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Sample records for growth ability conidia

  1. Ecological study of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis in soil: growth ability, conidia production and molecular detection

    PubMed Central

    Terçarioli, Gisela Ramos; Bagagli, Eduardo; Reis, Gabriela Martins; Theodoro, Raquel Cordeiro; Bosco, Sandra De Moraes Gimenes; Macoris, Severino Assis da Graça; Richini-Pereira, Virgínia Bodelão

    2007-01-01

    Background Paracoccidioides brasiliensis ecology is not completely understood, although several pieces of evidence point to the soil as its most probable habitat. The present study aimed to investigate the fungal growth, conidia production and molecular pathogen detection in different soil conditions. Methods Soils samples of clayey, sandy and medium textures were collected from ground surface and the interior of armadillo burrows in a hyperendemic area of Paracoccidioidomycosis. P. brasiliensis was inoculated in soil with controlled humidity and in culture medium containing soil extracts. The molecular detection was carried out by Nested PCR, using panfungal and species specific primers from the ITS-5.8S rDNA region. Results The soil texture does not affect fungus development and the growth is more abundant on/in soil saturated with water. Some soil samples inhibited the development of P. brasiliensis, especially those that contain high values of Exchangeable Aluminum (H+Al) in their composition. Some isolates produced a large number of conidia, mainly in soil-extract agar medium. The molecular detection was positive only in samples collected from armadillo burrows, both in sandy and clayey soil. Conclusion P. brasiliensis may grow and produce the infectious conidia in sandy and clayey soil, containing high water content, mainly in wild animal burrows, but without high values of H+Al. PMID:17953742

  2. Filter Paper Degrading Ability of a Trichoderma Strain With Multinucleate Conidia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Hideo; Yano, Makiko; Hotta, Takeshi; Toyama, Nobuo

    The multinucleate conidia were produced from the green mature conidia of Trichoderma reesei Rut C-30 strain by colchicine treatment. The strain with higher Filter paper degrading ability was selected among those conidia using a double layer selection medium. The selected strain, JS-2 was able to collapse the filter paper within 15 min but the original strain took 25 min to collapse it completely. Moreover, the amount of reducing sugar in the L-type glass tube of the strain, JS-2, was greater than that of the original strain. The Avicel, CMC-Na, and Salicin hydrolyzing activity of the strain, JS-2, increased 2.1 times, 1.2 times, and 3.6 times higher than that of the original strain.

  3. Inhibition of Pseudogymnoascus destructans growth from conidia and mycelial extension by bacterially produced volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Cornelison, Christopher T; Gabriel, Kyle T; Barlament, Courtney; Crow, Sidney A

    2014-02-01

    The recently identified causative agent of white-nose syndrome (WNS), Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has been implicated in the mortality of an estimated 5.5 million North American bats since its initial documentation in 2006 (Frick et al. in Science 329:679-682, 2010). In an effort to identify potential biological and chemical control options for WNS, 6 previously described bacterially produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were screened for anti-P. destructans activity. The compounds include decanal; 2-ethyl-1-hexanol; nonanal; benzothiazole; benzaldehyde; andN,N-dimethyloctylamine. P. destructans conidia and mycelial plugs were exposed to the VOCs in a closed air space at 15 and 4 °C and then evaluated for growth inhibition. All VOCs inhibited growth from conidia as well as inhibiting radial mycelial extension, with the greatest effect at 4 °C. Studies of the ecology of fungistatic soils and the natural abundance of the fungistatic VOCs present in these environments suggest a synergistic activity of select VOCs may occur. The evaluation of formulations of two or three VOCs at equivalent concentrations was supportive of synergistic activity in several cases. The identification of bacterially produced VOCs with anti-P. destructans activity indicates disease-suppressive and fungistatic soils as a potentially significant reservoir of biological and chemical control options for WNS and provides wildlife management personnel with tools to combat this devastating disease. PMID:24190516

  4. Conidia immobilization of T-DNA inserted Trichoderma atroviride mutant AMT-28 with dichlorvos degradation ability and exploration of biodegradation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenliang; Chen, Yunpeng; Liu, Lixing; Tang, Jun; Chen, Jie; Liu, Peng

    2010-12-01

    An immobilizing conidia approach was used to study the degradation ability of dichlorvos in Trichoderma atroviride T-DNA insertional mutant AMT-28. Beads with 10(7) immobilized conidia per 100 mL of Na-alginate solution exhibited the highest degradation abilities. The immobilized conidia showed enhanced degradation abilities compared with immobilized or freely suspended mycelia. The immobilized cells kept good storage capacity and reusability. Dichlorvos was confirmed to be completely removed by mycelia of AMT-28 within 7 days using HPLC analysis. The dichlorvos degradation rates in auxotrophic Burk media varied and were significantly affected by nitrogen sources. There was no detectable biosorption and the removal of dichlorvos in AMT-28 was primarily attributed to a kind of Biomineralization process. PMID:20685111

  5. Distributions of the growth rate of the germ tubes and germination time of Penicillium chrysogenum conidia depend on water activity.

    PubMed

    Judet, Daniela; Bensoussan, Maurice; Perrier-Cornet, Jean-Marie; Dantigny, Philippe

    2008-10-01

    The effects of water activities for sporulation (a(wsp)) and germination (a(wge)) on the distributions of the growth rate of the germ tubes (mu) and the germination time (t(G)) of Penicillium chrysogenum conidia were determined by monitoring the length of the same germ tubes throughout the experiments automatically. No relationship between the individual t(G)'s and mu's could be established. Irrespective of the water activity for germination, mu was greater and t(G) was less for conidia produced at 0.95a(wsp) than that at 0.99a(wsp). At 0.99 a(wge) the mean and the standard deviation of t(G) were smaller than those obtained at 0.95a(wge). At 0.99a(wge), normal distributions for mu and t(G) were exhibited, but not at 0.95a(wge). The cumulative frequencies were used to reconstruct the germination curves. Great differences in the percentage of spores capable of germination (P(G)) and in the mean germination times between conidia produced at 0.95a(wsp) and at 0.99a(wsp) were clearly exhibited at 0.95a(wge), thus demonstrating the paramount influence of sporulation conditions on germination kinetics. PMID:18721680

  6. Growth of Esteya vermicola in media amended with nitrogen sources yields conidia with increased predacity and resistance to environmental stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Chun Yan; Gu, Li Juan; Wang, Yun Bo; Zhang, Yong An; Sung, Chang Keun

    2011-10-01

    Esteya vermicola , an endoparasitic fungus of pinewood nematode, exhibits great potential as a biological agent against nematodes. In this study to enhance the sporulation, predacity, and environmental resistance of E. vermicola, various nitrogen sources, such as glycine, L-leucine, and ammonium nitrate, were tested. The supplement of glycine and L-leucine had a significant influence on the growth rate of the colony, enhancing colony dry mass by 5-fold more than did ammonium nitrate or the control. Of the nitrogen sources tested, ammonium nitrate and L-leucine promoted sporulation, yielding more than 6 × 10(6) CFU/g, while glycine enhanced the proportion of lunate spores. Meanwhile, the supplement of nitrogen sources had a significant influence on adhesive rate and mortality rate against Bursaphelenchus xylophilus . Moreover, the supplement of glycine enhanced the survival rate against heat stress by more than 3-fold that of L-leucine, ammonium nitrate, and control. The spores produced in media amended with glycine, L-leucine, and ammonium nitrate had slightly but not significantly higher UV resistance and drought resistance than spores produced without nitrogen sources. These results suggested that the addition of glycine resulted in the production of E. vermicola conidia with increased predacity and resistance to environmental stress that may be more suitable for control of pine wilt disease. PMID:21942397

  7. The allergenicity of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia is influenced by growth temperature.

    PubMed

    Low, Swee Yang; Dannemiller, Karen; Yao, Maosheng; Yamamoto, Naomichi; Peccia, Jordan

    2011-07-01

    Common indoor and outdoor environmental fungi such as Aspergillus fumigatus produce asexual spores containing a collection of proteins that can bind IgE antibodies and trigger allergic reactions. We characterized the impact of sporulation temperature on the IgE-binding capacity (allergenicity) of A. fumigatus and explored the links between variable allergenicity and temperature-dependant expression of genes encoding these allergenic proteins. A 12-fold increase in A. fumigatus allergenicity per spore was observed when sporulation temperatures were decreased from 32°C to 17°C. Per spore protein mass and Asp f 1 allergen mass also followed this trend. Functional gene expression analysis of A. fumigatus sporulating cultures by real-time reverse-transcription PCR and gene expression microarrays revealed that a greater number of genes encoding known, major allergens are more highly expressed at lower sporulation temperatures. The results of this study indicate that environmental conditions at growth significantly influence the allergenicity of this common mould through the differential production of allergenic proteins, and highlight the importance of in vivo or in vitro allergenicity measurements for understanding environmental exposure to airborne allergenic fungi. PMID:21724168

  8. Collection of highly germinative pseudochain conidia of Oidium neolycopersici from conidiophores by electrostatic attraction.

    PubMed

    Nonomura, Teruo; Matsuda, Yoshinori; Xu, Ling; Kakutani, Koji; Takikawa, Yoshihiro; Toyoda, Hideyoshi

    2009-03-01

    A population of simultaneously germinating conidia is an ideal inoculum of the powdery mildew pathogen, Oidium neolycopersici. In conditions of no or low wind velocity, O. neolycopersici successively stacks mature conidia on conidiophores in a chain formation (pseudochain), without releasing the precedent mature conidia. These pseudochain conidia represent a perfect inoculum, in which all conidia used for inoculation germinate simultaneously. However, we found that conidia must be collected before they fall to the leaf surface, because the germination rate was lower among conidia deposited on the leaf surface. We used an electrostatic spore collector to collect the pseudochain conidia, and their high germination rate was not affected by this treatment. The spore collector consisted of an electrified insulator probe, which created an electrostatic field around its pointed tip, and attracted conidia within its electric field. The attractive force created by the probe tip was directly proportional to voltage, and was inversely proportional to the distance between the tip and a target colony on a leaf. Pseudochain conidia were successfully collected by bringing the electrified probe tip close to target colonies on leaves. In this way, conidia were collected from colonies at 3-d intervals. This effectively collected all conidia from conidiophores before they dropped to the leaf surface. A high germination rate was observed among conidia attracted to the probe tip (95.5+/-0.6%). Conidia were easily suspended in water with added surfactant, and retained their germination ability. These conidia were infective and produced conidia in pseudochains on conidiophores after inoculation. The electrostatic spore collection method can be used to collect conidia as they form on conidiophores, thus obtaining an inoculum population in which all of the conidia germinate simultaneously. PMID:19070662

  9. Production of conidia of Penicillium camemberti in liquid medium through microcycles of conidiation.

    PubMed

    Boualem, Khadidja; Gervais, Patrick; Cavin, Jean-François; Waché, Yves

    2014-11-01

    Microcycle conidiation is a survival mechanism of fungi encountering unfavorable conditions. In this phenomenon, asexual spores germinate secondary spores directly without formation of mycelium. As Penicillium camemberti conidia have the ability to produce conidiophores after germination in liquid culture induced by a thermal stress (18 and 30 °C), our work has aimed at producing conidia through this mean. Incubation at 18 and 30 °C increased the swelling of conidia and their proportion thereby producing conidiophores. Our results showed that the microcycle of conidiation can produce 5 × 10(8) conidia ml(-1) after 7 days at 18 °C of culture. The activity of these conidia was checked through culture on a solid medium. Conidia produced by microcycle conidiation formed a normal mycelium on the surface of solid media and 25 % could still germinate after 5 months of storage. PMID:24975730

  10. Variations in UV-B tolerance and germination speed of Metarhizium anisopliae conidia produced on insects and artificial substrates.

    PubMed

    Rangel, Drauzio E N; Braga, Gilberto U L; Flint, Stephan D; Anderson, Anne J; Roberts, Donald W

    2004-01-01

    Solar ultraviolet radiation (UV-A and UV-B) is a major factor in failure of programs using the insect pathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae as a biological control agent. Studies were conducted to determine if growth conditions, viz. artificial (agar media or rice grain) or natural (infected insects) substrates for conidial production affect two traits that directly influence performance of conidia after field application: tolerance to UV-B radiation and conidial germination speed. Conidia of two isolates (ARSEF 23 and ARSEF 2575) of M. anisopliae var. anisopliae produced on potato dextrose agar plus yeast extract (PDAY) or on fungus-killed larvae of two insect species, Galleria mellonella and Zophobas morio, were inactivated by exposure to UV-B radiation. Conidia of both isolates when produced on insect cadavers were significantly more sensitive to UV-B radiation than conidia produced on PDAY. Also, conidia from insect cadavers germinated slower than those from PDAY cultures. A comparison of conidia from artificial substrates showed that conidia produced on Czapek's and Emerson's YpSs agar media or rice grains had higher tolerance to UV-B radiation and germinated faster than conidia raised on PDA and PDAY. Accordingly, the growth substrate and nutritional environment in which conidia are produced influences M. anisopliae conidial UV-B tolerance and speed of germination; and manipulation of these variables could be used to obtain conidia with increased tolerance to UV-B radiation and shorter germination times. PMID:15579316

  11. Capillary electrophoresis of conidia from cultivated microscopic filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Kubesová, Anna; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2009-05-15

    In immunocompromised people fungal agents are able to cause serious infections with high mortality rate. An early diagnosis can increase the chances of survival of the affected patients. Simultaneously, the fungi produce toxins and they are frequent cause of allergy. Currently, various methods are used for detection and identification of these pathogens. They use microscopic examination and growth characteristic of the fungi. New methods are based on the analysis of structural elements of the target microorganisms such as proteins, polysaccharides, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, etc. for the construction of antibodies, probes, and primers for detection. The above-mentioned methods are time-consuming and elaborate. Here hydrophobic conidia from the cultures of different strains of the filamentous fungi were focused and separated by capillary zone electrophoresis and capillary isoelectric focusing. The detection was optimized by dynamic modifying of conidia by the nonionogenic tenside on the basis of pyrenebutanoate. Down to 10 labeled conidia of the fungal strains were fluorometrically detected, and isoelectric points of conidia were determined. The observed isoelectric points were compared with those obtained from the separation of the cultured clinical samples, and they were found to be not host-specific. PMID:19385663

  12. Comparison of methodologies for conidia production by Alternaria alternata from citrus

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Daniel D. C.; Alves, Eduardo; Batista, Tereza R. S.; Camargos, Renato B.; Lopes, Eloísa A. G. L.

    2008-01-01

    Conidia production is a problem in the study of Alternaria alternata from citrus. Thus, this study aimed to compare existing methodologies for conidial production of A. alternata isolated from Ponkan tangerine (2 isolates), Cravo lemon (1 isolate), Pêra orange (2 isolates) and Murcott tangor (1 isolate). The methodologies used were conidia production with 12 and 24 hours under white fluorescent light, evaluation with 24 and 48 hours after applying fungal mycelium stress technique, cold stress followed by injury of mycelium and evaluation with 24 hours, using healthy vegetable tissue and the use of black fluorescent near ultraviolet (NUV) lamp. Satisfactory result was obtained with A. alternata isolate from Murcott tangor, with the production of 2.8 × 105 conidia mL-1, when fungal mycelium was stressed (Petri dish with 66.66% of fungi growth) and subsequently 24 h of growth. The use of white light (24 h) and black fluorescent NUV lamp also induced expressive conidia production by one isolate of Ponkan tangerine, which produced 17.2 × 105 and 10.1 × 105conidia mL-1 and another of Murcott tangor, which produced 13.9 × 105 and 10.1 × 105 conidia mL-1, respectively. The remaining methodologies analyzed in this study were not able to induce conidia production in satisfactory quantity. The use of both mycelium stress technique and white light (24 h) and black fluorescent NUV lamp allowed the production of enough quantities of conidia to be used in vitro (detection of fungitoxic substances) and in vivo (pathogenicity test) assays, respectively. PMID:24031309

  13. Trichothecene mycotoxins in aerosolized conidia of Stachybotrys atra.

    PubMed Central

    Sorenson, W G; Frazer, D G; Jarvis, B B; Simpson, J; Robinson, V A

    1987-01-01

    Stachybotrys atra is the etiologic agent of stachybotryotoxicosis, and this fungus and its trichothecene mycotoxins were recently implicated in an outbreak of unexplained illness in homes. S. atra was grown on sterile rice, autoclaved, dried, and then aerosolized by acoustic vibration. The distribution of particles (mass and number) was monitored on an aerodynamic particle sizer interfaced with a computer. Dust was collected on preweighed glass-fiber filters and extracted with 90% aqueous methanol. Extracts were tested for the ability to inhibit protein synthesis in rat alveolar macrophages, the ability to inhibit the proliferation of mouse thymocytes, and the presence of specific trichothecene mycotoxins. Virtually all of the particles were less than 15 micron in aerodynamic diameter, and the mass median diameter was 5 micron. Thus, most of the particles were respirable. Microscopic analysis of the generated dust revealed that ca. 85% of the dust particles were conidia of S. atra, another 6% were hyphal fragments, and the remainder of the particles were unidentifiable. Thus, greater than 90% of the particles were of fungal origin. The extracts strongly inhibited protein synthesis and thymocyte proliferation. Purified satratoxin H was also highly toxic in the same systems. Each of the individual filters contained satratoxin H (average, 9.5 ng/mg of dust). Satratoxin G and trichoverrols A and B were found in lesser amounts in some, but not all, of the filters. The limit of analysis is ca. 50 ng. These results establish that the conidia of S. atra contain trichothecene mycotoxins. In view of the potent toxicity of the trichothecenes, the inhalation of aerosols containing high concentrations of these conidia could be a potential hazard to health. PMID:3496850

  14. Spontaneous Growth and Chemical Reduction Ability of Ge Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Liang, Changhao; Tian, Zhenfei; Zhang, Shuyuan; Shao, Guosheng

    2013-01-01

    Forming colloidal solutions containing semiconductor quantum-sized nanoparticles (NPs) with clean surface has been a long-standing scientific challenge. In this contribution, we report a “top-down” method for the fabrication of Ge NPs by laser ablation of a Ge target in deionized water without adding any stabilizing reagents. The initial Ge NPs in amorphous structure showed spontaneous growth behavior by aging Ge colloids in deionized water under ambient temperature, which gradually evolved into a metastable tetragonal structure as an intermediate phase and then transformed into the stable cubic structure, being consistent with the Ostwald's rule of stages for the growth in a metastable system. The laser-induced initial Ge NPs demonstrate a unique and prominent size-dependent chemical reductive ability, which is evidenced by the rapid degradation of organic molecules such as chlorinated aromatic compounds, organic dyes, and reduction of heavy metal Cr(VI) ions.

  15. Adhesion of Nongerminated Botrytis cinerea Conidia to Several Substrata †

    PubMed Central

    Doss, Robert P.; Potter, Sandra W.; Chastagner, Gary A; Christian, James K.

    1993-01-01

    Conidia of the plant pathogenic fungus Botrytis cinerea adhered to tomato cuticle and to certain other substrata immediately upon hydration. This immediate adhesion occurred with both living and nonliving conidia. Adhesion was not consistently influenced by several lectins, sugars, or salts or by protease treatment, but it was strongly inhibited by ionic or nonionic detergents. With glass and oxidized polyethylene, substrata whose surface hydrophobicities could be conveniently varied, there was a direct relationship between water contact angle and percent adhesion. Immediate adhesion did not involve specific conidial attachment structures, although the surfaces of attached conidia were altered by contact with a substratum. Freshly harvested conidia were very hydrophobic, with more than 97% partitioning into the organic layer when subjected to a phase distribution test. Percent adhesion of germinated conidia was larger than that of nongerminated conidia. Evidence suggests that immediate adhesion of conidia of B. cinerea depends, at least in part, on hydrophobic interactions between the conidia and substratum. Images PMID:16348954

  16. Effects of Metarhizium anisopliae conidia mixed with soil against the eggs of Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Leles, Renan Nunes; D'Alessandro, Walmirton Bezerra; Luz, Christian

    2012-04-01

    The effectiveness of Metarhizium anisopliae IP 46 conidia mixed with soil was tested against Aedes aegypti eggs. Mycelium and new conidia developed first on eggs between 4.8 and 15 days respectively after incubation of fungus-treated soils at 3.3 × 10(3) up to 3.3 × 10(5) conidia/g soil at 25°C and relative humidities close to saturation. After 15-day incubation, 53.3% of the eggs exposed to soil with 3.3 × 10(5) conidia/g showed external development of mycelium and conidia. Fungus-inoculated soils (but not untreated controls) showed some mycelial growth and sporulation apart from the eggs. Some eggs on treated soils hatched; those larvae died and eventually showed fungal development on their bodies. The cumulative relative eclosion of larvae after submersion of treated eggs in water decreased from 52.2% at 3.3 × 10(3) conidia/g to 25.3% at 3.3 × 10(5) conidia/g. These findings clearly showed that A. aegypti eggs can be infected by M. anisopliae when deposited on fungus-contaminated soil. The effectiveness of M. anisopliae against gravid females, larvae, and also eggs of A. aegypti underscored the possible usefulness of this fungus as a mycoinsecticide, whether naturally occurring or artificially applied, in the breeding sites of this mosquito. PMID:21984368

  17. Production of Conidia by the Fungus Metarhizium anisopliae Using Solid-State Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Loera-Corral, Octavio; Porcayo-Loza, Javier; Montesinos-Matias, Roberto; Favela-Torres, Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    This chapter describes the production of conidia by Metarhizium anisopliae using solid-state fermentation. Before production of conidia, procedures for strains conservation, reactivation, and propagation are essential in order to provide genetic stability of the strains. The strain is conserved in freeze-dried vials and then reactivated through insect inoculation. Rice is used as a substrate for the conidia production in two different bioreactors: plastic bags and tubular bioreactor. The CO2 production in the tubular bioreactors is measured with a respirometer; this system allows calculating indirect growth parameters as lag time (tlag) (25-35 h), maximum rate of CO2 production (rCO2 max) (0.5-0.7 mg/gdm h), specific rate of CO2 production (μ) (0.10-0.15 1/h), and final CO2 production (CO2) (100-120 mg/gdm). Conidial yield per gram of dry substrate (gdm) should be above 1 × 10(9) conidia/gdm after 10 days of incubation. Germination and viability of conidia obtained after 10 days of incubation should be above 80 % and 75 %, respectively. Bioassays using of Tenebrio molitor as a host insect should yield a final mortality above 80 %. PMID:27565492

  18. Electron Microscopy of Botrytis cinerea Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Patricia M.; Sjaholm, Virginia E.; Sommer, N. F.

    1966-01-01

    Buckley, Patricia M. (University of California, Davis), Virginia E. Sjaholm, and N. F. Sommer. Electron microscopy of Botrytis cinerea conidia. J. Bacteriol. 91:2037–2044. 1966.—Sections of germinating and nongerminating Botrytis cinerea conidia were examined with an electron microscope. Uranyl acetate or lead citrate provided contrast between membranes and cytoplasm. Membrane-bounded, dense inclusions previously unreported in dormant spores were termed “storage bodies.” Whorled structures, spherules, granules, and membrane loops were seen within these inclusions. The various forms assumed by the enclosed materials closely resemble phospholipid inclusions described for other cells. It is suggested that the inclusions provide material for the assembly of membranous organelles during germination. Utilization of the stored material apparently results in extensive vacuolization in advanced germinants. Images PMID:5949251

  19. Germination of conidia of Aspergillus niger is accompanied by major changes in RNA profiles

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, M.R.; Krijgsheld, P.; Bleichrodt, R.; Menke, H.; Stam, H.; Stark, J.; Wösten, H.A.B.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptome of conidia of Aspergillus niger was analysed during the first 8 h of germination. Dormant conidia started to grow isotropically two h after inoculation in liquid medium. Isotropic growth changed to polarised growth after 6 h, which coincided with one round of mitosis. Dormant conidia contained transcripts from 4 626 genes. The number of genes with transcripts decreased to 3 557 after 2 h of germination, after which an increase was observed with 4 780 expressed genes 8 h after inoculation. The RNA composition of dormant conidia was substantially different than all the subsequent stages of germination. The correlation coefficient between the RNA profiles of 0 h and 8 h was 0.46. They were between 0.76–0.93 when profiles of 2, 4 and 6 h were compared with that of 8 h. Dormant conidia were characterised by high levels of transcripts of genes involved in the formation of protecting components such as trehalose, mannitol, protective proteins (e.g. heat shock proteins and catalase). Transcripts belonging to the Functional Gene Categories (FunCat) protein synthesis, cell cycle and DNA processing and respiration were over-represented in the up-regulated genes at 2 h, whereas metabolism and cell cycle and DNA processing were over-represented in the up-regulated genes at 4 h. At 6 h and 8 h no functional gene classes were over- or under-represented in the differentially expressed genes. Taken together, it is concluded that the transcriptome of conidia changes dramatically during the first two h and that initiation of protein synthesis and respiration are important during early stages of germination. PMID:23449598

  20. Abilities and Skill Acquisition: A Latent Growth Curve Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voelkle, Manuel C.; Wittmann, Werner W.; Ackerman, Phillip L.

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between abilities and skill acquisition has been the subject of numerous controversies in psychology. However, while most researchers implicitly or explicitly accept the idea that abilities and skill acquisition should be related, empirical research has failed to provide evidence for a consistently strong correlation between the…

  1. Hypocrea/Trichoderma: species with conidiophore elongations and green conidia.

    PubMed

    Chaverri, Priscila; Castlebury, Lisa A; Overton, Barrie E; Samuels, Gary J

    2003-01-01

    Species of Trichoderma and Hypocrea that have green conidia and sterile or fertile elongations of their conidiophores are described or redescribed and their phylogenetic position explored. The described species include T. crassum, T. fasciculatum, T. fertile, T. hamatum, T. longipile, T. oblongisporum, T. pubescens, T. spirale, T. strictipile, T. strigosum, T. stromaticum, T. tomentosum, Hypocrea aureoviridis f. macrospora, H. ceramica. and H. semiorbis. Trichoderma fasciculatum originally was described from cultures from ascospores of an unidentified Hypocrea specimen; it is considered to be a synonym of T. strictipile. The remaining species of Trichoderma considered here have not been linked to teleomorphs, and the Trichoderma anamorphs of H. aureoviridis f. macrospora and H. semiorbis have not been named. Five new species of Hypocrea are described, viz. H. cremea, H. cuneispora, H. estonica, H. strictipilosa and H. surrotunda. The phylogenetic relationships of these species were inferred based on partial RPB2 and EF-1α DNA sequence data and phenotypic characteristics, including teleomorph, anamorph, colony and growth rates. Trichoderma crassum was found to be a sister species to T. virens, based on molecular sequences and phenotypic data. Hypocrea surrotunda and H. cremea, H. cuneispora and T. longipile, T. fertile and T. oblongisporum, T. tomentosum and H. atrogelatinosa, and T. hamatum and T. pubescens, respectively, were found to be closely related phylogenetically, based on RPB2 and EF-1α gene genealogies. Anamorph and teleomorph phenotype, including conidiophore elongations, phialide morphology, conidial morphology, stroma anatomy and ascospore morphology are not useful predictors of relationships. Despite the shared phenotypic characters of these Trichoderma and Hypocrea species, they are distributed between two major clades of Trichoderma/Hypocrea. Redescriptions and a key to species of Hypocrea/Trichoderma with green conidia and conidiophore

  2. Trends in Development of Abilities Related to Somatic Growth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brucefors, Agneta; And Others

    1974-01-01

    From a longitudinal sample of 202 children studied from birth to 8 years of age, two extreme groups were selected. One group had a more rapid development than normal and the other a slower development. A relationship between the development of abilities and weight and height increases was found for boys aged 4 weeks to 2 years and between the…

  3. A novel computerised image analysis method for the measurement of production of conidia from the aphid pathogenic fungus Erynia neoaphidis.

    PubMed

    Bonner, Tony J; Pell, Judith K; Gray, Simon N

    2003-03-14

    A semi-automated method has been developed for the quantification and measurement of conidia discharged by the aphid pathogen Erynia neoaphidis. This was used to compare conidiation by E. neoaphidis-mycosed pea aphid cadavers, mycelial plugs cut from agar plates, mycelial pellets from shake flasks and by mycelial pellets from different phases of liquid batch fermenter culture. Aphid cadavers discharged significantly more and significantly smaller conidia than plugs or pellets. The volume of conidia discharged was stable over the period of discharge (80 h), but more detailed analysis of the size frequency distribution showed that more very small and very large conidia were discharged after 5 h incubation than after 75 h incubation. Biomass harvested at the end of the exponential growth phase in batch fermenter culture produced significantly more conidia than biomass from any other growth phase. The implications of these findings for the development of production and formulation processes for E. neoaphidis as a biological control agent are discussed. PMID:12644230

  4. Splash dispersal of Phyllosticta citricarpa conidia from infected citrus fruit

    PubMed Central

    Perryman, S. A. M.; Clark, S. J.; West, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Rain-splash dispersal of Phyllosticta citricarpa (syn. Guignardia citricarpa) conidia (pycnidiospores) from infected oranges was studied in still air and combined with wind. High power microscopy demonstrated the presence of conidia in splash droplets from diseased oranges, which exuded conidia for over one hour during repeated wetting. The largest (5 mm) incident drops produced the highest splashes (up to 41.0 cm). A linear-by-quadratic surface model predicted highest splashes to be 41.91 cm at a horizontal distance of 25.97 cm from the target orange. Large splash droplets contained most conidia (4–5.5 mm splashes averaged 308 conidia), but were splashed <30 cm horizontal distance. Most (80–90%) splashes were <1 mm diameter but carried only 0–4 conidia per droplet. In multiple splash experiments, splashes combined to reach higher maxima (up to 61.7 cm; linear-by-quadratic surface model prediction, 62.1 cm) than in the single splash experiments. In combination with wind, higher wind speeds carried an increasing proportion of splashes downwind travelling horizontally at least 8 m at the highest wind speed tested (7 m/s), due to a small proportion of droplets (<1 mm) being aerosolised. These experiments suggest that P. citricarpa conidia can be dispersed from infected oranges by splashes of water in rainfall events. PMID:25298272

  5. Exploring Latent Class Based on Growth Rates in Number Sense Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Dongil; Shin, Jaehyun; Lee, Kijyung

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore latent class based on growth rates in number sense ability by using latent growth class modeling (LGCM). LGCM is one of the noteworthy methods for identifying growth patterns of the progress monitoring within the response to intervention framework in that it enables us to analyze latent sub-groups based not…

  6. Consecutive monitoring of lifelong production of conidia by individual conidiophores of Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei on barley leaves by digital microscopic techniques with electrostatic micromanipulation.

    PubMed

    Moriura, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Yoshinori; Oichi, Wataru; Nakashima, Shinya; Hirai, Tatsuo; Sameshima, Takeshi; Nonomura, Teruo; Kakutani, Koji; Kusakari, Shin-Ichi; Higashi, Katsuhide; Toyoda, Hideyoshi

    2006-01-01

    Conidial formation and secession by living conidiophores of Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei on barley leaves were consecutively monitored using a high-fidelity digital microscopic technique combined with electrostatic micromanipulation to trap the released conidia. Conidial chains formed on conidiophores through a series of septum-mediated division and growth of generative cells. Apical conidial cells on the conidiophores were abstricted after the conidial chains developed ten conidial cells. The conidia were electrically conductive, and a positive charge was induced in the cells by a negatively polarized insulator probe (ebonite). The electrostatic force between the conidia and the insulator was used to attract the abstricted conidia from the conidiophores on leaves. This conidium movement from the targeted conidiophore to the rod was directly viewed under the digital microscope, and the length of the interval between conidial septation and secession, the total number of the conidia produced by a single conidiophore, and the modes of conidiogenesis were clarified. During the stage of conidial secession, the generative cells pushed new conidial cells upwards by repeated division and growth. The successive release of two apical conidia was synchronized with the successive septation and growth of a generative cell. The release ceased after 4-5 conidia were released without division and growth of the generative cell. Thus, the life of an individual conidiophore (from the erection of the conidiophore to the release of the final conidium) was shown to be 107 h and to produce an average of 33 conidia. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the direct estimation of life-long conidial production by a powdery mildew on host leaves. PMID:16378716

  7. Quantitative Genetic Analysis of Latent Growth Curve Models of Cognitive Abilities in Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Chandra A.; Finkel, Deborah; McArdle, John J.; Gatz, Margaret; Berg, Stig; Pedersen, Nancy L.

    2005-01-01

    Though many cognitive abilities exhibit marked decline over the adult years, individual differences in rates of change have been observed. In the current study, biometrical latent growth models were used to examine sources of variability for ability level (intercept) and change (linear and quadratic effects) for verbal, fluid, memory, and…

  8. Linking Brain Growth with the Development of Scientific Reasoning Ability and Conceptual Change during Adolescence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwon, Yong-Ju; Lawson, Anton E.

    2000-01-01

    Tests the hypothesis that an early adolescent brain growth plateau and spurt exists, and that this plateau and spurt influence students' ability to reason scientifically and to learn theoretical science concepts. Finds that measures of students' (n=210) prefrontal lobe activity correlated highly with scientific reasoning ability, and that these…

  9. The Groove of Growth: How Early Gains in Math Ability Influence Adolescent Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Tyler W.; Duncan, Greg J.; Siegler, Robert S.; Davis-Kean, Pamela E.

    2014-01-01

    A number of studies, both small scale and of nationally-representative student samples, have reported substantial associations between school entry math ability and later elementary school achievement. However, questions remain regarding the persistence of the association between early growth in math ability and later math achievement due to the…

  10. Location of Aryl Sulfatase in Conidia and Young Mycelia of Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Walter A.; Metzenberg, Robert L.

    1970-01-01

    Aryl sulfatase (arylsulfate sulfohydrolase, EC 3.1.6.1) was found to have multiple locations in Neurospora conidia. Some enzyme activity remained in the supernatant when a spore suspension was centrifuged or filtered. Part of the cell-bound activity could be detected by adding the assay ingredients to a suspension of intact spores (patent enzyme), and additional activity was only detectable when the spores were first treated to destroy their permeability barriers (cryptic enzyme). Such treatments include: disruption with an X-press, brief rinsing with chloroform or acetone, incubation at 60 C for 5 min, and incubation with phenethyl alcohol, nystatin, or ascosin. Part of the patent aryl sulfatase was inactivated by briefly acid treating the intact spores (no loss of conidial viability). This enzyme was considered to have a cell surface location. Some enzyme was acid-resistant in intact spores, but all of the enzyme was acid-sensitive in spores whose permeability barriers had been disrupted. The pH dependence, kinetic properties, and p-nitrophenyl sulfate uptake were investigated in acid-treated conidia. No aryl sulfatase was detected in ascospores. Young mycelia contained more aryl sulfatase than did conidia, but little, if any, was secreted into the growth medium. Cryptic activity was demonstrated in young mycelia by brief chloroform treatment or by rinsing the cells with 0.1 m acetate buffer. Enzyme activity in young mycelia was completely labile to acid treatment, as was cell viability. PMID:16559101

  11. The effect of natamycin on the transcriptome of conidia of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    van Leeuwen, M.R.; Krijgsheld, P.; Wyatt, T.T.; Golovina, E.A.; Menke, H.; Dekker, A.; Stark, J.; Stam, H.; Bleichrodt, R.; Wösten, H.A.B.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2013-01-01

    The impact of natamycin on Aspergillus niger was analysed during the first 8 h of germination of conidia. Polarisation, germ tube formation, and mitosis were inhibited in the presence of 3 and 10 μM of the anti-fungal compound, while at 10 μM also isotropic growth was affected. Natamycin did not have an effect on the decrease of microviscosity during germination and the concomitant reduction in mannitol and trehalose levels. However, it did abolish the increase of intracellular levels of glycerol and glucose during the 8 h period of germination. Natamycin hardly affected the changes that occur in the RNA profile during the first 2 h of germination. During this time period, genes related to transcription, protein synthesis, energy and cell cycle and DNA processing were particularly up-regulated. Differential expression of 280 and 2586 genes was observed when 8 h old germlings were compared with conidia that had been exposed to 3 μM and 10 μM natamycin, respectively. For instance, genes involved in ergosterol biosynthesis were down-regulated. On the other hand, genes involved in endocytosis and the metabolism of compatible solutes, and genes encoding protective proteins were up-regulated in natamycin treated conidia. PMID:23449730

  12. Is Overall Oral English Ability Related to Young Latinos' English Reading Growth?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Jill; Amendum, Steven J.; Relyea, Jackie Eunjung; Garcia, Sandra G.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated whether young Latino dual-language learners' 2-year English reading growth varied over time according to their initial overall oral English ability. We followed 41 Latino children for 2 years. We tested overall oral English at the beginning of the study and administered multiple curriculum-based reading…

  13. Brain Structural Integrity and Intrinsic Functional Connectivity Forecast 6 Year Longitudinal Growth in Children's Numerical Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Kochalka, John; Ngoon, Tricia J.; Wu, Sarah S.; Qin, Shaozheng; Battista, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Early numerical proficiency lays the foundation for acquiring quantitative skills essential in today's technological society. Identification of cognitive and brain markers associated with long-term growth of children's basic numerical computation abilities is therefore of utmost importance. Previous attempts to relate brain structure and function to numerical competency have focused on behavioral measures from a single time point. Thus, little is known about the brain predictors of individual differences in growth trajectories of numerical abilities. Using a longitudinal design, with multimodal imaging and machine-learning algorithms, we investigated whether brain structure and intrinsic connectivity in early childhood are predictive of 6 year outcomes in numerical abilities spanning childhood and adolescence. Gray matter volume at age 8 in distributed brain regions, including the ventrotemporal occipital cortex (VTOC), the posterior parietal cortex, and the prefrontal cortex, predicted longitudinal gains in numerical, but not reading, abilities. Remarkably, intrinsic connectivity analysis revealed that the strength of functional coupling among these regions also predicted gains in numerical abilities, providing novel evidence for a network of brain regions that works in concert to promote numerical skill acquisition. VTOC connectivity with posterior parietal, anterior temporal, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices emerged as the most extensive network predicting individual gains in numerical abilities. Crucially, behavioral measures of mathematics, IQ, working memory, and reading did not predict children's gains in numerical abilities. Our study identifies, for the first time, functional circuits in the human brain that scaffold the development of numerical skills, and highlights potential biomarkers for identifying children at risk for learning difficulties. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Children show substantial individual differences in math abilities and ease of math

  14. Virulence of Sporothrix schenckii conidia and yeast cells, and their susceptibility to nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, K S S; Coelho, A L J; Bezerra, L M Lopes; Barja-Fidalgo, C

    2000-01-01

    The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) in macrophage (Mφ) fungicidal activity against Sporothrix schenckii, and the relationship between NO susceptibility and the differential virulence of conidia and yeast cells, were investigated. Confirming a previously reported correlation between the length of time in culture and virulence of S. schenckii, conidia isolated from 12-day mycelial cultures (Ss-12) were less virulent to mice than conidia from 7-day cultures (Ss-7) or yeast cells. Indicative of NO production, infected animals showed a significant increase in serum levels of nitrite that was lower in mice infected with Ss-12 than in mice infected with Ss-7 or yeast. Stimulation of murine Mφ with interferon-γ (IFN-γ) induced NO production and inhibition of fungal growth. The cytotoxic activity of Mφ against Ss-12 was significantly greater than against Ss-7 or yeast cells, the highly virulent fungal forms. The addition of NO synthase inhibitors abrogated Mφ cytotoxic activity against all fungal forms. The phagocytic activity of Mφ against Ss-7 was significantly lower than against Ss-12 or yeast cells. Although the ingestion of fungal cells triggered the oxidative burst in Mφ, the fungicidal activity was not altered in the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. In addition, Ss-12 and yeast cells were more susceptible than Ss-7 to the direct fungicidal activity of the NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-dl-penicillamine (SNAP), S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1). The results of this study indicate that NO is a key cytotoxic mediator involved in the murine Mφ defence against S. schenckii, and that the virulence of Ss-7, Ss-12 and yeast cells may be related to a differential susceptibility to NO. PMID:11122461

  15. A relative humidity processing method for the sampling of aerosol particles with low growth-ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Bengt G.; Hansson, Hans-Christen; Asking, Lars; Cederfelt, Sven-Inge

    1992-11-01

    A method for the fractionation of aerosol particles with respect to size and ability to grow with an increased relative humidity has been developed. The system consists of cascade impactors, diffusion driers, a humidifier, and a temperature stabilizer. Diffusion driers were designed and the vapor penetration was modeled below 20 percent. A humidifier which can be operated with an output relative humidity above 95 percent was developed. Flow-rates up to 51/min can be used and the relative humidity can be controlled within approximately 1 percent. The ability of the system to fractionate aerosol particles with respect to growth with relative humidity was investigated. The equivalent aerodynamic diameter growth factor for sodium chloride was determined to 2 at a relative humidity of 98 percent, in good agreement with theory.

  16. Optimization of Solid-State Fermentation for Improved Conidia Production of Beauveria bassiana as a Mycoinsecticide

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Kim, Jeong Jun

    2010-01-01

    The production of conidia of entomopathogenic Beauveria bassiana by solid-state fermentation was studied for the development of a biocontrol agent against aphid Myzus persicae. The optimal conditions for conidia production on polished white rice were 40% moisture content, 25℃ culture temperature, 2-day-old seeding culture grown in 3% corn meal, 2% rice bran, 2% corn steep powder medium, initial conidia concentration of 107 conidia/g in the wet rice, 10% inoculum size, and use of a polyethylene bag as a container. The polyethylene bag containing inoculated rice was hand-shaken every 12 hr during fermentation. Using optimal conditions, the maximum conidia production obtained was 4.05 g conidia/100 g dry rice after 14 days of cultivation, a rate 2.83 times higher than conidia yield of pre-optimization. PMID:23956642

  17. Optimization of Solid-State Fermentation for Improved Conidia Production of Beauveria bassiana as a Mycoinsecticide.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tuan Anh; Kim, Jeong Jun; Kim, Keun

    2010-06-01

    The production of conidia of entomopathogenic Beauveria bassiana by solid-state fermentation was studied for the development of a biocontrol agent against aphid Myzus persicae. The optimal conditions for conidia production on polished white rice were 40% moisture content, 25℃ culture temperature, 2-day-old seeding culture grown in 3% corn meal, 2% rice bran, 2% corn steep powder medium, initial conidia concentration of 10(7) conidia/g in the wet rice, 10% inoculum size, and use of a polyethylene bag as a container. The polyethylene bag containing inoculated rice was hand-shaken every 12 hr during fermentation. Using optimal conditions, the maximum conidia production obtained was 4.05 g conidia/100 g dry rice after 14 days of cultivation, a rate 2.83 times higher than conidia yield of pre-optimization. PMID:23956642

  18. Heterogeneity in liquid shaken cultures of Aspergillus niger inoculated with melanised conidia or conidia of pigmentation mutants

    PubMed Central

    van Veluw, G.J.; Teertstra, W.R.; de Bekker, C.; Vinck, A.; van Beek, N.; Muller, W.H.; Arentshorst, M.; van der Mei, H.C.; Ram, A.F.J.; Dijksterhuis, J.; Wösten, H.A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Black pigmented conidia of Aspergillus niger give rise to micro-colonies when incubated in liquid shaken medium. These micro-colonies are heterogeneous with respect to gene expression and size. We here studied the biophysical properties of the conidia of a control strain and of strains in which the fwnA, olvA or brnA gene is inactivated. These strains form fawn-, olive-, and brown-coloured conidia, respectively. The ΔolvA strain produced larger conidia (3.8 μm) when compared to the other strains (3.2–3.3 μm). Moreover, the conidia of the ΔolvA strain were highly hydrophilic, whereas those of the other strains were hydrophobic. The zeta potential of the ΔolvA conidia in medium was also more negative when compared to the control strain. This was accompanied by the near absence of a rodlet layer of hydrophobins. Using the Complex Object Parametric Analyzer and Sorter it was shown that the ratio of individual hyphae and micro-colonies in liquid shaken cultures of the deletion strains was lower when compared to the control strain. The average size of the micro-colonies of the control strain was also smaller (628 μm) than that of the deletion strains (790–858 μm). The size distribution of the micro-colonies of the ΔfwnA strain was normally distributed, while that of the other strains could be explained by assuming a population of small and a population of large micro-colonies. In the last set of experiments it was shown that relative expression levels of gpdA, and AmyR and XlnR regulated genes correlate in individual hyphae at the periphery of micro-colonies. This indicates the existence of transcriptionally and translationally highly active and lowly active hyphae as was previously shown in macro-colonies. However, the existence of distinct populations of hyphae with high and low transcriptional and translational activity seems to be less robust when compared to macro-colonies grown on solid medium. PMID:23449476

  19. Tailoring fungal morphology of Aspergillus niger MYA 135 by altering the hyphal morphology and the conidia adhesion capacity: biotechnological applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Current problems of filamentous fungi fermentations and their further successful developments as microbial cell factories are dependent on control fungal morphology. In this connection, this work explored new experimental procedures in order to quantitatively check the potential of some culture conditions to induce a determined fungal morphology by altering both hyphal morphology and conidia adhesion capacity. The capacity of environmental conditions to modify hyphal morphology was evaluated by examining the influence of some culture conditions on the cell wall lytic potential of Aspergillus niger MYA 135. The relative value of the cell wall lytic potential was determined by measuring a cell wall lytic enzyme activity such as the mycelium-bound β-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase (Mb-NAGase). On the other hand, the quantitative value of conidia adhesion was considered as an index of its aggregation capacity. Concerning microscopic morphology, a highly negative correlation between the hyphal growth unit length (lHGU) and the specific Mb-NAGase activity was found (r = -0.915, P < 0.001). In fact, the environment was able to induce highly branched mycelia only under those culture conditions compatible with specific Mb-NAGase values equal to or higher than 190 U gdry.wt-1. Concerning macroscopic morphology, a low conidia adhesion capacity was followed by a dispersed mycelial growth. In fact, this study showed that conidia adhesion units per ml equal to or higher than 0.50 were necessary to afford pellets formation. In addition, it was also observed that once the pellet was formed the lHGU had an important influence on its final diameter. Finally, the biotechnological significance of such results was discussed as well. PMID:23688037

  20. Exploring the Different Trajectories of Analytical Thinking Ability Factors: An Application of the Second-Order Growth Curve Factor Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saengprom, Narumon; Erawan, Waraporn; Damrongpanit, Suntonrapot; Sakulku, Jaruwan

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this study were 1) Compare analytical thinking ability by testing the same sets of students 5 times 2) Develop and verify whether analytical thinking ability of students corresponds to second-order growth curve factors model. Samples were 1,093 eighth-grade students. The results revealed that 1) Analytical thinking ability scores…

  1. Growth rates of rhizosphere microorganisms depend on competitive abilities of plants for nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Littschwager, Johanna; Lauerer, Marianna; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2010-05-01

    Rhizosphere - one of the most important ‘hot spots' in soil - is characterized not only by accelerated turnover of microbial biomass and nutrients but also by strong intra- and inter-specific competition. Intra-specific competition occurs between individual plants of the same species, while inter-specific competition can occur both at population level (plant species-specific, microbial species-specific interactions) and at community level (plant - microbial interactions). Such plant - microbial interactions are mainly governed by competition for available N sources, since N is one of the main growth limiting nutrients in natural ecosystems. Functional structure and activity of microbial community in rhizosphere is not uniform and is dependent on quantity and quality of root exudates which are plant specific. It is still unclear how microbial growth and turnover in the rhizosphere are dependent on the features and competitive abilities of plants for N. Depending on C and N availability, acceleration and even retardation of microbial activity and carbon mineralization can be expected in the rhizosphere of plants with high competitive abilities for N. We hypothesized slower microbial growth rates in the rhizosphere of plants with smaller roots, as they usually produce less exudates compared to plants with small shoot-to-root ratio. As the first hypothesis is based solely on C availability, we also expected the greater effect of N availability on microbial growth in rhizosphere of plants with smaller root mass. These hypothesis were tested for two plant species of strawberry: Fragaria vesca L. (native species), and Duchesnea indica (Andrews) Focke (an invasive plant in central Europe) growing in intraspecific and interspecific competition. Microbial biomass and the kinetic parameters of microbial growth in the rhizosphere were estimated by dynamics of CO2 emission from the soil amended with glucose and nutrients. Specific growth rate (µ) of soil microorganisms was

  2. Preparation of fungal conidia impacts their susceptibility to inactivation by ethanol vapours.

    PubMed

    Dao, Thien; Dantigny, Philippe

    2009-11-15

    A common protocol employed for the preparation of conidia employs flooding a fungal colony grown on semi-solid media under optimum conditions with an aqueous solution. In contrast, conidia produced in a natural environment are usually not hydrated when disseminated in air and can be produced under water stress. In order to simulate the latter conditions, cultures were grown at different water activities and conidia were dry-harvested on the lid by turning the dishes upside-down then gently tapping the bottom of the box. This study aimed at assessing the effect of the preparation of fungal conidia on their inactivation by ethanol vapours. Firstly ethanol vapours (either 0.30 or 0.45 kPa) were applied to conidia obtained from the standardised protocol and to dry-harvested conidia for some species of Penicillium. While all dry-harvested conidia remained viable after 24 h of treatment, about 1.0, 3.5 and 2.5 log(10) reductions were observed for hydrated conidia of Penicillium chrysogenum, Penicillium digitatum and Penicillium italicum respectively. Secondly ethanol vapours (0.67 kPa) were applied to dry-harvested conidia obtained from cultures grown at 0.99 a(w) and at reduced water activities. For all species, the susceptibility to ethanol vapours of conidia obtained at 0.99 a(w) was significantly greater than that of conidia obtained at reduced water activities. Conidia produced in a natural environment under non-optimal conditions would be much more resistant to ethanol vapours than those produced in the laboratory. This phenomenon may be due to a reduced intracellular water activity of dry-harvested conidia. PMID:19762103

  3. The pbrB Gene Encodes a Laccase Required for DHN-Melanin Synthesis in Conidia of Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei

    PubMed Central

    Sapmak, Ariya; Boyce, Kylie J.; Andrianopoulos, Alex; Vanittanakom, Nongnuch

    2015-01-01

    Talaromyces marneffei (Basionym: Penicillium marneffei) is a significant opportunistic fungal pathogen in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus in Southeast Asia. T. marneffei cells have been shown to become melanized in vivo. Melanins are pigment biopolymers which act as a non-specific protectant against various stressors and which play an important role during virulence in fungi. The synthesis of the two most commonly found melanins in fungi, the eumelanin DOPA-melanin and the allomelanin DHN-melanin, requires the action of laccase enzymes. The T. marneffei genome encodes a number of laccases and this study describes the characterization of one of these, pbrB, during growth and development. A strain carrying a PbrB-GFP fusion shows that pbrB is expressed at high levels during asexual development (conidiation) but not in cells growing vegetatively. The pbrB gene is required for the synthesis of DHN-melanin in conidia and when deleted results in brown pigmented conidia, in contrast to the green conidia of the wild type. PMID:25866870

  4. Analysis of the abilities of endophytic bacteria associated with banana tree roots to promote plant growth.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Leandro Fernandes; de Souza, Gleika Larisse Oliveira Dorasio; Nietsche, Silvia; Xavier, Adelica Aparecida; Costa, Marcia Regina; Cardoso, Acleide Maria Santos; Pereira, Marlon Cristian Toledo; Pereira, Débora Francine Gomes Silva

    2014-01-01

    A total of 40 endophytic bacterial isolates obtained from banana tree roots were characterized for their biotechnological potential for promoting banana tree growth. All isolates had at least one positive feature. Twenty isolates were likely diazotrophs and formed pellicles in nitrogen-free culture medium, and 67% of these isolates belonged to the genus Bacillus sp. The isolates EB-04, EB-169, EB-64, and EB-144 had N fixation abilities as measured by the Kjeldahl method and by an acetylene reduction activity assay. Among the 40 isolates, 37.5% were capable of solubilizing inorganic phosphate and the isolates EB-47 and EB-64 showed the highest solubilization capacity. The isolate EB-53 (Lysinibacillus sp.) had a high solubilization index, whereas 73% of the isolates had low solubilization indices. The synthesis of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in the presence of L-tryptophan was detected in 40% of the isolates. The isolate EB-40 (Bacillus sp.) produced the highest amount of IAA (47.88 μg/ml) in medium supplemented with L-tryptophan and was able to synthesize IAA in the absence of L-tryptophan. The isolates EB-126 (Bacillus subtilis) and EB-47 (Bacillus sp.) were able to simultaneously fix nitrogen, solubilize phosphate and produce IAA in vitro. The results of this study demonstrated that the isolates analyzed here had diverse abilities and all have the potential to be used as growth-promoting microbial inoculants for banana trees. PMID:24390835

  5. Production of conidia of Beauveria bassiana in solid-state culture: current status and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Perez, M; Rodriguez-Gomez, D; Loera, O

    2015-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana is an important entomopathogenic fungus widely commercialized in the world. Recent progress and achievements on conidia production have focused on a yield goal of 10(9) to 10(10) conidia per gram of dry substrate. Due to cost-competitive perspectives, these yields should be associated with better production rates or productivities. This study presents a review of relevant studies of B. bassiana conidia production on solid-state cultures and the parameters that should be taken into account to maintain constant quality in the product to be commercialized. Conditions for maximizing production and infectivity of B. bassiana conidia are also analysed. PMID:24494702

  6. Inherent Variability of Growth Media Impacts the Ability of Salmonella Typhimurium to Interact with Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sridhar, Sushmita; Steele-Mortimer, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    Efficient invasion of non-phagocytic cells, such as intestinal epithelial cells, by Salmonella Typhimurium is dependent on the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 (SPI-1)-encoded Type Three Secretion System. The environmental cues involved in SPI-1 induction are not well understood. In vitro, various conditions are used to induce SPI-1 and the invasive phenotype. Although lysogeny broth (LB) is widely used, multiple formulations exist, and variation can arise due to intrinsic differences in complex components. Minimal media are also susceptible to variation. Still, the impact of these inconsistencies on Salmonella virulence gene expression has not been well studied. The goal of this project is to identify growth conditions in LB and minimal medium that affect SPI-1 induction in vitro using both whole population and single cell analysis. Here we show, using a fluorescent reporter of the SPI-1 gene prgH, that growth of Salmonella in LB yields variable induction. Deliberate modification of media components can influence the invasive profile. Finally, we demonstrate that changes in SPI-1 inducing conditions can affect the ability of Salmonella to replicate intracellularly. These data indicate that the specific media growth conditions impact how the bacteria interact with host cells. PMID:27280414

  7. The influence of micropropagation on growth and coppicing ability of Eucalyptus polybractea.

    PubMed

    Goodger, Jason Q D; Woodrow, Ian E

    2010-02-01

    A micropropagation protocol was recently developed for Eucalyptus polybractea R.T. Baker, a commercially important eucalypt grown in short-rotation coppice cultivation and harvested for its foliar 1,8-cineole oil. Micropropagation of elite E. polybractea trees has resulted in selection gains for foliar oil traits, but decreased above-ground biomass accumulation has been observed in clones compared to related half-sibling families. This study aims to use a greenhouse study to investigate if micropropagation induces somaclonal variation that can account for the reduction in above-ground biomass in E. polybractea clones. Secondly, the study aims to compare the coppicing ability of micropropagated clones with related half-sibling seedlings using de-topped plantation-grown saplings. The results of the greenhouse study suggest that micropropagation of E. polybractea induces somaclonal variation that manifests in more mature leaf morphologies such as increased foliar oil concentrations and lower specific leaf area (SLA), attributable to an isobilateral arrangement of increased palisade mesophyll layers. Lower SLA, rather than differences in root allocation, is likely to be a key contributor to the lower relative growth rates observed in early sapling growth of micropropagated clones. In the field study, all micropropagated and seedling-derived E. polybractea saplings coppiced vigorously in the 12 months after de-topping. The coppice growth was so vigorous in the 12 months after de-topping that total above-ground biomass equalled that of the 27-month-old saplings, irrespective of propagation source. The morphological distinction between leaves of micropropagated and seed-derived plants was no longer evident in the coppice regrowth. The results presented here suggest that the micropropagated leaf morphology and the resultant growth reduction is transient and micropropagated plants coppice just as vigorously as seed-derived plants. Therefore, micropropagation is unlikely to

  8. Functional abilities of cultivable plant growth promoting bacteria associated with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Fernanda da S; Costa, Pedro B da; Souza, Rocheli de; Beneduzi, Anelise; Lisboa, Bruno B; Vargas, Luciano K; Passaglia, Luciane M P

    2016-03-01

    In the pursuit of sustainable agriculture, bioinoculants usage as providers of a crop's needs is a method to limit environmental damage. In this study, a collection of cultivable putative plant growth promoting (PGP) bacteria associated with wheat crops was obtained and this bacterial sample was characterized in relation to the functional diversity of certain PGP features. The isolates were obtained through classical cultivation methods, identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing and characterized for PGP traits of interest. Functional diversity characterization was performed using Categorical Principal Component Analysis (CatPCA) and Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA). The most abundant genera found among the 346 isolates were Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Enterobacter. Occurrence of PGP traits was affected by genus, niche, and sampling site. A large number of genera grouped together with the ability to produce indolic compounds; phosphate solubilization and siderophores production formed a second group related to fewer genera, in which the genus Burkholderia has a great importance. The results obtained may help future studies aiming prospection of putative plant growth promoting bacteria regarding the desired organism and PGP trait. PMID:27007904

  9. Functional abilities of cultivable plant growth promoting bacteria associated with wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) crops

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, Fernanda da S.; da Costa, Pedro B.; de Souza, Rocheli; Beneduzi, Anelise; Lisboa, Bruno B.; Vargas, Luciano K.; Passaglia, Luciane M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In the pursuit of sustainable agriculture, bioinoculants usage as providers of a crop's needs is a method to limit environmental damage. In this study, a collection of cultivable putative plant growth promoting (PGP) bacteria associated with wheat crops was obtained and this bacterial sample was characterized in relation to the functional diversity of certain PGP features. The isolates were obtained through classical cultivation methods, identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing and characterized for PGP traits of interest. Functional diversity characterization was performed using Categorical Principal Component Analysis (CatPCA) and Multiple Correspondence Analysis (MCA). The most abundant genera found among the 346 isolates were Pseudomonas, Burkholderia, and Enterobacter. Occurrence of PGP traits was affected by genus, niche, and sampling site. A large number of genera grouped together with the ability to produce indolic compounds; phosphate solubilization and siderophores production formed a second group related to fewer genera, in which the genus Burkholderia has a great importance. The results obtained may help future studies aiming prospection of putative plant growth promoting bacteria regarding the desired organism and PGP trait. PMID:27007904

  10. High Prevalence, Genetic Diversity and Intracellular Growth Ability of Legionella in Hot Spring Environments

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haijian; Wang, Huanxin; Xu, Ying; Zhao, Mingqiang; Guan, Hong; Li, Machao; Shao, Zhujun

    2013-01-01

    Background Legionella is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, and hot springs are a major source of outbreaks of this disease. It is important from a public health perspective to survey hot spring environments for the presence of Legionella. Methods Prospective surveillance of the extent of Legionella pollution was conducted at three hot spring recreational areas in Beijing, China in 2011. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and sequence-based typing (SBT) were used to describe the genetic polymorphism of isolates. The intracellular growth ability of the isolates was determined by interacting with J774 cells and plating the dilutions onto BCYE agar plates. Results Overall, 51.9% of spring water samples showed Legionella-positive, and their concentrations ranged from 1 CFU/liter to 2,218 CFU/liter. The positive rates of Legionella were significantly associated with a free chlorine concentration of ≥0.2 mg/L, urea concentration of ≥0.05 mg/L, total microbial counts of ≥400 CFU/ml and total coliform of ≥3 MPN/L (p<0.01). The Legionella concentrations were significantly associated with sample temperature, pH, total microbial counts and total coliform (p<0.01). Legionella pneumophila was the most frequently isolated species (98.9%), and the isolated serogroups included serogroups 3 (25.3%), 6 (23.4%), 5 (19.2%), 1 (18.5%), 2 (10.2%), 8 (0.4%), 10 (0.8%), 9 (1.9%) and 12 (0.4%). Two hundred and twenty-eight isolates were analyzed by PFGE and 62 different patterns were obtained. Fifty-seven L. pneumophila isolates were selected for SBT analysis and divided into 35 different sequence types with 5 main clonal groups. All the 57 isolates had high intracellular growth ability. Conclusions Our results demonstrated high prevalence and genetic polymorphism of Legionella in springs in Beijing, China, and the SBT and intracellular growth assay results suggested that the Legionella isolates of hot spring environments were pathogenic. Improved control and

  11. Expression and identification of a laminin-binding protein in Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    PubMed Central

    Tronchin, G; Esnault, K; Renier, G; Filmon, R; Chabasse, D; Bouchara, J P

    1997-01-01

    Adhesion of Aspergillus fumigatus, the causative agent of human aspergillosis, to the extracellular matrix protein laminin has been previously demonstrated. This study investigated the expression of laminin receptors during swelling of conidia, a step leading to germination and subsequent colonization of tissues. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the laminin binding sites were distributed over the external rodlet layer of resting conidia. During swelling, the characteristic rodlet layer progressively disintegrated and conidia surrounded by a smooth cell wall layer appeared. Flow cytometry using fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated laminin demonstrated that expression of laminin receptors at the surface of conidia was swelling dependent. Resting conidia expressed high levels of laminin receptors on their surface. A gradual decrease of laminin binding was then observed as swelling occurred, reaching a minimum for 4-h-swollen conidia. This correlated with a loss of adherence of swollen conidia to laminin immobilized on microtiter plates. Trypsin pretreatment of conidia reduced laminin binding. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and ligand blotting with laminin identified in a cell wall extract a major 72-kDa cell wall glycoprotein which binds laminin. Thus, one of the initial events in the host colonization may be the recognition of basement membrane laminin by this 72-kDa cell wall surface component. PMID:8975886

  12. Microencapsuling aerial conidia of Trichoderma harzianum through spray drying at elevated temperatures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Trichoderma conidia are mostly produced by solid fermentation systems. Inoculum is produced by liquid culturing, and then transferred to solid substrate for aerial conidial production. Aerial conidia of T. harzianum are hydrophilic in nature, and it is difficult to separate them from the solid subst...

  13. Phagocytosis of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia by primary nasal epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Botterel, Françoise; Gross, Karine; Ibrahim-Granet, Oumaïma; Khoufache, Khaled; Escabasse, Virginie; Coste, André; Cordonnier, Catherine; Escudier, Estelle; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2008-01-01

    Background Invasive aspergillosis, which is mainly caused by the fungus Aspergillus fumigatus, is an increasing problem in immunocompromised patients. Infection occurs by inhalation of airborne conidia, which are first encountered by airway epithelial cells. Internalization of these conidia into the epithelial cells could serve as a portal of entry for this pathogenic fungus. Results We used an in vitro model of primary cultures of human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) at an air-liquid interface. A. fumigatus conidia were compared to Penicillium chrysogenum conidia, a mould that is rarely responsible for invasive disease. Confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and anti-LAMP1 antibody labeling studies showed that conidia of both species were phagocytosed and trafficked into a late endosomal-lysosomal compartment as early as 4 h post-infection. In double immunolabeling experiments, the mean percentage of A. fumigatus conidia undergoing phagocytosis 4 h post-infection was 21.8 ± 4.5%. Using combined staining with a fluorescence brightener and propidium iodide, the mean rate of phagocytosis was 18.7 ± 9.3% and the killing rate 16.7 ± 7.5% for A. fumigatus after 8 h. The phagocytosis rate did not differ between the two fungal species for a given primary culture. No germination of the conidia was observed until 20 h of observation. Conclusion HNEC can phagocytose fungal conidia but killing of phagocytosed conidia is low, although the spores do not germinate. This phagocytosis does not seem to be specific to A. fumigatus. Other immune cells or mechanisms are required to kill A. fumigatus conidia and to avoid further invasion. PMID:18564423

  14. Dark Period Following UV-C Treatment Enhances Killing of Botrytis cinerea Conidia and Controls Gray Mold of Strawberries.

    PubMed

    Janisiewicz, Wojciech J; Takeda, Fumiomi; Glenn, D Michael; Camp, Mary J; Jurick, Wayne M

    2016-04-01

    Strawberries are available throughout the year either from production in the field or from high and low tunnel culture. Diversity of production conditions results in new challenges in controlling diseases before and after harvest. Fungicides have traditionally been used to control these diseases; however, their limitations necessitate a search for new approaches. We found that UV-C irradiation of Botrytis cinerea, a major pathogen of strawberry, can effectively kill this fungus if a dark period follows the treatment. The inclusion of a 4-h dark period resulted in almost complete kill of B. cinerea conidia on agar media at a dose of 12.36 J/m2. The UV-C dose did not cause a reduction in photosynthesis in strawberry leaves or discoloration of sepals, even after exposing plants repeatedly (twice a week) for 7 weeks. Although irradiation of dry conidia of B. cinerea with this dose resulted in some survival, the conidia were not infective and not able to cause decay even when inoculated onto a highly susceptible mature apple fruit. Irradiation of strawberry pollen at 12.36 J/m2 did not affect pollen germination, tube growth and length in vitro, or germination and tube growth in the style of hand-pollinated emasculated strawberry flowers. No negative effect of the UV-C treatment was observed on fruit yield and quality in high tunnel culture. In the fruit and flower petal inoculation tests, the UV-C treatment was highly effective in reducing fruit decay and petal infection. This UV-C treatment with an exposure time of 60 s may be useful in controlling gray mold in tunnel production of strawberries and may also have the potential for use in intensive field and indoor production of other fruits and vegetables providing that a 4-h dark period follows the irradiation. PMID:26714103

  15. Unique ability of the Proteus mirabilis capsule to enhance mineral growth in infectious urinary calculi.

    PubMed

    Dumanski, A J; Hedelin, H; Edin-Liljegren, A; Beauchemin, D; McLean, R J

    1994-07-01

    Struvite (MgNH4PO4.6H2O) calculi are a common complication of Proteus mirabilis urinary tract infections. Although urease is a major virulence factor in calculus formation, the polysaccharide capsule (CPS) of this organism also enhances struvite crystallization and growth in vitro (L. Clapham, R. J. C. McLean, J. C. Nickel, J. Downey, and J. W. Costerton, J. Crystal Growth 104:475-484, 1990). We obtained purified CPS, of known structure and varying anionic character, from P. mirabilis ATCC 49565 and several other organisms. Artificial urine was added to CPS, and the pH was elevated from 5.8 to 8.5 by the addition of urease or titration with 0.25 M NH4OH to induce struvite crystallization. Crystallization was measured by particle counting (Coulter counter), and the morphology (crystal habit) was examined by phase-contrast microscopy. In the presence of partially anionic P. mirabilis CPS, struvite formation occurred at a lower pH than in the absence of CPS or in the presence of other neutral, partially anionic, or anionic CPS. At pH 7.5 to 8.0, significantly more struvite crystals formed in the presence of P. mirabilis CPS than under other experimental conditions. With the exception of one polymer (curdlan) which did not bind Mg2+, enhancement of struvite formation by CPS polymers was inversely proportional to their Mg2+ binding ability. We speculate that the structure and partial anionic nature of P. mirabilis CPS enable it to enhance struvite formation by weakly concentrating Mg2+ ions during struvite crystal formation. This illustrates a new virulence aspect of bacterial CPS during infection. PMID:8005688

  16. Verruculogen associated with Aspergillus fumigatus hyphae and conidia modifies the electrophysiological properties of human nasal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Khoufache, Khaled; Puel, Olivier; Loiseau, Nicolas; Delaforge, Marcel; Rivollet, Danièle; Coste, André; Cordonnier, Catherine; Escudier, Estelle; Botterel, Françoise; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2007-01-01

    Background The role of Aspergillus fumigatus mycotoxins in the colonization of the respiratory tract by conidia has not been studied extensively, even though patients at risk from invasive aspergillosis frequently exhibit respiratory epithelium damage. In a previous study, we found that filtrates of A. fumigatus cultures can specifically alter the electrophysiological properties of human nasal epithelial cells (HNEC) compared to those of non pathogenic moulds. Results We fractionated the organic phase of filtrate from 3-day old A. fumigatus cultures using high-performance liquid chromatography. The different fractions were tested for their ability to modify the electrophysiological properties of HNEC in an in vitro primary culture model. The fraction collected between 20 and 30 min mimicked the effects of the whole filtrate, i.e. decrease of transepithelial resistance and increase of potential differences, and contained secondary metabolites such as helvolic acid, fumagillin, and verruculogen. Only verruculogen (10-8 M) had effects similar to the whole filtrate. We verified that verruculogen was produced by a collection of 67 human, animal, plant and environmental A. fumigatus isolates. Using MS-MS analysis, we found that verruculogen was associated with both mycelium and conidia extracts. Conclusion Verruculogen is a secondary metabolite that modifies the electrophysiological properties of HNEC. The role of these modifications in the colonization and invasion of the respiratory epithelium by A. fumigatus on first contact with the epithelium remains to be determined. PMID:17244350

  17. A staining method for assessing the viability of Esteya vermicola conidia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunbo; Thang, NguyenTrong; Li, Zheng; Zhang, Yongan; Li, Jingjie; Xue, Jianjie; Gu, Lijuan; Hong, VuThuy; Mira, Lee; Sung, Changkeun

    2014-07-01

    The viability of conidia of Esteya vermicola, a potentially important biocontrol agent against the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, is usually determined by cultivation for 18-48 h in culture medium. As an alternative to this labor-intensive method, we have developed a rapid, simple, and low-cost staining method for assessing E vermicola conidia survival rates. A mixture of neutral red and methylene blue was found to be the most optimal among several stains that also included safranin O and Janus green B. This mixture stained nonviable conidia blue, in contrast to viable conidia, which were stained red in the cytoplasm and blue in the cell wall. This method may be particularly useful for traditional research laboratories, as it provides rapid results using common, relatively inexpensive laboratory equipment. PMID:24585076

  18. Germination of fungal conidia after exposure to low concentration ozone atmospheres.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The germinability of conidia of Alternaria alternata, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Penicillium digitatum, Penicillium expansum, or Penicillium italicum was determined periodically during exposure for approximately 100 days to a humid atmosphere of air alone or air containing 150 ppb ozone ...

  19. Inactivation of conidia of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus by near-ultraviolet (UVB and UVA) and visible radiation.

    PubMed

    Fargues, J; Rougier, M; Goujet, R; Smits, N; Coustere, C; Itier, B

    1997-01-01

    The detrimental effects of solar radiation, especially the ultraviolet waveband, on quiescent conidia of Paecilomyces fumosoroseus were investigated. Conidia were irradiated by a high-intensity source, which emitted a continuous spectrum from 270 to 1100 nm and which was equipped with long-pass filters to block short wavelengths below 280, 295, 320, or 400 nm. After irradiation, conidia were tested for germinability, survival, and infectivity toward Spodoptera frugiperda larvae. It was demonstrated that the detrimental effects of light depended on irradiance in the shortest wavelengths. The UVB (280-320 and 295-320 nm) appeared to be the most detrimental part of natural radiation, although UVA (320-400 nm) was also harmful. Visible and near infrared radiations were less harmful than UV. Our results demonstrate that the irradiance of the UVB waveband should be considered as the pertinent factor for the detrimental effects of sunlight on the persistence of conidia of entomopathogenic fungi in insolated environments. PMID:9028931

  20. THE POWER OF THE SMALL: THE EXAMPLE OF Paracoccidioides brasiliensis CONIDIA

    PubMed Central

    RESTREPO, Angela; CANO, Luz Elena; GONZALEZ, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Research on Paracoccidioides brasiliensis has centered in the yeast cell probably because of the lack of distinctive features in the mycelium. In 1942 and for the first time, lateral conidia were noticed in the fungus' hyphae. Later on, Brazilian, Venezuelan and Argentinean researchers described "aleurias" when the fungus was grown in natural substrates. In 1970 authors became interested in the conidia and were able to obtain them in large numbers and treat them as individual units. Their shape and size were defined and the presence of all the elements of a competent eukaryotic cell were demonstrated. Conidia exhibited thermal dimorphism and, additionally, when given intranasally to BALB/c male mice, they converted into yeasts in the lungs and produce progressive pulmonary lesions with further dissemination to other organs. Studies on the phagocyte-conidia interaction were revealing and showed that these versatile structures allow a better understanding of the host- P. brasiliensis interactions. PMID:26465363

  1. Identification of a hard surface contact-induced gene in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides conidia as a sterol glycosyl transferase, a novel fungal virulence factor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon-Ki; Wang, Yuhuan; Liu, Zhi-Mei; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E

    2002-04-01

    Hard surface contact has been known to be necessary to induce infection structure (appressorium) formation in many phytopathogenic fungi. However, the molecular basis of this requirement is unknown. We have used a differential display approach to clone some of the genes induced in the conidia by hard surface contact. We report that one of the genes induced by hard-surface contact of the conidia of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, chip6, encodes a protein with homology to sterol glycosyl transferases. chip6 expressed in E. coli catalyses glucosyl transfer from UDP-glucose to cholesterol. Disruption of chip6 causes a marked decrease in the transferase activity and a drastic reduction in virulence on its natural host, avocado fruits, although the mutant is capable of normal growth and appressorium formation. The requirement for sterol glycosyl transferase for pathogenicity suggests a novel biological function for this transferase. PMID:12000454

  2. A halocin-H4 mutant Haloferax mediterranei strain retains the ability to inhibit growth of other halophilic archaea.

    PubMed

    Naor, Adit; Yair, Yael; Gophna, Uri

    2013-11-01

    Many members of the Halobacteriaceae were found to produce halocins, molecules that inhibit the growth of other halophilic archaea. Halocin H4 that is produced by Haloferax mediterranei and inhibits the growth of Halobacterium salinarum is one of the best studied halocins to date. The gene encoding this halocin had been previously identified as halH4, located on one of Hfx. mediterranei megaplasmids. We generated a mutant of the halH4 gene and examined the killing ability of the Haloferax mediterranei halH4 mutant with respect to both Halobacterium salinarum and Haloferax volcanii. We showed that both wild-type Hfx. mediterranei and the halH4 mutant strain efficiently inhibited the growth of both species, indicating halocin redundancy. Surprisingly, the halH4 deletion mutant exhibited faster growth in standard medium than the wild type, and is likely to have a better response to several nucleotides, which could explain this phenotype. PMID:24037372

  3. Influence of Additives on the Yield and Pathogenicity of Conidia Produced by Solid State Cultivation of an Isaria javanica Isolate

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ling; Han, Ji Hee; Lee, Sang Yeob

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the Q biotype of tobacco whitefly has been recognized as the most hazardous strain of Bemisia tabaci worldwide, because of its increased resistance to some insecticide groups. As an alternative control agent, we selected an Isaria javanica isolate as a candidate for the development of a mycopesticide against the Q biotype of sweet potato whitefly. To select optimal mass production media for solid-state fermentation, we compared the production yield and virulence of conidia between 2 substrates (barley and brown rice), and we also compared the effects of various additives on conidia production and virulence. Barley was a better substrate for conidia production, producing 3.43 × 1010 conidia/g, compared with 3.05 × 1010 conidia/g for brown rice. The addition of 2% CaCO3 + 2% CaSO4 to barley significantly increased conidia production. Addition of yeast extract, casein, or gluten also improved conidia production on barley. Gluten addition (3% and 1.32%) to brown rice improved conidia production by 14 and 6 times, respectively, relative to brown rice without additives. Conidia cultivated on barley produced a mortality rate of 62% in the sweet potato whitefly after 4-day treatment, compared with 53% for conidia cultivated on brown rice. The amendment of solid substrate cultivation with additives changed the virulence of the conidia produced; the median lethal time (LT50) was shorter for conidia produced on barley and brown rice with added yeast extract (1.32% and 3%, respectively), KNO3 (0.6% and 1%), or gluten (1.32% and 3%) compared with conidia produced on substrates without additives. PMID:25606006

  4. Influence of Additives on the Yield and Pathogenicity of Conidia Produced by Solid State Cultivation of an Isaria javanica Isolate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Jun; Xie, Ling; Han, Ji Hee; Lee, Sang Yeob

    2014-12-01

    Recently, the Q biotype of tobacco whitefly has been recognized as the most hazardous strain of Bemisia tabaci worldwide, because of its increased resistance to some insecticide groups. As an alternative control agent, we selected an Isaria javanica isolate as a candidate for the development of a mycopesticide against the Q biotype of sweet potato whitefly. To select optimal mass production media for solid-state fermentation, we compared the production yield and virulence of conidia between 2 substrates (barley and brown rice), and we also compared the effects of various additives on conidia production and virulence. Barley was a better substrate for conidia production, producing 3.43 × 10(10) conidia/g, compared with 3.05 × 10(10) conidia/g for brown rice. The addition of 2% CaCO3 + 2% CaSO4 to barley significantly increased conidia production. Addition of yeast extract, casein, or gluten also improved conidia production on barley. Gluten addition (3% and 1.32%) to brown rice improved conidia production by 14 and 6 times, respectively, relative to brown rice without additives. Conidia cultivated on barley produced a mortality rate of 62% in the sweet potato whitefly after 4-day treatment, compared with 53% for conidia cultivated on brown rice. The amendment of solid substrate cultivation with additives changed the virulence of the conidia produced; the median lethal time (LT50) was shorter for conidia produced on barley and brown rice with added yeast extract (1.32% and 3%, respectively), KNO3 (0.6% and 1%), or gluten (1.32% and 3%) compared with conidia produced on substrates without additives. PMID:25606006

  5. Effects of temperature and solar radiation interactions on the survival of quiescent conidia of the entomopathogenic hyphomycetePaecilomyces fumosoroseus (Wize) Brown and Smith.

    PubMed

    Smits, N; Fargues, J; Rougier, M; Goujet, R; Itier, B

    1996-09-01

    The detrimental effect of solar radiation on the survival of conidia of the entomopathogenic fungusPaecilomyces fumoroseus was studied by monitoring germinability and ability to form colonies (CFU) of conidia irradiated at two temperatures, 25 and 35 °C, harmless to shaded conidia. There was no apparent effect when spores were exposed to a high level of artificial radiation (0.66 W m(-2) UVB). However, at a lower level of irradiance (0.33 W m(-2)), effects of radiation occurred more quickly at 35 °C than at 25 °C. Under natural solar radiation, the rate of decrease in germinability or viability was doubled at 35 °C as compared to 25 °C, indicating an interaction between temperature and radiation effects under natural conditions. This interaction was not detected in indoor experiments, indicating that the spectral distribution of UV radiation has to be taken in account as well as its irradiance when studying its effects. PMID:20882452

  6. Influence of antibiotics on growth dynamics and movement ability of Salmonella rods.

    PubMed

    Rzedzicki, J; Boś, M; Kolasa, A

    2004-01-01

    Variety of traits important in diagnostics and epidemiology of pathogenic microorganisms may change due to antibiotics. Movement ability, that is characteristic for every serovar except from Salmonella Gallinarum-Pullorum, is important to salmonellas. In own experiments using semi-fluid MSRV medium, it was found that a decrease in salmonella sensibility to selected antibiotics and chemiotherapeutics due to passage might lead to weakening of its movement ability. Movement ability of all strains (S. Enteritidis, S. Dublin, S. Typhimurium) after passage with amoxycillin, neomycin, colistin and enrofloxacin became weakened as compared to results achieved before passage. The strongest inhibition of movement ability was most often observed in strains after passage on medium with colistin. It seems to be associated with the action mechanism of the antibiotic. Colistin injuries cellular membranes, where flagella (active motoric organ of Salmonella) are anchored. Appearance of drug-resistance as a result of passage at the presence of antibiotics may cause variability of biochemical properties of Salmonella rods and leads to weakening of movement ability of ciliated Salmonella. PMID:15633786

  7. Effect of Commercial Cyanobacteria Products on the Growth and Antagonistic Ability of Some Bioagents under Laboratory Conditions

    PubMed Central

    El-Mougy, Nehal S.; Abdel-Kader, Mokhtar M.

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of the efficacy of blue-green algal compounds against the growth of either pathogenic or antagonistic microorganisms as well as their effect on the antagonistic ability of bioagents was studied under in vitro conditions. The present study was undertaken to explore the inhibitory effect of commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, against some soil-borne pathogens. In growth medium supplemented with these algal compounds, the linear growth of pathogenic fungi decreased by increasing tested concentrations of the two algal compounds. Complete reduction in pathogenic fungal growth was observed at 2% of both Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. Gradual significant reduction in the pathogenic fungal growth was caused by the two bioagents and by increasing the concentrations of algal compounds Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix. The present work showed that commercial algal compounds, Weed-Max and Oligo-Mix, have potential for the suppression of soil-borne fungi and enhance the antagonistic ability of fungal, bacterial, and yeast bio-agents. PMID:24307948

  8. A comparative study on flocculating ability and growth potential of two microalgae in simulated secondary effluent.

    PubMed

    Lv, Junping; Guo, Junyan; Feng, Jia; Liu, Qi; Xie, Shulian

    2016-04-01

    The flocculating ability was an important property to microalgal harvesting, especially in secondary effluent. In this study, the flocculating ability of two microalgae, Chlorococcum sp. GD and Parachlorella kessleri TY, was evaluated after 10d of cultivation in secondary effluent. After 180min of settling, the flocculating ability of Chlorococcum sp. GD and P. kessleri TY was 84.43% and 16.23%, respectively. It was suggested that Chlorococcum sp. GD was an excellent self-flocculating microalgae. The mechanism on self-flocculating of Chlorococcum sp. GD was probably related to hydrophobic extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). Besides, compared to P. kessleri TY, the nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiency of Chlorococcum sp. GD was high, which was up to 66.51% and 74.19%, respectively. Chlorococcum sp. GD also had high lipid content and biomass concentration. Therefore, Chlorococcum sp. GD could be regarded as a promising candidate for microalgal cultivation and harvesting in secondary effluent. PMID:26820924

  9. Ability of Cecal Cultures to Inhibit Growth of Salmonella Typhimurium during Aerobic Incubation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction: Poultry can serve as reservoirs for Salmonella; however, chicks provided cultures of cecal bacteria develop resistance to colonization by Salmonella. Research has indicated that cecal bacteria metabolize organic acids to produce substances that inhibit Salmonella growth. Purpose: The...

  10. Ability-Growth Interactions in the Acquisition of a Complex Skill: A Spline-Modeling Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuelke, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    While investigating how the relationship of abilities and skill acquisition changes over the course of training, researchers have unknowingly obscured the very relationship they sought to examine by relying on analyses that focused on attainment and did not model acquisition. Although more recent approaches have modeled acquisition independently…

  11. Production of Aerial Conidia of Lecanicillium lecanii 41185 by Solid-State Fermentation for Use as a Mycoinsecticide

    PubMed Central

    Vu, Van Hanh; Hong, Suk Il

    2008-01-01

    The production of aerial conidia of Lecanicillium lecanii 41185, a highly virulent fungus, by solid-state fermentation was studied for use as a biocontrol agent against aphids. Among several agro-industrial solid media, steamed polished rice was found to produce the highest amount of aerial conidia. The optimal conditions for aerial conidia production were determined to be a 28.5% moisture content in the rice, 25℃ culture temperature, rice pH of 6.0, 75% ambient relative humidity, 4-dold seeding culture, 0.6% KNO3, and 12 d of culture time. The conidia yield increased from 5.7 × 109 conidia/g polished rice to 18.2 × 109 conidia/g polished rice following application of these optimized conditions. PMID:23997622

  12. Patterns of Growth in Adaptive Social Abilities among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Deborah K.; Oti, Rosalind S.; Lord, Catherine; Welch, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive social skills were assessed longitudinally at approximately ages 2, 3, 5, 9, and 13 years in a sample of 192 children with a clinical diagnosis of autism (n = 93), PDD-NOS (n = 51), or nonspectrum developmental disabilities (n = 46) at age 2. Growth curve analyses with SAS proc mixed were used to analyze social trajectories over time.…

  13. Metabolic activity in dormant conidia of Aspergillus niger and developmental changes during conidial outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Novodvorska, Michaela; Stratford, Malcolm; Blythe, Martin J; Wilson, Raymond; Beniston, Richard G; Archer, David B

    2016-09-01

    The early stages of development of Aspergillus niger conidia during outgrowth were explored by combining genome-wide gene expression analysis (RNAseq), proteomics, Warburg manometry and uptake studies. Resting conidia suspended in water were demonstrated for the first time to be metabolically active as low levels of oxygen uptake and the generation of carbon dioxide were detected, suggesting that low-level respiratory metabolism occurs in conidia for maintenance. Upon triggering of spore germination, generation of CO2 increased dramatically. For a short period, which coincided with mobilisation of the intracellular polyol, trehalose, there was no increase in uptake of O2 indicating that trehalose was metabolised by fermentation. Data from genome-wide mRNA profiling showed the presence of transcripts associated with fermentative and respiratory metabolism in resting conidia. Following triggering of conidial outgrowth, there was a clear switch to respiration after 25min, confirmed by cyanide inhibition. No effect of SHAM, salicylhydroxamic acid, on respiration suggests electron flow via cytochrome c oxidase. Glucose entry into spores was not detectable before 1h after triggering germination. The impact of sorbic acid on germination was examined and we showed that it inhibits glucose uptake. O2 uptake was also inhibited, delaying the onset of respiration and extending the period of fermentation. In conclusion, we show that conidia suspended in water are not completely dormant and that conidial outgrowth involves fermentative metabolism that precedes respiration. PMID:27378203

  14. Diversity, Biocontrol, and Plant Growth Promoting Abilities of Xylem Residing Bacteria from Solanaceous Crops

    PubMed Central

    Achari, Gauri A.

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is one of the solanaceous crops of economic and cultural importance and is widely cultivated in the state of Goa, India. Eggplant cultivation is severely affected by bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum that colonizes the xylem tissue. In this study, 167 bacteria were isolated from the xylem of healthy eggplant, chilli, and Solanum torvum Sw. by vacuum infiltration and maceration. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) grouped these xylem residing bacteria (XRB) into 38 haplotypes. Twenty-eight strains inhibited growth of R. solanacearum and produced volatile and diffusible antagonistic compounds and plant growth promoting substances in vitro. Antagonistic strains XB86, XB169, XB177, and XB200 recorded a biocontrol efficacy greater than 85% against BW and exhibited 12%–22 % increase in shoot length in eggplant in the greenhouse screening. 16S rRNA based identification revealed the presence of 23 different bacterial genera. XRB with high biocontrol and plant growth promoting activities were identified as strains of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Enterobacter sp., and Agrobacterium sp. This study is the first report on identity of bacteria from the xylem of solanaceous crops having traits useful in cultivation of eggplant. PMID:24963298

  15. Diversity, biocontrol, and plant growth promoting abilities of xylem residing bacteria from solanaceous crops.

    PubMed

    Achari, Gauri A; Ramesh, Raman

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is one of the solanaceous crops of economic and cultural importance and is widely cultivated in the state of Goa, India. Eggplant cultivation is severely affected by bacterial wilt caused by Ralstonia solanacearum that colonizes the xylem tissue. In this study, 167 bacteria were isolated from the xylem of healthy eggplant, chilli, and Solanum torvum Sw. by vacuum infiltration and maceration. Amplified rDNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) grouped these xylem residing bacteria (XRB) into 38 haplotypes. Twenty-eight strains inhibited growth of R. solanacearum and produced volatile and diffusible antagonistic compounds and plant growth promoting substances in vitro. Antagonistic strains XB86, XB169, XB177, and XB200 recorded a biocontrol efficacy greater than 85% against BW and exhibited 12%-22 % increase in shoot length in eggplant in the greenhouse screening. 16S rRNA based identification revealed the presence of 23 different bacterial genera. XRB with high biocontrol and plant growth promoting activities were identified as strains of Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp., Streptomyces sp., Enterobacter sp., and Agrobacterium sp. This study is the first report on identity of bacteria from the xylem of solanaceous crops having traits useful in cultivation of eggplant. PMID:24963298

  16. Copulation Activity, Sperm Production and Conidia Transfer in Aedes aegypti Males Contaminated by Metarhizium anisopliae: A Biological Control Prospect

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Tanya L.; Braks, Marieta A. H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Dengue is the most prevalent arboviral disease transmitted by Aedes aegypti worldwide, whose chemical control is difficult, expensive, and of inconsistent efficacy. Releases of Metarhizium anisopliae—exposed Ae. aegypti males to disseminate conidia among female mosquitoes by mating represents a promising biological control approach against this important vector. A better understanding of fungus virulence and impact on reproductive parameters of Ae. aegypti, is need before testing auto-dissemination strategies. Methodology/Principal Findings Mortality, mating competitiveness, sperm production, and the capacity to auto-disseminate the fungus to females up to the 5thcopulation, were compared between Aedes aegypti males exposed to 5.96 x 107 conidia per cm2 of M. anisopliae and uninfected males. Half (50%) of fungus-exposed males (FEMs) died within the first 4 days post-exposure (PE). FEMs required 34% more time to successively copulate with 5 females (165 ± 3 minutes) than uninfected males (109 ± 3 minutes). Additionally, fungus infection reduced the sperm production by 87% at 5 days PE. Some beneficial impacts were observed, FEMs were able to successfully compete with uninfected males in cages, inseminating an equivalent number of females (about 25%). Under semi-field conditions, the ability of FEMs to search for and inseminate females was also equivalent to uninfected males (both inseminating about 40% females); but for the remaining females that were not inseminated, evidence of tarsal contact (transfer of fluorescent dust) was significantly greater in FEMs compared to controls. The estimated conidia load of a female exposed on the 5th copulation was 5,200 mL-1 which was sufficient to cause mortality. Conclusion/Significance Our study is the first to demonstrate auto-dissemination of M. anisopliae through transfer of fungus from males to female Ae. aegypti during mating under semi-field conditions. Our results suggest that auto-dissemination studies

  17. A murine inhalation model to characterize pulmonary exposure to dry Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    PubMed

    Buskirk, Amanda D; Green, Brett J; Lemons, Angela R; Nayak, Ajay P; Goldsmith, W Travis; Kashon, Michael L; Anderson, Stacey E; Hettick, Justin M; Templeton, Steven P; Germolec, Dori R; Beezhold, Donald H

    2014-01-01

    Most murine models of fungal exposure are based on the delivery of uncharacterized extracts or liquid conidia suspensions using aspiration or intranasal approaches. Studies that model exposure to dry fungal aerosols using whole body inhalation have only recently been described. In this study, we aimed to characterize pulmonary immune responses following repeated inhalation of conidia utilizing an acoustical generator to deliver dry fungal aerosols to mice housed in a nose only exposure chamber. Immunocompetent female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to conidia derived from Aspergillus fumigatus wild-type (WT) or a melanin-deficient (Δalb1) strain. Conidia were aerosolized and delivered to mice at an estimated deposition dose of 1×105 twice a week for 4 weeks (8 total). Histopathological and immunological endpoints were assessed 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the final exposure. Histopathological analysis showed that conidia derived from both strains induced lung inflammation, especially at 24 and 48 hour time points. Immunological endpoints evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the mediastinal lymph nodes showed that exposure to WT conidia led to elevated numbers of macrophages, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. Importantly, CD8+ IL17+ (Tc17) cells were significantly higher in BALF and positively correlated with germination of A. fumigatus WT spores. Germination was associated with specific IgG to intracellular proteins while Δalb1 spores elicited antibodies to cell wall hydrophobin. These data suggest that inhalation exposures may provide a more representative analysis of immune responses following exposures to environmentally and occupationally prevalent fungal contaminants. PMID:25340353

  18. A Murine Inhalation Model to Characterize Pulmonary Exposure to Dry Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Buskirk, Amanda D.; Green, Brett J.; Lemons, Angela R.; Nayak, Ajay P.; Goldsmith, W. Travis; Kashon, Michael L.; Anderson, Stacey E.; Hettick, Justin M.; Templeton, Steven P.; Germolec, Dori R.; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Most murine models of fungal exposure are based on the delivery of uncharacterized extracts or liquid conidia suspensions using aspiration or intranasal approaches. Studies that model exposure to dry fungal aerosols using whole body inhalation have only recently been described. In this study, we aimed to characterize pulmonary immune responses following repeated inhalation of conidia utilizing an acoustical generator to deliver dry fungal aerosols to mice housed in a nose only exposure chamber. Immunocompetent female BALB/cJ mice were exposed to conidia derived from Aspergillus fumigatus wild-type (WT) or a melanin-deficient (Δalb1) strain. Conidia were aerosolized and delivered to mice at an estimated deposition dose of 1×105 twice a week for 4 weeks (8 total). Histopathological and immunological endpoints were assessed 4, 24, 48, and 72 hours after the final exposure. Histopathological analysis showed that conidia derived from both strains induced lung inflammation, especially at 24 and 48 hour time points. Immunological endpoints evaluated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and the mediastinal lymph nodes showed that exposure to WT conidia led to elevated numbers of macrophages, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. Importantly, CD8+ IL17+ (Tc17) cells were significantly higher in BALF and positively correlated with germination of A. fumigatus WT spores. Germination was associated with specific IgG to intracellular proteins while Δalb1 spores elicited antibodies to cell wall hydrophobin. These data suggest that inhalation exposures may provide a more representative analysis of immune responses following exposures to environmentally and occupationally prevalent fungal contaminants. PMID:25340353

  19. Morphological Transition of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Conidia to Yeast Cells: In Vivo Inhibition in Females

    PubMed Central

    Aristizabal, Beatriz H.; Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.; Restrepo, Angela

    1998-01-01

    Clinical paracoccidioidomycosis is 13 times more common in men than in women. Estrogen inhibits the transition of mycelia or conidia (the saprophytic form of Paracoccidoides brasiliensis) to yeasts (the parasitic form) in vitro. Here, we show that, in male mice that were infected intranasally (mimicking natural infection) the transition of conidia in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids to intermediate forms and yeasts occurred over 24 to 96 h; CFU and yeasts (shown by histopathology) increased subsequently. In females, transition did not occur and infection cleared. These events in vivo are consistent with epidemiological and in vitro observations, suggesting that female hormones block transition and are responsible for resistance. PMID:9784579

  20. Genome Sequencing of a Mung Bean Plant Growth Promoting Strain of P. aeruginosa with Biocontrol Ability

    PubMed Central

    Illakkiam, Devaraj; Shankar, Manoharan; Ponraj, Paramasivan; Rajendhran, Jeyaprakash

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa PGPR2 is a mung bean rhizosphere strain that produces secondary metabolites and hydrolytic enzymes contributing to excellent antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina, one of the prevalent fungal pathogens of mung bean. Genome sequencing was performed using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine generating 1,354,732 reads (6,772,433 sequenced bases) achieving ~25-fold coverage of the genome. Reference genome assembly using MIRA 3.4.0 yielded 198 contigs. The draft genome of PGPR2 encoded 6803 open reading frames, of which 5314 were genes with predicted functions, 1489 were genes of known functions, and 80 were RNA-coding genes. Strain specific and core genes of P. aeruginosa PGPR2 that are relevant to rhizospheric habitat were identified by pangenome analysis. Genes involved in plant growth promoting function such as synthesis of ACC deaminase, indole-3-acetic acid, trehalose, mineral scavenging siderophores, hydrogen cyanide, chitinases, acyl homoserine lactones, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, and phytases were identified. In addition, niche-specific genes such as phosphate solubilising 3-phytase, adhesins, pathway-specific transcriptional regulators, a diguanylate cyclase involved in cellulose synthesis, a receptor for ferrienterochelin, a DEAD/DEAH-box helicase involved in stress tolerance, chemotaxis/motility determinants, an HtpX protease, and enzymes involved in the production of a chromanone derivative with potent antifungal activity were identified. PMID:25184130

  1. Elemental sulfur improves growth and phytoremediative ability of wheat grown in lead-contaminated calcareous soil.

    PubMed

    Saifullah; Khan, Muhammad Naeem; Iqbal, Muhammad; Naeem, Asif; Bibi, Sadia; Waraich, Ejaz Ahmad; Dahlawi, Saad

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the effect of elemental sulfur on lead uptake and its toxicity in wheat. A pot experiment was conducted with the purpose to examine the impact of sulfur on improving Pb solubility in soil, and uptake and accumulation in wheat plants. The effect of three levels of lead (0, 50, and 100 mg/kg soil) and sulfur (0, 150, and 300 mmol/kg soil) was tested in all possible combinations. Root dry matter, straw, and grain yields, and the photosynthetic and transpiration rates decreased significantly with increase in the concentration of Pb in the soil. However, sulfur fertilization in the presence of Pb improved the photosynthetic and transpiration rates and consequently increased the straw and grain yields of wheat. It also enhanced Pb accumulation in roots, its translocation from roots to shoot, and accumulation in grain. S and Zn contents of different plant parts were also enhanced. Thus, by mitigating the toxic effect of Pb and improving wheat growth, sulfur enhances Pb accumulation by the aboveground plant parts and hence the phytoextraction capacity of wheat. However, total accumulation of Pb shows that wheat plant cannot be considered as a suitable candidate for phytoremediation. PMID:26852881

  2. Conidia of Alternaria in the atmosphere of the city of Cordoba, Spain in relation to meteorological parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angulo-Romero, J.; Mediavilla-Molina, Ana; Domínguez-Vilches, Eugenio

    In this study, we have analyzed the presence of conidia belonging to different species of the genus Alternaria in the atmosphere of the city of Cordoba, using a Hirst sampler. The results show that spores of this genus are present all year, with a clear seasonal pattern which shows two peaks, one in spring and the other in fall. A total of 26,822 conidia/m3 have been sampled, which implies a daily mean of 74.3 conidia/m3. Statistical analyses comparing the data with meteorological parameters show a positive correlation with maximum, minimum and mean temperatures, and a negative correlation with rain. Nevertheless, meteorological parameters seem to affect the number of conidia differently according to the season of the year. Regression analyses carried out in order to obtain a predictive pattern show that the best fit is between the 7-day running mean of the number of conidia and a week's accumulated mean temperature.

  3. Modestobacter lacusdianchii sp. nov., a Phosphate-Solubilizing Actinobacterium with Ability to Promote Microcystis Growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing-Huo; Salam, Nimaichand; Cheng, Juan; Li, Han-Quan; Yang, Jian-Yuan; Zha, Dai-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Ai, Meng-Jie; Hozzein, Wael N; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-01-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated strain JXJ CY 19T, was isolated from a culture mat of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 collected from Dianchi Lake, South-west China. 16S rRNA gene sequences comparison of strain JXJ CY 19T and the available sequences in the GenBank database showed that the strain was closely related to Modestobacter marinus 42H12-1T (99.1% similarity) and Modestobacter roseus KLBMP 1279T (99.0%). The isolate had meso-diaminopimelic in the cell wall with whole-cell sugars of mannose, rhamnose, ribose, glucose, galactose, and arabinose. The menaquinone detected was MK-9(H4), while the major cellular fatty acids include C17:1 ω8c, C15:0 iso, C15:1 iso G and C16:0 iso. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and an unidentified phospholipid. The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strains JXJ CY 19T and the closely related type strains Modestobacter marinus CGMCC 4.5581T and Modestobacter roseus NBRC 108673T were determined to be 50.8 ± 0.8% and 44.1 ± 1.7%, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 71.9 mol%. On the basis of the above taxonomic data and differences in physiological characters from the closely related type strains, strain JXJ CY 19T was recognized as a novel species of the genus Modestobacter, for which the name Modestobacter lacusdianchii sp. nov. (JXJ CY 19T = KCTC 39600T = CPCC 204352T) is proposed. The type strain JXJ CY 19T can solubilize calcium phosphate tribasic (Ca3(PO4)2), phytin and L-α-phosphatidylcholine. The phosphate-solubilizing property of the novel actinobacterium could be a possible factor for the increase in growth of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 in ecosystem where the amount of available soluble phosphate is limited such as Dianchi Lake. PMID:27537546

  4. Modestobacter lacusdianchii sp. nov., a Phosphate-Solubilizing Actinobacterium with Ability to Promote Microcystis Growth

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Juan; Li, Han-Quan; Yang, Jian-Yuan; Zha, Dai-Ming; Zhang, Yu-Qin; Ai, Meng-Jie; Hozzein, Wael N.; Li, Wen-Jun

    2016-01-01

    A novel actinobacterium, designated strain JXJ CY 19T, was isolated from a culture mat of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 collected from Dianchi Lake, South-west China. 16S rRNA gene sequences comparison of strain JXJ CY 19T and the available sequences in the GenBank database showed that the strain was closely related to Modestobacter marinus 42H12-1T (99.1% similarity) and Modestobacter roseus KLBMP 1279T (99.0%). The isolate had meso-diaminopimelic in the cell wall with whole-cell sugars of mannose, rhamnose, ribose, glucose, galactose, and arabinose. The menaquinone detected was MK-9(H4), while the major cellular fatty acids include C17:1 ω8c, C15:0 iso, C15:1 iso G and C16:0 iso. The polar lipids were diphosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylinositol mannoside and an unidentified phospholipid. The DNA-DNA hybridization values between strains JXJ CY 19T and the closely related type strains Modestobacter marinus CGMCC 4.5581T and Modestobacter roseus NBRC 108673T were determined to be 50.8 ± 0.8% and 44.1 ± 1.7%, respectively. The DNA G+C content was 71.9 mol%. On the basis of the above taxonomic data and differences in physiological characters from the closely related type strains, strain JXJ CY 19T was recognized as a novel species of the genus Modestobacter, for which the name Modestobacter lacusdianchii sp. nov. (JXJ CY 19T = KCTC 39600T = CPCC 204352T) is proposed. The type strain JXJ CY 19T can solubilize calcium phosphate tribasic (Ca3(PO4)2), phytin and L-α-phosphatidylcholine. The phosphate-solubilizing property of the novel actinobacterium could be a possible factor for the increase in growth of Microcystis aeruginosa FACHB-905 in ecosystem where the amount of available soluble phosphate is limited such as Dianchi Lake. PMID:27537546

  5. Optimization of compatible non-ionic surfactant for formulation development of hydrophobic conidia of entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales:Cordycipitaceae) and Metarhizium anisopliae Hypocreales:Clavicipita

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerial conidia, especially dried conidia of entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae are hydrophobic, and therefore surfactants are needed for developing water-based formulations in laboratory studies, greenhouse bioassays, and field trials as well as commercial product ...

  6. Variability in susceptibility to simulated sunlight of conidia among isolates of entomopathogenic Hyphomycetes.

    PubMed

    Fargues, J; Goettel, M S; Smits, N; Ouedraogo, A; Vidal, C; Lacey, L A; Lomer, C J; Rougier, M

    1996-09-01

    The influence of simulated sunlight on survival of conidia of 4 species of entomopathogenic Hyphomycetes was investigated. Conidia from 65 isolates ofBeauveria bassiana, 23 ofMetarhizium anisopliae, 14 ofMetarhizium flavoviride and 33 isolates ofPaecilomyces fumosoroseus were irradiated by artificial sunlight (295 to 1,100 nm at an ultraviolet-B irradiance of 0.3 W m(-2)) for 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8 h. Survival was estimated by comparing the number of colony forming units (CFU) produced by conidia exposed to irradiation to the number of CFUs produced by an unexposed control. Survival decreased with increased exposure to simulated sunlight; exposure for 2 h or more was detrimental to all isolates tested. Overall, isolates ofM. flavoviride were the most resistant to irradiation followed byB. bassiana andM. anisopliae. Conidia ofP. fumosoroseus were most susceptible. In addition to the large interspecies differences in susceptibility to irradiation, there was also an intraspecies variation indicating that strain selection to irradiation tolerance may be important in the development of microbial control agents where increased persistence in an insolated environment is desirable. PMID:20882453

  7. Chlamydospore Induction from Conidia of Cylindrocarpon destructans Isolated from Ginseng in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kang, Yunhee; Kim, Mi Ran; Kim, Ki Hong; Lee, Jungkwan; Lee, Seung-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Cylindrocarpon destructans causes root rot disease in ginseng and can survive for a long time, producing chlamydospores. We optimized conditions to induce chlamydospore production from the conidia of C. destructans, isolated from Korean ginseng. This will provide the basis for testing the efficacy of control agents targeting these chlamydospores. PMID:27103857

  8. Chlamydospore Induction from Conidia of Cylindrocarpon destructans Isolated from Ginseng in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yunhee; Kim, Mi Ran; Kim, Ki Hong

    2016-01-01

    Cylindrocarpon destructans causes root rot disease in ginseng and can survive for a long time, producing chlamydospores. We optimized conditions to induce chlamydospore production from the conidia of C. destructans, isolated from Korean ginseng. This will provide the basis for testing the efficacy of control agents targeting these chlamydospores. PMID:27103857

  9. Evaluation of Soyscreen in an Oil-based Formulation for UV Protection of Beauveria bassiana Conidia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    SoyScreen oil was studied as a formulation ingredient to protect Beauveria bassiana (Balsamo) Vuillemin conidia from UV degradation. Feruloylated soy glycerides, referred to as SoyScreen oil, are biobased ultraviolet-absorbing molecules made by combining molecules of soybean oil with ferulic acid. ...

  10. Interactions of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia with Airway Epithelial Cells: A Critical Review

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Carys A.; Culibrk, Luka; Moore, Margo M.; Tebbutt, Scott J.

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an environmental filamentous fungus that also acts as an opportunistic pathogen able to cause a variety of symptoms, from an allergic response to a life-threatening disseminated fungal infection. The infectious agents are inhaled conidia whose first point of contact is most likely to be an airway epithelial cell (AEC). The interaction between epithelial cells and conidia is multifaceted and complex, and has implications for later steps in pathogenesis. Increasing evidence has demonstrated a key role for the airway epithelium in the response to respiratory pathogens, particularly at early stages of infection; therefore, elucidating the early stages of interaction of conidia with AECs is essential to understand the establishment of infection in cohorts of at-risk patients. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the early interactions between A. fumigatus and AECs, including bronchial and alveolar epithelial cells. We describe mechanisms of adhesion, internalization of conidia by AECs, the immune response of AECs, as well as the role of fungal virulence factors, and patterns of fungal gene expression characteristic of early infection. A clear understanding of the mechanisms involved in the early establishment of infection by A. fumigatus could point to novel targets for therapy and prophylaxis. PMID:27092126

  11. Absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer of fungi (Trichoderma conidia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, B.; Smausz, T.; Antal, Zs.; Kresz, N.; Bor, Zs.; Chrisey, D.

    2004-09-01

    We present an investigation on absorbing film assisted laser induced forward transfer (AFA-LIFT) of fungus (Trichoderma) conidia. A KrF excimer laser beam [λ =248nm,FWHM=30ns (FWHM, full width at half maximum)] was directed through a quartz plate and focused onto its silver coated surface where conidia of the Trichoderma strain were uniformly spread. The laser fluence was varied in the range of 0-2600mJ/cm2 and each laser pulse transferred a pixel of target material. The average irradiated area was 8×10-2mm2. After the transfer procedure, the yeast extract medium covered glass slide and the transferred conidia patterns were incubated for 20 h and then observed using an optical microscope. The transferred conidia pixels were germinated and the areas of the culture medium surfaces covered by the pixels were evaluated as a function of laser fluence. As the laser fluence was increased from 0 to 355mJ/cm2 the transferred and germinated pixel area increased from 0 to 0.25mm2. Further increase in fluence resulted in a drastic decrease down to an approximately constant value of 0.06mm2. The yield of successful transfer by AFA-LIFT and germination was as much as 75% at 355mJ/cm2. The results prove that AFA-LIFT can successfully be applied for the controlled transfer of biological objects.

  12. Metacridamides A and B, bioactive macrocycles from conidia of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium acridum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Metarhizium acridum, an entomopathogenic fungus, has been commercialized and used successfully for biocontrol of grasshopper pests in Africa and Australia. Its conidia produce two novel 17-membered macrocycles, metacridamides A (1) and B (2), which consist of a Phe unit condensed with a nonaketide....

  13. Human Neutrophils Use Different Mechanisms To Kill Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia and Hyphae: Evidence from Phagocyte Defects.

    PubMed

    Gazendam, Roel P; van Hamme, John L; Tool, Anton T J; Hoogenboezem, Mark; van den Berg, J Merlijn; Prins, Jan M; Vitkov, Ljubomir; van de Veerdonk, Frank L; van den Berg, Timo K; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W

    2016-02-01

    Neutrophils are known to play a pivotal role in the host defense against Aspergillus infections. This is illustrated by the prevalence of Aspergillus infections in patients with neutropenia or phagocyte functional defects, such as chronic granulomatous disease. However, the mechanisms by which human neutrophils recognize and kill Aspergillus are poorly understood. In this work, we have studied in detail which neutrophil functions, including neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation, are involved in the killing of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia and hyphae, using neutrophils from patients with well-defined genetic immunodeficiencies. Recognition of conidia involves integrin CD11b/CD18 (and not dectin-1), which triggers a PI3K-dependent nonoxidative intracellular mechanism of killing. When the conidia escape from early killing and germinate, the extracellular destruction of the Aspergillus hyphae needs opsonization by Abs and involves predominantly recognition via Fcγ receptors, signaling via Syk, PI3K, and protein kinase C to trigger the production of toxic reactive oxygen metabolites by the NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase. A. fumigatus induces NET formation; however, NETs did not contribute to A. fumigatus killing. Thus, our findings reveal distinct killing mechanisms of Aspergillus conidia and hyphae by human neutrophils, leading to a comprehensive insight in the innate antifungal response. PMID:26718340

  14. Citric acid production using immobilized conidia of Aspergillus niger TMB 2022

    SciTech Connect

    Tsay, S.S.; To, K.Y.

    1987-02-20

    Conidia of Aspergillus niger TMB 2022 were immobilized in calcium alginate for the production of citric acid. A 1-ml condidia suspension containing ca. 2.32 x 10/sup 8/ conidia were entrapped into sodium alginate solution in order to prepare 3% Ca-alginate (w/v) gel bead. Immobilized conidia were inoculated into productive medium containing 14% sucrose, 0.25% (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/CO/sub 3/, 0.25% KH/sub 2/PO/sub 4/, and 0.025% MgSO/sub 4/.7H/sub 2/O with addition of 0.06 mg/l CuSO/sub 4/.5H/sub 2/O, 0.25 mg/l ZnCl/sub 2/, 1.3 mg/l FeCl/sub 3/.6H/sub 2/O, pH 3.8, and incubated at 35 degrees C for 13 days by surface culture to produce 61.53 g/l anhydrous citric acid. Under the same conditions with a batchwise culture, it was found that immobilized conidia could maintain a longer period for citric acid production (31 days): over 70 g/l anhydrous citric acid from runs No. 2-4, with the maximum yield for anhydrous citric acid reaching 77.02 g/l for run No. 2. In contrast, free conidia maintained a shorter acid-producing phase, circa 17 days; the maximum yield for anhydrous citric acid was 71.07 g/l for run No. 2 but dropped quickly as the run number increased. 14 references.

  15. Debilitation in conidia of the entomopathogenic fungi Beauveria and Metarhizium anisopliae and implications with respect to viability determinations and mycopesticide quality assessments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Viabilities of entomopathogenic fungal conidia comprising biopesticide products are most commonly determined by suspension of dry conidia from storage in a water/surfactant solution immediately before inoculation onto an agar-based germination substrate; conidia are then incubated at a moderate temp...

  16. Transforming growth factor-β1 and cigarette smoke inhibit the ability of β2-agonists to enhance epithelial permeability.

    PubMed

    Unwalla, Hoshang J; Ivonnet, Pedro; Dennis, John S; Conner, Gregory E; Salathe, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis, caused by cigarette smoke exposure, is characterized by mucus hypersecretion and reduced mucociliary clearance (MCC). Effective MCC depends, in part, on adequate airway surface liquid. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) provides the necessary osmotic gradient for serosal to mucosal fluid transport through its ability to both secrete Cl(-) and regulate paracellular permeability, but CFTR activity is attenuated in chronic bronchitis and in smokers. β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) agonists are widely used for managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and can activate CFTR, stimulate ciliary beat frequency, and increase epithelial permeability, thereby stimulating MCC. Patients with chronic airway diseases and cigarette smokers demonstrate increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling, which suppresses β2-agonist-mediated CFTR activation and epithelial permeability increases. Restoring CFTR function in these diseases can restore the ability of β2-agonists to enhance epithelial permeability. Human bronchial epithelial cells, fully redifferentiated at the air-liquid interface, were used for (14)C mannitol flux measurements, Ussing chamber experiments, and quantitative RT-PCR. β2-agonists enhance epithelial permeability by activating CFTR via the β2-AR/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway. TGF-β1 inhibits β2-agonist-mediated CFTR activation and epithelial permeability enhancement. Although TGF-β1 down-regulates both β2-AR and CFTR mRNA, functionally it only decreases CFTR activity. Cigarette smoke exposure inhibits β2-agonist-mediated epithelial permeability increases, an effect reversed by blocking TGF-β signaling. β2-agonists enhance epithelial permeability via CFTR activation. TGF-β1 signaling inhibits β2-agonist-mediated CFTR activation and subsequent increased epithelial permeability, potentially limiting the ability of β2-agonists to facilitate paracellular transport in disease

  17. Transforming Growth Factor-β1 and Cigarette Smoke Inhibit the Ability of β2-Agonists to Enhance Epithelial Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Ivonnet, Pedro; Dennis, John S.; Conner, Gregory E.; Salathe, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Chronic bronchitis, caused by cigarette smoke exposure, is characterized by mucus hypersecretion and reduced mucociliary clearance (MCC). Effective MCC depends, in part, on adequate airway surface liquid. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) provides the necessary osmotic gradient for serosal to mucosal fluid transport through its ability to both secrete Cl− and regulate paracellular permeability, but CFTR activity is attenuated in chronic bronchitis and in smokers. β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) agonists are widely used for managing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and can activate CFTR, stimulate ciliary beat frequency, and increase epithelial permeability, thereby stimulating MCC. Patients with chronic airway diseases and cigarette smokers demonstrate increased transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 signaling, which suppresses β2-agonist–mediated CFTR activation and epithelial permeability increases. Restoring CFTR function in these diseases can restore the ability of β2-agonists to enhance epithelial permeability. Human bronchial epithelial cells, fully redifferentiated at the air–liquid interface, were used for 14C mannitol flux measurements, Ussing chamber experiments, and quantitative RT-PCR. β2-agonists enhance epithelial permeability by activating CFTR via the β2-AR/adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway. TGF-β1 inhibits β2-agonist–mediated CFTR activation and epithelial permeability enhancement. Although TGF-β1 down-regulates both β2-AR and CFTR mRNA, functionally it only decreases CFTR activity. Cigarette smoke exposure inhibits β2-agonist–mediated epithelial permeability increases, an effect reversed by blocking TGF-β signaling. β2-agonists enhance epithelial permeability via CFTR activation. TGF-β1 signaling inhibits β2-agonist–mediated CFTR activation and subsequent increased epithelial permeability, potentially limiting the ability of β2-agonists to facilitate paracellular transport in

  18. Association of a Myosin Immunoanalogue with Cell Envelopes of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia and Its Participation in Swelling and Germination

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Karine; el Moudni, Brahim; Bouchara, Jean-Philippe; Chabasse, Dominique; Tronchin, Guy

    1999-01-01

    A myosin immunoanalogue was identified in conidia of Aspergillus fumigatus by Western blotting, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and gold immunoelectron microscopy with two different antimyosin antibodies. The distribution pattern of this protein was followed during the early stages of germination. A single 180-kDa polypeptide, detected predominantly in a cell envelope extract, was found to cross-react with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies raised against vertebrate muscle myosin. Immunoelectron microscopy permitted precise localization of this polypeptide, indicating that myosin analogue was mainly distributed along the plasma membrane of resting and swollen conidia. In germinating conidia, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed myosin analogue at the periphery of germ tubes, whereas actin appeared as dispersed punctate structures in the cytoplasm that were more concentrated at the site of germ tube emergence. A myosin ATPase inhibitor, butanedione monoxime, greatly reduced swelling and blocked germination. In contrast, when conidia were treated with cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, swelling was not affected and germination was only partially reduced. Butanedione monoxime-treated conidia showed accumulation of cytoplasmic vesicles and did not achieve cell wall reorganization, unlike swollen conidia. Collectively, these results suggest an essential role for this myosin analogue in the deposition of cell wall components during germination of A. fumigatus conidia and therefore in host tissue colonization. PMID:10024566

  19. Elevated CO2 impacts bell pepper growth with consequences to Myzus persicae life history, feeding behaviour and virus transmission ability

    PubMed Central

    Dáder, Beatriz; Fereres, Alberto; Moreno, Aránzazu; Trębicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) impacts plant growth and metabolism. Indirectly, the performance and feeding of insects is affected by plant nutritional quality and resistance traits. Life history and feeding behaviour of Myzus persicae were studied on pepper plants under ambient (aCO2, 400 ppm) or elevated CO2 (eCO2, 650 ppm), as well as the direct impact on plant growth and leaf chemistry. Plant parameters were significantly altered by eCO2 with a negative impact on aphid’s life history. Their pre-reproductive period was 11% longer and fecundity decreased by 37%. Peppers fixed significantly less nitrogen, which explains the poor aphid performance. Plants were taller and had higher biomass and canopy temperature. There was decreased aphid salivation into sieve elements, but no differences in phloem ingestion, indicating that the diminished fitness could be due to poorer tissue quality and unfavourable C:N balance, and that eCO2 was not a factor impeding feeding. Aphid ability to transmit Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was studied by exposing source and receptor plants to ambient (427 ppm) or elevated (612 ppm) CO2 before or after virus inoculation. A two-fold decrease on transmission was observed when receptor plants were exposed to eCO2 before aphid inoculation when compared to aCO2. PMID:26743585

  20. Elevated CO2 impacts bell pepper growth with consequences to Myzus persicae life history, feeding behaviour and virus transmission ability.

    PubMed

    Dáder, Beatriz; Fereres, Alberto; Moreno, Aránzazu; Trębicki, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) impacts plant growth and metabolism. Indirectly, the performance and feeding of insects is affected by plant nutritional quality and resistance traits. Life history and feeding behaviour of Myzus persicae were studied on pepper plants under ambient (aCO2, 400 ppm) or elevated CO2 (eCO2, 650 ppm), as well as the direct impact on plant growth and leaf chemistry. Plant parameters were significantly altered by eCO2 with a negative impact on aphid's life history. Their pre-reproductive period was 11% longer and fecundity decreased by 37%. Peppers fixed significantly less nitrogen, which explains the poor aphid performance. Plants were taller and had higher biomass and canopy temperature. There was decreased aphid salivation into sieve elements, but no differences in phloem ingestion, indicating that the diminished fitness could be due to poorer tissue quality and unfavourable C:N balance, and that eCO2 was not a factor impeding feeding. Aphid ability to transmit Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was studied by exposing source and receptor plants to ambient (427 ppm) or elevated (612 ppm) CO2 before or after virus inoculation. A two-fold decrease on transmission was observed when receptor plants were exposed to eCO2 before aphid inoculation when compared to aCO2. PMID:26743585

  1. New solid-state fermentation chamber for bulk production of aerial conidia of fungal biocontrol agents on rice.

    PubMed

    Ye, S D; Ying, S H; Chen, C; Feng, M G

    2006-06-01

    A novel solid-state fermentation apparatus, namely an upright multi-tray conidiation chamber, was developed to facilitate the production of aerial conidia of fungal biocontrol agents, such as Beauveria bassiana. The chamber with 25 bottom-meshed metal trays had a capacity of > or =50 kg rice with each tray holding > or =2 kg. In repeated trials, a mean yield of 2.4 (1.8-2.7) x 10(12) conidia kg(-1) rice was harvested from the 7-day cultures of B. bassiana in a fully loaded chamber. The new apparatus has a high potential for bulk production of fungal conidia. PMID:16786244

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor C complements the ability of positron emission tomography to predict nodal disease in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farjah, Farhood; Madtes, David K.; Wood, Douglas E.; Flum, David R.; Zadworny, Megan E.; Waworuntu, Rachel; Hwang, Billanna; Mulligan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) C and D are biologically rational markers of nodal disease that could improve the accuracy of lung cancer staging. We hypothesized that these biomarkers would improve the ability of positron emission tomography (PET) to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods A cross-sectional study (2010–2013) was performed of patients prospectively enrolled in a lung nodule biorepository, staged by computed tomography (CT) and PET, and who underwent pathologic nodal evaluation. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure biomarker levels in plasma from blood drawn before anesthesia. Likelihood ratio testing was used to compare the following logistic regression prediction models: ModelPET, ModelPET/VEGF-C, ModelPET/VEGF-D, and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D. To account for 5 planned pairwise comparisons, P values<.01 were considered significant. Results Among 62 patients (median age, 67 years; 48% men; 87% white; and 84% NSCLC), 58% had fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in hilar and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed lymph node metastases was 40%. Comparisons of prediction models revealed the following: ModelPET/VEGF-C versus ModelPET (P = .0069), ModelPET/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .1886), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET (P = .0146), ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-C (P = .2818), and ModelPET/VEGF-C/VEGF-D versus ModelPET/VEGF-D (P = .0095). In ModelPET/VEGF-C, higher VEGF-C levels were associated with an increased risk of nodal disease (odds ratio, 2.96; 95% confidence interval, 1.26–6.90). Conclusions Plasma levels of VEGF-C complemented the ability of PET to predict nodal disease among patients with suspected or confirmed NSCLC. VEGF-D did not improve prediction. PMID:26320776

  3. In vitro photodynamic inactivation of conidia of the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum graminicola with cationic porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Vandresen, Camila Chevonica; Gonçalves, Alan Guilherme; Ducatti, Diogo Ricardo Bazan; Murakami, Fabio Seigi; Noseda, Miguel Daniel; Duarte, Maria Eugenia Rabello; Barreira, Sandra Mara Woranovicz

    2016-05-11

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) is an efficient approach for the elimination of a series of microorganisms; however, PDI involving phytopathogenic filamentous fungi is scarce in the literature. In the present study, we have demonstrated the photoinactivating properties of five cationic meso-(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)porphyrins on conidia of the phytopathogen Colletotrichum graminicola. For this purpose, photophysical properties (photostability and (1)O2 singlet production) of the porphyrins under study were first evaluated. PDI assays were then performed with a fluence of 30, 60, 90 and 120 J cm(-2) and varying the porphyrin concentration from 1 to 25 μmol L(-1). Considering the lowest concentration that enabled the best photoinactivation, with the respective lowest effective irradiation time, the meso-(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)porphyrins herein studied could be ranked as follows: triple-charged 4 (1 μmol L(-1) with a fluence of 30 J cm(-2)) > double-charged-trans2 (1 μmol L(-1) with 60 J cm(-2)) > tetra-charged 5 (15 μmol L(-1) with 90 J cm(-2)) > mono-charged 1 (25 μmol L(-1) with 120 J cm(-2)). Double-charged-cis-porphyrin 3 inactivated C. graminicola conidia in the absence of light. Evaluation of the porphyrin binding to the conidia and fluorescence microscopic analysis were also performed, which were in agreement with the PDI results. In conclusion, the cationic porphyrins herein studied were considered efficient photosensitizers to inactivate C. graminicola conidia. The amount and position of positive charges are related to the compounds' amphiphilicity and therefore to their photodynamic activity. PMID:27109559

  4. The Membrane-anchoring Domain of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands Dictates Their Ability to Operate in Juxtacrine Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Jianying; Opresko, Lee; Chrisler, William B.; Orr, Galya; Quesenberry, Ryan D.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H S.

    2005-06-01

    All ligands of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are synthesized as membrane-anchored precursors. Previous work has suggested that some ligands, such as EGF, must be proteolytically released to be active, whereas others, such as heparin binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) can function while still anchored to the membrane (i.e., juxtacrine signaling). To explore the structural basis for these differences in ligand activity, we engineered a series of membrane-anchored ligands in which the core, receptor-binding domain of EGF was combined with different domains of both EGF and HB-EGF. We found that ligands having the N-terminal extension of EGF could not bind to the EGFR, even when released from the membrane. Ligands lacking an N-terminal extension, but possessing the membrane-anchoring domain of EGF still required proteolytic release for activity, whereas ligands with the membrane anchoring domain of HB-EGF could elicit full biological activity while still membrane anchored. Ligands containing the HB-EGF membrane anchor, but lacking an N-terminal extension, activated EGFR during their transit through the Golgi apparatus . However, cell-mixing experiments and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) studies showed that juxtacrine signaling typically occurred in trans at the cell surface, at points of cell-cell contact. Our data suggest that the membrane-anchoring domain of ligands selectively controls their ability to participate in juxtacrine signaling and thus, only a subclass of EGFR ligands can act in a juxtacrine mode.

  5. EVALUATION OF DIFFERENT METHODS FOR THE EXTRACTION OF DNA FROM FUNGAL CONIDIA BY QUANTITATIVE COMPETITIVE PCR ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five different DNA extraction methods were evaluated for their effectiveness in recovering PCR templates from the conidia of a series of fungal species often encountered in indoor air. The test organisms were Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium chrysogenum, Stachybotrys chartaru...

  6. Effects of UVB irradiance on conidia and germinants of the entomopathogenic Hyphomycete Metarhizium anisopliae: a study of reciprocity and recovery.

    PubMed

    Braga, G U; Flint, S D; Messias, C L; Anderson, A J; Roberts, D W

    2001-02-01

    We tested the effects of irradiances of 920 and 1200 mW m-2 (weighted irradiance) on the conidia and germinants of the entomopathogenic Hyphomycete Metarhizium anisopliae. The conidia were exposed to the two irradiances for 1, 2, 4, 6, 7 or 8 h. Increased exposure decreased relative percent culturability. The inactivation provoked by the irradiance of 1200 mW m-2 was higher than for the 920 mW m-2, with a reduction in the 50% lethal time (LT50) from 6 h 40 min to 4 h 26 min. Reciprocity was not observed when conidia in water suspension and germinants in different stages of the germinative process were exposed to a 17.3 kJ m-2 total dose at both irradiance levels. Although nonreciprocity was observed in all situations, its magnitude varied as a function of metabolic state and/or cell-cycle phase in which the conidia were at the exposure time. The least difference between the effects of the two irradiance levels was observed when nongerminating conidia in suspension were exposed, and the greatest was observed when conidia were exposed during an advanced germination phase. Doses of 6.6 and 17.3 kJ m-2 supplied through the two irradiance levels delayed the germination of the surviving conidia. At both doses, delay was greater during exposure to the higher irradiance. Nonreciprocity was higher for the 17.3 kJ m-2 dose. Nonreciprocity magnitude, in addition to depending on the conidial physiological state, also depended on dose. The results demonstrate the importance of evaluating the impact of the increase in irradiance during the different stages of the fungal life cycle, especially during the stages which are more sensitive to UV, and not simply in dormant conidia. PMID:11272727

  7. Amphibian Symbiotic Bacteria Do Not Show a Universal Ability To Inhibit Growth of the Global Panzootic Lineage of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Antwis, Rachael E; Preziosi, Richard F; Harrison, Xavier A; Garner, Trenton W J

    2015-06-01

    Microbiomes associated with multicellular organisms influence the disease susceptibility of hosts. The potential exists for such bacteria to protect wildlife from infectious diseases, particularly in the case of the globally distributed and highly virulent fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis of the global panzootic lineage (B. dendrobatidis GPL), responsible for mass extinctions and population declines of amphibians. B. dendrobatidis GPL exhibits wide genotypic and virulence variation, and the ability of candidate probiotics to restrict growth across B. dendrobatidis isolates has not previously been considered. Here we show that only a small proportion of candidate probiotics exhibited broad-spectrum inhibition across B. dendrobatidis GPL isolates. Moreover, some bacterial genera showed significantly greater inhibition than others, but overall, genus and species were not particularly reliable predictors of inhibitory capabilities. These findings indicate that bacterial consortia are likely to offer a more stable and effective approach to probiotics, particularly if related bacteria are selected from genera with greater antimicrobial capabilities. Together these results highlight a complex interaction between pathogens and host-associated symbiotic bacteria that will require consideration in the development of bacterial probiotics for wildlife conservation. Future efforts to construct protective microbiomes should incorporate bacteria that exhibit broad-spectrum inhibition of B. dendrobatidis GPL isolates. PMID:25819964

  8. Amphibian Symbiotic Bacteria Do Not Show a Universal Ability To Inhibit Growth of the Global Panzootic Lineage of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis

    PubMed Central

    Preziosi, Richard F.; Harrison, Xavier A.; Garner, Trenton W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Microbiomes associated with multicellular organisms influence the disease susceptibility of hosts. The potential exists for such bacteria to protect wildlife from infectious diseases, particularly in the case of the globally distributed and highly virulent fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis of the global panzootic lineage (B. dendrobatidis GPL), responsible for mass extinctions and population declines of amphibians. B. dendrobatidis GPL exhibits wide genotypic and virulence variation, and the ability of candidate probiotics to restrict growth across B. dendrobatidis isolates has not previously been considered. Here we show that only a small proportion of candidate probiotics exhibited broad-spectrum inhibition across B. dendrobatidis GPL isolates. Moreover, some bacterial genera showed significantly greater inhibition than others, but overall, genus and species were not particularly reliable predictors of inhibitory capabilities. These findings indicate that bacterial consortia are likely to offer a more stable and effective approach to probiotics, particularly if related bacteria are selected from genera with greater antimicrobial capabilities. Together these results highlight a complex interaction between pathogens and host-associated symbiotic bacteria that will require consideration in the development of bacterial probiotics for wildlife conservation. Future efforts to construct protective microbiomes should incorporate bacteria that exhibit broad-spectrum inhibition of B. dendrobatidis GPL isolates. PMID:25819964

  9. Liquid culture production of microsclerotia and submerged conidia by Trichoderma harzianum active against damping-off disease caused by Rhizoctonia solani.

    PubMed

    Kobori, Nilce N; Mascarin, Gabriel M; Jackson, Mark A; Schisler, David A

    2015-04-01

    Media and culturing protocols were identified that supported the formation of submerged conidia and microsclerotia (MS) by Trichoderma harzianum Rifai strain T-22 using liquid culture fermentation. Liquid media with a higher carbon concentration (36 g L(-1)) promoted MS formation at all C:N ratios tested. Hyphae aggregated to form MS after 2 d growth and after 7 d MS were fully melanized. This is the first report of MS formation by T. harzianum or any species of Trichoderma. Furthermore, submerged conidia formation was induced by liquid culture media, but yields, desiccation tolerance, and storage stability varied with C:N ratio and carbon rate. Air-dried MS granules (<4% moisture) retained excellent shelf life under cool and unrefrigerated storage conditions with no loss in conidial production. A low-cost complex nitrogen source based on cottonseed flour effectively supported high MS yields. Amending potting mix with dried MS formulations reduced or eliminated damping-off of melon seedlings caused by Rhizoctonia solani. Together, the results provide insights into the liquid culture production, stabilization process, and bioefficacy of the hitherto unreported MS of T. harzianum as a potential biofungicide for use in integrated management programs against soilborne diseases. PMID:25813507

  10. Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells from Patients with Dermatophytosis Restrict the Growth of Trichophyton rubrum and Induce CD4-T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Karla; Bomfim, Gisele Facholi; Criado, Paulo Ricardo; Almeida, Sandro Rogerio

    2014-01-01

    Dermatophytes are the most common agents of superficial mycoses that are caused by mold fungi. Trichophyton rubrum is the most common pathogen causing dermatophytosis. The immunology of dermatophytosis is currently poorly understood. Recently, our group investigated the interaction of T. rubrum conidia with peritoneal mouse macrophages. We found that macrophages phagocytose T. rubrum conidia resulted in a down-modulation of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens and in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules. Furthermore, it induced the production of IL-10, and T. rubrum conidia differentiated into hyphae that grew and killed the macrophages after 8 hrs of culture. This work demonstrated that dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages, from patients or normal individuals, avidly interact with pathogenic fungus T. rubrum. The dermatophyte has two major receptors on human monocyte-derived DC: DC-SIGN and mannose receptor. In contrast macrophage has only mannose receptor that participates in the phagocytosis or bound process. Another striking aspect of this study is that unlike macrophages that permit rapid growth of T. rubrum, human DC inhibited the growth and induces Th activation. The ability of DC from patients to interact and kill T. rubrum and to present Ags to T cells suggests that DC may play an important role in the host response to T. rubrum infection by coordinating the development of cellular immune response. PMID:25372145

  11. Immunomodulatory effect of mesenchymal stem cells on the immune response of macrophages stimulated by Aspergillus fumigatus conidia.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sung-Yeon; Kwon, Eun-Young; Choi, Su-Mi; Lee, Dong-Gun; Park, Chulmin; Park, Sun Hee; Yoo, Jin-Hong; Choi, Jung-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known to exert potent immunosuppression and anti-inflammatory effects. There is growing interest in their use for immunotherapy for controlling inflammation as well as acute organ injury. However, there are few reports regarding MSC's immunomodulatory effects in the settings of fungal infection. In this study, we attempted to examine the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs in response toAspergillus fumigatus We measured the cytokine response of murine MSCs on the immune response of murine macrophages (J774A.1 cells) evoked byA. fumigatusconidia. In addition, we evaluated the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the MSC-related cytokine response and fungal growth. As a results, after conidia stimulation, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α was down-regulated and interleukin (IL)-10 was up-regulated in MSC-treated J774A.1 cells when compared to J774A.1 cells alone. In addition, fungal growth was reduced in MSC-treated J774A.1 cells when compared to J774A.1 cells, which recovered by GM-CSF. However, the effect of MSCs on the cytokine response was not reversed by GM-CSF. NF-κB translocation decreased in MSC-treated J774A.1 cells compared to J774A.1 cells alone. In conclusion, MSCs demonstrate immunomodulatory properties in both aspects of cytokines and fungal growth. The anti-inflammatory effect of MSCs with regard to cytokine response might be associated with decreased NF-κB translocation, and is not reversed by GM-CSF. PMID:26768375

  12. Environmental Growth Conditions Influence the Ability of Escherichia coli K1 To Invade Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells and Confer Serum Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Badger, Julie L.; Kim, Kwang Sik

    1998-01-01

    A major limitation to advances in prevention and therapy of neonatal meningitis is our incomplete understanding of the pathogenesis of this disease. In an effort to understand the pathogenesis of meningitis due to Escherichia coli K1, we examined whether environmental growth conditions similar to those that the bacteria might be exposed to in the blood could influence the ability of E. coli K1 to invade brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMEC) in vitro and to cross the blood-brain barrier in vivo. We found that the following bacterial growth conditions enhanced E. coli K1 invasion of BMEC 3- to 10-fold: microaerophilic growth, media buffered at pH 6.5, and media supplemented with 50% newborn bovine serum (NBS), magnesium, or iron. Growth conditions that significantly repressed invasion (i.e., 2- to 250-fold) included iron chelation, a pH of 8.5, and high osmolarity. More importantly, E. coli K1 traversal of the blood-brain barrier was significantly greater for the growth condition enhancing BMEC invasion (50% NBS) than for the condition repressing invasion (osmolarity) in newborn rats with experimental hematogenous meningitis. Of interest, bacterial growth conditions that enhanced or repressed invasion also elicited similar serum resistance phenotype patterns. This is the first demonstration that bacterial ability to enter the central nervous system can be affected by environmental growth conditions. PMID:9826343

  13. Beta 1,4-oligoglucosides inhibit the binding of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kan, V L; Bennett, J E

    1991-05-01

    The binding of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia to human monocytes is mediated by a barley beta-glucan-inhibitable receptor. The simplest linkages in this glucan are present in the disaccharides laminaribiose (beta 1,3) and cellobiose (beta 1,4). Although laminaribiose gave strong inhibition of conidial binding to monocytes, cellobiose and oligosaccharides with beta 1,4-linked glucose residues were more potent as specific inhibitors of this binding over similar concentrations. Increasing the number of beta 1,4-linked glucose residues led to greater inhibition of conidial binding by human monocytes. PMID:2019764

  14. Butyl acetate and yeasts interact in adhesion and germination of Botrytis cinerea conidia in vitro and in fungal decay of golden delicious apple.

    PubMed

    Filonow, A B

    2001-04-01

    Butyl acetate is a volatile aroma and flavor compound in apple. Conidia of three strains of Botrytis cinerea, a fungus that causes decay of apple fruit in postharvest storage, had greater adhesion to and greater germination on polycarbonate membrane filters on water inside sealed 500 cc glass jars that were injected with 4 microliters butyl acetate than conidia not so exposed. Conidial germination was highly correlated with conidial adhesion. The yeasts Sporobolomyces roseus and Cryptococcus laurentii, but not Saccharomyces cerevisiae, reduced the adhesion and germination promoting effect of butyl acetate. Conidia did not readily utilize butyl acetate as a food source, as shown by lack of tetrazolium violet reduction, whereas S. roseus and C. laurentii, but not S. cerevisiae did. Butyl acetate added to suspensions of conidia increased the electrical conductivity of the suspensions and increased the loss of 14C from 14C-labeled conidia compared to conidia unexposed to butyl acetate. Uptake of [14C]glucose by conidia was not increased by butyl acetate. Wounds of Golden Delicious apples inoculated with conidia (strain F-J-4) in a dilute solution of butyl acetate had greater decay than unexposed wounds. S. roseus and C. laurentii, but not S. cerevisiae, added with the conidia decreased the incidence or size of decay. Results indicated that butyl acetate increased conidial adhesion, stimulating conidial germination, and some yeasts can reduce this effect. PMID:11446303

  15. conF and conJ contribute to conidia germination and stress response in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Sarikaya Bayram, Özlem; Bayram, Özgür; Braus, Gerhard H

    2013-07-01

    Light induces various responses in fungi including formation of asexual and sexual reproductive structures. The formation of conidia in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans is regulated by red and blue light receptors. Expression of conidia associated con genes, which are widely spread in the fungal kingdom, increases upon exposure to light. We have characterized the light-inducible conF and conJ genes of A. nidulans which are homologs of con-6 and con-10 of Neurospora crassa. con genes are expressed during conidia formation in asexual development. Five minutes light exposure are sufficient to induce conF or conJ expression in vegetative mycelia. Similar to N. crassa there were no significant phenotypes of single con mutations. A double conF and conJ deletion resulted in significantly increased cellular amounts of glycerol or erythritol. This leads to a delayed germination phenotype combined with increased resistance against desiccation. These defects were rescued by complementation of the double mutant strain with either conF or conJ. This suggests that fungal con genes exhibit redundant functions in controlling conidia germination and adjusting cellular levels of substances which protect conidia against dryness. PMID:23644150

  16. [Ability of representatives of Pantoea agglomerans, as well as Bacillus subtilis and some Pseudomonas species to suppress the development of phytopathgenic bacteria and micromycetes in regulating plant growth].

    PubMed

    Romanenko, V M; Alimov, D M

    2000-01-01

    The ability of representatives of Pantoea agglomerans (Erwinia herbicola (Lohnis) Dye [21]), Bacillus subtilis and some species of Pseudomonas genus to inhibit the growth of phytopathogenic bacteria and micromycetes and to regulate the growth of plants has been comparatively studied. The ability to inhibit the growth of mycellium of phytopathogenic Fusarium avenaceum, F. gibbosum, F. oxysporum was found out in all of 13 investigated strains of P. agglomerans, while the growth of F. culmorum is inhibited by 2 strains and Bipolaris sorokiniana is inhibited by 7 strains. The strains of P. agglomerans and Bacillus subtilis inhibit the growth of mycellium of these mycromycetes to the greater extent than the representatives of Pseudomonas genus. The mycellium growth of B. sorokiniana is better inhibited by B. subtilis and representatives of Pseudomonas genus. Besides the antifungal action 8 strains of P. agglomerans manifested the antagonistic activity in respect to phytopathogenic Agrobacterium tumefaciens and representatives of genera Clavibacter, Erwinia, Pseudomonas, Xanthomonas and also in respect to the microflora which is present in the cabbage and wheat seeds. The strains have been revealed which, parallel with high antagonistic activity in respect to phytopathogenic micromycetes and bacteria, stimulate the seed germination and increase the weight of the cabbage and wheat sprouts. PMID:11421000

  17. Conidia of the insect pathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, fail to adhere to mosquito larval cuticle

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, Bethany P. J.; Lord, Alex M.; Dudley, Ed; Butt, Tariq M.

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion of conidia of the insect pathogenic fungus, Metarhizium anisopliae, to the arthropod host cuticle initially involves hydrophobic forces followed by consolidation facilitated by the action of extracellular enzymes and secretion of mucilage. Gene expression analysis and atomic force microscopy were used to directly quantify recognition and adhesion between single conidia of M. anisopliae and the cuticle of the aquatic larval stage of Aedes aegypti and a representative terrestrial host, Tenebrio molitor. Gene expression data indicated recognition by the pathogen of both hosts; however, the forces for adhesion to the mosquito were approximately five times lower than those observed for Tenebrio. Although weak forces were recorded in response to Aedes, Metarhizium was unable to consolidate firm attachment. An analysis of the cuticular composition revealed an absence of long-chain hydrocarbons in Aedes larvae which are thought to be required for fungal development on host cuticle. This study provides, to our knowledge, the first evidence that Metarhizium does not form firm attachment to Ae. aegypti larvae in situ, therefore preventing the normal route of invasion and pathogenesis from occuring. PMID:26064542

  18. A Non-canonical Melanin Biosynthesis Pathway Protects Aspergillus terreus Conidia from Environmental Stress.

    PubMed

    Geib, Elena; Gressler, Markus; Viediernikova, Iuliia; Hillmann, Falk; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Nietzsche, Sandor; Hertweck, Christian; Brock, Matthias

    2016-05-19

    Melanins are ubiquitous pigments found in all kingdoms of life. Most organisms use them for protection from environmental stress, although some fungi employ melanins as virulence determinants. The human pathogenic fungus Aspergillus fumigatus and related Ascomycetes produce dihydroxynaphthalene- (DHN) melanin in their spores, the conidia, and use it to inhibit phagolysosome acidification. However, biosynthetic origin of melanin in a related fungus, Aspergillus terreus, has remained a mystery because A. terreus lacks genes for synthesis of DHN-melanin. Here we identify genes coding for an unusual NRPS-like enzyme (MelA) and a tyrosinase (TyrP) that A. terreus expressed under conidiation conditions. We demonstrate that MelA produces aspulvinone E, which is activated for polymerization by TyrP. Functional studies reveal that this new pigment, Asp-melanin, confers resistance against UV light and hampers phagocytosis by soil amoeba. Unexpectedly, Asp-melanin does not inhibit acidification of phagolysosomes, thus likely contributing specifically to survival of A. terreus conidia in acidic environments. PMID:27133313

  19. Effects of Airflow and Changing Humidity on the Aerosolization of Respirable Fungal Fragments and Conidia of Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the aerosolization of particles (micro- and macroconidia and fragments) from Botrytis cinerea cultures in relation to potential human inhalation in indoor environments. The influence of the following factors on the aerosolization of B. cinerea particles was studied: exposure to airflow, relative humidity (rh), changing rh, and plant or building materials. The aerodynamic diameter (da) and the respirable fraction of the aerosolized particles were determined. Conidia and fragments of B. cinerea were not aerosolized as a response to a decrease in the rh. In contrast, both micro- and macroconidia and fungal fragments were aerosolized when exposed to an airflow of 1.5 m s−1 or 0.5 m s−1. Significantly more particles of microconidial size and fragment size were aerosolized at a low rh (18 to 40% rh) than at a higher rh (60 to 80% rh) when cultures were exposed to airflow. The size of the respirable fraction of the aerosolized particles was dependent on the rh but not on the growth material. At high rh, about 30% of the aerosolized particles were of respirable size, while at low rh, about 70% were of respirable size. During low rh, more fungal (1→3)-β-d-glucan and chitinase were aerosolized than during high rh. In conclusion, exposure to external physical forces such as airflow is necessary for the aerosolization of particles from B. cinerea. The amount and size distribution are highly affected by the rh, and more particles of respirable sizes were aerosolized at low rh than at high rh. PMID:22447608

  20. Toxicity of ozone gas to conidia of Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, and Botrytis cinerea and control of gray mold on table grapes.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Penicillium digitatum, P. italicum, and Botrytis cinerea attack fresh fruit and cause significant postharvest decay losses and the toxicity of ozone (O3) gas at different relative humidities to control their conidia was determined. Conidia were exposed to an atmosphere containing 200 to 350 µL L-1 o...

  1. Conidia production by Beauveria bassiana (for the biocontrol of a diamondback moth) during solid-state fermentation in a packed-bed bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kang, S W; Lee, S H; Yoon, C S; Kim, S W

    2005-01-01

    Conidia of Beauveria bassiana CS-1, which have the potential for the control of the diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), were produced by solid-state fermentation (SSF) using a packed-bed bioreactor with rice straw and wheat bran. As the packing density and the bed height were increased, the production of conidia decreased. In a packed-bed bioreactor under no aeration and no addition of polypropylene (PP) foam (control), the total average of conidia was 4.9 x 10(8) g-1. The production of conidia was affected more by the addition of PP foam as an inert support than forced aeration and was approx. 23 times higher than that of the control. The total average of conidia produced by B. bassiana was 1.1-1.2 x 10(10) g-1 . PMID:15703878

  2. Listeria monocytogenes LO28: Surface Physicochemical Properties and Ability To Form Biofilms at Different Temperatures and Growth Phases

    PubMed Central

    Chavant, Patrick; Martinie, Brigitte; Meylheuc, Thierry; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle; Hebraud, Michel

    2002-01-01

    The surface physicochemical properties of Listeria monocytogenes LO28 under different conditions (temperature and growth phase) were determined by use of microelectrophoresis and microbial adhesion to solvents. The effect of these parameters on adhesion and biofilm formation by L. monocytogenes LO28 on hydrophilic (stainless steel) and hydrophobic (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]) surfaces was assessed. The bacterial cells were always negatively charged and possessed hydrophilic surface properties, which were negatively correlated with growth temperature. The colonization of the two surfaces, monitored by scanning electron microscopy, epifluorescence microscopy, and cell enumeration, showed that the strain had a great capacity to colonize both surfaces whatever the incubation temperature. However, biofilm formation was faster on the hydrophilic substratum. After 5 days at 37 or 20°C, the biofilm structure was composed of aggregates with a three-dimensional shape, but significant detachment took place on PTFE at 37°C. At 8°C, only a bacterial monolayer was visible on stainless steel, while no growth was observed on PTFE. The growth phase of bacteria used to inoculate surfaces had a significant effect only in some cases during the first steps of biofilm formation. The surface physicochemical properties of the strain are correlated with adhesion and surface colonization. PMID:11823213

  3. Transformation of the bioherbicide Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. Aeschynomene By electroporation of germinated conidia.

    PubMed

    Robinson, M; Sharon, A

    1999-08-01

    A highly efficient and reproducible procedure for the transformation of the bioherbicide Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene by electroporation of germinated conidia is reported. Development of the procedure involved a detailed study of the germination process followed by extensive calibration of the electrical-pulse and selection conditions. Optimization of the transformation protocol was facilitated by the use of the green fluorescent protein that helped in the identification of stable transformants and in a fast assessment of transgene expression levels, colony homogeneity and genetic stability. Under optimal conditions, over 80 stable transformants/cuvette were obtained. Plasmid integration was predominantly homologous, but high transformation rates were obtained both with homologous and non-homologous vectors. The method described not only opens up opportunities for the genetic manipulation of C. gloeosporioides f. sp. aeschynomene, but also provides a framework for the development and optimization of transformation in other fungi. PMID:10447601

  4. Effect of N-acetyl cysteine and glycine supplementation on growth performance, glutathione synthesis, anti-oxidative and immune ability of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shiwei; Zhou, Weiwen; Tian, Lixia; Niu, Jin; Liu, Yongjian

    2016-08-01

    An 8-week feeding trial was conducted to evaluate the effect of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) and glycine supplementation on growth performance, glutathione (GSH) synthesis, anti-oxidative and immune ability of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus. Four practical diets were formulated, control, control +0.2% NAC, control +0.5% glycine, control +0.2% NAC +0.5% glycine. Each diet was randomly assigned to quadruplicate groups of 30 fish (approximately 9.5 g). The weight gain and specific growth rate were significantly increased with the supplementation of NAC and glycine. While they had no effect on feed efficiency feed intake and survival. Glutathion peroxidase (GPx) was increased by NAC and γ-glutamine cysteine synthase (γ-GCS) in plasma were increased by glycine. After the feeding trail, fish were challenged by Streptococcus iniae, fish fed the diet supplemented with NAC obtained significantly higher survival rate after 72 h challenge test. NAC also decreased malonaldehyde (MDA) in liver, increased glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity in plasma, up-regulated mRNA expression of Superoxide dismutase (SOD) and GPx in liver and headkidney. Dietary supplementation of glycine increased the anti-oxidative ability of tilapia through increase anti-oxidative enzyme activity (SOD, glutathione reductase, myeloperoxidase) and up-regulate anti-oxidative gene expression (SOD). Immune ability only enhanced by the supplementation of NAC through increased interleukin-1β (IL-1β) mRNA expression. These results clearly indicated that the supplementation of NAC and glycine can significantly improve the growth performance of tilapia, and NAC also enhance the anti-oxidative and immune capacity of tilapia, glycine could only enhance the anti-oxidative ability. PMID:27235905

  5. "Elastic" property of mesoporous silica shell: for dynamic surface enhanced Raman scattering ability monitoring of growing noble metal nanostructures via a simplified spatially confined growth method.

    PubMed

    Lin, Min; Wang, Yunqing; Sun, Xiuyan; Wang, Wenhai; Chen, Lingxin

    2015-04-15

    The Raman enhancing ability of noble metal nanoparticles (NPs) is an important factor for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate screening, which is generally evaluated by simply mixing as-prepared NPs with Raman reporters for Raman signal measurements. This method usually leads to incredible results because of the NP surface coverage nonuniformity and reporter-induced NP aggregation. Moreover, it cannot realize in situ, continuous SERS characterization. Herein, we proposed a dynamic SERS monitoring strategy for NPs with precisely tuned structures based on a simplified spatially confined NP growth method. Gold nanorod (AuNR) seed NPs were coated with a mesoporous silica (mSiO2) shell. The permeability of mSiO2 for both reactive species and Raman reporters rendered the silver overcoating reaction and SERS indication of NP growth. Additionally, the mSiO2 coating ensured monodisperse NP growth in a Raman reporter-rich reaction system. Moreover, "elastic" features of mSiO2 were observed for the first time, which is crucial for holding the growing NP without breakage. This feature makes the mSiO2 coating adhere to metal NPs throughout the growing process, providing a stable Raman reporter distribution microenvironment near the NPs and ensuring that the substrate's SERS ability comparison is accurate. Three types of NPs, i.e., core-shell Au@AgNR@mSiO2, Au@AuNR@mSiO2, and yolk-shell Au@void@AuNR@mSiO2 NPs, were synthesized via core-shell overgrowth and galvanic replacement methods, showing the versatility of the approach. The living cell SERS labeling ability of Au@AgNR@mSiO2-based tags was also demonstrated. This strategy addresses the problems of multiple batch NP preparation, aggregation, and surface adsorption differentiation, which is a breakthrough for the dynamic comparison of SERS ability of metal NPs with precisely tuned structures and optical properties. PMID:25815901

  6. A Quantitative Dynamic Simulation of Bremia lactucae Airborne Conidia Concentration above a Lettuce Canopy.

    PubMed

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Carisse, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Lettuce downy mildew, caused by the oomycete Bremia lactucae Regel, is a major threat to lettuce production worldwide. Lettuce downy mildew is a polycyclic disease driven by airborne spores. A weather-based dynamic simulation model for B. lactucae airborne spores was developed to simulate the aerobiological characteristics of the pathogen. The model was built using the STELLA platform by following the system dynamics methodology. The model was developed using published equations describing disease subprocesses (e.g., sporulation) and assembled knowledge of the interactions among pathogen, host, and weather. The model was evaluated with four years of independent data by comparing model simulations with observations of hourly and daily airborne spore concentrations. The results show an accurate simulation of the trend and shape of B. lactucae temporal dynamics of airborne spore concentration. The model simulated hourly and daily peaks in airborne spore concentrations. More than 95% of the simulation runs, the daily-simulated airborne conidia concentration was 0 when airborne conidia were not observed. Also, the relationship between the simulated and the observed airborne spores was linear. In more than 94% of the simulation runs, the proportion of the linear variation in the hourly-observed values explained by the variation in the hourly-simulated values was greater than 0.7 in all years except one. Most of the errors came from the deviation from the 1:1 line, and the proportion of errors due to the model bias was low. This model is the only dynamic model developed to mimic the dynamics of airborne inoculum and represents an initial step towards improved lettuce downy mildew understanding, forecasting and management. PMID:26953691

  7. Thermal inactivation of Botrytis cinerea conidia in synthetic medium and strawberry puree.

    PubMed

    Villa-Rojas, R; Sosa-Morales, M E; López-Malo, A; Tang, J

    2012-04-16

    Botrytis cinerea is one of the most important post-harvest molds that cause quality deterioration of strawberries and other fruits even during refrigeration storage. This research studied the effects of thermal inactivation of B. cinerea in synthetic medium and strawberry puree using hot water baths at different temperatures. These media were studied in order to determine if results obtained in a solution with the major components of the fruit (synthetic media), are comparable to the ones obtained in fruit purees. The results demonstrated that B. cinerea spores can be inactivated by heat treatments using relatively low temperatures (42-46 °C). Inactivation curves were well described by first order kinetics (R² 0.91-0.99). B. cinerea conidia inoculated in synthetic medium required less time to achieve one log reduction in population than those inoculated in the fruit puree. D values were 22, 8.5, 4 and 1.4 min at 42, 44, 46 and 48 °C, respectively, in synthetic medium; while D values in strawberry puree were 44.9, 13.8, 4.7 and 1.4 min at 42, 44, 46 and 48 °C, respectively. The z values obtained were 4.15 and 5.08 °C for the strawberry puree and synthetic medium respectively, showing higher sensitivity of B. cinerea in fruit purees than in the synthetic medium. Thus, a change in the medium composition had a marked difference in the heat inactivation of B. cinerea conidia, and the results obtained in synthetic medium are not accurate to describe the behavior of the microorganism in the fruit. PMID:22445202

  8. A Quantitative Dynamic Simulation of Bremia lactucae Airborne Conidia Concentration above a Lettuce Canopy

    PubMed Central

    Fall, Mamadou Lamine; Van der Heyden, Hervé; Carisse, Odile

    2016-01-01

    Lettuce downy mildew, caused by the oomycete Bremia lactucae Regel, is a major threat to lettuce production worldwide. Lettuce downy mildew is a polycyclic disease driven by airborne spores. A weather-based dynamic simulation model for B. lactucae airborne spores was developed to simulate the aerobiological characteristics of the pathogen. The model was built using the STELLA platform by following the system dynamics methodology. The model was developed using published equations describing disease subprocesses (e.g., sporulation) and assembled knowledge of the interactions among pathogen, host, and weather. The model was evaluated with four years of independent data by comparing model simulations with observations of hourly and daily airborne spore concentrations. The results show an accurate simulation of the trend and shape of B. lactucae temporal dynamics of airborne spore concentration. The model simulated hourly and daily peaks in airborne spore concentrations. More than 95% of the simulation runs, the daily-simulated airborne conidia concentration was 0 when airborne conidia were not observed. Also, the relationship between the simulated and the observed airborne spores was linear. In more than 94% of the simulation runs, the proportion of the linear variation in the hourly-observed values explained by the variation in the hourly-simulated values was greater than 0.7 in all years except one. Most of the errors came from the deviation from the 1:1 line, and the proportion of errors due to the model bias was low. This model is the only dynamic model developed to mimic the dynamics of airborne inoculum and represents an initial step towards improved lettuce downy mildew understanding, forecasting and management. PMID:26953691

  9. Optimization of erythritol and glycerol accumulation in conidia of Beauveria bassiana by solid-state fermentation, using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Tarocco, Federico; Lecuona, Roberto E; Couto, Alicia S; Arcas, Jorge A

    2005-09-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi are widely produced for use as mycoinsecticides. Therefore, improvement of the shelf life of fungal propagules under good and adverse conditions should be a pre-requisite of their production. In order to improve conidial physiology as well as mycoinsecticide efficiency, culture conditions may be varied. The Doehlert design was used to generate response surfaces with an estimation of the parameters of the quadratic model allowing the study of three different factors at a different number of levels. This experimental design was applied to optimize water activity (aw), pH, and fermentation time for Beauveria bassiana conidial production and accumulation of polyols in solid-state fermentation. Thus, it was possible to identify the region in the experimental range in which the optimum values of these parameters were simultaneously achieved. Maximal conidia production was achieved at pH 5-6 and aw=0.999. Under these conditions, polyol accumulation was 3 mg erythritol/g conidia and 29.6 mg glycerol/g conidia. However, maximal polyol accumulation was achieved at pH 4.5 and aw 0.950; erythritol production increased 33-fold and glycerol production 4.5-fold. Under these conditions conidia production was 1,000 times lower. The possibilities of increasing the quality of the biocontrol agent without neglecting yield are discussed. PMID:15731900

  10. QUANTIFICATION OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM CONIDIA IN INDOOR DUST USING REAL TIME, FLUORESCENT PROBE-BASED DETECTION OF PCR PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Analyses of fungal spores or conidia in indoor dust samples can be useful for determining the contamination status of building interiors and in signaling instances where potentially harmful exposures of building occupants to these organisms may exist. A recently developed method ...

  11. The effects of dietary soybean isoflavones on growth, innate immune responses, hepatic antioxidant abilities and disease resistance of juvenile golden pompano Trachinotus ovatus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chuanpeng; Lin, Heizhao; Ge, Xianping; Niu, Jin; Wang, Jun; Wang, Yun; Chen, Lixiong; Huang, Zhong; Yu, Wei; Tan, Xiaohong

    2015-03-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary soybean isoflavones (SI) supplementation on growth performance, innate immune responses, hepatic antioxidant abilities, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) gene expression and resistance to the pathogen Vibrio harveyi in Trachinotus ovatus. A basal diet was supplemented with SI at 0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 mg kg(-1) feed for 8 weeks. Significantly maximum weight gain (WG) and specific growth rate (SGR) were observed in treatment with 40 mg kg(-1) SI supplement (P < 0.05). Feed conversion ratio (FCR), feeding rate (FR) and survival rate were not significantly different among treatments. Fish fed a diet with 40 mg kg(-1) SI showed significant increase in plasma total protein content, complement 3 content, lysozyme activity as well as respiratory burst activity, but decrease in alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase activities (P < 0.05). Increased plasma alkaline phosphatase activity, hepatic total antioxidative capacity, catalase activity and superoxide dismutase activity were also noticed in fish fed SI at 40 or 60 mg kg(-1) (P < 0.05). On the contrary, the lowest hepatic malondialdehyde (MDA) content was observed in fish fed SI at 40 mg kg(-1) (P < 0.05). Compared with the control, the relative level of HSP70 mRNA in fish fed SI at 40-80 mg kg(-1) were significantly increased, respectively (P < 0.05). After challenge with V. harveyi, significant higher post-challenge survival was observed in fish fed diets with 40-80 mg kg(-1) SI supplement than that in control group (P < 0.05). These results indicated that dietary intake containing SI could enhance the immune ability of fish and improve its resistance to infection by V. harveyi. Especially supplementation with 40 mg kg(-1) SI to the fish for 8 weeks showed remarkable improvement in the growth, non-specific immune responses, hepatic antioxidant abilities and HSP70 gene expression. PMID:25541076

  12. Effects of Palygorskite Inclusion on the Growth Performance, Meat Quality, Antioxidant Ability, and Mineral Element Content of Broilers.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Y F; Chen, Y P; Li, X H; Yang, W L; Wen, C; Zhou, Y M

    2016-09-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate different levels of palygorskite supplementation on the growth performance, meat quality, muscular oxidative status, and mineral element accumulation of broilers. One hundred ninety-two 1-day-old Arbor Acres broiler chicks were allocated to four dietary treatments with six replicates of eight chicks per replicate. Birds in the four treatments were given a basal diet supplemented with 0, 5, 10 and 20 g/kg palygorskite for 42 days, respectively. Compared with the control group, neither 5 g/kg nor 10 g/kg palygorskite inclusion affected growth performance of broilers during the 42-day study (P > 0.05). However, the highest level of palygorskite supplementation at 20 g/kg increased feed/gain ratio (F/G) of broilers (P < 0.001). Yellowness (P < 0.001) and redness (P = 0.003) of breast muscle and yellowness of leg muscle (P = 0.001) were decreased by palygorskite supplementation at the levels of 10 g/kg and especially 20 g/kg. In addition, redness of leg muscle was also reduced by the inclusion of 20 g/kg palygorskite (P = 0.009). In contrast, malonaldehyde (MDA) accumulation in the breast muscle was significantly increased by 20 g/kg palygorskite supplementation (P < 0.001). Supplementation of palygorskite at either 10 or 20 g/kg significantly decreased lead (Pb) accumulation in the breast (P = 0.001) or thigh (P = 0.045) and copper (Cu) accumulation in the breast (P = 0.022). In conclusion, growth performance, meat color, and antioxidant capacity of meat would reduce with the increasing level of palygorskite supplementation, whereas a higher level of palygorskite (10 or 20 g/kg) can alter mineral element accumulations in muscles as evidenced by reduced muscular Cu and Pb contents. PMID:26899316

  13. [The effect of coccidiostats on the growth capacity and the survival ability of Salmonella live vaccine agents].

    PubMed

    Martin, G; Meyer, H

    1994-11-01

    Anticoccidial agents are obligatory feed additives during several rearing periods of poultry. The success of an oral immunization of young chicken with Salmonella live vaccines depends on the insensitivity of the vaccine strain against such anticoccidial agents because the vaccination success depends on the survival of the vaccine strain in the gut of the chick and the temporary colonization of lymphatic tissue. We investigated the in vitro sensitivity of the vaccine strain in the S. typhimurium live vaccine "Zoosaloral H" registered for the vaccination of poultry in Germany in connection with often used anticoccidial agents (Diclazuril, Monensin, Narasin and Salinomycin). No differences in growth and survival between the samples containing and lacking anticoccidial agents were found even by using double amounts of the permitted concentration of the anticoccidial agents. No negative effects of the tested anticoccidial agents on Salmonella being used as oral live vaccines in poultry should be expected. PMID:7872948

  14. The Phytoplankton Nannochloropsis oculata Enhances the Ability of Roseobacter Clade Bacteria to Inhibit the Growth of Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    PubMed Central

    Sharifah, Emilia Noor; Eguchi, Mitsuru

    2011-01-01

    Background Phytoplankton cultures are widely used in aquaculture for a variety of applications, especially as feed for fish larvae. Phytoplankton cultures are usually grown in outdoor tanks using natural seawater and contain probiotic or potentially pathogenic bacteria. Some Roseobacter clade isolates suppress growth of the fish pathogen Vibrio anguillarum. However, most published information concerns interactions between probiotic and pathogenic bacteria, and little information is available regarding the importance of phytoplankton in these interactions. The objectives of this study, therefore, were to identify probiotic Roseobacter clade members in phytoplankton cultures used for rearing fish larvae and to investigate their inhibitory activity towards bacterial fish pathogens in the presence of the phytoplankton Nannochloropsis oculata. Methodology/Principal Findings The fish pathogen V. anguillarum, was challenged with 6 Roseobacter clade isolates (Sulfitobacter sp. (2 strains), Thalassobius sp., Stappia sp., Rhodobacter sp., and Antarctobacter sp.) from phytoplankton cultures under 3 different nutritional conditions. In an organic nutrient-rich medium (VNSS), 6 Roseobacter clade isolates, as well as V. anguillarum, grew well (109 CFU/ml), even when cocultured. In contrast, in a phytoplankton culture medium (ESM) based on artificial seawater, coculture with the 6 isolates decreased the viability of V. anguillarum by approximately more than 10-fold. Excreted substances in media conditioned by growth of the phytoplankton N. oculata (NCF medium) resulted in the complete eradication of V. anguillarum when cocultured with the roseobacters. Autoclaved NCF had the same inhibitory effect. Furthermore, Sulfitobacter sp. much more efficiently incorporated 14C- photosynthetic metabolites (14C-EPM) excreted by N. oculata than did V. anguillarum. Conclusion/Significance Cocultures of a phytoplankton species and Roseobacter clade members exhibited a greater antibacterial

  15. Disruption of the Eng18B ENGase Gene in the Fungal Biocontrol Agent Trichoderma atroviride Affects Growth, Conidiation and Antagonistic Ability

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Mukesh K.; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Sandgren, Mats; Funck Jensen, Dan; Karlsson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    The recently identified phylogenetic subgroup B5 of fungal glycoside hydrolase family 18 genes encodes enzymes with mannosyl glycoprotein endo-N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (ENGase)-type activity. Intracellular ENGase activity is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway (ERAD) of misfolded glycoproteins, although the biological relevance in filamentous fungi is not known. Trichoderma atroviride is a mycoparasitic fungus that is used for biological control of plant pathogenic fungi. The present work is a functional study of the T. atroviride B5-group gene Eng18B, with emphasis on its role in fungal growth and antagonism. A homology model of T. atroviride Eng18B structure predicts a typical glycoside hydrolase family 18 (αβ)8 barrel architecture. Gene expression analysis shows that Eng18B is induced in dual cultures with the fungal plant pathogens Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani, although a basal expression is observed in all growth conditions tested. Eng18B disruption strains had significantly reduced growth rates but higher conidiation rates compared to the wild-type strain. However, growth rates on abiotic stress media were significantly higher in Eng18B disruption strains compared to the wild-type strain. No difference in spore germination, germ-tube morphology or in hyphal branching was detected. Disruption strains produced less biomass in liquid cultures than the wild-type strain when grown with chitin as the sole carbon source. In addition, we determined that Eng18B is required for the antagonistic ability of T. atroviride against the grey mould fungus B. cinerea in dual cultures and that this reduction in antagonistic ability is partly connected to a secreted factor. The phenotypes were recovered by re-introduction of an intact Eng18B gene fragment in mutant strains. A putative role of Eng18B ENGase activity in the endoplasmic reticulum associated protein degradation pathway of endogenous glycoproteins in T

  16. Aromatase gene and its effects on growth, reproductive and maternal ability traits in a multibreed sheep population from Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    We determined the polymorphism C242T of the aromatase gene (Cyp19) and its allelic frequency, as well as the effect of the variants on productive and reproductive traits in 71 purebred Santa Inês sheep, 13 purebred Brazilian Somali sheep, nine purebred Poll Dorset sheep, and 18 crossbred 1/2 Dorper sheep. The animals were genotyped using the PCR-RFLP technique. The influence of the animal's genotype on its performance or on the performance of its lambs was analyzed by the least square method. Another factor assessed was the importance of the animal's genotype in analysis models for quantitative breeding value estimates, and whether there were differences among the averages of breeding values of animals with different genotypes for this gene. In the sample studied, no AA individuals were observed; the AB and BB frequencies were 0.64 and 0.36, respectively. All Brazilian Somali sheep were of genotype BB. All 1/2 Dorper BB animals presented a lower age at first lambing, and the Santa Inês BB ewes presented a lower lambing interval. In these same genetic groups, AB ewes presented higher litter weight at weaning. This is evidence that BB ewes have a better reproductive performance phenotype, whereas AB ewes present a better maternal ability phenotype. However, in general, animals with genotype AB presented better average breeding values than those with genotype BB. PMID:21637510

  17. Plasmid load adversely affects growth and gluconic acid secretion ability of mineral phosphate-solubilizing rhizospheric bacterium Enterobacter asburiae PSI3 under P limited conditions.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Archana, G; Naresh Kumar, G

    2011-01-20

    Effect of the metabolic load caused by the presence of plasmids on mineral phosphate-solubilizing (MPS) Enterobacter asburiae PSI3, was monitored with four plasmid cloning vectors and one native plasmid, varying in size, nature of the replicon, copy number and antibiotic resistance genes. Except for one plasmid, the presence of all other plasmids in E. asburiae PSI3 resulted in the loss of the MPS phenotype as reflected by the failure to bring about a drop in pH and release soluble P when grown in media containing rock phosphate (RP) as the sole P source. When 100 μM soluble P was supplemented along with RP, the adverse effects of plasmids on MPS phenotype and on growth parameters was reduced for some plasmid bearing derivatives, as monitored in terms of specific growth rates, glucose consumed, gluconic acids yields and P released. When 10 mM of soluble P as the only P source, was added to the medium all transformants showed growth and pH drop comparable with native strain. It may be concluded that different plasmids impose, to varying extents, a metabolic load in the phosphate-solubilizing bacterium E. asburiae PSI3 and results in diminishing its growth and P-solubilizing ability in P deficient conditions. PMID:20171856

  18. Insulin-like growth factor-1 endues monocytes with immune suppressive ability to inhibit inflammation in the intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Rong-Ti; Mo, Li-Hua; Wu, Ruijin; Liu, Jiang-Qi; Zhang, Huan-Ping; Liu, Zhigang; Liu, Zhanju; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of some chronic inflammation such as inflammatory bowel disease is unclear. Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) has active immune regulatory capability. This study aims to investigate into the mechanism by which IGF1 modulates the monocyte (Mo) properties to inhibit immune inflammation in the intestine. In this study, the production of IGF1 by intestinal epithelial cells was evaluated by real time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Mos were analyzed by flow cytometry. A mouse colitis model was created with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid. The results showed that mouse IECs produced IGF1, which could be up regulated by exposure to CpG-ODN (CpG-oligodeoxynueleotides) in the culture. Culture the CpG-ODN-primed IEC cells and Mos or exposure of Mos to IGF1 in the culture induced the Mos to express IL-10. The IGF1-primed Mos showed the immune suppressive effect on inhibiting the immune inflammation in the mouse colon. In conclusion, the IGF1-primed Mos are capable of suppressing immune inflammation in the intestine. PMID:25588622

  19. Conidial germination in Scedosporium apiospermum, S. aurantiacum, S. minutisporum and Lomentospora prolificans: influence of growth conditions and antifungal susceptibility profiles.

    PubMed

    Mello, Thaís Pereira de; Aor, Ana Carolina; Oliveira, Simone Santiago Carvalho de; Branquinha, Marta Helena; Santos, André Luis Souza Dos

    2016-06-27

    In the present study, we have investigated some growth conditions capable of inducing the conidial germination in Scedosporium apiospermum, S. aurantiacum, S. minutisporum and Lomentospora prolificans. Germination in Sabouraud medium (pH 7.0, 37ºC, 5% CO2) showed to be a typically time-dependent event, reaching ~75% in S. minutisporum and > 90% in S. apiospermum, S. aurantiacum and L. prolificans after 4 h. Similar germination rate was observed when conidia were incubated under different media and pHs. Contrarily, temperature and CO2 tension modulated the germination. The isotropic conidial growth (swelling) and germ tube-like projection were evidenced by microscopy and cytometry. Morphometric parameters augmented in a time-dependent fashion, evidencing changes in size and granularity of fungal cells compared with dormant 0 h conidia. In parallel, a clear increase in the mitochondrial activity was measured during the transformation of conidia-into-germinated conidia. Susceptibility profiles to itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin varied regarding each morphotype and each fungal species. Overall, the minimal inhibitory concentrations for hyphae were higher than conidia and germinated conidia, except for caspofungin. Collectively, our study add new data about the conidia-into-hyphae transformation in Scedosporium and Lomentospora species, which is a relevant biological process of these molds directly connected to their antifungal resistance and pathogenicity mechanisms. PMID:27355215

  20. Conidial germination in Scedosporium apiospermum, S. aurantiacum, S. minutisporum and Lomentospora prolificans: influence of growth conditions and antifungal susceptibility profiles

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Thaís Pereira; Aor, Ana Carolina; de Oliveira, Simone Santiago Carvalho; Branquinha, Marta Helena; dos Santos, André Luis Souza

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated some growth conditions capable of inducing the conidial germination in Scedosporium apiospermum, S. aurantiacum, S. minutisporum and Lomentospora prolificans. Germination in Sabouraud medium (pH 7.0, 37ºC, 5% CO2) showed to be a typically time-dependent event, reaching ~75% in S. minutisporum and > 90% in S. apiospermum, S. aurantiacum and L. prolificans after 4 h. Similar germination rate was observed when conidia were incubated under different media and pHs. Contrarily, temperature and CO2 tension modulated the germination. The isotropic conidial growth (swelling) and germ tube-like projection were evidenced by microscopy and cytometry. Morphometric parameters augmented in a time-dependent fashion, evidencing changes in size and granularity of fungal cells compared with dormant 0 h conidia. In parallel, a clear increase in the mitochondrial activity was measured during the transformation of conidia-into-germinated conidia. Susceptibility profiles to itraconazole, fluconazole, voriconazole, amphotericin B and caspofungin varied regarding each morphotype and each fungal species. Overall, the minimal inhibitory concentrations for hyphae were higher than conidia and germinated conidia, except for caspofungin. Collectively, our study add new data about the conidia-into-hyphae transformation in Scedosporium and Lomentospora species, which is a relevant biological process of these molds directly connected to their antifungal resistance and pathogenicity mechanisms. PMID:27355215

  1. Metacridamides A and B, macrocycles from conidia of the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium acridum

    PubMed Central

    Krasnoff, Stuart B.; Englich, Ulrich; Miller, Paula G.; Shuler, Michael L.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Donzelli, Bruno G. G.; Gibson, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Metarhizium acridum, an entomopathogenic fungus, has been commercialized and used successfully for biocontrol of grasshopper pests in Africa and Australia. Its conidia produce two novel 17-membered macrocycles, metacridamides A (1) and B (2), which consist of a Phe unit condensed with a nonaketide. Planar structures were elucidated by a combination of mass spectrometric and NMR techniques. Following hydrolysis of 1, chiral amino acid analysis assigned the L-configuration to the Phe unit. A crystal structure established the absolute configuration of the eight remaining stereogenic centers in 1. Metacridamide A (1) showed cytotoxicity to three cancer lines with IC50s of 6.2, 11.0, and 10.8 µM against Caco-2 (epithelial colorectal adenocarcinoma), MCF-7 (breast cancer), and HepG2/C3A (hepatoma) cell lines, respectively. In addition, metacridamide B (2) had an IC50 of 18.2 µM against HepG2/C3A, although it was inactive at 100 µM against Caco-2 and MCF-7. Neither analogue showed antimicrobial, phytotoxic, or insecticidal activity. PMID:22292922

  2. Distinct Innate Immune Phagocyte Responses to Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia and Hyphae in Zebrafish Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Benjamin P.; Deng, Qing; Rood, Mary; Eickhoff, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common filamentous fungal pathogen of immunocompromised hosts, resulting in invasive aspergillosis (IA) and high mortality rates. Innate immunity is known to be the predominant host defense against A. fumigatus; however, innate phagocyte responses to A. fumigatus in an intact host and their contributions to host survival remain unclear. Here, we describe a larval zebrafish A. fumigatus infection model amenable to real-time imaging of host-fungal interactions in live animals. Following infection with A. fumigatus, innate phagocyte populations exhibit clear preferences for different fungal morphologies: macrophages rapidly phagocytose conidia and form aggregates around hyphae, while the neutrophil response is dependent upon the presence of hyphae. Depletion of macrophages rendered host larvae susceptible to invasive disease. Moreover, a zebrafish model of human leukocyte adhesion deficiency with impaired neutrophil function also resulted in invasive disease and impaired host survival. In contrast, macrophage-deficient but not neutrophil-deficient larvae exhibited attenuated disease following challenge with a less virulent (ΔlaeA) strain of A. fumigatus, which has defects in secondary metabolite production. Taking these results together, we have established a new vertebrate model for studying innate immune responses to A. fumigatus that reveals distinct roles for neutrophils and macrophages in mediating host defense against IA. PMID:24879123

  3. Utilization of a Conidia-Deficient Mutant to Study Sexual Development in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Son, Hokyoung; Lim, Jae Yun; Lee, Yoonji; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome analysis is a widely used approach to study the molecular mechanisms underlying development and the responses of fungi to environmental cues. However, it is difficult to obtain cells with a homogeneous status from the sexually-induced culture of the plant pathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum. In this study, we provided phenotypic and genetic evidence to show that the current conditions applied for perithecia induction inevitably highly induced asexual sporulation in this fungus. We also found that hundreds of genes under the control of the conidiation-specific gene ABAA were unnecessarily upregulated after perithecia induction. Deletion of ABAA specifically blocked conidia production in both the wild-type strain and sexually-defective mutants during sexual development. Taken together, our results suggest that the abaA strain could be used as a background strain for studies of the initial stages of perithecia production in F. graminearum. Further comparative transcriptome analysis between the abaA mutant and the sexually-defective transcription factor mutant carrying the ABAA deletion would contribute to the construction of the genetic networks involved in perithecia development in F. graminearum. PMID:27175901

  4. The Tumor Suppressor Activity of the Transmembrane Protein with Epidermal Growth Factor and Two Follistatin Motifs 2 (TMEFF2) Correlates with Its Ability to Modulate Sarcosine Levels*

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaofei; Overcash, Ryan; Green, Thomas; Hoffman, Donald; Asch, Adam S.; Ruiz-Echevarría, Maria J.

    2011-01-01

    The type I transmembrane protein with epidermal growth factor and two follistatin motifs 2 (TMEFF2) is expressed in brain and prostate and overexpressed in prostate cancer, but its role in this disease is unclear. Several studies have suggested that TMEFF2 plays a role in suppressing the growth and invasive potential of human cancer cells, whereas others suggest that the shed portion of TMEFF2, which lacks the cytoplasmic region, has a growth-promoting activity. Here we show that TMEFF2 has a dual mode of action. Ectopic expression of wild-type full-length TMEFF2 inhibits soft agar colony formation, cellular invasion, and migration and increases cellular sensitivity to apoptosis. However, expression of the ectodomain portion of TMEFF2 increases cell proliferation. Using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry, we identify sarcosine dehydrogenase (SARDH), the enzyme that converts sarcosine to glycine, as a TMEFF2-interacting protein. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence analysis confirms the interaction of SARDH with full-length TMEFF2. The ectodomain does not bind to SARDH. Moreover, expression of the full-length TMEFF2 but not the ectodomain results in a decreased level of sarcosine in the cells. These results suggest that the tumor suppressor activity of TMEFF2 requires the cytoplasmic/transmembrane portion of the protein and correlates with its ability to bind to SARDH and to modulate the level of sarcosine. PMID:21393249

  5. Nitric Oxide Participation in the Fungicidal Mechanism of Gamma Interferon-Activated Murine Macrophages against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Conidia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Angel; de Gregori, Waldemar; Velez, Diana; Restrepo, Angela; Cano, Luz E.

    2000-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis, a systemic mycosis restricted to Latin America and produced by the dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, is probably acquired by inhalation of conidia produced by the mycelial form. The macrophage (Mφ) represents the major cell defense against this pathogen; when activated with gamma interferon (IFN-γ), murine Mφs kill the fungus by an oxygen-independent mechanism. Our goal was to determine the role of nitric oxide in the fungicidal effect of Mφs on P. brasiliensis conidia. The results revealed that IFN-γ-activated murine Mφs inhibited the conidium-to-yeast transformation process in a dose-dependent manner; maximal inhibition was observed in Mφs activated with 50 U/ml and incubated for 96 h at 37°C. When Mφs were activated with 150 to 200 U of cytokine per ml, the number of CFU was 70% lower than in nonactivated controls, indicating that there was a fungicidal effect. The inhibitory effect was reversed by the addition of anti-IFN-γ monoclonal antibodies. Activation by IFN-γ also enhanced Mφ nitric oxide production, as revealed by increasing NO2 values (8 ± 3 μM in nonactivated Mφs versus 43 ± 13 μM in activated Mφs). The neutralization of IFN-γ also reversed nitric oxide production at basal levels (8 ± 5 μM). Additionally, we found that there was a significant inverse correlation (r = −0.8975) between NO2− concentration and transformation of P. brasiliensis conidia. Additionally, treatment with any of the three different nitric oxide inhibitors used (arginase, NG-monomethyl-l-arginine, and aminoguanidine), reverted the inhibition of the transformation process with 40 to 70% of intracellular yeast and significantly reduced nitric oxide production. These results show that IFN-γ-activated murine Mφs kill P. brasiliensis conidia through the l-arginine–nitric oxide pathway. PMID:10768942

  6. A proteomic and genetic analysis of the Neurospora crassa conidia cell wall proteins identifies two glycosyl hydrolases involved in cell wall remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ao, Jie; Aldabbous, Mash'el; Notaro, Marysa J; Lojacono, Mark; Free, Stephen J

    2016-09-01

    A proteomic analysis of the conidial cell wall identified 35 cell wall proteins. A comparison with the proteome of the vegetative hyphae showed that 16 cell wall proteins were shared, and that these shared cell wall proteins were cell wall biosynthetic proteins or cell wall structural proteins. Deletion mutants for 34 of the genes were analyzed for phenotypes indicative of conidial cell wall defects. Mutants for two cell wall glycosyl hydrolases, the CGL-1 β-1,3-glucanase (NCU07523) and the NAG-1 exochitinase (NCU10852), were found to have a conidial separation phenotype. These two enzymes function in remodeling the cell wall between adjacent conidia to facilitate conidia formation and dissemination. Using promoter::RFP and promoter::GFP constructs, we demonstrated that the promoters for 15 of the conidia-specific cell wall genes, including cgl-1 and nag-1, provided for conidia-specific gene expression or for a significant increase in their expression during conidiation. PMID:27381444

  7. Comparison between conidia and blastospores of Esteya vermicola, an endoparasitic fungus of the pinewood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun-Bo; Yang, Zhi-Hong; Yu, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Yong-An; Xue, Jian-Jie; Li, Zheng; Li, Jing-Jie; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wang, Zhen; Hou, Jin-Gang; Begum, Shahraz; Gu, Li-Juan; Lee, Mi-Ra; Sung, Chang-Keun

    2013-12-01

    Esteya vermicola, an endoparasitic fungus of Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the pinewood nematode (PWN), exhibits great potential as a biological control agent against this nematode. E. vermicola produces blastospores in liquid media and aerial conidia on solid media. The agent was mass-produced using two kinds of culture media: S (50 % wheat bran and 50 % pine wood powder), L (0.5 g wheat bran and 0.5 g pinewood powder in 200 ml of potato dextrose broth), and two controls: SC (potato dextrose agar), LC (potato dextrose broth). Yields, multiple stress tolerance, storage life, new generation conidial number, and PWN mortality rates of the spores were measured in each of these four media and compared. The spore yields, new generation conidial number, and nematode mortality rates of blastospores were higher than those of conidia. Nevertheless, the conidia had a higher germination rate than the blastospores during the storage process and multiple stress treatments. Considering the number of spores surviving from the process of the storage and multiple stress treatments per unit of mass media, the blastospores from L survived most. Comprehensive analysis indicates that the L culture medium is the most optimal medium for mass production relatively. PMID:23918632

  8. Modulation of conidia production and expression of the gene bbrgs1 from Beauveria bassiana by oxygen pulses and light.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Gomez, Divanery; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Loera, Octavio

    2015-09-01

    Light and oxidant states affect the conidiation in diverse fungi, although the response has not been described when both stimuli are applied simultaneously. Conidial production and quality in Beauveria bassiana were analysed under four conditions for a wild-type (wt) strain and a previously isolated mutant (mt): normal atmosphere (21% O2; NA) or oxygen-enriched pulses (26% O2; OEP), with either light (L) or darkness (D). The response was complemented by following the expression of the bbrgs1 gene, encoding a regulator of the G-protein signal associated to conidia production. Conidiation was not significantly affected in the mutant strain by any condition (highest value with NA-L: 2.7×10(8)concm(-2)). Relative to maximal levels under NA (NA-D: 4×10(7)concm(2)), the wt strain diminished conidiation by 34-fold under OEP. The expression of bbrgs1 was higher (up to 188 times) in the mutant strain in every condition relative to the wt strain, in fact expression levels were consistent with the conidiation yields between strains. Viability and hydrophobicity were less affected by culture conditions, although pathogenicity parameters improved in conidia from OEP. The response to OEP, either with light or darkness, was strain-dependent for conidial production, viability, hydrophobicity and infectivity of conidia, then these parameters could be modulated in mass production processes. PMID:26166809

  9. Surface Structure Characterization of Aspergillus fumigatus Conidia Mutated in the Melanin Synthesis Pathway and Their Human Cellular Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Beaussart, Audrey; Dufrêne, Yves F.; Sharma, Meenu; Bansal, Kushagra; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Aimanianda, Vishukumar; Brakhage, Axel A.; Kaveri, Srini V.; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J.

    2014-01-01

    In Aspergillus fumigatus, the conidial surface contains dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN)-melanin. Six-clustered gene products have been identified that mediate sequential catalysis of DHN-melanin biosynthesis. Melanin thus produced is known to be a virulence factor, protecting the fungus from the host defense mechanisms. In the present study, individual deletion of the genes involved in the initial three steps of melanin biosynthesis resulted in an altered conidial surface with masked surface rodlet layer, leaky cell wall allowing the deposition of proteins on the cell surface and exposing the otherwise-masked cell wall polysaccharides at the surface. Melanin as such was immunologically inert; however, deletion mutant conidia with modified surfaces could activate human dendritic cells and the subsequent cytokine production in contrast to the wild-type conidia. Cell surface defects were rectified in the conidia mutated in downstream melanin biosynthetic pathway, and maximum immune inertness was observed upon synthesis of vermelone onward. These observations suggest that although melanin as such is an immunologically inert material, it confers virulence by facilitating proper formation of the A. fumigatus conidial surface. PMID:24818666

  10. Bundle-like α'-NaV2O5 mesocrystals: from synthesis, growth mechanism to analysis of Na-ion intercalation/deintercalation abilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengcheng; Zhou, Dehua; Zhu, Kongjun; Wu, Qingliu; Wang, Yifeng; Tai, Guoan; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Qilin

    2016-01-01

    Bundle-like α'-NaV2O5 mesocrystals were synthesized successfully by a two-step hydrothermal method. Observations using electron microscopy revealed that the obtained NaV2O5 mesocrystals were composed of nanobelts with the preferential growth direction of [010]. The precise crystal structure was further confirmed by Rietveld refinement and Raman spectroscopy. Based on analysis of crystal structure and microscopy, a reaction and growth mechanism, hydrolysis-condensation (oxolation and olation)-ion exchange-self-assembly, was proposed and described in detail. Furthermore, electrochemical measurements were used to analyze the Na-ions intercalation/deintercalation abilities in NaV2O5, and indicated that Na-ions were difficult to extract. Importantly, the DFT theoretical calculation results, which showed that the migration energy of Na-ions was so huge that migration of Na-ions was quite difficult, can explain and support well the results of the electrochemical measurements.Bundle-like α'-NaV2O5 mesocrystals were synthesized successfully by a two-step hydrothermal method. Observations using electron microscopy revealed that the obtained NaV2O5 mesocrystals were composed of nanobelts with the preferential growth direction of [010]. The precise crystal structure was further confirmed by Rietveld refinement and Raman spectroscopy. Based on analysis of crystal structure and microscopy, a reaction and growth mechanism, hydrolysis-condensation (oxolation and olation)-ion exchange-self-assembly, was proposed and described in detail. Furthermore, electrochemical measurements were used to analyze the Na-ions intercalation/deintercalation abilities in NaV2O5, and indicated that Na-ions were difficult to extract. Importantly, the DFT theoretical calculation results, which showed that the migration energy of Na-ions was so huge that migration of Na-ions was quite difficult, can explain and support well the results of the electrochemical measurements. Electronic supplementary

  11. A comparison between intratracheal and inhalation delivery of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia in the development of fungal allergic asthma in C57BL/6 mice

    PubMed Central

    Samarasinghe, Amali E.; Hoselton, Scott A.; Schuh, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Allergic asthma is a debilitating disease of the airways characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia with associated mucus hypersecretion, and airway wall remodelling events, particularly subepithelial fibrosis and smooth muscle cell hyperplasia. Animal models that accurately mimic these hallmarks of allergic airways disease are critical for studying mechanisms associated with the cellular and structural changes that lead to disease pathogenesis. Aspergillus fumigatus, is a common aeroallergen of human asthmatics. The intratracheal (IT) delivery of A. fumigatus conidia into the airways of sensitized mice has been described as a model of allergic disease. Here, we compared the IT model with a newly developed inhalation (IH) challenge model. The IH model allowed multiple fungal exposures, which resulted in an exacerbation to the allergic asthma phenotype. Increased recruitment of eosinophils and lymphocytes, the hallmark leukocytes of asthma, were noted with the IH model as compared to the IT model in which macrophages and neutrophils were more prominent. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) production was significantly greater after IH challenge, while that of IgG2a was higher after IT challenge. Airway wall remodelling was pronounced in IH-treated mice, particularly after multiple allergen challenges. Although the IT model may be appropriate for the examination of the played by innate cells in the acute response to fungus, it fails to consistently reproduce the chronic remodelling hallmarks of allergic asthma. The ability of the IH challenge to mimic these characteristics recommends it as a model suited to study these important events. PMID:21215951

  12. A comparison between intratracheal and inhalation delivery of Aspergillus fumigatus conidia in the development of fungal allergic asthma in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Samarasinghe, Amali E; Hoselton, Scott A; Schuh, Jane M

    2011-01-01

    Allergic asthma is a debilitating disease of the airways characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophilic inflammation, goblet cell metaplasia with associated mucus hypersecretion, and airway wall remodelling events, particularly subepithelial fibrosis and smooth muscle cell hyperplasia. Animal models that accurately mimic these hallmarks of allergic airways disease are critical for studying mechanisms associated with the cellular and structural changes that lead to disease pathogenesis. Aspergillus fumigatus, is a common aeroallergen of human asthmatics. The intratracheal (IT) delivery of A. fumigatus conidia into the airways of sensitized mice has been described as a model of allergic disease. Here, we compared the IT model with a newly developed inhalation (IH) challenge model. The IH model allowed multiple fungal exposures, which resulted in an exacerbation to the allergic asthma phenotype. Increased recruitment of eosinophils and lymphocytes, the hallmark leukocytes of asthma, was noted with the IH model as compared to the IT model in which macrophages and neutrophils were more prominent. Immunoglobulin E (IgE) production was significantly greater after IH challenge, while that of IgG(2a) was higher after IT challenge. Airway wall remodelling was pronounced in IH-treated mice, particularly after multiple allergen challenges. Although the IT model may be appropriate for the examination of the played by innate cells in the acute response to fungus, it fails to consistently reproduce the chronic remodelling hallmarks of allergic asthma. The ability of the IH challenge to mimic these characteristics recommends it as a model suited to study these important events. PMID:21215951

  13. Intact Cell/Spore Mass Spectrometry of Fusarium Macro Conidia for Fast Isolate and Species Differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hongjuan; Marchetti-Deschmann, Martina; Winkler, Wolfgang; Lohninger, Hans; Allmaier, Guenter

    The focus of this paper is the development of an approach called intact cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) or intact spore mass spectrometry (ISMS) based on the technique matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) for the rapid differentiation and identification of Fusarium species. Several parameters, which are known to affect the quality of IC mass spectra, have been investigated in detail by varying the MALDI matrix as well as the solvent system, in which the matrix has been dissolved, the solvent system for sample purification and the type of sample/MALDI matrix deposition technique. In the end characteristic as well as highly reproducible IC or IS mass spectra or peptide/protein fingerprints of three Fusarium species (F. cerealis, F. graminearum and F. poae) including 16 Fusarium isolates derived from different hosts and geographical locations have been obtained. Unscaled hierarchical cluster analysis based on ICMS data of eight selected Fusarium isolates of two species F. graminearum and F. poae revealed significant difference among the peptide/protein pattern of them. The results of the applied cluster analysis proved that, ICMS is a powerful approach for the rapid differentiation of Fusarium species. In addition, an on-target tryptic digestion was applied to Fusarium macro conidia spores to identify proteins using MALDI post source decay (PSD) fragment ion analysis. Two kinds of trypsin, namely bead-immobilized - to favor cleavage of surface-associated proteins - and non-immobilized trypsin were applied and compared. The results showed that the latter is more suitable for generating sequence tags by PSD fragment ion analysis.

  14. A phenazine-1-carboxylic acid producing polyextremophilic Pseudomonas chlororaphis (MCC2693) strain, isolated from mountain ecosystem, possesses biocontrol and plant growth promotion abilities.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rahul; Pandey, Anita

    2016-09-01

    The genus Pseudomonas is known to comprise a huge diversity of species with the ability to thrive in different habitats, including those considered as extreme environments. In the present study, a psychrotolerant, wide pH tolerant and halotolerant strain of Pseudomonas chlororaphis GBPI_507 (MCC2693), isolated from the wheat rhizosphere growing in a mountain location in Indian Himalayan Region (IHR), has been investigated for its antimicrobial potential with particular reference to phenazine production and plant growth promoting traits. GBPI_507 showed phenazine production at the temperatures ranged from 14 to 25°C. The benzene extracted compound identified as phenazine-1-carboxylic acid (PCA) through GC-MS exhibited antimicrobial properties against Gram positive bacteria and actinomycetes. The inhibition of phytopathogens in diffusible biocontrol assays was recorded in an order: Alternaria alternata>Phytophthora sp.>Fusarium solani>F. oxysporum. In volatile metabolite assays, all the pathogens, except Phytophthora sp. produced distorted colonies, characterized by restricted sporulation. The isolate also possessed other growth promoting and biocontrol traits including phosphate solubilization and production of siderophores, HCN, ammonia, and lytic enzymes (lipase and protease). Molecular studies confirmed production of PCA by the bacterium GBPI_507 through presence of phzCD and phzE genes in its genome. The polyextremophilic bacterial strain possesses various important characters to consider it as a potential agent for field applications, especially in mountain ecosystem, for sustainable and eco-friendly crop production. PMID:27394000

  15. Coloration signals the ability to cope with elevated stress hormones: effects of corticosterone on growth of barn owls are associated with melanism.

    PubMed

    Almasi, B; Roulin, A; Korner-Nievergelt, F; Jenni-Eiermann, S; Jenni, L

    2012-06-01

    Stressful situations during development can shape the phenotype for life by provoking a trade-off between development and survival. Stress hormones, mainly glucocorticoids, play an important orchestrating role in this trade-off. Hence, how stress sensitive an animal is critically determines the phenotype and ultimately fitness. In several species, darker eumelanic individuals are less sensitive to stressful conditions than less eumelanic conspecifics, which may be due to the pleiotropic effects of genes affecting both coloration and physiological traits. We experimentally tested whether the degree of melanin-based coloration is associated with the sensitivity to an endocrine response to stressful situations in the barn owl. We artificially administered the mediator of a hormonal stress response, corticosterone, to nestlings to examine the prediction that corticosterone-induced reduction in growth rate is more pronounced in light eumelanic nestlings than in darker nest mates. To examine whether such an effect may be genetically determined, we swapped hatchlings between randomly chosen pairs of nests. We first showed that corticosterone affects growth and, thus, shapes the phenotype. Second, we found that under corticosterone administration, nestlings with large black spots grew better than nestlings with small black spots. As in the barn owl the expression of eumelanin-based coloration is heritable and not sensitive to environmental conditions, it is therefore a reliable, genetically based sign of the ability to cope with an increase in blood corticosterone level. PMID:22530630

  16. Bundle-like α'-NaV2O5 mesocrystals: from synthesis, growth mechanism to analysis of Na-ion intercalation/deintercalation abilities.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengcheng; Zhou, Dehua; Zhu, Kongjun; Wu, Qingliu; Wang, Yifeng; Tai, Guoan; Zhang, Wei; Gu, Qilin

    2016-01-28

    Bundle-like α'-NaV2O5 mesocrystals were synthesized successfully by a two-step hydrothermal method. Observations using electron microscopy revealed that the obtained NaV2O5 mesocrystals were composed of nanobelts with the preferential growth direction of [010]. The precise crystal structure was further confirmed by Rietveld refinement and Raman spectroscopy. Based on analysis of crystal structure and microscopy, a reaction and growth mechanism, hydrolysis-condensation (oxolation and olation)-ion exchange-self-assembly, was proposed and described in detail. Furthermore, electrochemical measurements were used to analyze the Na-ions intercalation/deintercalation abilities in NaV2O5, and indicated that Na-ions were difficult to extract. Importantly, the DFT theoretical calculation results, which showed that the migration energy of Na-ions was so huge that migration of Na-ions was quite difficult, can explain and support well the results of the electrochemical measurements. PMID:26673118

  17. The Influence of Speech Perception, Oral Language Ability, the Home Literacy Environment, and Pre-Reading Knowledge on the Growth of Phonological Sensitivity: A One-Year Longitudinal Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the influences of speech perception, oral language ability, emergent literacy, and the home literacy environment on the growth of phonological sensitivity. Finds, overall, the combination of predictors explained a significant proportion of the variance in phonological sensitivity and its growth. Discusses results in terms of their…

  18. Growth of SJL/J-derived transplantable reticulum cell sarcoma as related to its ability to induce T-cell proliferation in the host- III. Studies on thymectomized and congenitally athymic SJL mice. [Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, I.R.; Chapman-Alexander, J.; Jacobson, E.B.; Lerman, S.P.; Thorbecke, G.J.

    1981-11-15

    When SJL mice are irradiated and reconstituted with syngeneic bone marrow (XBM) they support growth of transplantable reticulum cell sarcoma to approximately 60% of that in normal mice. The ability to support RCS growth gradually improves with time after irradiation and reaches 90% of normal by 8-12 weeks. However, if the mice are thymectomized 4 weeks prior to treatment (Tx-XBM) they initially show 50% which increases to only 65% of growth in normal mice after 12 weeks. The ability of lymphoid cells from these mice to proliferate in vitro in response to irradiated RCS cells is normal 4 weeks after treatment in XBM, but remains <10% of normal in Tx-XBM mice. Nude mice of SJL background also show greatly diminished RCS growth. It is concluded that T cells promote RCS growth in vivo possibly via their tendency to proliferate upon exposure to RCS.

  19. Age-Related Macular Degeneration-Associated Silent Polymorphisms in HtrA1 Impair Its Ability To Antagonize Insulin-Like Growth Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Jacobo, Sarah Melissa P.; DeAngelis, Margaret M.; Kim, Ivana K.

    2013-01-01

    Synonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a transcript's coding region produce no change in the amino acid sequence of the protein product and are therefore intuitively assumed to have a neutral effect on protein function. We report that two common variants of high-temperature requirement A1 (HTRA1) that increase the inherited risk of neovascular age-related macular degeneration (NvAMD) harbor synonymous SNPs within exon 1 of HTRA1 that convert common codons for Ala34 and Gly36 to less frequently used codons. The frequent-to-rare codon conversion reduced the mRNA translation rate and appeared to compromise HtrA1's conformation and function. The protein product generated from the SNP-containing cDNA displayed enhanced susceptibility to proteolysis and a reduced affinity for an anti-HtrA1 antibody. The NvAMD-associated synonymous polymorphisms lie within HtrA1's putative insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) binding domain. They reduced HtrA1's abilities to associate with IGF-1 and to ameliorate IGF-1-stimulated signaling events and cellular responses. These observations highlight the relevance of synonymous codon usage to protein function and implicate homeostatic protein quality control mechanisms that may go awry in NvAMD. PMID:23478260

  20. Binding of pulmonary surfactant proteins A and D to Aspergillus fumigatus conidia enhances phagocytosis and killing by human neutrophils and alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Madan, T; Eggleton, P; Kishore, U; Strong, P; Aggrawal, S S; Sarma, P U; Reid, K B

    1997-01-01

    To determine whether the lung surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) are involved in the initial protective immunity against opportunistic pulmonary fungal infections caused by Aspergillus fumigatus, we performed a series of in vitro functional studies to see if SP-A and SP-D enhanced binding, phagocytosis, activation, and killing of A. fumigatus conidia by human alveolar macrophages and circulating neutrophils. Both SP-A and SP-D bound to carbohydrate structures on A. fumigatus conidia in a calcium-dependent manner. SP-A and SP-D were also chemoattractant and significantly enhanced agglutination and binding of conidia to alveolar macrophages and neutrophils. Furthermore, in the presence of SP-A and SP-D, the phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and killing of A. fumigatus conidia by neutrophils were significantly increased. These findings indicate that SP-A and SP-D may have an important immunological role in the early antifungal defense responses in the lung, through inhibiting infectivity of conidia by agglutination and by enhancing uptake and killing of A. fumigatus by phagocytic cells. PMID:9234771

  1. Musical ability.

    PubMed

    Sloboda, J

    1993-01-01

    Musical ability is the ability to 'make sense' of music, and develops in most people over the first decade of life through normal enculturation. Whether this ability is developed to a high level usually depends on the decision to start learning a musical instrument, which forces high levels of focused cognitive engagement (practice) with musical materials. Performance ability has both technical and expressive aspects. These aspects are not always developed equally well. Factors contributing to the development of a well-balanced musical performer include (a) lengthy periods of engagement with music through practice and exploration, (b) high levels of material and emotional support from parents and other adults, (c) relationships with early teachers characterized by warmth and mutual liking, and (d) early experiences with music that promote, rather than inhibit, intense sensuous/affective experiences. It is argued that much formal education inhibits the development of musical ability through over-emphasis on assessment, creating performance anxiety, coupled with class and sex stereotyping of approved musical activities. Early free exploration of a medium is a necessity for the development of high levels of musicality. PMID:8168360

  2. Proteomic analysis of conidia germination in Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 reveals new targets in ergosterol biosynthesis pathway for controlling Fusarium wilt of banana.

    PubMed

    Deng, Gui-Ming; Yang, Qiao-Song; He, Wei-Di; Li, Chun-Yu; Yang, Jing; Zuo, Cun-Wu; Gao, Jie; Sheng, Ou; Lu, Shao-Yun; Zhang, Sheng; Yi, Gan-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Conidial germination is a crucial step of the soilborne fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense tropical race 4 (Foc TR4), a most important lethal disease of banana. In this study, a total of 3659 proteins were identified by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based comparative proteomic approach, of which 1009 were differentially expressed during conidial germination of the fungus at 0, 3, 7, and 11 h. Functional classification and bioinformatics analysis revealed that the majority of the differentially expressed proteins are involved in six metabolic pathways. Particularly, all differential proteins involved in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway were significantly upregulated, indicating the importance of the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway to the conidial germination of Foc TR4. Quantitative RT-PCR, western blotting, and in vitro growth inhibition assay by several categories of fungicides on the Foc TR4 were used to validate the proteomics results. Four enzymes, C-24 sterol methyltransferase (ERG6), cytochrome P450 lanosterol C-14α-demethylase (EGR11), hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA synthase (ERG13), and C-4 sterol methyl oxidase (ERG25), in the ergosterol biosynthesis pathway were identified and verified, and they hold great promise as new targets for effective inhibition of Foc TR4 early growth in controlling Fusarium wilt of banana. To the best of our knowledge, this report represents the first comprehensive study on proteomics profiling of conidia germination in Foc TR4. It provides new insights into a better understanding of the developmental processes of Foc TR4 spores. More importantly, by host plant-induced gene silencing (HIGS) technology, the new targets reported in this work allow us to develop novel transgenic banana leading to high protection from Fusarium wilt and to explore more effective antifungal drugs against either individual or multiple target proteins of Foc TR4. PMID:26129952

  3. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass displays improved growth and fermentative ability in high solids concentrations and in the presence of inhibitory compounds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Softwoods are the dominant source of lignocellulosic biomass in the northern hemisphere, and have been investigated worldwide as a renewable substrate for cellulosic ethanol production. One challenge to using softwoods, which is particularly acute with pine, is that the pretreatment process produces inhibitory compounds detrimental to the growth and metabolic activity of fermenting organisms. To overcome the challenge of bioconversion in the presence of inhibitory compounds, especially at high solids loading, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was subjected to evolutionary engineering and adaptation for fermentation of pretreated pine wood (Pinus taeda). Results An industrial strain of Saccharomyces, XR122N, was evolved using pretreated pine; the resulting daughter strain, AJP50, produced ethanol much more rapidly than its parent in fermentations of pretreated pine. Adaptation, by preculturing of the industrial yeast XR122N and the evolved strains in 7% dry weight per volume (w/v) pretreated pine solids prior to inoculation into higher solids concentrations, improved fermentation performance of all strains compared with direct inoculation into high solids. Growth comparisons between XR122N and AJP50 in model hydrolysate media containing inhibitory compounds found in pretreated biomass showed that AJP50 exited lag phase faster under all conditions tested. This was due, in part, to the ability of AJP50 to rapidly convert furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural to their less toxic alcohol derivatives, and to recover from reactive oxygen species damage more quickly than XR122N. Under industrially relevant conditions of 17.5% w/v pretreated pine solids loading, additional evolutionary engineering was required to decrease the pronounced lag phase. Using a combination of adaptation by inoculation first into a solids loading of 7% w/v for 24 hours, followed by a 10% v/v inoculum (approximately equivalent to 1 g/L dry cell weight) into 17.5% w/v solids, the final

  4. Method for Determining the best Hydrophilic-lipophilic Balance (HLB) Number of a Compatible Non-ionic Surfactant in Formulation Development for Areal Conidia of Metarhizium anisopliae (Deuteromycotina: Hyphomycetes)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A non-swirling/direct dropping method was developed to optimize a compatible, non-ionic surfactant for formulation development of Metarhizium anisopliae conidia by determining the optimal hydrophilic-lipophilic balance number. Results showed the optimal HLB number of the tested M. anisopliae conidia...

  5. Human abilities.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, R J; Kaufman, J C

    1998-01-01

    This chapter reviews recent literature, primarily from the 1990s, on human abilities. The review opens with a consideration of the question of what intelligence is, and then considers some of the major definitions of intelligence, as well as implicit theories of intelligence around the world. Next, the chapter considers cognitive approaches to intelligence, and then biological approaches. It proceeds to psychometric or traditional approaches to intelligence, and then to broad, recent approaches. The different approaches raise somewhat different questions, and hence produce somewhat different answers. They have in common, however, the attempt to understand what kinds of mechanisms lead some people to adapt to, select, and shape environments in ways that match particularly well the demands of those environments. PMID:9496630

  6. Activity of oil-formulated conidia of the fungal entomopathogens Nomuraea rileyi and Isaria tenuipes against lepidopterous larvae.

    PubMed

    Vega-Aquino, Paulina; Sanchez-Peña, Sergio; Blanco, Carlos A

    2010-03-01

    The fungi Nomuraea rileyi and Isaria tenuipes (=Paecilomyces tenuipes) are ecologically obligate, widespread pathogens of lepidopterans. Bioassays were carried out to evaluate the activity of oil-suspended conidia of N. rileyi and I. tenuipes against larvae of Spodoptera frugiperda, Spodoptera exigua, Helicoverpa zea, and Heliothis virescens. The tests consisted of two bioassay sets. In the first set, conidia of N. rileyi and I. tenuipes were suspended in water+Tween 80, and in vegetable (canola, soybean) and mineral (proprietary mixture of alkanes and cyclic paraffins) oils, and tested against S. frugiperda. Both fungi were highly compatible with oils and caused mortalities near 100% in all oil treatments; the lowest LT(50) values were 4.7 days for N. rileyi in mineral oil and 6.0 days for I. tenuipes in soybean oil. The second set included additional fungal strains and oil formulations (mineral, canola, sunflower, olive and peanut oils) tested against larvae of S. exigua, S. frugiperda, H. zea and H. virescens. The highest activity was that of N. rileyi in mineral oil against Spodoptera spp., with LT(50) values of 2.5 days (strain ARSEF 135) and 3 days (strain ARSEF 762) respectively. For two different isolates of I. tenuipes the lowest LT(50) values (5.1-5.6 days respectively) were obtained with mineral oil formulations against Spodoptera spp. and H. zea respectively. Additionally, we tested both fungi against prepupae of all four lepidopteran species. Mortalities with I. tenuipes against S. exigua ranged from 90% to 100% (strains ARSEF 2488 and 4096); N. rileyi caused 95% mortality on S. frugiperda. The activity of formulations depended on host species and oil used; Spodoptera spp. was more susceptible to these fungi than Heliothis and Helicoverpa. The results indicate that a comprehensive evaluation of these entomopathogens in agriculture using oil application technologies is advisable, particularly, in organic and sustainable settings. PMID:20025883

  7. Interactions of Chemical Additives, pH, and Temperature on Conidia Germination and Virulence of Colletotrichum truncatum, a Bioherbicide of Sesbania exaltata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We studied several factors that influence conidial germination and pathogenicity of the fungus Colletotrichum truncatum, which is a potential bioherbicide for hemp sesbania. The conidia germinated on 2% water agar over the pH range of 3.5 to 9.0, and the optimal pH for germination depended upon the ...

  8. Impact of two treatments of a formulation of Beauveria bassiana (Deuteromycota: Hyphomycetes) conidia on Varroa mites (Acari: Varroidae) and on honeybee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colony health

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bee colonies in southern France were treated with conidia from 2 strains of Beauveria bassiana – one commercial (GHA) and the other isolated from Varroa mites in the region (Bb05002). Objectives were to evaluate treatment effect on colony weight, adult bee mass, capped brood, and on Varroa fall onto...

  9. Impact of two treatments of a formulation of Beauveria bassiana (Deuteromycota: Hyphomycetes) conidia on Varroa mites (Acari: Varroidae) and on honeybee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colony health.

    PubMed

    Meikle, William G; Mercadier, Guy; Holst, Niels; Girod, Vincent

    2008-12-01

    Bee colonies in southern France were treated with conidia (asexual spores) from two strains of Beauveria bassiana, an entomopathogenic fungus. One strain was commercial (GHA) and the other had been isolated from Varroa mites in the region (Bb05002). Objectives were to evaluate treatment effect on colony weight, adult bee mass, capped brood, and on Varroa fall onto sticky boards. Treatments included conidia formulated with either carnauba or candelilla wax powder, candelilla wax powder alone, or control; in two treatment groups formulation was applied a second time after one week. Treatment did not affect colony health. Colonies treated twice with Bb05002 conidia and carnauba wax powder had significantly higher mite fall compared to colonies treated with blank candelilla wax powder. The proportion of fallen mites that were infected in both conidia treatments was higher than controls for 18 days after the second treatment. The number of fungal propagules on the bees themselves remained elevated for about 14 days after the second treatment. These results were compared to published results from previous experiments with regard to infection duration. PMID:18506583

  10. Application of hydrophilic-lypophilic balance (HLB) number to optimize a compatible non-ionic surfactant for dried aerial conidia of Beauveria bassiana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) number system was used to optimize a compatible non-ionic surfactant, TDA(polyoxyethylene tridecyl ether) in formulations for two Beauveria bassiana strains, NI8 and GHA. The optimal HLB number for TDA was determined on the basis of wetting times for conidia...

  11. Identification of growth stage molecular markers in Trichoderma sp. 'atroviride type B' and their potential application in monitoring fungal growth and development in soil.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Mendoza, Artemio; Steyaert, Johanna; Nieto-Jacobo, Maria Fernanda; Holyoake, Andrew; Braithwaite, Mark; Stewart, Alison

    2015-11-01

    Several members of the genus Trichoderma are biocontrol agents of soil-borne fungal plant pathogens. The effectiveness of biocontrol agents depends heavily on how they perform in the complex field environment. Therefore, the ability to monitor and track Trichoderma within the environment is essential to understanding biocontrol efficacy. The objectives of this work were to: (a) identify key genes involved in Trichoderma sp. 'atroviride type B' morphogenesis; (b) develop a robust RNA isolation method from soil; and (c) develop molecular marker assays for characterizing morphogenesis whilst in the soil environment. Four cDNA libraries corresponding to conidia, germination, vegetative growth and conidiogenesis were created, and the genes identified by sequencing. Stage specificity of the different genes was confirmed by either Northern blot or quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis using RNA from the four stages. con10, a conidial-specific gene, was observed in conidia, as well as one gene also involved in subsequent stages of germination (L-lactate/malate dehydrogenase encoding gene). The germination stage revealed high expression rates of genes involved in amino acid and protein biosynthesis, while in the vegetative-growth stage, genes involved in differentiation, including the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase similar to Kpp7 from Ustilago maydis and the orthologue to stuA from Aspergillus nidulans, were preferentially expressed. Genes involved in cell-wall synthesis were expressed during conidiogenesis. We standardized total RNA isolation from Trichoderma sp. 'atroviride type B' growing in soil and then examined the expression profiles of selected genes using qRT-PCR. The results suggested that the relative expression patterns were cyclic and not accumulative. PMID:26341342

  12. Cellular characterization of a new irreversible inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase and its use in determining the relative abilities of individual polyamines to sustain growth and viability of L1210 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, D L; Khomutov, R M; Bukin, Y V; Khomutov, A R; Porter, C W

    1989-01-01

    S-(5'-Deoxy-5'-adenosyl)methylthioethylhydroxylamine (AMA) is an irreversible inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet) decarboxylase, which is designed to bind covalently the pyruvate residue at the enzyme active site. In the present study the cellular effects of AMA were characterized for the first time in cultured L1210 leukaemia cells. At the approximate IC50 (concn. giving 50% inhibition; 100 microM), AMA decreased spermidine and spermine by more than 80% at 48 h while increasing putrescine more than 10-fold. As an indication of enzyme specificity, growth inhibition was fully prevented with exogenous spermidine. When compared with the irreversible inhibitor of ornithine decarboxylase, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO), at similar growth-inhibitory concentrations, AMA was less cytotoxic, as determined by colony-formation efficiency. In combination with AMA, DFMO eliminated the rise in putrescine and decreased growth in an additive manner. The near-total depletion of intracellular polyamine pools achieved with the drug combination provided an opportunity to examine the relative abilities of individual polyamines to support growth and viability. Of the three exogenously supplied polyamines, only spermidine fully sustained cell growth and viability at control values during incubations totalling 120 h. By contrast, spermine supported growth at 23% of control and viability at 8%. Putrescine was similarly ineffective, supporting growth at 13% of control and viability at 7%. The data indicate that, in L1210 cells, spermidine is apparently the preferred polyamine in growth-related functions and is capable of fully supporting cell growth by itself. However, because spermine and putrescine can also support growth to some extent, maximum interference with growth and viability is best achieved by strategies which deplete all three polyamine pools. PMID:2497733

  13. Effect of diet on ability of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A (VEGFA) isoforms to alter follicular progression in bovine ovarian cortical cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of changes in diet on ability of VEGFA isoforms to alter follicle progression in bovine ovarian cortex cultures. Our hypothesis was that diet would affect the magnitude of VEGFA isoform actions on follicular development. Heifers (n = 30) receiv...

  14. The Indoor Fungus Cladosporium halotolerans Survives Humidity Dynamics Markedly Better than Aspergillus niger and Penicillium rubens despite Less Growth at Lowered Steady-State Water Activity

    PubMed Central

    Segers, Frank J. J.; van Laarhoven, Karel A.; Huinink, Hendrik P.; Adan, Olaf C. G.; Wösten, Han A. B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Indoor fungi cause damage in houses and are a potential threat to human health. Indoor fungal growth requires water, for which the terms water activity (aw) and relative humidity (RH) are used. The ability of the fungi Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium halotolerans, and Penicillium rubens at different developmental stages to survive changes in aw dynamics was studied. Fungi grown on media with high aw were transferred to a controlled environment with low RH and incubated for 1 week. Growth of all developmental stages was halted during incubation at RHs below 75%, while growth continued at 84% RH. Swollen conidia, germlings, and microcolonies of A. niger and P. rubens could not reinitiate growth when retransferred from an RH below 75% to a medium with high aw. All developmental stages of C. halotolerans showed growth after retransfer from 75% RH. Dormant conidia survived retransfer to medium with high aw in all cases. In addition, retransfer from 84% RH to medium with high aw resulted in burst hyphal tips for Aspergillus and Penicillium. Cell damage of hyphae of these fungi after incubation at 75% RH was already visible after 2 h, as observed by staining with the fluorescent dye TOTO-1. Thus, C. halotolerans is more resistant to aw dynamics than A. niger and P. rubens, despite its limited growth compared to that of these fungi at a lowered steady-state aw. The survival strategy of this phylloplane fungus in response to the dynamics of aw is discussed in relation to its morphology as studied by cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM). IMPORTANCE Indoor fungi cause structural and cosmetic damage in houses and are a potential threat to human health. Growth depends on water, which is available only at certain periods of the day (e.g., during cooking or showering). Knowing why fungi can or cannot survive indoors is important for finding novel ways of prevention. Until now, the ability of fungi to grow on media with little available water at steady state

  15. Evaluation of ability of ferulic acid to control growth and fumonisin production of Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum on maize based media.

    PubMed

    Ferrochio, Laura; Cendoya, Eugenia; Farnochi, María Cecilia; Massad, Walter; Ramirez, María Laura

    2013-10-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of ferulic acid (1, 10, 20 and 25 mM) at different water activity (aw) values (0.99, 0.98, 0.96 and 0.93) at 25 °C on growth and fumonisin production by Fusarium verticillioides and Fusarium proliferatum on maize based media. For both Fusarium species, the lag phase significantly decreased (p ≤ 0.001), and the growth rates increased (p ≤ 0.001) at the lowest ferulic acid concentration used (1mM), regardless of the aw. However, high doses of ferulic acid (10 to 25 mM) significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.001) the growth rate of both Fusarium species, regardless of the a(w). In general, growth rate inhibition increased as ferulic acid doses increased and as media aw decreased. Fumonisin production profiles of both Fusarium species showed that low ferulic acid concentrations (1-10mM) significantly increased (p ≤ 0.001) toxin production, regardless of the aw. High doses of ferulic acid (20-25 mM) reduced fumonisin production, in comparison with the controls, by both Fusarium species but they were not statistically significant in most cases. The results show that the use of ferulic acid as a post-harvest strategy to reduce mycotoxin accumulation on maize needs to be discussed. PMID:24140805

  16. The ability of exogenous growth hormone to maintain milk production during prolonged lactation in the mouse is more evident with reduced nursing frequency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although growth hormone (GH) increases milk production in dairy animals, the milk production response of lactating rodents to this treatment has been variable. Milk removal frequency in the lactating mouse is about 10-fold higher than that of lactating dairy cows. The hypothesis tested in this study...

  17. Developing a General Outcome Measure of Growth in the Cognitive Abilities of Children 1 to 4 Years Old: The Early Problem-Solving Indicator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Walker, Dale; Carta, Judith J.; Higgins, Susan K.

    2006-01-01

    Proficiency in problem solving is an important outcome in early childhood necessary for cognitive and emotional development. The development of an individual growth and development indicator of problem solving for children 1 to 4 years of age is described. Based on the general outcome measurement approach (Deno, 1997), the measure is intended for…

  18. Aspergillus flavus Conidia-derived Carbon/Sulfur Composite as a Cathode Material for High Performance Lithium–Sulfur Battery

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Maowen; Jia, Min; Mao, Cuiping; Liu, Sangui; Bao, Shujuan; Jiang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to prepare porous carbon materials with an extremely high surface area of 2459.6 m2g−1 by using Aspergillus flavus conidia as precursors. The porous carbon serves as a superior cathode material to anchor sulfur due to its uniform and tortuous morphology, enabling high capacity and good cycle lifetime in lithium sulfur-batteries. Under a current rate of 0.2 C, the carbon-sulfur composites with 56.7 wt% sulfur loading deliver an initial capacity of 1625 mAh g−1, which is almost equal to the theoretical capacity of sulfur. The good performance may be ascribed to excellent electronic networks constructed by the high-surface-area carbon species. Moreover, the semi-closed architecture of derived carbons can effectively retard the polysulfides dissolution during charge/discharge, resulting in a capacity of 940 mAh g−1 after 120 charge/discharge cycles. PMID:26732547

  19. Aspergillus flavus Conidia-derived Carbon/Sulfur Composite as a Cathode Material for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Maowen; Jia, Min; Mao, Cuiping; Liu, Sangui; Bao, Shujuan; Jiang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to prepare porous carbon materials with an extremely high surface area of 2459.6 m2g-1 by using Aspergillus flavus conidia as precursors. The porous carbon serves as a superior cathode material to anchor sulfur due to its uniform and tortuous morphology, enabling high capacity and good cycle lifetime in lithium sulfur-batteries. Under a current rate of 0.2 C, the carbon-sulfur composites with 56.7 wt% sulfur loading deliver an initial capacity of 1625 mAh g-1, which is almost equal to the theoretical capacity of sulfur. The good performance may be ascribed to excellent electronic networks constructed by the high-surface-area carbon species. Moreover, the semi-closed architecture of derived carbons can effectively retard the polysulfides dissolution during charge/discharge, resulting in a capacity of 940 mAh g-1 after 120 charge/discharge cycles.

  20. Aspergillus flavus Conidia-derived Carbon/Sulfur Composite as a Cathode Material for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    PubMed

    Xu, Maowen; Jia, Min; Mao, Cuiping; Liu, Sangui; Bao, Shujuan; Jiang, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Zhisong

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach was developed to prepare porous carbon materials with an extremely high surface area of 2459.6 m(2)g(-1) by using Aspergillus flavus conidia as precursors. The porous carbon serves as a superior cathode material to anchor sulfur due to its uniform and tortuous morphology, enabling high capacity and good cycle lifetime in lithium sulfur-batteries. Under a current rate of 0.2 C, the carbon-sulfur composites with 56.7 wt% sulfur loading deliver an initial capacity of 1625 mAh g(-1), which is almost equal to the theoretical capacity of sulfur. The good performance may be ascribed to excellent electronic networks constructed by the high-surface-area carbon species. Moreover, the semi-closed architecture of derived carbons can effectively retard the polysulfides dissolution during charge/discharge, resulting in a capacity of 940 mAh g(-1) after 120 charge/discharge cycles. PMID:26732547

  1. Detecting free radicals in biochars and determining their ability to inhibit the germination and growth of corn, wheat and rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shaohua; Pan, Bo; Li, Hao; Zhang, Di; Xing, Baoshan

    2014-01-01

    Biochar can benefit human society as a carbon-negative material and soil amendment. However, negative biochar impacts on plant germination and growth have been observed, and they have not been fully explained. Therefore, protocols to avoid these risks cannot be proposed. We hypothesized that the free radicals generated during charring may inhibit plant germination and growth. Significant electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals were observed in the biochars derived from several types of common biomass (corn stalk, rice, and wheat straws) and the major biopolymer components of biomass (cellulose and lignin), but not in the original materials, suggesting the ubiquitous presence of free radicals in biochars. EPR signal intensity increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature, and it was dominantly contributed by oxygen centered in the mixture of oxygen- and carbon-centered free radicals as the temperature increased. The free radicals in biochars induced strong ·OH radicals in the aqueous phase. Significant germination inhibition, root and shoot growth retardation and plasma membrane damage were observed for biochars with abundant free radicals. Germination inhibition and plasma membrane damage were not obvious for biochars containing low free radicals, but they were apparent at comparable concentrations of conventional contaminants, such as heavy metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The potential risk and harm of relatively persistent free radicals in biochars must be addressed to apply them safely. PMID:24988274

  2. The Weak Acid Preservative Sorbic Acid Inhibits Conidial Germination and Mycelial Growth of Aspergillus niger through Intracellular Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Plumridge, Andrew; Hesse, Stephan J. A.; Watson, Adrian J.; Lowe, Kenneth C.; Stratford, Malcolm; Archer, David B.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger, a common food spoilage organism, is inhibited by the weak acid preservative sorbic acid (trans-trans-2,4-hexadienoic acid). Conidia inoculated at 105/ml of medium showed a sorbic acid MIC of 4.5 mM at pH 4.0, whereas the MIC for the amount of mycelia at 24 h developed from the same spore inoculum was threefold lower. The MIC for conidia and, to a lesser extent, mycelia was shown to be dependent on the inoculum size. A. niger is capable of degrading sorbic acid, and this ability has consequences for food preservation strategies. The mechanism of action of sorbic acid was investigated using 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We show that a rapid decline in cytosolic pH (pHcyt) by more than 1 pH unit and a depression of vacuolar pH (pHvac) in A. niger occurs in the presence of sorbic acid. The pH gradient over the vacuole completely collapsed as a result of the decline in pHcyt. NMR spectra also revealed that sorbic acid (3.0 mM at pH 4.0) caused intracellular ATP pools and levels of sugar-phosphomonoesters and -phosphodiesters of A. niger mycelia to decrease dramatically, and they did not recover. The disruption of pH homeostasis by sorbic acid at concentrations below the MIC could account for the delay in spore germination and retardation of the onset of subsequent mycelial growth. PMID:15184150

  3. Zinc and Manganese Chelation by Neutrophil S100A8/A9 (Calprotectin) Limits Extracellular Aspergillus fumigatus Hyphal Growth and Corneal Infection.

    PubMed

    Clark, Heather L; Jhingran, Anupam; Sun, Yan; Vareechon, Chairut; de Jesus Carrion, Steven; Skaar, Eric P; Chazin, Walter J; Calera, José Antonio; Hohl, Tobias M; Pearlman, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Calprotectin, a heterodimer of S100A8 and S100A9, is an abundant neutrophil protein that possesses antimicrobial activity primarily because of its ability to chelate zinc and manganese. In the current study, we showed that neutrophils from calprotectin-deficient S100A9(-/-) mice have an impaired ability to inhibit Aspergillus fumigatus hyphal growth in vitro and in infected corneas in a murine model of fungal keratitis; however, the ability to inhibit hyphal growth was restored in S100A9(-/-) mice by injecting recombinant calprotectin. Furthermore, using recombinant calprotectin with mutations in either the Zn and Mn binding sites or the Mn binding site alone, we show that both zinc and manganese binding are necessary for calprotectin's antihyphal activity. In contrast to hyphae, we found no role for neutrophil calprotectin in uptake or killing of intracellular A. fumigatus conidia either in vitro or in a murine model of pulmonary aspergillosis. We also found that an A. fumigatus ∆zafA mutant, which demonstrates deficient zinc transport, exhibits impaired growth in infected corneas and following incubation with neutrophils or calprotectin in vitro as compared with wild-type. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a novel stage-specific susceptibility of A. fumigatus to zinc and manganese chelation by neutrophil-derived calprotectin. PMID:26582948

  4. The 5' non-coding region of the BCR/ABL oncogene augments its ability to stimulate the growth of immature lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Gishizky, M L; McLaughlin, J; Pendergast, A M; Witte, O N

    1991-08-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1, t9:22;34:q11) is a reciprocal translocation between chromosome 22 and chromosome 9 which results in the formation of the chimeric BCR/ABL oncogene. Alternative forms of BCR/ABL are produced by splicing different sets of exons of the BCR gene to a common set of c-ABL sequences. This results in the formation of an 8.7 kilobase mRNA that encodes the P210 BCR/ABL gene product or a 7.0 kilobase mRNA that encodes the P185 BCR/ABL gene product. Both BCR/ABL transcripts derive their 5' non-coding sequences from the BCR gene locus. This 5' region is over 500 nucleotides in length, has a GC content greater than 75% and has a short open reading frame. To determine if this unusual 5' non-coding region plays a role in BCR/ABL transformation, we prepared retroviral vectors containing identical BCR/ABL coding regions but differing in the length of the BCR 5' non-coding region. Matched viral stocks were evaluated for their ability to transform bone marrow in vitro and for their ability to cause tumors when inoculated into 3- to 4-week-old mice. In this report we present the unexpected finding that the BCR/ABL 5' non-coding region augments the transforming activity of both P210 and P185 BCR/ABL in vitro. In vivo, BCR/ABL is a weak tumorigenic agent and its potency is enhanced by the presence of the 5' non-coding region. PMID:1886706

  5. Screening of Rhizobacteria for Their Plant Growth Promotion Ability and Antagonism Against Damping off and Root Rot Diseases of Broad Bean (Vicia faba L.).

    PubMed

    Indira Devi, S; Talukdar, N C; Chandradev Sharma, K; Jeyaram, K; Rohinikumar, M

    2011-01-01

    Development of microbial inoculants from rhizobacterial isolates with potential for plant growth promotion and root disease suppression require rigorous screening. Fifty-four (54) fluorescent pseudomonads, out of a large collection of rhizobacteria from broad bean fields of 20 different locations within Imphal valley of Manipur, were initially screened for antifungal activity against Macrophomina phaseolina and Rhizoctonia solani, of diseased roots of broad bean and also three other reference fungal pathogens of plant roots. Fifteen fluorescent pseudomonas isolates produced inhibition zone (8-29 mm) of the fungal growth in dual plate assay and IAA like substances (24.1-66.7 μg/ml) and soluble P (12.7-56.80 μg/ml) in broth culture. Among the isolates, RFP 36 caused a marked increase in seed germination, seedling biomass and control of the root borne pathogens of broad bean. PCR-RAPD analysis of these isolates along with five MTCC reference fluorescent pseudomonas strains indicated that the RFP-36 belonged to a distinct cluster and the PCR of its genomic DNA with antibiotic specific primers Phenazine-1-carboxylic acid and 2, 4-diacetyl phloroglucinol suggested possible occurrence of gene for the potent antibiotics. Overall, the result of the study indicated the potential of the isolate RFP 36 as a microbial inoculant with multiple functions for broad bean. PMID:22282623

  6. Rapid Isolation of the Trichoderma Strain with Higher Degrading Ability of a Filter Paper and Superior Proliferation Characteristics Using Avicel Plates and the Double-Layer Selection Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyama, Hideo; Nakano, Megumi; Satake, Yuuki; Toyama, Nobuo

    The cost of cellulase is still a problem for bioethanol production. As the cellulase of Trichoderma reesei is applicable for producing ethanol from cellulosic materials, the cellulase productivity of this fungus should be increased. Therefore, we attempted to develop a system to isolate the strain with higher degrading ability of a filter paper and superior proliferation characteristics among the conidia treated with the mitotic arrester, colchicine. When green mature conidia of T. reesei RUT C-30 were swollen, autopolyploidized, and incubated in the double-layer selection medium containing Avicel, colonies appeared on the surface earlier than the original strain. When such colonies and the original colony were incubated on the Avicel plates, strain B5, one of the colonies derived from the colchicinetreated conidia, showed superior proliferation characteristics. Moreover, when strain B5 and the original strain were compared in the filter paper degrading ability and the cellulose hydrolyzing activity, strain B5 was also superior to the original strain. It was suspected that superior proliferation characteristics of strain B5 reflects higher filter paper degrading ability. Thus, we concluded that the Trichoderma strain with higher degrading ability of a filter paper and superior proliferation characteristics can be isolated using Avicel plates and the double-layer selection medium.

  7. Effect of prior vegetative growth, inoculum density and light on conidiation in Erysiphe necator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A driving force in epidemics of grape powdery mildew is the abundant production of conidia. Our objective was to better define the three factors involved in the qualitative change that occurs when a mildew colony switches from vegetative growth to sporulation –inoculum density, light, and a sporulat...

  8. Human Neutrophils Are Primed by Chemoattractant Gradients for Blocking the Growth of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jones, Caroline N; Dimisko, Laurie; Forrest, Kevin; Judice, Kevin; Poznansky, Mark C; Markmann, James F; Vyas, Jatin M; Irimia, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    The contribution of human neutrophils to the protection against fungal infections by Aspergillus fumigatus is essential but not fully understood. Whereas healthy people can inhale spores of A. fumigatus without developing disease, neutropenic patients and those receiving immunosuppressive drugs have a higher incidence of invasive fungal infections. To study the role of neutrophils in protection against A. fumigatus infections, we developed an in vitro assay in which the interactions between human neutrophils and A. fumigatus were observed in real time, at single-cell resolution, in precisely controlled conditions. We measured the outcomes of neutrophil-fungus interactions and found that human neutrophils have a limited ability to migrate toward A. fumigatus and block the growth of A. fumigatus conidia (proportion with growth blocked, 69%). The blocking ability of human neutrophils increased to 85.1% when they were stimulated by uniform concentrations of fMLP and was enhanced further, to 99.4%, in the presence of chemoattractant gradients. Neutrophils from patients receiving immunosuppressive treatment after transplantation were less effective against the fungus than those from healthy donors, and broader heterogeneity exists between patients, compared with healthy individuals. Further studies using this microfluidic platform will help understand the relevance of innate immune deficiencies responsible for the higher risk of fungal infections in patients with immunosuppressive disease. PMID:26272935

  9. A few shared up-regulated genes may influence conidia to yeast transformation in dimorphic fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, Theo N

    2016-08-01

    The small number of fungi that commonly cause disease in normal people share the capacity to grow as mycelia in the soil at 25°C and as yeast (or spherules) in mammals at 37°C. This remarkable conversion has long been a topic of interest in medical mycology. The conidia to yeast conversion has been studied by transcription profiling in several fungal species, including Histoplasma capsulatum, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, Coccidioides spp., Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Talaromyces marneffei One limitation of transcriptional profiling is determining which genes are involved in the process of conversion to yeast as opposed to a result of conversion to yeast. If there are genes that are up-regulated in the yeast phase of more than one dimorphic, pathogenic fungus they might be required for conversion to yeast (or spherules). To address this issue, 24 up-regulated genes common to Coccidioides spp spherules and H. capsulatum yeasts were identified. Four homologs of these genes were also found in P. brasiliensis, B. dermatitidis or T. marneffei genes that were up-regulated in yeast. 4-hydroxyphenylpurvate dioxygenase, a gene involved in tyrosine metabolism and melanin synthesis that has been shown to be required for yeast conversion, is conserved and up-regulated in yeast in all five species. Another up-regulated gene that is conserved in all five species is a MFS sugar porter. These results suggest that a minority of up-regulated yeast (or spherule) genes are conserved across species and raises the possibility that conserved up-regulated genes may be of special interest for differentiation of mycelium into yeast. PMID:27118798

  10. Survival of Penicillium spp. conidia during deep-frying and baking steps of frozen chicken nuggets processing.

    PubMed

    Wigmann, Évelin Francine; Moreira, Rafael Chelala; Alvarenga, Verônica Ortiz; Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Copetti, Marina Venturini

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed at determining whether Penicillium spp. strains could survive through the heat treatment applied during the processing of frozen chicken nuggets. Firstly, it was found that the conidia of Penicillium were not able to survive the heat shock in phosphate buffer at pH 7.2 in thermal death tubes (TDT) at 80 °C/30 min. Subsequently, each Penicillium strain was inoculated in frozen chicken nuggets, which were subjected to the following treatments: i) only deep frying (frying oil at 195-200 °C), ii) only baking (120-130 °C until the internal temperature reached 70 °C) and iii) deep frying followed by baking (frying oil temperature of 195-200 °C and baking temperature of 120-130 °C, until the internal temperature reached 70 °C). The results indicated that Penicillium polonicum NGT 23/12, Penicillium commune NGT 16/12, Penicillium solitum NGT 30/12 and Penicillium crustosum NGT 51/12 were able to survive after the combined treatment (deep frying followed by baking) when inoculated in chicken nuggets. P. polonicum NGT 23/12 was the most resistant strain to the combined treatment (deep frying and baking), as its population was reduced by 3 log cycles CFU/g, when the internal temperature reached 78 °C after 10 min and 30 s of baking. The present data show that if Penicillium spp. is present in high numbers in raw materials, such as breading flours, it will survive the thermal processing applied during chicken nuggets production. PMID:26742610

  11. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  12. RasGAP Shields Akt from Deactivating Phosphatases in Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling but Loses This Ability Once Cleaved by Caspase-3.

    PubMed

    Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Burnol, Anne-Françoise; Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Widmann, Christian; Browaeys-Poly, Edith

    2015-08-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are involved in proliferative and differentiation physiological responses. Deregulation of FGFR-mediated signaling involving the Ras/PI3K/Akt and the Ras/Raf/ERK MAPK pathways is causally involved in the development of several cancers. The caspase-3/p120 RasGAP module is a stress sensor switch. Under mild stress conditions, RasGAP is cleaved by caspase-3 at position 455. The resulting N-terminal fragment, called fragment N, stimulates anti-death signaling. When caspase-3 activity further increases, fragment N is cleaved at position 157. This generates a fragment, called N2, that no longer protects cells. Here, we investigated in Xenopus oocytes the impact of RasGAP and its fragments on FGF1-mediated signaling during G2/M cell cycle transition. RasGAP used its N-terminal Src homology 2 domain to bind FGFR once stimulated by FGF1, and this was necessary for the recruitment of Akt to the FGFR complex. Fragment N, which did not associate with the FGFR complex, favored FGF1-induced ERK stimulation, leading to accelerated G2/M transition. In contrast, fragment N2 bound the FGFR, and this inhibited mTORC2-dependent Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and ERK2 phosphorylation but not phosphorylation of Akt on Thr-308. This also blocked cell cycle progression. Inhibition of Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and entry into G2/M was relieved by PHLPP phosphatase inhibition. Hence, full-length RasGAP favors Akt activity by shielding it from deactivating phosphatases. This shielding was abrogated by fragment N2. These results highlight the role played by RasGAP in FGFR signaling and how graded stress intensities, by generating different RasGAP fragments, can positively or negatively impact this signaling. PMID:26109071

  13. Effects of sheep fleece washings on the germination and growth of Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Taylor, B; Luke, B; Wall, R; Taylor, M; Moore, D

    2009-02-01

    The development of biopesticides against ectoparasites must take into account the effect that an animal host's secretions and host associated micro-organisms may have on the viability of the applied agent. In this study, the effects of secretions washed from the pelt of sheep on the viability and growth of the fungal pathogen Beauveria bassiana, were assessed. The fungal isolate had been obtained from the parasitic sheep scab mite Psoroptes ovis. It was added to 0.05% Tween 80 in which sheep fleece had been washed up to six times, to ascertain whether successive washings had any effect on the viability of conidia over 6 days. The effects of sterile and non-sterile washings on viability and growth were also investigated. Results indicated that substances in the sheep fleece may cause a significant reduction in the viability of conidia. Viability was linked to the number of times the sheep pelt had been washed in the Tween, with conidia incubated in the first wash from the sheep pelt showing a significantly greater decrease in viability compared to those incubated in the sixth wash. Viability was not linked to the sterility of the washes, although there was a significant difference between length of germ tube growth from viable conidia in sterile and non-sterile washings. PMID:19041656

  14. A 3-Month, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study Evaluating the Ability of an Extra-Strength Marine Protein Supplement to Promote Hair Growth and Decrease Shedding in Women with Self-Perceived Thinning Hair

    PubMed Central

    Ablon, Glynis

    2015-01-01

    An oral marine protein supplement (MPS) is designed to promote hair growth in women with temporary thinning hair (Viviscal Extra Strength; Lifes2good, Inc., Chicago, IL). This double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessed the ability of MPS to promote terminal hair growth in adult women with self-perceived thinning hair associated with poor diet, stress, hormonal influences, or abnormal menstrual cycles. Adult women with thinning hair were randomized to receive MPS (N = 30) or placebo (N = 30) twice daily for 90 days. Digital images were obtained from a 4 cm2 area scalp target area. Each subject's hair was washed and shed hairs were collected and counted. After 90 days, these measures were repeated and subjects completed Quality of Life and Self-Assessment Questionnaires. MPS-treated subjects achieved a significant increase in the number of terminal hairs within the target area (P < 0.0001) which was significantly greater than placebo (P < 0.0001). MPS use also resulted in significantly less hair shedding (P = 0.002) and higher total Self-Assessment (P = 0.006) and Quality of Life Questionnaires scores (P = 0.035). There were no reported adverse events. MPS promotes hair growth and decreases hair loss in women suffering from temporary thinning hair. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02297360. PMID:25883641

  15. AgrAbility Project

    MedlinePlus

    About Us Search Search for: AgrAbility Assisting farmers and ranchers with disabilities. Menu Skip to content Home About AgrAbility Newsletters (old) AT Resources AT Database Staff Development Archive Contact Us We ...

  16. Long-term insulin-like growth factor-I expression in skeletal muscles attenuates the enhanced in vitro proliferation ability of the resident satellite cells in transgenic mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Schwartz, R. J.; Booth, F. W.

    2001-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) overexpression for 1-month in mouse skeletal muscle increases satellite cell proliferation potential. However, it is unknown whether this beneficial enhancement by IGF-I expression would persist over a longer-term duration in aged mice. This is an important issue to address if a prolonged course of IGF-I is to be used clinically in muscle-wasting conditions where satellite cells may become limiting. Using the IGF-I transgenic (IGF-I Tg) mouse that selectively expresses the IGF-I transgene in striated muscles, we found that 18-months of continuous IGF-I overexpression led to a loss in the enhanced in vitro proliferative capacity of satellite cells from Tg skeletal muscles. Also 18-month-old IGF-I Tg satellite cells lost the enhanced BrdU incorporation, greater pRb and Akt phosphorylations, and decreased p27(Kip1) levels initially observed in cells from 1-month-old IGF-I Tg mice. The levels of those biochemical markers reverted to similar values seen in the 18-months WT littermates. These findings, therefore, suggest that there is no further beneficial effect on enhancing satellite cell proliferation ability with persistent long-term expression of IGF-I in skeletal muscles of these transgenic mice.

  17. Competence and ability.

    PubMed

    Vogelstein, Eric

    2014-06-01

    It is nearly universally thought that the kind of decision-making competence that gives one a strong prima facie right to make one's own medical decisions essentially involves having an ability (or abilities) of some sort, or having a certain level or degree of ability (or abilities). When put under philosophical scrutiny, however, this kind of theory does not hold up. I will argue that being competent does not essentially involve abilities, and I will propose and defend a theory of decision-making competence according to which one is competent only if one possesses a certain kind of rationality in making treatment decisions. PMID:22845798

  18. Ability of Slovakian Pupils to Identify Birds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prokop, Pavol; Rodak, Rastislav

    2009-01-01

    A pupil's ability to identify common organisms is necessary for acquiring further knowledge of biology. We investigated how pupils were able to identify 25 bird species following their song, growth habits, or both features presented simultaneously. Just about 19% of birds were successfully identified by song, about 39% by growth habit, and 45% of…

  19. Morphogenetic circuitry regulating growth and development in the dimorphic pathogen Penicillium marneffei.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kylie J; Andrianopoulos, Alex

    2013-02-01

    Penicillium marneffei is an emerging human-pathogenic fungus endemic to Southeast Asia. Like a number of other fungal pathogens, P. marneffei exhibits temperature-dependent dimorphic growth and grows in two distinct cellular morphologies, hyphae at 25°C and yeast cells at 37°C. Hyphae can differentiate to produce the infectious agents, asexual spores (conidia), which are inhaled into the host lung, where they are phagocytosed by pulmonary alveolar macrophages. Within macrophages, conidia germinate into unicellular yeast cells, which divide by fission. This minireview focuses on the current understanding of the genes required for the morphogenetic control of conidial germination, hyphal growth, asexual development, and yeast morphogenesis in P. marneffei. PMID:23204189

  20. Scientific Ability and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Kurt A.

    2007-01-01

    Following an introductory definition of "scientific ability and creativity", product-oriented, personality and social psychological approaches to studying scientific ability are examined with reference to competence and performance. Studies in the psychometric versus cognitive psychological paradigms are dealt with in more detail. These two…

  1. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes inhibit Aspergillus fumigatus conidial growth by lactoferrin-mediated iron depletion.

    PubMed

    Zarember, Kol A; Sugui, Janyce A; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Gallin, John I

    2007-05-15

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold, rarely infects humans, except during prolonged neutropenia or in cases of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the NADPH oxidase that normally produces fungicidal reactive oxygen species. Filamentous hyphae of Aspergillus are killed by normal, but not CGD polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN); however, the few studies on PMN-mediated host defenses against infectious conidia (spores) of this organism have yielded conflicting results, some showing that PMN do not inhibit conidial growth, with others showing that they do, most likely using reactive oxygen species. Given that CGD patients are exposed daily to hundreds of viable A. fumigatus conidia, yet considerable numbers of them survive years without infection, we reasoned that PMN use ROS-independent mechanisms to combat Aspergillus. We show that human PMN from both normal controls and CGD patients are equipotent at arresting the growth of Aspergillus conidia in vitro, indicating the presence of a reactive oxygen species-independent factor(s). Cell-free supernatants of degranulated normal and CGD neutrophils both suppressed fungal growth and were found to be rich in lactoferrin, an abundant PMN secondary granule protein. Purified iron-poor lactoferrin at concentrations occurring in PMN supernatants (and reported in human mucosal secretions in vivo) decreased fungal growth, whereas saturation of lactoferrin or PMN supernatants with iron, or testing in the presence of excess iron in the form of ferritin, completely abolished activity against conidia. These results demonstrate that PMN lactoferrin sequestration of iron is important for host defense against Aspergillus. PMID:17475866

  2. Measuring creative imagery abilities

    PubMed Central

    Jankowska, Dorota M.; Karwowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative visual imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA), developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail), originality (the ability to produce unique imagery), and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery). TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of nine studies on a total sample of more than 1700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument's validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science. PMID:26539140

  3. Measuring creative imagery abilities.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Dorota M; Karwowski, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Over the decades, creativity and imagination research developed in parallel, but they surprisingly rarely intersected. This paper introduces a new theoretical model of creative visual imagination, which bridges creativity and imagination research, as well as presents a new psychometric instrument, called the Test of Creative Imagery Abilities (TCIA), developed to measure creative imagery abilities understood in accordance with this model. Creative imagination is understood as constituted by three interrelated components: vividness (the ability to create images characterized by a high level of complexity and detail), originality (the ability to produce unique imagery), and transformativeness (the ability to control imagery). TCIA enables valid and reliable measurement of these three groups of abilities, yielding the general score of imagery abilities and at the same time making profile analysis possible. We present the results of nine studies on a total sample of more than 1700 participants, showing the factor structure of TCIA using confirmatory factor analysis, as well as provide data confirming this instrument's validity and reliability. The availability of TCIA for interested researchers may result in new insights and possibilities of integrating the fields of creativity and imagination science. PMID:26539140

  4. AgrAbility Project

    MedlinePlus

    ... About AgrAbility State Projects Directory The Toolbox AT Database Resources Veterans & Beginning Farmers Communities of Interest News ... 800) 825-4264 Home About The Toolbox AT Database Resources Online Training Contact Us You are here: ...

  5. Apollo MEED mycology revisited and reviewed, including the Trichophyton terrestre keratinophilic growth at splashdown and 23 years after exposure to space parameters.

    PubMed

    Volz, P A; Long, J D; Veselenak, J M

    1995-01-01

    Keratinophilic Trichophyton terrestre conidia were exposed to selected parameters of space flight including 254, 280 and 300 nm UV light, full light and total darkness of space. Phenotypic isolates were grown on human hair collected from one source at years 1 and 23 after splashdown. The patterns of fungal growth on the hair, and the hair deterioration rates, were noted according to the space exposure. Growth and deterioration were consistent but slightly reduced at year 23. PMID:7476563

  6. The effects of culture media, solid substrates, and relative humidity on growth, sporulation and conidial discharge of Valdensinia heterodoxa.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiguang; Shamoun, Simon F

    2006-11-01

    Valdensinia heterodoxa (Sclerotiniacae) is a potential fungal bioherbicide for control of salal (Gaultheria shallon). The effect of culture media, substrates and relative humidity (RH) on growth, sporulation and conidial discharge of V. heterodoxa was determined for two isolates PFC2761 and PFC3027 in vitro. Culture media significantly affected the growth, sporulation, and conidial discharge of V. heterodoxa. Of eight agar media used, colony radial growth was optimal on salal oatmeal agar and salal potato dextrose agar for isolates PFC2761 and PFC3027, respectively; whereas sporulation was at an optimum on salal oatmeal agar for both isolates. Of the eight liquid media tested, mycelial production was highest on wheat bran-salal-potato dextrose broth. Growth on solid substrates greatly stimulated sporulation and conidial discharge of V. heterodoxa. Of the 12 solid substrates used, the greatest numbers of discharged conidia were observed from wheat bran and wheat bran-salal within 14d of sporulation. Sporulation on solid substrates continued for 42d. RH significantly affected the sporulation and conidial discharge for both isolates across all solid substrates tested. No conidia were produced or discharged below 93 % RH on wheat bran-salal and millet. With an increase of the RH from 93 to 97 %, sporulation and the number of discharged conidia increased significantly for both isolates on wheat bran-salal, but not on millet. PMID:17070027

  7. Priming Ability Emotional Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schutte, Nicola S.; Malouff, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Two studies examined whether priming self-schemas relating to successful emotional competency results in better emotional intelligence performance. In the first study participants were randomly assigned to a successful emotional competency self-schema prime condition or a control condition and then completed an ability measure of emotional…

  8. Transformation Problem Solving Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harmel, Sarah Jane

    The relationship between transformation problem performance and Guilford Structure of Intellect (SI) abilities is explored. During two group sessions 42 females and 35 males, age 18-39, were administered 12 Guilford SI tests exemplifying all five symbolic content (numeric) operations, and three contents in the divergent production area. Logical…

  9. Conservatism and Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stankov, Lazar

    2009-01-01

    Conservatism and cognitive ability are negatively correlated. The evidence is based on 1254 community college students and 1600 foreign students seeking entry to United States' universities. At the individual level of analysis, conservatism scores correlate negatively with SAT, Vocabulary, and Analogy test scores. At the national level of…

  10. Measuring Divergent Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefer, Jasmina

    The validity and reliability of the Yugoslavian (Beograd) version of the Hungarian adaptation of the Torrance Divergent Capacities Test (HAT-DAT) were tested, with a view toward improving the methodology of scoring the creative abilities test and determining standards for Yugoslavia. The test, based on the work of J. P. Guilford (1977), examines…

  11. A Specific Calculating Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Mike; O'Connor, Neil; Hermelin, Beate

    1998-01-01

    Studied the calculating ability used by a low IQ savant to identify prime numbers in two experiments comparing him to control subjects, one involving reaction time and the other involving inspection time. Concludes that this individual uses a complex computational algorithm to identify primes and discusses the apparent contradiction of his low IQ.…

  12. LONG-TERM INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR-I EXPRESSION IN SKELETAL MUSCLES ATTENUATES THE ENHANCED IN VITRO PROLIFERATION ABILITY OF THE RESIDENT SATELLITE CELLS IN TRANSGENIC MICE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) overexpression for 1-month in mouse skeletal muscle increases satellite cell proliferation potential. However, it is unknown whether this beneficial enhancement by IGF-I expression would persist over a longer-term duration in aged mice. This is an important issue...

  13. Music and nonmusical abilities.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, E G

    2001-06-01

    Reports that exposure to music causes benefits in nonmusical domains have received widespread attention in the mainstream media. Such reports have also influenced public policy. The so-called "Mozart effect" actually refers to two relatively distinct phenomena. One concerns short-term increases in spatial abilities that are said to occur from listening to music composed by Mozart. The other refers to the possibility that formal training in music yields nonmusical benefits. A review of the relevant findings indicates that the short-term effect is small and unreliable. Moreover, when it is evident, it can be explained by between-condition differences in the listener's mood or levels of cognitive arousal. By contrast, the effect of music lessons on nonmusical aspects of cognitive development is still an open question. Several studies have reported positive associations between formal music lessons and abilities in nonmusical (e.g., linguistic, mathematical, and spatial) domains. Nonetheless, compelling evidence for a causal link remains elusive. PMID:11458841

  14. Evaluation of the control ability of five essential oils against Aspergillus section Nigri growth and ochratoxin A accumulation in peanut meal extract agar conditioned at different water activities levels.

    PubMed

    Passone, María A; Girardi, Natalia S; Etcheverry, Miriam

    2012-10-15

    Essential oils (EOs) from boldo [Pëumus boldus Mol.], poleo [Lippia turbinata var. integrifolia (Griseb.)], clove [Syzygium aromaticum L.], anise [Pimpinella anisum] and thyme [Thymus vulgaris]) obtained by hydrodistillation were evaluated for their effectiveness against the growth of Aspergillus niger aggregate and A. carbonarius and accumulation of ochratoxin A (OTA). The evaluation was performed by compound dissolution at the doses of 0, 500, 1500 and 2500μL/L in peanut meal extract agar (PMEA) and exposure to volatiles of boldo, poleo (0, 1000, 2000 and 3000μL/L) and clove oils (0, 1000, 3000 and 5000μL/L), taking into account the levels of the water activity of the medium (a(W) 0.98, 0.95, 0.93). Statistical analyses on growth of Aspergillus strains indicated that the major effect was produced by oil concentrations followed by substrate a(W), and that reductions in antifungal efficiency of the oils tested were observed in vapor exposure assay. At all a(W) levels, complete fungal growth inhibition was achieved with boldo EO at doses of 1500 and 2000μL/L by contact and volatile assays, respectively. Contact exposure by poleo and clove EOs showed total fungal inhibition at the middle level tested of 1500μL/L, regardless of a(W), while their antifungal effects in headspace volatile assay were closely dependent on medium a(W). The fumigant activity of poleo (2000μL/L) and clove oils (3000μL/L) inhibited growth rate by 66.0% and 80.6% at a(W) 0.98 and 0.93, respectively. OTA accumulation was closely dependent on a(W) conditions. The antiochratoxigenic property of the volatile fractions of boldo, poleo and clove EOs (1000μL/L) was more significant at low a(W) levels, inhibition percentages were estimated at 14.7, 41.7 and 78.5% at a(W) 0.98, 0.95 and 0.93, respectively. Our results suggest that boldo, poleo and clove oils affect the OTA biosynthesis pathway of both Aspergillus species. This finding leaves open the possibility of their use by vapor exposure

  15. Different Dimensions of Spatial Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eliot, John; Hauptman, Anna

    1981-01-01

    Indicates that spatial ability describes a variety of different behaviors and briefly reviews efforts to define intelligence factors and identify processes involved in solving tasks requiring spatial ability. (DS)

  16. A Mechanistic Model of Botrytis cinerea on Grapevines That Includes Weather, Vine Growth Stage, and the Main Infection Pathways.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, Elisa; Caffi, Tito; Ciliberti, Nicola; Rossi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic model for Botrytis cinerea on grapevine was developed. The model, which accounts for conidia production on various inoculum sources and for multiple infection pathways, considers two infection periods. During the first period ("inflorescences clearly visible" to "berries groat-sized"), the model calculates: i) infection severity on inflorescences and young clusters caused by conidia (SEV1). During the second period ("majority of berries touching" to "berries ripe for harvest"), the model calculates: ii) infection severity of ripening berries by conidia (SEV2); and iii) severity of berry-to-berry infection caused by mycelium (SEV3). The model was validated in 21 epidemics (vineyard × year combinations) between 2009 and 2014 in Italy and France. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to: i) evaluate the ability of the model to predict mild, intermediate, and severe epidemics; and ii) assess how SEV1, SEV2, and SEV3 contribute to epidemics. The model correctly classified the severity of 17 of 21 epidemics. Results from DFA were also used to calculate the daily probabilities that an ongoing epidemic would be mild, intermediate, or severe. SEV1 was the most influential variable in discriminating between mild and intermediate epidemics, whereas SEV2 and SEV3 were relevant for discriminating between intermediate and severe epidemics. The model represents an improvement of previous B. cinerea models in viticulture and could be useful for making decisions about Botrytis bunch rot control. PMID:26457808

  17. A Mechanistic Model of Botrytis cinerea on Grapevines That Includes Weather, Vine Growth Stage, and the Main Infection Pathways

    PubMed Central

    González-Domínguez, Elisa; Caffi, Tito; Ciliberti, Nicola; Rossi, Vittorio

    2015-01-01

    A mechanistic model for Botrytis cinerea on grapevine was developed. The model, which accounts for conidia production on various inoculum sources and for multiple infection pathways, considers two infection periods. During the first period (“inflorescences clearly visible” to “berries groat-sized”), the model calculates: i) infection severity on inflorescences and young clusters caused by conidia (SEV1). During the second period (“majority of berries touching” to “berries ripe for harvest”), the model calculates: ii) infection severity of ripening berries by conidia (SEV2); and iii) severity of berry-to-berry infection caused by mycelium (SEV3). The model was validated in 21 epidemics (vineyard × year combinations) between 2009 and 2014 in Italy and France. A discriminant function analysis (DFA) was used to: i) evaluate the ability of the model to predict mild, intermediate, and severe epidemics; and ii) assess how SEV1, SEV2, and SEV3 contribute to epidemics. The model correctly classified the severity of 17 of 21 epidemics. Results from DFA were also used to calculate the daily probabilities that an ongoing epidemic would be mild, intermediate, or severe. SEV1 was the most influential variable in discriminating between mild and intermediate epidemics, whereas SEV2 and SEV3 were relevant for discriminating between intermediate and severe epidemics. The model represents an improvement of previous B. cinerea models in viticulture and could be useful for making decisions about Botrytis bunch rot control. PMID:26457808

  18. Complete genome sequences of the Serratia plymuthica strains 3Rp8 and 3Re4-18, two rhizosphere bacteria with antagonistic activity towards fungal phytopathogens and plant growth promoting abilities.

    PubMed

    Adam, Eveline; Müller, Henry; Erlacher, Armin; Berg, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    The Serratia plymuthica strains 3Rp8 and 3Re4-18 are motile, Gram-negative, non-sporulating bacteria. Strain 3Rp8 was isolated from the rhizosphere of Brassica napus L. and strain 3Re4-18 from the endorhiza of Solanum tuberosum L. Studies have shown in vitro activity against the soil-borne fungi Verticillium dahliae Kleb., Rhizoctonia solani Kühn, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Here, we announce and describe the complete genome sequence of S. plymuthica 3Rp8 consisting of a single circular chromosome of 5.5 Mb that encodes 4954 protein-coding and 108 RNA-only encoding genes and of S. plymuthica 3Re4-18 consisting of a single circular chromosome of 5.4 Mb that encodes 4845 protein-coding and 109 RNA-only encoding genes. The whole genome sequences and annotations are available in NCBI under the locus numbers CP012096 and CP012097, respectively. The genome analyses revealed genes putatively responsible for the promising plant growth promoting and biocontrol properties including predicting factors such as secretion systems, iron scavenging siderophores, chitinases, secreted proteases, glucanases and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases, as well as unique genomic islands. PMID:27602183

  19. Transforming growth factor-β1 induces invasion ability of HSC-4 human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells through the Slug/Wnt-5b/MMP-10 signalling axis.

    PubMed

    Hino, Masafumi; Kamo, Masaharu; Saito, Daishi; Kyakumoto, Seiko; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Mizuki, Harumi; Ishisaki, Akira

    2016-06-01

    Molecular mechanism underlying the invasion of oral cancer cells remains to be clarified. We previously demonstrated that transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) induces the expression of mesenchymal markers in human oral squamous cell carcinoma HSC-4 cells. Intriguingly, the expression of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition-related transcription factor Slug was also significantly upregulated upon TGF-β1 stimulation. However, the mechanism by which Slug transduces the TGF-β1-induced signal to enhance the invasiveness of HSC-4 cells is poorly understood. Proteomic analysis revealed that the expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-10 was upregulated in TGF-β1-stimulated cells. Additionally, a Boyden chamber assay revealed that the TGF-β1-induced increase in invasiveness of HSC-4 cells was significantly inhibited by MMP-10 small interfering RNA (siRNA). Intriguingly, Slug siRNA suppressed TGF-β1-induced expression of MMP-10. These results suggest that TGF-β1 induces invasion in HSC-4 cells through the upregulation of MMP-10 expression in a Slug-dependent manner. On the other hand, Slug siRNA suppressed TGF-β1-induced Wnt-5b expression. Wnt-5b significantly induced MMP-10 expression, whereas Wnt-5b siRNA suppressed the TGF-β1-induced increase in invasiveness, suggesting that TGF-β1-induced expression of MMP-10 and the resulting upregulation of invasiveness are mediated by Wnt-5b. Overall, these results suggest that TGF-β1 stimulates HSC-4 cell invasion through the Slug/Wnt-5b/MMP-10 signalling axis. PMID:26861993

  20. Role of Ca2+ channels in the ability of membrane depolarization to prevent neuronal death induced by trophic-factor deprivation: evidence that levels of internal Ca2+ determine nerve growth factor dependence of sympathetic ganglion cells.

    PubMed Central

    Koike, T; Martin, D P; Johnson, E M

    1989-01-01

    Sympathetic neurons depend on nerve growth factor (NGF) for their survival both in vivo and in vitro; these cells die upon acute deprivation of NGF. We studied the effects of agents that cause membrane depolarization on neuronal survival after NGF deprivation. High-K+ medium (greater than or equal to 33 mM) prevented cell death; the effect of K+ was dose-dependent (EC50 = 21 mM). The protection by high K+ was abolished either by withdrawal of extracellular Ca2+ or by preloading the cells with a Ca2+ chelator. The involvement of Ca2+ flux across membranes in high-K+ saving of NGF-deprived neurons was also supported by experiments using Ca2+-channel antagonists and agonists. The Ca2+ antagonists nimodipine and nifedipine effectively blocked the survival-promoting effect of high K+. The Ca2+ agonists Bay K 8644 and (S)-202-791 did not by themselves save neurons from NGF deprivation but did strongly augment the effect of high K+; EC50 was shifted from 21 mM to 13 mM. These data suggest that dihydropyridine-sensitive L-type Ca2+ channels play a major role in the high-K+ saving. The depolarizing agents choline (EC50 = 1 mM) and carbamoylcholine (EC50 = 1 microM), acting through nicotinic cholinergic receptors, also rescued NGF-deprived neurons. The saving effect of nicotinic agonists was not blocked by withdrawal of extracellular Ca2+ but was counteracted by a chelator of intracellular Ca2+, suggesting the possible involvement of Ca2+ release from internal stores. Based on these findings we propose a "Ca2+ set-point hypothesis" for the degree of trophic-factor dependence of sympathetic neurons in vitro. Images PMID:2548215

  1. Increasing Reading Ability among First and Third Grade Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Commare, Colleen C.; Sedlack, Sarah E.

    The purpose of this study was designed to increase the reading abilities of students in the targeted first and third grade classes in two elementary schools located in the Midwest. The study involved an action research project highlighting the overall growth of the students' academic achievement through increased reading growth. The study was…

  2. Individual differences in auditory abilities.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Gary R; Watson, Charles S; Gygi, Brian

    2007-07-01

    Performance on 19 auditory discrimination and identification tasks was measured for 340 listeners with normal hearing. Test stimuli included single tones, sequences of tones, amplitude-modulated and rippled noise, temporal gaps, speech, and environmental sounds. Principal components analysis and structural equation modeling of the data support the existence of a general auditory ability and four specific auditory abilities. The specific abilities are (1) loudness and duration (overall energy) discrimination; (2) sensitivity to temporal envelope variation; (3) identification of highly familiar sounds (speech and nonspeech); and (4) discrimination of unfamiliar simple and complex spectral and temporal patterns. Examination of Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT) scores for a large subset of the population revealed little or no association between general or specific auditory abilities and general intellectual ability. The findings provide a basis for research to further specify the nature of the auditory abilities. Of particular interest are results suggestive of a familiar sound recognition (FSR) ability, apparently specialized for sound recognition on the basis of limited or distorted information. This FSR ability is independent of normal variation in both spectral-temporal acuity and of general intellectual ability. PMID:17614500

  3. Assessing Highly-Creative Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowdroy, Rob; de Graaff, Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a psychological perspective of the educational dilemma of assessing highly (high-level) creative ability (with some connections to contemporary philosophical debate). Assessment of highly-creative ability is a topic of longstanding debate involving questions of what constitutes creativity; whether the creative mental process is…

  4. Diver First Class Reading Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bain, E. C., III; Berghage, T. E.

    The Nelson-Denny reading test was administered to thirty Navy first class diver candidates to evaluate the group's vocabulary, reading comprehension, reading rate and over-all reading ability. Reading rate and comprehension were at the twelfth grade level, while vocabulary ability was equal to the college freshman norm. (Author)

  5. Egocentrism and Map Reading Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Towler, John O.

    Egocentrism was investigated as an influencing factor in the development of the perceptual abilities needed to understand and interpret topographic maps. Attainment of an adequate concept of space, and the ability to accurately perceive spatial relationships (perspectives) are considered fundamental. Piaget and Inhelder identified three stages of…

  6. Implicit Learning as an Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaufman, Scott Barry; DeYoung, Caroline G.; Gray, Jeremy R.; Jimenez, Luis; Brown, Jamie; Mackintosh, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    The ability to automatically and implicitly detect complex and noisy regularities in the environment is a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Despite considerable interest in implicit processes, few researchers have conceptualized implicit learning as an ability with meaningful individual differences. Instead, various researchers (e.g., Reber,…

  7. Ability Measurement: Conventional or Adaptive?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.; Betz, Nancy E.

    Research to date on adaptive (sequential, branched, individualized, tailored, programmed, response-contingent) ability testing is reviewed and summarized, following a brief review of problems inherent in conventional individual and group approaches to ability measurement. Research reviewed includes empirical, simulation and theoretical studies of…

  8. The Measurement of Translation Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles W.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Variables that constitute translation ability are discussed, based on a two-year development and validation study of job-related tests of translation ability for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The project involved the development of two parallel forms of the Spanish into English Verbatim Translation Exam (SEVTE). (five references) (LB)

  9. Growth hormone stimulation test

    MedlinePlus

    The growth hormone (GH) stimulation test measures the ability of the body to produce GH. ... killing medicine (antiseptic). The first sample is drawn early in the morning. Medicine is given through the ...

  10. [Driving ability with multiple sclerosis].

    PubMed

    Küst, J; Dettmers, C

    2014-07-01

    Driving is an important issue for young patients, especially for those whose walking capacity is impaired. Driving might support the patient's social and vocational participation. The question as to whether a patient with multiple sclerosis (MS) is restricted in the ability to drive a car depends on neurological and neuropsychological deficits, self-awareness, insight into deficits and ability to compensate for loss of function. Because of the enormous variability of symptoms in MS the question is highly individualized. A practical driving test under supervision of a driving instructor (possibly accompanied by a neuropsychologist) might be helpful in providing both patient and relatives adequate feedback on driving abilities. PMID:24906536

  11. Effects of volatile organic compounds from Streptomyces albulus NJZJSA2 on growth of two fungal pathogens.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuncheng; Yuan, Jun; E, Yaoyao; Raza, Waseem; Shen, Qirong; Huang, Qiwei

    2015-09-01

    A Streptomyces albulus strain NJZJSA2 was isolated from the forest soil sample of Tzu-chin Mountain (Nanjing China) and identified based on its morphological and physiological properties and 16S rDNA gene sequence analysis. The strain S. albulus NJZJSA2 was evaluated for the production of antifungal volatile organic compounds (VOCs) against two fungal pathogens. Results showed that the VOCs generated by S. albulus NJZJSA2 inhibited mycelial growth of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (SS) and Fusarium oxysporum (FO) by 100 and 56.3%, respectively. The germination of SS sclerotia and FO conidia was completely inhibited in the presence of VOCs produced by S. albulus NJZJSA2 in vitro. In soil, the VOCs delayed the germination of SS sclerotia and inhibited the germination of FO conidia for 45 days. The strain S. albulus NJZJSA2 was able to produce 13 VOCs based on GC/MS analyses. Among those, six compounds were purchased and used for the antifungal activity assay. Three relatively abundant VOCs, 4-methoxystyrene, 2-pentylfuran, and anisole were proved to have antifungal activity. Microscopy analysis showed that the pathogen hyphae were shriveled and damaged after treatment with 4-methoxystyrene. These results suggest that the S. albulus strain NJZJSA2 produce VOCs that not only reduce the growth of SS and FO, but also significantly inhibit the SS sclerotia and FO conidia. The results are useful for the better understanding of biocontrol mechanisms by S. albulus strains and will help to improve the biological control efficiency of lethal plant diseases. PMID:26059065

  12. Fitness and competitive ability of Botrytis cinerea field isolates with dual resistance to SDHI and QoI fungicides, associated with several sdhB and the cytb G143A mutations.

    PubMed

    Veloukas, T; Kalogeropoulou, P; Markoglou, A N; Karaoglanidis, G S

    2014-04-01

    Respiration inhibitors such as the succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors (SDHIs) and the quinone outside inhibitors (QoIs) are fungicide classes with increasing relevance in gray mold control. However, recent studies have shown that dual resistance to both fungicide classes is a common trait in Botrytis cinerea populations from several hosts throughout the world. Resistance of B. cinerea to SDHIs is associated with several mutations in the sdhB, sdhC, and sdhD genes, while resistance to QoIs, in most cases, is associated with the G143A mutation in the cytb gene. The objective of the current study was to investigate the fitness and the competitive ability of B. cinerea field strains possessing one of the H272Y/R/L, N230I, or P225F sdhB substitutions and the G143A mutation of cytb. Fitness parameters measured were (i) mycelial growth and conidia germination in vitro, (ii) aggressiveness and sporulation capacity in vivo, (iii) sclerotia production in vitro and sclerotia viability under different storage conditions, and (iv) sensitivity to oxidative stress imposed by diquat treatments. The competitive ability of the resistant isolates was measured in the absence and presence of the SDHI fungicides boscalid and fluopyram selection pressure. The measurements of individual fitness components showed that the H272R/G143A isolates had the lower differences compared with the sensitive isolates. In contrast, the groups of H272Y/L/G143A, N230I/G143A, and P225F/G143A isolates showed reduced fitness values compared with the sensitive isolates. Isolates possessing only the cytb G143A substitution did not show any fitness cost. The competition experiments showed that, in the absence of fungicide selection pressure, after four disease cycles on apple fruit, the sensitive isolates dominated in the population in all the mixtures tested. In contrast, when the competition experiment was conducted under the selection pressure of boscalid, a gradual decrease in the frequency of sensitive

  13. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default.

    PubMed

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-07-01

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one's mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage. PMID:23798401

  14. Numerical ability predicts mortgage default

    PubMed Central

    Gerardi, Kristopher; Goette, Lorenz; Meier, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Unprecedented levels of US subprime mortgage defaults precipitated a severe global financial crisis in late 2008, plunging much of the industrialized world into a deep recession. However, the fundamental reasons for why US mortgages defaulted at such spectacular rates remain largely unknown. This paper presents empirical evidence showing that the ability to perform basic mathematical calculations is negatively associated with the propensity to default on one’s mortgage. We measure several aspects of financial literacy and cognitive ability in a survey of subprime mortgage borrowers who took out loans in 2006 and 2007, and match them to objective, detailed administrative data on mortgage characteristics and payment histories. The relationship between numerical ability and mortgage default is robust to controlling for a broad set of sociodemographic variables, and is not driven by other aspects of cognitive ability. We find no support for the hypothesis that numerical ability impacts mortgage outcomes through the choice of the mortgage contract. Rather, our results suggest that individuals with limited numerical ability default on their mortgage due to behavior unrelated to the initial choice of their mortgage. PMID:23798401

  15. Inhibitory Control Predicts Grammatical Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Paul; Kearvell-White, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that individual variation in grammatical ability can be predicted by individual variation in inhibitory control. We tested 81 5-year-olds using two classic tests from linguistics and psychology (Past Tense and the Stroop). Inhibitory control was a better predicator of grammatical ability than either vocabulary or age. Our explanation is that giving the correct response in both tests requires using a common cognitive capacity to inhibit unwanted competition. The implications are that understanding the developmental trajectory of language acquisition can benefit from integrating the developmental trajectory of non-linguistic faculties, such as executive control. PMID:26659926

  16. FvSO regulates vegetative hyphal fusion, asexual growth, fumonisin B1 production, and virulence in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li; Wenner, Nancy; Kuldau, Gretchen A

    2015-12-01

    Hyphal anastomosis is a hallmark of filamentous fungi and plays vital roles including cellular homoeostasis, interhyphal communication and nutrient translocation. Here we identify a gene, FvSO, in Fusarium verticillioides, a filamentous ascomycete causing maize ear and stalk rot and producing fumonisin mycotoxins. FvSO, like its Neurospora crassa homologue SO, is required for vegetative hyphal fusion. It is also essential for normal vegetative growth, sporulation, and pathogenesis. FvSO encodes a predicted WW domain protein and shares 70 % protein sequence identity with N. crassa SO. FvSO deletion mutants (ΔFvSO) had abnormal distribution of conidia size, and conidia of ΔFvSO germinated much later and slower than wild type. ΔFvSO was deficient in hyphal anastomosis, had slower radial growth and produced less fungal biomass than wild type. ΔFvSO were unable to perform anastomosis, a key feature of filamentous fungi. Interestingly, production of fumonisin B1 by ΔFvSO was significantly reduced compared to wild type. Additionally, ΔFvSO was nonpathogenic to corn ears, stalks and seedlings, likely due to defective growth and development. In conclusion, FvSO is essential for vegetative hyphal fusion and is required for normal vegetative growth and sporulation, normal levels of fumonisin production and pathogenicity in F. verticillioides. The pleiotropic nature of ΔFvSO phenotypes suggests that FvSO is likely involved in certain signalling pathways that regulate multiple cellular functions. PMID:26615739

  17. Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbst, H. H.; Maree, J. G.; Sibanda, E.

    2006-01-01

    While exceptional leaders share certain qualities like a strong personal ethic and a compelling vision of the future, research has failed to provide conclusive "proof" of the link between a leader's effectiveness and his/ her emotional intelligence (defined from a cognitive perspective, as a set of abilities). Given the increased recognition of…

  18. Performance Equals Ability and What?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunnette, Marvin D.

    The results of several research studies designed to evaluate different theories of work motivation are presented. Graen (1967), through hiring 169 high school girls to do a clerical task, showed that ability measures can account for far more performance variance than motivation variables such as expectancy and instrumentality. Similar results were…

  19. The Structure of Mathematical Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furneaux, W. D.; Rees, Ruth

    1978-01-01

    A mathematics test and the Thurstone PMA Battery were administered to 225 technical students. The item/item correlations were analyzed using both a principal components and a maximum-likelihood method. After varimax rotation, the same structure emerged from both. Results suggest a "mathematical ability" factor independent of "g." (Author/SJL)

  20. Challenging High-Ability Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scager, Karin; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Pilot, Albert; Wubbels, Theo

    2014-01-01

    The existing literature on indicators of an optimal learning environment for high-ability students frequently discusses the concept of challenge. It is, however, not clear what, precisely, constitutes appropriate challenge for these students. In this study, the authors examined an undergraduate honours course, Advanced Cell Biology, which has…

  1. Community Influences on Cognitive Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coon, Hilary; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Associations between community environment and cognitive ability were studied in 167 adoptive and 175 nonadoptive Colorado families. Seven families were omitted. A proposed model, tested by census measures, finds several aspects of communities showing environmental relationships with child IQ over parental influences. Rural communities have a…

  2. Ability Grouping and Cooperative Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1994

    This collection of articles is intended to demonstrate that there is solid research to justify both ability grouping and cooperative learning with gifted students and that each approach should be used judiciously to address particular student needs. Introductory material describes the philosophy and program policy of the Center for Talented Youth…

  3. Technology and Motor Ability Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Lin; Lang, Yong; Luo, Zhongmin

    2014-01-01

    As a new member joining the technology family, active video games have been developed to promote physical exercise. This working-in-progress paper shares an ongoing project on examining the basic motor abilities that are enhanced through participating in commercially available active video games. [For the full proceedings see ED557181.

  4. The Assessment of Mathematical Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Herbert H.

    1983-01-01

    A test was given to 322 secondary students to develop a profile of mathematical ability based on four components: computation, pattern recognition, logical reasoning, and symbolic manipulation. These profiles were compared to mathematics test scores; the results verified hypotheses about individual differences in mental processes and knowledge…

  5. Competence: Commodification of Human Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Han, Soonghee

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to analyze the meaning and presumptions of competence in the concrete context of knowledge capitalism. First, the nature of competence as a "commodification of human ability" that obtains a standardized monetary value to sell in the labor market, is elucidated by applying Karl Marx's critical theory. Second, it is…

  6. Cognitive Abilities of Maltreated Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viezel, Kathleen D.; Freer, Benjamin D.; Lowell, Ari; Castillo, Jenean A.

    2015-01-01

    School psychologists should be aware of developmental risk factors for children who have been abused or neglected. The present study used the "Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition" to examine the cognitive abilities of 120 children in foster care subsequent to maltreatment. Results indicated that, compared to a…

  7. Learning Anatomy Enhances Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vorstenbosch, Marc A. T. M.; Klaassen, Tim P. F. M.; Donders, A. R. T.; Kooloos, Jan G. M.; Bolhuis, Sanneke M.; Laan, Roland F. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability is an important factor in learning anatomy. Students with high scores on a mental rotation test (MRT) systematically score higher on anatomy examinations. This study aims to investigate if learning anatomy also oppositely improves the MRT-score. Five hundred first year students of medicine ("n" = 242, intervention) and…

  8. Ability and Mathematics: The Mindset Revolution that Is Reshaping Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boaler, Jo

    2013-01-01

    Recent scientific evidence demonstrates both the incredible potential of the brain to grow and change and the powerful impact of growth mindset messages upon students' attainment. Schooling practices, however, particularly in England, are based upon notions of fixed ability thinking which limits students' attainment and increases…

  9. Visual Discriminatory Ability Among Prereaders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, John Raymond; Ryckman, David B.

    The ability of 50 lower middle-class and 25 upper middle-class prereading children to discriminate between pairs of uppercase alphabet letters was tested. A set of 3x5 cards with a sample stimulus in the upper center section of each card and two alternative choice stimuli just below and to the right and left of the sample was used. The 650 total…

  10. Loss of msnA, a Putative Stress Regulatory Gene, in Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus Increased Production of Conidia, Aflatoxins and Kojic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Perng-Kuang; Scharfenstein, Leslie L.; Luo, Meng; Mahoney, Noreen; Molyneux, Russell J.; Yu, Jiujiang; Brown, Robert L.; Campbell, Bruce C.

    2011-01-01

    Production of the harmful carcinogenic aflatoxins by Aspergillus parasiticus and Aspergillus flavus has been postulated to be a mechanism to relieve oxidative stress. The msnA gene of A. parasiticus and A. flavus is the ortholog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MSN2 that is associated with multi-stress response. Compared to wild type strains, the msnA deletion (∆msnA) strains of A. parasiticus and A. flavus exhibited retarded colony growth with increased conidiation. The ∆msnA strains also produced slightly higher amounts of aflatoxins and elevated amounts of kojic acid on mixed cereal medium. Microarray assays showed that expression of genes encoding oxidative stress defense enzymes, i.e., superoxide dismutase, catalase, and cytochrome c peroxidase in A. parasiticus ∆msnA, and the catalase A gene in A. flavus ∆msnA, was up-regulated. Both A. parasiticus and A. flavus ∆msnA strains produced higher levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and ROS production of A. flavus msnA addback strains was decreased to levels comparable to that of the wild type A. flavus. The msnA gene appears to be required for the maintenance of the normal oxidative state. The impairment of msnA resulted in the aforementioned changes, which might be used to combat the increased oxidative stress in the cells. PMID:22069691

  11. The Dimensionality of Language Ability in Young Children.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to empirically examine the dimensionality of language ability for young children (4-8 years) from prekindergarten to third grade (n = 915), theorizing that measures of vocabulary and grammar ability will represent a unitary trait across these ages, and to determine whether discourse skills represent an additional source of variance in language ability. Results demonstrated emergent dimensionality of language across development with distinct factors of vocabulary, grammar, and discourse skills by third grade, confirming that discourse skills are an important source of variance in children's language ability and represent an important additional dimension to be accounted for in studying growth in language skills over the course of childhood. PMID:26509742

  12. [Rheumatic diseases and work ability].

    PubMed

    Minisola, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Musculoskeletal diseases are tile most frequent cause of pain in the working population. Rheumatic diseases are chronic illnesses, cause of functional impairnment, relevant working disability and absence from work; however, affected patients maintain a significant functional ability. In this context, the "Fit for work" project, operating in Italy since 2012, promotes the management of chronic musculoskeletal conditions through the realization, also in our country, of a rheumatic medical assistance network in behalf of workers affected by rheumatic diseases and other musculoskeletal disabiliting conditions. PMID:25558722

  13. Low intelligence and special abilities.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, N; Hermelin, B

    1988-07-01

    In summary, our research enables us to conclude that specific talents are found in people who differ widely in general intelligence levels and such talents should therefore be regarded as at least partly intelligence-independent. However, between normal and mentally handicapped populations and even within the idiot savant group, general cognitive capacity plays some part in determining the manner in which talents manifest themselves. Idiot savant special abilities can neither be regarded as the sole consequence of practice and training, nor are such skills based only on an efficient rote memory. Instead, idiots savants use strategies which are founded on the deduction and application of rules governing the material upon which their special ability operates. They also generate novel or new examples of such rule based structures just as we do in our use of language. Because of the much greater prevalence of idiots savants in the autistic than in the mentally handicapped population, some characteristic common to both autism and specific giftedness might be assumed. An obsessional pre-occupation with a limited section of the environment might be a common factor to both. It may be this rather than autism itself which is relevant to the idiot savant phenomenon. PMID:3063716

  14. Assessing Algebraic Solving Ability: A Theoretical Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam

    2012-01-01

    Algebraic solving ability had been discussed by many educators and researchers. There exists no definite definition for algebraic solving ability as it can be viewed from different perspectives. In this paper, the nature of algebraic solving ability in terms of algebraic processes that demonstrate the ability in solving algebraic problem is…

  15. Elevated temperature crack growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, K. S.; Vanstone, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to extend the work performed in the base program (CR 182247) into the regime of time-dependent crack growth under isothermal and thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) loading, where creep deformation also influences the crack growth behavior. The investigation was performed in a two-year, six-task, combined experimental and analytical program. The path-independent integrals for application to time-dependent crack growth were critically reviewed. The crack growth was simulated using a finite element method. The path-independent integrals were computed from the results of finite-element analyses. The ability of these integrals to correlate experimental crack growth data were evaluated under various loading and temperature conditions. The results indicate that some of these integrals are viable parameters for crack growth prediction at elevated temperatures.

  16. Cardioprotective abilities of white wine.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jianhua; Tosaki, Arpad; Cordis, Gerald A; Bertelli, Alberto A E; Bertelli, Aldo; Maulik, Nilanjana; Das, Dipak K

    2002-05-01

    To study if white wines, like red wine, can also protect the heart from ischemia reperfusion injury, ethanol-free extracts of three different white wines (WW1, WW2 and WW3) (100 mg/100 g body weight) were given orally to Sprague Dawley rats (200 g body weight) for three weeks. Control rats were given water only for the same period of time. After three weeks, rats were anesthetized and sacrificed, and the hearts excised for the preparation of isolated working rat heart. All hearts were subjected to 30 min global ischemia followed by two hours of reperfusion. The results demonstrated that among the three different white wines, only WW2 showed cardioprotection as evidenced by improved post-ischemic ventricular recovery compared to control. The amount of malonaldehyde production in white wine-fed rat hearts were lower compared to that found in control hearts indicating reduced formation of the reactive oxygen species. In vitro studies using chemiluminescence technique revealed that these white wines scavenged both superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals. The results of our study demonstrated that only WW2 white wine provided cardioprotection as evidenced by the improved the post-ischemic contractile recovery and reduced myocardial infarct size. The cardioprotective effect of this white wine may be attributed, at least in part, from its ability to function as an in vivo antioxidant. PMID:12074987

  17. Growth Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... gland problem or disease. The pituitary gland makes growth hormone, which stimulates the growth of bone and other ... of it may be very short. Treatment with growth hormone can stimulate growth. People can also have too ...

  18. Innovative Allies: Spatial and Creative Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coxon, Steve V.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial and creative abilities are important for innovations in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) fields, but talents are rarely developed from these abilities by schools, including among gifted children and adolescents who have a high potential to become STEM innovators. This article provides an overview of each ability and makes…

  19. A Structural Theory of Spatial Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guttman, Ruth; And Others

    1990-01-01

    After a brief review of the contributions of factor analysis and regional analysis to the elaboration of the structures of spatial abilities, a facet design and regional model for spatial abilities are presented. A cylindrical-wedge model is proposed to represent the correlational structure of spatial ability tests. (SLD)

  20. Explaining High Abilities of Nobel Laureates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shavinina, Larisa

    2004-01-01

    Although the Nobel Prize is associated with a rare, superior degree of intellectually creative achievement, high abilities of Nobel laureates are far from well explained. This paper argues that Nobel laureates' high abilities are determined in part by their extracognitive abilities, that is, specific feelings, preferences, beliefs and intuitive…

  1. Predicting Academic Achievement with Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohde, Treena Eileen; Thompson, Lee Anne

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explain variation in academic achievement with general cognitive ability and specific cognitive abilities. Grade point average, Wide Range Achievement Test III scores, and SAT scores represented academic achievement. The specific cognitive abilities of interest were: working memory, processing speed, and…

  2. Pre-Service Teachers' Mindset Beliefs about Student Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutshall, C. Anne

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: We all have beliefs about our ability or intelligence. The extent to which we believe ability is malleable (growth) or stable (fixed) is commonly referred to as our mindset. This research is designed to explore pre-service teachers' mindset beliefs as well as their beliefs when applied to hypothetical student scenarios. Method:…

  3. You Are What You Eat? Meal Type, Socio-Economic Status and Cognitive Ability in Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Stumm, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    The current study tests if the type of children's daily main meal (slow versus fast food) mediates the association of socioeconomic status (SES) with cognitive ability and cognitive growth in childhood. A Scottish birth cohort (Growing Up in Scotland) was assessed at ages 3 (N = 4512) and 5 years (N = 3833) on cognitive ability (i.e. vocabulary…

  4. Superitem Test: An Alternative Assessment Tool to Assess Students' Algebraic Solving Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lian, Lim Hooi; Yew, Wun Thiam; Idris, Noraini

    2010-01-01

    Superitem test based on the SOLO model (Structure of the Observing Learning Outcome) has become a powerful alternative assessment tool for monitoring the growth of students' cognitive ability in solving mathematics problems. This article focused on developing a superitem test to assess students' algebraic solving ability through interview method.…

  5. An empirical investigation on the forecasting ability of mallows model averaging in a macro economic environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Yip Chee; Hock-Eam, Lim

    2012-09-01

    This paper investigates the forecasting ability of Mallows Model Averaging (MMA) by conducting an empirical analysis of five Asia countries, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines, Indonesia and China's GDP growth rate. Results reveal that MMA has no noticeable differences in predictive ability compared to the general autoregressive fractional integrated moving average model (ARFIMA) and its predictive ability is sensitive to the effect of financial crisis. MMA could be an alternative forecasting method for samples without recent outliers such as financial crisis.

  6. Inverse correlation of ability to produce aflatoxin and aspergillus colonization of maize seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Seeds of aflatoxin-resistant and aflatoxin susceptible maize lines were inoculated with conidia of aflatoxin-producing Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus isolates or isogenic non-producing mutants. Conidial yields recovered from resistant maize seed after seven days were significantly lower for af...

  7. Mouth Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis Growths can ... Dry Mouth Mouth Growths Mouth Sores and Inflammation Toothache Malocclusion Teeth Grinding Recurrent Aphthous Stomatitis NOTE: This ...

  8. Bidirectional Relations of Phonological Sensitivity and Prereading Abilities: Evidence from a Preschool Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Stephen R.; Lonigan, Christopher J.

    1998-01-01

    Examined the relationship between phonological sensitivity and letter knowledge in 4- and 5-year-olds in a one-year longitudinal study. Found that phonological sensitivity predicted letter knowledge growth, and letter knowledge predicted phonological sensitivity growth, when controlling for age and oral language abilities. Also found that the…

  9. Face recognition: a model specific ability

    PubMed Central

    Wilmer, Jeremy B.; Germine, Laura T.; Nakayama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    In our everyday lives, we view it as a matter of course that different people are good at different things. It can be surprising, in this context, to learn that most of what is known about cognitive ability variation across individuals concerns the broadest of all cognitive abilities; an ability referred to as general intelligence, general mental ability, or just g. In contrast, our knowledge of specific abilities, those that correlate little with g, is severely constrained. Here, we draw upon our experience investigating an exceptionally specific ability, face recognition, to make the case that many specific abilities could easily have been missed. In making this case, we derive key insights from earlier false starts in the measurement of face recognition’s variation across individuals, and we highlight the convergence of factors that enabled the recent discovery that this variation is specific. We propose that the case of face recognition ability illustrates a set of tools and perspectives that could accelerate fruitful work on specific cognitive abilities. By revealing relatively independent dimensions of human ability, such work would enhance our capacity to understand the uniqueness of individual minds. PMID:25346673

  10. Face recognition: a model specific ability.

    PubMed

    Wilmer, Jeremy B; Germine, Laura T; Nakayama, Ken

    2014-01-01

    In our everyday lives, we view it as a matter of course that different people are good at different things. It can be surprising, in this context, to learn that most of what is known about cognitive ability variation across individuals concerns the broadest of all cognitive abilities; an ability referred to as general intelligence, general mental ability, or just g. In contrast, our knowledge of specific abilities, those that correlate little with g, is severely constrained. Here, we draw upon our experience investigating an exceptionally specific ability, face recognition, to make the case that many specific abilities could easily have been missed. In making this case, we derive key insights from earlier false starts in the measurement of face recognition's variation across individuals, and we highlight the convergence of factors that enabled the recent discovery that this variation is specific. We propose that the case of face recognition ability illustrates a set of tools and perspectives that could accelerate fruitful work on specific cognitive abilities. By revealing relatively independent dimensions of human ability, such work would enhance our capacity to understand the uniqueness of individual minds. PMID:25346673

  11. Effects of Two Salts Compounds on Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Spore Germination of Six Isolates of Botrytis cinerea in the Western North of Algeria.

    PubMed

    Boumaaza, Boualem; Benkhelifa, Mohamed; Belkhoudja, Moulay

    2015-01-01

    Six isolates of Botrytis cinerea were isolated from leaves and stems of different tomato varieties taken from four areas in the northwest of Algeria where tomato is mostly grown in greenhouses and high tunnels. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of two salts, NaCl and CaCl2, on three stages of Botrytis cinerea's life cycle. All isolates tested were stimulated in 50 to 150 ppm; NaCl was the most effective treatment to increase mycelial growth at two tested concentrations. However, at 300 ppm concentration, CaCl2 completely inhibited the growth of mycelium; they reach 34.78% for the isolate TR46 and 26.72% for isolate F27. The sodium and calcium salts stimulated conidia production in liquid culture. We noticed that the effect of calcium chloride on sporulation was average while sodium chloride. In the medium containing 50 ppm, calcium chloride and sodium chloride increased the germination capacity of most isolates compared with the control. Other calcium salts, at 100 or 300 ppm, decreased the germination percentage of the conidia. With the exception of sodium salts, the inhibitions of germination reduce at 150 or 300 compared with the control. Conidial germination was slightly inhibited by sodium chloride only when the concentration was over 300 ppm. PMID:25883657

  12. Effects of Two Salts Compounds on Mycelial Growth, Sporulation, and Spore Germination of Six Isolates of Botrytis cinerea in the Western North of Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Boumaaza, Boualem; Benkhelifa, Mohamed; Belkhoudja, Moulay

    2015-01-01

    Six isolates of Botrytis cinerea were isolated from leaves and stems of different tomato varieties taken from four areas in the northwest of Algeria where tomato is mostly grown in greenhouses and high tunnels. The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of two salts, NaCl and CaCl2, on three stages of Botrytis cinerea's life cycle. All isolates tested were stimulated in 50 to 150 ppm; NaCl was the most effective treatment to increase mycelial growth at two tested concentrations. However, at 300 ppm concentration, CaCl2 completely inhibited the growth of mycelium; they reach 34.78% for the isolate TR46 and 26.72% for isolate F27. The sodium and calcium salts stimulated conidia production in liquid culture. We noticed that the effect of calcium chloride on sporulation was average while sodium chloride. In the medium containing 50 ppm, calcium chloride and sodium chloride increased the germination capacity of most isolates compared with the control. Other calcium salts, at 100 or 300 ppm, decreased the germination percentage of the conidia. With the exception of sodium salts, the inhibitions of germination reduce at 150 or 300 compared with the control. Conidial germination was slightly inhibited by sodium chloride only when the concentration was over 300 ppm. PMID:25883657

  13. Graphic Abilities in Relation to Mathematical and Scientific Ability in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stavridou, Fotini; Kakana, Domna

    2008-01-01

    Background: The study investigated a small range of cognitive abilities, related to visual-spatial intelligence, in adolescents. This specific range of cognitive abilities was termed "graphic abilities" and defined as a range of abilities to visualise and think in three dimensions, originating in the domain of visual-spatial intelligence, and…

  14. Developing and Demonstrating Knowledge: Ability and Non-Ability Determinants of Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beier, Margaret E.; Campbell, Madeline; Crook, Amy E.

    2010-01-01

    Ability and non-ability traits were examined as predictors of learning, operationalized as the development of knowledge structure accuracy, and exam performance in a semester-long course. As predicted by investment theories of intellectual development, both cognitive ability and non-ability traits were important determinants of learning and exam…

  15. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  16. Work Ability of Finnish Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mäkelä, Kasper; Hirvensalo, Mirja

    2015-01-01

    In the physical education (PE) teachers' profession, physical tasks comprise a large part of the job. PE teachers identify their health as good, and they are satisfied with their job. Nevertheless, the work ability of PE teachers may be decreasing. Purpose: The purpose of this article was to explore the work ability of Finnish PE teachers. What…

  17. Contour Line Portraits: Excited about Artistic Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Kari Gertz

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a self-portrait project that encouraged students, boosted their self-confidence, and got them excited about their artistic abilities--while producing amazing results. This lesson effectively develops artistic ability by compelling students to see that drawing is quite simply breaking down objects into the…

  18. Improvisation as Ability, Culture, and Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Lee; Mantie, Roger

    2013-01-01

    We argue in this article for greater role for improvisation in the music classroom. Based on an extensive examination of scholarship about improvisational practices, we propose three conceptualizations--ability, culture, experience--that can serve to guide the teaching of improvisation. When considered as an "ability," improvisation is a…

  19. The Learning Effect of Modeling Ability Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Shu-Nu

    2008-01-01

    To achieve the goal of scientific literacy, besides conveying science and technology concepts, cultivating students' modeling ability has become important. However, in-service teachers face the difficulty that their teaching load increases while they are still bound by limited teaching hours. Teachers may know of modeling ability, life related…

  20. Sex Differences in Spatial Ability: A Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clear, Sarah-Jane

    1978-01-01

    Explores (1) problems of the validity of tests of spatial ability, and (2) problems of the recessive gene influence theory of the origin of sex differences in spatial ability. Studies of cognitive strategies in spatial problem solving are suggested as a way to further investigate recessive gene influence. (Author/RH)

  1. Ability Explorer: A Review and Critique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Anne

    The Ability Explorer (AE) is a newly developed self-report inventory of abilities that is appropriate for group or individual administration. There are machine-scorable and hand-scorable versions of the test, and there are two levels. Level 1 is for students from junior high to high school, and Level 2 is for high school students and adults.…

  2. Reading Abilities and Strategies: A Short Introduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Feng

    2010-01-01

    This paper gives a short analysis of reading abilities and reading strategies. Much research has been done to investigate the nature of reading, though it's had to exactly define reading abilities and strategies. Different kinds of readings are discussed in this paper and distinctions are made between first language reading and second or foreign…

  3. Developing the Ability for Making Evaluative Judgements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, John

    2010-01-01

    It is suggested that a more specific emphasis should be placed in undergraduate education on the explicit development of the ability to make evaluative judgements. This higher level cognitive ability is highlighted as the foundation for much sound and successful personal and professional development throughout education, and in lifelong…

  4. Cultural Studies, Pedagogy, and Response-Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossiter, Penelope

    2012-01-01

    A few years ago, in a tutorial in an advanced level undergraduate subject that she teaches--"Emotions, Culture and Community"--the author was a witness and participant in a pedagogical event that moved and provoked the class: It incited response-ability. This article is about that event, the meaning of response-ability, and the window that it…

  5. IRT Models for Ability-Based Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ernesto San; del Pino, Guido; De Boeck, Paul

    2006-01-01

    An ability-based guessing model is formulated and applied to several data sets regarding educational tests in language and in mathematics. The formulation of the model is such that the probability of a correct guess does not only depend on the item but also on the ability of the individual, weighted with a general discrimination parameter. By so…

  6. 45 CFR 1616.7 - Language ability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... § 1616.7 Language ability. In areas where a significant number of clients speak a language other than English as their principal language, a recipient shall adopt employment policies that insure that legal... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Language ability. 1616.7 Section 1616.7...

  7. 45 CFR 1616.7 - Language ability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... § 1616.7 Language ability. In areas where a significant number of clients speak a language other than English as their principal language, a recipient shall adopt employment policies that insure that legal... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Language ability. 1616.7 Section 1616.7...

  8. 45 CFR 1616.7 - Language ability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Language ability. 1616.7 Section 1616.7 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION ATTORNEY HIRING § 1616.7 Language ability. In areas where a significant number of clients speak a language other than English as their principal language, a...

  9. 45 CFR 1616.7 - Language ability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... § 1616.7 Language ability. In areas where a significant number of clients speak a language other than English as their principal language, a recipient shall adopt employment policies that insure that legal... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Language ability. 1616.7 Section 1616.7...

  10. Does Classmate Ability Influence Students' Social Skills?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Empirically, the link between classmate ability and individual-level student achievement has been established. And yet, within the scope of this body of literature, there is a dearth of studies examining if a relationship also persists between classmate ability and non-achievement outcomes--that is, social skills. This article fills this research…

  11. Psycholinguistic Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rossi, Natalia F.; Heinze, Elena Garayzabal; Giacheti, Celia M.; Goncalves, Oscar F.; Sampaio, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the psycholinguistic abilities of children with Williams syndrome (WS) and typically developing children using the Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities (ITPA). Performance on the ITPA was analysed in a group with WS (N=20, mean age=8.5 years, SD=1.62) and two typically developing groups,…

  12. Does Spatial Training Improve Children's Mathematics Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Yi-Ling; Mix, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    The authors' primary aim was to investigate a potential causal relationship between spatial ability and math ability. To do so, they used a pretest-training-posttest experimental design in which children received short-term spatial training and were tested on problem solving in math. They focused on first and second graders because earlier studies…

  13. 45 CFR 1616.7 - Language ability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Language ability. 1616.7 Section 1616.7 Public... § 1616.7 Language ability. In areas where a significant number of clients speak a language other than English as their principal language, a recipient shall adopt employment policies that insure that...

  14. Overview of Research on Ability Grouping.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raze, Nasus

    Although over 77 percent of American school districts use ability grouping, or tracking, research overwhelmingly indicates that the practice benefits only the gifted. High schools commonly have two or three tracks. Regardless of the methods used to place students, the effects of ability grouping are uniform; furthermore, placement in low ability…

  15. A microscopy study of hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum under dynamic humidity conditions.

    PubMed

    van Laarhoven, Karel A; Huinink, Hendrik P; Adan, Olaf C G

    2016-05-01

    To remediate indoor fungal growth, understanding the moisture relations of common indoor fungi is crucial. Indoor moisture conditions are commonly quantified by the relative humidity (RH). RH is a major determinant of the availability of water in porous indoor surfaces that fungi grow on. The influence of steady-state RH on growth is well understood. Typically, however, the indoor RH constantly changes so that fungi have to endure frequent periods of alternating low and high RH. Knowledge of how common indoor fungi survive and are affected by the low-RH periods is limited. In particular, the specific effects of a drop in RH on the growth of the mycelium remain unclear. In this work, video microscopy was used to monitor hyphal growth of Penicillium rubens on gypsum substrates under controlled dynamic humidity conditions. The effect of a single period of low RH (RH = 50-90%) interrupting favourable conditions (RH = 97%) was tested. It was found that hyphal tips ceased to extend when exposed to any tested decrease in RH. However, new hyphal growth always emerges, seemingly from the old mycelium, suggesting that this indoor fungus does not rely only on conidia to survive the humidity patterns considered. These findings are a fundamental step in unravelling the effect of RH on indoor fungal growth. PMID:26996401

  16. Why do spatial abilities predict mathematical performance?

    PubMed

    Tosto, Maria Grazia; Hanscombe, Ken B; Haworth, Claire M A; Davis, Oliver S P; Petrill, Stephen A; Dale, Philip S; Malykh, Sergey; Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2014-05-01

    Spatial ability predicts performance in mathematics and eventual expertise in science, technology and engineering. Spatial skills have also been shown to rely on neuronal networks partially shared with mathematics. Understanding the nature of this association can inform educational practices and intervention for mathematical underperformance. Using data on two aspects of spatial ability and three domains of mathematical ability from 4174 pairs of 12-year-old twins, we examined the relative genetic and environmental contributions to variation in spatial ability and to its relationship with different aspects of mathematics. Environmental effects explained most of the variation in spatial ability (~70%) and in mathematical ability (~60%) at this age, and the effects were the same for boys and girls. Genetic factors explained about 60% of the observed relationship between spatial ability and mathematics, with a substantial portion of the relationship explained by common environmental influences (26% and 14% by shared and non-shared environments respectively). These findings call for further research aimed at identifying specific environmental mediators of the spatial-mathematics relationship. PMID:24410830

  17. [Visual perceptual abilities of children with low motor abilities--a pilot study].

    PubMed

    Werpup-Stüwe, Lina; Petermann, Franz

    2015-01-01

    The results of many studies show visual perceptual deficits in children with low motor abilities. This study aims to indicate the correlation between visual-perceptual and motor abilities. The correlation of visual-perceptual and motor abilities of 41 children is measured by using the German versions of the Developmental Test of Visual Perception--Adolescent and Adult (DTVP-A) and the Movement Assessment Battery for Children--Second Edition (M-ABC-2). The visual-perceptual abilities of children with low motor abilities (n=21) are also compared to the visual-perceptual abilities of children with normal motor abilities (the control group, n=20). High correlations between the visual-perceptual and motor abilities are found. The perceptual abilities of the groups differ significantly. Nearly half of the children with low motor abilities show visual-perceptual deficits. Visual perceptual abilities of children suffering coordination disorders should always be assessed. The DTVP-A is useful, because it provides the possibilities to compare motor-reduced visual-perceptual abilities and visualmotor integration abilities and to estimate the deficit's degree. PMID:26493482

  18. Eyelid Growths

    MedlinePlus

    ... a microscope). The growth is usually removed surgically. Did You Know... A growth on the eyelid that ... respond to initial treatments. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Figure 1 ...

  19. Growth Hormone

    MedlinePlus

    ... the dose of glucose. Growth hormone stimulates the production of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) . ... regular intervals for years afterward to monitor GH production and to detect tumor recurrence. Other blood tests ...

  20. Spatial Abilities of Expert Clinical Anatomists: Comparison of Abilities between Novices, Intermediates, and Experts in Anatomy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ruth; Dror, Itiel E.; Smith, Claire

    2011-01-01

    Spatial ability has been found to be a good predictor of success in learning anatomy. However, little research has explored whether spatial ability can be improved through anatomy education and experience. This study had two aims: (1) to determine if spatial ability is a learned or inherent facet in learning anatomy and (2) to ascertain if there…

  1. Idiot Savants: A Categorization of Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, A. Lewis

    1974-01-01

    Reported from a search of 52 sources are categories of special abilities such as fine sensory discriminations and calendar calculations demonstrated by idiot savants (retarded persons exhibiting an unusually developed skill in some special task). (CL)

  2. Adults' ability to detect children's lying.

    PubMed

    Crossman, Angela M; Lewis, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Adults are poor deception detectors when examining lies told by adults, on average. However, there are some adults who are better at detecting lies than others. Children learn to lie at a very young age, a behavior that is socialized by parents. Yet, less is known about the ability to detect children's lies, particularly with regard to individual differences in the ability to detect this deception. The current study explored adult raters' ability to discern honesty in children who lied or told the truth about committing a misdeed. Results showed that adults are no better at detecting children's lies than they are with adult lies. In particular, adults were very poor at identifying children's honest statements. However, individual differences did emerge, suggesting that the ability to detect lying in children might be facilitated by relevant experience working with children. Implications for legal and mental health contexts are discussed. PMID:17016813

  3. Videogame interventions and spatial ability interactions.

    PubMed

    Redick, Thomas S; Webster, Sean B

    2014-01-01

    Numerous research studies have been conducted on the use of videogames as tools to improve one's cognitive abilities. While meta-analyses and qualitative reviews have provided evidence that some aspects of cognition such as spatial imagery are modified after exposure to videogames, other evidence has shown that matrix reasoning measures of fluid intelligence do not show evidence of transfer from videogame training. In the current work, we investigate the available evidence for transfer specifically to nonverbal intelligence and spatial ability measures, given recent research that these abilities may be most sensitive to training on cognitive and working memory tasks. Accordingly, we highlight a few studies that on the surface provide evidence for transfer to spatial abilities, but a closer look at the pattern of data does not reveal a clean interpretation of the results. We discuss the implications of these results in relation to research design and statistical analysis practices. PMID:24723880

  4. Everyday Cognition: Age and Intellectual Ability Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Allaire, Jason C.; Marsiske, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to examine the relationship between a new battery of everyday cognition measures, which assessed 4 cognitive abilities within 3 familiar real-world domains, and traditional psychometric tests of the same basic cognitive abilities. Several theoreticians have argued that everyday cognition measures are somewhat distinct from traditional cognitive assessment approaches, and the authors investigated this assertion correlationally in the present study. The sample consisted of 174 community-dwelling older adults from the Detroit metropolitan area, who had an average age of 73 years. Major results of the study showed that (a) each everyday cognitive test was strongly correlated with the basic cognitive abilities; (b) several basic abilities, as well as measures of domain-specific knowledge, predicted everyday cognitive performance; and (c) everyday and basic measures were similarly related to age. The results suggest that everyday cognition is not unrelated to traditional measures, nor is it less sensitive to age-related differences. PMID:10632150

  5. Videogame interventions and spatial ability interactions

    PubMed Central

    Redick, Thomas S.; Webster, Sean B.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous research studies have been conducted on the use of videogames as tools to improve one’s cognitive abilities. While meta-analyses and qualitative reviews have provided evidence that some aspects of cognition such as spatial imagery are modified after exposure to videogames, other evidence has shown that matrix reasoning measures of fluid intelligence do not show evidence of transfer from videogame training. In the current work, we investigate the available evidence for transfer specifically to nonverbal intelligence and spatial ability measures, given recent research that these abilities may be most sensitive to training on cognitive and working memory tasks. Accordingly, we highlight a few studies that on the surface provide evidence for transfer to spatial abilities, but a closer look at the pattern of data does not reveal a clean interpretation of the results. We discuss the implications of these results in relation to research design and statistical analysis practices. PMID:24723880

  6. Self-Fulfilling Prophecies in Ability Settings.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jason; Filson Moses, Jennifer; Snyder, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that one person's expectations can influence the behavior of another person, thereby creating a self-fulfilling prophecy. This study examined the effects of ability-based expectations in an experiment in which some participants ("coaches") were assigned false expectations of the basketball free-throw shooting ability of other participants ("players"). Coaches allocated more opportunities to players for whom the false expectation was positive, and fewer shots to players for whom the false expectation was negative. In turn, players who were allocated more shots made a higher percentage of them, thereby confirming their coaches' expectations about their shooting ability, and were more confident in their shooting ability following the task, than players who were allocated fewer shots. PMID:26214717

  7. AgrAbility: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... About AgrAbility State Projects Directory The Toolbox AT Database Resources Veterans & Beginning Farmers Communities of Interest News ... 800) 825-4264 Home About The Toolbox AT Database Resources Online Training Contact Us You are here: ...

  8. AgrAbility: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... the location of the incident. How can I contact someone for help? If you are interested in ... as price, shipping costs, etc. Who do I contact? AgrAbility provides resources to farmers and ranchers with ...

  9. Delayed growth

    MedlinePlus

    Growth - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Weight gain - slow (child 0 - 5 years); Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; ... A child should have regular, well-baby check-ups with a health care provider. These checkups are usually scheduled ...

  10. Dissociating the ability and propensity for empathy.

    PubMed

    Keysers, Christian; Gazzola, Valeria

    2014-04-01

    Neuroimaging suggests psychopaths have reduced vicarious activations when simply witnessing pain but less so when asked to empathize. This inspired us to distinguish the ability from the propensity to empathize. We argue that (i) this ability-propensity distinction is crucial to characterizing empathy in psychiatric disorders such as psychopathy and autism, (ii) that costly helping might be best predicted by the propensity for empathy, and (iii) suggest how social neuroscientists can start exploring this distinction. PMID:24484764

  11. The biology of growth.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Noël

    2008-01-01

    Variability in human growth is not only in the timing of critical periods within the whole pattern of growth but also in the magnitude and rate of change coincident with the period. In addition, for a radical change in, e.g., height to occur there must also be changes in the anatomical parts that make up total height and these changes are themselves variable. Acceleration, for instance in height velocity, may be the result of different changes in the length of the spine, femur, and/or tibia, each of which may contribute differently to the total process. In addition, not only may the process be variable within a single child, it may also be variable between different children of the same or opposite sexes. The mathematical and statistical problems arising from the seemingly simple process of an increase in height are thus complex. In order to review the biology of human growth this contribution will discuss the principles of growth that are fundamental to our ability to interpret the response of the child to factors that might modify the genetically programmed pattern of growth from conception to maturity. In this way the biology of human growth will be described by a set of phenomena that reflect the actions of biological control mechanisms. These mechanisms are subject to genetic and environmental influences and their expression is characterised by variation in timing, magnitude, and duration. PMID:18196941

  12. Cognitive Ability and the Demand for Redistribution

    PubMed Central

    Mollerstrom, Johanna; Seim, David

    2014-01-01

    Empirical research suggests that the cognitively able are politically more influential than the less able, by being more likely to vote and to assume leadership positions. This study asks whether this pattern matters for public policy by investigating what role a person's cognitive ability plays in determining his preferences for redistribution of income among citizens in society. To answer this question, we use a unique Swedish data set that matches responses to a tailor-made questionnaire to administrative tax records and to military enlistment records for men, with the latter containing a measure of cognitive ability. On a scale of 0 to 100 percent redistribution, a one-standard-deviation increase in cognitive ability reduces the willingness to redistribute by 5 percentage points, or by the same amount as a $35,000 increase in mean annual income. We find support for two channels mediating this economically strong and statistically significant relation. First, higher ability is associated with higher income. Second, ability is positively correlated with the view that economic success is the result of effort, rather than luck. Both these factors are, in turn, related to lower demand for redistribution. PMID:25343713

  13. Gender differences in multitasking reflect spatial ability.

    PubMed

    Mäntylä, Timo

    2013-04-01

    Demands involving the scheduling and interleaving of multiple activities have become increasingly prevalent, especially for women in both their paid and unpaid work hours. Despite the ubiquity of everyday requirements to multitask, individual and gender-related differences in multitasking have gained minimal attention in past research. In two experiments, participants completed a multitasking session with four gender-fair monitoring tasks and separate tasks measuring executive functioning (working memory updating) and spatial ability (mental rotation). In both experiments, males outperformed females in monitoring accuracy. Individual differences in executive functioning and spatial ability were independent predictors of monitoring accuracy, but only spatial ability mediated gender differences in multitasking. Menstrual changes accentuated these effects, such that gender differences in multitasking (and spatial ability) were eliminated between males and females who were in the menstrual phase of the menstrual cycle but not between males and females who were in the luteal phase. These findings suggest that multitasking involves spatiotemporal task coordination and that gender differences in multiple-task performance reflect differences in spatial ability. PMID:23462757

  14. Impaired musical ability in people with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Hatada, Sanae; Sawada, Ken; Akamatsu, Masanori; Doi, Erina; Minese, Masayoshi; Yamashita, Motoshi; Thornton, Allen E.; Honer, William G.; Inoue, Shimpei

    2014-01-01

    Background Assessment of the musical ability of people with schizophrenia has attracted little interest despite the diverse and substantive findings of impairments in sound perception and processing and the therapeutic effect of music in people with the illness. The present study investigated the musical ability of people with schizophrenia and the association with psychiatric symptoms and cognition. Methods We recruited patients with chronic schizophrenia and healthy controls for participation in our study. To measure musical ability and cognitive function, we used the Montreal Battery of Evaluation of Amusia (MBEA) and the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia (BACS). We carried out a mediation analysis to investigate a possible pathway to a deficit in musical ability. Results We enrolled 50 patients and 58 controls in the study. The MBEA global score in patients with schizophrenia was significantly lower than that in controls (p < 0.001), and was strongly associated with both the composite cognitive function score (r = 0.645, p < 0.001) and the negative symptom score (r = −0.504, p < 0.001). Further analyses revealed direct and indirect effects of negative symptoms on musical ability. The indirect effects were mediated through cognitive impairment. Limitations The relatively small sample size did not permit full evaluation of the possible effects of age, sex, education, medication and cultural influences on the results. Conclusion Examining the associations between musical deficits, negative symptoms and cognitive imapirment in patients with schizophrenia may identify shared biological mechanisms. PMID:24119791

  15. Spatial ability in radiologists: a necessary prerequisite?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Visuospatial ability is fundamental to the cognitive understanding of the three-dimensional environment and is widely recognized as an important skill in the performance of challenging visuospatial tasks. Its contribution to attainment and performance in a variety of professional disciplines is recognized, but there is relatively little known in relation to its relevance in radiological practice. On the basis of a review of the existing cognitive psychological literature and on the basis of the author's own observations, and on the assumption that spatial ability is of increasing and fundamental importance to high-level performance as a radiologist, it is proposed that consideration should be given to the testing of visuospatial ability as part of the selection process for prospective applicants to radiology training programmes. PMID:25756868

  16. Does verbal and gestural expression ability predict comprehension ability in cerebral palsy?

    PubMed

    Pueyo, Roser; Ariza, Mar; Narberhaus, Ana; Ballester-Plané, Júlia; Laporta-Hoyos, Olga; Junqué, Carme; Vendrell, Pere

    2013-04-01

    Some people with cerebral palsy have motor and associated impairments that may hinder verbal and gestural expression to various extents. This study explores whether the ability to produce verbal or gestural expressions may be related to the comprehension of verbal communications and gestures. The influence of severity of motor impairment, general cognitive performance, and age on comprehension ability was also explored. Forty people with cerebral palsy were assigned to different groups according to their verbal and gestural expression abilities. A neuropsychological assessment of comprehension abilities and general cognitive performance was carried out. Multiple linear regression analysis was applied to identify the possible influence of expression abilities on comprehension abilities and also to detect the possible contribution of severity of motor impairment, general cognitive performance, and age. Results indicate that verbal and gestural comprehension was mainly predicted by general cognitive performance. Severity of motor impairment and age did not contribute to predicting comprehension abilities. Only verbal grammar comprehension was significantly predicted by verbal expression ability. Verbal expression ability may be an important marker for cerebral palsy therapies. In non-ambulant patients with bilateral cerebral palsy, impaired gestural expression should not be taken as an indicator of impaired gestural comprehension. PMID:24032327

  17. Emotional Intelligence: New Ability or Eclectic Traits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, John D.; Salovey, Peter; Caruso, David R.

    2008-01-01

    Some individuals have a greater capacity than others to carry out sophisticated information processing about emotions and emotion-relevant stimuli and to use this information as a guide to thinking and behavior. The authors have termed this set of abilities emotional intelligence (EI). Since the introduction of the concept, however, a schism has…

  18. Basic Structure of Work-Relevant Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prediger, Dale J.

    This study sought to determine whether the dimensions underlying a comprehensive set of 15 work-relevant abilities were similar to the Data/Ideas and Things/People Work Task Dimensions (D. J. Prediger, 1996) underlying J. L. Holland's (1997) hexagonal model of interest and occupational types. The work task dimensions and a general ability…

  19. Learning ability in children with Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Elefant, Cochavit; Wigram, Tony

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to present results of a research study examining learning ability in individuals with Rett syndrome. The material for this article was drawn from a more extensive doctoral study, designed to investigate intentional communication in this population, through the use of songs in music therapy. Rett syndrome is a neurological disorder resulting from an X-linked mutation, affecting mainly females, and found across racial and ethnic groups worldwide. One of the main areas affecting functioning in individuals with Rett syndrome is a severe impairment of receptive and expressive communication. This creates difficulties when attempting to reveal their potential learning abilities. This population has been observed as very responsive to music hence music therapy intervention has been advocated in promoting and motivating them to communicate and to learn. Seven girls with Rett syndrome, between ages 4 and 10 participated in the study. A single subject, multiple probe design was applied during 30-min trials, three times per week and lasted 8 months. During the trials the participants were asked to choose from a selection of 18 familiar and unfamiliar songs, while their ability to learn was observed and measured. Findings revealed that all seven girls demonstrated an ability to learn and to sustain learning over time. This intervention demonstrated that individuals with Rett syndrome could be promoted and motivated to communicate and learn when therapeutically employed by a trained music therapists. PMID:16182495

  20. Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities. Third Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Diane F.

    This book examines the science and politics of cognitive sex differences, reflecting theories and research in the area over the past several years. Eight chapters discuss: (1) "Introduction and Overview" (e.g., theoretical approaches, values and science, and terminology); (2) "Searching for Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities" (e.g., the need…

  1. Second Language Ability and Emotional Prosody Perception

    PubMed Central

    Bhatara, Anjali; Laukka, Petri; Boll-Avetisyan, Natalie; Granjon, Lionel; Anger Elfenbein, Hillary; Bänziger, Tanja

    2016-01-01

    The present study examines the effect of language experience on vocal emotion perception in a second language. Native speakers of French with varying levels of self-reported English ability were asked to identify emotions from vocal expressions produced by American actors in a forced-choice task, and to rate their pleasantness, power, alertness and intensity on continuous scales. Stimuli included emotionally expressive English speech (emotional prosody) and non-linguistic vocalizations (affect bursts), and a baseline condition with Swiss-French pseudo-speech. Results revealed effects of English ability on the recognition of emotions in English speech but not in non-linguistic vocalizations. Specifically, higher English ability was associated with less accurate identification of positive emotions, but not with the interpretation of negative emotions. Moreover, higher English ability was associated with lower ratings of pleasantness and power, again only for emotional prosody. This suggests that second language skills may sometimes interfere with emotion recognition from speech prosody, particularly for positive emotions. PMID:27253326

  2. Effects of Infant Starvation on Learning Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Pnina S.

    Explored were the effects of starvation during infancy on the learning abilities of 50 children when evaluated between 5 and 14 years of age. All Ss had suffered from pyloric stenosis, a condition which prevents passage of food from the stomach, in infancy for periods ranging from 2 days to 3 weeks. Ss were given five tests of various learning…

  3. 21st Century Conceptions of Musical Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Susan

    2010-01-01

    This study explored conceptions of musical ability using an inventory derived from previous qualitative research. Participants included 102 musicians, 95 educators, 132 adult amateur musicians, 60 adults who were not actively engaged in making music, 193 children actively engaged in making music in addition to their engagement with the school…

  4. Do High Ability Students Have Mathematics Anxiety?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeo, Kai Kow Joseph

    2004-01-01

    This exploratory study investigates the level of mathematics anxiety among 116 high ability Secondary Two students. These students were from the top 10% of the Secondary Two students in Singapore. Mathematics Anxiety was measured using the Fennema-Sherman Mathematics Anxiety Scale (MAS) (Fennema & Sherman, 1978) which consisted of twelve items…

  5. Benchmarking Year Five Students' Reading Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Chang Kuan; Eng, Lin Siew; Mohamed, Abdul Rashid

    2014-01-01

    Reading and understanding a written text is one of the most important skills in English learning.This study attempts to benchmark Year Five students' reading abilities of fifteen rural schools in a district in Malaysia. The objectives of this study are to develop a set of standardised written reading comprehension and a set of indicators to inform…

  6. Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities. Fourth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halpern, Diane F.

    2011-01-01

    The fourth edition of "Sex Differences in Cognitive Abilities" critically examines the breadth of research on this complex and controversial topic, with the principal aim of helping the reader to understand where sex differences are found--and where they are not. Since the publication of the third edition, there have been many exciting and…

  7. Spatial Ability through Engineering Graphics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marunic, Gordana; Glazar, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Spatial ability has been confirmed to be of particular importance for successful engineering graphics education and to be a component of human intelligence that can be improved through instruction and training. Consequently, the creation and communication by means of graphics demand careful development of spatial skills provided by the balanced…

  8. Spatial Ability and Cerebral Sensory Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federico, Pat-Anthony

    To provide converging support that the proper integration of analog and propositional representational systems is associated with spatial ability, the visual, auditory, and bimodal brain event-related potentials were recorded from 50 right-handed Caucasian males. Sensory interaction indices were derived for these subjects who had taken the Surface…

  9. Nine Actions to Build Students' Mathematics Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Kenna

    2010-01-01

    The author was asked to develop a list of actions that teachers could take to build students' mathematics abilities. Too many students fail to graduate and fail to pass state assessments as a result of weak mathematics skills. Even many students who do graduate leave high school lacking sufficient understanding of mathematics to pass college…

  10. Assessing Postgraduate Students' Critical Thinking Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Javed, Muhammad; Nawaz, Muhammad Atif; Qurat-Ul-Ain, Ansa

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses to assess the critical thinking ability of postgraduate students. The target population was the male and female students at University level in Pakistan. A small sample of 45 male and 45 female students were selected randomly from The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Pakistan. Cornell Critical Thinking Test Series, The…

  11. Do mental speed and musical abilities interact?

    PubMed

    Gruhn, Wilfried; Galley, Niels; Kluth, Christine

    2003-11-01

    The relation between mental speed and musical ability was investigated. Seventeen subjects aged 3-7 years were divided into two subgroups: one (G1; n = 9) consisted of children who participated in an early childhood music program and who received informal musical guidance, but no special training; the other (G2; n = 8) consisted of highly talented young violin players who received intensive parental support and special training by daily deliberate practice. Mental and musical abilities of both groups were controlled by standardized tests (Kaufman's ABC and Gordon's PMMA) and compared with data taken from recordings of saccadic eye movement using online identification from an electrooculogram (EOG). Results of EOG measurement are referred to as "mental speed," which correlates highly with general mental abilities (intelligence). These results were compared with EOG scores taken from a larger sample of children of the same age range (n = 82) who received no music instruction. The grand average of their scores served as a reference line for mental speed, which is normally expected to be performed by an equivalent age group. Data in the two experimental groups did not differ statistically; however, all musically experienced children had a highly significant advantage in mental age (P <0.01) compared to the reference line of the normal population who did not exhibit any effect of training and practice. This indicates strong interaction between mental speed and music ability, which can be interpreted in terms of the expertise model and cognitive transfer effects. PMID:14681172

  12. Informal Assessment of Older Readers' Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siedow, Mary Dunn

    1991-01-01

    Explores the utility of an informal reading inventory for assessing the reading abilities of college students. Determines the amount and kinds of information that can be learned from an informal reading inventory. Determines whether information gained from the Advanced Reading Inventory differed qualitatively from that obtained from the Nelson…

  13. Adaptive Assessment of Spatial Abilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bejar, Isaac I.

    This report summarizes the results of research designed to study the psychometric and technological feasibility of adaptive testing to assess spatial ability. Data was collected from high school students on two types of spatial items: three-dimensional cubes and hidden figure items. The analysis of the three-dimensional cubes focused on the fit of…

  14. Young Children's Time and Intellectual Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falbo, Toni; Cooper, Catherine R.

    1980-01-01

    Examines assumptions of the confluence model of the effects of family structure on children's intelligence. Subjects were 24 preschool children. Findings indicate that individual differences in intellectual ability are associated with the amount of time children spend in certain activities and with certain people. (Author/RH)

  15. Response Ability Pathways: A Curriculum for Connecting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koehler, Nancy; Seger, Vikki

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a new training curriculum for educators, youth workers, and mentors which draws from research and best practices in positive youth development and positive behavior support. Response Ability Pathways or RAP focuses on three practical interventions: connect to others for support, clarify challenging problems, and restore…

  16. Synaptic Transmission Correlates of General Mental Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRorie, Margaret; Cooper, Colin

    2004-01-01

    Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and efficiency of synaptic transmission are two possible biological mechanisms that may underpin intelligence. Direct assessments of NCV, without synaptic transmission, show few substantial or reliable correlations with cognitive abilities ["Intelligence" 16 (1992) 273]. We therefore assessed the latencies of…

  17. Narrative Abilities of Children with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strekas, Amy; Ratner, Nan Bernstein; Berl, Madison; Gaillard, William D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a noticeable publication gap in the speech-language pathology literature regarding the language abilities of children with common types of epilepsy. This paper reviews studies that suggest a high frequency of undetected language problems in this population, and it proposes the need for pragmatically based assessment of…

  18. Kinesthetic Ability in Children with Spastic Hemiplegia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrysagis, Nikolaos K.; Skordilis, Emmanouil K.; Koutsouki, Dimitra; Evans, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to examine the differences in kinesthetic ability, at the elbow joint, between children with (n = 15) and without (n = 15) spastic hemiplegia. The Kin Com 125 AP isokinetic dynamometer Configuration Chattanooga was used. Results revealed significant (p less than 0.05) interaction between participant groups and side which was a…

  19. Psycholinguistic Abilities in Children with Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Von Isser, Aldine

    1977-01-01

    The Illinois Test of Psycholinguistic Abilities was administered to 22 children (mean age=90 months) with petit mal epilepsy and 28 children (mean age=85 months) evidencing mixed seizures to determine whether any differences would be found when these two groups were compared either with each other or with a randomly selected group of nonepileptic…

  20. Identities of Dis/Ability and Music

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Michael; Ridley, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Centring on a small-scale capability-based case study of music provision for adults with profound dis/abilities, this paper considers the significance of music and music education in people's lives. It offers a philosophical defence of music's importance in enjoying a truly human life and then, drawing on an overview of the work of dis/abled…

  1. Haplogroups as Evolutionary Markers of Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindermann, Heiner; Woodley, Michael A.; Stratford, James

    2012-01-01

    Studies investigating evolutionary theories on the origins of national differences in intelligence have been criticized on the basis that both national cognitive ability measures and supposedly evolutionarily informative proxies (such as latitude and climate) are confounded with general developmental status. In this study 14 Y chromosomal…

  2. Does Listening to Mozart Affect Listening Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowman, Becki J.; Punyanunt-Carter, Narissra; Cheah, Tsui Yi; Watson, W. Joe; Rubin, Rebecca B.

    2007-01-01

    Considerable research has been conducted testing Rauscher, Shaw, and Ky's (1993) Mozart Effect (ME). This study attempts to replicate, in part, research that tested the ME on listening comprehension abilities. Also included in this study is an examination of control group issues in current day research. We hypothesized that students who listen to…

  3. Dis/Ability through Artists' Eyes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metcalf, Suesi; Gervais, Julie; Dase, Monica; Griseta, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    An individual's concept of disability depends upon one's experience, based on personal, physical, mental, and emotional knowledge (Linton, 1998; Wendell, 1996). The United Nations (United Nations, 2005) defines disability as any restriction or deficiency of ability to perform within the range of what is considered normal for an individual. A…

  4. Enhancing Readers' Analysis-by-Synthesis Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Margaret E.

    A variety of techniques for improving readers' analysis-by-synthesis abilities (rapid, efficient reading typical of highly skilled readers) are presented in this paper. The techniques discussed in the first part emphasize improving reading comprehension and include the following: (1) modifications of the cloze procedure (encouraging readers to use…

  5. Spatial Ability Improvement and Curriculum Content

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Patrick E.

    2009-01-01

    There has been a significant history of research on spatial ability and visualization improvement and related curriculum content presented by members of the Engineering Design Graphics Division over the past decade. Recently, interest in this topic has again been heightened thanks to the work of several division members on research such as the…

  6. Children's Abilities in Topographic Map Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carswell, Ronald J. B.

    Although over 40 studies have been done since 1925 on map reading, there is little understanding of children's ability to comprehend maps or the mental processes involved. Children's inability to read maps is well document, as are their improved skills after instruction. Yet map skills are part of the elementary curriculum. Success in teaching map…

  7. On Developing Students' Spatial Visualisation Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risma, Dwi Afrini; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Hartono, Yusuf

    2013-01-01

    This research aims at studying on how students develop their spatial visualisation abilities. In this paper, one of five activities in an ongoing classroom activity is discussed. This paper documents students' learning activity in exploring the building blocks. The goal of teaching experiment is to support the development of students' spatial…

  8. Improving Spatial Ability with Mentored Sketching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mohler, James L.; Miller, Craig L.

    2008-01-01

    As the result of a qualitative investigation into spatial ability, a teaching technique called mentored sketching was found to be effective for teaching visualization skills to freshman engineering students. This contribution describes the technique, how it evolved, and comments made by students as to its effectiveness. While mentored sketching…

  9. Development of Network Synchronization Predicts Language Abilities.

    PubMed

    Doesburg, Sam M; Tingling, Keriann; MacDonald, Matt J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of oscillations among brain areas is understood to mediate network communication supporting cognition, perception, and language. How task-dependent synchronization during word production develops throughout childhood and adolescence, as well as how such network coherence is related to the development of language abilities, remains poorly understood. To address this, we recorded magnetoencephalography while 73 participants aged 4-18 years performed a verb generation task. Atlas-guided source reconstruction was performed, and phase synchronization among regions was calculated. Task-dependent increases in synchronization were observed in the theta, alpha, and beta frequency ranges, and network synchronization differences were observed between age groups. Task-dependent synchronization was strongest in the theta band, as were differences between age groups. Network topologies were calculated for brain regions associated with verb generation and were significantly associated with both age and language abilities. These findings establish the maturational trajectory of network synchronization underlying expressive language abilities throughout childhood and adolescence and provide the first evidence for an association between large-scale neurophysiological network synchronization and individual differences in the development of language abilities. PMID:26401810

  10. Unmasking Abilities Hidden by Developmental Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mallik, Kalisankar, Ed.; Shaver, Elaine M., Ed.

    This document contains 16 papers that were scheduled to be presented at a conference (which was canceled) on approaches and programs for helping developmentally disabled persons to be more self-sufficient. The book is divided into three sections: (1) unmasking vocational abilities, (2) enhancing functional independence, and (3) medical and…

  11. The Development of Symbol Processing Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnham-Diggory, Sylvia

    Visual and auditory stimuli were presented to children to measure symbol processing abilities. Slides which required matching the similarities in two objects in a group of three were presented. At times the matching criteria varied between function, color, and form. Reaction time was quicker when matching by color than by function, which was…

  12. ABILITY, FAMILY SOCIOECONOMIC LEVEL, AND ADVANCED EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHOENFELDT, LYLE F.

    TWO GROUPS OF NURSES OF COMPARABLE ABILITY AND ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT WERE STUDIED TO EVALUATE THE EFFECTS OF FAMILY BACKGROUND ON DECISIONS TO CONTINUE EDUCATION AFTER HIGH SCHOOL. BECAUSE FUTURE NURSES MAY ENROLL IN DIFFERENT KINDS OF TRAINING PROGRAMS, IT WAS FELT THAT USING THESE STUDENTS AS SUBJECTS WOULD ENABLE MORE POSITIVE IDENTIFICATION OF…

  13. Why Do Spatial Abilities Predict Mathematical Performance?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tosto, Maria Grazia; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Dale, Philip S.; Malykh, Sergey; Plomin, Robert; Kovas, Yulia

    2014-01-01

    Spatial ability predicts performance in mathematics and eventual expertise in science, technology and engineering. Spatial skills have also been shown to rely on neuronal networks partially shared with mathematics. Understanding the nature of this association can inform educational practices and intervention for mathematical underperformance.…

  14. Auditory Temporal Pattern Discrimination and Reading Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAnally, Ken I.; Castles, Anne; Bannister, Susan

    2004-01-01

    The relation between reading ability and performance on an auditory temporal pattern discrimination task was investigated in children who were either good or delayed readers. The stimuli in the primary task consisted of sequences of tones, alternating between high and low frequencies. The threshold interstimulus interval (ISI) for discrimination…

  15. Rasch Based Analysis of Reading Ability Questionnaire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Yuji

    2000-01-01

    This paper examines the results of a questionnaire on reading ability in English by Japanese college students, which was formerly analyzed using raw scores, from the viewpoint of Rasch measured scores. In the Rasch analysis, the basic requirements for measuring are the following: (1) reduction of experience to one dimensional abstraction; (2)…

  16. Spatial Abilities across the Adult Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borella, Erika; Meneghetti, Chiara; Ronconi, Lucia; De Beni, Rossana

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates age-related effects across the adult life span on spatial abilities (testing subabilities based on a distinction between spatial visualization, mental rotation, and perspective taking) and spatial self-assessments. The sample consisted of 454 participants (223 women and 231 men) from 20 to 91 years of age. Results showed…

  17. The genetic basis of music ability.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yi Ting; McPherson, Gary E; Peretz, Isabelle; Berkovic, Samuel F; Wilson, Sarah J

    2014-01-01

    Music is an integral part of the cultural heritage of all known human societies, with the capacity for music perception and production present in most people. Researchers generally agree that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the broader realization of music ability, with the degree of music aptitude varying, not only from individual to individual, but across various components of music ability within the same individual. While environmental factors influencing music development and expertise have been well investigated in the psychological and music literature, the interrogation of possible genetic influences has not progressed at the same rate. Recent advances in genetic research offer fertile ground for exploring the genetic basis of music ability. This paper begins with a brief overview of behavioral and molecular genetic approaches commonly used in human genetic analyses, and then critically reviews the key findings of genetic investigations of the components of music ability. Some promising and converging findings have emerged, with several loci on chromosome 4 implicated in singing and music perception, and certain loci on chromosome 8q implicated in absolute pitch and music perception. The gene AVPR1A on chromosome 12q has also been implicated in music perception, music memory, and music listening, whereas SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q has been associated with music memory and choir participation. Replication of these results in alternate populations and with larger samples is warranted to confirm the findings. Through increased research efforts, a clearer picture of the genetic mechanisms underpinning music ability will hopefully emerge. PMID:25018744

  18. The genetic basis of music ability

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yi Ting; McPherson, Gary E.; Peretz, Isabelle; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Wilson, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    Music is an integral part of the cultural heritage of all known human societies, with the capacity for music perception and production present in most people. Researchers generally agree that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the broader realization of music ability, with the degree of music aptitude varying, not only from individual to individual, but across various components of music ability within the same individual. While environmental factors influencing music development and expertise have been well investigated in the psychological and music literature, the interrogation of possible genetic influences has not progressed at the same rate. Recent advances in genetic research offer fertile ground for exploring the genetic basis of music ability. This paper begins with a brief overview of behavioral and molecular genetic approaches commonly used in human genetic analyses, and then critically reviews the key findings of genetic investigations of the components of music ability. Some promising and converging findings have emerged, with several loci on chromosome 4 implicated in singing and music perception, and certain loci on chromosome 8q implicated in absolute pitch and music perception. The gene AVPR1A on chromosome 12q has also been implicated in music perception, music memory, and music listening, whereas SLC6A4 on chromosome 17q has been associated with music memory and choir participation. Replication of these results in alternate populations and with larger samples is warranted to confirm the findings. Through increased research efforts, a clearer picture of the genetic mechanisms underpinning music ability will hopefully emerge. PMID:25018744

  19. College Major Choice and Ability: Why Is General Ability Not Enough?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartolj, Tjasa; Polanec, Saso

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the impact of cognitive ability on college major choices using an administrative data set for full-time students enrolled in four-year business and economics programs offered by the largest Slovenian university. In contrast to existing studies, we are able to distinguish between general ability, measured with high school…

  20. Predictive Ability of the General Ability Index (GAI) versus the Full Scale IQ among Gifted Referrals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowe, Ellen W.; Kingsley, Jessica M.; Thompson, Dawna F.

    2010-01-01

    The General Ability Index (GAI) is a composite ability score for the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV) that minimizes the impact of tasks involving working memory and processing speed. The goal of the current study was to compare the degree to which the Full Scale IQ (FSIQ) and the GAI predict academic achievement…

  1. Predicting Student Performance in Sonographic Scanning Using Spatial Ability as an Ability Determinent of Skill Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clem, Douglas Wayne

    2012-01-01

    Spatial ability refers to an individual's capacity to visualize and mentally manipulate three dimensional objects. Since sonographers manually manipulate 2D and 3D sonographic images to generate multi-viewed, logical, sequential renderings of an anatomical structure, it can be assumed that spatial ability is central to the perception and…

  2. Predicting student performance in sonographic scanning using spatial ability as an ability determinent of skill acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clem, Douglas Wayne

    Spatial ability refers to an individual's capacity to visualize and mentally manipulate three dimensional objects. Since sonographers manually manipulate 2D and 3D sonographic images to generate multi-viewed, logical, sequential renderings of an anatomical structure, it can be assumed that spatial ability is central to the perception and interpretation of these medical images. Using Ackerman's theory of ability determinants of skilled performance as a conceptual framework, this study explored the relationship of spatial ability and learning sonographic scanning. Beginning first year sonography students from four different educational institutions were administered a spatial abilities test prior to their initial scanning lab coursework. The students' spatial test scores were compared with their scanning competency performance scores. A significant relationship between the students' spatial ability scores and their scanning performance scores was found. This result suggests that the use of spatial ability tests for admission to sonography programs may improve candidate selection, as well as assist programs in adjusting instruction and curriculum for students who demonstrate low spatial ability.

  3. Growth and nutrition effects on gilt development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The growth and development of gilts are a component of their lifetime potential for productivity. Growth and development affects not only their ability to reach puberty, they also likely affect their reproductive performance through later parities and their physical soundness as they age. Because of...

  4. Morphological Awareness and Vocabulary Development among Kindergarteners with Different Ability Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez, Gloria; Walton, Patrick; Roberts, William

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to investigate the growth of vocabulary and morphological awareness over time in the context of an intervention for kindergartners with different ability levels in these skills. Participants in this exploratory study were 108 children from schools serving socioeconomically disadvantaged neighborhoods. Results indicated that children…

  5. Measurement Matters: Assessing Personal Qualities Other than Cognitive Ability for Educational Purposes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duckworth, Angela L.; Yeager, David Scott

    2015-01-01

    There has been perennial interest in personal qualities other than cognitive ability that determine success, including self-control, grit, growth mind-set, and many others. Attempts to measure such qualities for the purposes of educational policy and practice, however, are more recent. In this article, we identify serious challenges to doing so.…

  6. Improving Learners' Ability to Recognize Emergence with Embedded Assessment in a Virtual Watershed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlandson, Benjamin E.

    2014-01-01

    Measures of participants' water cycle knowledge and ability to recognize emergence were taken at various points throughout a 2-h experience with the Cloverdale virtual watershed socioecological simulation. Multilevel growth models were estimated for analysis of hypothesized predictive relationships between measured variables. Significant…

  7. Maize dwarf mosaic can reduce weed suppressive ability of sweet corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize dwarf mosaic (MDM) stunts corn growth, delays development, and is the most prevalent viral disease of sweet corn grown in many regions of North America and Europe. Although weeds evade control in most sweet corn fields, the extent to which MDM influences the weed suppressive ability of the cro...

  8. Spatial Reasoning: Improvement of Imagery and Abilities in Sophomore Organic Chemistry. Perspective to Enhance Student Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornbuckle, Susan F.; Gobin, Latanya; Thurman, Stephanie N.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial reasoning has become a demanded skill for students pursuing a science emphasis to compete with the dynamic growth of our professional society. The ability to reason spatially includes explorations in memory recollection and problem solving capabilities as well as critical thinking and reasoning skills. With these advancements, educational…

  9. Tolerance for error and computational estimation ability.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Thomas P; Wyckoff, Laurie A; Krebs, Paul; Jones, William; Fitzgerald, Mark P

    2004-06-01

    Previous investigators have suggested that the personality variable tolerance for error is related to success in computational estimation. However, this suggestion has not been tested directly. This study examined the relationship between performance on a computational estimation test and scores on the NEO-Five Factor Inventory, a measure of the Big Five personality traits, including Openness, an index of tolerance for ambiguity. Other variables included SAT-I Verbal and Mathematics scores and self-rated mathematics ability. Participants were 65 college students. There was no significant relationship between the tolerance variable and computational estimation performance. There was a modest negative relationship between Agreeableness and estimation performance. The skepticism associated with the negative pole of the Agreeableness dimension may be important to pursue in further understanding of estimation ability. PMID:15362423

  10. Valued life abilities among veteran cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Karel, Michele J.; Mulligan, Elizabeth A.; Walder, Annette; Martin, Lindsey A.; Moye, Jennifer; Naik, Aanand D.

    2016-01-01

    Background When patients have multiple chronic illnesses, it is not feasible to provide disease-based care when treatments for one condition adversely affect another. Instead, health-care delivery requires a broader person-centred treatment plan based on collaborative, patient-oriented values and goals. Objective We examined the individual variability, thematic content, and sociodemographic correlates of valued life abilities and activities among multimorbid veterans diagnosed with life-altering cancer. Setting and participants Participants were 144 veterans in the ‘Vet-Cares’ study who completed a health-care values and goals scale 12 months after diagnosis of head and neck, gastro-oesophageal, or colorectal cancer. They had mean age of 65 years and one quarter identified as Hispanic and/or African American. Design At twelve months post-diagnosis, participants rated 16 life abilities/activities in their importance to quality of life on a 10-point Likert scale, during an in-person interview. Scale themes were validated via exploratory factor analysis and examining associations with sociodemographic variables. Results Participants rated most life abilities/activities as extremely important. Variability in responses was sufficient to identify three underlying values themes in exploratory factor analysis: self-sufficiency, enjoyment/comfort, and connection to family, friends and spirituality. Veterans with a spouse/partner rated self-sufficiency as less important. African American veterans rated connection as more important than did White veterans. Conclusions It is feasible yet challenging to ask older, multimorbid patients to rate relative importance of values associated with life abilities/activities. Themes related to self-sufficiency, enjoyment/comfort in daily life and connection are salient and logically consistent with sociodemographic traits. Future studies should explore their role in goal-directed health care. PMID:25645124

  11. Spatial Ability Development in the Geosciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, T. K.; Hall-Wallace, M. K.

    2003-12-01

    We designed an experiment to evaluate change in students' spatial skills as a result of completing an earth science course. Our test subjects included high school students in earth science classes, college level non-science majors enrolled in large enrollment introductory geoscience courses and introductory level geoscience majors. They also varied as to whether their course had a hand-on laboratory experience or used supplemental Geographic Information System (GIS) based activities. We measured all students' ability to mentally rotate three-dimensional objects and to construct a three-dimensional object from a two-dimensional representation before and after taking the earth science course. Results show an improvement in spatial skills for all groups after completing the science course. We also observed a consistent improvement in spatial skills overall from high school level science to courses for majors, which is possibly related to their increased exposure to science. A subgroup of the test subjects among both high school and the college non-science majors completed supplementary GIS activities. The GIS implementation at the high school level was more extensive and resulted in significant improvements in both categories of spatial ability. At the college level, the non-science majors that used the GIS curriculum showed no significant difference from those that did not, probably because the time spent on the curriculum was too short. At the college level, the geoscience majors had nearly three times the improvement of non-science majors in both categories of spatial ability. This can most likely be attributed to hands-on, weekly laboratory experiences, which were not part of the course for non-science majors. Students choosing science majors typically have much higher spatial skills than the average first or second year non-science major, however there were large variations in spatial ability within all groups. These results suggest that we evaluate teaching

  12. The mouth and dis/ability.

    PubMed

    Liddiard, K; Goodley, D

    2016-06-01

    Our aims in this paper are threefold. First, to understand how the mouth reveals the kinds of human beings that are de/valued in specific national locations and in global discourses with special attention on disability. Second, to subject the mouth to analysis from critical disability studies, specifically, an approach we describe as dis/ability studies. Third, to ask how the mouth might work as a site of resistance for disabled people. The paper begins by providing an introduction to critical disability studies, a perspective that foregrounds disability as the primary focus for thinking through the ways in which the body and society are shaped together. We move in this literature review towards a dis/ability studies approach that recognises the simultaneous processes of disablism (the exclusion of people with impairments) and ableism (the system by which standards of human autonomy and capability are made as key indicators of human worth). We then analyse the mouth in relation to pathologisation, human enhancement and resistance. We conclude with some final thoughts on the offerings of a dis/ability studies approach to those of interested with the intersections of the mouth and society. PMID:27352472

  13. Implicit theories and ability emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Rosario; Fernández-Berrocal, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that people differ in their implicit theories about the essential characteristics of intelligence and emotions. Some people believe these characteristics to be predetermined and immutable (entity theorists), whereas others believe that these characteristics can be changed through learning and behavior training (incremental theorists). The present study provides evidence that in healthy adults (N = 688), implicit beliefs about emotions and emotional intelligence (EI) may influence performance on the ability-based Mayer-Salovey-Caruso Emotional Intelligence Test (MSCEIT). Adults in our sample with incremental theories about emotions and EI scored higher on the MSCEIT than entity theorists, with implicit theories about EI showing a stronger relationship to scores than theories about emotions. Although our participants perceived both emotion and EI as malleable, they viewed emotions as more malleable than EI. Women and young adults in general were more likely to be incremental theorists than men and older adults. Furthermore, we found that emotion and EI theories mediated the relationship of gender and age with ability EI. Our findings suggest that people's implicit theories about EI may influence their emotional abilities, which may have important consequences for personal and professional EI training. PMID:26052309

  14. Relative sound localisation abilities in human listeners

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Katherine C.; Bizley, Jennifer K.

    2015-01-01

    Spatial acuity varies with sound-source azimuth, signal-to-noise ratio, and the spectral characteristics of the sound source. Here, the spatial localisation abilities of listeners were assessed using a relative localisation task. This task tested localisation ability at fixed angular separations throughout space using a two-alternative forced-choice design across a variety of listening conditions. Subjects were required to determine whether a target sound originated to the left or right of a preceding reference in the presence of a multi-source noise background. Experiment 1 demonstrated that subjects' ability to determine the relative location of two sources declined with less favourable signal-to-noise ratios and at peripheral locations. Experiment 2 assessed performance with both broadband and spectrally restricted stimuli designed to limit localisation cues to predominantly interaural level differences or interaural timing differences (ITDs). Predictions generated from topographic, modified topographic, and two-channel models of sound localisation suggest that for low-pass stimuli, where ITD cues were dominant, the two-channel model provides an adequate description of the experimental data, whereas for broadband and high frequency bandpass stimuli none of the models was able to fully account for performance. Experiment 3 demonstrated that relative localisation performance was uninfluenced by shifts in gaze direction. PMID:26328685

  15. Effects of fetal testosterone on visuospatial ability.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Bonnie; Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Ashwin, Emma; Taylor, Kevin; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated whether fetal testosterone (FT) measured from second trimester amniotic fluid was related to specific aspects of visuospatial ability, in children aged 7-10 years (35 boys, 29 girls). A series of tasks were used: the children's Embedded Figures Test (EFT) (a test of attention to detail), a ball targeting task (measuring hand-eye coordination), and a computerized mental rotation task (measuring rotational ability). FT was a significant predictor for EFT scores in both boys and girls, with boys also showing a clear advantage for this task. No significant sex differences were observed in targeting. Boys scored higher than girls on mental rotation. However, no significant relationships were observed between FT and targeting or mental rotation. Girls' performance on the mental rotation and targeting tasks was significantly related to age, indicating that these tasks may have been too difficult for the younger children. These results indicate that FT has a significant role in some aspects of cognitive development but that further work is needed to understand its effect on the different aspects of visuospatial ability. PMID:22033667

  16. Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Jesse Q.; Zacks, Jeffrey M.; Hambrick, David Z.; Zacks, Rose T.; Kurby, Christopher A.; Bailey, Heather R.; Eisenberg, Michelle L.; Beck, Taylor M.

    2013-01-01

    Memory for everyday events plays a central role in tasks of daily living, autobiographical memory, and planning. Event memory depends in part on segmenting ongoing activity into meaningful units. This study examined the relationship between event segmentation and memory in a lifespan sample to answer the following question: Is the ability to segment activity into meaningful events a unique predictor of subsequent memory, or is the relationship between event perception and memory accounted for by general cognitive abilities? Two hundred and eight adults ranging from 20 to 79 years old segmented movies of everyday events and attempted to remember the events afterwards. They also completed psychometric ability tests and tests measuring script knowledge for everyday events. Event segmentation and script knowledge both explained unique variance in event memory above and beyond the psychometric measures, and did so as strongly in older as in younger adults. These results suggest that event segmentation is a basic cognitive mechanism, important for memory across the lifespan. PMID:23942350

  17. On the Evolution of Calculation Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Ardila, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    Some numerical knowledge, such as the immediate recognition of small quantities, is observed in animals. The development of arithmetical abilities found in man's evolution as well as in child's development represents a long process following different stages. Arithmetical abilities are relatively recent in human history and are clearly related with counting, i.e., saying aloud a series of number words that correspond to a collection of objects. Counting probably began with finger sequencing, and that may explain the 10-base found in most numerical systems. From a neuropsychological perspective, there is a strong relationship between numerical knowledge and finger recognition, and both are impaired in cases of left posterior parietal damage (angular or Gerstmann's syndrome). Writing numbers appeared earlier in human history than written language. Positional digit value is clearly evident in Babylonians, and around 1,000 BC the zero was introduced. Contemporary neuroimaging techniques, specifically fMRI, have demonstrated that the left parietal lobe, particularly the intraparietal sulcus, is systematically activated during a diversity of tasks; other areas, particularly the frontal lobe, are also involved in processing numerical information and solving arithmetical problems. It can be conjectured that numerical abilities continue evolving due to advances in mathematical knowledge and the introduction of new technologies. PMID:20725520

  18. Transport optimization considering the node aggregation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Li, Lian; Guo, Jiawei; Li, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Using the theories of complex networks and gravitational field, we study the dynamic routing process under the framework of node gravitational field, define the equation of gravitation of travel path to data package and introduce two parameters α and γ for adjusting the dependences of transmission data on the unblocked degree of node, the transmission capacity of node and the path length. Based on the path's attraction, a gravitational field routing strategy under node connection ability constraint is proposed with considering the affect of node aggregation ability to transport process, and a parameter is used to adjust the control strength of routing process to node aggregation ability. In order to clarify the efficiency of suggested method, we introduce an order parameter η to measure the throughput of the network by the critical value of phase transition from free state to congestion state, and analyze the distribution of betweenness centrality and traffic jam. Simulation results show that, compared with the traditional shortest path routing strategy, our method greatly improve the throughput of a network, balance the network traffic load and most of the network nodes are used efficiently. Moreover, the network throughput is maximized under μ = -1, and the transmission performance of the algorithm is independent of the values of α and γ, which indicate the routing strategy is stable and reliable.

  19. [High arsenic-tolerant fungi: their isolation and tolerant ability].

    PubMed

    Su, Shi-ming; Zeng, Xi-bai; Jiang, Xi-liang; Bai, Ling-yu; Li, Lian-fang; Zhang, Yan-rong

    2010-12-01

    A total of thirteen fungal strains with higher arsenic (As)-tolerance ability were isolated from six As-contaminated soil samples collected from the mining areas of Shimen County and Chenz-hou City in Hunan Province. Among the strains isolated, Penicillin janthinellum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Trichoderma asperellum had the highest As-tolerance ability, based on the morphological identification and phylogenetic analysis. Culture experiment showed that on the solid plates with 30,000, 30,000, and 20,000 mg x L(-1) of As, P. janthinellum, F. oxysporum, and T. asperellum had a better colony growth, and after cultured in the liquid medium with 0-50, 0-50, and 0-80 mg x L(-1) of As for 2 days, respectively, the dry mycelia masses of the three strains all increased with increasing As concentration. When the As concentration reached 50, 50, and 80 mg x L(-1), respectively, the fungal biomass of F. oxysporum, T. asperellum, and P. janthinellum increased significantly, compared with CK. High concentration As had no significant effects on the sporalation of the three fungal strains. PMID:21443013

  20. Growth chart

    MedlinePlus

    Height and weight chart ... Growth charts are used to compare your child's height, weight, and head size against children of the ... From these numbers, the national average weight and height for each age and gender were established. The ...

  1. Halotolerance, ligninase production and herbicide degradation ability of basidiomycetes strains

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, R.L.; Monteiro, D.A.; Boscolo, M.; Dasilva, R.; Gomes, E.

    2013-01-01

    Fungi have been recently recognized as organisms able to grow in presence of high salt concentration with halophilic and halotolerance properties and their ligninolytic enzyme complex have an unspecific action enabling their use to degradation of a number of xenobiotic compounds. In this work, both the effect of salt and polyols on growth of the basidiomycetes strains, on their ability to produce ligninolytic enzyme and diuron degradation were evaluated. Results showed that the presence of NaCl in the culture medium affected fungal specimens in different ways. Seven out of ten tested strains had growth inhibited by salt while Dacryopinax elegans SXS323, Polyporus sp MCA128 and Datronia stereoides MCA167 fungi exhibited higher biomass production in medium containing 0.5 and 0.6 mol.L−1 of NaCl, suggesting to be halotolerant. Polyols such as glycerol and mannitol added into the culture media improved the biomass and ligninases production by D. elegans but the fungus did not reveal consumption of these polyols from media. This fungus degraded diuron in medium control, in presence of NaCl as well as polyols, produced MnP, LiP and laccase. PMID:24688513

  2. Population growth and economic growth.

    PubMed

    Narayana, D L

    1984-01-01

    This discussion of the issues relating to the problem posed by population explosion in the developing countries and economic growth in the contemporary world covers the following: predictions of economic and social trends; the Malthusian theory of population; the classical or stationary theory of population; the medical triage model; ecological disaster; the Global 2000 study; the limits to growth; critiques of the Limits to Growth model; nonrenewable resources; food and agriculture; population explosion and stabilization; space and ocean colonization; and the limits perspective. The Limits to Growth model, a general equilibrium anti-growth model, is the gloomiest economic model ever constructed. None of the doomsday models, the Malthusian theory, the classical stationary state, the neo-Malthusian medical triage model, the Global 2000 study, are so far reaching in their consequences. The course of events that followed the publication of the "Limits to Growth" in 1972 in the form of 2 oil shocks, food shock, pollution shock, and price shock seemed to bear out formally the gloomy predictions of the thesis with a remarkable speed. The 12 years of economic experience and the knowledge of resource trends postulate that even if the economic pressures visualized by the model are at work they are neither far reaching nor so drastic. Appropriate action can solve them. There are several limitations to the Limits to Growth model. The central theme of the model, which is overshoot and collapse, is unlikely to be the course of events. The model is too aggregative to be realistic. It exaggerates the ecological disaster arising out of the exponential growth of population and industry. The gross underestimation of renewable resources is a basic flaw of the model. The most critical weakness of the model is its gross underestimation of the historical trend of technological progress and the technological possiblities within industry and agriculture. The model does correctly emphasize

  3. Growth Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sawchuk, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Teach For America's (TFA) shift over the past decade toward measuring and promoting its teachers' ability to boost student performance has caused the organization to reconfigure not just program directors' roles, but nearly all its other support components. It has overhauled its five-week summer training, known as "Institute," to incorporate the…

  4. Communication-Related Abilities and Upward Mobility: A Longitudinal Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sypher, Beverly Davenport; Zorn, Theodore E., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Studies relationships among four measures of communication abilities, and between these abilities and job level and upward mobility in a selected insurance company. Concludes that communication abilities are important to the success of individuals in organizations. (MS)

  5. Concept Car Design and Ability Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Jiefeng; Lu, Hairong

    The concept design as a symbol of creative design thinking, reflecting on the future design of exploratory and prospective, as a vehicle to explore the notion of future car design, design inspiration and creativity is not only a bold display, more through demonstrate the concept, reflects the company's technological strength and technological progress, and thus enhance their brand image. Present Chinese automobile design also has a very big disparity with world level, through cultivating students' concept design ability, to establish native design features and self-reliant brand image is practical and effective ways, also be necessary and pressing.

  6. Genetic component in learning ability in bees.

    PubMed

    Kerr, W E; Moura Duarte, F A; Oliveira, R S

    1975-10-01

    Twenty-five bees, five from each of five hives, were trained to collect food at a table. When the bee reached the table, time was recorded for 12 visits. Then a blue and yellow pan was substituted for the original metal pan, and time and correct responses were recorded for 30 trips (discrimination phase). Finally, food was taken from the pan and extinction was recorded as incorrect responses for 20 visits. Variance analysis was carried out, and genetic variance was undetected for discrimination, but was detected for extinction. It is concluded that learning is very important for bees, so that any impairment in such ability affects colony survival. PMID:1191157

  7. Language Experience Changes Language and Cognitive Ability

    PubMed Central

    Poarch, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    The sustained use of two languages by bilinguals has been shown to induce broad changes in language and cognitive abilities across the lifespan. The largest changes are seen as advantages in executive control, a set of processes responsible for controlled attention, inhibition, and shifting. Moreover, there is evidence that these executive control advantages mitigate cognitive decline in older age and contribute to cognitive reserve. In this paper, we examine some of the evidence for these findings and explain their relation to bilingual language use. These effects are considered in terms of their implications for our understanding of cognitive and brain plasticity. Some implications for social policy are discussed. PMID:25435805

  8. Exposure to Salt and Organic Acids Increases the Ability of Listeria monocytogenes To Invade Caco-2 Cells but Decreases Its Ability To Survive Gastric Stress†

    PubMed Central

    Garner, Matthew R.; James, Karen E.; Callahan, Michelle C.; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of environmental stress exposure on Listeria monocytogenes growth and virulence-associated characteristics were investigated. Specifically, we measured the effects of temperature (7 or 37°C), pH (5.5 or 7.4), the presence of salt and organic acids (375 mM NaCl, 8.45 mM sodium diacetate [SD], 275 mM sodium lactate [SL], or a combination of NaCl, SD, and SL), and deletion of sigB, which encodes a key stress response regulator, on the ability of L. monocytogenes to grow, invade Caco-2 cells, and survive exposure to synthetic gastric fluid (pH 2.5 or 4.5). Our results indicate that (i) L. monocytogenes log-phase generation times and maximum cell numbers are not dependent on the alternative sigma factor σB in the presence of NaCl and organic acids at concentrations typically found in foods; (ii) growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes through the addition of organic acids is pH dependent; (iii) the ability of L. monocytogenes to invade Caco-2 cells is affected by growth phase, temperature, and the presence of salt and organic acids, with the highest relative invasion capabilities observed for cells grown with SL or NaCl at 37°C and pH 7.4; (iv) growth of L. monocytogenes in the presence of NaCl, SD, or SL reduces its ability to survive exposure to gastric fluid; and (v) exposure of L. monocytogenes to gastric fluid reduces the enhanced invasiveness caused by growth in the presence of NaCl or SL. These findings suggest that virulence-associated characteristics that determine the L. monocytogenes infectious dose are likely to be affected by food-specific properties (e.g., pH or the presence of salt or organic acid). PMID:16885290

  9. Exposure to salt and organic acids increases the ability of Listeria monocytogenes to invade Caco-2 cells but decreases its ability to survive gastric stress.

    PubMed

    Garner, Matthew R; James, Karen E; Callahan, Michelle C; Wiedmann, Martin; Boor, Kathryn J

    2006-08-01

    The effects of environmental stress exposure on Listeria monocytogenes growth and virulence-associated characteristics were investigated. Specifically, we measured the effects of temperature (7 or 37 degrees C), pH (5.5 or 7.4), the presence of salt and organic acids (375 mM NaCl, 8.45 mM sodium diacetate [SD], 275 mM sodium lactate [SL], or a combination of NaCl, SD, and SL), and deletion of sigB, which encodes a key stress response regulator, on the ability of L. monocytogenes to grow, invade Caco-2 cells, and survive exposure to synthetic gastric fluid (pH 2.5 or 4.5). Our results indicate that (i) L. monocytogenes log-phase generation times and maximum cell numbers are not dependent on the alternative sigma factor sigmaB in the presence of NaCl and organic acids at concentrations typically found in foods; (ii) growth inhibition of L. monocytogenes through the addition of organic acids is pH dependent; (iii) the ability of L. monocytogenes to invade Caco-2 cells is affected by growth phase, temperature, and the presence of salt and organic acids, with the highest relative invasion capabilities observed for cells grown with SL or NaCl at 37 degrees C and pH 7.4; (iv) growth of L. monocytogenes in the presence of NaCl, SD, or SL reduces its ability to survive exposure to gastric fluid; and (v) exposure of L. monocytogenes to gastric fluid reduces the enhanced invasiveness caused by growth in the presence of NaCl or SL. These findings suggest that virulence-associated characteristics that determine the L. monocytogenes infectious dose are likely to be affected by food-specific properties (e.g., pH or the presence of salt or organic acid). PMID:16885290

  10. Nature versus Nurture in Determining Athletic Ability.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xu; Papadimitriou, Ioannis; Lidor, Ronnie; Eynon, Nir

    2016-01-01

    This overview provides a general discussion of the roles of nature and nurture in determining human athletic ability. On the nature (genetics) side, a review is provided with emphasis on the historical research and on several areas which are likely to be important for future research, including next-generation sequencing technologies. In addition, a number of well-designed training studies that could possibly reveal the biological mechanism ('cause') behind the association between gene variants and athletic ability are discussed. On the nurture (environment) side, we discuss common environmental variables including deliberate practice, family support, and the birthplace effect, which may be important in becoming an elite athlete. Developmental effects are difficult to disassociate with genetic effects, because the early life environment may have long-lasting effects in adulthood. With this in mind, the fetal programming hypothesis is also briefly reviewed, as fetal programming provides an excellent example of how the environment interacts with genetics. We conclude that the traditional argument of nature versus nurture is no longer relevant, as it has been clearly established that both are important factors in the road to becoming an elite athlete. With the availability of the next-generation genetics (sequencing) techniques, it is hoped that future studies will reveal the relevant genes influencing performance, as well as the interaction between those genes and environmental (nurture) factors. PMID:27287074

  11. Phishing IQ Tests Measure Fear, Not Ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandpara, Vivek; Dingman, Andrew; Jakobsson, Markus; Liu, Debin; Roinestad, Heather

    We argue that phishing IQ tests fail to measure susceptibility to phishing attacks. We conducted a study where 40 subjects were asked to answer a selection of questions from existing phishing IQ tests in which we varied the portion (from 25% to 100%) of the questions that corresponded to phishing emails. We did not find any correlation between the actual number of phishing emails and the number of emails that the subjects indicated were phishing. Therefore, the tests did not measure the ability of the subjects. To further confirm this, we exposed all the subjects to existing phishing education after they had taken the test, after which each subject was asked to take a second phishing test, with the same design as the first one, but with different questions. The number of stimuli that were indicated as being phishing in the second test was, again, independent of the actual number of phishing stimuli in the test. However, a substantially larger portion of stimuli was indicated as being phishing in the second test, suggesting that the only measurable effect of the phishing education (from the point of view of the phishing IQ test) was an increased concern—not an increased ability.

  12. Psychopathology and the Ability to Do Otherwise

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    When philosophers want an example of a person who lacks the ability to do otherwise, they turn to psychopathology. Addicts, agoraphobics, kleptomaniacs, neurotics, obsessives, and even psychopathic serial murderers, are all purportedly subject to irresistible desires that compel the person to act: no alternative possibility is supposed to exist. I argue that this conception of psychopathology is false and offer an empirically and clinically informed understanding of disorders of agency which preserves the ability to do otherwise. First, I appeal to standard clinical treatment for disorders of agency and argue that it undermines this conception of psychopathology. Second, I offer a detailed discussion of addiction, where our knowledge of the neurobiological mechanisms underpinning the disorder is relatively advanced. I argue that neurobiology notwithstanding, addiction is not a form of compulsion and I explain how addiction can impair behavioural control without extinguishing it. Third, I step back from addiction, and briefly sketch what the philosophical landscape more generally looks like without psychopathological compulsion: we lose our standard purported real-world example of psychologically determined action. I conclude by reflecting on the centrality of choice and free will to our concept of action, and their potency within clinical treatment for disorders of agency. PMID:25929318

  13. Hearing ability decreases in ageing locusts.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Shira D; Windmill, James F C

    2015-07-01

    Insects display signs of ageing, despite their short lifespan. However, the limited studies on senescence emphasize longevity or reproduction. We focused on the hearing ability of ageing adult locusts, Schistocerca gregaria. Our results indicate that the youngest adults (2 weeks post-maturity) have a greater overall neurophysiological response to sound, especially for low frequencies (<10 kHz), as well as a shorter latency to this neural response. Interestingly, when measuring displacement of the tympanal membrane that the receptor neurons directly attach to, we found movement is not directly correlated with neural response. Therefore, we suggest the enhanced response in younger animals is due to the condition of their tissues (e.g. elasticity). Secondly, we found the sexes do not have the same responses, particularly at 4 weeks post-adult moult. We propose female reproductive condition reduces their ability to receive sounds. Overall our results indicate older animals, especially females, are less sensitive to sounds. PMID:25944922

  14. Numerical approximation abilities correlate with and predict informal but not formal mathematics abilities

    PubMed Central

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has found a relationship between individual differences in children’s precision when nonverbally approximating quantities and their school mathematics performance. School mathematics performance emerges from both informal (e.g., counting) and formal (e.g., knowledge of mathematics facts) abilities. It remains unknown whether approximation precision relates to both of these types of mathematics abilities. In the present study we assessed the precision of numerical approximation in 85 3- to 7-year-old children four times over a span of two years. Additionally, at the last time point, we tested children’s informal and formal mathematics abilities using the Test of Early Mathematics Ability (TEMA-3; Ginsburg & Baroody, 2003). We found that children’s numerical approximation precision correlated with and predicted their informal, but not formal, mathematics abilities when controlling for age and IQ. These results add to our growing understanding of the relationship between an unlearned, non-symbolic system of quantity representation and the system of mathematical reasoning that children come to master through instruction. PMID:24076381

  15. Cortical activity patterns predict speech discrimination ability

    PubMed Central

    Engineer, Crystal T; Perez, Claudia A; Chen, YeTing H; Carraway, Ryan S; Reed, Amanda C; Shetake, Jai A; Jakkamsetti, Vikram; Chang, Kevin Q; Kilgard, Michael P

    2010-01-01

    Neural activity in the cerebral cortex can explain many aspects of sensory perception. Extensive psychophysical and neurophysiological studies of visual motion and vibrotactile processing show that the firing rate of cortical neurons averaged across 50–500 ms is well correlated with discrimination ability. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that primary auditory cortex (A1) neurons use temporal precision on the order of 1–10 ms to represent speech sounds shifted into the rat hearing range. Neural discrimination was highly correlated with behavioral performance on 11 consonant-discrimination tasks when spike timing was preserved and was not correlated when spike timing was eliminated. This result suggests that spike timing contributes to the auditory cortex representation of consonant sounds. PMID:18425123

  16. TIE: An Ability Test of Emotional Intelligence

    PubMed Central

    Śmieja, Magdalena; Orzechowski, Jarosław; Stolarski, Maciej S.

    2014-01-01

    The Test of Emotional Intelligence (TIE) is a new ability scale based on a theoretical model that defines emotional intelligence as a set of skills responsible for the processing of emotion-relevant information. Participants are provided with descriptions of emotional problems, and asked to indicate which emotion is most probable in a given situation, or to suggest the most appropriate action. Scoring is based on the judgments of experts: professional psychotherapists, trainers, and HR specialists. The validation study showed that the TIE is a reliable and valid test, suitable for both scientific research and individual assessment. Its internal consistency measures were as high as .88. In line with theoretical model of emotional intelligence, the results of the TIE shared about 10% of common variance with a general intelligence test, and were independent of major personality dimensions. PMID:25072656

  17. Does Environmental Heterogeneity Promote Cognitive Abilities?

    PubMed

    González-Gómez, Paulina L; Razeto-Barry, Pablo; Araya-Salas, Marcelo; Estades, Cristian F

    2015-09-01

    In the context of global change the possible loss of biodiversity has been identified as a major concern. Biodiversity could be seriously threatened as a direct consequence of changes in availability of food, changing thermal conditions, and loss and fragmentation of habitat. Considering the magnitude of global change, an understanding of the mechanisms involved in coping with a changing environment is urgent. We explore the hypothesis that species and individuals experiencing highly variable environments are more likely to develop a wider range of responses to handle the different and unpredictable conditions imposed by global change. In the case of vertebrates, the responses to the challenges imposed by unpredictable perturbations ultimately are linked to cognitive abilities allowing the solving of problems, and the maximization of energy intake. Our models were hummingbirds, which offer a particularly compelling group in which to examine the functional and mechanistic links between behavioral and energetic strategies in individuals experiencing different degrees of social and environmental heterogeneity. PMID:26082484

  18. Pharmacy Students’ Ability to Think About Thinking

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Eric F.; Vuk, Jasna; Stowe, Cindy D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To investigate students’ metacognitive skills to distinguish what they know from what they do not know, to assess students’ prediction of performance on a summative examination, and to compare student-identified incorrect questions with actual examination performance in order to improve exam quality. Methods. Students completed a test-taking questionnaire identifying items perceived to be incorrect and rating their test-taking ability. Results. Higher performing students evidenced better metacognitive skills by more accurately identifying incorrect items on the exam. Most students (86%) underpredicted their performance on the summative examination (actual=73.6 ± 7.1 versus predicted=63.7 ± 10.5, p<0.05). Student responses helped refine items and resulted in examination changes. Conclusion. Metacognition is important to the development of life-long learning in pharmacy students. Students able to monitor what they know and what they do not know can improve their performance. PMID:25386013

  19. The Relationship between Career Growth and Organizational Commitment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Qingxiong; McElroy, James C.; Morrow, Paula C.; Liu, Rongzhi

    2010-01-01

    This research examines the relationship between employees' career growth and organizational commitment. Career growth was conceptualized by four factors: career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed and remuneration growth, while organizational commitment was conceptualized using Meyer and Allen's (1997) three component…

  20. Familial aggregation patterns in mathematical ability.

    PubMed

    Wijsman, Ellen M; Robinson, Nancy M; Ainsworth, Kathryn H; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Holzman, Ted; Raskind, Wendy H

    2004-01-01

    Mathematical talent is an asset in modern society both at an individual and a societal level. Environmental factors such as quality of mathematics education undoubtedly affect an individual's performance, and there is some evidence that genetic factors also may play a role. The current study was performed to investigate the feasibility of undertaking genetics studies on mathematical ability. Because the etiology of low ability in mathematics is likely to be multifactorial and heterogeneous, we evaluated families ascertained through a proband with high mathematical performance in grade 7 on the SAT to eliminate, to some degree, adverse environmental factors. Families of sex-matched probands, selected for high verbal performance on the SAT, served as the comparison group. We evaluated a number of proxy measures for their usefulness in the study of clustering of mathematical talent. Given the difficulty of testing mathematics performance across developmental ages, especially with the added complexity of decreasing exposure to formal mathematics concepts post schooling, we also devised a semiquantitative scale that incorporated educational, occupational, and avocational information as a surrogate for an academic mathematics measure. Whereas several proxy measures showed no evidence of a genetic basis, we found that the semiquantitative scale of mathematical talent showed strong evidence of a genetic basis, with a differential response as a function of the performance measure used to select the proband. This observation suggests that there may be a genetic basis to specific mathematical talent, and that specific, as opposed to proxy, investigative measures that are designed to measure such talent in family members could be of benefit for this purpose. PMID:14739696

  1. Change in Cognitive Abilities in Older Latinos.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert S; Capuano, Ana W; Marquez, David X; Amofa, Priscilla; Barnes, Lisa L; Bennett, David A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare patterns of cognitive decline in older Latinos and non-Latinos. At annual intervals for a mean of 5.7 years, older Latino (n=104) and non-Latino (n=104) persons of equivalent age, education, and race completed a battery of 17 cognitive tests from which previously established composite measures of episodic memory, semantic memory, working memory, perceptual speed, and visuospatial ability were derived. In analyses adjusted for age, sex, and education, performance declined over time in each cognitive domain, but there were no ethnic group differences in initial level of function or annual rate of decline. There was evidence of retest learning following the baseline evaluation, but neither the magnitude nor duration of the effect was related to Latino ethnicity, and eliminating the first two evaluations, during which much of retest learning occurred, did not affect ethnic group comparisons. Compared to the non-Latino group, the Latino group had more diabetes (38.5% vs. 25.0; χ2[1]=4.4; p=.037), fewer histories of smoking (24.0% vs. 39.4%, χ2[1]=5.7; p=.017), and lower childhood household socioeconomic level (-0.410 vs. -0.045, t[185.0]=3.1; p=.002), but controlling for these factors did not affect results. Trajectories of cognitive aging in different abilities are similar in Latino and non-Latino individuals of equivalent age, education, and race. (JINS, 2016, 22, 58-65). PMID:26553103

  2. The cell end marker protein TeaC is involved in growth directionality and septation in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Higashitsuji, Yuhei; Herrero, Saturnino; Takeshita, Norio; Fischer, Reinhard

    2009-07-01

    Polarized growth in filamentous fungi depends on the correct spatial organization of the microtubule (MT) and actin cytoskeleton. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe it was shown that the MT cytoskeleton is required for the delivery of so-called cell end marker proteins, e.g., Tea1 and Tea4, to the cell poles. Subsequently, these markers recruit several proteins required for polarized growth, e.g., a formin, which catalyzes actin cable formation. The latest results suggest that this machinery is conserved from fission yeast to Aspergillus nidulans. Here, we have characterized TeaC, a putative homologue of Tea4. Sequence identity between TeaC and Tea4 is only 12.5%, but they both share an SH3 domain in the N-terminal region. Deletion of teaC affected polarized growth and hyphal directionality. Whereas wild-type hyphae grow straight, hyphae of the mutant grow in a zig-zag way, similar to the hyphae of teaA deletion (tea1) strains. Some small, anucleate compartments were observed. Overexpression of teaC repressed septation and caused abnormal swelling of germinating conidia. In agreement with the two roles in polarized growth and in septation, TeaC localized to hyphal tips and to septa. TeaC interacted with the cell end marker protein TeaA at hyphal tips and with the formin SepA at hyphal tips and at septa. PMID:19429780

  3. How Spatial Abilities Enhance, and Are Enhanced by, Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hegarty, Mary; Keehner, Madeleine; Khooshabeh, Peter; Montello, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    In two studies with a total of 324 participants, dentistry students were assessed on psychometric measures of spatial ability, reasoning ability, and on new measures of the ability to infer the appearance of a cross-section of a three-dimensional (3-D) object. We examined how these abilities and skills predict success in dental education programs,…

  4. Linking Abilities, Interests, and Sex via Latent Class Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Wendy; Bouchard, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    The few studies that have examined associations between measured interests and abilities have suffered from small sample sizes, restricted ranges of ability and background, preconceived groupings of interests, and measures of ability that confound general and specific cognitive abilities. In this study of 425 adults from diverse backgrounds, the…

  5. Is Approximate Number Precision a Stable Predictor of Math Ability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that children's ability to estimate numbers of items using their Approximate Number System (ANS) predicts later math ability. To more closely examine the predictive role of early ANS acuity on later abilities, we assessed the ANS acuity, math ability, and expressive vocabulary of preschoolers twice, six months apart. We…

  6. Comment on Goldhammer's "Measuring Ability, Speed, or Both"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davison, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    The answer to the question, "Ability, speed, or both?" may be "both at once" if speed is simply a manifestation of ability. If differences in speed are manifestations of differences in ability, then both speed and ability may reflect a single dimension best characterized by a single score. While measurement of speed has proven…

  7. The development and malleability of executive control abilities

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Nina S.; Novick, Jared M.; Jaeggi, Susanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Executive control (EC) generally refers to the regulation of mental activity. It plays a crucial role in complex cognition, and EC skills predict high-level abilities including language processing, memory, and problem solving, as well as practically relevant outcomes such as scholastic achievement. EC develops relatively late in ontogeny, and many sub-groups of developmental populations demonstrate an exaggeratedly poor ability to control cognition even alongside the normal protracted growth of EC skills. Given the value of EC to human performance, researchers have sought means to improve it through targeted training; indeed, accumulating evidence suggests that regulatory processes are malleable through experience and practice. Nonetheless, there is a need to understand both whether specific populations might particularly benefit from training, and what cortical mechanisms engage during performance of the tasks used in the training protocols. This contribution has two parts: in Part I, we review EC development and intervention work in select populations. Although promising, the mixed results in this early field make it difficult to draw strong conclusions. To guide future studies, in Part II, we discuss training studies that have included a neuroimaging component – a relatively new enterprise that also has not yet yielded a consistent pattern of results post-training, preventing broad conclusions. We therefore suggest that recent developments in neuroimaging (e.g., multivariate and connectivity approaches) may be useful to advance our understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying the malleability of EC and brain plasticity. In conjunction with behavioral data, these methods may further inform our understanding of the brain–behavior relationship and the extent to which EC is dynamic and malleable, guiding the development of future, targeted interventions to promote executive functioning in both healthy and atypical populations. PMID:25071485

  8. Aspergillus nidulans ArfB Plays a Role in Endocytosis and Polarized Growth ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Chan; Schmidtke, Sabrina N.; Dangott, Lawrence J.; Shaw, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo polarized growth throughout most of their life cycles. The Spitzenkörper is an apical organelle composed primarily of vesicles that is unique to filamentous fungi and is likely to act as a vesicle supply center for tip growth. Vesicle assembly and trafficking are therefore important for hyphal growth. ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs), a group of small GTPase proteins, play an important role in nucleating vesicle assembly. Little is known about the role of Arfs in filamentous hyphal growth. We found that Aspergillus nidulans is predicted to encode six Arf family proteins. Analysis of protein sequence alignments suggests that A. nidulans ArfB shares similarity with ARF6 of Homo sapiens and Arf3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An arfB null allele (arfB disrupted by a transposon [arfB::Tn]) was characterized by extended isotropic growth of germinating conidia followed by cell lysis or multiple, random germ tube emergence, consistent with a failure to establish polarity. The mutant germ tubes and hyphae that do form initially meander abnormally off of the axis of polarity and frequently exhibit dichotomous branching at cell apices, consistent with a defect in polarity maintenance. FM4-64 staining of the arfB::Tn strain revealed that another phenotypic characteristic seen for arfB::Tn is a reduction and delay in endocytosis. ArfB is myristoylated at its N terminus. Green fluorescent protein-tagged ArfB (ArfB::GFP) localizes to the plasma membrane and endomembranes and mutation (ArfBG2A::GFP) of the N-terminal myristoylation motif disperses the protein to the cytoplasm rather than to the membranes. These results demonstrate that ArfB functions in endocytosis to play important roles in polarity establishment during isotropic growth and polarity maintenance during hyphal extension. PMID:18539885

  9. Educational Attainment as a Proxy for Cognitive Ability in Selection: Effects on Levels of Cognitive Ability and Adverse Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Christopher M.; Gruys, Melissa L.; Sackett, Paul R.

    2006-01-01

    The authors examined the differences in mean level of cognitive ability and adverse impact that can be expected when selecting employees solely on educational attainment as a proxy for cognitive ability versus selecting employees directly on cognitive ability. Selection using cognitive ability worked as a more efficient cognitive screen. Imposing…

  10. Selection on herbivory resistance and growth rate in an invasive plant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Invasive species face different conditions in their new range, which may lead to evolutionary change. The evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis proposes that invasive species evolve decreased defense and increased growth rate and competitive ability following introduction. W...

  11. "Please Mr. Hay, What Are My Poss(Abilities)?": Legitimation of Ability through Physical Education Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hay, Peter J.; Lisahunter

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides two vignettes that draw on data from projects that interrogate how a student can be positioned by practices within physical education (PE) and directed by the PE teacher in relation to their valued or legitimated ability. Through the use of Pierre Bourdieu's conceptual tools of field, habitus and capital we investigate the…

  12. Exploring Visuospatial Thinking in Learning about Mineralogy: Spatial Orientation Ability and Spatial Visualization Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozdemir, Gokhan

    2010-01-01

    This mixed-method research attempted to clarify the role of visuospatial abilities in learning about mineralogy. Various sources of data--including quantitative pre- and postmeasures of spatial visualization and spatial orientation tests and achievement scores on six measures and qualitative unstructured observations, interviews, and field trip…

  13. A Detailed Analysis of DanceAbility's Contribution to Mixed-Abilities Dance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Amanda; Chatfield, Steven

    2010-01-01

    In the 1960s a visible shift in the ideology of contemporary dancers and choreographers took place. A desire for a dance language that rejected the need for the classical dancerly body paved the way for dance that was open to a more diverse population of participants. DanceAbility emerged in that late 1980s as a method of making dance accessible…

  14. Comparing Creative Thinking Abilities and Reasoning Ability of Deaf and Hearing Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebrahim, Fawzy

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on comparing the creative thinking and reasoning abilities of deaf and hearing children. Two groups of deaf (N = 210) and hearing children (N = 200) were chosen based on specific criteria. Two instruments were used in the study: the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking-Figural, Form A and Matrix Analogies Test. Canonical…

  15. Sleep loss and "divergent" thinking ability.

    PubMed

    Horne, J A

    1988-12-01

    Although much is known about the impact of sleep loss on many aspects of psychological performance, the effects on divergent ("creative") thinking has received little attention. Twelve subjects went 32 h without sleep, and 12 others acted as normally sleeping controls. All subjects were assessed on the figural and verbal versions of the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking. As compared with the control condition, sleep loss impaired performance on all test scales (e.g., "flexibility," the ability to change strategy, and "originality," generation of unusual ideas) for both versions, even on an initial 5-min test component. In an attempt at further understanding of whether these findings might be explained solely by a loss of motivation, two additional short and stimulating tests were also used--a word fluency task incorporating high incentive to do well and a challenging nonverbal planning test. Performance at these tasks was still significantly impaired by sleep loss. Increased perseveration was clearly apparent. Apparently, 1 night of sleep loss can affect divergent thinking. This contrasts with the outcome for convergent thinking tasks, which are more resilient to short-term sleep loss. PMID:3238256

  16. Complexity and Ability in Ising Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez, Ayax; George, Michael

    2008-03-01

    In previous work [1, 2], we discussed various facets of designs in games, and considered the evolution [2] of Ising games. The traditional aspect of game theory, with its focus on rational decisions, was not considered in this work. Instead, there was a predominant interest in the time evolution of design toward a goal design, and resulting levels of frustration. There was also a concern with time- reversal properties. In the new work, our goal is to consider the molecular structureof the Ising model as it evolves, and to associate this molecular structure with feedback into the structure that can be understood in algorithmic terms. We develop an analogy with the famous Malthusian argument concerning exponential population increase, associating ability to cope with complexity, and algorithmic complexity, and discuss biological implications of the ideas associated with these games. [1] M. George, A nonequilibrium statistical model based on latin squares, paper presented at WorldComp'07, Las Vegas, Nevada, June 25-28, 2007. [2] M. George, Classical and quantum Ising games, paper presented at Fourth International Conference in Applied Mathematics and Computing, Plovdiv, Bulgaria, August, 2007.

  17. Children's abilities to distinguish novel languages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Z. S.; Stockmal, Verna

    2005-04-01

    When adults hear spoken samples of a language which they do not know, they can often identify it and discriminate between languages even when produced by the same talkers. Children have much less experience making metalinguistic judgments. How do children respond to languages which they do not know? We have conducted three experiments examining the abilities of 4-year old and 8-year old children to discriminate between spoken samples of different languages produced by bilingual talkers. We constructed listening tests from 5-second phrases excerpted from fluent reading provided by the talkers. In the three experiments, we progressively simplified the response mode employed by the children as well as the cognitive load of the task. Even in the simplest version, only a third of the 4-year-olds could do the task while the 8-year old children performed above chance in all three experiments. The younger children tended to respond different more than same, as if their criterion for same was identify.

  18. A comprehensive test of evolutionarily increased competitive ability in a highly invasive plant species

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Srijana; Gruntman, Michal; Bilton, Mark; Seifan, Merav; Tielbörger, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims A common hypothesis to explain plants' invasive success is that release from natural enemies in the introduced range selects for reduced allocation to resistance traits and a subsequent increase in resources available for growth and competitive ability (evolution of increased competitive ability, EICA). However, studies that have investigated this hypothesis have been incomplete as they either did not test for all aspects of competitive ability or did not select appropriate competitors. Methods Here, the prediction of increased competitive ability was examined with the invasive plant Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) in a set of common-garden experiments that addressed these aspects by carefully distinguishing between competitive effect and response of invasive and native plants, and by using both intraspecific and interspecific competition settings with a highly vigorous neighbour, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle), which occurs in both ranges. Key Results While the intraspecific competition results showed no differences in competitive effect or response between native and invasive plants, the interspecific competition experiment revealed greater competitive response and effect of invasive plants in both biomass and seed production. Conclusions The use of both intra- and interspecific competition experiments in this study revealed opposing results. While the first experiment refutes the EICA hypothesis, the second shows strong support for it, suggesting evolutionarily increased competitive ability in invasive populations of L. salicaria. It is suggested that the use of naturally co-occurring heterospecifics, rather than conspecifics, may provide a better evaluation of the possible evolutionary shift towards greater competitive ability. PMID:25301818

  19. Polykaryon formation using a swollen conidium of Trichoderma reesei.

    PubMed

    Toyama, Hideo; Yano, Makiko; Hotta, Takeshi

    2004-01-01

    The cellulolytic fungus, Trichoderma has oval and mononucleate conidia. When these conidia are incubated in a liquid medium, they begin to swell and their shape becomes spherical followed by an increase in inner space. In such swollen conidia, it is possible to produce a larger autopolyploid nucleus using a mitotic arrester compared with the case of the original conidia. In this study, polykaryon formation was attempted using these swollen conidia. Dried mature green conidia of Trichoderma reesei QM6a (IFO 31326) were incubated in Mandel's medium in order to swell. The swollen conidia were treated with a mitotic arrester, colchicine, for autopolyploidization. After autopolyploidization, polykaryon formation was carried out using the swollen conidia. After the treatment, multiple smaller nuclei whose diameter was almost the same as that of the original strain were generated from an autopolyploid nucleus in a swollen conidium. A cellulase hyperproducer without decrease in growth rate could be selected using such swollen conidia. PMID:15054260

  20. A Study of the Relationship between Personality Factors and Growth in Student Writing Ability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, James Andrew

    A study correlated the results of the Omnibus Personality Inventory (OPI) and two holistically scored narrative writing samples to determine how high school students' intellectual and emotional characteristics affected their writing improvement. Students in a small West Coast high school completed the OPI and generated a pretest writing sample in…

  1. Ability of lactate and pyruvate to stimulate aerobic growth of campylobacter in media supplemented with fumarate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Campylobacter spp. are human, foodborne, and bacterial pathogens that are frequently isolated from live poultry and processed poultry products. These pathogens are classified as microaerophiles; therefore, Campylobacter cultures are generally grown in atmospheres with reduced oxygen levels and elev...

  2. Maternal effects on growth and competitive ability in a commonly used restoration species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Adaptive maternal effects are when plants provision their seeds to perform best in the environment that matches that of the maternal plants. Manipulating maternal effects in production gardens may improve the performance of seeds planted in large-scale restoration. In ex-situ experiments, we tested ...

  3. Revisiting the host as a growth medium

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Stacie A.; Palmer, Kelli L.; Whiteley, Marvin

    2011-01-01

    The ability of the human body to play host to bacterial pathogens has been studied for more than 200 years. Successful pathogenesis relies on the ability to acquire the nutrients that are necessary for growth and survival, yet relatively little is understood about the in vivo physiology and metabolism of most human pathogens. This Review discusses how in vivo carbon sources can affect disease and highlights the concept that carbon metabolic pathways provide viable targets for antibiotic development. PMID:18679171

  4. Effects of acivicin on growth, mycotoxin production and virulence of phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Maeda, K; Nakajima, Y; Motoyama, T; Kitou, Y; Kosaki, T; Saito, T; Nishiuchi, T; Kanamaru, K; Osada, H; Kobayashi, T; Kimura, M

    2014-10-01

    Acivicin is an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase and glutamine amidotransferase. When grown on a synthetic minimal agar medium, acivicin strongly inhibited the growth of Magnaporthe oryzae and Alternaria brassicicola, and to a lesser extent, Botrytis cinerea. However, only partial or marginal growth inhibition was observed with regard to Fusarium sporotrichioides and Fusarium graminearum. The growth retardation caused by acivicin was significantly alleviated by cultivating the fungus on a nutrient-rich medium. The inhibition of M. oryzae growth caused by 1 μmol l(-1) of acivicin on minimal agar medium was subdued by the addition of specific single amino acids, including His, a branched-chain amino acid (Leu, Ile or Val), an aromatic amino acid (Trp, Tyr or Phe), Met or Gln, at a concentration of 0·4 mmol l(-1). Trichothecene production by F. graminearum in trichothecene-inducing liquid medium was reduced significantly in the presence of acivicin despite its inability to inhibit growth in the trichothecene-inducing liquid medium. Foliar application of conidia in the presence of acivicin reduced the severity of rice blast disease caused by M. oryzae. These results suggest the usefulness of this modified amino acid natural product to mitigate agricultural problems caused by some phytopathogenic fungi. Significance and impact of the study: Fusarium head blight or scab disease and rice blast, caused by Fusarium graminearum and Magnaporthe oryzae, respectively, are major diseases of cereal crops that cause a significant loss of yield and deterioration in the quality of the grain. The present study investigated the effects of acivicin, a glutamine amino acid analog, on the physiology of various phytopathogenic fungi. Application of acivicin to a fungal culture and conidial suspension reduced mycotoxin production by the wheat scab fungus and the severity of rice blast, respectively. These results suggest the possibility that acivicin may serve as a lead compound to

  5. Perceived mathematical ability under challenge: a longitudinal perspective on sex segregation among STEM degree fields.

    PubMed

    Nix, Samantha; Perez-Felkner, Lara; Thomas, Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions of their mathematics ability vary by gender and seem to influence science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degree choice. Related, students' perceptions during academic difficulty are increasingly studied in educational psychology, suggesting a link between such perceptions and task persistence. Despite interest in examining the gender disparities in STEM, these concepts have not been considered in tandem. In this manuscript, we investigate how perceived ability under challenge-in particular in mathematics domains-influences entry into the most sex-segregated and mathematics-intensive undergraduate degrees: physics, engineering, mathematics, and computer science (PEMC). Using nationally representative Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS) data, we estimate the influence of perceived ability under challenging conditions on advanced high school science course taking, selection of an intended STEM major, and specific major type 2 years after high school. Demonstrating the importance of specificity when discussing how gender influences STEM career pathways, the intersecting effects of gender and perceived ability under mathematics challenge were distinct for each scientific major category. Perceived ability under challenge in secondary school varied by gender, and was highly predictive of selecting PEMC and health sciences majors. Notably, women's 12th grade perceptions of their ability under mathematics challenge increased their probability of selecting PEMC majors over and above biology. In addition, gender moderated the effect of growth mindset on students' selection of health science majors. Perceptions of ability under challenge in general and verbal domains also influenced retention in and declaration of certain STEM majors. The implications of these results are discussed, with particular attention to access to advanced scientific coursework in high school and interventions aimed at enhancing young women's perceptions of

  6. Perceived mathematical ability under challenge: a longitudinal perspective on sex segregation among STEM degree fields

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Samantha; Perez-Felkner, Lara; Thomas, Kirby

    2015-01-01

    Students' perceptions of their mathematics ability vary by gender and seem to influence science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) degree choice. Related, students' perceptions during academic difficulty are increasingly studied in educational psychology, suggesting a link between such perceptions and task persistence. Despite interest in examining the gender disparities in STEM, these concepts have not been considered in tandem. In this manuscript, we investigate how perceived ability under challenge—in particular in mathematics domains—influences entry into the most sex-segregated and mathematics-intensive undergraduate degrees: physics, engineering, mathematics, and computer science (PEMC). Using nationally representative Education Longitudinal Study of 2002 (ELS) data, we estimate the influence of perceived ability under challenging conditions on advanced high school science course taking, selection of an intended STEM major, and specific major type 2 years after high school. Demonstrating the importance of specificity when discussing how gender influences STEM career pathways, the intersecting effects of gender and perceived ability under mathematics challenge were distinct for each scientific major category. Perceived ability under challenge in secondary school varied by gender, and was highly predictive of selecting PEMC and health sciences majors. Notably, women's 12th grade perceptions of their ability under mathematics challenge increased their probability of selecting PEMC majors over and above biology. In addition, gender moderated the effect of growth mindset on students' selection of health science majors. Perceptions of ability under challenge in general and verbal domains also influenced retention in and declaration of certain STEM majors. The implications of these results are discussed, with particular attention to access to advanced scientific coursework in high school and interventions aimed at enhancing young women

  7. Emergency medicine resident crisis resource management ability: a simulation-based longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Samuel; Horeczko, Timothy; Carlisle, Matthew; Barton, Joseph D.; Ng, Vivienne; Al-Somali, Sameerah; Bair, Aaron E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Simulation has been identified as a means of assessing resident physicians’ mastery of technical skills, but there is a lack of evidence for its utility in longitudinal assessments of residents’ non-technical clinical abilities. We evaluated the growth of crisis resource management (CRM) skills in the simulation setting using a validated tool, the Ottawa Crisis Resource Management Global Rating Scale (Ottawa GRS). We hypothesized that the Ottawa GRS would reflect progressive growth of CRM ability throughout residency. Methods Forty-five emergency medicine residents were tracked with annual simulation assessments between 2006 and 2011. We used mixed-methods repeated-measures regression analyses to evaluate elements of the Ottawa GRS by level of training to predict performance growth throughout a 3-year residency. Results Ottawa GRS scores increased over time, and the domains of leadership, problem solving, and resource utilization, in particular, were predictive of overall performance. There was a significant gain in all Ottawa GRS components between postgraduate years 1 and 2, but no significant difference in GRS performance between years 2 and 3. Conclusions In summary, CRM skills are progressive abilities, and simulation is a useful modality for tracking their development. Modification of this tool may be needed to assess advanced learners’ gains in performance. PMID:25499769

  8. Latent ability: grades and test scores systematically underestimate the intellectual ability of negatively stereotyped students.

    PubMed

    Walton, Gregory M; Spencer, Steven J

    2009-09-01

    Past research has assumed that group differences in academic performance entirely reflect genuine differences in ability. In contrast, extending research on stereotype threat, we suggest that standard measures of academic performance are biased against non-Asian ethnic minorities and against women in quantitative fields. This bias results not from the content of performance measures, but from the context in which they are assessed-from psychological threats in common academic environments, which depress the performances of people targeted by negative intellectual stereotypes. Like the time of a track star running into a stiff headwind, such performances underestimate the true ability of stereotyped students. Two meta-analyses, combining data from 18,976 students in five countries, tested this latent-ability hypothesis. Both meta-analyses found that, under conditions that reduce psychological threat, stereotyped students performed better than nonstereotyped students at the same level of past performance. We discuss implications for the interpretation of and remedies for achievement gaps. PMID:19656335

  9. Motor-reduced visual perceptual abilities and visual-motor integration abilities of Chinese learning children.

    PubMed

    Lai, Mun Yee; Leung, Frederick Koon Shing

    2012-10-01

    This study investigated the relationship between motor-reduced visual perceptual abilities and visual-motor integration abilities of Chinese learning children by employing the Developmental Test of Visual Perception (Hammill, Pearson, & Voress, 1993), in which both abilities are measured in a single test. A total of 72 native Chinese learners of age 5 participated in this study. The findings indicated that the Chinese learners scored much higher in the visual-motor integration tasks than in motor-reduced visual perceptual tasks. The results support the theory of autonomous systems of motor-reduced visual perception and visual-motor integration and query current beliefs about the prior development of the former to the latter for the Chinese learners. To account for the Chinese participants' superior performance in visual-motor integration tasks over motor-reduced visual perceptual tasks, the visual-spatial properties of Chinese characters, general handwriting theories, the motor control theory and the psychogeometric theory of Chinese character-writing are referred to. The significance of the findings is then discussed. PMID:22663773

  10. Trichoderma reesei Sch9 and Yak1 regulate vegetative growth, conidiation, and stress response and induced cellulase production.

    PubMed

    Lv, Xinxing; Zhang, Weixin; Chen, Guanjun; Liu, Weifeng

    2015-04-01

    Protein kinases are key players in controlling many basic cellular processes in almost all the organisms via mediating signal transduction processes. In the present study, we characterized the cellulolytic Trichoderma reesei orthologs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sch9 and Yak1 by sequence alignment and functional analysis. The T. reesei Trsch9Δ and Tryak1Δ mutant strains displayed a decreased growth rate on different carbon sources and produced less conidia. The absence of these two kinases also resulted in different but abnormal polarized apical growth as well as sensitivity to various stresses. In addition, disruption of the genes Trsch9 or Tryak1 resulted in perturbation of cell wall integrity. Interestingly, while the induced production of cellulases was slightly compromised in the Trsch9Δ strain, the extracellular production of cellulases was significantly improved in the absence of Yak1. The results indicate that TrSch9 and TrYak1 play an important role in filamentous growth, stress response and induced production of cellulases in T. reesei. PMID:25636423

  11. Drought enhances symbiotic dinitrogen fixation and competitive ability of a temperate forest tree.

    PubMed

    Wurzburger, Nina; Miniat, Chelcy Ford

    2014-04-01

    General circulation models project more intense and frequent droughts over the next century, but many questions remain about how terrestrial ecosystems will respond. Of particular importance, is to understand how drought will alter the species composition of regenerating temperate forests wherein symbiotic dinitrogen (N2)-fixing plants play a critical role. In experimental mesocosms we manipulated soil moisture to study the effect of drought on the physiology, growth and competitive interactions of four co-occurring North American tree species, one of which (Robinia pseudoacacia) is a symbiotic N2-fixer. We hypothesized that drought would reduce growth by decreasing stomatal conductance, hydraulic conductance and increasing the water use efficiency of species with larger diameter xylem vessel elements (Quercus rubra, R. pseudoacacia) relative to those with smaller elements (Acer rubrum and Liriodendron tulipifera). We further hypothesized that N2 fixation by R. pseudoacacia would decline with drought, reducing its competitive ability. Under drought, growth declined across all species; but, growth and physiological responses did not correspond to species' hydraulic architecture. Drought triggered an 80% increase in nodule biomass and N accrual for R. pseudoacacia, improving its growth relative to other species. These results suggest that drought intensified soil N deficiency and that R. pseudoacacia's ability to fix N2 facilitated competition with non-fixing species when both water and N were limiting. Under scenarios of moderate drought, N2 fixation may alleviate the N constraints resulting from low soil moisture and improve competitive ability of N2-fixing species, and as a result, supply more new N to the ecosystem. PMID:24337710

  12. Motivation and Math Anxiety for Ability Grouped College Math Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helming, Luralyn

    2013-01-01

    The author studied how math anxiety, motivation, and ability group interact to affect performance in college math courses. This clarified the effects of math anxiety and ability grouping on performance. It clarified the interrelationships between math anxiety, motivation, and ability grouping by considering them in a single analysis. It introduces…

  13. 48 CFR 18.107 - AbilityOne specification changes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AbilityOne specification... AbilityOne specification changes. Contracting officers are not held to the notification required when changes in AbilityOne specifications or descriptions are required to meet emergency needs. (See 8.712(d).)...

  14. Self-Efficacy, Reasoning Ability, and Achievement in College Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawson, Anton E.; Banks, Debra L.; Logvin, Marshall

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the relationships of self-efficacy and reasoning ability to achievement in introductory college biology. Based on the hypothesis that developing formal and postformal reasoning ability is a primary factor influencing self-efficacy, a significant positive correlation was predicted between reasoning ability and degree of…

  15. Educators' Ability to Detect True and False Bullying Statements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gomez-Garibello, Carlos; Saykaly, Christine; Moore, Kelsey; Talwar, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    The majority of research investigating children's lie-telling behavior has focused on lay people and legal professionals' abilities to detect deception. Fewer researchers have assessed educators' abilities to evaluate the veracity of children's reports of bullying. In this study, educators' abilities to detect true and false accounts of bullying…

  16. Computerized Ability Testing, 1972-1975. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, David J.

    Three and one-half years of research on computerized ability testing are summarized. The original objectives of the research were: (1) to develop and implement the stratified computer-based ability test; (2) to compare, on psychometric criteria, the various approaches to computer-based ability testing, including the stratified computerized test,…

  17. Narrative Fiction and Expository Nonfiction Differentially Predict Verbal Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mar, Raymond A.; Rain, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Although reading is known to be an important contributor to language abilities, it is not yet well established whether different text genres are uniquely associated with verbal abilities. We examined how exposure to narrative fiction and expository nonfiction predict language ability among university students. Exposure was measured both with…

  18. Visuo-Spatial Ability in Colonoscopy Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Buzink, Sonja N.; Verwey, Willem B.; Jakimowicz, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    Visuo-spatial ability is associated with a quality of performance in a variety of surgical and medical skills. However, visuo-spatial ability is typically assessed using "Visualization" tests only, which led to an incomplete understanding of the involvement of visuo-spatial ability in these skills. To remedy this situation, the current study…

  19. Visuospatial Ability Factors and Performance Variables in Laparoscopic Simulator Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luursema, Jan-Maarten; Verwey, Willem B.; Burie, Remke

    2012-01-01

    Visuospatial ability has been shown to be important to several aspects of laparoscopic performance, including simulator training. Only a limited subset of visuospatial ability factors however has been investigated in such studies. Tests for different visuospatial ability factors differ in stimulus complexity, in their emphasis on identifying…

  20. Intonation Abilities of Children with Williams Syndrome: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stojanovik, Vesna; Setter, Jane; van Ewijk, Lizet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated expressive and receptive intonation abilities in children with Williams syndrome (WS) and the relation of these abilities to other linguistic abilities. Method: Fourteen children with WS, 14 typically developing children matched to the WS group for receptive language (LA), and 15 typically developing children…

  1. Ability Requirement Implications of Job Design: An Interdisciplinary Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campion, Michael A.

    1989-01-01

    Measured multiple approaches to job design and examined relationships with ability requirements, using two distinctly different samples (total N=213 jobs), different measures of job design, and ability requirements. Found that motivational attributes of jobs related positively to mental ability requirements; other approaches to job design related…

  2. Differentiation of Cognitive Abilities across the Life Span

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker-Drob, Elliot M.

    2009-01-01

    Existing representations of cognitive ability structure are exclusively based on linear patterns of interrelations. However, a number of developmental and cognitive theories predict that abilities are differentially related across ages (age differentiation-dedifferentiation) and across levels of functioning (ability differentiation). Nonlinear…

  3. Clinical Competence: General Ability or Case-Specific?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wimmers, Paul F.; Splinter, Ted A. W.; Hancock, Gregory R.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Before the 1970s, research into the development of clinical competence was mainly focused on general problem-solving abilities. The scope of research changed when Elstein and colleagues discovered that individual ability to solve clinical problems varies considerably across cases. It was concluded that problem solving abilities are…

  4. Preschoolers' Dot Enumeration Abilities Are Markers of Their Arithmetic Competence

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Sarah A.; Reeve, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The abilities to enumerate small sets of items (e.g., dots) and to compare magnitudes are claimed to be indexes of core numerical competences that scaffold early math development. Insofar as this is correct, these abilities may be diagnostic markers of math competence in preschoolers. However, unlike magnitude comparison abilities, little research has examined preschoolers' ability to enumerate small sets, or its significance for emerging math abilities; which is surprising since dot enumeration is a marker of school-aged children's math competence. It is nevertheless possible that general cognitive functions (working memory, response inhibition in particular) are associated with preschoolers' math abilities and underlie nascent dot enumeration abilities. We investigated whether preschoolers' dot enumeration abilities predict their non-verbal arithmetic ability, over and above the influence of working memory and response inhibition. Two measures of dot enumeration ability were examined—inverse efficiency and paradigm specific (response time profiles) measures—to determine which has the better diagnostic utility as a marker of math competence. Seventy-eight 42-to-57 month-olds completed dot enumeration, working memory, response inhibition, and non-verbal addition and subtraction tasks. Dot enumeration efficiency predicted arithmetic ability over and above the influence of general cognitive functions. While dot enumeration efficiency was a better predictor of arithmetic ability than paradigm specific response time profiles; the response time profile displaying the smallest subitizing range and steepest subitizing slope, also displayed poor addition abilities, suggesting a weak subitizing profile may have diagnostic significance in preschoolers. Overall, the findings support the claim that dot enumeration abilities and general cognitive functions are markers of preschoolers' math ability. PMID:24714052

  5. What is Recognised as Ability in Physical Education? A Systematic Appraisal of How Ability and Ability Differences Are Socially Constructed within Mainstream Secondary School Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, Shaun; Littlefair, David; Barlow-Meade, Linda

    2013-01-01

    In sport, schools and physical education (PE) ability has invariably been understood as an inherent and relatively immutable capacity, amendable to varying degrees by interventions such as training regimes and education. Differences in achievement are assumed to be an inevitable consequence of natural variations in ability and an indication of…

  6. Childhood cognitive ability accounts for associations between cognitive ability and brain cortical thickness in old age.

    PubMed

    Karama, S; Bastin, M E; Murray, C; Royle, N A; Penke, L; Muñoz Maniega, S; Gow, A J; Corley, J; Valdés Hernández, M del C; Lewis, J D; Rousseau, M-É; Lepage, C; Fonov, V; Collins, D L; Booth, T; Rioux, P; Sherif, T; Adalat, R; Starr, J M; Evans, A C; Wardlaw, J M; Deary, I J

    2014-05-01

    Associations between brain cortical tissue volume and cognitive function in old age are frequently interpreted as suggesting that preservation of cortical tissue is the foundation of successful cognitive aging. However, this association could also, in part, reflect a lifelong association between cognitive ability and cortical tissue. We analyzed data on 588 subjects from the Lothian Birth Cohort 1936 who had intelligence quotient (IQ) scores from the same cognitive test available at both 11 and 70 years of age as well as high-resolution brain magnetic resonance imaging data obtained at approximately 73 years of age. Cortical thickness was estimated at 81 924 sampling points across the cortex for each subject using an automated pipeline. Multiple regression was used to assess associations between cortical thickness and the IQ measures at 11 and 70 years. Childhood IQ accounted for more than two-third of the association between IQ at 70 years and cortical thickness measured at age 73 years. This warns against ascribing a causal interpretation to the association between cognitive ability and cortical tissue in old age based on assumptions about, and exclusive reference to, the aging process and any associated disease. Without early-life measures of cognitive ability, it would have been tempting to conclude that preservation of cortical thickness in old age is a foundation for successful cognitive aging when, instead, it is a lifelong association. This being said, results should not be construed as meaning that all studies on aging require direct measures of childhood IQ, but as suggesting that proxy measures of prior cognitive function can be useful to take into consideration. PMID:23732878

  7. The ABCs of Math: A Genetic Analysis of Mathematics and Its Links with Reading Ability and General Cognitive Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Sara A.; Petrill, Stephen A.; Thompson, Lee A.; Plomin, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this first major report from the Western Reserve Reading Project Math component is to explore the etiology of the relationship among tester-administered measures of mathematics ability, reading ability, and general cognitive ability. Data are available on 314 pairs of monozygotic and same-sex dizygotic twins analyzed across 5 waves of…

  8. Planning Ability across Ranges of Intellectual Ability: An Examination of the Luria-Das Information-Processing Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, R. Steve; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Based on Luria-Das information processing theory, hypothesized that 26 educable mentally retarded children would score significantly less well on relatively pure measures of planning ability than would 13 younger average ability students after students were matched on cognitive processing ability. Hypothesis was not supported by study. (Author/NB)

  9. Sex Differences in Latent Cognitive Abilities Ages 5 to 17: Evidence from the Differential Ability Scales--Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keith, Timothy Z.; Reynolds, Matthew R.; Roberts, Lisa G.; Winter, Amanda L.; Austin, Cynthia A.

    2011-01-01

    Sex differences in the latent general and broad cognitive abilities underlying the Differential Ability Scales, Second Edition were investigated for children and youth ages 5 through 17. Multi-group mean and covariance structural equation modeling was used to investigate sex differences in latent cognitive abilities as well as changes in these…

  10. Early numerical abilities and cognitive skills in kindergarten children.

    PubMed

    Passolunghi, Maria Chiara; Lanfranchi, Silvia; Altoè, Gianmarco; Sollazzo, Nadia

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a unitary path analysis model was developed to investigate the relationship between cognitive variables (derived from published studies) and early numerical abilities in children attending the last year of kindergarten. We tested 100 children starting their last year of kindergarten on the following cognitive abilities: intelligence, phonological abilities, counting, verbal and visuospatial short-term memory and working memory, processing speed, and early numerical abilities. The same children were tested again on early numerical abilities at the end of the same year. The children's early numerical abilities at the beginning of the final year of kindergarten were found to be directly related to their verbal intelligence, phonological abilities, processing speed, and working memory and to be indirectly related to their nonverbal intelligence. Early numerical abilities at the end of the same year are directly related not only to early numerical abilities assessed at the beginning of the year but also to working memory and phonological abilities as well as have an indirect relationship with verbal and nonverbal intelligence. Overall, our results showed that both general and specific abilities are related to early mathematic learning in kindergarten-age children. PMID:25818537

  11. Reduced growth factor requirement of keloid-derived fibroblasts may account for tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, S.B.; Trupin, K.M.; Rodriguez-Eaton, S.; Russell, J.D.; Trupin, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Keloids are benign dermal tumors that form during an abnormal wound-healing process is genetically susceptible individuals. Although growth of normal and keloid cells did not differ in medium containing 10% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid culture grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid cultures grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) plasma or 1% fetal bovine serum. Conditioned medium from keloid cultures did not stimulate growth of normal cells in plasma nor did it contain detectable platelet-derived growth factor or epidermal growth factor. Keloid fibroblasts responded differently than normal adult fibroblasts to transforming growth factor ..beta... Whereas transforming growth factor ..beta.. reduced growth stimulation by epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from keloids. Normal and keloid fibroblasts also responded differently to hydrocortisone: growth was stimulated in normal adult cells and unaffected or inhibited in keloid cells. Fetal fibroblasts resembled keloid cells in their ability to grow in plasma and in their response to hydrocortisone. The ability of keloid fibroblasts to grow to higher cell densities in low-serum medium than cells from normal adult skin or from normal early or mature scars suggests that a reduced dependence on serum growth factors may account for their prolonged growth in vivo. Similarities between keloid and fetal cells suggest that keloids may result from the untimely expression of growth-control mechanism that is developmentally regulated.

  12. Strigolactones Effects on Root Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltai, Hinanit

    2012-07-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) were defined as a new group of plant hormones that suppress lateral shoot branching. Our previous studies suggested SLs to be regulators of root development. SLs were shown to alter root architecture by regulating lateral root formation and to affect root hair elongation in Arabidopsis. Another important effect of SLs on root growth was shown to be associated with root directional growth. Supplementation of SLs to roots led to alterations in root directional growth, whereas associated mutants showed asymmetrical root growth, which was influenced by environmental factors. The regulation by SLs of root development was shown to be conducted via a cross talk of SLs with other plant hormones, including auxin. SLs were shown to regulate auxin transport, and to interfere with the activity of auxin-efflux carriers. Therefore, it might be that SLs are regulators of root directional growth as a result of their ability to regulated auxin transport. However, other evidences suggest a localized effect of SLs on cell division, which may not necessarily be associated with auxin efflux. These and other, recent hypothesis as to the SLs mode of action and the associated root perception and response to environmental factors will be discussed.

  13. Field emission and growth of fullerene nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rinzler, A.G.; Hafner, J.H.; Nilolaev, P.; Colbert, D.T.; Smalley, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    Efforts to control the growth of individual carbon nanotubes from nanotube seed crystals have led to a characterization of their field-induced electron emission behavior. The application of a bias voltage in the growth apparatus was motivated by the prolific formation of nanotubes in the carbon are growth method, in which the electric field appears to play a central role. The authors report here the ability to achieve various tube tip configurations by the controlled application of voltage, heat and chemicals to an individual nanotube, and that these states are well characterized by the emission currents they induce.

  14. Modeling Longitudinal Change in the Language Abilities of Children with Autism: Parent Behaviors and Child Characteristics as Predictors of Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siller, Michael; Sigman, Marian

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the patterns of longitudinal change in the language abilities of 28 children with autism during early and middle childhood. Results from fitting a series of multilevel models showed that children's rate of language growth was independently predicted by (a) children's responsiveness to others' bids…

  15. No evolution of increased competitive ability or decreased allocation to defense in Melaleuca quinquenervia since release from natural enemies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    If invasive plants are released from natural enemies in their introduced range, they may evolve decreased allocation to defense and increased growth, as predicted by the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) hypothesis. A field experiment using the invasive tree Melaleuca quinquenervia ...

  16. Trajectories of Change in Students' Self-Concepts of Ability and Values in Math and College Major Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musu-Gillette, Lauren E.; Wigfield, Allan; Harring, Jeffrey R.; Eccles, Jacquelynne S.

    2015-01-01

    This study extends previous research on the long-term connections between motivation constructs in expectancy-value theory and achievement outcomes. Using growth mixture modelling, we examined trajectories of change for 421 students from 4th grade through college in their self-concept of ability (SCA) in math, interest in math, and perceived…

  17. Processing of space, time, and number contributes to mathematical abilities above and beyond domain-general cognitive abilities.

    PubMed

    Skagerlund, Kenny; Träff, Ulf

    2016-03-01

    The current study investigated whether processing of number, space, and time contributes to mathematical abilities beyond previously known domain-general cognitive abilities in a sample of 8- to 10-year-old children (N=133). Multiple regression analyses revealed that executive functions and general intelligence predicted all aspects of mathematics and overall mathematical ability. Working memory capacity did not contribute significantly to our models, whereas spatial ability was a strong predictor of achievement. The study replicates earlier research showing that non-symbolic number processing seems to lose predictive power of mathematical abilities once the symbolic system is acquired. Novel findings include the fact that time discrimination ability was tied to calculation ability. Therefore, a conclusion is that magnitude processing in general contributes to mathematical achievement. PMID:26637947

  18. Calcium Phosphate Growth at Electropolished Titanium Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Elnaz; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois

    2012-01-01

    This work investigated the ability of electropolished Ti surface to induce Hydroxyapatite (HA) nucleation and growth in vitro via a biomimetic method in Simulated Body Fluid (SBF). The HA induction ability of Ti surface upon electropolishing was compared to that of Ti substrates modified with common chemical methods including alkali, acidic and hydrogen peroxide treatments. Our results revealed the excellent ability of electropolished Ti surfaces in inducing the formation of bone-like HA at the Ti/SBF interface. The chemical composition, crystallinity and thickness of the HA coating obtained on the electropolished Ti surface was found to be comparable to that achieved on the surface of alkali treated Ti substrate, one of the most effective and popular chemical treatments. The surface characteristics of electropolished Ti contributing to HA growth were discussed thoroughly. PMID:24955535

  19. Epidermal growth factor and growth in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a dose-dependent thickening of the epidermis in suckling mice. The cellular mechanisms underlying this thickening were analyzed by measuring the effect of EGF on the cell-cycle. Neonatal mice were given daily injections of either 2ug EGF/g body weight/day or an equivalent volume of saline, and on the seventh day received a single injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine. At various times the mice were perfused with fixative; 1um sections of skin were stained with a modification of Harris' hematoxylin and were autoradiographed. The sections were analyzed using three methods based on the dependence on time after injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine of: frequency of labelled mitoses, labelling index, and reciprocal grains/nucleus. It was found that EGF caused a two-fold increase in the cell production rate. The effect of exogenous EGF on the morphology of gastric mucosa and incisors of suckling mice was also studied. The gastric mucosa appeared thicker in EGF-treated animals, but the effect was not statistically significant. In contrast to its effect on epidermis and gastric mucosa, EGF caused a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the size of the incisors. Because the mouse submandibular salivary gland is the major source of EGF the effect of sialoadenectomy on female reproductive functions was examined. Ablation of the submandibular gland had no effect on: length of estrus cycle, ability of the female to produce litters, length of the gestation period, litter size, and weight of the litter at birth. There was also no effect on survival of the offspring or on age at which the eyelids separated.

  20. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes: Structure, Catalyst, and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and hence have been receiving much attention in recent years for their potential in nanoelectronics, field emission devices, scanning probes, high strength composites and many more applications. Catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon feedstock with the aid of supported transition metal catalysts - also known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - has become popular to produce single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) and multiwalled nanofibers (MWNFs). The ability to grow CNTs on patterned substrates and in vertically aligned arrays, and the simplicity of the process, has made CVD growth of CNTs an attractive approach.

  1. Children with Williams syndrome: Developmental trajectories for intellectual abilities, vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Pitts, C Holley

    2015-06-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4-15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (>7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (<7.5 years at Time 1). Furthermore, correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 SSs were larger for the older cohort than for the younger cohort, indicating that SS stability was greater for older children than for younger children. Although mean SSs declined for most measures, indicating that children with WS as a group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered. PMID:25989316

  2. Children with Williams Syndrome: Developmental Trajectories for Intellectual Abilities, Vocabulary Abilities, and Adaptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Pitts, C. Holley

    2016-01-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4 – 15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (> 7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (< 7.5 years at Time 1). Furthermore, correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 SSs were larger for the older cohort than for the younger cohort, indicating that SS stability was greater for older children than for younger children. Although mean SSs declined for most measures, indicating that children with WS as a group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered. PMID:25989316

  3. Housing mobility and cognitive development: Change in verbal and nonverbal abilities.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Patrick J; McGrath, Lauren M; Henry, David B; Schoeny, Michael; Chavira, Dina; Taylor, Jeremy J; Day, Orin

    2015-10-01

    This study investigates the influence of housing instability on verbal and nonverbal cognitive development among at-risk children and adolescents involved in the child welfare system. Frequent residential changes threaten child mental health, especially among low-income families. Little is known regarding disruptions to cognitive growth, specifically the impact on verbal and nonverbal abilities. The study tests whether developmental timing of housing mobility affects cognitive development beyond individual and family risks. A nationally representative study of families (n=2,442) susceptible to housing and family instability tracked children and adolescents aged 4-14 years (M=8.95 years) over 36 months following investigation by the child welfare system. Youth completed standardized cognitive assessments while caregivers reported on behavior problems and family risk at three time points. Latent growth models examined change in cognitive abilities over time. Housing mobility in the 12 months prior to baseline predicts lower verbal cognitive abilities that improve marginally. Similar effects emerge for all age groups; however, frequent moves in infancy diminish the influence of subsequent housing mobility on verbal tasks. Housing instability threatened cognitive development beyond child maltreatment, family changes, poverty, and other risks. Findings inform emerging research on environmental influences on neurocognitive development, as well as identify targets for early intervention. Systematic assessment of family housing problems, including through the child welfare system, provides opportunities for coordinated responses to prevent instability and cognitive threats. PMID:26184055

  4. Probe on training the practical ability of undergraduates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qiaohui; Meng, Xiuxia; Leng, Bing

    2010-07-01

    Practical ability means physical and psychological characteristics that ensure the individual to make use of the knowledge and skills to solve the practical problems smoothly. Only with practical ability, the man can sum up experience from practice, at the same time he can identify problems and make innovation. This article describes the meaning and characteristics of practice and introduces how to build the capacity of the practical ability of students in foreign university. As well as the article put forward how to set up a practical training teaching system which can improve practical ability of college students and a series of training programs to help Chinese universities students to improve the student's practical ability and cultivate student's with a strong practical ability and high-quality talent.

  5. [Methodological challenges in measurements of functional ability in gerontological research].

    PubMed

    Avlund, E K

    1997-10-20

    This article addresses the advantages and disadvantages of different methods in measuring functional ability with its main focus on frame of reference, operationalization, practical procedure, validity, discriminatory power, and responsiveness. When measuring functional ability it is recommended: 1) Always to consider the theoretical frame of reference as part of the validation process. 2) Always to assess the content validity of items before they are combined into an index and before performing tests for construct validity. 3) Not to combine mobility, PADL and IADL in the same index/scale. 4) Not to use IADL as a health-related functional ability measure or, if used, to ask whether problems with IADL or non-performance of IADL are caused by health-related factors. 5) Always to analyse functional ability separately for men and women. 6) To exclude the dead in analyses of change in functional ability if the focus is on predictors of deterioration in functional ability. PMID:9411957

  6. A thermodynamic theory of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Desmond-Le Quéméner, Elie; Bouchez, Théodore

    2014-08-01

    Our ability to model the growth of microbes only relies on empirical laws, fundamentally restricting our understanding and predictive capacity in many environmental systems. In particular, the link between energy balances and growth dynamics is still not understood. Here we demonstrate a microbial growth equation relying on an explicit theoretical ground sustained by Boltzmann statistics, thus establishing a relationship between microbial growth rate and available energy. The validity of our equation was then questioned by analyzing the microbial isotopic fractionation phenomenon, which can be viewed as a kinetic consequence of the differences in energy contents of isotopic isomers used for growth. We illustrate how the associated theoretical predictions are actually consistent with recent experimental evidences. Our work links microbial population dynamics to the thermodynamic driving forces of the ecosystem, which opens the door to many biotechnological and ecological developments. PMID:24522260

  7. Mental ability and common sense in an artificial society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malarz, Krzysztof; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2014-07-01

    Having equally valid premises pro and contra, what does a rational human being prefer? The answer is: nothing. We designed a test of this kind and applied it to an artificial society, characterized by a given level of mental ability. A stream of messages from media is supplemented by ongoing interpersonal communication. The result is that high ability leads to wellbalanced opinions, while low ability produces extreme opinions.

  8. Integrated approach for disease management and growth enhancement of Sesamum indicum L. utilizing Azotobacter chroococcum TRA2 and chemical fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, D K; Dubey, R C; Aeron, Abhinav; Kumar, Bhavesh; Kumar, Sandeep; Tewari, Sakshi; Arora, Naveen Kumar

    2012-10-01

    Azotobacter chroococcum TRA2, an isolate of wheat rhizosphere displayed plant growth promoting attributes including indole acetic acid, HCN, siderophore production, solubilization of inorganic phosphate and fixation of atmospheric nitrogen. In addition, it showed strong antagonistic effect against Macrophomina phaseolina and Fusarium oxysporum. It also caused degradation and digestion of cell wall components, resulting in hyphal perforations, empty cell (halo) formation, shrinking and lysis of fungal mycelia along with significant degeneration of conidia. Fertilizer adaptive variant strain of A. chroococcum TRA2 was studied with Tn5 induced streptomycin resistant transconjugants of wild type tetracycline-resistant TRA2 (designated TRA2(tetra+strep+)) after different durations. The strain was significantly competent in rhizosphere, as its population increased by 15.29 % in rhizosphere of Sesamum indicum. Seed bacterization with the strain TRA2 resulted in significant increase in vegetative growth parameters and yield of sesame over the non-bacterized seeds. However, application of TRA2 with half dose of fertilizers showed sesame yield almost similar to that obtained by full dose treatment. Moreover, the oil yield increased by 24.20 %, while protein yield increased by 35.92 % in treatment receiving half dose of fertilizer along with TRA2 bacterized seeds, as compared to untreated control. PMID:22828791

  9. Cognitive Ability: Social Correlates and Consequences in Contemporary China*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guoying; Xie, Yu; Xu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the measurement of cognitive ability in the China Family Panel Studies (CFPS), especially for verbal skill, mathematical skill, memory, and quantitative reasoning. The available CFPS cognitive measurements can be useful for studies on the importance of cognitive ability in many substantive domains of interest. Using the CFPS data, we show that measures of cognitive ability are clearly related to key demographic and social characteristics, such as age, gender, education, and hukou status. We also illustrate how cognitive ability influences school performance and deviant behaviors among children, income and political capital among adults, and daily functioning among the elderly. PMID:27570709

  10. COMPETITIVE ABILITY IN MALE HOUSE MICE (Mus musculus): GENETIC INFLUENCES

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Christopher B.; Ruff, James S.; Chase, Kevin; Potts, Wayne K.; Carrier, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Conspecifics of many animal species physically compete to gain reproductive resources and thus fitness. Despite the importance of competitive ability across the animal kingdom, specific traits that influence or underpin competitive ability are poorly characterized. Here, we investigate whether there are genetic influences on competitive ability within male house mice. Additionally, we examined if litter demographics (litter size and litter sex ratio) influence competitive ability. We phenotyped two generations for a male s ability to possess a reproductive resource--a prime nesting site--using semi-natural enclosures with mixed sex groupings. We used the animal model coupled with an extensive pedigree to estimate several genetic parameters. Competitive ability was found to be highly heritable, but only displayed a moderate genetic correlation to body mass. Interestingly, litter sex ratio had a weak negative influence on competitive ability. Litter size had no significant influence on competitive ability. Our study also highlights how much remians unknown about the proximal causes of competitive ability. PMID:23291957

  11. Is Approximate Number Precision a Stable Predictor of Math Ability?

    PubMed Central

    Libertus, Melissa E.; Feigenson, Lisa; Halberda, Justin

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that children’s ability to estimate numbers of items using their Approximate Number System (ANS) predicts later math ability. To more closely examine the predictive role of early ANS acuity on later abilities, we assessed the ANS acuity, math ability, and expressive vocabulary of preschoolers twice, six months apart. We also administered attention and memory span tasks to ask whether the previously reported association between ANS acuity and math ability is ANS-specific or attributable to domain-general cognitive skills. We found that early ANS acuity predicted math ability six months later, even when controlling for individual differences in age, expressive vocabulary, and math ability at the initial testing. In addition, ANS acuity was a unique concurrent predictor of math ability above and beyond expressive vocabulary, attention, and memory span. These findings of a predictive relationship between early ANS acuity and later math ability add to the growing evidence for the importance of early numerical estimation skills. PMID:23814453

  12. Subjective workload and individual differences in information processing abilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damos, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes several experiments examining the source of individual differences in the experience of mental workload. Three sources of such differences were examined: information processing abilities, timesharing abilities, and personality traits/behavior patterns. On the whole, there was little evidence that individual differences in information processing abilities or timesharing abilities are related to perceived differences in mental workload. However, individuals with strong Type A coronary prone behavior patterns differed in both single- and multiple-task performance from individuals who showed little evidence of such a pattern. Additionally, individuals with a strong Type A pattern showed some dissociation between objective performance and the experience of mental workload.

  13. Maternal and developmental immune challenges alter behavior and learning ability of offspring

    PubMed Central

    Grindstaff, Jennifer L.; Hunsaker, Veronica R.; Cox, Shelby N.

    2012-01-01

    Stimulation of the offspring immune response during development is known to influence growth and behavioral phenotype. However, the potential for maternal antibodies to block the behavioral effects of immune activation during the neonatal period has not been assessed. We challenged female zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) prior to egg laying and then challenged offspring during the nestling and juvenile periods with one of two antigens (keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS)). We then tested the effects of maternal and neonatal immune challenges on offspring growth rates and neophobia and learning ability of offspring during adulthood. Neonatal immune challenge depressed growth rates. Neophobia of adult offspring was influenced by a combination of maternal treatment, offspring treatment, and offspring sex. Males challenged with LPS during the nestling and juvenile periods had reduced learning performance in a novel foraging task; however, female learning was not impacted. Offspring challenged with the same antigen as mothers exhibited similar growth suppression and behavioral changes as offspring challenged with a novel antigen. Thus, developmental immune challenges have long-term effects on the growth and behavioral phenotype of offspring. We found limited evidence that matching of maternal and offspring challenges reduces the effects of immune challenge in the altricial zebra finch. This may be a result of rapid catabolism of maternal antibodies in altricial birds. Our results emphasize the need to address sex differences in the long-term effects of developmental immune challenge and suggest neonatal immune activation may be one proximate mechanism underlying differences in adult behavior. PMID:22522078

  14. Sexual dimorphism in intra- and interspecific competitive ability of the dioecious herb Mercurialis annua.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Vilas, J; Turner, A; Pannell, J R

    2011-01-01

    Males and females of dioecious plant species often show different responses to competition with individuals of the same or opposite gender, but almost no data are available on the outcome of competition with members of other species. Here, we show that male and female individuals of the wind-pollinated herb Mercurialis annua are sexually dimorphic in both their intraspecific and interspecific competitive abilities. In a controlled experiment, we found that both sexes of M. annua were negatively affected by interspecific competition, but the sensitivity of males and females depended on the identity of their competitor species, with females tending to suppress the aboveground growth of competitor species more than males. Further, we found that intrasexual and intersexual competition affected the aboveground growth of males but not that of females: only males showed a significant reduction in growth when growing with conspecific competitors (male or female). We discuss our results with reference to related studies that suggest that males and females of M. annua have different resource requirements for reproduction, which in turn affect their competitive abilities. PMID:21186695

  15. Transformation of pWWO in Rhizobium leguminosarum DPT to Engineer Toluene Degrading Ability for Rhizoremediation.

    PubMed

    Goel, Garima; Pandey, Piyush; Sood, Anchal; Bisht, Sandeep; Maheshwari, D K; Sharma, G D

    2012-06-01

    Rhizoremediation of organic xenobiotics is based on interactions between plants and their associated micro-organisms. The present work was designed to engineer a bacterial system having toluene degradation ability along with plant growth promoting characteristics for effective rhizoremediation. pWWO harboring the genes responsible for toluene breakdown was isolated from Pseudomonas putida MTCC 979 and successfully transformed in Rhizobium DPT. This resulted in a bacterial strain (DPT(T)) which had the ability to degrade toluene as well as enhance growth of host plant. The frequency of transformation was recorded 5.7 × 10(-6). DPT produced IAA, siderophore, chitinase, HCN, ACC deaminase, solubilized inorganic phosphate, fixed atmospheric nitrogen and inhibited the growth of Fusarium oxysporum and Macrophomina phaseolina in vitro. During pot assay, 50 ppm toluene in soil was found to inhibit the germination of Cajanus cajan seeds. However when the seeds bacterized with toluene degrading P. putida or R. leguminosarum DPT were sown in pots, again no germination was observed. Non-bacterized as well as bacterized seeds germinated successfully in toluene free soil as control. The results forced for an alternative mode of application of bacteria for rhizoremediation purpose. Hence bacterial suspension was mixed with soil having 50 ppm of toluene. Germination index in DPT treated soil was 100% while in P. putida it was 50%. Untreated soil with toluene restricted the seeds to germinate. PMID:23729882

  16. Organizational Career Growth, Affective Occupational Commitment and Turnover Intentions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weng, Qingxiong; McElroy, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Survey data, collected from the People's Republic of China, were used to test Weng's (2010) four facet model of career growth and to examine its effect on occupational commitment and turnover intentions. Weng conceptualized career growth as consisting of four factors: career goal progress, professional ability development, promotion speed, and…

  17. Transformation of Epichloë typhina by electroporation of conidia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Choke, caused by the endophytic fungus Epichloë typhina is an important disease of orchardgrass (Dactylis glomerata L.) grown for seed. Very little is known concerning the conditions necessary for successful infection of orchardgrass by E. typhina. Detection of E. typhina early in the disease cycle ...

  18. Language Ability Predicts the Development of Behavior Problems in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Isaac T.; Bates, John E.; D’Onofrio, Brian M.; Coyne, Claire A.; Lansford, Jennifer E.; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Pettit, Gregory S.; Van Hulle, Carol A.

    2013-01-01

    Prior studies have suggested, but not fully established, that language ability is important for regulating attention and behavior. Language ability may have implications for understanding attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorders, as well as subclinical problems. This article reports findings from two longitudinal studies to test (a) whether language ability has an independent effect on behavior problems, and (b) the direction of effect between language ability and behavior problems. In Study 1 (N = 585), language ability was measured annually from ages 7 to 13 years by language subtests of standardized academic achievement tests administered at the children’s schools. Inattentive-hyperactive (I-H) and externalizing (EXT) problems were reported annually by teachers and mothers. In Study 2 (N = 11,506), language ability (receptive vocabulary) and mother-rated I-H and EXT problems were measured biannually from ages 4 to 12 years. Analyses in both studies showed that language ability predicted within-individual variability in the development of I-H and EXT problems over and above the effects of sex, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), and performance in other academic and intellectual domains (e.g., math, reading comprehension, reading recognition, and short-term memory [STM]). Even after controls for prior levels of behavior problems, language ability predicted later behavior problems more strongly than behavior problems predicted later language ability, suggesting that the direction of effect may be from language ability to behavior problems. The findings suggest that language ability may be a useful target for the prevention or even treatment of attention deficits and EXT problems in children. PMID:23713507

  19. Latent regeneration abilities persist following recent evolutionary loss in asexual annelids.

    PubMed

    Bely, Alexandra E; Sikes, James M

    2010-01-26

    Regeneration abilities have been repeatedly lost in many animal phyla. However, because regeneration research has focused almost exclusively on highly regenerative taxa or on comparisons between regenerating and nonregenerating taxa that are deeply diverged, virtually nothing is known about how regeneration loss occurs. Here, we show that, following a recent evolutionary loss of regeneration, regenerative abilities can remain latent and still be elicited. Using comparative regeneration experiments and a molecular phylogeny, we show that ancestral head regeneration abilities have been lost three times among naidine annelids, a group of small aquatic worms that typically reproduce asexually by fission. In all three lineages incapable of head regeneration, worms consistently seal the wound but fail to progress to the first stage of tissue replacement. However, despite this coarse-level convergence in regeneration loss, further investigation of two of these lineages reveals marked differences in how much of the regeneration machinery has been abolished. Most notably, in a species representing one of these two lineages, but not in a representative of the other, amputation within a narrow proliferative region that forms during fission can still elicit regeneration of an essentially normal head. Thus, the presence at the wound site of elements characteristic of actively growing tissues, such as activated stem cells or growth factors, may permit blocks to regeneration to be circumvented, allowing latent regeneration abilities to be manifested. PMID:19966282

  20. Latent regeneration abilities persist following recent evolutionary loss in asexual annelids

    PubMed Central

    Bely, Alexandra E.; Sikes, James M.

    2009-01-01

    Regeneration abilities have been repeatedly lost in many animal phyla. However, because regeneration research has focused almost exclusively on highly regenerative taxa or on comparisons between regenerating and nonregenerating taxa that are deeply diverged, virtually nothing is known about how regeneration loss occurs. Here, we show that, following a recent evolutionary loss of regeneration, regenerative abilities can remain latent and still be elicited. Using comparative regeneration experiments and a molecular phylogeny, we show that ancestral head regeneration abilities have been lost three times among naidine annelids, a group of small aquatic worms that typically reproduce asexually by fission. In all three lineages incapable of head regeneration, worms consistently seal the wound but fail to progress to the first stage of tissue replacement. However, despite this coarse-level convergence in regeneration loss, further investigation of two of these lineages reveals marked differences in how much of the regeneration machinery has been abolished. Most notably, in a species representing one of these two lineages, but not in a representative of the other, amputation within a narrow proliferative region that forms during fission can still elicit regeneration of an essentially normal head. Thus, the presence at the wound site of elements characteristic of actively growing tissues, such as activated stem cells or growth factors, may permit blocks to regeneration to be circumvented, allowing latent regeneration abilities to be manifested. PMID:19966282

  1. Infection of Keratinocytes with Trichophytum rubrum Induces Epidermal Growth Factor-Dependent RNase 7 and Human Beta-Defensin-3 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, Franziska; Schröder, Lena; Brasch, Jochen; Harder, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Human keratinocytes are able to express various antimicrobial peptides (AMP) to protect the skin from exaggerated microbial colonization and infection. Recently, in vitro growth-inhibiting activity of the skin-derived AMP psoriasin, RNase 7 and human beta-defensin (hBD)-2 against dermatophytes such as Trichophyton (T.) rubrum have been reported. To evaluate whether keratinocytes are able to respond to T. rubrum infection by an induced expression of AMP we exposed primary keratinocytes to living conidia of T. rubrum. This led to conidia germination and mycelial growth which was paralleled by a strong gene induction of the skin-derived AMP RNase 7 and hBD-3. Gene expression of the AMP psoriasin (S100A7) and hBD-2 were only slightly induced. The T. rubrum-mediated RNase 7 gene induction was accompanied by increased secretion of RNase 7. Parallel treatment of the keratinocytes with T. rubrum and the cytokine combination IL-17A/IFN-γ resulted in synergistic induction of RNase 7 and hBD-3 expression. Since patients receiving therapy by inhibition of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) more often suffer from dermatophytoses we investigated whether EGFR may be involved in the T. rubrum-mediated RNase 7 and hBD-3 induction. Primary keratinocytes incubated with an EGFR blocking antibody as well as with the EGFR antagonist AG1478 showed a significantly diminished RNase 7 and hBD-3 induction upon exposure of the keratinocytes to T. rubrum indicating that EGFR is involved in the T. rubrum-mediated induction of RNase 7 and hBD-3. The growth of T. rubrum in vitro was inhibited by hBD-3 in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that hBD-3 may contribute to cutaneous innate defense against T. rubrum. Taken together our data indicate that keratinocytes are able to initiate a fast defense response towards T. rubrum by the increased expression of AMP active against T. rubrum. A dysregulation of AMP may contribute to chronic and recurring dermatophytoses. PMID:24747887

  2. Zinc tolerance and zinc removal ability of living and dried biomass of Desmodesmus communis.

    PubMed

    Novák, Zoltán; Jánószky, Mihály; B-Béres, Viktória; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Bácsi, István

    2014-12-01

    Effects of zinc on growth, cell morphology, oxidative stress, and zinc removal ability of the common phytoplankton species Desmodesmus communis were investigated at a concentration range of 0.25-160 mg L(-1) zinc. Cell densities and chlorophyll content decreased in treated cultures, changes in coenobia morphology and elevated lipid peroxidation levels appeared above 2.5 mg L(-1) zinc. The most effective zinc removal was observed at 5 mg L(-1) zinc concentration, while maximal amount of removed zinc appeared in 15 mg L(-1) zinc treated culture. Removed zinc is mainly bound on the cell surface. Dead biomass adsorbed more zinc than living biomass relative to unit of dry mass, but living biomass was more effective, relative to initial zinc content. This study comprehensively examines the zinc tolerance and removal ability of D. communis and demonstrates, in comparison with published literature, that these characteristics of different isolates of the same species can vary within a wide range. PMID:25193446

  3. Substantial gains in word learning ability between 20 and 24 months: A longitudinal ERP study.

    PubMed

    Borgström, Kristina; von Koss Torkildsen, Janne; Lindgren, Magnus

    2015-10-01

    This longitudinal ERP study investigated changes in children's ability to map novel words to novel objects during the dynamic period of vocabulary growth between 20 and 24 months. During this four-month period the children on average tripled their productive vocabulary, an increase which was coupled with changes in the N400 effect to pseudoword-referent associations. Moreover, productive vocabulary size was related to the dynamics of semantic processing during novel word learning. In children with large productive vocabularies, the N400 amplitude was linearly reduced during the five experimental learning trials, consistent with the repetition effect typically seen in adults, while in children with smaller vocabularies the N400 attenuation did not appear until the end of the learning phase. Vocabulary size was related only to modulation of the N400 to pseudowords, not to real words. These findings demonstrate a remarkable development of fast mapping ability between 20 and 24 months. PMID:26185047

  4. Assessing the competitive ability of Japanese stilt grass, Microstegium vimineum (Trin.) A. Camus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leicht, S.A.; Silander, J.A., Jr.; Greenwood, K.

    2005-01-01

    Microstegium vimineum (Japanese stilt grass) is an invasive grass in the eastern half of the United States which can form dense monocultures in forest understories, displacing native species. Although the loss of native species has been observed in the field, the actual competitive ability of this grass has not been examined. Microstegium vimineum was grown under controlled environment, greenhouse conditions in competition with Lolium perenne ssp. multiflorum (annual rye grass) and Muhlenbergia mexicana (Mexican muhly) in varying density ratios in full and low light treatments. Microstegium vimineum had a greater aboveground biomass, relative growth rate, and reproductive output than both competitors in both light treatments. The high competitive ability of Microstegium vimineum, especially in low light conditions, reflects its highly aggressive nature in forested or other landscapes of eastern North America.

  5. Preliminary studies on the evolution of carbon assimilation abilities within Mucorales.

    PubMed

    Pawłowska, Julia; Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Banach, Agnieszka; Kiersztyn, Bartosz; Muszewska, Anna; Serewa, Lidia; Szatraj, Katarzyna; Wrzosek, Marta

    2016-05-01

    Representatives of Mucorales belong to one of the oldest lineages of terrestrial fungi. Although carbon is of fundamental importance for fungal growth and functioning, relatively little is known about enzymatic capacities of Mucorales. The evolutionary history and the variability of the capacity to metabolize different carbon sources among representatives of the order Mucorales was studied using Phenotypic Microarray Plates. The ability of 26 strains belonging to 23 nonpathogenic species of Mucorales to use 95 different carbon sources was tested. Intraspecies variability of carbon assimilation profiles was lower than interspecies variation for some selected strains. Although similarities between the phylogenetic tree and the dendrogram created from carbon source utilization data were observed, the ability of the various strains to use the analyzed substrates did not show a clear correlation with the evolutionary history of the group. Instead, carbon assimilation profiles are probably shaped by environmental conditions. PMID:27109371

  6. Effects of General and Broad Cognitive Abilities on Mathematics Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taub, Gordon E.; Keith, Timothy Z.; Floyd, Randy G.; Mcgrew, Kevin S.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the direct and indirect effects of general intelligence and 7 broad cognitive abilities on mathematics achievement. Structural equation modeling was used to investigate the simultaneous effects of both general and broad cognitive abilities on students' mathematics achievement. A hierarchical model of intelligence derived…

  7. Laterality and Intellectual Ability: A Just Not Noticeable Difference?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardyck, C.

    1977-01-01

    Research on laterality and intellectual abilities suggests that left-handed persons may be divided into two categories: one not discriminably different from those who are right-handed, and one deficient in intellectual and cognitive abilities. 7688 children were tested on handedness, intellectual performance, and scholastic aptitude in order to…

  8. Cognitive Modeling of Learning Abilities: A Status Report of LAMP.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kyllonen, Patrick C.; Christal, Raymond E.

    Research activities underway as part of the Air Force's Learning Abilities Measurement Program (LAMP) are described. A major objective of the program is to devise new models of the nature and organization of human abilities, that could be applied to improve personnel selection and classification systems. The activities of the project have been…

  9. Sex Differences in Infants' Ability to Represent Complex Event Sequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweinle, Amy; Wilcox, Teresa

    2004-01-01

    Prior research suggests that when very simple event sequences are used, 4.5-month-olds demonstrate the ability to individuate objects based on the continuity or disruption of their speed of motion (Wilcox & Schweinle, 2003). However, infants demonstrate their ability to individuate objects in an event-monitoring task (i.e., infants must keep track…

  10. Children's Ability to Recognise Toxic and Non-Toxic Fruits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancovicova, Jana; Prokop, Pavol

    2011-01-01

    Children's ability to identify common plants is a necessary prerequisite for learning botany. However, recent work has shown that children lack positive attitudes toward plants and are unable to identify them. We examined children's (aged 10-17) ability to discriminate between common toxic and non-toxic plants and their mature fruits presented in…

  11. My Convictions about the Nature of Abilities, Gifts, and Talents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagne, Francoys

    1999-01-01

    Presents a set of 22 sequentially structured statements on the nature and origin of human abilities, gifts, and talents. The statements are grouped into three sections: the nature of human abilities, individual differences and their origins, and the specific case of gifts and talents. (Author/CR)

  12. Profiling Communication and Symbolic Abilities in Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wetherby, Amy M.; Prizant, Barry M.

    1993-01-01

    This article discusses strategies for sampling communication and symbolic abilities in young children who are not yet talking or who are at early language stages, placing emphasis on caregiver involvement. The paper points out that profiling a young child's communication and symbolic abilities can contribute to the early identification of language…

  13. What the Nose Knows: Olfaction and Cognitive Abilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danthiir, Vanessa; Roberts, Richard D.; Pallier, Gerry; Stankov, Lazar

    2001-01-01

    Studied the role of olfactory processes within the theory of fluid and crystallized intelligence by testing 107 Australian college students with a battery of psychometric and olfactory tests. Results indicate the likely existence of an olfactory memory ability that is structurally independent of established higher-order abilities and not related…

  14. Language and Academic Abilities in Children with Selective Mutism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nowakowski, Matilda E.; Cunningham, Charles E.; McHolm, Angela E.; Evans, Mary Ann; Edison, Shannon; St. Pierre, Jeff; Boyle, Michael H.; Schmidt, Louis A.

    2009-01-01

    We examined receptive language and academic abilities in children with selective mutism (SM; n = 30; M age = 8.8 years), anxiety disorders (n = 46; M age = 9.3 years), and community controls (n = 27; M age = 7.8 years). Receptive language and academic abilities were assessed using standardized tests completed in the laboratory. We found a…

  15. 12 CFR 1026.51 - Ability to pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End Credit Offered to College Students § 1026.51 Ability to pay. (a) General rule. (1)(i) Consideration of ability to pay. A card issuer must not open a credit card... any information about a consumer's income, assets, or current obligations, or to issue a credit...

  16. 12 CFR 1026.51 - Ability to pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End Credit Offered to College Students § 1026.51 Ability to pay. (a) General rule—(1)(i) Consideration of ability to pay. A card issuer must not open a credit card... any information about a consumer's income, assets, or current obligations, or to issue a credit...

  17. 12 CFR 1026.51 - Ability to Pay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Applicable to Credit Card Accounts and Open-End Credit Offered to College Students § 1026.51 Ability to Pay. (a) General rule—(1)(i) Consideration of ability to pay. A card issuer must not open a credit card... credit card to a consumer who does not have any income or assets. (2) Minimum periodic payments....

  18. 20 CFR 604.4 - Application-ability to work.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application-ability to work. 604.4 Section... ELIGIBILITY FOR UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION § 604.4 Application—ability to work. (a) A State may consider an individual to be able to work during the week of unemployment claimed if the individual is able to work...

  19. 50 CFR 253.13 - Ability and experience requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ability and experience requirements. 253.13 Section 253.13 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Obligation Guarantee Program § 253.13 Ability and experience requirements. A notemaker and the majority...

  20. The Allocation of Educational Environment, Ability Grouping, and the Law

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Frank; Smith, Elsie

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of ability grouping in relation to equal educational opportunity as provided for by the "equal protection clause" of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. In view of the disproportionate numbers of minorities assigned to low ability groups, is grouping legal? (Author/JM)