDNA-binding activity. We conclude that RPA is recognizing single-stranded character caused by the damaged nucleotides. We also show that RPA binds specifically to damaged ssDNA. The specificity of binding varies with the type of damage with RPA having up to a 60-fold preference for a pyrimidine(6-4)pyrimidone photoproduct. We show that this specific binding was absolutely dependent on the zinc-finger domain in the C-terminus of the 70-kDa subunit. The affinity of RPA for damaged ssDNA was 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of the damage recognition protein XPA (xeroderma pigmentosum group A protein). These findings suggest that RPA probably binds to both damaged and undamaged strands in the NER excision complex. RPA binding may be important for efficient excision of damaged DNA in NER. PMID:10653628

  5. Low-Dose Formaldehyde Delays DNA Damage Recognition and DNA Excision Repair in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Luch, Andreas; Frey, Flurina C. Clement; Meier, Regula; Fei, Jia; Naegeli, Hanspeter

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formaldehyde is still widely employed as a universal crosslinking agent, preservative and disinfectant, despite its proven carcinogenicity in occupationally exposed workers. Therefore, it is of paramount importance to understand the possible impact of low-dose formaldehyde exposures in the general population. Due to the concomitant occurrence of multiple indoor and outdoor toxicants, we tested how formaldehyde, at micromolar concentrations, interferes with general DNA damage recognition and excision processes that remove some of the most frequently inflicted DNA lesions. Methodology/Principal Findings The overall mobility of the DNA damage sensors UV-DDB (ultraviolet-damaged DNA-binding) and XPC (xeroderma pigmentosum group C) was analyzed by assessing real-time protein dynamics in the nucleus of cultured human cells exposed to non-cytotoxic (<100 μM) formaldehyde concentrations. The DNA lesion-specific recruitment of these damage sensors was tested by monitoring their accumulation at local irradiation spots. DNA repair activity was determined in host-cell reactivation assays and, more directly, by measuring the excision of DNA lesions from chromosomes. Taken together, these assays demonstrated that formaldehyde obstructs the rapid nuclear trafficking of DNA damage sensors and, consequently, slows down their relocation to DNA damage sites thus delaying the excision repair of target lesions. A concentration-dependent effect relationship established a threshold concentration of as low as 25 micromolar for the inhibition of DNA excision repair. Conclusions/Significance A main implication of the retarded repair activity is that low-dose formaldehyde may exert an adjuvant role in carcinogenesis by impeding the excision of multiple mutagenic base lesions. In view of this generally disruptive effect on DNA repair, we propose that formaldehyde exposures in the general population should be further decreased to help reducing cancer risks. PMID:24722772

  6. "Photoclick" postsynthetic modification of DNA.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Stefanie; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim

    2014-12-22

    A new DNA building block bearing a push-pull-substituted diaryltetrazole linked to the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine through an aminopropynyl group was synthesized. The accordingly modified oligonucleotide allows postsynthetic labeling with a maleimide-modified sulfo-Cy3 dye, N-methylmaleimide, and methylmethacrylate as dipolarophiles by irradiation at 365?nm (LED). The determined rate constant of (237)?M(-1) ?s(-1) is remarkably high with respect to other copper-free bioorthogonal reactions and comparable with the copper-catalyzed cycloaddition between azides and acetylenes. PMID:25359534

  7. Probing DNA-DNA electrostatic friction in tight superhelical DNA plies.

    PubMed

    Cherstvy, A G

    2009-04-23

    We estimate theoretically the strength of DNA-DNA electrostatic friction forces emerging upon a slow drag of one DNA over another one in a close juxtaposition. For ideally helical DNA duplexes, this friction occurs due to correlations in electrostatic potential near the DNA surface. The latter originate from the intrinsic helicity of DNA phosphates and adsorbed cations on a scale of 3.4 nm. They produce positive-negative charge interlocking along the DNA-DNA contact. For realistic nonideally helical DNAs, where electrostatic potential barriers become decorrelated due to accumulation of mismatches in DNA structure, DNA-DNA frictional forces are strongly impeded. We discuss possibilities of probing the DNA-DNA intermolecular interactions in strongly confined DNA superhelical plies, as obtained in single-molecule experiments. PMID:19331342

  8. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, XUEFENG; He, YAN; JI, MIN; CHEN, XIAOFANG; QI, JING; SHI, WEI; HAO, TIANBO; JU, SHAOQING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ovarian tumor cases, and 19 healthy, non-cancerous ovaries. bDNA techniques were used to detect serum cf-DNA concentrations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in the ovarian cancer group compared with those of the benign ovarian tumor group and healthy ovarian group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in stage III and IV ovarian cancer compared with those of stages I and II (P<0.01). In addition, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased on the first day post-surgery (P<0.01), and subsequently demonstrated a gradual decrease. In the ovarian cancer group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA and the sensitivity were 0.917 and 88.9%, respectively, which was higher than those of cancer antigen 125 (0.724, 75%) and human epididymis protein 4 (0.743, 80.6%). There was a correlation between the levels of serum cf-DNA and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer in the patients evaluated. bDNA techniques possessed higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods for the detection of serum cf-DNA in patients exhibiting ovarian cancer, and bDNA techniques are more useful for detecting cf-DNA than other factors. Thus, the present study demonstrated the potential value for the use of bDNA as an adjuvant diagnostic method for ovarian cancer. PMID:26788153

  9. ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF HIGH METHIONINE INTAKE ON DNA METHYLATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methylation of DNA occurs at cytosines within CpG (cytosine-guanine) dinucleotides and is one of several epigenetic mechanisms that serve to establish and maintain tissue-specific patterns of gene expression. The methyl groups transferred in mammalian DNA methylation reactions are ultimately derived...

  10. DNA Isolation Method Is a Source of Global DNA Methylation Variability Measured with LUMA. Experimental Analysis and a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Trraga, Carolina; Jimnez-Conde, Jordi; Giralt-Steinhauer, Eva; Ois, ngel; Rodrguez-Campello, Ana; Cuadrado-Godia, Elisa; Fernndez-Cadenas, Israel; Montaner, Joan; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto; Roquer, Jaume

    2013-01-01

    In DNA methylation, methyl groups are covalently bound to CpG dinucleotides. However, the assumption that methyl groups are not lost during routine DNA extraction has not been empirically tested. To avoid nonbiological associations in DNA methylation studies, it is essential to account for potential batch effect bias in the assessment of this epigenetic mechanism. Our purpose was to determine if the DNA isolation method is an independent source of variability in methylation status. We quantified Global DNA Methylation (GDM) by luminometric methylation assay (LUMA), comparing the results from 3 different DNA isolation methods. In the controlled analysis (n?=?9), GDM differed slightly for the same individual depending on extraction method. In the population analysis (n?=?580) there were significant differences in GDM between the 3 DNA isolation methods (medians, 78.1%, 76.5% and 75.1%; p<0.001). A systematic review of published data from LUMA GDM studies that specify DNA extraction methods is concordant with our findings. DNA isolation method is a source of GDM variability measured with LUMA. To avoid possible bias, the method used should be reported and taken into account in future DNA methylation studies. PMID:23585847

  11. Genotyping Performance Assessment of Whole Genome Amplified DNA with Respect to Multiplexing Level of Assay and Its Period of Storage

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Daniel W. H.; Yiu, Wai Chi; Yap, Maurice K. H.; Fung, Wai Yan; Ng, Po Wah; Yip, Shea Ping

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome amplification can faithfully amplify genomic DNA (gDNA) with minimal bias and substantial genome coverage. Whole genome amplified DNA (wgaDNA) has been tested to be workable for high-throughput genotyping arrays. However, issues about whether wgaDNA would decrease genotyping performance at increasing multiplexing levels and whether the storage period of wgaDNA would reduce genotyping performance have not been examined. Using the Sequenom MassARRAY iPLEX Gold assays, we investigated 174 single nucleotide polymorphisms for 3 groups of matched samples: group 1 of 20 gDNA samples, group 2 of 20 freshly prepared wgaDNA samples, and group 3 of 20 stored wgaDNA samples that had been kept frozen at −70°C for 18 months. MassARRAY is a medium-throughput genotyping platform with reaction chemistry different from those of high-throughput genotyping arrays. The results showed that genotyping performance (efficiency and accuracy) of freshly prepared wgaDNA was similar to that of gDNA at various multiplexing levels (17-plex, 21-plex, 28-plex and 36-plex) of the MassARRAY assays. However, compared with gDNA or freshly prepared wgaDNA, stored wgaDNA was found to give diminished genotyping performance (efficiency and accuracy) due to potentially inferior quality. Consequently, no matter whether gDNA or wgaDNA was used, better genotyping efficiency would tend to have better genotyping accuracy. PMID:22022531

  12. Many Ways to Loop DNA

    PubMed Central

    Griffith, Jack D.

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, I developed methods for directly visualizing DNA and DNA-protein complexes using an electron microscope. This made it possible to examine the shape of DNA and to visualize proteins as they fold and loop DNA. Early applications included the first visualization of true nucleosomes and linkers and the demonstration that repeating tracts of adenines can cause a curvature in DNA. The binding of DNA repair proteins, including p53 and BRCA2, has been visualized at three- and four-way junctions in DNA. The trombone model of DNA replication was directly verified, and the looping of DNA at telomeres was discovered. PMID:24005675

  13. DNA Barcodes for Nearctic Auchenorrhyncha (Insecta: Hemiptera)

    PubMed Central

    Foottit, Robert G.; Maw, Eric; Hebert, P. D. N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown the suitability of sequence variation in the 5? region of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene as a DNA barcode for the identification of species in a wide range of animal groups. We examined 471 species in 147 genera of Hemiptera: Auchenorrhyncha drawn from specimens in the Canadian National Collection of Insects to assess the effectiveness of DNA barcoding in this group. Methodology/Principal Findings Analysis of the COI gene revealed less than 2% intra-specific divergence in 93% of the taxa examined, while minimum interspecific distances exceeded 2% in 70% of congeneric species pairs. Although most species are characterized by a distinct sequence cluster, sequences for members of many groups of closely related species either shared sequences or showed close similarity, with 25% of species separated from their nearest neighbor by less than 1%. Conclusions/Significance This study, although preliminary, provides DNA barcodes for about 8% of the species of this hemipteran suborder found in North America north of Mexico. Barcodes can enable the identification of many species of Auchenorrhyncha, but members of some species groups cannot be discriminated. Future use of DNA barcodes in regulatory, pest management, and environmental applications will be possible as the barcode library for Auchenorrhyncha expands to include more species and broader geographic coverage. PMID:25004106

  14. The interplay of primer-template DNA phosphorylation status and single-stranded DNA binding proteins in directing clamp loaders to the appropriate polarity of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Hayner, Jaclyn N.; Douma, Lauren G.; Bloom, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    Sliding clamps are loaded onto DNA by clamp loaders to serve the critical role of coordinating various enzymes on DNA. Clamp loaders must quickly and efficiently load clamps at primer/template (p/t) junctions containing a duplex region with a free 3′OH (3′DNA), but it is unclear how clamp loaders target these sites. To measure the Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae clamp loader specificity toward 3′DNA, fluorescent β and PCNA clamps were used to measure clamp closing triggered by DNA substrates of differing polarity, testing the role of both the 5′phosphate (5′P) and the presence of single-stranded binding proteins (SSBs). SSBs inhibit clamp loading by both clamp loaders on the incorrect polarity of DNA (5′DNA). The 5′P groups contribute selectivity to differing degrees for the two clamp loaders, suggesting variations in the mechanism by which clamp loaders target 3′DNA. Interestingly, the χ subunit of the E. coli clamp loader is not required for SSB to inhibit clamp loading on phosphorylated 5′DNA, showing that χ·SSB interactions are dispensable. These studies highlight a common role for SSBs in directing clamp loaders to 3′DNA, as well as uncover nuances in the mechanisms by which SSBs perform this vital role. PMID:25159615

  15. Low integrated DNA repair score and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Sevilya, Ziv; Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Pinchev, Mila; Kremer, Ran; Elinger, Dalia; Rennert, Hedy S; Schechtman, Edna; Freedman, Laurence S; Rennert, Gad; Paz-Elizur, Tamar; Livneh, Zvi

    2014-04-01

    DNA repair is a prime mechanism for preventing DNA damage, mutation, and cancers. Adopting a functional approach, we examined the association with lung cancer risk of an integrated DNA repair score, measured by a panel of three enzymatic DNA repair activities in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The panel included assays for AP endonuclease 1 (APE1), 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1), and methylpurine DNA glycosylase (MPG), all of which repair oxidative DNA damage as part of the base excision repair pathways. A blinded population-based case-control study was conducted with 96 patients with lung cancer and 96 control subjects matched by gender, age (1 year), place of residence, and ethnic group (Jews/non-Jews). The three DNA repair activities were measured, and an integrated DNA repair OMA (OGG1, MPG, and APE1) score was calculated for each individual. Conditional logistic regression analysis revealed that individuals in the lowest tertile of the integrated DNA repair OMA score had an increased risk of lung cancer compared with the highest tertile, with OR = 9.7; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.1-29.8; P < 0.001, or OR = 5.6; 95% CI, 2.1-15.1; P < 0.001 after cross-validation. These results suggest that pending validation, this DNA repair panel of risk factors may be useful for lung cancer risk assessment, assisting prevention and referral to early detection by technologies such as low-dose computed tomography scanning. PMID:24356339

  16. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  17. Conformational changes of the phenyl and naphthyl isocyanate-DNA adducts during DNA replication and by minor groove binding molecules

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Shu-ichi; Uotani, Yuuki; Sato, Yuichi; Oka, Hirohito; Fujii, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    DNA lesions produced by aromatic isocyanates have an extra bulky group on the nucleotide bases, with the capability of forming stacking interaction within a DNA helix. In this work, we investigated the conformation of the 2′-deoxyadenosine and 2′-deoxycytidine derivatives tethering a phenyl or naphthyl group, introduced in a DNA duplex. The chemical modification experiments using KMnO4 and 1-cyclohexyl-3 -(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluenesulfonate have shown that the 2′-deoxycytidine lesions form the base pair with guanine while the 2′-deoxyadenosine lesions have less ability of forming the base pair with thymine in solution. Nevertheless, the kinetic analysis shows that these DNA lesions are compatible with DNA ligase and DNA polymerase reactions, as much as natural DNA bases. We suggest that the adduct lesions have a capability of adopting dual conformations, depending on the difference in their interaction energies between stacking of the attached aromatic group and base pairing through hydrogen bonds. It is also presented that the attached aromatic groups change their orientation by interacting with the minor groove binding netropsin, distamycin and synthetic polyamide. The nucleotide derivatives would be useful for enhancing the phenotypic diversity of DNA molecules and for exploring new non-natural nucleotides. PMID:23873956

  18. Conformational changes of the phenyl and naphthyl isocyanate-DNA adducts during DNA replication and by minor groove binding molecules.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Shu-ichi; Uotani, Yuuki; Sato, Yuichi; Oka, Hirohito; Fujii, Masayuki; Sugimoto, Naoki

    2013-10-01

    DNA lesions produced by aromatic isocyanates have an extra bulky group on the nucleotide bases, with the capability of forming stacking interaction within a DNA helix. In this work, we investigated the conformation of the 2'-deoxyadenosine and 2'-deoxycytidine derivatives tethering a phenyl or naphthyl group, introduced in a DNA duplex. The chemical modification experiments using KMnO4 and 1-cyclohexyl-3 -(2-morpholinoethyl) carbodiimide metho-p-toluenesulfonate have shown that the 2'-deoxycytidine lesions form the base pair with guanine while the 2'-deoxyadenosine lesions have less ability of forming the base pair with thymine in solution. Nevertheless, the kinetic analysis shows that these DNA lesions are compatible with DNA ligase and DNA polymerase reactions, as much as natural DNA bases. We suggest that the adduct lesions have a capability of adopting dual conformations, depending on the difference in their interaction energies between stacking of the attached aromatic group and base pairing through hydrogen bonds. It is also presented that the attached aromatic groups change their orientation by interacting with the minor groove binding netropsin, distamycin and synthetic polyamide. The nucleotide derivatives would be useful for enhancing the phenotypic diversity of DNA molecules and for exploring new non-natural nucleotides. PMID:23873956

  19. Constructing Group Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimlich, Joe E.

    1996-01-01

    Presents guidelines for constructing group learning activities, describes group learning methods (discussion, gaming, role play, simulation, projects), and provides tips for facilitating group activities. (SK)

  20. Ecological diversification in the Bacillus cereus Group.

    PubMed

    Guinebretire, Marie-Hlne; Thompson, Fabiano L; Sorokin, Alexei; Normand, Philippe; Dawyndt, Peter; Ehling-Schulz, Monika; Svensson, Birgitta; Sanchis, Vincent; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Heyndrickx, Marc; De Vos, Paul

    2008-04-01

    The Bacillus cereus Group comprises organisms that are widely distributed in the environment and are of health and economic interest. We demonstrate an 'ecotypic' structure of populations in the B. cereus Group using (i) molecular data from Fluorescent Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism patterns, ribosomal gene sequences, partial panC gene sequences, 'psychrotolerant' DNA sequence signatures and (ii) phenotypic and descriptive data from range of growth temperature, psychrotolerance and thermal niches. Seven major phylogenetic groups (I to VII) were thus identified, with ecological differences that provide evidence for a multiemergence of psychrotolerance in the B. cereus Group. A moderate thermotolerant group (VII) was basal to the mesophilic group I, from which in turn distinct thermal lineages have emerged, comprising two mesophilic groups (III, IV), an intermediate group (V) and two psychrotolerant groups (VI, II). This stepwise evolutionary transition toward psychrotolerance was particularly well illustrated by the relative abundance of the 'psychrotolerant' rrs signature (as defined by Pruss et al.) copies accumulated in strains that varied according to the phylogenetic group. The 'psychrotolerant' cspA signature (as defined by Francis et al.) was specific to group VI and provided a useful way to differentiate it from the psychrotolerant group II. This study illustrates how adaptation to novel environments by the modification of temperature tolerance limits has shaped historical patterns of global ecological diversification in the B. cereus Group. The implications for the taxonomy of this Group and for the human health risk are discussed. PMID:18036180

  1. Nanotechnology: Deadly DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Swati; Simmel, Friedrich C.

    2015-01-01

    DNA self-assembly has previously been used to create channel-like structures that can penetrate through lipid bilayer membranes. However, such assemblies have not been shown to cause cell death before. Now a DNA nanopore has been shown to exert a cytotoxic effect when administered to cells.

  2. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in

  3. Translesion DNA synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Vaisman, Alexandra; McDonald, John P.; Woodgate, Roger

    2014-01-01

    All living organisms are continually exposed to agents that damage their DNA, which threatens the integrity of their genome. As a consequence, cells are equipped with a plethora of DNA repair enzymes to remove the damaged DNA. Unfortunately, situations nevertheless arise where lesions persist, and these lesions block the progression of the cells replicase. Under these situations, cells are forced to choose between recombination-mediated damage avoidance pathways, or use a specialized DNA polymerase (pol) to traverse the blocking lesion. The latter process is referred to as Translesion DNA Synthesis (TLS). As inferred by its name, TLS not only results in bases being (mis)incorporated opposite DNA lesions, but also downstream of the replicase-blocking lesion, so as to ensure continued genome duplication and cell survival. Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium possess five DNA polymerases, and while all have been shown to facilitate TLS under certain experimental conditions, it is clear that the LexA-regulated and damage-inducible pols II, IV and V perform the vast majority of TLS under physiological conditions. Pol V can traverse a wide range of DNA lesions and performs the bulk of mutagenic TLS, whereas pol II and pol IV appear to be more specialized TLS polymerases. PMID:25401115

  4. Modeling DNA Replication Intermediates

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Roy, D.; Shapiro, R.

    1997-06-01

    While there is now available a great deal of information on double stranded DNA from X-ray crystallography, high resolution NMR and computer modeling, very little is known about structures that are representative of the DNA core of replication intermediates. DNA replication occurs at a single strand/double strand junction and bulged out intermediates near the junction can lead to frameshift mutations. The single stranded domains are particularly challenging. Our interest is focused on strategies for modeling the DNA of these types of replication intermediates. Modeling such structures presents special problems in addressing the multiple minimum problem and in treating the electrostatic component of the force field. We are testing a number of search strategies for locating low energy structures of these types and we are also investigating two different distance dependent dielectric functions in the coulombic term of the force field. We are studying both unmodified DNA and DNA damaged by aromatic amines, carcinogens present in the environment in tobacco smoke, barbecued meats and automobile exhaust. The nature of the structure adopted by the carcinogen modified DNA at the replication fork plays a key role in determining whether the carcinogen will cause a mutation during replication that can initiate the carcinogenic process. In the present work results are presented for unmodified DNA.

  5. Forensic DNA testing.

    PubMed

    Weedn, V W; Roby, R K

    1993-05-01

    Forensic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) testing has revolutionized criminal investigations. Deoxyribonucleic acid testing is superseding traditional serologic testing due to its discriminatory power, universal application to biologic materials, and resistance to environmental insults, among other advantages. Its acceptance is becoming commonplace, and it is being put into widespread use. Forensic DNA testing technology and its application is continuing to evolve. PMID:8489337

  6. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  7. DNA sequences encoding erythropoietin

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, F.K.

    1987-10-27

    A purified and isolated DNA sequence is described consisting essentially of a DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence sufficiently duplicative of that of erythropoietin to allow possession of the biological property of causing bone marrow cells to increase production of reticulocytes and red blood cells, and to increase hemoglobin synthesis or iron uptake.

  8. Routine DNA testing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Routine DNA testing. Its done once youve Marker-Assisted Breeding Pipelined promising Qantitative Trait Loci within your own breeding program and thereby established the performance-predictive power of each DNA test for your germplasm under your conditions. By then you are ready to screen your par...

  9. Environmental DNA Samples

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Samples from various aquatic species and other material necessary to create environemntal DNA (eDNA) assays are stored at the Snake River Field Station in Boise. Water samples from aquatic ecosystems are compared against the assays to identify the presence and location of species in those ecosy...

  10. Environmental DNA Samples

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Samples collected form coho salmon that will be used to develop environmental DNA (eDNA) assays for the species. Water samples from aquatic ecosystems are compared against the assays to identify the presence and location of species in those ecosystems....

  11. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  12. DNA as information.

    PubMed

    Wills, Peter R

    2016-03-13

    This article reviews contributions to this theme issue covering the topic 'DNA as information' in relation to the structure of DNA, the measure of its information content, the role and meaning of information in biology and the origin of genetic coding as a transition from uninformed to meaningful computational processes in physical systems. PMID:26857666

  13. MICROWAVE RESONANCES IN DNA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes spectroscopic studies of DNA which were undertaken to better understand a physical basis for microwave absorption by this molecule. hree types of studies are described. ) The low frequency scattered light spectrum of DNA was studied by two methods. irst, Ram...

  14. Curating DNA specimens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA data are used in a variety of ethnobiological disciplines including archaeology, conservation, ecology, medicinal plants and natural products research, taxonomy and systematics, crop evolution and domestication, and genetic diversity. It frequently is convenient to store and share DNA among coop...

  15. Hierarchical-Multiplex DNA Patterns Mediated by Polymer Brush Nanocone Arrays That Possess Potential Application for Specific DNA Sensing.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wendong; Liu, Xueyao; Ge, Peng; Fang, Liping; Xiang, Siyuan; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Shen, Huaizhong; Yang, Bai

    2015-11-11

    This paper provides a facile and cost-efficient method to prepare single-strand DNA (ssDNA) nanocone arrays and hierarchical DNA patterns that were mediated by poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brush. The PHEMA brush nanocone arrays with different morphology and period were fabricated via colloidal lithography. The hierarchical structure was prepared through the combination of colloidal lithography and traditional photolithography. The DNA patterns were easily achieved via grafting the amino group modified ssDNA onto the side chain of polymer brush, and the anchored DNA maintained their reactivity. The as-prepared ssDNA nanocone arrays can be applied for target DNA sensing with the detection limit reaching 1.65 nM. Besides, with the help of introducing microfluidic ideology, the hierarchical-multiplex DNA patterns on the same substrate could be easily achieved with each kind of pattern possessing one kind of ssDNA, which are promising surfaces for the preparation of rapid, visible, and multiplex DNA sensors. PMID:26497053

  16. Translesion DNA Polymerases

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Myron F.; Woodgate, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are continually exposed to DNA-damaging agents that threaten their genomic integrity. Although DNA repair processes rapidly target the damaged DNA for repair, some lesions nevertheless persist and block genome duplication by the cell’s replicase. To avoid the deleterious consequence of a stalled replication fork, cells use specialized polymerases to traverse the damage. This process, termed “translesion DNA synthesis” (TLS), affords the cell additional time to repair the damage before the replicase returns to complete genome duplication. In many cases, this damage-tolerance mechanism is error-prone, and cell survival is often associated with an increased risk of mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. Despite being tightly regulated by a variety of transcriptional and posttranslational controls, the low-fidelity TLS polymerases also gain access to undamaged DNA where their inaccurate synthesis may actually be beneficial for genetic diversity and evolutionary fitness. PMID:23838442

  17. Parametric resonance in DNA.

    PubMed

    Lacitignola, Deborah; Saccomandi, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    We consider a simple mesoscopic model of DNA in which the binding of the RNA polymerase enzyme molecule to the promoter sequence of the DNA is included through a substrate energy term modeling the enzymatic interaction with the DNA strands. We focus on the differential system for solitary waves and derive conditions--in terms of the model parameters--for the occurrence of the parametric resonance phenomenon. We find that what truly matters for parametric resonance is not the ratio between the strength of the stacking and the inter-strand forces but the ratio between the substrate and the inter-strands. On the basis of these results, the standard objection that longitudinal motion is negligible because of the second order seems to fail, suggesting that all the studies involving the longitudinal degree of freedom in DNA should be reconsidered when the interaction of the RNA polymerase with the DNA macromolecule is not neglected. PMID:24510728

  18. Eukaryotic DNA polymerase ?.

    PubMed

    Makarova, Alena V; Burgers, Peter M

    2015-05-01

    This review focuses on eukaryotic DNA polymerase ? (Pol ?), the enzyme responsible for the bulk of mutagenesis in eukaryotic cells in response to DNA damage. Pol ? is also responsible for a large portion of mutagenesis during normal cell growth, in response to spontaneous damage or to certain DNA structures and other blocks that stall DNA replication forks. Novel insights in mutagenesis have been derived from recent advances in the elucidation of the subunit structure of Pol ?. The lagging strand DNA polymerase ? shares the small Pol31 and Pol32 subunits with the Rev3-Rev7 core assembly giving a four subunit Pol ? complex that is the active form in mutagenesis. Furthermore, Pol ? forms essential interactions with the mutasome assembly factor Rev1 and with proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). These interactions are modulated by posttranslational modifications such as ubiquitination and phosphorylation that enhance translesion synthesis (TLS) and mutagenesis. PMID:25737057

  19. Recombinant DNA in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Cederbaum, Stephen D.; Fareed, George C.; Lovett, Michael A.; Shapiro, Larry J.

    1984-01-01

    Studies in bacteria and bacterial viruses have led to methods to manipulate and recombine DNA in unique and reproducible ways and to amplify these recombined molecules millions of times. Once properly identified, the recombinant DNA molecules can be used in various ways useful in medicine and human biology. There are many applications for recombinant DNA technology. Cloned complementary DNA has been used to produce various human proteins in microorganisms. Insulin and growth hormone have been extensively and successfully tested in humans and insulin has been licensed for sale. Mass production of bacterial and viral antigens with recombinant DNA technology is likely to provide safe and effective vaccines for some disorders for which there is no prevention. The cloned probes for the human ?- and ?-globin loci, for specific disease genes, such as the Z allele of ?-antitrypsin, and for random genomic sequences are proving useful for prenatally diagnosing human genetic disorders and preventing their clinical consequences. Images PMID:6208695

  20. Reversing DNA Methylation: Mechanisms, Genomics, and Biological Functions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Methylation of cytosines in the mammalian genome represents a key epigenetic modification and is dynamically regulated during development. Compelling evidence now suggests that dynamic regulation of DNA methylation is mainly achieved through a cyclic enzymatic cascade comprised of cytosine methylation, iterative oxidation of methyl group by TET dioxygenases, and restoration of unmodified cytosines by either replication-dependent dilution or DNA glycosylase-initiated base excision repair. In this review, we discuss the mechanism and function of DNA demethylation in mammalian genomes, focusing particularly on how developmental modulation of the cytosine-modifying pathway is coupled to active reversal of DNA methylation in diverse biological processes. PMID:24439369

  1. Fidelity of DNA polymerases in DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Keohavong, P.; Thilly, W.G. )

    1989-12-01

    Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to separate and isolate the products of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The strategy permitted direct enumeration and identification of point mutations created by T4, modified T7, Klenow fragment of polymerase I, and Thermus aquaticus (Tag) DNA polymerases. Incorrectly synthesized sequences were separated from the wild type by DGGE as mutant/wild-type heteroduplexes and the heteroduplex fraction was used to calculate the average error rate (mutations per base duplication). The error rate induced in the 104-base-pair low-temperature melting domain of exon 3 of the human hypoxanthine/guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) gene was {approx} 3.4 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} for modified T7, 1.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Klenow fragment, and 2.1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for Taq polymerases after a 10{sup 6}-fold amplification. The error rate for T4 DNA polymerase was not more than 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} error per base duplication. The predominant mutations were sequenced and found to be transitions of G{center dot}C to A{center dot}T for T4 and modified T7 DNA polymerases, and A{center dot}T to G{center dot}C for Taq polymerase. Klenow fragment induced both possible transitions and deletions of 2 and 4 base pairs.

  2. DNA Align Editor: DNA Alignment Editor Tool

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The SNPAlignEditor is a DNA sequence alignment editor that runs on Windows platforms. The purpose of the program is to provide an intuitive, user-friendly tool for manual editing of multiple sequence alignments by providing functions for input, editing, and output of nucleotide sequence alignments....

  3. Polycomb Group Response Elements in Drosophila and Vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, Judith A.; Brown, J. Lesley

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group genes (PcG) encode a group of about 16 proteins that were first identified in Drosophila as repressors of homeotic genes. PcG proteins are present in all metazoans and are best characterized as transcriptional repressors. In Drosophila, these proteins are known as epigenetic regulators because they remember, but do not establish, the patterned expression state of homeotic genes throughout development. PcG proteins, in general, are not DNA binding proteins, but act in protein complexes to repress transcription at specific target genes. How are PcG proteins recruited to the DNA? In Drosophila, there are specific regulatory DNA elements called Polycomb group response elements (PREs) that bring PcG protein complexes to the DNA. Drosophila PREs are made up of binding sites for a complex array of DNA binding proteins. Functional PRE assays in transgenes have shown that PREs act in the context of other regulatory DNA and PRE activity is highly dependent on genomic context. Drosophila PREs tend to regulate genes with a complex array of regulatory DNA in a cell or tissue-specific fashion and it is the interplay between regulatory DNA that dictates PRE function. In mammals, PcG proteins are more diverse and there are multiple ways to recruit PcG complexes, including RNA-mediated recruitment. In this review, we discuss evidence for PREs in vertebrates and explore similarities and differences between Drosophila and vertebrate PREs. PMID:23419717

  4. Thymidine analogues for tracking DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, Brenton L; Walker, Tom; Norazit, Anwar; Meedeniya, Adrian C B

    2011-01-01

    Replicating cells undergo DNA synthesis in the highly regulated, S-phase of the cell cycle. Analogues of the pyrimidine deoxynucleoside thymidine may be inserted into replicating DNA, effectively tagging dividing cells allowing their characterisation. Tritiated thymidine, targeted using autoradiography was technically demanding and superseded by 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and related halogenated analogues, detected using antibodies. Their detection required the denaturation of DNA, often constraining the outcome of investigations. Despite these limitations BrdU alone has been used to target newly synthesised DNA in over 20,000 reviewed biomedical studies. A recent breakthrough in "tagging DNA synthesis" is the thymidine analogue 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU). The alkyne group in EdU is readily detected using a fluorescent azide probe and copper catalysis using 'Huisgen's reaction' (1,3-dipolar cycloaddition or 'click chemistry'). This rapid, two-step biolabelling approach allows the tagging and imaging of DNA within cells whilst preserving the structural and molecular integrity of the cells. The bio-orthogonal detection of EdU allows its application in more experimental assays than previously possible with other "unnatural bases". These include physiological, anatomical and molecular biological experimentation in multiple fields including, stem cell research, cancer biology, and parasitology. The full potential of EdU and related molecules in biomedical research remains to be explored. PMID:21921870

  5. A search for specificity in DNA-drug interactions.

    PubMed

    Cruciani, G; Goodford, P J

    1994-06-01

    The GRID force field and a principal component analysis have been used in order to predict the interactions of small chemical groups with all 64 different triplet sequences of B-DNA. Factors that favor binding to guanine-cytosine base pairs have been identified, and a dictionary of ligand groups and their locations is presented as a guide to the design of specific DNA ligands. PMID:7918250

  6. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  7. Facilitating Reminiscence Groups: Perceptions of Group Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christensen, Teresa M.; Hulse-Killacky, Diana; Salgado, Roy A.; Thornton, Mark D.; Miller, Jason L.

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the results of a two-year qualitative investigation in which group leaders provided their perceptions of the process of facilitating reminiscence groups with elderly persons in a residential care facility. Group Culture emerged as the dominant construct. Findings from this study can serve guide leaders who are interested in

  8. Group Dynamic Processes in Email Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alpay, Esat

    2005-01-01

    Discussion is given on the relevance of group dynamic processes in promoting decision-making in email discussion groups. General theories on social facilitation and social loafing are considered in the context of email groups, as well as the applicability of psychodynamic and interaction-based models. It is argued that such theories may indeed

  9. Studying DNA in the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zarins, Silja

    1993-01-01

    Outlines a workshop for teachers that illustrates a method of extracting DNA and provides instructions on how to do some simple work with DNA without sophisticated and expensive equipment. Provides details on viscosity studies and breaking DNA molecules. (DDR)

  10. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  11. DNA methyltransferase 1 mutations and mitochondrial pathology: is mtDNA methylated?

    PubMed Central

    Maresca, Alessandra; Zaffagnini, Mirko; Caporali, Leonardo; Carelli, Valerio; Zanna, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia-deafness and narcolepsy (ADCA-DN) and Hereditary sensory neuropathy with dementia and hearing loss (HSN1E) are two rare, overlapping neurodegenerative syndromes that have been recently linked to allelic dominant pathogenic mutations in the DNMT1 gene, coding for DNA (cytosine-5)-methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1). DNMT1 is the enzyme responsible for maintaining the nuclear genome methylation patterns during the DNA replication and repair, thus regulating gene expression. The mutations responsible for ADCA-DN and HSN1E affect the replication foci targeting sequence domain, which regulates DNMT1 binding to chromatin. DNMT1 dysfunction is anticipated to lead to a global alteration of the DNA methylation pattern with predictable downstream consequences on gene expression. Interestingly, ADCA-DN and HSN1E phenotypes share some clinical features typical of mitochondrial diseases, such as optic atrophy, peripheral neuropathy, and deafness, and some biochemical evidence of mitochondrial dysfunction. The recent discovery of a mitochondrial isoform of DNMT1 and its proposed role in methylating mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) suggests that DNMT1 mutations may directly affect mtDNA and mitochondrial physiology. On the basis of this latter finding the link between DNMT1 abnormal activity and mitochondrial dysfunction in ADCA-DN and HSN1E appears intuitive, however, mtDNA methylation remains highly debated. In the last years several groups demonstrated the presence of 5-methylcytosine in mtDNA by different approaches, but, on the other end, the opposite evidence that mtDNA is not methylated has also been published. Since over 1500 mitochondrial proteins are encoded by the nuclear genome, the altered methylation of these genes may well have a critical role in leading to the mitochondrial impairment observed in ADCA-DN and HSN1E. Thus, many open questions still remain unanswered, such as why mtDNA should be methylated, and how this process is regulated and executed? PMID:25815005

  12. Molecular structure of r/GCG/d/TATACGC/ - A DNA-RNA hybrid helix joined to double helical DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H.-J.; Fujii, S.; Rich, A.; Van Boom, J. H.; Van Der Marel, G. A.; Van Boeckel, S. A. A.

    1982-01-01

    The molecule r(GCG)d(TATACGC) is self-complementary and forms two DNA-RNA hybrid segments surrounding a central region of double helical DNA; its molecular structure has been solved by X-ray analysis. All three parts of the molecule adopt a conformation which is close to that seen in the 11-fold RNA double helix. The conformation of the ribonucleotides is partly determined by water molecules bridging between the ribose O2' hydroxyl group and cytosine O2. The hybrid-DNA duplex junction contains no structural discontinuities. However, the central DNA TATA sequence has some structural irregularities.

  13. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boya, Luis J.

    2011-01-01

    This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old) five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  14. Lipopolysaccharide-induced mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Choumar, Amal; Tarhuni, Arige; Lettron, Philippe; Reyl-Desmars, Florence; Dauhoo, Nismah; Damasse, Julie; Vadrot, Nathalie; Nahon, Pierre; Moreau, Richard; Pessayre, Dominique; Mansouri, Abdellah

    2011-12-01

    Hepatic energy depletion has been described in severe sepsis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been shown to cause mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage. To clarify the mechanisms of LPS-induced mtDNA damage and mitochondrial alterations, we treated wild-type (WT) or transgenic manganese superoxide dismutase-overerexpressing (MnSOD(+++)) mice with a single dose of LPS (5 mg/kg). In WT mice, LPS increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species formation, hepatic inducible nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mRNA and protein, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, and high-mobility group protein B1 concentrations. Six to 48 h after LPS administration (5 mg/kg), liver mtDNA levels, respiratory complex I activity, and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) contents were decreased. In addition, LPS increased interferon-? concentration and decreased mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) mRNA, Tfam protein, and mtDNA-encoded mRNAs. Morphological studies showed mild hepatic inflammation. The LPS (5 mg/kg)-induced mtDNA depletion, complex I inactivation, ATP depletion, and alanine aminotransferase increase were prevented in MnSOD(+++) mice or in WT mice cotreated with 1400W (a NOS inhibitor), (2-(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl-4-ylamino)-2-oxoethyl)triphenylphosphonium chloride, monohydrate (a superoxide scavenger) or uric acid (a peroxynitrite scavenger). The MnSOD overexpression delayed death in mice challenged by a higher, lethal dose of LPS (25 mg/kg). In conclusion, LPS administration damages mtDNA and alters mitochondrial function. The protective effects of MnSOD, NOS inhibitors, and superoxide or peroxynitrite scavengers point out a role of the superoxide anion reacting with NO to form mtDNA- and protein-damaging peroxynitrite. In addition to the acute damage caused by reactive species, decreased levels of mitochondrial transcripts contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:21767162

  15. DNA binding by pixantrone.

    PubMed

    Adnan, Najia; Buck, Damian P; Evison, Benny J; Cutts, Suzanne M; Phillips, Don R; Collins, J Grant

    2010-12-01

    The binding of the anticancer drug pixantrone (6,9-bis[(2-aminoethyl)amino]benzo[g]isoquinoline-5,10-dione dimaleate) to the octanucleotide duplexes d(ACGATCGT)(2) and the corresponding C-5 methylated cytosine ((5Me)C) analogue d(A(5Me)CGAT(5Me)CGT)(2) has been studied by NMR spectroscopy and molecular modelling. The large upfield shifts observed for the resonances from the aromatic protons of pixantrone upon addition to either d(ACGATCGT)(2) or the corresponding (5Me)C analogue is consistent with the drug binding the octanucleotides by intercalation. The selective reduction in the sequential NOEs between the C(2)-G(3) and C(6)-G(7) nucleotides in NOESY spectra of either octanucleotide with added pixantrone confirms the intercalative binding mechanism. Strong NOEs from the side-chain ethylene protons of pixantrone to the H5 protons and the 5-CH(3) protons of the C(2) and C(6) residues of d(ACGATCGT)(2) and d(A(5Me)CGAT(5Me)CGT)(2), respectively, indicate that pixantrone predominantly intercalates from the DNA major groove at the 5'-CG and 5'-(5Me)CG sites. Simple molecular models based on the conclusions from the NMR experiments indicated that the (5Me)C groups do not represent a steric barrier to intercalation from the major groove. However, the observation of weak NOEs from the ethylene protons of pixantrone to a variety of minor groove protons from either octanucleotide suggests that the drug can also associate in the minor groove. PMID:20865205

  16. Distinct evolutionary histories of the DNA-A and DNA-B components of bipartite begomoviruses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Viruses of the genus Begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) have genomes consisting of either one or two genomic components. The component of bipartite begomoviruses known as DNA-A is homologous to the genomes of all geminiviruses and encodes proteins required for replication, control of gene expression, overcoming host defenses, encapsidation and insect transmission. The second component, referred to as DNA-B, encodes two proteins with functions in intra- and intercellular movement in host plants. The origin of the DNA-B component remains unclear. The study described here was initiated to investigate the relationship between the DNA-A and DNA-B components of bipartite begomoviruses with a view to unraveling their evolutionary histories and providing information on the possible origin of the DNA-B component. Results Comparative phylogenetic and exhaustive pairwise sequence comparison of all DNA-A and DNA-B components of begomoviruses demonstrates that the two molecules have very distinct molecular evolutionary histories and likely are under very different evolutionary pressures. The analysis highlights that component exchange has played a far greater role in diversification of begomoviruses than previously suspected, although there are distinct differences in the apparent ability of different groups of viruses to utilize this "sexual" mechanism of genetic exchange. Additionally we explore the hypothesis that DNA-B originated as a satellite that was captured by the monopartite progenitor of all extant bipartite begomoviruses and subsequently evolved to become the integral (essential) genome component that we recognize today. The situation with present-day satellites associated with begomoviruses provides some clues to the processes and selection pressures that may have led to the "domestication" of a wild progenitor of the DNA-B component. Conclusions The analysis has highlighted the greater genetic variation of DNA-B components, in comparison to the DNA-A components, and that component exchange is more widespread than previously demonstrated and confined to viruses from the Old World. Although the vast majority of New World and some Old World begomoviruses show near perfect co-evolution of the DNA-A and DNA-B components, this is not the case for the majority of Old World viruses. Genetic differences between Old and New World begomoviruses and the cultivation of exotic crops in the Old World are likely factors that have led to this dichotomy. PMID:20377896

  17. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  18. Molecular surgery of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takatoki; Washizu, Masao; Kurosawa, Osamu; Shimamoto, Nobuo

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate 'molecular surgery of DNA', where DNA strand is stretched straight and immobilized on a solid surface, to which an enzyme-labeled micro particle is brought into contact, to make chemical modifications at an arbitrary position on the strand. An electrode array, whose spacing is made equal to the length of DNA, is micro-patterned on a glass surface. The electrodes are energized by a high frequency power supply, to create >= 1 MV/m, approximately equals 1 MHz electrostatic field in the gap. DNA supplied in the gap is stretched straight by the high-intensity field and both termini of the DNA strand are pulled into the electrode edges. As a result, the strand is anchored at both molecular ends bridging over two adjacent electrodes, but the middle part is free, so that the enzyme can bind and react. An enzyme-labeled micro bead, 1-3 micrometers in diameter, is laser-manipulated, and contacted on the immobilized DNA. Using DNase II and HhaI as the enzyme, cutting of DNA is experimentally demonstrated.

  19. Innovations. DNA detectives.

    PubMed

    May, M

    1999-01-01

    To understand the many potential causes and resulting consequences of DNA damage, scientists first need methods to detect it. Canadian scientists X. Chris Le and Michael Weinfeld, with help from U.S. molecular biologist Steven Leadon, developed a selective, sensitive technique for measuring DNA damage. The scientists combined a thymine glycol antibody with thymine glycol to selectively tag a specific type of DNA damage. They then added a second antibody with fluorescing properties, and used laser-induced fluorescence to identify the damaged portion of the tagged DNA. The fluorescence can be quantified, with higher levels of fluorescence indicating higher DNA damage. The technique was shown to find 1 damaged base in 1 billion normal bases. This level of sensitivity could allow the measurement of DNA damage resulting from clinical levels of radiation, and may allow scientists to establish a day-to-day baseline for DNA damage. From this baseline, it would be possible to ascertain the levels of damage that a cell can tolerate, as well as how much damaged it is capable of repairing on a daily basis. PMID:9872726

  20. Organization of DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chagin, Vadim O.; Stear, Jeffrey H.; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of the DNA double helix structure half a century ago immediately suggested a mechanism for its duplication by semi-conservative copying of the nucleotide sequence into two DNA daughter strands. Shortly after, a second fundamental step toward the elucidation of the mechanism of DNA replication was taken with the isolation of the first enzyme able to polymerize DNA from a template. In the subsequent years, the basic mechanism of DNA replication and its enzymatic machinery components were elucidated, mostly through genetic approaches and in vitro biochemistry. Most recently, the spatial and temporal organization of the DNA replication process in vivo within the context of chromatin and inside the intact cell are finally beginning to be elucidated. On the one hand, recent advances in genome-wide high throughput techniques are providing a new wave of information on the progression of genome replication at high spatial resolution. On the other hand, novel super-resolution microscopy techniques are just starting to give us the first glimpses of how DNA replication is organized within the context of single intact cells with high spatial resolution. The integration of these data with time lapse microscopy analysis will give us the ability to film and dissect the replication of the genome in situ and in real time. PMID:20452942

  1. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    Gonzlez-Prez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  2. Chimeric proteins for detection and quantitation of DNA mutations, DNA sequence variations, DNA damage and DNA mismatches

    DOEpatents

    McCutchen-Maloney, Sandra L.

    2002-01-01

    Chimeric proteins having both DNA mutation binding activity and nuclease activity are synthesized by recombinant technology. The proteins are of the general formula A-L-B and B-L-A where A is a peptide having DNA mutation binding activity, L is a linker and B is a peptide having nuclease activity. The chimeric proteins are useful for detection and identification of DNA sequence variations including DNA mutations (including DNA damage and mismatches) by binding to the DNA mutation and cutting the DNA once the DNA mutation is detected.

  3. Microscopic and spectroscopic analysis of chitosan-DNA conjugates.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, D; Kreplak, L; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2016-02-10

    Conjugations of DNA with chitosans 15kD (ch-15), 100kD (ch-100) and 200kD (ch-200) were investigated in aqueous solution at pH 5.5-6.5. Multiple spectroscopic methods and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to locate the chitosan binding sites and the effect of polymer conjugation on DNA compaction and particle formation. Structural analysis showed that chitosan-DNA conjugation is mainly via electrostatic interactions through polymer cationic charged NH2 and negatively charged backbone phosphate groups. As polymer size increases major DNA compaction and particle formation occurs. At high chitosan concentration major DNA structural changes observed indicating a partial B to A-DNA conformational transition. PMID:26686122

  4. Highly efficient remote controlled release system based on light-driven DNA nanomachine functionalized mesoporous silica.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yongqiang; Xu, Liping; Wang, Wenqian; Wang, Danyang; Du, Hongwu; Zhang, Xueji

    2012-08-01

    An intelligent photoswitchable single-molecule nanomachine with DNA hairpin-loop structure was designed by the incorporation of azobenzene groups in DNA sequences, which was studied by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and attached onto the surface of mesoporous silica. Based on the photo-induced conformational transformation of DNA, highly efficient controlled release was realized. PMID:22751906

  5. DNA as a Binary Code: How the Physical Structure of Nucleotide Bases Carries Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallister, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The DNA triplet code also functions as a binary code. Because double-ring compounds cannot bind to double-ring compounds in the DNA code, the sequence of bases classified simply as purines or pyrimidines can encode for smaller groups of possible amino acids. This is an intuitive approach to teaching the DNA code. (Contains 6 figures.)

  6. DNA-PK assay

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  7. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  8. Structure of large dsDNA viruses

    PubMed Central

    Klose, Thomas; Rossmann, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Nucleocytoplasmic large dsDNA viruses (NCLDVs) encompass an ever-increasing group of large eukaryotic viruses, infecting a wide variety of organisms. The set of core genes shared by all these viruses includes a major capsid protein with a double jelly-roll fold forming an icosahedral capsid, which surrounds a double layer membrane that contains the viral genome. Furthermore, some of these viruses, such as the members of the Mimiviridae and Phycodnaviridae have a unique vertex that is used during infection to transport DNA into the host. PMID:25003382

  9. Diversity of DNA 1: a satellite-like molecule associated with monopartite begomovirus-DNA beta complexes.

    PubMed

    Briddon, Rob W; Bull, Simon E; Amin, Imran; Mansoor, Shahid; Bedford, Ian D; Rishi, Narayan; Siwatch, Surender S; Zafar, Yusuf; Abdel-Salam, Aly M; Markham, Peter G

    2004-07-01

    DNA 1 components are satellite-like, single-stranded DNA molecules associated with begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae) that require the satellite molecule DNA beta to induce authentic disease symptoms in some hosts. They have been shown to be present in the begomovirus-DNA beta complexes causing cotton leaf curl disease (CLCuD) and okra leaf curl disease (OLCD) in Pakistan as well as Ageratum yellow vein disease (AYVD) in Singapore. We have cloned and sequenced a further 17 DNA 1 molecules from a diverse range of plant species and geographical origins. The analysis shows that DNA 1 components are associated with the majority of begomovirus-DNA beta complexes, being absent from only two of the complexes examined, both of which have their origins in Far East Asia. The sequences showed a high level of conservation as well as a common organization consisting of a single open reading frame (ORF) in the virion sense, a region of sequence rich in adenine and a predicted hairpin structure. In phylogenetic analyses, there was some evidence of grouping of DNA 1 molecules according to geographic origin, but less evidence for grouping according to host plant origin. The possible origin and function of DNA 1 components are discussed in light of these findings. PMID:15207631

  10. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of the DNA-remodelling protein DnaD from Bacillus subtilis

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Sabine; Carneiro, Maria J. V. M.; Ioannou, Charikleia; Soultanas, Panos; Paoli, Max

    2007-02-01

    Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the two domains of DnaD from B. subtilis is reported. The DnaD protein is an essential component of the chromosome-replication machinery of the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis and is part of the primosomal cascade that ultimately loads the replicative ring helicase DnaC onto DNA. Moreover, DnaD is a global regulator of DNA architecture, as it forms higher order nucleoprotein structures in order to open supercoiled DNA. Here, the crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the two domains of DnaD from B. subtilis are reported. Crystals of the N-terminal domain are trigonal, with either P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21 space-group symmetry, and diffracted X-rays to 2.0 resolution; crystals of the C-terminal domain are hexagonal, with space group P6{sub 1} or P6{sub 5}, and diffracted X-rays to 2.9 resolution in-house. Determination of the structure of the DnaD domains will provide insight into how remodelling of the nucleoid is associated with priming of replication in the model Gram-positive organism B. subtilis.

  11. Biology of DNA restriction.

    PubMed Central

    Bickle, T A; Krüger, D H

    1993-01-01

    Our understanding of the evolution of DNA restriction and modification systems, the control of the expression of the structural genes for the enzymes, and the importance of DNA restriction in the cellular economy has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent years. This review documents these advances for the three major classes of classical restriction and modification systems, describes the discovery of a new class of restriction systems that specifically cut DNA carrying the modification signature of foreign cells, and deals with the mechanisms developed by phages to avoid the restriction systems of their hosts. PMID:8336674

  12. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  13. DNA Mismatch Repair

    PubMed Central

    MARINUS, M. G.

    2014-01-01

    DNA mismatch repair functions to correct replication errors in newly synthesized DNA and to prevent recombination between related, but not identical (homeologous), DNA sequences. The mechanism of mismatch repair is best understood in Escherichia coli and is the main focus of this review. The early genetic studies of mismatch repair are described as a basis for the subsequent biochemical characterization of the system. The effects of mismatch repair on homologous and homeologous recombination are described. The relationship of mismatch repair to cell toxicity induced by various drugs is included. The VSP (Very Short Patch) repair system is described in detail. PMID:26442827

  14. Influence of killing method on Lepidoptera DNA barcode recovery.

    PubMed

    Willows-Munro, Sandi; Schoeman, M Corrie

    2015-05-01

    The global DNA barcoding initiative has revolutionized the field of biodiversity research. Such large-scale sequencing projects require the collection of large numbers of specimens, which need to be killed and preserved in a way that is both DNA-friendly and which will keep voucher specimens in good condition for later study. Factors such as time since collection, correct storage (exposure to free water and heat) and DNA extraction protocol are known to play a role in the success of downstream molecular applications. Limited data are available on the most efficient, DNA-friendly protocol for killing. In this study, we evaluate the quality of DNA barcode (cytochrome oxidase I) sequences amplified from DNA extracted from specimens collected using three different killing methods (ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing). Previous studies have suggested that chemicals, such as ethyl acetate and formaldehyde, degraded DNA and as such may not be appropriate for the collection of insects for DNA-based research. All Lepidoptera collected produced DNA barcodes of good quality, and our study found no clear difference in nucleotide signal strength, probability of incorrect base calling and phylogenetic utility among the three different treatment groups. Our findings suggest that ethyl acetate, cyanide and freezing can all be used to collect specimens for DNA analysis. PMID:25229871

  15. In vitro supplementation with deoxynucleoside monophosphates rescues mitochondrial DNA depletion

    PubMed Central

    Bulst, Stefanie; Holinski-Feder, Elke; Payne, Brendan; Abicht, Angela; Krause, Sabine; Lochmüller, Hanns; Chinnery, Patrick F.; Walter, Maggie C.; Horvath, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes are a genetically heterogeneous group of often severe diseases, characterized by reduced cellular mitochondrial DNA content. Investigation of potential therapeutic strategies for mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes will be dependent on good model systems. We have previously suggested that myotubes may be the optimal model system for such studies. Here we firstly validate this technique in a diverse range of cells of patients with mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes, showing contrasting effects in cell lines from genetically and phenotypically differing patients. Secondly, we developed a putative therapeutic approach using variable combinations of deoxynucleoside monophosphates in different types of mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes, showing near normalization of mitochondrial DNA content in many cases. Furthermore, we used nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors to precisely titrate mtDNA depletion in vitro. In this manner we can unmask a physiological defect in mitochondrial depletion syndrome cell lines which is also ameliorated by deoxynucleoside monophosphate supplementation. Finally, we have extended this model to study fibroblasts after myogenic transdifferentiation by MyoD transfection, which similar to primary myotubes also showed deoxynucleoside monophosphate responsive mitochondrial DNA depletion in vitro, thus providing a more convenient method for deriving future models of mitochondrial DNA depletion. Our results suggest that using different combinations of deoxynucleoside monophosphates depending on the primary gene defect and molecular mechanism may be a possible therapeutic approach for many patients with mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes and is worthy of further clinical investigation. PMID:22608879

  16. Improved immobilization of DNA to microwell plates for DNA-DNA hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, H; Tamaoka, J; Horikoshi, K

    1996-01-01

    An improved and simplified protocol for DNA immobilization was developed to enhance DNA-DNA hybridization on microwell plates. Target DNA was immobilized by simple dry-adsorption. Efficiencies of DNA immobilization and retention were enhanced 1.4-6.5 times and 4.2-19.6 times, respectively, compared with a conventional method. The overall hybridization efficiency was increased 3.1-5.2 times. This simple new protocol can reduce the consumption of scarce DNA samples. PMID:8918820

  17. Stool vs. Serum Hepatitis B Virus DNA in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji-Shun; Chen, Meng-Meng; Yang, Hai-Fei; Zhou, Xiang-Tian; Liu, Yan-Yan; Li, Jia-Bin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Serum hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg) liver function in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) are significantly associated. A comparison of clinical significance of fecal HBV DNA and serum HBV DNA has not yet been reported. MATERIAL AND METHODS Stool and serum samples were collected from 66 patients with CHB. Fecal HBV DNA, serum HBV DNA, and intestinal microbiota DNA were detected by real-time quantitative fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Liver function and HBeAg were analyzed. RESULTS The stool and serum HBV DNA were positively correlated (r=0.57, P=0.001). Fecal HBV DNA was higher in the HBeAg-positive group than in the HBeAg-negative group (P=0.02). Fecal HBV DNA was negatively correlated with alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (r=-0.41, P=0.001) and TBIL (r=-0.29, P=0.02), and was positively correlated with Enterococcus (r=0.38, P=0.002). Serum HBV DNA was negatively correlated with alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (r=-0.30,P=0.02), aminotransferase (AST) (r=-0.26, P=0.049), and Lactobacillus (r=-0.31, P=0.01). CONCLUSIONS These observations suggest that fecal HBV DNA and serum HBV DNA in patients with CHB have different effects. Fecal HBV DNA might be associated with changes in Enterococcus concentrations, but serum HBV DNA is not. PMID:26645150

  18. Stability and proton transfer in DNA base pairs of AMD473-DNA adduct

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmah, Pubalee; Deka, Ramesh C.

    2011-05-01

    We investigate the energetics of four different adducts of cisplatin analogue cis-[PtCl 2(NH 3)(2-picoline)] (AMD473) with a duplex DNA using DFT/ONIOM methods to probe their stabilities. Further, we study the possibilities of proton transfer between DNA base pairs of the most stable drug-DNA adduct. The adduct b(2-picoline trans to 3'-G and 2-methyl group directs to the DNA major groove) is found to be the most stable configuration among all the possible adducts. From the proton transfer analysis we found that the single proton transfer between N1 position of guanine (G) and N3 position of cytosine (C) of each GC pair gives a structure energetically as stable as the original one.

  19. The DNA repair endonuclease Mus81 facilitates fast DNA replication in the absence of exogenous damage

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Haiqing; Martin, Melvenia M.; Regairaz, Marie; Huang, Liang; You, Yang; Lin, Chi-Mei; Ryan, Michael; Kim, RyangGuk; Shimura, Tsutomu; Pommier, Yves; Aladjem, Mirit I.

    2015-01-01

    The Mus81 endonuclease resolves recombination intermediates and mediates cellular responses to exogenous replicative stress. Here, we show that Mus81 also regulates the rate of DNA replication during normal growth by promoting replication fork progression while reducing the frequency of replication initiation events. In the absence of Mus81 endonuclease activity, DNA synthesis is slowed and replication initiation events are more frequent. In addition, Mus81 deficient cells fail to recover from exposure to low doses of replication inhibitors and cell viability is dependent on the XPF endonuclease. Despite an increase in replication initiation frequency, cells lacking Mus81 use the same pool of replication origins as Mus81-expressing cells. Therefore, decelerated DNA replication in Mus81 deficient cells does not initiate from cryptic or latent origins not used during normal growth. These results indicate that Mus81 plays a key role in determining the rate of DNA replication without activating a novel group of replication origins. PMID:25879486

  20. Opening Enediyne Scissors Wider: pH-Dependent DNA Photocleavage by meta-Diyne Lysine Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Kemal; Johnson, Madeleine; Alabugin, Igor V

    2015-01-01

    Photochemical activation of meta-diynes incapable of Bergman and C1-C5 cyclizations still leads to efficient double-strand DNA cleavage. Spatial proximity of the two arylethynyl groups is not required for efficient DNA photocleavage by the enediyne-lysine conjugates. Efficiency of the cleavage is a function of the external pH and DNA damage is strongly enhanced at pH < 7. The pH-dependence of the DNA photocleavage activity stems from the protonation states of lysine amino groups, the internal electron donors responsible for intramolecular PET quenching and deactivation of the photoreactive excited states. DNA-binding analysis suggests intercalative DNA binding for phenyl substituted conjugate and groove binding for TFP-substituted conjugate. Additional insights in the possible mechanism for DNA damage from the ROS (Reactive Oxygen Species) scavenger experiments found that generation of singlet oxygen is partially involved in the DNA damage. PMID:25545396

  1. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  2. Peripheral blood mitochondrial DNA/nuclear DNA (mtDNA/nDNA) ratio as a marker of mitochondrial toxicities of stavudine containing antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Malawian patients.

    PubMed

    Kampira, Elizabeth; Dzobo, Kevin; Kumwenda, Johnstone; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Parker, M Iqbal; Dandara, Collet

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial toxicity is a major concern related to nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Common manifestations are peripheral neuropathy and lipodystrophy. Depletion of mitochondria has been associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. We investigated whether mitochondria DNA (mtDNA) levels in peripheral blood can be used as biomarker of stavudine-associated mitochondrial toxicities. We enrolled 203 HIV-infected Malawian adult patients on stavudine-containing ART and 64 healthy controls of Bantu origin in a cross-sectional study. Total DNA was extracted from whole blood.The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene was used to estimate nuclear DNA (nDNA) levels and the ATP synthase-8 mitochondrial DNA gene to estimate mtDNA levels, from which mtDNA/nDNA ratios were determined. MtDNA subhaplogroups were established by sequencing. Among patients, peripheral neuropathy was present in 21% (43/203), lipodystrophy in 18% (20/112), elevated lactate level (>2.5 mmol/L) in 17% (19/113). Healthy controls had a higher median mtDNA/nDNA ratio when compared to HIV/AIDS patients (6.64 vs. 5.08; p=0.05), patients presenting with peripheral neuropathy (6.64 vs. 3.40, p=0.039), and patients with high lactate levels (6.64 vs. 0.68, p=0.024), respectively. Significant differences in median mtDNA/nDNA ratios were observed between patients with high and normal lactate levels (5.88 vs. 0.68, p=0.018). The median mtDNA/nDNA ratio of patients in subhaplogroup L0a2 was much lower (0.62 vs. 8.50, p=0.01) than that of those in subhaplogroup L2a. Our data indicate that peripheral blood mtDNA/nDNA ratio is a marker of mitochondrial toxicities of stavudine and is associated with elevated lactate levels and mtDNA subhaplogroups. This could open the prospect to select a substantial group of patients who will not have problematic side effects from stavudine, an affordable and effective antiretroviral drug that is being phased out in Africa due to its toxicity. PMID:24816082

  3. Modulation of binding properties of amphiphilic DNA containing multiple dodecyl phosphotriester linkages to lipid bilayer membrane.

    PubMed

    Makishi, Shingo; Shibata, Tomonori; Okazaki, Masatsugu; Dohno, Chikara; Nakatani, Kazuhiko

    2014-08-01

    DNA is a promising functional molecule to modify and design lipid membrane functions. In order to use DNA in a hydrophilic-hydrophobic interface including lipid membrane, we have developed an amphiphilic DNA having dodecyl phosphotriester linkages (dod-DNA). Herein, we report the binding of a series of amphiphilic dod-DNAs to the lipid bilayer membrane. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay and fluorescent microscopy showed that dod-DNA having three dodecyl groups at each end strongly bound to lipid membrane due to the slow dissociation rate and the dod-DNA can be used as a linear template for molecular arrangement on the membrane surface. PMID:24909080

  4. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  5. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    SciTech Connect

    Cook-Deegan, R.M.; Venter, J.C.; Gilbert, W.; Mulligan, J.; Mansfield, B.K.

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  6. [Diagnostic DNA probes].

    PubMed

    Fey, M F

    1990-05-19

    Advances in molecular biology have had a tremendous impact on our understanding of the pathogenesis of hereditary disorders, tumours and infectious diseases. It is anticipated that recombinant DNA technology will gradually assume an important role as a diagnostic tool in medicine, since at least some of the techniques are now ready for routine use in the clinical laboratory. The most lucrative application (and hence the most competitive market) for DNA probes will be the detection of bacteria, viruses and other microbiological organisms by nucleic acid hybridization techniques. The value of recombinant DNA technology for prenatal diagnosis and carrier detection in genetic disorders is now firmly established. Analysis of DNA and RNA obtained from tumours may provide diagnostic information of practical relevance in carefully selected cases. It is, however, unlikely to challenge the established value of the more "traditional" diagnostic tools such as histopathology and immunophenotyping. PMID:2190309

  7. Close encounters with DNA

    PubMed Central

    Maffeo, C.; Yoo, J.; Comer, J.; Wells, D. B.; Luan, B.; Aksimentiev, A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past ten years, the all-atom molecular dynamics method has grown in the scale of both systems and processes amenable to it and in its ability to make quantitative predictions about the behavior of experimental systems. The field of computational DNA research is no exception, witnessing a dramatic increase in the size of systems simulated with atomic resolution, the duration of individual simulations and the realism of the simulation outcomes. In this topical review, we describe the hallmark physical properties of DNA from the perspective of all-atom simulations. We demonstrate the amazing ability of such simulations to reveal the microscopic physical origins of experimentally observed phenomena and we review the frustrating limitations associated with imperfections of present atomic force fields and inadequate sampling. The review is focused on the following four physical properties of DNA: effective electric charge, response to an external mechanical force, interaction with other DNA molecules and behavior in an external electric field. PMID:25238560

  8. Making DNA Fingerprints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunley, Kathie F.

    1996-01-01

    Presents an activity to simulate electrophoresis using everyday items. Uses adding machine paper to construct a set of DNA fingerprints that can be used to solve crime cases designed by students in any biology class. (JRH)

  9. FBI's DNA analysis program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, John R.

    1994-03-01

    Forensic DNA profiling technology is a significant law enforcement tool due to its superior discriminating power. Applying the principles of population genetics to the DNA profile obtained in violent crime investigations results in low frequency of occurrence estimates for the DNA profile. These estimates often range from a frequency of occurrence of 1 in 50 unrelated individuals to 1 in a million unrelated individuals or even smaller. It is this power to discriminate among individuals in the population that has propelled forensic DNA technology to the forefront of forensic testing in violent crime cases. Not only is the technology extremely powerful in including or excluding a criminal suspect as the perpetrator, but it also gives rise to the potential of identifying criminal suspects in cases where the investigators of unknown suspect cases have exhausted all other available leads.

  10. Multiplex analysis of DNA

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Kieffer-Higgins, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    This invention features vectors and a method for sequencing DNA. The method includes the steps of: a) ligating the DNA into a vector comprising a tag sequence, the tag sequence includes at least 15 bases, wherein the tag sequence will not hybridize to the DNA under stringent hybridization conditions and is unique in the vector, to form a hybrid vector, b) treating the hybrid vector in a plurality of vessels to produce fragments comprising the tag sequence, wherein the fragments differ in length and terminate at a fixed known base or bases, wherein the fixed known base or bases differs in each vessel, c) separating the fragments from each vessel according to their size, d) hybridizing the fragments with an oligonucleotide able to hybridize specifically with the tag sequence, and e) detecting the pattern of hybridization of the tag sequence, wherein the pattern reflects the nucleotide sequence of the DNA.

  11. Nanoparticle-based detection and quantification of DNA with single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Wei Jie; Yung, Lin Yue Lanry

    2007-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA detection is important in various biomedical applications such as gene expression profiling, disease diagnosis and treatment, drug discovery and forensic analysis. Here we report a gold nanoparticle-based method that allows DNA detection and quantification and is capable of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination. The precise quantification of single-stranded DNA is due to the formation of defined nanoparticle-DNA conjugate groupings in the presence of target/linker DNA. Conjugate groupings were characterized and quantified by gel electrophoresis. A linear correlation between the amount of target DNA and conjugate groupings was found. For SNP detection, single base mismatch discrimination was achieved for both the end- and center-base mismatch. The method described here may be useful for the development of a simple and quantitative DNA detection assay. PMID:17720714

  12. Elevated Level of DNA Damage and Impaired Repair of Oxidative DNA Damage in Patients with Recurrent Depressive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Czarny, Piotr; Kwiatkowski, Dominik; Kacperska, Dagmara; Kawczy?ska, Daria; Talarowska, Monika; Orzechowska, Agata; Bielecka-Kowalska, Anna; Szemraj, Janusz; Gaandlstrokecki, Piotr; ?liwi?ski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Background Depressive disorder (DD), including recurrent DD (rDD), is a severe psychological disease, which affects a large percentage of the world population. Although pathogenesis of the disease is not known, a growing body of evidence shows that inflammation together with oxidative stress may contribute to development of DD. Since reactive oxygen species produced during stress may damage DNA, we wanted to evaluate the extent of DNA damage and efficiency of DNA repair in patients with depression. Material/Methods We measured and compared the extent of endogenous DNA damage single- and double-strand breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative damage of the pyrimidines and purines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from rDD patients (n=40) and healthy controls (n=46) using comet assay. We also measured DNA damage evoked by hydrogen peroxide and monitored changes in DNA damage during repair incubation. Results We found an increased number DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative modification of DNA bases in the patients compared to the controls. Exposure to hydrogen peroxide evoked the same increased damage in both groups. Examination of the repair kinetics of both groups revealed that the lesions were more efficiently repaired in the controls than in the patients. Conclusions For the first time we showed that patients with depression, compared with non-depresses individuals, had more DNA breaks, alkali-labile sites, and oxidative DNA damage, and that those lesions may be accumulated by impairments of the DNA repair systems. More studies must be conducted to elucidate the role of DNA damage and repair in depression. PMID:25656523

  13. Das DNA-Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, Stefan

    Im Jahre 1953 wurde von James Watson und Francis Crick erstmalig der strukturelle Aufbau der sogenannten DNA (Desoxyribonukleinsure) beschrieben, welche das Erbgut jedes Lebewesens enthlt. Der wesentliche Teil des Erbguts wird dabei durch eine sehr lange Folge der vier Basen Adenin (A), Cytosin (C), Guanin (G) und Thymin (T) codiert. Seit einigen Jahren ist es mglich, die Folge der vier Basen zu einer gegebenen DNA zu bestimmen. Biologen bezeichnen diesen Vorgang als Sequenzierung.

  14. Raman spectroscopy of topotecan, an inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochalov, K. E.; Ustinova, O. A.; Strel'Tsov, S. A.; Grokhovskii, S. L.; Zhuze, A. L.; Nabiev, I. R.; Sukhanova, A. V.; Oleinikov, V. A.

    2002-10-01

    Topotecan (TPT), a water-soluble derivative of camptothecin (inhibitor of human DNA topoiomerase I), has found wide application in cancer chemotherapy. The central problem in using topotecan is the presence of lactone rings in its molecules, which undergo hydrolysis at a physiological pH yielding an inactive and even toxic form of the drug. The analysis of Raman spectra of TPT in H2O and D2O solutions made it possible to assign the spectral bands to the vibrations of particular molecular groups. Spectral features indicative of the opening of the lactone rings of the TPT molecules, deprotonation of the hydroxyl groups in their quinoline fragments, and of possible participation of the hydroxyl and carbonyl groups in H bonding are found. The data obtained are necessary to study the molecular mechanisms of TPT-DNA interaction and the formation of ternary complexes between TPT, DNA, and DNA topoisomerase I.

  15. An azide-modified nucleoside for metabolic labeling of DNA.

    PubMed

    Neef, Anne B; Luedtke, Nathan W

    2014-04-14

    Metabolic incorporation of azido nucleoside analogues into living cells can enable sensitive detection of DNA replication through copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) and strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) "click" reactions. One major limitation to this approach is the poor chemical stability of nucleoside derivatives containing an aryl azide group. For example, 5-azido-2'-deoxyuridine (AdU) exhibits a 4 h half-life in water, and it gives little or no detectable labeling of cellular DNA. In contrast, the benzylic azide 5-(azidomethyl)-2'-deoxyuridine (AmdU) is stable in solution at 37?C, and it gives robust labeling of cellular DNA upon addition of fluorescent alkyne derivatives. In addition to providing the first examples of metabolic incorporation into and imaging of azide groups in cellular DNA, these results highlight the general importance of assessing azide group stability in bioorthogonal chemical reporter strategies. PMID:24644275

  16. Ribonucleotide triggered DNA damage and RNA-DNA damage responses

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that the transient contamination of DNA with ribonucleotides exceeds all other known types of DNA damage combined. The consequences of ribose incorporation into DNA, and the identity of protein factors operating in this RNA-DNA realm to protect genomic integrity from RNA-triggered events are emerging. Left unrepaired, the presence of ribonucleotides in genomic DNA impacts cellular proliferation and is associated with chromosome instability, gross chromosomal rearrangements, mutagenesis, and production of previously unrecognized forms of ribonucleotide-triggered DNA damage. Here, we highlight recent findings on the nature and structure of DNA damage arising from ribonucleotides in DNA, and the identification of cellular factors acting in an RNA-DNA damage response (RDDR) to counter RNA-triggered DNA damage. PMID:25692233

  17. Complex kinetics of DNA condensation revealed through DNA twist tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Wong, Wei Juan; Lim, Ci Ji; Ju, Hai-Peng; Li, Ming; Yan, Jie; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2015-08-01

    Toroid formation is an important mechanism for DNA condensation in cells. The length change during DNA condensation was investigated in previous single-molecule experiments. However, DNA twist is key to understanding the topological kinetics of DNA condensation. In this study, DNA twist as well as DNA length was traced during the DNA condensation by the freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and the tilted magnetic tweezers combined with Brownian dynamics simulations. The experimental results disclose the complex relationship between DNA extension and backbone rotation. Brownian dynamics simulations show that the toroid formation follows a wiggling pathway which leads to the complex DNA backbone rotation as revealed in our experiments. These findings provide the complete description of multivalent cation-dependent DNA toroid formation under tension.

  18. DNA-mediated charge transport for DNA repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boon, Elizabeth M.; Livingston, Alison L.; Chmiel, Nikolas H.; David, Sheila S.; Barton, Jacqueline K.

    2003-10-01

    MutY, like many DNA base excision repair enzymes, contains a [4Fe4S]2+ cluster of undetermined function. Electrochemical studies of MutY bound to a DNA-modified gold electrode demonstrate that the [4Fe4S] cluster of MutY can be accessed in a DNA-mediated redox reaction. Although not detectable without DNA, the redox potential of DNA-bound MutY is 275 mV versus NHE, which is characteristic of HiPiP iron proteins. Binding to DNA is thus associated with a change in [4Fe4S]3+/2+ potential, activating the cluster toward oxidation. Given that DNA charge transport chemistry is exquisitely sensitive to perturbations in base pair structure, such as mismatches, we propose that this redox process of MutY bound to DNA exploits DNA charge transport and provides a DNA signaling mechanism to scan for mismatches and lesions in vivo.

  19. DNA methylation and differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Michalowky, L.A.; Jones, P.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The methylation of specific cytosine residues in DNA has been implicated in regulating gene expression and facilitating functional specialization of cellular phenotypes. Generally, the demethylation of certain CpG sites correlates with transcriptional activation of genes. 5-Azacytidine is an inhibitor of DNA methylation and has been widely used as a potent activator of suppressed genetic information. Treatment of cells with 5-azacytidine results in profound phenotypic alterations. The drug-induced hypomethylation of DNA apparently perturbs DNA-protein interactions that may consequently alter transcriptional activity and cell determination. The inhibitory effect of cytosine methylation may be exerted via altered DNA-protein interactions specifically or may be transduced by a change in the conformation of chromatin. Recent studies have demonstrated that cytosine methylation also plays a central role in parental imprinting, which in turn determines the differential expression of maternal and paternal genomes during embryogenesis. In other words, methylation is the mechanism whereby the embryo retains memory of the gametic origin of each component of genetic information. A memory of this type would probably persist during DNA replication and cell division as methylation patterns are stable and heritable.

  20. DNA biosensors that reason.

    PubMed

    Sainz de Murieta, Iñaki; Rodríguez-Patón, Alfonso

    2012-08-01

    Despite the many designs of devices operating with the DNA strand displacement, surprisingly none is explicitly devoted to the implementation of logical deductions. The present article introduces a new model of biosensor device that uses nucleic acid strands to encode simple rules such as "IF DNA_strand(1) is present THEN disease(A)" or "IF DNA_strand(1) AND DNA_strand(2) are present THEN disease(B)". Taking advantage of the strand displacement operation, our model makes these simple rules interact with input signals (either DNA or any type of RNA) to generate an output signal (in the form of nucleotide strands). This output signal represents a diagnosis, which either can be measured using FRET techniques, cascaded as the input of another logical deduction with different rules, or even be a drug that is administered in response to a set of symptoms. The encoding introduces an implicit error cancellation mechanism, which increases the system scalability enabling longer inference cascades with a bounded and controllable signal-noise relation. It also allows the same rule to be used in forward inference or backward inference, providing the option of validly outputting negated propositions (e.g. "diagnosis A excluded"). The models presented in this paper can be used to implement smart logical DNA devices that perform genetic diagnosis in vitro. PMID:22406690

  1. Variations in brain DNA

    PubMed Central

    Avila, Jess; Gmez-Ramos, Alberto; Soriano, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    It is assumed that DNA sequences are conserved in the diverse cell types present in a multicellular organism like the human being. Thus, in order to compare the sequences in the genome of DNA from different individuals, nucleic acid is commonly isolated from a single tissue. In this regard, blood cells are widely used for this purpose because of their availability. Thus blood DNA has been used to study genetic familiar diseases that affect other tissues and organs, such as the liver, heart, and brain. While this approach is valid for the identification of familial diseases in which mutations are present in parental germinal cells and, therefore, in all the cells of a given organism, it is not suitable to identify sporadic diseases in which mutations might occur in specific somatic cells. This review addresses somatic DNA variations in different tissues or cells (mainly in the brain) of single individuals and discusses whether the dogma of DNA invariance between cell types is indeed correct. We will also discuss how single nucleotide somatic variations arise, focusing on the presence of specific DNA mutations in the brain. PMID:25505410

  2. Group B Strep Infection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Overview What is group B strep? Group B streptococcus, or group B strep for short, is a ... can develop an infection of the lungs (called pneumonia), bloodstream (called sepsis), or the fluid around the ...

  3. Studies of nanoscale structural ordering in planar DNA complexes with amphiphilic mono- and polycations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipina, Maria N.; Gainutdinov, Radmir V.; Rachnyanskaya, Anna A.; Tolstikhina, Alla L.; Yurova, Tatiana V.; Khomutov, Gennady B.

    2003-06-01

    Formation of DNA complexes with Langmuir monolayers of cationic lipid octadecylamine (ODA) and new amphiphilic polycation poly-4-vinylpyridine with 16% cetylpyridinium groups (PVP-16) on the surface of native DNA aqueous solution with low ionic strength has been studied. AFM topographic images of DNA/ODA and DNA/PVP-16 complex Langmuir-Blodgett films deposited on the mica substrates were obtained. The complex structures and individual DNA molecules on the amphiphile monolayer surface were observed. The characteristic extended net-like structures and quasi-circular toroidal condensed conformations of the planar DNA complexes were formed in dependence on the polycationic amphiphile monolayer state during the DNA binding. The data obtained give evidence for the effectiveness of monolayer techniques for investigation the mechanisms of DNA complexation with amphiphilic mono- and polycations and demonstrate its perspectives for creation of supramolecular planar DNA-based self-organized nanostructures with nanoscale structural ordering.

  4. DNA templates silver clusters with magic sizes and colors for multi-cluster fluorescent assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copp, Stacy

    2015-03-01

    The natural inclusion of information in DNA, a vital part of life's rich complexity, can also be exploited to create diverse structures with multiple scales of complexity. Now emerging in novel photonic applications, DNA-stabilized silver clusters (AgN-DNA) are compelling examples of multi-scale DNA-directed assembly: individual fluorescent clusters, each templated by specific DNA base motifs, can then be arranged together in DNA-mediated multi-cluster assemblies with nanoscale precision. We discuss how DNA imbues AgN-DNA with unique features. Our optical data on pure AgN-DNA show that DNA base-cationic silver ligands impose rod-like shapes for neutral silver clusters, whose length primarily determines fluorescence color. This shape anisotropy leads to the aspherical AgN-DNA magic number cluster sizes and ``magic color'' groupings. We exploit DNA's sequence properties to extract multi-base motifs that select certain magic cluster sizes, using machine learning algorithms applied to large data sets. With these base motifs, we design DNA scaffolds to arrange multiple atomically precise AgN together in nanoscale proximity. We demonstrate that clusters are stable when held at separations below 10 nm, both in bicolor, dual cluster DNA clamp assemblies and in one-dimensional assemblies of atomically precise clusters arrayed on DNA nanotubes. Supported by NSF-CHE-1213895 and NSF-DMR-1309410. SMC acknowledges NSF-DGE-1144085, a NSF GRFP.

  5. A single residue in DNA polymerases of the Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I family is critical for distinguishing between deoxy- and dideoxyribonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Tabor, S.; Richardson, C.C.

    1995-07-03

    Bacteriophage T7 DNA polymerase efficiently incorporates a chain-terminating dideoxynucleotide into DNA, in contrast to the DNA polymerases from Escherichia coli and Thermus aquaticus. The molecular basis for this difference has been determined by constructing active site hybrids of these polymerases. A single hydroxyl group on the polypeptide chain is critical for selectivity. Replacing tyrosine-526 of T7 DNA polymerase with phenylalanine increases discrimination against the four dideoxynucleotides by >2000-fold, while replacing the phenylalanine at the homologous position in E. coli DNA polymerase I (position 762) or T. aquaticus DNA polymerase (position 667) with tyrosine decreases discrimination against the four dideoxynucleotides 250- to 8000-fold. These mutations allow the engineering of new DNA polymerases with enhanced properties for use in DNA sequence analysis. 29 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Supramolecular Complexes of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuber, G.; Scherman, D.

    Deoxyribose nucleic acid or DNA is a linear polymer in the form of a double strand, synthesised by sequential polymerisation of a large number of units chosen from among the nucleic bases called purines (adenosine A and guanosine G) and pyrimidines (cytosine C and thymidine T). DNA contains all the genetic information required for life. It exists in the form of a limited number (a few dozen) of very big molecules, called chromosomes. This genetic information is first of all transcribed. In this process, a restricted fragment of the DNA called a gene is copied in the form of ribonucleic acid, or RNA. This RNA is itself a polymer, but with a single strand in which the sequence of nucleic acids is schematically analogous to the sequence on one of the two strands of the transcribed DNA. Finally, this RNA is translated into a protein, yet another linear polymer. The proteins make up the main part of the active constituents ensuring the survival of the cell. Any loss of information, either by mutation or by deletion of the DNA, will cause an imbalance in the cell's metabolism that may in turn lead to incurable pathologies. Several strategies have been developed to reduce the consequences of such genetic deficiencies or, more generally, to act, by amplifying or suppressing them, on the mechanisms leading from the reading of the genetic information to the production of proteins: Strategies aiming to introduce synthetic DNA or RNA, which selectively block the expression of certain genes, are now being studied by an increasing number of research scientists and pharmacologists. They use antisense oligodeoxyribonucleotides or interfering oligoribonucleotides and they already have clinical applications. This kind of therapy is often called gene pharmacology. Other, more ambitious strategies aim to repair in situ mutated or incomplete DNA within the chromosomes themselves, by introducing short sequences of DNA or RNA which recognise and take the place of mutations. This is the underlying principle of genetic correction. Yet other strategies aim to reintroduce the deficient DNA fragments into the cells in the form of genes. Indeed, in certain diseases, the only solution is to bring genetic information back into the cells by transferring exogeneous DNA into the cell nucleus. This approach goes by the name of gene therapy.

  7. Simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH.

    PubMed

    Lai, Lan-Tian; Meng, Zhenyu; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A highly useful tool for studying lncRNAs is simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH, which reveals the localization and quantitative information of RNA and DNA in cellular contexts. However, a simple combination of RNA FISH and DNA FISH often generates disappointing results because the fragile RNA signals are often damaged by the harsh conditions used in DNA FISH for denaturing the DNA. Here, we describe a robust and simple RNA-DNA FISH protocol, in which amino-labeled nucleic acid probes are used for RNA FISH. The method is suitable to detect single-RNA molecules simultaneously with DNA. PMID:26721488

  8. Dietary lipid concentration affects liver mitochondrial DNA copy number, gene expression and DNA methylation in large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).

    PubMed

    Liao, Kai; Yan, Jing; Mai, Kangsen; Ai, Qinghui

    2016-03-01

    In response to changes in energy demand and nutrient supply, the organism regulates mitochondrial metabolic status to coordinate ATP production. To survey mitochondrial metabolic adaptation in response to dietary lipid concentration, citrate synthase (EC 2.3.3.1, CS) activity, the expression of several mitochondrial transcription factors, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number, mitochondrial gene expression, mtDNA methylation, and oxidative stress parameters were analyzed in the liver of large yellow croaker fed one of three diets with a low (6%), moderate (12%, the control diet) or high (18%) crude lipid content for 70d. MtDNA copy number was significantly increased in the low- and high-lipid groups compared to the control. The transcription of cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COX1), COX2, COX3, ATP synthase 6 (ATPase 6), 12S rRNA and 16S rRNA was also significantly increased in the low-lipid group compared with the control, while the transcription of these genes in the high-lipid group was unchanged. Moreover, D-loop (displacement loop) methylation in the high-lipid group was significantly higher than the control. The increase in mtDNA copy number and mitochondrial transcription might be a compensatory mechanism that matches ATP supply to demand under a low-lipid diet, while the increase of mtDNA copy number with unchanged mitochondrial transcription in the high-lipid group probably came from the increase of D-loop methylation. PMID:26692128

  9. DNA Knots: Theory and Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumners, D. W.

    Cellular DNA is a long, thread-like molecule with remarkably complex topology. Enzymes that manipulate the geometry and topology of cellular DNA perform many vital cellular processes (including segregation of daughter chromosomes, gene regulation, DNA repair, and generation of antibody diversity). Some enzymes pass DNA through itself via enzyme-bridged transient breaks in the DNA; other enzymes break the DNA apart and reconnect it to different ends. In the topological approach to enzymology, circular DNA is incubated with an enzyme, producing an enzyme signature in the form of DNA knots and links. By observing the changes in DNA geometry (supercoiling) and topology (knotting and linking) due to enzyme action, the enzyme binding and mechanism can often be characterized. This paper will discuss some personal research history, and the tangle model for the analysis of site-specific recombination experiments on circular DNA.

  10. Multicolor and Erasable DNA Photolithography

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The immobilization of DNA molecules onto a solid support is a crucial step in biochip research and related applications. In this work, we report a DNA photolithography method based on photocleavage of 2-nitrobenzyl linker-modified DNA strands. These strands were subjected to ultraviolet light irradiation to generate multiple short DNA strands in a programmable manner. Coupling the toehold-mediated DNA strand-displacement reaction with DNA photolithography enabled the fabrication of a DNA chip surface with multifunctional DNA patterns having complex geometrical structures at the microscale level. The erasable DNA photolithography strategy was developed to allow different paintings on the same chip. Furthermore, the asymmetrical modification of colloidal particles was carried out by using this photolithography strategy. This strategy has broad applications in biosensors, nanodevices, and DNA-nanostructure fabrication. PMID:24988147

  11. Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I resolves both naturally and chemically induced DNA adducts and its potential as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Comeaux, Evan Q; van Waardenburg, Robert C A M

    2014-11-01

    DNA is subject to a wide range of insults, resulting from endogenous and exogenous sources that need to be metabolized/resolved to maintain genome integrity. Tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase I (Tdp1) is a eukaryotic DNA repair enzyme that catalyzes the removal of covalent 3'-DNA adducts. As a phospholipase D superfamily member Tdp1 utilizes two catalytic histidines each within a His-Lys-Asn motif. Tdp1 was discovered for its ability to hydrolyze the 3'-phospho-tyrosyl that in the cell covalently links DNA Topoisomerase I (Topo1) and DNA. Tdp1's list of substrates has since grown and can be divided into two groups: protein-DNA adducts, such as camptothecin stabilized Topo1-DNA adducts, and modified nucleotides, including oxidized nucleotides and chain terminating nucleoside analogs. Since many of Tdp1's substrates are generated by clinically relevant chemotherapeutics, Tdp1 became a therapeutic target for molecularly targeted small molecules. Tdp1's unique catalytic cycle allows for two different targeting strategies: (1) the intuitive inhibition of Tdp1 catalysis to prevent Tdp1-mediated repair of chemotherapeutically induced DNA adducts, thereby enhancing their toxicity and (2) stabilization of the Tdp1-DNA covalent reaction intermediate, prevents resolution of Tdp1-DNA adduct and increases the half-life of this potentially toxic DNA adduct. This concept is best illustrated by a catalytic Tdp1 mutant that forms the molecular basis of the autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease spinocerebellar ataxia with axonal neuropathy, and results in an increased stability of its Tdp1-DNA reaction intermediate. Here, we will discuss Tdp1 catalysis from a structure-function perspective, Tdp1 substrates and Tdp1 potential as a therapeutic target. PMID:25327705

  12. Energy and Technology Review: Unlocking the mysteries of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, W.A.

    1993-04-01

    DNA, the genetic blueprint, has the remarkable property of encoding its own repair following diverse types of structural damage induced by external agents or normal metabolism. We are studying the interplay of DNA damaging agents, repair genes, and their protein products to decipher the complex biochemical pathways that mediate such repair. Our research focuses on repair processes that correct DNA damage produced by chemical mutagens and radiation, both ionizing and ultraviolet. The most important type of DNA repair in human cells is called excision repair. This multistep process removes damaged or inappropriate pieces of DNA -- often as a string of 29 nucleotides containing the damage -- and replaces them with intact ones. We have isolated, cloned, and mapped several human repair genes associated with the nucleotide excision repair pathway and involved in the repair of DNA damage after exposure to ultraviolet light or mutagens in cooked food. We have shown that a defect in one of these repair genes, ERCC2, is responsible for the repair deficiency in one of the groups of patients with the recessive genetic disorder xeroderma pigmentosum (XP group D). We are exploring ways to purify sufficient quantities (milligrams) of the protein products of these and other repair genes so that we can understand their functions. Our long-term goals are to link defective repair proteins to human DNA repair disorders that predispose to cancer, and to produce DNA-repair-deficient mice that can serve as models for the human disorders.

  13. Characteristics of CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform bacteria isolated from clinical specimens.

    PubMed Central

    Funke, G; Lucchini, G M; Pfyffer, G E; Marchiani, M; von Graevenitz, A

    1993-01-01

    Fifteen strains of CDC group 1 coryneform and biochemically similar bacteria were isolated from clinical specimens. Of the 15 strains isolated, 11 were derived from abscesses and purulent lesions, mostly from the upper part of the body, and 3 were grown from blood cultures. Nine strains were associated with mixed anaerobic but no other aerobic flora. Seven strains exhibited the classical biochemical profile of CDC coryneform group 1; however, eight strains were unable to reduce nitrate and were called "group 1-like." Other reactions to differentiate CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform rods include alpha-hemolysis on human blood agar, fermentation of adonitol, and the presence of alkaline phosphatase. Fifteen strains showed marked CAMP reactions on different erythrocyte agars. Gas-liquid chromatography of volatile and nonvolatile fatty acids as well as cellular fatty acid patterns and the composition of cell wall components suggest that CDC group 1 and group 1-like coryneform bacteria do not belong to the genus Corynebacterium but possibly to the genus Actinomyces or Arcanobacterium. DNA-DNA hybridization studies revealed that group 1 and group 1-like strains represent different species. Images PMID:8263175

  14. Mechanism of Ribonucleotide Incorporation by Human DNA Polymerase η.

    PubMed

    Su, Yan; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F Peter

    2016-02-19

    Ribonucleotides and 2'-deoxyribonucleotides are the basic units for RNA and DNA, respectively, and the only difference is the extra 2'-OH group on the ribonucleotide sugar. Cellular rNTP concentrations are much higher than those of dNTP. When copying DNA, DNA polymerases not only select the base of the incoming dNTP to form a Watson-Crick pair with the template base but also distinguish the sugar moiety. Some DNA polymerases use a steric gate residue to prevent rNTP incorporation by creating a clash with the 2'-OH group. Y-family human DNA polymerase η (hpol η) is of interest because of its spacious active site (especially in the major groove) and tolerance of DNA lesions. Here, we show that hpol η maintains base selectivity when incorporating rNTPs opposite undamaged DNA and the DNA lesions 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer but with rates that are 10(3)-fold lower than for inserting the corresponding dNTPs. X-ray crystal structures show that the hpol η scaffolds the incoming rNTP to pair with the template base (dG) or 7,8-dihydro-8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine with a significant propeller twist. As a result, the 2'-OH group avoids a clash with the steric gate, Phe-18, but the distance between primer end and Pα of the incoming rNTP increases by 1 Å, elevating the energy barrier and slowing polymerization compared with dNTP. In addition, Tyr-92 was identified as a second line of defense to maintain the position of Phe-18. This is the first crystal structure of a DNA polymerase with an incoming rNTP opposite a DNA lesion. PMID:26740629

  15. DNA methylation abnormalities in congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Cuscó, Ivon; Homs, Aïda; Flores, Raquel; Torán, Núria; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects represent the most common malformation at birth, occurring also in ∼50% of individuals with Down syndrome. Congenital heart defects are thought to have multifactorial etiology, but the main causes are largely unknown. We have explored the global methylation profile of fetal heart DNA in comparison to blood DNA from control subjects: an absolute correlation with the type of tissue was detected. Pathway analysis revealed a significant enrichment of differential methylation at genes related to muscle contraction and cardiomyopathies in the developing heart DNA. We have also searched for abnormal methylation profiles on developing heart-tissue DNA of syndromic and non-syndromic congenital heart defects. On average, 3 regions with aberrant methylation were detected per sample and 18 regions were found differentially methylated between groups. Several epimutations were detected in candidate genes involved in growth regulation, apoptosis and folate pathway. A likely pathogenic hypermethylation of several intragenic sites at the MSX1 gene, involved in outflow tract morphogenesis, was found in a fetus with isolated heart malformation. In addition, hypermethylation of the GATA4 gene was present in fetuses with Down syndrome with or without congenital heart defects, as well as in fetuses with isolated heart malformations. Expression deregulation of the abnormally methylated genes was detected. Our data indicate that epigenetic alterations of relevant genes are present in developing heart DNA in fetuses with both isolated and syndromic heart malformations. These epimutations likely contribute to the pathogenesis of the malformation by cis-acting effects on gene expression. PMID:25587870

  16. Biomimetic DNA nanoballs for oligonucleotide delivery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Park, Joo Yeon; Shim, Gayong; Choi, Han-Gon; Oh, Yu-Kyoung

    2015-09-01

    Here, we designed biomimetic DNA nanoballs for delivery of multiple antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs). DNA templates with ASOs-complementary sequences were amplified by rolling circle amplification (RCA). RCA products were loaded with two types of ASOs by hybridization, condensed using adenovirus-derived Mu peptide, and coated with hyaluronic acid (HA) for delivery into CD44-overexpressing tumor cells. HA-coated, Mu peptide-condensed, dual ASO-loaded DNA nanoballs (HMA nanoballs) showed considerable cellular entry of Cy5-incorporated RCA product DNA and fluorescent ASOs, whereas Mu peptide-condensed, dual ASO-loaded DNA nanoballs (MA nanoballs) revealed limited uptake. Dual ASOs, Dz13 and OGX-427, delivered by HMA nanoballs could reduce the levels of protein targets and exert anticancer effects. Enhanced tumor distribution was observed for fluorescent HMA nanoballs than the corresponding MA nanoballs. Upon intravenous co-administration with doxorubicin, HMA nanoballs exerted the greatest anti-tumor effects among the groups. These results suggest HMA nanoballs as a nanoplatform for sequence-specific delivery of multiple ASOs and other functional oligonucleotides. PMID:26056726

  17. [Acriflavine binding and DNA stability].

    PubMed

    Zarubina, O P; Zyrianova, I M; Frisman, E V

    1986-01-01

    The influence of acriflavine in the process of exposing DNA solution to gamma-radiation is studied. Acriflavine being actively bound to DNA is demonstrated not to protect DNA molecule from radiation damage. No radiation-induced variation in acriflavine-DNA binding degree is discovered. Acriflavine protective properties are revealed when the concentration of acriflavine is essentially high. This confirms our early results according to which only free ligands in solution protect DNA from radiation damage. PMID:3801520

  18. Forensic DNA profiling and database.

    PubMed

    Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2003-07-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection. PMID:23386793

  19. Tris-dependent oxidative DNA strand scission during electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Ray, T; Mills, A; Dyson, P

    1995-06-01

    The DNA of two Streptomyces species contains site-specific labile modifications. During gel electrophoresis the DNA can undergo Tris-dependent strand scission at the positions of these modifications. Our investigations into the nucleolytic activity which reacts with the modifications implicate a peracid derivative of Tris formed at the anode; the kinetics of production and decay of this activity were followed using both a DNA cleavage assay and a reduced methyl viologen assay to measure oxidant. Anode activation could be chemically mimicked by addition of peracetic acid to Tris buffers. We tested the DNA cleavage activity of several other compounds after anode or chemical activation; we used an analogue of Tris lacking a primary amine group and also several reagents known to promote DNA strand cleavage by amine-catalysis at abasic sites. Anode generation of oxidant could be detected for compounds containing either hydroxyl or carboxyl groups. However, DNA cleavage activity correlated with oxidant formation only for those compounds also containing primary amine groups. These results support a mechanism of DNA strand scission at modification sites via concerted peracid-mediated oxidative and amine-catalysed reactions. The novel finding of Tris-dependent formation of a long-lived reactive oxidant at the anode suggests that this compound is unsuited as an electrophoresis buffer for certain biological macromolecules. PMID:7498131

  20. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  1. Circadian Modulation of 8-Oxoguanine DNA Damage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Manzella, Nicola; Bracci, Massimo; Strafella, Elisabetta; Staffolani, Sara; Ciarapica, Veronica; Copertaro, Alfredo; Rapisarda, Venerando; Ledda, Caterina; Amati, Monica; Valentino, Matteo; Tomasetti, Marco; Stevens, Richard G.; Santarelli, Lory

    2015-01-01

    The DNA base excision repair pathway is the main system involved in the removal of oxidative damage to DNA such as 8-Oxoguanine (8-oxoG) primarily via the 8-Oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1). Our goal was to investigate whether the repair of 8-oxoG DNA damage follow a circadian rhythm. In a group of 15 healthy volunteers, we found a daily variation of Ogg1 expression and activity with higher levels in the morning compared to the evening hours. Consistent with this, we also found lower levels of 8-oxoG in morning hours compared to those in the evening hours. Lymphocytes exposed to oxidative damage to DNA at 8:00 AM display lower accumulation of 8-oxoG than lymphocytes exposed at 8:00 PM. Furthermore, altered levels of Ogg1 expression were also observed in a group of shift workers experiencing a deregulation of circadian clock genes compared to a control group. Moreover, BMAL1 knockdown fibroblasts with a deregulated molecular clock showed an abolishment of circadian variation of Ogg1 expression and an increase of OGG1 activity. Our results suggest that the circadian modulation of 8-oxoG DNA damage repair, according to a variation of Ogg1 expression, could render humans less susceptible to accumulate 8-oxoG DNA damage in the morning hours. PMID:26337123

  2. An Electrochemical DNA Microbiosensor Based on Succinimide-Modified Acrylic Microspheres

    PubMed Central

    Ulianas, Alizar; Heng, Lee Yook; Hanifah, Sharina Abu; Ling, Tan Ling

    2012-01-01

    An electrochemical microbiosensor for DNA has been fabricated based on new acrylic microspheres modified with reactive N-acryloxysuccinimide (NAS) functional groups. Hydrophobic poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesized in an emulsion form with a simple one-step photopolymerization technique. Aminated DNA probe was attached to the succinimde functional group of the acrylic microspheres via covalent bonding. The hybridization of the immobilized DNA probe with the complementary DNA was studied by differential pulse voltametry using anthraquninone-2-sulfonic acid monohydrate sodium salt (AQMS) as the electroactive hybridization label. The influences of many factors such as duration of DNA probe immobilization and hybridization, pH, type of ions, buffer concentrations, ionic strength, operational temperature and non-complementary DNA on the biosensor performance were evaluated. Under optimized conditions, the DNA microbiosensor demonstrated a linear response range to target DNA over a wide concentration range of 1.0 10?16 and 1.0 10?8 M with a lower limit of detection (LOD) of 9.46 10?17 M (R2 = 0.97). This DNA microbiosensor showed good reproducibility with 2.84% RSD (relative standard deviation) (n = 3). Application of the NAS-modified acrylic microspheres in the construction of DNA microbiosensor had improved the overall analytical performance of the resultant DNA microbiosensor when compared with other reported DNA biosensors using other nano-materials for membranes and microspheres as DNA immobilization matrices. PMID:22778594

  3. Mitochondrial DNA analysis of ancient Peruvian highlanders.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Ken-ichi; Adachi, Noboru; Guillen, Sonia; Shimada, Izumi

    2006-09-01

    Ancient DNA recovered from 57 individuals excavated by Hiram Bingham at the rural communities of Paucarcancha, Patallacta, and Huata near the famed Inca royal estate and ritual site of Machu Picchu was analyzed by polymerase chain reaction, and the results were compared with ancient and modern DNA from various Central Andean areas to test their hypothesized indigenous highland origins. The control and coding regions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of 35 individuals in this group were sequenced, and the haplogroups of each individual were determined. The frequency data for the haplogroups of these samples show clear proximity to those of modern Quechua and Aymara populations in the Peruvian and Bolivian highlands, and contrast with those of pre-Hispanic individuals of the north coast of Peru that we defined previously. Our study suggests a strong genetic affinity between sampled late pre-Hispanic individuals and modern Andean highlanders. A previous analysis of the Machu Picchu osteological collection suggests that the residents there were a mixed group of natives from various coastal and highland regions relocated by the Inca state for varied purposes. Overall, our study indicates that the sampled individuals from Paucarcancha and Patallacta were indigenous highlanders who provided supportive roles for nearby Machu Picchu. PMID:16485299

  4. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L.

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  5. Active DNA unwinding dynamics during processive DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Morin, Jos A; Cao, Francisco J; Lzaro, Jos M; Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo; Valpuesta, Jos M; Carrascosa, Jos L; Salas, Margarita; Ibarra, Borja

    2012-05-22

    Duplication of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) requires a fine-tuned coordination between the DNA replication and unwinding reactions. Using optical tweezers, we probed the coupling dynamics between these two activities when they are simultaneously carried out by individual Phi29 DNA polymerase molecules replicating a dsDNA hairpin. We used the wild-type and an unwinding deficient polymerase variant and found that mechanical tension applied on the DNA and the DNA sequence modulate in different ways the replication, unwinding rates, and pause kinetics of each polymerase. However, incorporation of pause kinetics in a model to quantify the unwinding reaction reveals that both polymerases destabilize the fork with the same active mechanism and offers insights into the topological strategies that could be used by the Phi29 DNA polymerase and other DNA replication systems to couple unwinding and replication reactions. PMID:22573817

  6. DNA damage response: three levels of DNA repair regulation.

    PubMed

    Sirbu, Bianca M; Cortez, David

    2013-08-01

    Genome integrity is challenged by DNA damage from both endogenous and environmental sources. This damage must be repaired to allow both RNA and DNA polymerases to accurately read and duplicate the information in the genome. Multiple repair enzymes scan the DNA for problems, remove the offending damage, and restore the DNA duplex. These repair mechanisms are regulated by DNA damage response kinases including DNA-PKcs, ATM, and ATR that are activated at DNA lesions. These kinases improve the efficiency of DNA repair by phosphorylating repair proteins to modify their activities, by initiating a complex series of changes in the local chromatin structure near the damage site, and by altering the overall cellular environment to make it more conducive to repair. In this review, we focus on these three levels of regulation to illustrate how the DNA damage kinases promote efficient repair to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. PMID:23813586

  7. DNA Damage Response: Three Levels of DNA Repair Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sirbu, Bianca M.; Cortez, David

    2013-01-01

    Genome integrity is challenged by DNA damage from both endogenous and environmental sources. This damage must be repaired to allow both RNA and DNA polymerases to accurately read and duplicate the information in the genome. Multiple repair enzymes scan the DNA for problems, remove the offending damage, and restore the DNA duplex. These repair mechanisms are regulated by DNA damage response kinases including DNA-PKcs, ATM, and ATR that are activated at DNA lesions. These kinases improve the efficiency of DNA repair by phosphorylating repair proteins to modify their activities, by initiating a complex series of changes in the local chromatin structure near the damage site, and by altering the overall cellular environment to make it more conducive to repair. In this review, we focus on these three levels of regulation to illustrate how the DNA damage kinases promote efficient repair to maintain genome integrity and prevent disease. PMID:23813586

  8. DNA damage enhances melanogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Eller, M S; Ostrom, K; Gilchrest, B A

    1996-01-01

    Although the ability of UV irradiation to induce pigmentation in vivo and in vitro is well documented, the intracellular signals that trigger this response are poorly understood. We have recently shown that increasing DNA repair after irradiation enhances UV-induced melanization. Moreover, addition of small DNA fragments, particularly thymine dinucleotides (pTpT), selected to mimic sequences excised during the repair of UV-induced DNA photoproducts, to unirradiated pigment cells in vitro or to guinea pig skin in vivo induces a pigment response indistinguishable from UV-induced tanning. Here we present further evidence that DNA damage and/or the repair of this damage increases melanization. (i) Treatment with the restriction enzyme Pvu II or the DNA-damaging chemical agents methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) or 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4-NQO) produces a 4- to 10-fold increase in melanin content in Cloudman S91 murine melanoma cells and an up to 70% increase in normal human melanocytes, (ii) UV irradiation, MMS, and pTpT all upregulate the mRNA level for tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in melanin biosynthesis. (iii) Treatment with pTpT or MMS increases the response of S91 cells to melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH) and increases the binding of MSH to its cell surface receptor, as has been reported for UV irradiation. Together, these data suggest that UV-induced DNA damage and/or the repair of this damage is an important signal in the pigmentation response to UV irradiation. Because Pvu II acts exclusively on DNA and because MMS and 4-NQO, at the concentrations used, primarily interact with DNA, such a stimulus alone appears sufficient to induce melanogenesis. Of possible practical importance, the dinucleotide pTpT mimics most, if not all, of the effects of UV irradiation on pigmentation, tyrosinase mRNA regulation, and response to MSH without the requirement for antecedent DNA damage. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8577719

  9. The Group Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wadsworth, John

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of group dynamics and leadership activities is a component of the CORE Standards for the Master's degree curriculum in Rehabilitation Counseling. A group experience is often included as a learning activity in rehabilitation counselor education curricula as an instructional method of imparting knowledge of group dynamics. Group experience

  10. The Human Oxidative DNA Glycosylase NEIL1 Excises Psoralen-induced Interstrand DNA Cross-links in a Three-stranded DNA Structure*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Couvé, Sophie; Macé-Aimé, Gaëtane; Rosselli, Filippo; Saparbaev, Murat K.

    2009-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that human oxidative DNA glycosylase NEIL1 excises photoactivated psoralen-induced monoadducts but not genuine interstrand cross-links (ICLs) in duplex DNA. It has been postulated that the repair of ICLs in mammalian cells is mainly linked to DNA replication and proceeds via dual incisions in one DNA strand that bracket the cross-linked site. This process, known as “unhooking,” enables strand separation and translesion DNA synthesis through the gap, yielding a three-stranded DNA repair intermediate composed of a short unhooked oligomer covalently bound to the duplex. At present, the detailed molecular mechanism of ICL repair in mammalian cells remains unclear. Here, we constructed and characterized three-stranded DNA structures containing a single ICL as substrates for the base excision repair proteins. We show that NEIL1 excises with high efficiency the unhooked ICL fragment within a three-stranded DNA structure. Complete reconstitution of the repair of unhooked ICL shows that it can be processed in a short patch base excision repair pathway. The new substrate specificity of NEIL1 points to a preferential involvement in the replication-associated repair of ICLs. Based on these data, we propose a model for the mechanism of ICL repair in mammalian cells that implicates the DNA glycosylase activity of NEIL1 downstream of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F/Excision Repair Cross-Complementing 1 endonuclease complex (XPF/ERCC1) and translesion DNA synthesis repair steps. Finally, our data demonstrate that Nei-like proteins from Escherichia coli to human cells can excise bulky unhooked psoralen-induced ICLs via hydrolysis of glycosidic bond between cross-linked base and deoxyribose sugar, thus providing an alternative heuristic solution for the removal of complex DNA lesions. PMID:19258314

  11. The human oxidative DNA glycosylase NEIL1 excises psoralen-induced interstrand DNA cross-links in a three-stranded DNA structure.

    PubMed

    Couvé, Sophie; Macé-Aimé, Gaëtane; Rosselli, Filippo; Saparbaev, Murat K

    2009-05-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that human oxidative DNA glycosylase NEIL1 excises photoactivated psoralen-induced monoadducts but not genuine interstrand cross-links (ICLs) in duplex DNA. It has been postulated that the repair of ICLs in mammalian cells is mainly linked to DNA replication and proceeds via dual incisions in one DNA strand that bracket the cross-linked site. This process, known as "unhooking," enables strand separation and translesion DNA synthesis through the gap, yielding a three-stranded DNA repair intermediate composed of a short unhooked oligomer covalently bound to the duplex. At present, the detailed molecular mechanism of ICL repair in mammalian cells remains unclear. Here, we constructed and characterized three-stranded DNA structures containing a single ICL as substrates for the base excision repair proteins. We show that NEIL1 excises with high efficiency the unhooked ICL fragment within a three-stranded DNA structure. Complete reconstitution of the repair of unhooked ICL shows that it can be processed in a short patch base excision repair pathway. The new substrate specificity of NEIL1 points to a preferential involvement in the replication-associated repair of ICLs. Based on these data, we propose a model for the mechanism of ICL repair in mammalian cells that implicates the DNA glycosylase activity of NEIL1 downstream of Xeroderma Pigmentosum group F/Excision Repair Cross-Complementing 1 endonuclease complex (XPF/ERCC1) and translesion DNA synthesis repair steps. Finally, our data demonstrate that Nei-like proteins from Escherichia coli to human cells can excise bulky unhooked psoralen-induced ICLs via hydrolysis of glycosidic bond between cross-linked base and deoxyribose sugar, thus providing an alternative heuristic solution for the removal of complex DNA lesions. PMID:19258314

  12. Mammalian DNA demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Schomacher, Lars

    2013-01-01

    DNA cytosine methylation is a reversible epigenetic mark regulating gene expression. Aberrant methylation profiles are concomitant with developmental defects and cancer. Numerous studies in the past decade have identified enzymes and pathways responsible for active DNA demethylation both on a genome-wide as well as gene-specific scale. Recent findings have strengthened the idea that 5-methylcytosine oxidation catalyzed by members of the ten-eleven translocation (Tet13) oxygenases in conjunction with replication-coupled dilution of the conversion products causes the majority of genome-wide erasure of methylation marks during early development. In contrast, short and long patch DNA excision repair seems to be implicated mainly in gene-specific demethylation. Growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible protein 45 a (Gadd45a) regulates gene-specific demethylation within regulatory sequences of limited lengths raising the question of how such site specificity is achieved. A new study identified the protein inhibitor of growth 1 (Ing1) as a reader of the active chromatin mark histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). Ing1 binds and directs Gadd45a to target sites, thus linking the histone code with DNA demethylation. PMID:23803967

  13. Liposome-mediated DNA immunisation via the subcutaneous route.

    PubMed

    Perrie, Y; McNeil, S; Vangala, A

    2003-01-01

    Compared to naked DNA immunisation, entrapment of plasmid-based DNA vaccines into liposomes by the dehydration-rehydration method has shown to enhance both humoural and cell-mediated immune responses to encoded antigens administered by a variety of routes. In this paper, we have investigated the application of liposome-entrapped DNA and their cationic lipid composition on such potency after subcutaneous immunisation. Plasmid pI.18Sfi/NP containing the nucleoprotein (NP) gene of A/Sichuan/2/87 (H3N2) influenza virus in the pI.18 expression vector was incorporated by the dehydration-rehydration method into liposomes composed of 16 micromol egg phosphatidylcholine (PC), 8 micromoles dioleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) or cholesterol (Chol) and either the cationic lipid 1,2-diodeoyl-3-(trimethylammonium) propane (DOTAP) or cholesteryl 3-N-(dimethyl amino ethyl) carbamate (DC-Chol). This method, entailing mixing of small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) with DNA, followed by dehydration and rehydration, yielded incorporation values of 90-94% of the DNA used. Mixing or rehydration of preformed cationic liposomes with 100 microg plasmid DNA also led to similarly high complexation values (92-94%). In an attempt to establish differences in the nature of DNA association with these various liposome preparations their physico-chemical characteristics were investigated. Studies on vesicle size, zeta potential and gel electrophoresis in the presence of the anion sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) indicate that, under the conditions employed, formulation of liposomal DNA by the dehydration-rehydration generated submicron size liposomes incorporating most of the DNA in a manner that prevents DNA displacement through anion competition. The bilayer composition of these dehydration-rehydration vesicles (DRV(DNA)) can also further influence these physico-chemical characteristics with the presence of DOPE within the liposome bilayer resulting in a reduced vesicle zeta potential. Subcutaneous liposome-mediated DNA immunisation employing two DRV(DNA) formulations as well as naked DNA revealed that humoural responses (immunoglobulin total IgG, and subclasses IgG1 and 1gG2a) engendered by the plasmid encoded NP were substantially higher after dosing twice, 28 days apart with 10 microg liposome-entrapped DNA compared to naked DNA. At all time points measured, mice immunised with naked DNA showed no greater immune response compared to the control, non-immunised group. In contrast, as early as day 49, responses were significantly higher in mice injected with DNA entrapped in DRV liposomes containing DOTAP compared to the control group and mice immunised with naked DNA. By day 56, all total IgG responses from mice immunised with both DRV formulations were significantly higher. Comparison between the DRV formulations revealed no significant difference in immune responses elicited except at day 114, where the humoural responses of the group injected with liposomal formulation containing DC-Chol dropped to significantly lower levels that those measured in mice which received the DOTAP formulation. Similar results were found when the IgG1 and IgG2a subclass responses were determined. These results suggest that, not only can DNA be effectively entrapped within liposomes using the DRV method but that such DRV liposomes containing DNA may be a useful system for subcutaneous delivery of DNA vaccines. PMID:15203925

  14. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative damage in muscle of mtDNA mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Kolesar, Jill E; Safdar, Adeel; Abadi, Arkan; MacNeil, Lauren G; Crane, Justin D; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Kaufman, Brett A

    2014-10-01

    A causal role for mitochondrial dysfunction in mammalian aging is supported by recent studies of the mtDNA mutator mouse ("PolG" mouse), which harbors a defect in the proofreading-exonuclease activity of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma. These mice exhibit accelerated aging phenotypes characteristic of human aging, including systemic mitochondrial dysfunction, exercise intolerance, alopecia and graying of hair, curvature of the spine, and premature mortality. While mitochondrial dysfunction has been shown to cause increased oxidative stress in many systems, several groups have suggested that PolG mutator mice show no markers of oxidative damage. These mice have been presented as proof that mitochondrial dysfunction is sufficient to accelerate aging without oxidative stress. In this study, by normalizing to mitochondrial content in enriched fractions we detected increased oxidative modification of protein and DNA in PolG skeletal muscle mitochondria. We separately developed novel methods that allow simultaneous direct measurement of mtDNA replication defects and oxidative damage. Using this approach, we find evidence that suggests PolG muscle mtDNA is indeed oxidatively damaged. We also observed a significant decrease in antioxidants and expression of mitochondrial biogenesis pathway components and DNA repair enzymes in these mice, indicating an association of maladaptive gene expression with the phenotypes observed in PolG mice. Together, these findings demonstrate the presence of oxidative damage associated with the premature aging-like phenotypes induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25106705

  15. Introduction to Quantum Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podle?, P.; Mller, E.

    We give an elementary introduction to the theory of algebraic and topological quantum groups (in the spirit of S. L. Woronowicz). In particular, we recall the basic facts from Hopf (*-) algebra theory, theory of compact (matrix) quantum groups and the theory of their actions on compact quantum spaces. We also provide the most important examples, including the classification of quantum SL(2)-groups, their real forms and quantum spheres. We also consider quantum SLq(N)-groups and quantum Lorentz groups.

  16. Nearby Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binggeli, B.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Groups of galaxies are gravitationally bound aggregates of tens of galaxies, like the LOCAL GROUP (LG), the home of our MILKY WAY GALAXY. What we call a `nearby' group has to be sufficiently close such that the group can be studied, in terms of structure and contents, with similar (but of course always inferior) detail as the LG. This is roughly met by groups lying in the Local Superclustera fla...

  17. Coarse-graining DNA for simulations of DNA nanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doye, Jonathan P. K.; Ouldridge, Thomas E.; Louis, Ard A.; Romano, Flavio; Šulc, Petr; Matek, Christian; Snodin, Benedict E. K.; Rovigatti, Lorenzo; Schreck, John S.; Harrison, Ryan M.; Smith, William P. J.

    To simulate long time and length scale processes involving DNA it is necessary to use a coarse-grained description. Here we provide an overview of different approaches to such coarse graining, focussing on those at the nucleotide level that allow the self-assembly processes associated with DNA nanotechnology to be studied. OxDNA, our recently-developed coarse-grained DNA model, is particularly suited to this task, and has opened up this field to systematic study by simulations. We illustrate some of the range of DNA nanotechnology systems to which the model is being applied, as well as the insights it can provide into fundamental biophysical properties of DNA.

  18. DNA Display I. Sequence-Encoded Routing of DNA Populations

    PubMed Central

    Halpin, David R

    2004-01-01

    Recently reported technologies for DNA-directed organic synthesis and for DNA computing rely on routing DNA populations through complex networks. The reduction of these ideas to practice has been limited by a lack of practical experimental tools. Here we describe a modular design for DNA routing genes, and routing machinery made from oligonucleotides and commercially available chromatography resins. The routing machinery partitions nanomole quantities of DNA into physically distinct subpools based on sequence. Partitioning steps can be iterated indefinitely, with worst-case yields of 85% per step. These techniques facilitate DNA-programmed chemical synthesis, and thus enable a materials biology that could revolutionize drug discovery. PMID:15221027

  19. DNA methylation in an engineered heart tissue model of cardiac hypertrophy: common signatures and effects of DNA methylation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stenzig, Justus; Hirt, Marc N; Lser, Alexandra; Bartholdt, Lena M; Hensel, Jan-Tobias; Werner, Tessa R; Riemenschneider, Mona; Indenbirken, Daniela; Guenther, Thomas; Mller, Christian; Hbner, Norbert; Stoll, Monika; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation affects transcriptional regulation and constitutes a drug target in cancer biology. In cardiac hypertrophy, DNA methylation may control the fetal gene program. We therefore investigated DNA methylation signatures and their dynamics in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy based on engineered heart tissue (EHT). We exposed EHTs from neonatal rat cardiomyocytes to a 12-fold increased afterload (AE) or to phenylephrine (PE 20M) and compared DNA methylation signatures to control EHT by pull-down assay and DNA methylation microarray. A 7-day intervention sufficed to induce contractile dysfunction and significantly decrease promoter methylation of hypertrophy-associated upregulated genes such as Nppa (encoding ANP) and Acta1 (?-skeletal actin) in both intervention groups. To evaluate whether pathological consequences of AE are affected by inhibiting de novo DNA methylation we applied AE in the absence and presence of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors: 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (aza, 100M, nucleosidic inhibitor), RG108 (60M, non-nucleosidic) or methylene disalicylic acid (MDSA, 25M, non-nucleosidic). Aza had no effect on EHT function, but RG108 and MDSA partially prevented the detrimental consequences of AE on force, contraction and relaxation velocity. RG108 reduced AE-induced Atp2a2 (SERCA2a) promoter methylation. The results provide evidence for dynamic DNA methylation in cardiac hypertrophy and warrant further investigation of the potential of DNA methylation in the treatment of cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:26680771

  20. DNA Vaccination Techniques.

    PubMed

    Fissolo, Nicols; Montalban, Xavier; Comabella, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory, demyelinating, and neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system (CNS) in humans. Although the etiology of MS remains unknown, several lines of evidence support the notion that autoimmunity against components of the myelin sheath plays a major role in susceptibility to and development of the disease. At present, there are no approved MS therapies aimed specifically toward downregulating antigen-specific autoreactive immune cells. One antigen-specific approach that appears promising for the treatment of MS is DNA vaccination. This technique has demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials while maintaining safety.Here, we describe the generation of DNA vaccines containing immunologically relevant antigens of MS. Moreover, we present a detailed protocol for the prophylactic and therapeutic administration of DNA vaccines via intramuscular injection targeting on the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model resembling MS. PMID:24973869