Science.gov

Sample records for growth cone neck

  1. Mechanochemical regulation of growth cone motility

    PubMed Central

    Kerstein, Patrick C.; Nichol IV, Robert H.; Gomez, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal growth cones are exquisite sensory-motor machines capable of transducing features contacted in their local extracellular environment into guided process extension during development. Extensive research has shown that chemical ligands activate cell surface receptors on growth cones leading to intracellular signals that direct cytoskeletal changes. However, the environment also provides mechanical support for growth cone adhesion and traction forces that stabilize leading edge protrusions. Interestingly, recent work suggests that both the mechanical properties of the environment and mechanical forces generated within growth cones influence axon guidance. In this review we discuss novel molecular mechanisms involved in growth cone force production and detection, and speculate how these processes may be necessary for the development of proper neuronal morphogenesis. PMID:26217175

  2. Second messenger networks for accurate growth cone guidance.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroki; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    Growth cones are able to navigate over long distances to find their appropriate target by following guidance cues that are often presented to them in the form of an extracellular gradient. These external cues are converted into gradients of specific signaling molecules inside growth cones, while at the same time these internal signals are amplified. The amplified instruction is then used to generate asymmetric changes in the growth cone turning machinery so that one side of the growth cone migrates at a rate faster than the other side, and thus the growth cone turns toward or away from the external cue. This review examines how signal specification and amplification can be achieved inside the growth cone by multiple second messenger signaling pathways activated downstream of guidance cues. These include the calcium ion, cyclic nucleotide, and phosphatidylinositol signaling pathways. PMID:24285606

  3. Coupled local translation and degradation regulate growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Deglincerti, Alessia; Colak, Dilek; Hengst, Ulrich; Liu, Yaobin; Xu, Guoqiang; Jaffrey, Samie R.

    2015-01-01

    Local translation mediates axonal responses to Semaphorin3A (Sema3A) and other guidance cues. However, only a subset of the axonal proteome is locally synthesized, while most proteins are trafficked from the soma. The reason why only specific proteins are locally synthesized is unknown. Here we show that local protein synthesis and degradation are linked events in growth cones. We find that growth cones exhibit high levels of ubiquitination and that local signaling pathways trigger the ubiquitination and degradation of RhoA, a mediator of Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. Inhibition of RhoA degradation is sufficient to remove the protein-synthesis requirement for Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse. In addition to RhoA, we find that locally translated proteins are the main targets of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in growth cones. Thus, local protein degradation is a major feature of growth cones and creates a requirement for local translation to replenish proteins needed to maintain growth cone responses. PMID:25901863

  4. Cinder cone growth modeled after Northeast crater, Mount Etna, Sicily

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgetchin, T. R.; Settle, M.; Chouet, B. A.

    1974-01-01

    The structure, physical properties of ejecta, ballistics, and growth of Northeast crater, a young pyroclastic cone that originated in 1911 near the summit of Mount Etna, Sicily, were studied in order to form a model of volcano cinder cone growth. Four stages of growth were discerned: (1) a simple cone; (2) a cone with an outward-dipping talus slope; (3) destruction of rounded rim by the inward migration of the upper edge of the talus pile; and (4) extension of limits of talus pile beyond the ballistic limit of ejecta trajectories. The model is used to predict the features of lunar and Martian cones, assuming that they erupted under conditions qualitatively similar to Etna's Northeast crater.

  5. Increase in Growth Cone Size Correlates with Decrease in Neurite Growth Rate

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Several important discoveries in growth cone cell biology were made possible by the use of growth cones derived from cultured Aplysia bag cell neurons, including the characterization of the organization and dynamics of the cytoskeleton. The majority of these Aplysia studies focused on large growth cones induced by poly-L-lysine substrates at early stages in cell culture. Under these conditions, the growth cones are in a steady state with very little net advancement. Here, we offer a comprehensive cellular analysis of the motile behavior of Aplysia growth cones in culture beyond this pausing state. We found that average growth cone size decreased with cell culture time whereas average growth rate increased. This inverse correlation of growth rate and growth cone size was due to the occurrence of large growth cones with a peripheral domain larger than 100 μm2. The large pausing growth cones had central domains that were less consistently aligned with the direction of growth and could be converted into smaller, faster-growing growth cones by addition of a three-dimensional collagen gel. We conclude that the significant lateral expansion of lamellipodia and filopodia as observed during these culture conditions has a negative effect on neurite growth. PMID:27274874

  6. Division of labor in the growth cone by DSCR1.

    PubMed

    Catlett, Timothy S; Gomez, Timothy M

    2016-05-23

    Local protein synthesis directs growth cone turning of nascent axons, but mechanisms governing this process within compact, largely autonomous microenvironments remain poorly understood. In this issue, Wang et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201510107) demonstrate that the calcineurin regulator Down syndrome critical region 1 protein modulates both basal neurite outgrowth and growth cone turning. PMID:27216257

  7. Functional Complexity of the Axonal Growth Cone: A Proteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Bernal, Adriana; Sanford, Staci D.; Sosa, Lucas J.; Simon, Glenn C.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Pfenninger, Karl H.

    2012-01-01

    The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions. PMID:22384089

  8. ERM proteins regulate growth cone responses to Sema3A

    PubMed Central

    Mintz, C. David; Carcea, Ioana; McNickle, Daniel G.; Dickson, Tracey C.; Ge, Yongchao; Salton, Stephen R.J.; Benson, Deanna L.

    2008-01-01

    Axonal growth cones initiate and sustain directed growth in response to cues in their environment. A variety of events such as receptor internalization, kinase activation, and actin rearrangement can be stimulated by guidance cues and are essential for mediating targeted growth cone behavior. Surprisingly little is known about how such disparate actions are coordinated. Our data suggest that ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERMs), a family of highly homologous, multifunctional proteins may be able to coordinate growth cone responses to the guidance cue, Sema3A. We show that active ERMs concentrate asymmetrically in neocortical growth cones, are rapidly and transiently inactivated by Sema3A, and are required for Sema3A-mediated growth cone collapse and guidance. The FERM domain of active ERMs regulates internalization of the Sema3A receptor, Npn1 and its co-receptor, L1CAM, while the ERM C-terminal domain binds and caps F-actin. Our data support a model in which ERMs can coordinate membrane and actin dynamics in response to Sema3A. PMID:18651636

  9. Kinetic-structural analysis of neuronal growth cone veil motility.

    PubMed

    Mongiu, Anne K; Weitzke, Elizabeth L; Chaga, Oleg Y; Borisy, Gary G

    2007-03-15

    Neuronal growth cone advance was investigated by correlative light and electron microscopy carried out on chick dorsal root ganglion cells. Advance was analyzed in terms of the two principal organelles responsible for protrusive motility in the growth cone - namely, veils and filopodia. Veils alternated between rapid phases of protrusion and retraction. Electron microscopy revealed characteristic structural differences between the phases. Our results provide a significant advance in three respects: first, protruding veils are comprised of a densely branched network of actin filaments that is lamellipodial in appearance and includes the Arp2/3 complex. On the basis of this structural and biomarker evidence, we infer that the dendritic nucleation and/or array-treadmilling mechanism of protrusive motility is conserved in veil protrusion of growth cones as in the motility of fibroblasts; second, retracting veils lack dendritic organization but contain a sparse network of long filaments; and third, growth cone filopodia have the capacity to nucleate dendritic networks along their length, a property consistent with veil formation seen at the light microscopic level but not previously understood in supramolecular terms. These elements of veil and filopodial organization, when taken together, provide a conceptual framework for understanding the structural basis of growth cone advance. PMID:17327278

  10. Actin Dynamics in Growth Cone Motility and Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Timothy M.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Motile growth cones lead growing axons through developing tissues to synaptic targets. These behaviors depend on the organization and dynamics of actin filaments that fill the growth cone leading margin (peripheral (P-) domain). Actin filament organization in growth cones is regulated by actin-binding proteins that control all aspects of filament assembly, turnover, interactions with other filaments and cytoplasmic components, and participation in producing mechanical forces. Actin filament polymerization drives protrusion of sensory filopodia and lamellipodia, and actin filament connections to the plasma membrane link the filament network to adhesive contacts of filopodia and lamellipodia with other surfaces. These contacts stabilize protrusions and transduce mechanical forces generated by actomyosin activity into traction that pulls an elongating axon along the path towards its target. Adhesive ligands and extrinsic guidance cues bind growth cone receptors and trigger signaling activities involving Rho GTPases, kinases, phosphatases, cyclic nucleotides and [Ca++] fluxes. These signals regulate actin binding proteins to locally modulate actin polymerization, interactions and force transduction to steer the growth cone leading margin towards the sources of attractive cues and away from repellent guidance cues. PMID:24164353

  11. Ultra-short pulses to signal neuronal growth cone machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, Manoj; Amat-Roldan, Ivan; Andres, Rosa; Cormack, Iain G.; Artigas, David; Soriano, Eduardo; Loza-Alvarez, Pablo

    2007-02-01

    Measurable change in the sensory motor machinery of growth cones are induced by non contact femtosecond laser. The focused laser beam with an average power of 3 mW was positioned at some distance away from the closest fillopodia of cortical neurons from primary cell cultures (mice E15). By identifying a set of preliminary parameters we were able to statistically analyze the phenomenological behavior of the fillopodia and classify the effects different conditions of laser light has on the growth cone. Results show that fillopodia become significantly biased towards the focused femtosecond laser light. The same experiment performed with continuous wave (CW) produced results which were indistinguishable from the case where there is no laser light present (placebo condition) indicating no clear effects of the CW laser light on the fillopodia at a distance. These findings show the potential for ultrashort pulsed light to become a new type of pathfinding cue for neuronal growth cones.

  12. Variability and Reliabiltiy in Axon Growth Cone Navigation Decision Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnelo, Marta; Ricoult, Sébastien G.; Juncker, David; Kennedy, Timothy E.; Faisal, Aldo A.

    2015-03-01

    The nervous system's wiring is a result of axon growth cones navigating through specific molecular environments during development. In order to reach their target, growth cones need to make decisions under uncertainty as they are faced with stochastic sensory information and probabilistic movements. The overall system therefore exhibits features of whole organisms (perception, decision making, action) in the subset of a single cell. We aim to characterise growth cone navigation in defined nano-dot guidance cue environments, by using the tools of computational neuroscience to conduct ``molecular psychophysics.'' We start with a generative model of growth cone behaviour and we 1. characterise sensory and internal sources of noise contributing to behavioural variables, by combining knowledge of the underlying stochastic dynamics in cue sensing and the growth of the cytoskeleton. This enables us to 2. produce bottom-up lower limit estimates of behavioural response reliability and visualise it as probability distributions over axon growth trajectories. Given this information we can match our in silico model's ``psychometric'' decision curves with empirical data. Finally we use a Monte-Carlo approach to predict response distributions of axon trajectories from our model.

  13. Clinical implementation of intraoperative cone-beam CT in head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Barker, E.; Bachar, G.; Dixon, B. J.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2011-03-01

    A prototype mobile C-arm for cone-beam CT (CBCT) has been translated to a prospective clinical trial in head and neck surgery. The flat-panel CBCT C-arm was developed in collaboration with Siemens Healthcare, and demonstrates both sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose (e.g., <1/5th of a typical diagnostic head CT). CBCT images are available ~15 seconds after scan completion (~1 min acquisition) and reviewed at bedside using custom 3D visualization software based on the open-source Image-Guided Surgery Toolkit (IGSTK). The CBCT C-arm has been successfully deployed in 15 head and neck cases and streamlined into the surgical environment using human factors engineering methods and expert feedback from surgeons, nurses, and anesthetists. Intraoperative imaging is implemented in a manner that maintains operating field sterility, reduces image artifacts (e.g., carbon fiber OR table) and minimizes radiation exposure. Image reviews conducted with surgical staff indicate bony detail and soft-tissue visualization sufficient for intraoperative guidance, with additional artifact management (e.g., metal, scatter) promising further improvements. Clinical trial deployment suggests a role for intraoperative CBCT in guiding complex head and neck surgical tasks, including planning mandible and maxilla resection margins, guiding subcranial and endonasal approaches to skull base tumours, and verifying maxillofacial reconstruction alignment. Ongoing translational research into complimentary image-guidance subsystems include novel methods for real-time tool tracking, fusion of endoscopic video and CBCT, and deformable registration of preoperative volumes and planning contours with intraoperative CBCT.

  14. Deformable planning CT to cone-beam CT image registration in head-and-neck cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hou Jidong; Guerrero, Mariana; Chen, Wenjuan; D'Souza, Warren D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to implement and validate a deformable CT to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image registration method in head-and-neck cancer to eventually facilitate automatic target delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twelve head-and-neck cancer patients underwent a planning CT and weekly CBCT during the 5-7 week treatment period. The 12 planning CT images (moving images) of these patients were registered to their weekly CBCT images (fixed images) via the symmetric force Demons algorithm and using a multiresolution scheme. Histogram matching was used to compensate for the intensity difference between the two types of images. Using nine known anatomic points as registration targets, the accuracy of the registration was evaluated using the target registration error (TRE). In addition, region-of-interest (ROI) contours drawn on the planning CT were morphed to the CBCT images and the volume overlap index (VOI) between registered contours and manually delineated contours was evaluated. Results: The mean TRE value of the nine target points was less than 3.0 mm, the slice thickness of the planning CT. Of the 369 target points evaluated for registration accuracy, the average TRE value was 2.6{+-}0.6 mm. The mean TRE for bony tissue targets was 2.4{+-}0.2 mm, while the mean TRE for soft tissue targets was 2.8{+-}0.2 mm. The average VOI between the registered and manually delineated ROI contours was 76.2{+-}4.6%, which is consistent with that reported in previous studies. Conclusions: The authors have implemented and validated a deformable image registration method to register planning CT images to weekly CBCT images in head-and-neck cancer cases. The accuracy of the TRE values suggests that they can be used as a promising tool for automatic target delineation on CBCT.

  15. Growth Cone Biomechanics in Peripheral and Central Nervous System Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbach, Jeffrey; Koch, Daniel; Rosoff, Will; Geller, Herbert

    2012-02-01

    The growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of an axon, integrates information about the local environment and modulates outgrowth and guidance, but little is known about effects of external mechanical cues and internal mechanical forces on growth-cone mediated guidance. We have investigated neurite outgrowth, traction forces and cytoskeletal substrate coupling on soft elastic substrates for dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons (from the peripheral nervous system) and hippocampal neurons (from the central) to see how the mechanics of the microenvironment affect different populations. We find that the biomechanics of DRG neurons are dramatically different from hippocampal, with DRG neurons displaying relatively large, steady traction forces and maximal outgrowth and forces on substrates of intermediate stiffness, while hippocampal neurons display weak, intermittent forces and limited dependence of outgrowth and forces on substrate stiffness. DRG growth cones have slower rates of retrograde actin flow and higher density of localized paxillin (a protein associated with substrate adhesion complexes) compared to hippocampal neurons, suggesting that the difference in force generation is due to stronger adhesions and therefore stronger substrate coupling in DRG growth cones.

  16. Evaluation of the accuracy of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT): medical imaging technology in head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background With the introduction, development and commercialization of Cone Beam Computerized Tomography (CBCT) technologies in the field of head and neck reconstruction, clinicians now have increased access to the technology. Given the growth of this new user group, there is an increasing concern regarding proper use, understanding, quality and patient safety. Methods The present study was carried out to evaluate data acquisition of CBCT medical imaging technology and the accuracy of the scanning at three different machine warming times. The study also compared the accuracy of CBCT at 0.2 mm slice thickness and Computerized Tomography (CT) at 1 mm slice thickness. A control model was CT scanned at five random intervals, at 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanned at specialized intervals, at 0.2 mm slice thickness. The data was then converted and imported into a software program where a digital registration procedure was used to compare the average deviations of the scanned models to the control. Results The study found that there was no statistically significant difference amongst the three CBCT machine warming times. There was a statistically significant difference between CT scanning with 1 mm slice thickness and CBCT scanning with 0.2 mm slice thickness. Conclusions The accuracy of the i-CAT CBCT scans used in the present study with a parameter at voxel size 0.2, will remain consistent and reliable at any warming stage. Also the difference between the CBCT i-CAT scans and the CT scans was not clinically significant based on suggested requirements of clinicians in head and neck reconstruction. PMID:23672880

  17. The role of cytoskeleton in organizing growth cones: a microfilament- associated growth cone component depends upon microtubules for its localization

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    We are interested in the relationship between the cytoskeleton and the organization of polarized cell morphology. We show here that the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in culture are specifically stained by a monoclonal antibody called 13H9. In other systems, the antigen recognized by 13H9 is associated with marginal bands of chicken erythrocytes and shows properties of both microtubule-and microfilament- associated proteins (Birgbauer, E., and F. Solomon. 1989 J. Cell Biol. 109:1609-1620). This dual nature is manifest in hippocampal neurons as well. At early stages after plating, the antibody stains the circumferential lamellipodia that mediate initial cell spreading. As processes emerge, 13H9 staining is heavily concentrated in the distal regions of growth cones, particularly in lamellipodial fans. In these cells, the 13H9 staining is complementary to the localization of assembled microtubules. It colocalizes partially, but not entirely, with phalloidin staining of assembled actin. Incubation with nocodazole rapidly induces microtubule depolymerization, which proceeds in the distal-to-proximal direction in the processes. At the same time, a rapid and dramatic redistribution of the 13H9 staining occurs; it delocalizes along the axon shaft, becoming clearly distinct from the phalloidin staining and always remaining distal to the receding front of assembled microtubules. After longer times without assembled microtubules, no staining of 13H9 can be detected. Removal of the nocodazole allows the microtubules to reform, in an ordered proximal-to- distal fashion. The 13H9 immunoreactivity also reappears, but only in the growth cones, not in any intermediate positions along the axon, and only after the reformation of microtubules is complete. The results indicate that the antigen recognized by 13H9 is highly concentrated in growth cones, closely associated with polymerized actin, and that its proper localization depends upon intact microtubules. PMID:2677024

  18. Evaluating positional accuracy using megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography for IMRT with head-and-neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Motegi, Kana; Kohno, Ryosuke; Ueda, Takashi; Shibuya, Toshiyuki; Ariji, Takaki; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Akimoto, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Accurate dose delivery is essential for the success of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with head-and-neck (HN) cancer. Reproducibility of IMRT dose delivery to HN regions can be critically influenced by treatment-related changes in body contours. Moreover, some set-up margins may not be adaptable to positional uncertainties of HN structures at every treatment. To obtain evidence for appropriate set-up margins in various head and neck areas, we prospectively evaluated positional deviation (δ values) of four bony landmarks (i.e. the clivus and occipital protuberance for the head region, and the mental protuberance and C5 for the neck region) using megavoltage cone-beam computed tomography during a treatment course. Over 800 δ values were analyzed in each translational direction. Positional uncertainties for HN cancer patients undergoing IMRT were evaluated relative to the body mass index. Low positional accuracy was observed for the neck region compared with the head region. For the head region, most of the δ was distributed within ±5 mm, and use of the current set-up margin was appropriate. However, the δ values for the neck region were within ±8 mm. Especially for overweight patients, a few millimeters needed to be added to give an adequate set-up margin. For accurate dose delivery to targets and to avoid excess exposure to normal tissues, we recommend that the positional verification process be performed before every treatment. PMID:24449713

  19. DSCR1 is required for both axonal growth cone extension and steering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Rai, Asit; Hur, Eun-Mi; Smilansky, Zeev; Chang, Karen T; Min, Kyung-Tai

    2016-05-23

    Local information processing in the growth cone is essential for correct wiring of the nervous system. As an axon navigates through the developing nervous system, the growth cone responds to extrinsic guidance cues by coordinating axon outgrowth with growth cone steering. It has become increasingly clear that axon extension requires proper actin polymerization dynamics, whereas growth cone steering involves local protein synthesis. However, molecular components integrating these two processes have not been identified. Here, we show that Down syndrome critical region 1 protein (DSCR1) controls axon outgrowth by modulating growth cone actin dynamics through regulation of cofilin activity (phospho/dephospho-cofilin). Additionally, DSCR1 mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor-induced local protein synthesis and growth cone turning. Our study identifies DSCR1 as a key protein that couples axon growth and pathfinding by dually regulating actin dynamics and local protein synthesis. PMID:27185837

  20. Use of scanning ion conductance microscopy to guide and redirect neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Pellegrino, Mario; Orsini, Paolo; De Gregorio, Francesca

    2009-07-01

    Scanning ion conductance microscopy has been applied to neuronal growth cones of the leech either to image or to stimulate them. Growth cone advance was recorded in non-contact mode using a 2% ion current decrease criterion for pipette-membrane distance control. We demonstrate effective growth cone remodelling using a 5% criterion (near-scanning). Recurrent line near-scanning aligned growth cone processes along the scan line. The new membrane protrusions, marked by DiI, started a few minutes after scanning onset and progressively grew in thickness. Using scanning patterns suitable for connecting distinct growth cones, new links were consistently developed. Although the underlying mechanism is still a matter for investigation, a mechanical perturbation produced by the moving probe appeared to induce the process formation. Thanks to its deterministic and interactive features, this novel approach to guiding growth cones is a promising way to develop networks of identified neurons as well as link them with artificial structures. PMID:19447298

  1. Cyclic GMP evoked calcium transients in olfactory receptor cell growth cones.

    PubMed

    Kafitz, K W; Leinders-Zufall, T; Zufall, F; Greer, C A

    2000-03-20

    Nitric oxide-induced calcium transients in growth cones are believed to be mediated by cyclic nucleotides. Because nitric oxide is thought to influence the development of olfactory receptor cells (ORCs), we have begun to explore the effect of cyclic nucleotides on ORC growth cones. Cultured ORCs were loaded with fluo-3 AM and confocal imaging was employed to monitor calcium transients following cyclic nucleotide-gated channel activation. Application of 8-bromo-cGMP at the growth cone caused transient increases in fluorescence which were restricted to the growth cone and lasted tens of seconds. The signal was abolished by LY83583, an inhibitor of cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. 8-Bromo-cGMP also inhibited further extension of growth cones. The data indicate that ORC growth cones exhibit cGMP-dependent calcium transients that are consistent with those generated by cyclic nucleotide-gated channels. PMID:10757499

  2. A Novel Function for p53: Regulation of Growth Cone Motility through Interaction with Rho Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Qingyu; Baudry, Michel; Liao, Guanghong; Noniyev, Albert; Galeano, James; Bi, Xiaoning

    2009-01-01

    The transcription factor p53 suppresses tumorgenesis by regulating cell proliferation and migration. We investigated whether p53 could also control cell motility in postmitotic neurons. P53 isoforms recognized by phospho-p53-specific (at Ser15) or “mutant” conformation specific antibodies were highly and specifically expressed in axons and axonal growth cones in primary hippocampal neurons. Inhibition of p53 function by inhibitors, siRNAs, or by dominant negative forms, induced axonal growth cone collapse, whereas p53 over-expression led to larger growth cones. Furthermore, deletion of the p53 nuclear export signal blocked its axonal distribution and induced growth cone collapse. P53 inhibition-induced axonal growth cone collapse was significantly reduced by the Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632. Our results reveal a new function for p53 as a critical regulator of axonal growth cone behavior by suppressing ROCK activity. PMID:19386914

  3. Radixin Is Involved in Lamellipodial Stability during Nerve Growth Cone Motility

    PubMed Central

    Castelo, Leslie; Jay, Daniel G.

    1999-01-01

    Immunocytochemistry and in vitro studies have suggested that the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) protein, radixin, may have a role in nerve growth cone motility. We tested the in situ role of radixin in chick dorsal root ganglion growth cones by observing the effects of its localized and acute inactivation. Microscale chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (micro-CALI) of radixin in growth cones causes a 30% reduction of lamellipodial area within the irradiated region whereas all control treatments did not affect lamellipodia. Micro-CALI of radixin targeted to the middle of the leading edge often split growth cones to form two smaller growth cones during continued forward movement (>80%). These findings suggest a critical role for radixin in growth cone lamellipodia that is similar to ezrin function in pseudopodia of transformed fibroblasts. They are consistent with radixin linking actin filaments to each other or to the membrane during motility. PMID:10233159

  4. Y-P30 promotes axonal growth by stabilizing growth cones.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Janine R; Dash-Wagh, Suvarna; Jüngling, Kay; Tsai, Teresa; Meschkat, Martin; Räk, Andrea; Schönfelder, Sabine; Riedel, Christian; Hamad, Mohammad I K; Wiese, Stefan; Pape, Hans-Christian; Gottmann, Kurt; Kreutz, Michael R; Wahle, Petra

    2015-07-01

    The 30-amino acid peptide Y-P30, generated from the N-terminus of the human dermcidin precursor protein, has been found to promote neuronal survival, cell migration and neurite outgrowth by enhancing the interaction of pleiotrophin and syndecan-3. We now show that Y-P30 activates Src kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Y-P30 promotes axonal growth of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived neurons, embryonic mouse spinal cord motoneurons, perinatal rat retinal neurons, and rat cortical neurons. Y-P30-mediated axon growth was dependent on heparan sulfate chains. Y-P30 decreased the proportion of collapsing/degenerating growth cones of cortical axons in an Src and ERK-dependent manner. Y-P30 increased for 90 min in axonal growth cones the level of Tyr418-phosphorylated Src kinase and the amount of F-actin, and transiently the level of Tyr-phosphorylated ERK. Levels of total Src kinase, actin, GAP-43, cortactin and the glutamate receptor subunit GluN2B were not altered. When exposed to semaphorin-3a, Y-P30 protected a significant fraction of growth cones of cortical neurons from collapse. These results suggest that Y-P30 promotes axonal growth via Src- and ERK-dependent mechanisms which stabilize growth cones and confer resistance to collapsing factors. PMID:24728870

  5. Filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization in Drosophila visual circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Mehmet Neset; Langen, Marion; Hassan, Bassem A; Hiesinger, P Robin

    2015-01-01

    Filopodial dynamics are thought to control growth cone guidance, but the types and roles of growth cone dynamics underlying neural circuit assembly in a living brain are largely unknown. To address this issue, we have developed long-term, continuous, fast and high-resolution imaging of growth cone dynamics from axon growth to synapse formation in cultured Drosophila brains. Using R7 photoreceptor neurons as a model we show that >90% of the growth cone filopodia exhibit fast, stochastic dynamics that persist despite ongoing stepwise layer formation. Correspondingly, R7 growth cones stabilize early and change their final position by passive dislocation. N-Cadherin controls both fast filopodial dynamics and growth cone stabilization. Surprisingly, loss of N-Cadherin causes no primary targeting defects, but destabilizes R7 growth cones to jump between correct and incorrect layers. Hence, growth cone dynamics can influence wiring specificity without a direct role in target recognition and implement simple rules during circuit assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10721.001 PMID:26512889

  6. Genes that guide growth cones along the C. elegans ventral nerve cord.

    PubMed

    Wightman, B; Baran, R; Garriga, G

    1997-07-01

    During nervous system development, growth cone pioneering and fasciculation contribute to nerve bundle structure. Pioneer growth cones initially navigate along neuroglia to establish an axon scaffold that guides later extending growth cones. In C. elegans, the growth cone of the PVPR neuron pioneers the left ventral nerve cord bundle, providing a path for the embryonic extensions of the PVQL and AVKR growth cones. Later during larval development, the HSNL growth cone follows cues in the left ventral nerve cord bundle provided by the PVPR and PVQL axons. Here we show that mutations in the genes enu-1, fax-1, unc-3, unc-30, unc-42 and unc-115 disrupt pathfinding of growth cones along the left ventral nerve cord bundle. Our results indicate that unc-3 and unc-30 function in ventral nerve cord pioneering and that enu-1, fax-1, unc-42 and unc-115 function in recognition of the PVPR and PVQL axons by the AVKR and HSNL growth cones. PMID:9216999

  7. Subcellular Profiling Reveals Distinct and Developmentally Regulated Repertoire of Growth Cone mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zivraj, Krishna H.; Tung, Yi Chun Loraine; Piper, Michael; Gumy, Laura; Fawcett, James W.; Yeo, Giles S. H.; Holt, Christine E.

    2013-01-01

    Cue-directed axon guidance depends partly on local translation in growth cones. Many mRNA transcripts are known to reside in developing axons, yet little is known about their subcellular distribution or, specifically, which transcripts are in growth cones. Here laser capture microdissection (LCM) was used to isolate the growth cones of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons of two vertebrate species, mouse and Xenopus, coupled with unbiased genomewide microarray profiling. An unexpectedly large pool of mRNAs defined predominant pathways in protein synthesis, oxidative phosphorylation, cancer, neurological disease, and signaling. Comparative profiling of “young” (pathfinding) versus “old” (target-arriving) Xenopus growth cones revealed that the number and complexity of transcripts increases dramatically with age. Many presynaptic protein mRNAs are present exclusively in old growth cones, suggesting that functionally related sets of mRNAs are targeted to growth cones in a developmentally regulated way. Remarkably, a subset of mRNAs was significantly enriched in the growth cone compared with the axon compartment, indicating that mechanisms exist to localize mRNAs selectively to the growth cone. Furthermore, some receptor transcripts (e.g., EphB4), present exclusively in old growth cones, were equally abundant in young and old cell bodies, indicating that RNA trafficking from the soma is developmentally regulated. Our findings show that the mRNA repertoire in growth cones is regulated dynamically with age and suggest that mRNA localization is tailored to match the functional demands of the growing axon tip as it transforms into the presynaptic terminal. PMID:21084603

  8. Involvement of microtubules in the regulation of neuronal growth cone morphologic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Gallo, G

    1998-05-01

    The guidance of nerve fibers depends on the constant protrusion, movement, and retraction (i.e., remodeling) of growth cone lamellae and filopodia. We used drugs that interfere with the dynamics of microtubules to investigate the role of microtubules in the remodeling of larval amphibian spinal cord neuronal growth cones. Vinblastine (8-100 nM), taxol (10 nM), and nocodazole (330 nM) altered microtubule distributions in growth cones and decreased the percentage of lamellar perimeter undergoing remodeling, while not affecting the rates of lamellar protrusion and retraction. Also, 8-20 nM vinblastine caused temporary losses of the continuity of the originally fan-shaped lamella, resulting in two or more lamellae at the growth cone. At higher concentrations of microtubule drugs, the originally fan-shaped lamella broke up into separate smaller lamellae followed by the centrifugal displacement from the base of the growth cone and eventual collapse of the resultant lamellae. Low doses of cytochalasin B prevented the centrifugal displacement of lamellae in response to microtubule drugs. During microtubule drug-mediated loss of growth cone lamellae, some filopodia were observed to elongate to greater than normal lengths. Similarly, exposure to 20 nM vinblastine resulted in an increase in filopodial length but not filopodial number. As evidenced by DiOC6(3) staining, 8-20 nM vinblastine altered the distribution of membranous organelles within growth cones, suggesting that the effects of microtubule drugs on growth cones may be mediated in part by alterations in organelle localization. Our data show that microtubules are involved in the maintenance and regulation of lamellar and filopodial structures at the neuronal growth cone. These findings have implications for the mechanisms by which growth cones are guided during development and regeneration. PMID:9581969

  9. Live cell imaging of neuronal growth cone motility and guidance in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The neuronal growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of neuronal processes, is an excellent model system for studying directional cell movements. While biochemical and genetic approaches unveiled molecular interactions between ligand, receptor, signaling and cytoskeleton-associated proteins controlling axonal growth and guidance, in vitro live cell imaging has emerged as a crucial approach for dissecting cellular mechanisms of growth cone motility and guidance. Important insights into these mechanisms have been gained from studies using the large growth cones elaborated by Aplysia californica neurons, an outstanding model system for live cell imaging for a number of reasons. Identified neurons can be isolated and imaged at room temperature. Aplysia growth cones are 5–10 times larger than growth cones from other species, making them suitable for quantitative high-resolution imaging of cytoskeletal protein dynamics and biophysical approaches. Lastly, protein, RNA, fluorescent probes and small molecules can be microinjected into the neuronal cell body for localization and functional studies. The following chapter describes culturing of Aplysia bag cell neurons, live cell imaging of neuronal growth cones using differential interference contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy as well as the restrained bead interaction assay to induce adhesion-mediated growth cone guidance in vitro. PMID:21748670

  10. Protein synthesis in distal axons is not required for growth cone responses to guidance cues

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Florence K.; Marsick, Bonnie M.; Letourneau, Paul C.

    2009-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests growth cone responses to guidance cues require local protein synthesis. Using chick neurons, we investigated whether protein synthesis is required for growth cones of several types to respond to guidance cues. First, we found that global inhibition of protein synthesis stops axonal elongation after two hr. When protein synthesis inhibitors were added 15 min before adding guidance cues, we found no changes in the typical responses of retinal, sensory and sympathetic growth cones. In the presence of cycloheximide or anisomycin, ephrin-A2, slit-3, and semaphorin3A still induced growth cone collapse and loss of actin filaments, NGF and NT-3 still induced growth cone protrusion and increased F-actin, and sensory growth cones turned toward an NGF source. In compartmented chambers that separated perikarya from axons, axons grew for 24-48 hr in the presence of cycloheximide and responded to negative and positive cues. Our results indicate that protein synthesis is not strictly required in the mechanisms for growth cone responses to many guidance cues. Differences between our results and other studies may exist because of different cellular metabolic levels in in vitro conditions, and a difference in when axonal functions become dependent on local protein synthesis. PMID:19158291

  11. Diethylstilbestrol alters the morphology and calcium levels of growth cones of PC12 cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Janevski, J; Choh, V; Stopper, H; Schiffmann, D; De Boni, U

    1993-01-01

    Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen with carcinogenic properties. DES is known to alter cytoskeletal components, including the organization of actin stress fibres in C6 rat glioma cells. In a test of the hypothesis that DES disrupts actin filaments of growth cones in neuron-like cells, DES-induced changes in filopodial lengths were quantified in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in vitro. DES significantly altered growth cone morphology, with collapse of growth cone filopodia and neurite retraction invariably occurring at a concentration of 10 microM. At 5 microM DES, transient reductions in total filopodial lengths occurred. At DES concentrations of 0.1 nM and 1 nM, reductions in total filopodial lengths occurred in a fraction of growth cones. Evidence exists which shows that growth cone activity and morphology are intimately linked to levels of intracellular, free calcium and that DES increases such levels. Measurements of free intracellular calcium levels by fluorescence microscopy, at times concurrent with the DES-induced reduction in total filopodial lengths, showed that calcium levels were indeed significantly increased by 10 microM DES. Labelling of filamentous actin (f-actin) with FITC-phalloidin showed that the f-actin distribution in growth cones exposed to DES could not be differentiated from the distribution found in spontaneously retracting growth cones. Together with evidence which showed that growth cone motility was not affected, the results are taken to indicate that DES, rather than acting directly on the cytoskeleton, exerts its effects indirectly, by a calcium-induced destabilization of actin filaments in the growth cone. PMID:8164893

  12. Concentration of membrane antigens by forward transport and trapping in neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Sheetz, M P; Baumrind, N L; Wayne, D B; Pearlman, A L

    1990-04-20

    Formation of the nervous system requires that neuronal growth cones follow specific paths and then stop at recognition signals, sensed at the growth cone's leading edge. We used antibody-coated gold particles viewed by video-enhanced differential interference contrast microscopy to observe the distribution and movement of two cell surface molecules, N-CAM and the 2A1 antigen, on growth cones of cultured cortical neurons. Gold particles are occasionally transported forward at 1-2 microns/s to the leading edge where they are trapped but continue to move. Concentration at the edge persists after cytochalasin D treatment or ATP depletion, but active movements to and along edges cease. We also observed a novel outward movement of small cytoplasmic aggregates at 1.8 microns/s in filopodia. We suggest that active forward transport and trapping involve reversible attachment of antigens to and transport along cytoskeletal elements localized to edges of growth cones. PMID:2331749

  13. Growth cone travel in space and time: the cellular ensemble of cytoskeleton, adhesion, and membrane

    PubMed Central

    Vitriol, Eric A; Zheng, James Q

    2012-01-01

    Growth cones, found at the tip of axonal projections, are the sensory and motile organelles of developing neurons that enable axon pathfinding and target recognition for precise wiring of neural circuitry. To date, many families of conserved guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors have been identified that work in space and time to ensure billions of axons to their targets. Research in the past two decades has also gained significant insight into the mechanisms by which growth cones translate extracellular signals into directional migration. This review aims to examine new progress towards understanding the cellular mechanisms underlying directional motility of the growth cone and to discuss questions that remain to be addressed. Specifically we will focus on the cellular ensemble of cytoskeleton, adhesion, and membrane and examine how the intricate interplay between these processes orchestrates the directed movement of growth cones. PMID:22445336

  14. Crosstalk between Second Messengers Predicts the Motility of the Growth Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Takahiko; Nagase, Fumiaki; Hotta, Kohji; Oka, Kotaro

    2013-11-01

    Axon guidance involves multiple second messenger signal transduction pathways. Although each signal transduction pathway has been characterized, only a few studies have examined crosstalk between these cascades. Here, we applied a simultaneous second messenger imaging method to the growth cone and demonstrated correlations between cAMP, cGMP, and Ca2+. The levels of cAMP and cGMP in non-stimulated freely extending growth cones showed a negative correlation without delay. Although there was no direct correlation between cAMP and Ca2+, examination of cross correlations using small time windows showed frequent switching behavior from negative to positive and vice versa. Furthermore, spatially asymmetric cAMP and cGMP signals in freely deviating growth cones were visualized directly. These results indicate that we succeed in relating second messenger crosstalk to growth cone deviation and extension, and also indicate the possibility of predicting axon guidance from this second messenger crosstalk.

  15. Integrin-linked kinase regulates oligodendrocyte cytoskeleton, growth cone, and adhesion dynamics.

    PubMed

    Michalski, John-Paul; Cummings, Sarah E; O'Meara, Ryan W; Kothary, Rashmi

    2016-02-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK), a focal adhesion protein, brokers the link between cytoskeleton, cell membrane, and extracellular environment. Here, we demonstrate a role for ILK in laminin-2-mediated adhesion in primary murine oligodendrocytes (OLs) - with ILK loss leading to severe defects in process branching and outgrowth. These defects were partially recovered when the ILK-depleted OLs were instead grown on the non-integrin-activating substrate poly-l-lysine. Intriguingly, ILK loss on the neutral poly-l-lysine substrate led to swelling at the tips of OL processes, which we identified as enlarged growth cones. Employing the bloated ILK-depleted growth cones as template, we demonstrate the appearance of distinct cytoskeletal domains within OL growth cones bearing classic neuronal growth cone architecture. Further, microtubule organization was severely perturbed following ILK loss, with centripetal microtubule looping and failure to bundle occurring in a laminin-2-independent manner. Together, our work highlights differences in specific aspects of OL biology as driven by laminin-2-dependent or independent ILK governed mechanisms. We also reinforce the idea of OLs as growth cone bearing cells and describe the neuronal-like cytoskeleton therein. Finally, we demonstrate a role for ILK in OL growth cone maturation through microtubule regulation, the loss of which translates to decreased process length and myelin production capacity. We describe herein how different substrates fundamentally alter the oligodendrocyte's response to loss of integrin-linked kinase (ILK). On laminin-2 (Ln-2), ILK-depleted oligodendrocytes appear stunted and malformed, while on the non-integrin-activating substrate PLL branching and membrane formation are restored. We also reinforce the idea of oligodendrocytes as growth cone-bearing cells, detailing the growth cone's cytoskeletal architecture. Strikingly, loss of ILK on poly-l-lysine leads to growth cone swelling, the structure's size and

  16. Nano-scale Topographical Studies on the Growth Cones of Nerve Cells using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durkaya, Goksel; Zhong, Lei; Rehder, Vincent; Dietz, Nikolaus

    2009-11-01

    Nerve cells are the fundamental units which are responsible for intercommunication within the nervous system. The neurites, fibrous cable-like extensions for information delivery, of nerve cells are tipped by highly motile sensory structures known as the growth cones which execute important functions; neural construction, decision making and navigation during development and regeneration of the nervous system. The highly dynamic subcomponents of the growth cones are important in neural activity. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is the most powerful microscopy technique which is capable of imaging without conductivity constraint and in liquid media. AFM providing nano-scale topographical information on biological structures is also informative on the physical properties such as: elasticity, adhesion, and softness. This contribution focuses on AFM analysis of the growth cones of the nerve cells removed from the buccal ganglion of Helisoma trivolvis. The results of nano-scale topography and softness analysis on growth cone central domain, filopodia and overlying lamellopodium (veil) are presented. The subcomponents of the growth cones of different nerve cells are compared to each other. The results of the analysis are linked to the mechanical properties and internal molecular density distribution of the growth cones.

  17. Heparanase 2 Attenuates Head and Neck Tumor Vascularity and Growth.

    PubMed

    Gross-Cohen, Miriam; Feld, Sari; Doweck, Ilana; Neufeld, Gera; Hasson, Peleg; Arvatz, Gil; Barash, Uri; Naroditsky, Inna; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2016-05-01

    The endoglycosidase heparanase specifically cleaves the heparan sulfate (HS) side chains on proteoglycans, an activity that has been implicated strongly in tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. Heparanase-2 (Hpa2) is a close homolog of heparanase that lacks intrinsic HS-degrading activity but retains the capacity to bind HS with high affinity. In head and neck cancer patients, Hpa2 expression was markedly elevated, correlating with prolonged time to disease recurrence and inversely correlating with tumor cell dissemination to regional lymph nodes, suggesting that Hpa2 functions as a tumor suppressor. The molecular mechanism associated with favorable prognosis following Hpa2 induction is unclear. Here we provide evidence that Hpa2 overexpression in head and neck cancer cells markedly reduces tumor growth. Restrained tumor growth was associated with a prominent decrease in tumor vascularity (blood and lymph vessels), likely due to reduced Id1 expression, a transcription factor highly implicated in VEGF-A and VEGF-C gene regulation. We also noted that tumors produced by Hpa2-overexpressing cells are abundantly decorated with stromal cells and collagen deposition, correlating with a marked increase in lysyl oxidase expression. Notably, heparanase enzymatic activity was unimpaired in cells overexpressing Hpa2, suggesting that reduced tumor growth is not caused by heparanase regulation. Moreover, growth of tumor xenografts by Hpa2-overexpressing cells was unaffected by administration of a mAb that targets the heparin-binding domain of Hpa2, implying that Hpa2 function does not rely on heparanase or heparan sulfate. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2791-801. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27013193

  18. Comparison of sensory neuron growth cone and filopodial responses to structurally diverse aggrecan variants, in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Beller, Justin A.; Kulengowski, Brandon; Kobraei, Edward M.; Curinga, Gabrielle; Calulot, Christopher M.; Bahrami, Azita; Hering, Thomas M.; Snow, Diane M.

    2013-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury, a regenerating neurite encounters a glial scar enriched in chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs), which presents a major barrier. There are two points at which a neurite makes contact with glial scar CSPGs: initially, filopodia surrounding the growth cone extend and make contact with CSPGs, then the peripheral domain of the entire growth cone makes CSPG contact. Aggrecan is a CSPG commonly used to model the effect CSPGs have on elongating or regenerating neurites. In this study, we investigated filopodial and growth cone responses to contact with structurally diverse aggrecan variants using the common stripe assay. Using time-lapse imaging with 15-sec intervals, we measured growth cone area, growth cone width, growth cone length, filopodia number, total filopodia length, and the length of the longest filopodia following contact with aggrecan. Responses were measured after both filopodia and growth cone contact with five different preparations of aggrecan: two forms of aggrecan derived from bovine articular cartilage (purified and prepared using different techniques), recombinant aggrecan lacking chondroitin sulfate side chains (produced in CHO-745 cells) and two additional recombinant aggrecan preparations with varying lengths of chondroitin sulfate side chains (produced in CHO-K1 and COS-7 cells). Responses in filopodia and growth cone behavior differed between the structurally diverse aggrecan variants. Mutant CHO-745 aggrecan (lacking chondroitin sulfate chains) permitted extensive growth across the PG stripe. Filopodia contact with the CHO-745 aggrecan caused a significant increase in growth cone width and filopodia length (112.7% ± 4.9 and 150.9% ± 7.2 respectively, p<0.05), and subsequently upon growth cone contact, growth cone width remained elevated along with a reduction in filopodia number (121.9% ± 4.2; 72.39% ± 6.4, p<0.05). COS-7 derived aggrecan inhibited neurite outgrowth following growth cone contact. Filopodia

  19. Astrocytic Ca2+ Waves Guide CNS Growth Cones to Remote Regions of Neuronal Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Johanna; Colicos, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    Activity plays a critical role in network formation during developmental, experience-dependent, and injury related remodeling. Here we report a mechanism by which axon trajectory can be altered in response to remote neuronal activity. Using photoconductive stimulation to trigger high frequency action potentials in rat hippocampal neurons in vitro, we find that activity functions as an attractive cue for growth cones in the local environment. The underlying guidance mechanism involves astrocyte Ca2+ waves, as the connexin-43 antagonist carbenoxolone abolishes the attraction when activity is initiated at a distance greater than 120 µm. The asymmetric growth cone filopodia extension that precedes turning can be blocked with CNQX (10 µM), but not with the ATP and adenosine receptor antagonists suramin (100 µM) and alloxazine (4 µM), suggesting non-NMDA glutamate receptors on the growth cone mediate the interaction with astrocytes. These results define a potential long-range signalling pathway for activity-dependent axon guidance in which growth cones turn towards directional, temporally coordinated astrocyte Ca2+ waves that are triggered by neuronal activity. To assess the viability of the guidance effect in an injury paradigm, we performed the assay in the presence of conditioned media from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated purified microglial cultures, as well as directly activating the glia present in our co-cultures. Growth cone attraction was not inhibited under these conditions, suggesting this mechanism could be used to guide regeneration following axonal injury. PMID:19002247

  20. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13715.001 PMID:26987017

  1. Regulation of ECM degradation and axon guidance by growth cone invadosomes

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Medina, Miguel; Gregus, Kelly A.; Nichol, Robert H.; O'Toole, Sean M.; Gomez, Timothy M.

    2015-01-01

    Invadopodia and podosomes, collectively referred to as invadosomes, are F-actin-rich basal protrusions of cells that provide sites of attachment to and degradation of the extracellular matrix. Invadosomes promote the invasion of cells, ranging from metastatic cancer cells to immune cells, into tissue. Here, we show that neuronal growth cones form protrusions that share molecular, structural and functional characteristics of invadosomes. Growth cones from all neuron types and species examined, including a variety of human neurons, form invadosomes both in vitro and in vivo. Growth cone invadosomes contain dynamic F-actin and several actin regulatory proteins, as well as Tks5 and matrix metalloproteinases, which locally degrade the matrix. When viewed using three-dimensional super-resolution microscopy, F-actin foci often extended together with microtubules within orthogonal protrusions emanating from the growth cone central domain. Finally, inhibiting the function of Tks5 both reduced matrix degradation in vitro and disrupted motoneuron axons from exiting the spinal cord and extending into the periphery. Taken together, our results suggest that growth cones use invadosomes to target protease activity during axon guidance through tissues. PMID:25564649

  2. Birth order dependent growth cone segregation determines synaptic layer identity in the Drosophila visual system.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Abhishek; Ertekin, Deniz; Lee, Chi-Hon; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The precise recognition of appropriate synaptic partner neurons is a critical step during neural circuit assembly. However, little is known about the developmental context in which recognition specificity is important to establish synaptic contacts. We show that in the Drosophila visual system, sequential segregation of photoreceptor afferents, reflecting their birth order, lead to differential positioning of their growth cones in the early target region. By combining loss- and gain-of-function analyses we demonstrate that relative differences in the expression of the transcription factor Sequoia regulate R cell growth cone segregation. This initial growth cone positioning is consolidated via cell-adhesion molecule Capricious in R8 axons. Further, we show that the initial growth cone positioning determines synaptic layer selection through proximity-based axon-target interactions. Taken together, we demonstrate that birth order dependent pre-patterning of afferent growth cones is an essential pre-requisite for the identification of synaptic partner neurons during visual map formation in Drosophila. PMID:26987017

  3. Astrocytic Ca(2+) waves guide CNS growth cones to remote regions of neuronal activity.

    PubMed

    Hung, Johanna; Colicos, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Activity plays a critical role in network formation during developmental, experience-dependent, and injury related remodeling. Here we report a mechanism by which axon trajectory can be altered in response to remote neuronal activity. Using photoconductive stimulation to trigger high frequency action potentials in rat hippocampal neurons in vitro, we find that activity functions as an attractive cue for growth cones in the local environment. The underlying guidance mechanism involves astrocyte Ca(2+) waves, as the connexin-43 antagonist carbenoxolone abolishes the attraction when activity is initiated at a distance greater than 120 microm. The asymmetric growth cone filopodia extension that precedes turning can be blocked with CNQX (10 microM), but not with the ATP and adenosine receptor antagonists suramin (100 microM) and alloxazine (4 microM), suggesting non-NMDA glutamate receptors on the growth cone mediate the interaction with astrocytes. These results define a potential long-range signalling pathway for activity-dependent axon guidance in which growth cones turn towards directional, temporally coordinated astrocyte Ca(2+) waves that are triggered by neuronal activity. To assess the viability of the guidance effect in an injury paradigm, we performed the assay in the presence of conditioned media from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activated purified microglial cultures, as well as directly activating the glia present in our co-cultures. Growth cone attraction was not inhibited under these conditions, suggesting this mechanism could be used to guide regeneration following axonal injury. PMID:19002247

  4. Forces from the rear: deformed microtubules in neuronal growth cones influence retrograde flow and advancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauch, Philipp; Heine, Paul; Goettgens, Barbara; Käs, Josef A.

    2013-01-01

    The directed motility of growth cones at the tip of neuronal processes is a key function in neuronal path-finding and relies on a complex system of interacting cytoskeletal components. Despite intensive research in this field, many aspects of the mechanical roles of actin structures and, in particular, of microtubules throughout this process remain unclear. Mostly, force generation is ascribed to actin-myosin-based structures such as filopodia bundles and the dynamic polymer gel within the lamellipodium. Our analysis of microtubule buckling and deformation in motile growth cones reveals that extending microtubule filaments contribute significantly to the overall protrusion force. In this study, we establish a relationship of the local variations in stored bending energy and deformation characteristics to growth cone morphology and retrograde actin flow. This implies the relevance of microtubule pushing and deformation for general neurite advancement as well as steering processes.

  5. Regulated release of serotonin from axonal growth cones isolated from the fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Floran, B; Hernandez, J

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we propose an hypothetical model related to a molecular recognizing system for serotonin in isolated growth cone particles. This model is supported by previous results from our laboratory plus new ones which show that growth cones release serotonin tonically and such release can be stimulated by potassium in a calcium-dependent manner. The present results, together with other author's data, suggest a physiological basis for the putative role of serotonin as a trophic factor during nervous system development. PMID:9460708

  6. The Role of PI(3,4,5)P3 Signaling During Axonal Growth Cone Chemotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henle, Steven J.

    Development of the nervous system is a remarkably complex process that involves the birth of billions of neurons leading to the formation of trillions of synapses. Many biological programs underlie the formation of a functional nervous system. I focused on trying to understand the process by which a newly formed axon navigates a series of signals in the environment that guide it to a synaptic partner. At the tip of the extending neurite is a conical expansion known as the growth cone that primarily is responsible for performing this pathfinding process. In order to do so it senses the environment, and induces a program of intracellular signaling that in turn leads to directed axon extension. My work has focused on understanding this signaling machinery. I have aimed to understand the role the phosphoinositde PI(3,4,5)P3 due to the critical role it plays in amoeboid chemotaxis. I discovered that PI(3,4,5)P3 and its downstream kinase Akt define the leading edge during growth cone chemotaxis and lead to activation of a TRP (Transient Receptor Potential) channel. Furthermore, I found that the PI(3,4,5)P3 phosphatase PTEN appears to be exclusively linked to guiding growth cone migration in response to a gradient of chemorepellent. Taken together my data demonstrate that PI(3,4,5)P3 functions as a key instructive mediator of growth cone chemotaxis.

  7. Sema3F downregulates p53 expression leading to axonal growth cone collapse in primary hippocampal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Guanglu; Qu, Xiang; Zhang, Junmei; Zhao, Weidong; Wang, Hua

    2012-01-01

    Hippocampal nerve growth is regulated by the coordinated action of numerous external stimuli, including positively acting neurotrophin-derived growth cues and restrictive semaphorin cues, however the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unclear. We examined the potential cellular mechanism of Semaphorin3F (Sema3F) in cultured primary hippocampal neurons. We show that Sema3F can down-regulate p53 expression in primary hippocampal neurons, thereby contributing to growth cone collapse. Sema3F suppressed p53-induced pathways, which we show to be required to maintain growth cone structure. Sema3F-induced growth cone collapse was partially reversed by overexpression of p53, which promoted growth cone extension. Inhibition of p53 function by inhibitor, siRNAs, induced axonal growth cone collapse, whereas p53 over-expression led to larger growth cones in cultured primary hippocampal neurons.These data reveal a novel mechanism by which Sema3F can induce hippocampal neuron growth cone collapse and provide evidence for an intracellular mechanism for cross talk between positive and negative axon growth cues. PMID:22977659

  8. Roles of channels and receptors in the growth cone during PNS axonal regeneration.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sangwoo; Ming, Guo-li

    2010-05-01

    Neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are known to maintain a regenerative capacity and will normally regenerate their axons within a permissive growth environment. The success of regeneration in the PNS largely depends on maintenance of the supportive basal lamina membrane, efficient removal of axonal and myelin debris by macrophages and Schwann cells, expression of neurotrophic factors by Schwann cells, and up-regulation of the intrinsic growth program in PNS neurons. The PNS regenerative process is well characterized through initial Wallerian degeneration followed by axonal sprouting, formation of neuronal growth cones, active axonal growth to the target, and finally sensory and motor functional recovery. The initiation and maintenance of active growth cones during peripheral nerve regeneration recapitulate many aspects of early neural development and are achieved through the activation of complex signaling cascades, involving various receptors, channels, cytoplasmic signaling cascades, as well as transcriptional and translational programs. This review focuses on roles of cell surface ion channels and receptors in the growth cone during Wallerian degeneration and axon regeneration in the PNS. PMID:19833126

  9. Quantitative genetic parameters for yield, plant growth and cone chemical traits in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Most traits targeted in the genetic improvement of hop are quantitative in nature. Improvement based on selection of these traits requires a comprehensive understanding of their inheritance. This study estimated quantitative genetic parameters for 20 traits related to three key objectives for the genetic improvement of hop: cone chemistry, cone yield and agronomic characteristics. Results Significant heritable genetic variation was identified for α-acid and β-acid, as well as their components and relative proportions. Estimates of narrow-sense heritability for these traits (h 2  = 0.15 to 0.29) were lower than those reported in previous hop studies, but were based on a broader suite of families (108 from European, North American and hybrid origins). Narrow-sense heritabilities are reported for hop growth traits for the first time (h 2  = 0.04 to 0.20), relating to important agronomic characteristics such as emergence, height and lateral morphology. Cone chemistry and growth traits were significantly genetically correlated, such that families with more vigorous vegetative growth were associated with lower α-acid and β-acid levels. This trend may reflect the underlying population structure of founder genotypes (European and North American origins) as well as past selection in the Australian environment. Although male and female hop plants are thought to be indistinguishable until flowering, sex was found to influence variation in many growth traits, with male and female plants displaying differences in vegetative morphology from emergence to cone maturity. Conclusions This study reveals important insights into the genetic control of quantitative hop traits. The information gained will provide hop breeders with a greater understanding of the additive genetic factors which affect selection of cone chemistry, yield and agronomic characteristics in hop, aiding in the future development of improved cultivars. PMID:24524684

  10. Suppression of Radixin and Moesin Alters Growth Cone Morphology, Motility, and Process Formation In Primary Cultured Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Paglini, Gabriela; Kunda, Patricia; Quiroga, Santiago; Kosik, Kenneth; Cáceres, Alfredo

    1998-01-01

    In this study we have examined the cellular functions of ERM proteins in developing neurons. The results obtained indicate that there is a high degree of spatial and temporal correlation between the expression and subcellular localization of radixin and moesin with the morphological development of neuritic growth cones. More importantly, we show that double suppression of radixin and moesin, but not of ezrin–radixin or ezrin–moesin, results in reduction of growth cone size, disappearance of radial striations, retraction of the growth cone lamellipodial veil, and disorganization of actin filaments that invade the central region of growth cones where they colocalize with microtubules. Neuritic tips from radixin–moesin suppressed neurons displayed high filopodial protrusive activity; however, its rate of advance is 8–10 times slower than the one of growth cones from control neurons. Radixin–moesin suppressed neurons have short neurites and failed to develop an axon-like neurite, a phenomenon that appears to be directly linked with the alterations in growth cone structure and motility. Taken collectively, our data suggest that by regulating key aspects of growth cone development and maintenance, radixin and moesin modulate neurite formation and the development of neuronal polarity. PMID:9786954

  11. Netrin-1 induces local translation of down syndrome cell adhesion molecule in axonal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shruti; Welshhans, Kristy

    2016-07-01

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (DSCAM) plays an important role in many neurodevelopmental processes such as axon guidance, dendrite arborization, and synapse formation. DSCAM is located in the Down syndrome trisomic region of human chromosome 21 and may contribute to the Down syndrome brain phenotype, which includes a reduction in the formation of long-distance connectivity. The local translation of a select group of mRNA transcripts within growth cones is necessary for the formation of appropriate neuronal connectivity. Interestingly, we have found that Dscam mRNA is localized to growth cones of mouse hippocampal neurons, and is dynamically regulated in response to the axon guidance molecule, netrin-1. Furthermore, netrin-1 stimulation results in an increase in locally translated DSCAM protein in growth cones. Deleted in colorectal cancer (DCC), a netrin-1 receptor, is required for the netrin-1-induced increase in Dscam mRNA local translation. We also find that two RNA-binding proteins-fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) and cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein (CPEB)-colocalize with Dscam mRNA in growth cones, suggesting their regulation of Dscam mRNA localization and translation. Finally, overexpression of DSCAM in mouse cortical neurons results in a severe stunting of axon outgrowth and branching, suggesting that an increase in DSCAM protein results in a structural change having functional consequences. Taken together, these results suggest that netrin-1-induced local translation of Dscam mRNA during embryonic development may be an important mechanism to regulate axon growth and guidance in the developing nervous system. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 799-816, 2016. PMID:26518186

  12. Rapid Changes in the Translatome during the Conversion of Growth Cones to Synaptic Terminals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kelvin Xi; Tan, Liming; Pellegrini, Matteo; Zipursky, S Lawrence; McEwen, Jason M

    2016-02-01

    A common step in the formation of neural circuits is the conversion of growth cones to presynaptic terminals. Characterizing patterns of global gene expression during this process is problematic due to the cellular diversity of the brain and the complex temporal dynamics of development. Here, we take advantage of the synchronous conversion of Drosophila photoreceptor growth cones into presynaptic terminals to explore global changes in gene expression during presynaptic differentiation. Using a tandemly tagged ribosome trap (T-TRAP) and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) at multiple developmental times, we observed dramatic changes in coding and non-coding RNAs with presynaptic differentiation. Marked changes in the mRNA encoding transmembrane and secreted proteins occurred preferentially. The 3' UTRs of transcripts encoding synaptic proteins were preferentially lengthened, and these extended UTRs were preferentially enriched for sites recognized by RNA binding proteins. These data provide a rich resource for uncovering the regulatory logic underlying presynaptic differentiation. PMID:26832407

  13. Inhibiting geranylgeranylation increases neurite branching and differentially activates cofilin in cell bodies and growth cones.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Filsy; Reddy, Jairus; Kaimal, Radhika; Segovia, Vianey; Mo, Huanbiao; Hynds, DiAnna L

    2014-08-01

    Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, including the highly prescribed statins, reduce the production of cholesterol and isoprenoids such as geranylgeranyl pyrophosphates. The Rho family of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) requires isoprenylation, specifically geranylgeranylation, for activation. Because Rho GTPases are primary regulators of actin filament rearrangements required for process extension, neurite arborization, and synaptic plasticity, statins may affect cognition or recovery from nervous system injury. Here, we assessed how manipulating geranylgeranylation affects neurite initiation, elongation, and branching in neuroblastoma growth cones. Treatment with the statin, lovastatin (20 μM), decreased measures of neurite initiation by 17.0 to 19.0 % when a source of cholesterol was present and increased neurite branching by 4.03- to 9.54-fold (regardless of exogenous cholesterol). Neurite elongation was increased by treatment with lovastatin only in cholesterol-free culture conditions. Treatment with lovastatin decreased growth cone actin filament content by up to 24.3 %. In all cases, co-treatment with the prenylation precursor, geranylgeraniol (10 μM), reversed the effect of lovastatin. In a prior work, statin effects on outgrowth were linked to modulating the actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin. In our assays, treatment with lovastatin or geranylgeraniol decreased cofilin phosphorylation in whole cell lysates. However, lovastatin increased cofilin phosphorylation in cell bodies and decreased it in growth cones, indicating differential regulation in specific cell regions. Together, we interpret these data to suggest that protein geranylgeranylation likely regulates growth cone actin filament content and subsequent neurite outgrowth through mechanisms that also affect actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:24515839

  14. Organization of cytoskeletal elements and organelles preceding growth cone emergence from an identified neuron in situ.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, F; Bentley, D

    1989-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the arrangement of cytoskeletal elements and organelles in an identified neuron in situ at the site of emergence of its growth cone just before and concurrent with the onset of axonogenesis. The Ti1 pioneer neurons are the first pair of afferent neurons to differentiate in embryonic grasshopper limbs. They arise at the distal tip of the limb bud epithelium, the daughter cells of a single precursor cell, the Pioneer Mother Cell (PMC). Using immunohistochemical markers, we characterized the organization of microtubules, centrosomes, Golgi apparatus, midbody, actin filaments, and chromatin from mitosis in the PMC through axonogenesis in the Tils. Just before and concurrent with the onset of axonogenesis, a characteristic arrangement of tubulin, actin filaments, and Golgi apparatus is localized at the proximal pole of the proximal pioneer neuron. The growth cone of the proximal cell stereotypically arises from this site. Although the distal cell's axon generally grows proximally, occasionally it arises from its distal pole; in such limbs, the axons from the sister cells extend from mirror symmetric locations on their somata. In the presence of cytochalasin D, the PMC undergoes nuclear division but not cytokinesis and although other neuronal phenotypes are expressed, axongenesis is inhibited. Our data suggest that intrinsic information determines the site of growth cone emergence of an identified neuron in situ. PMID:2654140

  15. Using plusTipTracker software to measure microtubule dynamics in Xenopus laevis growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Alina; D’Amico, Salvatore; Enzenbacher, Tiffany; Ebbert, Patrick; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) localize to the growing plus-ends of MTs and regulate MT dynamics1,2. One of the most well-known and widely-utilized +TIPs for analyzing MT dynamics is the End-Binding protein, EB1, which binds all growing MT plus-ends, and thus, is a marker for MT polymerization1. Many studies of EB1 behavior within growth cones have used time-consuming and biased computer-assisted, hand-tracking methods to analyze individual MTs1-3. Our approach is to quantify global parameters of MT dynamics using the software package, plusTipTracker4, following the acquisition of high-resolution, live images of tagged EB1 in cultured embryonic growth cones5. This software is a Matlab-based, open-source, user-friendly package that combines automated detection, tracking, visualization, and analysis for movies of fluorescently-labeled +TIPs. Here, we present the protocol for using plusTipTracker for the analysis of fluorescently-labeled +TIP comets in cultured Xenopus laevis growth cones. However, this software can also be used to characterize MT dynamics in various cell types6-8. PMID:25225829

  16. Using plusTipTracker software to measure microtubule dynamics in Xenopus laevis growth cones.

    PubMed

    Stout, Alina; D'Amico, Salvatore; Enzenbacher, Tiffany; Ebbert, Patrick; Lowery, Laura Anne

    2014-01-01

    Microtubule (MT) plus-end-tracking proteins (+TIPs) localize to the growing plus-ends of MTs and regulate MT dynamics(1,2). One of the most well-known and widely-utilized +TIPs for analyzing MT dynamics is the End-Binding protein, EB1, which binds all growing MT plus-ends, and thus, is a marker for MT polymerization(1). Many studies of EB1 behavior within growth cones have used time-consuming and biased computer-assisted, hand-tracking methods to analyze individual MTs(1-3). Our approach is to quantify global parameters of MT dynamics using the software package, plusTipTracker(4), following the acquisition of high-resolution, live images of tagged EB1 in cultured embryonic growth cones(5). This software is a MATLAB-based, open-source, user-friendly package that combines automated detection, tracking, visualization, and analysis for movies of fluorescently-labeled +TIPs. Here, we present the protocol for using plusTipTracker for the analysis of fluorescently-labeled +TIP comets in cultured Xenopus laevis growth cones. However, this software can also be used to characterize MT dynamics in various cell types(6-8). PMID:25225829

  17. α2-Chimaerin interacts with EphA4 and regulates EphA4-dependent growth cone collapse

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lei; Fu, Wing-Yu; Hung, Kwok-Wang; Porchetta, Cassandra; Hall, Christine; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2007-01-01

    EphA4-dependent growth cone collapse requires reorganization of actin cytoskeleton through coordinated activation of Rho family GTPases. Whereas various guanine exchange factors have recently been identified to be involved in EphA4-mediated regulation of Rho GTPases and growth cone collapse, the functional roles of GTPase-activating proteins in the process are largely unknown. Here we report that EphA4 interacts with α2-chimaerin through its Src homology 2 domain. Activated EphA4 induces a rapid increase of tyrosine phosphorylation of α2-chimaerin and enhances its GTPase-activating protein activity toward Rac1. More importantly, α2-chimaerin regulates the action of EphA4 in growth cone collapse through modulation of Rac1 activity. Our findings have therefore identified a new α2-chimaerin-dependent signaling mechanism through which EphA4 transduces its signals to the actin cytoskeleton and modulates growth cone morphology. PMID:17911252

  18. GPCR cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by LPA and S1P

    PubMed Central

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, the problem of axonal guidance. We are using the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We show that both LPA and S1P cause specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences to mouse, but very similar to Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are GPCRs, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibiting Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA and S1P induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  19. The discovery of the growth cone and its influence on the study of axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Tamariz, Elisa; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    For over a century, there has been a great deal of interest in understanding how neural connectivity is established during development and regeneration. Interest in the latter arises from the possibility that knowledge of this process can be used to re-establish lost connections after lesion or neurodegeneration. At the end of the XIX century, Santiago Ramón y Cajal discovered that the distal tip of growing axons contained a structure that he called the growth cone. He proposed that this structure enabled the axon’s oriented growth in response to attractants, now known as chemotropic molecules. He further proposed that the physical properties of the surrounding tissues could influence the growth cone and the direction of growth. This seminal discovery afforded a plausible explanation for directed axonal growth and has led to the discovery of axon guidance mechanisms that include diffusible attractants and repellants and guidance cues anchored to cell membranes or extracellular matrix. In this review the major events in the development of this field are discussed. PMID:26029056

  20. The discovery of the growth cone and its influence on the study of axon guidance.

    PubMed

    Tamariz, Elisa; Varela-Echavarría, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    For over a century, there has been a great deal of interest in understanding how neural connectivity is established during development and regeneration. Interest in the latter arises from the possibility that knowledge of this process can be used to re-establish lost connections after lesion or neurodegeneration. At the end of the XIX century, Santiago Ramón y Cajal discovered that the distal tip of growing axons contained a structure that he called the growth cone. He proposed that this structure enabled the axon's oriented growth in response to attractants, now known as chemotropic molecules. He further proposed that the physical properties of the surrounding tissues could influence the growth cone and the direction of growth. This seminal discovery afforded a plausible explanation for directed axonal growth and has led to the discovery of axon guidance mechanisms that include diffusible attractants and repellants and guidance cues anchored to cell membranes or extracellular matrix. In this review the major events in the development of this field are discussed. PMID:26029056

  1. Bidirectional interactions between NOX2-type NADPH oxidase and the F-actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed

    Munnamalai, Vidhya; Weaver, Cory J; Weisheit, Corinne E; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Quinn, Mark T; Suter, Daniel M

    2014-08-01

    NADPH oxidases are important for neuronal function but detailed subcellular localization studies have not been performed. Here, we provide the first evidence for the presence of functional NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2)-type complex in neuronal growth cones and its bidirectional relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. NADPH oxidase inhibition resulted in reduced F-actin content, retrograde F-actin flow, and neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of NADPH oxidase via protein kinase C activation increased levels of hydrogen peroxide in the growth cone periphery. The main enzymatic NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2/gp91(phox) localized to the growth cone plasma membrane and showed little overlap with the regulatory subunit p40(phox) . p40(phox) itself exhibited colocalization with filopodial actin bundles. Differential subcellular fractionation revealed preferential association of NOX2/gp91(phox) and p40(phox) with the membrane and the cytoskeletal fraction, respectively. When neurite growth was evoked with beads coated with the cell adhesion molecule apCAM, we observed a significant increase in colocalization of p40(phox) with NOX2/gp91(phox) at apCAM adhesion sites. Together, these findings suggest a bidirectional functional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones, which contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth. We have previously shown that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critical for actin organization and dynamics in neuronal growth cones as well as neurite outgrowth. Here, we report that the cytosolic subunit p40(phox) of the NOX2-type NADPH oxidase complex is partially associated with F-actin in neuronal growth cones, while ROS produced by this complex regulates F-actin dynamics and neurite growth. These findings provide evidence for a bidirectional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones. PMID:24702317

  2. Automated laser guidance of neuronal growth cones using a spatial light modulator.

    PubMed

    Carnegie, David J; Cizmár, Tomás; Baumgartl, Jörg; Gunn-Moore, Frank J; Dholakia, Kishan

    2009-11-01

    The growth cone of a developing neuron can be guided using a focused infra-red (IR) laser beam [1]. In previous setups this process has required a significant amount of user intervention to adjust continuously the laser beam to guide the growing neuron. Previously, a system using an acousto-optical deflector (AOD) has been developed to steer the beam [2]. However, to enhance the controllability of this system, here we demonstrate the use of a computer controlled spatial light modulator (SLM) to steer and manipulate the shape of a laser beam for use in guided neuronal growth. This new experimental setup paves the way to enable a comprehensive investigation into beam shaping effects on neuronal growth and we show neuronal growth initiated by a Bessel light mode. This is a robust platform to explore the biochemistry of this novel phenomenon. PMID:19705368

  3. Whisker/Cone growth on the thermal control surfaces experiment no. S0069

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwiener, James M.; Coston, James E., Jr.; Miller, Edgar R.; Mell, Richard J.; Wilkes, Donald R.

    1995-01-01

    An unusual surface 'growth' was found during scanning electron microscope (SEM) investigations of the Thermal Control Surface Experiment (TCSE) S0069 front thermal cover. This 'growth' is similar to the cone type whisker growth phenomena as studied by G. K. Wehner beginning in the 1960's. Extensive analysis has identified the most probable composition of the whiskers to be a silicate type glass. Sources of the growth material are outgassing products from the experiment and orbital atomic oxygen, which occurs naturally at the orbital altitudes of the LDEF mission in the form of neutral atomic oxygen. The highly ordered symmetry and directionality of the whiskers are attributed to the long term (5.8 year) stable flight orientation of the LDEF.

  4. Ephrin-B2 elicits differential growth cone collapse and axon retraction in retinal ganglion cells from distinct retinal regions

    PubMed Central

    Petros, Timothy J.; Bryson, J. Barney; Mason, Carol

    2010-01-01

    The circuit for binocular vision and stereopsis is established at the optic chiasm, where retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons diverge into the ipsilateral and contralateral optic tracts. In the mouse retina, ventrotemporal (VT) RGCs express the guidance receptor EphB1, which interacts with the repulsive guidance cue ephrin-B2 on radial glia at the optic chiasm to direct VT RGC axons ipsilaterally. RGCs in the ventral retina also express EphB2, which interacts with ephrin-B2, whereas dorsal RGCs express low levels of EphB receptors. To investigate how growth cones of RGCs from different retinal regions respond upon initial contact with ephrin-B2, we utilized time-lapse imaging to characterize the effects of ephrin-B2 on growth cone collapse and axon retraction in real time. We demonstrate that bath application of ephrin-B2 induces rapid and sustained growth cone collapse and axon retraction in VT RGC axons, whereas contralaterally-projecting dorsotemporal RGCs display moderate growth cone collapse and little axon retraction. Dose response curves reveal that contralaterally-projecting ventronasal axons are less sensitive to ephrin-B2 treatment compared to VT axons. Additionally, we uncovered a specific role for Rho kinase signaling in the retraction of VT RGC axons but not in growth cone collapse. The detailed characterization of growth cone behavior in this study comprises an assay for the study of Eph signaling in RGCs, and provides insight into the phenomena of growth cone collapse and axon retraction in general. PMID:20629048

  5. Membrane proteins of the nerve growth cone and their developmental regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Simkowitz, P.; Ellis, L.; Pfenninger, K.H.

    1989-03-01

    The membrane polypeptides of growth cone fragments (growth cone particles, GCPs) isolated from fetal rat brain by subcellular fractionation have been analyzed in further detail. The major polypeptides of salt-washed GCP membranes detected by 1-dimensional gel electrophoresis resolve in 2-dimensional gels as a spot of 52 kDa that comigrates with beta-tubulin and reacts with anti-beta-tubulin; a 46 kDa, pl 4.3, polypeptide (pp46) that has no equivalent in the soluble fraction and is identical to one of the GCP's major phosphoproteins and to GAP43; a spot of 42 kDa that comigrates with actin; and a species of 34 kDa (p34) without soluble equivalent. The prominent 38 kDa doublet identified in 1-dimensional gels is difficult to resolve in 2-dimensional gels. The major phosphoproteins pp80ac, pp46, and pp40, as well as p34 partition into the oil phase of Triton X-114 extracts, suggesting that they are integral membrane proteins, at least in our experimental conditions. The properties of pp46 reported here are in conflict with the highly hydrophilic amino acid sequence predicted for GAP43/B50/F1. Growth-cone and presynaptic membrane proteins are compared as follows. After eye injection of 35S-methionine, GCPs and synaptosomes are isolated from the target areas of optic nerve of fetal and adult rats, respectively. Polypeptides are separated by 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and the radiolabeled species identified fluorographically. The comparison of labeled GCP and synaptosome polypeptides shows that all 5 major Coomassie blue-stained polypeptides of GCP membranes (52, 46, 42, 38, 34 kDa) are intensely labeled after eye injection. However, in synaptosomes, these polypeptides are weakly labeled if at all; instead, an intensely labeled polypeptide of 28 kDa, and several additional species not seen in GCPs, have appeared.

  6. Dislocation-Free Czochralski Silicon Crystal Growth without the Dislocation-Elimination-Necking Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshikawa, Keigo; Huang, Xinming; Taishi, Toshinori; Kajigaya, Tomio; Iino, Takayuki

    1999-12-01

    Dislocation-free silicon crystals have been grown successfully from heavily-boron-doped silicon melts by the Czochralski method without the dislocation-elimination-necking process (Dash neck). A dislocation-free silicon seed of <001> orientation with a boron concentration of about 4×1019 atoms/cm3 was used to grow a silicon crystal with the same boron concentration. No dislocation was generated in the seed during the dipping process, and no misfit dislocation occurred in the grown crystal. These results show that shoulder and body growth can be started immediately after the seeding process.

  7. FLIM FRET Visualization of Cdc42 Activation by Netrin-1 in Embryonic Spinal Commissural Neuron Growth Cones

    PubMed Central

    Rappaz, Benjamin; Lai Wing Sun, Karen; Correia, James P.; Wiseman, Paul W.; Kennedy, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Netrin-1 is an essential extracellular chemoattractant that signals through its receptor DCC to guide commissural axon extension in the embryonic spinal cord. DCC directs the organization of F-actin in growth cones by activating an intracellular protein complex that includes the Rho GTPase Cdc42, a critical regulator of cell polarity and directional migration. To address the spatial distribution of signaling events downstream of netrin-1, we expressed the FRET biosensor Raichu-Cdc42 in cultured embryonic rat spinal commissural neurons. Using FLIM-FRET imaging we detected rapid activation of Cdc42 in neuronal growth cones following application of netrin-1. Investigating the signaling mechanisms that control Cdc42 activation by netrin-1, we demonstrate that netrin-1 rapidly enriches DCC at the leading edge of commissural neuron growth cones and that netrin-1 induced activation of Cdc42 in the growth cone is blocked by inhibiting src family kinase signaling. These findings reveal the activation of Cdc42 in embryonic spinal commissural axon growth cones and support the conclusion that src family kinase activation downstream of DCC is required for Cdc42 activation by netrin-1. PMID:27482713

  8. TRPV1 at nerve endings regulates growth cone morphology and movement through cytoskeleton reorganization.

    PubMed

    Goswami, C; Schmidt, H; Hucho, F

    2007-02-01

    While the importance of Ca(2+) channel activity in axonal path finding is established, the underlying mechanisms are not clear. Here, we show that transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1), a member of the TRP superfamily of nonspecific ion channels, is physically and functionally present at dynamic neuronal extensions, including growth cones. These nonselective cation channels sense exogenous ligands, such as resenifera toxin, and endogenous ligands, such as N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA), and affect the integrity of microtubule cytoskeleton. Using TRPV1-transiently transfected F11 cells and embryonic dorsal root ganglia explants, we show that activation of TRPV1 results in growth cone retraction, and collapse and formation of varicosities along neurites. These changes were due to TRPV1-activation-mediated disassembly of microtubules and are partly Ca(2+)-independent. Prolonged activation with very low doses (1 nM) of NADA results in shortening of neurites in the majority of isolectin B4-positive dorsal root ganglia neurones. We postulate that TRPV1 activation plays an inhibitory role in sensory neuronal extension and motility by regulating the disassembly of microtubules. This might have a role in the chronification of pain. PMID:17288556

  9. Drosophila Ten-m and Filamin Affect Motor Neuron Growth Cone Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Lihua; Michelson, Yehudit; Freger, Vita; Avraham, Ziva; Venken, Koen J. T.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Justice, Monica J.; Wides, Ron

    2011-01-01

    The Drosophila Ten-m (also called Tenascin-major, or odd Oz (odz)) gene has been associated with a pair-rule phenotype. We identified and characterized new alleles of Drosophila Ten-m to establish that this gene is not responsible for segmentation defects but rather causes defects in motor neuron axon routing. In Ten-m mutants the inter-segmental nerve (ISN) often crosses segment boundaries and fasciculates with the ISN in the adjacent segment. Ten-m is expressed in the central nervous system and epidermal stripes during the stages when the growth cones of the neurons that form the ISN navigate to their targets. Over-expression of Ten-m in epidermal cells also leads to ISN misrouting. We also found that Filamin, an actin binding protein, physically interacts with the Ten-m protein. Mutations in cheerio, which encodes Filamin, cause defects in motor neuron axon routing like those of Ten-m. During embryonic development, the expression of Filamin and Ten-m partially overlap in ectodermal cells. These results suggest that Ten-m and Filamin in epidermal cells might together influence growth cone progression. PMID:21857973

  10. A hybrid computational model to predict chemotactic guidance of growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Roccasalvo, Iolanda Morana; Micera, Silvestro; Sergi, Pier Nicola

    2015-01-01

    The overall strategy used by growing axons to find their correct paths during the nervous system development is not yet completely understood. Indeed, some emergent and counterintuitive phenomena were recently described during axon pathfinding in presence of chemical gradients. Here, a novel computational model is presented together with its ability to reproduce both regular and counterintuitive axonal behaviours. In this model, the key role of intracellular calcium was phenomenologically modelled through a non standard Gierer-Meinhardt system, as a crucial factor influencing the growth cone behaviour both in regular and complex conditions. This model was able to explicitly reproduce neuritic paths accounting for the complex interplay between extracellular and intracellular environments, through the sensing capability of the growth cone. The reliability of this approach was proven by using quantitative metrics, numerically supporting the similarity between in silico and biological results in regular conditions (control and attraction). Finally, the model was able to qualitatively predict emergent and counterintuitive phenomena resulting from complex boundary conditions. PMID:26086936

  11. A hybrid computational model to predict chemotactic guidance of growth cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roccasalvo, Iolanda Morana; Micera, Silvestro; Sergi, Pier Nicola

    2015-06-01

    The overall strategy used by growing axons to find their correct paths during the nervous system development is not yet completely understood. Indeed, some emergent and counterintuitive phenomena were recently described during axon pathfinding in presence of chemical gradients. Here, a novel computational model is presented together with its ability to reproduce both regular and counterintuitive axonal behaviours. In this model, the key role of intracellular calcium was phenomenologically modelled through a non standard Gierer-Meinhardt system, as a crucial factor influencing the growth cone behaviour both in regular and complex conditions. This model was able to explicitly reproduce neuritic paths accounting for the complex interplay between extracellular and intracellular environments, through the sensing capability of the growth cone. The reliability of this approach was proven by using quantitative metrics, numerically supporting the similarity between in silico and biological results in regular conditions (control and attraction). Finally, the model was able to qualitatively predict emergent and counterintuitive phenomena resulting from complex boundary conditions.

  12. Comparison of 2D Radiographic Images and 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Positioning Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Zhu, X. Ronald Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei; Tung, Sam; Ahamad, Anesa M.D.; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Schwartz, David L.; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the positioning accuracy using two-dimensional kilovoltage (2DkV) imaging and three-dimensional cone beam CT (CBCT) in patients with head and neck (H and N) cancer receiving radiation therapy. To assess the benefit of patient-specific headrest. Materials and Methods: All 21 patients studied were immobilized using thermoplastic masks with either a patient-specific vacuum bag (11 of 21, IMA) or standard clear plastic (10 of 21, IMB) headrests. Each patient was imaged with a pair of orthogonal 2DkV images in treatment position using onboard imaging before the CBCT procedure. The 2DkV and CBCT images were acquired weekly during the same session. The 2DkV images were reviewed by oncologists and also analyzed by a software tool based on mutual information (MI). Results: Ninety-eight pairs of assessable 2DkV-CBCT alignment sets were obtained. Systematic and random errors were <1.6 mm for both 2DkV and CBCT alignments. When we compared shifts determined by CBCT and 2DkV for the same patient setup, statistically significant correlations were observed in all three major directions. Among all CBCT couch shifts, 4.1% {>=} 0.5 cm and 18.7% {>=} 0.3 cm, whereas among all 2DkV (MI) shifts, 1.7% {>=} 0.5 cm and 11.2% {>=} 0.3 cm. Statistically significant difference was found on anteroposterior direction between IMA and IMB with the CBCT alignment only. Conclusions: The differences between 2D and 3D alignments were mainly caused by the relative flexibility of certain H and N structures and possibly by rotation. Better immobilization of the flexible neck is required to further reduce the setup errors for H and N patients receiving radiotherapy.

  13. High-performance intraoperative cone-beam CT on a mobile C-arm: an integrated system for guidance of head and neck surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Nithiananthan, S.; Hamming, N.; Brock, K. K.; Irish, J. C.

    2009-02-01

    A system for intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) surgical guidance is under development and translation to trials in head and neck surgery. The system provides 3D image updates on demand with sub-millimeter spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility at low radiation dose, thus overcoming conventional limitations associated with preoperative imaging alone. A prototype mobile C-arm provides the imaging platform, which has been integrated with several novel subsystems for streamlined implementation in the OR, including: real-time tracking of surgical instruments and endoscopy (with automatic registration of image and world reference frames); fast 3D deformable image registration (a newly developed multi-scale Demons algorithm); 3D planning and definition of target and normal structures; and registration / visualization of intraoperative CBCT with the surgical plan, preoperative images, and endoscopic video. Quantitative evaluation of surgical performance demonstrates a significant advantage in achieving complete tumor excision in challenging sinus and skull base ablation tasks. The ability to visualize the surgical plan in the context of intraoperative image data delineating residual tumor and neighboring critical structures presents a significant advantage to surgical performance and evaluation of the surgical product. The system has been translated to a prospective trial involving 12 patients undergoing head and neck surgery - the first implementation of the research prototype in the clinical setting. The trial demonstrates the value of high-performance intraoperative 3D imaging and provides a valuable basis for human factors analysis and workflow studies that will greatly augment streamlined implementation of such systems in complex OR environments.

  14. Cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector on a mobile C-arm: preclinical investigation in image-guided surgery of the head and neck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siewerdsen, J. H.; Chan, Y.; Rafferty, M. A.; Moseley, D. J.; Jaffray, D. A.; Irish, J. C.

    2005-04-01

    A promising imaging platform for combined low-dose fluoroscopy and cone-beam CT (CBCT) guidance of interventional procedures has been developed in our laboratory. Based on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) incorporating a high-performance flat-panel detector (Varian PaxScan 4030CB), the system demonstrates sub-mm 3D spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility with field of view sufficient for head and body sites. For pre-clinical studies in head neck tumor surgery, we hypothesize that the 3D intraoperative information provided by CBCT permits precise, aggressive techniques with improved avoidance of critical structures. The objectives include: 1) quantify improvement in surgical performance achieved with CBCT guidance compared to open and endoscopic techniques; and 2) investigate specific, challenging surgical tasks under CBCT guidance. Investigations proceed from an idealized phantom model to cadaveric specimens. A novel surgical performance evaluation method based on statistical decision theory is applied to excision and avoidance tasks. Analogous to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis in medical imaging, the method quantifies surgical performance in terms of Lesion-Excised (True-Positve), Lesion-Remaining (False-Negative), Normal-Excised (False-Positive), and Normal-Remaining (True-Negative) fractions. Conservative and aggressive excision and avoidance tasks are executed in 12 cadaveric specimens with and without CBCT guidance, including: dissection through dura, preservation of posterior lamina, ethmoid air cells removal, exposure of peri-orbita, and excision of infiltrated bone in the skull base (clivus). Intraoperative CBCT data was found to dramatically improve surgical performance and confidence in the execution of such tasks. Pre-clinical investigation of this platform in head and neck surgery, as well as spinal, trauma, biopsy, and other nonvascular procedures, is discussed.

  15. On-Board Patient Positioning for Head-and-Neck IMRT: Comparing Digital Tomosynthesis to Kilovoltage Radiography and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Q. Jackie Godfrey, Devon J.; Wang Zhiheng; Zhang Junan; Zhou Sumin; Yoo Sua; Brizel, David M.; Yin Fangfang

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: High-precision intensity-modulated radiotherapy demands high patient positioning accuracy. On-board digital tomosynthesis (DTS) provides three-dimensional (3D) image guidance for daily positioning with a lower imaging dose, faster acquisition, and more geometric flexibility than 3D cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). This clinical study evaluated DTS as a daily imaging technique for patient positioning and compared the results with 3D CBCT and two-dimensional (2D) radiography. Methods and Materials: Head and neck cancer patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy were studied. For each session, the patient was positioned using laser marks. On-board imaging data sets, including 2D kilovoltage radiographs, DTS, and CBCT, were obtained to measure the daily patient positioning variations. The mean and standard deviations of the positioning variations in the translational and rotational directions were calculated. The positioning differences among 2D radiography, DTS, and CBCT were analyzed. Results: Image data sets were collected from 65 treatment fractions for 10 patients. The systematic patient positioning variation was <0.10 cm and 1.0 deg. one dimensionally. The random variations were 0.27-0.34 cm in the translational and 0.93{sup o}-1.99{sup o} in the rotational direction. The mean vector isocenter variation was 0.48 cm. DTS with 40 deg. and 20 deg. scan angles in the coronal or sagittal directions yielded the same results for patient positioning. DTS performance was comparable to that of CBCT, with positioning differences of <0.1 cm and 0.5{sup o}. The positioning difference between 2D radiography and DTS was {approx}0.1 cm and 0.2 cm in the vertical/longitudinal and lateral directions. Conclusion: Our results have demonstrated that DTS is a comparable 3D imaging technique to CBCT for daily patient positioning of head-and-neck patients as determined by manual registration of bony anatomy.

  16. Image Guidance During Head-and-Neck Cancer Radiation Therapy: Analysis of Alignment Trends With In-Room Cone-Beam Computed Tomography Scans

    SciTech Connect

    Zumsteg, Zachary; DeMarco, John; Lee, Steve P.; Steinberg, Michael L.; Lin, Chun Shu; McBride, William; Lin, Kevin; Wang, Pin-Chieh; Kupelian, Patrick; Lee, Percy

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: On-board cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is currently available for alignment of patients with head-and-neck cancer before radiotherapy. However, daily CBCT is time intensive and increases the overall radiation dose. We assessed the feasibility of using the average couch shifts from the first several CBCTs to estimate and correct for the presumed systematic setup error. Methods and Materials: 56 patients with head-and-neck cancer who received daily CBCT before intensity-modulated radiation therapy had recorded shift values in the medial-lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior dimensions. The average displacements in each direction were calculated for each patient based on the first five or 10 CBCT shifts and were presumed to represent the systematic setup error. The residual error after this correction was determined by subtracting the calculated shifts from the shifts obtained using daily CBCT. Results: The magnitude of the average daily residual three-dimensional (3D) error was 4.8 {+-} 1.4 mm, 3.9 {+-} 1.3 mm, and 3.7 {+-} 1.1 mm for uncorrected, five CBCT corrected, and 10 CBCT corrected protocols, respectively. With no image guidance, 40.8% of fractions would have been >5 mm off target. Using the first five CBCT shifts to correct subsequent fractions, this percentage decreased to 19.0% of all fractions delivered and decreased the percentage of patients with average daily 3D errors >5 mm from 35.7% to 14.3% vs. no image guidance. Using an average of the first 10 CBCT shifts did not significantly improve this outcome. Conclusions: Using the first five CBCT shift measurements as an estimation of the systematic setup error improves daily setup accuracy for a subset of patients with head-and-neck cancer receiving intensity-modulated radiation therapy and primarily benefited those with large 3D correction vectors (>5 mm). Daily CBCT is still necessary until methods are developed that more accurately determine which patients may benefit from

  17. Evaluation of deformable image registration for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhang, Y Y; Shi, Y H; Zhou, L H; Zhen, X

    2016-04-29

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) to propagate contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contours mapping, seven intensity-based DIR strategies are tested on the planning CT and weekly CBCT images from six Head & Neck cancer patients who underwent a 6 ∼ 7 weeks intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e. the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), are employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician delineated ground truths. It is found that the performance of all the evaluated DIR algorithms declines as the treatment proceeds. No statistically significant performance difference is observed between different DIR algorithms (p> 0.05), except for the double force demons (DFD) which yields the worst result in terms of DSC and PE. For the metric HD, all the DIR algorithms behaved unsatisfactorily with no statistically significant performance difference (p= 0.273). These findings suggested that special care should be taken when utilizing the intensity-based DIR algorithms involved in this study to deform OAR contours between CT and CBCT, especially for those organs with low contrast. PMID:27259084

  18. R-Type Calcium Channels Are Crucial for Semaphorin 3A–Induced DRG Axon Growth Cone Collapse

    PubMed Central

    Jover, Emmanuel; Bagnard, Dominique; Šatkauskas, Saulius

    2014-01-01

    Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a secreted protein involved in axon path-finding during nervous system development. Calcium signaling plays an important role during axonal growth in response to different guidance cues; however it remains unclear whether this is also the case for Sema3A. In this study we used intracellular calcium imaging to figure out whether Sema3A-induced growth cone collapse is a Ca2+ dependent process. Intracellular Ca2+ imaging results using Fura-2 AM showed Ca2+ increase in E15 mice dorsal root ganglia neurons upon Sema3A treatment. Consequently we analyzed Sema3A effect on growth cones after blocking or modifying intracellular and extracellular Ca2+ channels that are expressed in E15 mouse embryos. Our results demonstrate that Sema3A increased growth cone collapse rate is blocked by the non-selective R- and T- type Ca2+ channel blocker NiCl2 and by the selective R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX482. These Ca2+ channel blockers consistently decreased the Sema3A-induced intracellular Ca2+ concentration elevation. Overall, our results demonstrate that Sema3A-induced growth cone collapses are intimately related with increase in intracellular calcium concentration mediated by R-type calcium channels. PMID:25032951

  19. Bidirectional interactions between NOX2-type NADPH oxidase and the F-actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Munnamalai, Vidhya; Weaver, Cory J.; Weisheit, Corinne E.; Venkatraman, Prahatha; Agim, Zeynep Sena; Quinn, Mark T.; Suter, Daniel M.

    2014-01-01

    NADPH oxidases are important for neuronal function but detailed subcellular localization studies have not been performed. Here, we provide the first evidence for the presence of functional NOX2-type NADPH oxidase complex in neuronal growth cones and its bidirectional relationship with the actin cytoskeleton. NADPH oxidase inhibition resulted in reduced F-actin content, retrograde F-actin flow, and neurite outgrowth. Stimulation of NADPH oxidase via protein kinase C activation increased levels of hydrogen peroxide in the growth cone periphery. The main enzymatic NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2/gp91phox localized to the growth cone plasma membrane and showed little overlap with the regulatory subunit p40phox. p40phox itself exhibited co-localization with filopodial actin bundles. Differential subcellular fractionation revealed preferential association of NOX2/gp91phox and p40phox with the membrane and the cytoskeletal fraction, respectively. When neurite growth was evoked with beads coated with the cell adhesion molecule apCAM, we observed a significant increase in co-localization of p40phox with NOX2/gp91phox at apCAM adhesion sites. Together, these findings suggest a bidirectional functional relationship between NADPH oxidase activity and the actin cytoskeleton in neuronal growth cones, which contributes to the control of neurite outgrowth. PMID:24702317

  20. Deformation and flow of membrane into tethers extracted from neuronal growth cones.

    PubMed Central

    Hochmuth, F M; Shao, J Y; Dai, J; Sheetz, M P

    1996-01-01

    Membrane tethers are extracted at constant velocity from neuronal growth cones using a force generated by a laser tweezers trap. A thermodynamic analysis shows that as the tether is extended, energy is stored in the tether as bending and adhesion energies and in the cell body as "nonlocal" bending. It is postulated that energy is dissipated by three viscous mechanisms including membrane flow, slip between the two monolayers that form the bilayer, and slip between membrane and cytoskeleton. The analysis predicts and the experiments show a linear relation between tether force and tether velocity. Calculations based on the analytical results and the experimental measurements of a tether radius of approximately 0.2 micron and a tether force at zero velocity of approximately 8 pN give a bending modulus for the tether of 2.7 x 10(-19) N.m and an extraordinarily small "apparent surface tension" in the growth cone of 0.003 mN/m, where the apparent surface tension is the sum of the far-field, in-plane tension and the energy of adhesion. Treatments with cytochalasin B and D, ethanol, and nocodazole affect the apparent surface tension but not bending. ATP depletion affects neither, whereas large concentrations of DMSO affect both. Under conditions of flow, data are presented to show that the dominant viscous mechanism comes from the slip that occurs when the membrane flows over the cytoskeleton. ATP depletion and the treatment with DMSO cause a dramatic drop in the effective viscosity. If it is postulated that the slip between membrane and cytoskeleton occurs in a film of water, then this water film has a mean thickness of only approximately 10 A. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:8770212

  1. Cancer-related trauma, stigma and growth: the 'lived' experience of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Threader, J; McCormack, L

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is associated with multiple layers of distress including stigma. Stigma attraction or devalued social identity is twofold: (1) it is a cancer associated with lifestyle risk factors and (2) treatment often results in confronting facial disfigurement. Subjective interpretations from nine head and neck cancer patients were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis. An overarching superordinate theme--Distress, Stigma and Psychological Growth--encompassed four subordinate themes. Two themes captured the expressed trauma and terror as a result of diagnosis and treatment, and two the redefining of self despite stigma through meaning making. Distress was interpreted as a catalyst for awakening new life interpretations and combined with social support to facilitate two distinct pathways of growth: (1) psychological growth without support; (2) psychological and relational growth with support. Previously unfelt empathetic understanding and altruism for others with cancer emerged from the impact of stigma on 'self'. Acceptance allowed a new sense of identity that recognised cancer-related traumatic distress as integral to growth for these participants. The present study offers a unique insight into cancer-related trauma and stigma and the potential to redefine a more accepting, empathic and altruistic 'self' for psychological growth. Implications are discussed. PMID:25899673

  2. Corneal Sulfated Glycosaminoglycans and Their Effects on Trigeminal Nerve Growth Cone Behavior In Vitro: Roles for ECM in Cornea Innervation

    PubMed Central

    Schwend, Tyler; Deaton, Ryan J.; Zhang, Yuntao; Caterson, Bruce; Conrad, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. Sensory trigeminal nerve growth cones innervate the cornea in a highly coordinated fashion. The purpose of this study was to determine if extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans (ECM–GAGs), including keratan sulfate (KS), dermatan sulfate (DS), and chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and C (CSC), polymerized in developing eyefronts, may provide guidance cues to nerves during cornea innervation. Methods. Immunostaining using antineuron-specific-β-tubulin and monoclonal antibodies for KS, DS, and CSA/C was performed on eyefronts from embryonic day (E) 9 to E14 and staining visualized by confocal microscopy. Effects of purified GAGs on trigeminal nerve growth cone behavior were tested using in vitro neuronal explant cultures. Results. At E9 to E10, nerves exiting the pericorneal nerve ring grew as tight fascicles, advancing straight toward the corneal stroma. In contrast, upon entering the stroma, nerves bifurcated repeatedly as they extended anteriorly toward the epithelium. KS was localized in the path of trigeminal nerves, whereas DS and CSA/C–rich areas were avoided by growth cones. When E10 trigeminal neurons were cultured on different substrates comprised of purified GAG molecules, their neurite growth cone behavior varied depending on GAG type, concentration, and mode of presentation (immobilized versus soluble). High concentrations of immobilized KS, DS, and CSA/C inhibited neurite growth to varying degrees. Neurites traversing lower, permissive concentrations of immobilized DS and CSA/C displayed increased fasciculation and decreased branching, whereas KS caused decreased fasciculation and increased branching. Enzymatic digestion of sulfated GAGs canceled their effects on trigeminal neurons. Conclusions. Data herein suggest that GAGs may direct the movement of trigeminal nerve growth cones innervating the cornea. PMID:23132805

  3. Oxygen Radicals Elicit Paralysis and Collapse of Spinal Cord Neuron Growth Cones upon Exposure to Proinflammatory Cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Kuhn, Thomas B.

    2014-01-01

    A persistent inflammatory and oxidative stress is a hallmark of most chronic CNS pathologies (Alzheimer's (ALS)) as well as the aging CNS orchestrated by the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β). Loss of the integrity and plasticity of neuronal morphology and connectivity comprises an early step in neuronal degeneration and ultimate decline of cognitive function. We examined in vitro whether TNFα or IL-1β impaired morphology and motility of growth cones in spinal cord neuron cultures. TNFα and IL-1β paralyzed growth cone motility and induced growth cone collapse in a dose-dependent manner reflected by complete attenuation of neurite outgrowth. Scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS) or inhibiting NADPH oxidase activity rescued loss of neuronal motility and morphology. TNFα and IL-1β provoked rapid, NOX-mediated generation of ROS in advancing growth cones, which preceded paralysis of motility and collapse of morphology. Increases in ROS intermediates were accompanied by an aberrant, nonproductive reorganization of actin filaments. These findings suggest that NADPH oxidase serves as a pivotal source of oxidative stress in neurons and together with disruption of actin filament reorganization contributes to the progressive degeneration of neuronal morphology in the diseased or aging CNS. PMID:25050325

  4. Daily Image Guidance With Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Head-and-Neck Cancer Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Den, Robert B.; Doemer, Anthony; Kubicek, Greg; Bednarz, Greg; Galvin, James M.; Keane, William M.; Xiao Ying; Machtay, Mitchell

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: To report on a prospective clinical trial of the use of daily kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) to evaluate the interfraction and residual error motion of patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiotherapy for head-and-neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients were treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy with an Elekta linear accelerator using a mounted CBCT scanner. CBCT was performed before every treatment, and translational (but not rotational) corrections were performed. At least once per week, a CBCT scan was obtained after intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Variations were measured in the medial-lateral, superoinferior, and anteroposterior dimensions, as well as in the rotation around these axes. Results: A total of 28 consecutive patients (1,013 CBCT scans) were studied. The average interfraction shift was 1.4 +- 1.4, 1.7 +- 1.9, and 1.8 +- 2.1 mm in the medial-lateral, superoinferior, and anteroposterior dimensions, respectively. The corresponding average residual error shifts were 0.7 +- 0.8, 0.9 +- 0.9, and 0.9 +- 0.9 mm. These data indicate that in the absence of daily CBCT image-guided radiotherapy, a clinical target volume to planning target volume margin of 3.9, 4.1, and 4.9 mm is needed in the medial-lateral, superoinferior, and anteroposterior dimensions, respectively. With daily CBCT, corresponding margins of 1.6, 2.5, and 1.9 mm should be acceptable. Subgroup analyses showed that larynx cancers and/or intratreatment weight loss indicate a need for slightly larger clinical target volume to planning target volume margins. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that image-guided radiotherapy using CBCT for head-and-neck cancer is effective. These data suggest it allows a reduction in the clinical target volume to planning target volume margins by about 50%, which could facilitate future studies of dose escalation and/or improved toxicity reduction. Caution is particularly warranted for cases in which the

  5. Growth of microscopic cones on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps driven by sorption of large argon quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Porcelli, Tommaso; Siviero, Fabrizio; Bongiorno, Gero A.; Michelato, Paolo; Pagani, Carlo

    2015-09-15

    Microscopic cones have been observed on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps (SIPs) after pump operation. The cones were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Size and morphology of these cones are clearly correlated with the nature and the relative amount of each gas species pumped by each SIP during its working life. In particular, their growth was found to be fed by sputtering mechanisms, mostly during Ar pumping, and to be driven by the electromagnetic field applied to the Penning cells of each SIP. Experimental findings suggest that the formation and extent of such conic structures on cathode surfaces might play a leading role in the onset of phenomena typically related to the functioning of SIPs, e.g., the so-called argon instability.

  6. Nerve growth factor stimulates axon outgrowth through negative regulation of growth cone actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance

    PubMed Central

    Turney, Stephen G.; Ahmed, Mostafa; Chandrasekar, Indra; Wysolmerski, Robert B.; Goeckeler, Zoe M.; Rioux, Robert M.; Whitesides, George M.; Bridgman, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) promotes growth, differentiation, and survival of sensory neurons in the mammalian nervous system. Little is known about how NGF elicits faster axon outgrowth or how growth cones integrate and transform signal input to motor output. Using cultured mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, we found that myosin II (MII) is required for NGF to stimulate faster axon outgrowth. From experiments inducing loss or gain of function of MII, specific MII isoforms, and vinculin-dependent adhesion-cytoskeletal coupling, we determined that NGF causes decreased vinculin-dependent actomyosin restraint of microtubule advance. Inhibition of MII blocked NGF stimulation, indicating the central role of restraint in directed outgrowth. The restraint consists of myosin IIB- and IIA-dependent processes: retrograde actin network flow and transverse actin bundling, respectively. The processes differentially contribute on laminin-1 and fibronectin due to selective actin tethering to adhesions. On laminin-1, NGF induced greater vinculin-dependent adhesion–cytoskeletal coupling, which slowed retrograde actin network flow (i.e., it regulated the molecular clutch). On fibronectin, NGF caused inactivation of myosin IIA, which negatively regulated actin bundling. On both substrates, the result was the same: NGF-induced weakening of MII-dependent restraint led to dynamic microtubules entering the actin-rich periphery more frequently, giving rise to faster elongation. PMID:26631553

  7. D1-type dopamine receptors inhibit growth cone motility in cultured retina neurons: evidence that neurotransmitters act as morphogenic growth regulators in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, K L; DeMello, F G; Klein, W L

    1988-01-01

    Precedent exists for the early development and subsequent down-regulation of neurotransmitter receptor systems in the vertebrate central nervous system, but the function of such embryonic receptors has not been established. Here we show that stimulation of early-developing dopamine receptors in avian retina cells greatly inhibits the motility of neuronal growth cones. Neurons from embryonic chicken retinas were cultured in low-density monolayers, and their growth cones were observed with phase-contrast or video-enhanced-contrast-differential-interference-contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy. Approximately 25% of the neurons responded to micromolar dopamine with a rapid reduction in filopodial activity followed by a flattening of growth cones and retraction of neurites. The response occurred at all ages examined (embryonic day-8 retinal neurons cultured on polylysine-coated coverslips for 1-7 days), although neurite retraction was greatest in younger cultures. Effects of dopamine on growth cone function could be reversed by haloperidol or (+)-SCH 23390, whereas forskolin elicited a response similar to dopamine; these data show the response was receptor-mediated, acting through a D1-type system, and are consistent with the use of cAMP as a second messenger. The experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that neurotransmitters, besides mediating transynaptic signaling in the adult, may have a role in neuronal differentiation as growth regulators. Images PMID:3380807

  8. D1-type dopamine receptors inhibit growth cone motility in cultured retina neurons: evidence that neurotransmitters act as morphogenic growth regulators in the developing central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Lankford, K L; DeMello, F G; Klein, W L

    1988-01-01

    Precedent exists for the early development and subsequent down-regulation of neurotransmitter receptor systems in the vertebrate central nervous system, but the function of such embryonic receptors has not been established. Here we show that stimulation of early-developing dopamine receptors in avian retina cells greatly inhibits the motility of neuronal growth cones. Neurons from embryonic chicken retinas were cultured in low-density monolayers, and their growth cones were observed with phase-contrast or video-enhanced-contrast-differential-interference-contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy. Approximately 25% of the neurons responded to micromolar dopamine with a rapid reduction in filopodial activity followed by a flattening of growth cones and retraction of neurites. The response occurred at all ages examined (embryonic day-8 retinal neurons cultured on polylysine-coated coverslips for 1-7 days), although neurite retraction was greatest in younger cultures. Effects of dopamine on growth cone function could be reversed by haloperidol or (+)-SCH 23390, whereas forskolin elicited a response similar to dopamine; these data show the response was receptor-mediated, acting through a D1-type system, and are consistent with the use of cAMP as a second messenger. The experiments provide strong support for the hypothesis that neurotransmitters, besides mediating transynaptic signaling in the adult, may have a role in neuronal differentiation as growth regulators. Images PMID:3357895

  9. Foam dressing with epidermal growth factor for severe radiation dermatitis in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jihyo; Lee, Sang-Wook; Hong, Joon Pio; Shon, Myeong Wha; Ryu, Seung-Hee; Ahn, Seung Do

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of foam dressing with human recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) on the healing process in head and neck cancer patients who experience radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Seven patients, including three with oropharyngeal, two with nasopharyngeal and one each with hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinoma, who underwent radiotherapy (RT) for head and neck cancer at the Asan Medical Center from March to December 2008 were prospectively included in this study. Patients who showed severe RID (more than wet desquamation) on the supraclavicular fossa or neck areas were treated by wound cleaning and debridement of granulation tissue, followed by daily rhEGF spray and foam dressing. Median time to stop exudates and reepithelialisation was 4 days. Within 14 days (median 8 days), all patients showed complete healing of RID and no longer required dressings. This new method of treatment with dressing containing rhEGF may have the potential to accelerate the healing process in patients with RID. A case-control study is needed to confirm this finding. PMID:24947011

  10. Targeting epidermal growth factor receptor for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: still lost in translation?

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Christopher H.; Saba, Nabil F.

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is preferentially expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), and is a promising therapeutic target. Yet other than cetuximab, no agent targeting EGFR has been approved for this disease, and none has shown benefit over the standard of care. Several randomized trials of antibody and small molecule agents have found no new indication for these agents, despite their initial promise. In this review, we examine the major clinical evidence and discuss potential future developments of translational science in this area, including use of these agents in risk-stratified subgroups, inhibition of downstream/parallel targets, and combination with immunotherapy. PMID:27004227

  11. Perineural Growth in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Joseph; Muelleman, Thomas; Tawfik, Ossama; Thomas, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Perineural growth is a unique route of tumor metastasis that is associated with poor prognosis in several solid malignancies. It is diagnosed by the presence of tumor cells inside the neural space seen on histological or imaging evaluations. Little is known about molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and spread of tumor cells in neural spaces. The poor prognosis associated with perineural growth and lack of targeted approaches necessitates the study of molecular factors involved in communication between tumor and neural cells. Perineural growth rates, shown to be as high as 63% in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), correlate with increased local recurrence and decreased disease-free survival. Here we describe the literature on perineural growth in HNSCC. In addition, we discuss factors implicated in perineural growth of cancer. These factors include brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotropin-3 and -4, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), substance P (SP), and chemokines. We also explore the literature on membrane receptors, including the Trk family and the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor. This review highlights areas for further study of the mechanisms of perineural invasion which may facilitate the identification of therapeutic targets in HNSCC. PMID:25456006

  12. Significantly lower femoral neck growth in screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in unilateral slipped capital femoral epiphysis.

    PubMed

    Wölfle-Roos, Julia V; Urlaub, Stefanie; Reichel, Heiko; Taurman, Rita

    2016-05-01

    There is an ongoing debate on which fixation technique should be preferred for the prophylactic fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE). In the case of Kirschner-wire (K-wire) fixation, there is a possibility of secondary loss of fixation because of longitudinal growth of the physis, whereas in screw fixation, physeal growth of the femoral neck might be impaired. The aim of this matched-pair study was to compare the longitudinal growth of the femoral neck in screw fixation versus K-wire fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip in SCFE. All 18 patients (female : male=3 : 15), who had undergone screw fixation of the asymptomatic contralateral hip between 9/2001 and 9/2011, were matched according to age, bone age, sex, and time to follow-up to another 18 patients with K-wire fixation. The length of the femoral neck of the contralateral hip was measured in parallel to either screw or K-wire from the apex of the femoral head to the opposite cortical bone. The ratio of the femoral neck length measured directly after surgery and on follow-up was defined as femoral neck growth. There was no significant difference between groups with respect to age, modified Oxford Bone age score, and time to follow-up. We found a significant difference in femoral neck growth between patients with screw fixation (5.5±4.3%) compared with K-wire fixation (8.9±5.7%, P=0.048 matched Wilcoxon test). The difference in femoral neck growth of patients with K-wire or screw fixation of the contralateral asymptomatic hip in SCFE was small, but statistically significant. Thus, despite high rates of secondary loss of fixation, K-wire fixation should still be considered, especially in very young patients. PMID:26919622

  13. Val66Met Polymorphism of BDNF Alters Prodomain Structure to Induce Neuronal Growth Cone Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Anastasia, Agustin; Deinhardt, Katrin; Chao, Moses V.; Will, Nathan E.; Irmady, Krithi; Lee, Francis S.; Hempstead, Barbara L.; Bracken, Clay

    2013-01-01

    A common single-nucleotide polymorphism in the human brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene results in a Val66Met substitution in the BDNF prodomain region. This single-nucleotide polymorphism is associated with alterations in memory and with enhanced risk to develop depression and anxiety disorders in humans. Here we show that the isolated BDNF prodomain is detected in the hippocampus and that it can be secreted from neurons in an activity-dependent manner. Using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and circular dichroism we find that the prodomain is intrinsically disordered, and the Val66Met substitution induces structural changes. Surprisingly, application of Met66 (but not Val66) BDNF prodomain induces acute growth cone retraction and a decrease in Rac activity in hippocampal neurons. Expression of p75NTR and differential engagement of the Met66 prodomain to the SorCS2 receptor are required for this effect. These results identify the Met66 prodomain as a new active ligand which modulates neuronal morphology. PMID:24048383

  14. The Role of Rac1 in the Growth Cone Dynamics and Force Generation of DRG Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Sayyad, Wasim A.; Fabris, Paolo; Torre, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    We used optical tweezers, video imaging, immunocytochemistry and a variety of inhibitors to analyze the role of Rac1 in the motility and force generation of lamellipodia and filopodia from developing growth cones of isolated Dorsal Root Ganglia neurons. When the activity of Rac1 was inhibited by the drug EHop-016, the period of lamellipodia protrusion/retraction cycles increased and the lamellipodia retrograde flow rate decreased; moreover, the axial force exerted by lamellipodia was reduced dramatically. Inhibition of Arp2/3 by a moderate amount of the drug CK-548 caused a transient retraction of lamellipodia followed by a complete recovery of their usual motility. This recovery was abolished by the concomitant inhibition of Rac1. The filopodia length increased upon inhibition of both Rac1 and Arp2/3, but the speed of filopodia protrusion increased when Rac1 was inhibited and decreased instead when Arp2/3 was inhibited. These results suggest that Rac1 acts as a switch that activates upon inhibition of Arp2/3. Rac1 also controls the filopodia dynamics necessary to explore the environment. PMID:26766136

  15. An Automated Strategy for Unbiased Morphometric Analyses and Classifications of Growth Cones In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Chitsaz, Daryan; Morales, Daniel; Law, Chris; Kania, Artur

    2015-01-01

    During neural circuit development, attractive or repulsive guidance cue molecules direct growth cones (GCs) to their targets by eliciting cytoskeletal remodeling, which is reflected in their morphology. The experimental power of in vitro neuronal cultures to assay this process and its molecular mechanisms is well established, however, a method to rapidly find and quantify multiple morphological aspects of GCs is lacking. To this end, we have developed a free, easy to use, and fully automated Fiji macro, Conographer, which accurately identifies and measures many morphological parameters of GCs in 2D explant culture images. These measurements are then subjected to principle component analysis and k-means clustering to mathematically classify the GCs as "collapsed" or "extended". The morphological parameters measured for each GC are found to be significantly different between collapsed and extended GCs, and are sufficient to classify GCs as such with the same level of accuracy as human observers. Application of a known collapse-inducing ligand results in significant changes in all parameters, resulting in an increase in 'collapsed' GCs determined by k-means clustering, as expected. Our strategy provides a powerful tool for exploring the relationship between GC morphology and guidance cue signaling, which in particular will greatly facilitate high-throughput studies of the effects of drugs, gene silencing or overexpression, or any other experimental manipulation in the context of an in vitro axon guidance assay. PMID:26496644

  16. Dysregulation of epidermal growth factor receptor expression in premalignant lesions during head and neck tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shin, D M; Ro, J Y; Hong, W K; Hittelman, W N

    1994-06-15

    The development of head and neck cancer, believed to result from field cancerization and a multistep process of tumorigenesis, is often associated with an accumulation of genotypic and phenotypic alterations. The phenotypic changes could be the result of dysregulation of growth control genes such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). With the goal of identifying a potential biomarker of the multistep process of tumorigensis, we studied specimens of 36 head and neck squamous cell carcinomas from 5 different sites that contained normal epithelia and/or premalignant lesions adjacent to the tumors. Almost all of the individuals from whom these specimens were obtained had been exposed to first-hand smoking and/or alcohol consumption. Using a monoclonal anti-EGFR antibody for immunohistochemical analysis on paraffin-embedded sections with attached 886 cells for internal control, the levels of EGFR expression were assessed by image analysis. The relative staining intensity of EGFR in normal epithelia adjacent to tumors was 2-fold higher than that in normal control epithelium (P = 0.021), suggesting that, even in histologically normal epithelium, EGFR was already up-regulated in tissues surrounding tumors. These findings supported the theory of field cancerization in head and neck tumorigenesis. As tissue progressed from normal tissue adjacent to tumor to hyperplasia and to dysplasia, EGFR expression remained elevated. However, in the step from dysplasia to squamous cell carcinoma, EGFR expression was further and dramatically up-regulated (P = 0.01). Therefore, these results indicate that EGFR dysregulation happens in two steps, the moderate up-regulation of EGFR expression in normal epithelium adjacent to tumor and the further up-regulation of EGFR expression in the change from dysplasia to squamous cell carcinoma. In summary, the studies presented here indicate that EGFR dysregulation might be a useful marker for identifying individuals at risk of tumor development

  17. A molecular recognizing system of serotonin in rat fetal axonal growth cones: uptake and high affinity binding.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1992-09-18

    Axonal growth cone particles (AGCP) isolated from prenatal and postnatal rat brain had different high-affinity 5-HT uptake characteristics. In postnatal AGCP the uptake behaves as in the adult rat brain, while in the prenatal AGCP the uptake characteristics seem to be in a transitional stage. Also in prenatal AGCP we observed specific, high-affinity 5-HT binding sites. These results support the idea of an important role for 5-HT during axogenesis. PMID:1424085

  18. Stabilization of actin bundles by a dynamin 1/cortactin ring complex is necessary for growth cone filopodia.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Abe, Tadashi; Satoh, Ayano; Okazaki, Nana; Tago, Shota; Kobayashi, Kinue; Yoshida, Yumi; Oda, Yoshiya; Watanabe, Masami; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Matsui, Hideki; Takei, Kohji

    2013-03-01

    Dynamin GTPase, a key molecule in endocytosis, mechanically severs the invaginated membrane upon GTP hydrolysis. Dynamin functions also in regulating actin cytoskeleton, but the mechanisms are yet to be defined. Here we show that dynamin 1, a neuronal isoform of dynamin, and cortactin form ring complexes, which twine around F-actin bundles and stabilize them. By negative-staining EM, dynamin 1-cortactin complexes appeared as "open" or "closed" rings depending on guanine nucleotide conditions. By pyrene actin assembly assay, dynamin 1 stimulated actin assembly in mouse brain cytosol. In vitro incubation of F-actin with both dynamin 1 and cortactin led to the formation of long and thick actin bundles, on which dynamin 1 and cortactin were periodically colocalized in puncta. A depolymerization assay revealed that dynamin 1 and cortactin increased the stability of actin bundles, most prominently in the presence of GTP. In rat cortical neurons and human neuroblastoma cell line, SH-SY5Y, both dynamin 1 and cortactin localized on actin filaments and the bundles at growth cone filopodia as revealed by immunoelectron microscopy. In SH-SY5Y cell, acute inhibition of dynamin 1 by application of dynamin inhibitor led to growth cone collapse. Cortactin knockdown also reduced growth cone filopodia. Together, our results strongly suggest that dynamin 1 and cortactin ring complex mechanically stabilizes F-actin bundles in growth cone filopodia. Thus, the GTPase-dependent mechanochemical enzyme property of dynamin is commonly used both in endocytosis and regulation of F-actin bundles by a dynamin 1-cortactin complex. PMID:23467367

  19. Intraoperative cone-beam CT for guidance of head and neck surgery: Assessment of dose and image quality using a C-arm prototype.

    PubMed

    Daly, M J; Siewerdsen, J H; Moseley, D J; Jaffray, D A; Irish, J C

    2006-10-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector represents a promising modality for intraoperative imaging in interventional procedures, demonstrating sub-mm three-dimensional (3D) spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility. Measurements of patient dose and in-room exposure for CBCT-guided head and neck surgery are reported, and the 3D imaging performance as a function of dose and other acquisition/reconstruction parameters is investigated. Measurements were performed on a mobile isocentric C-arm (Siemens PowerMobil) modified in collaboration with Siemens Medical Solutions (Erlangen, Germany) to provide flat-panel CBCT. Imaging dose was measured in a custom-built 16 cm cylindrical head phantom at four positions (isocenter, anterior, posterior, and lateral) as a function of kVp (80-120 kVp) and C-arm trajectory ("tube-under" and "tube-over" half-rotation orbits). At 100 kVp, for example ("tube-under" orbit), the imaging dose was 0.059 (isocenter), 0.022 (anterior), 0.10 (posterior), and 0.056 (lateral) mGy/ mAs, with scans at approximately 50 and approximately 170 mAs typical for visualization of bony and soft-tissue structures, respectively. Dose to radiosensitive structures (viz., the eyes and thyroid) were considered in particular: significant dose sparing to the eyes (a factor of 5) was achieved using a "tube-under" (rather than "tube-over") half-rotation orbit; a thyroid shield (0.5 mm Pb-equivalent) gave moderate reduction in thyroid dose due to x-ray scatter outside the primary field of view. In-room exposure was measured at positions around the operating table and up to 2 m from isocenter. A typical CBCT scan (10 mGy to isocenter) gave in-air exposure ranging from 29 mR (0.26 mSv) at 35 cm from isocenter, to <0.5 mR (<0.005 mSv) at 2 m from isocenter. Three-dimensional (3D) image quality was assessed in CBCT reconstructions of an anthropomorphic head phantom containing contrast-detail spheres (11-103 HU; 1.6-12.7 mm) and a natural human

  20. Volumetric and dosimetric assessment by cone-beam computed tomography scans in head and neck radiation therapy: a monitoring in four phases of treatment.

    PubMed

    Cozzolino, M; Fiorentino, A; Oliviero, C; Pedicini, P; Clemente, S; Califano, G; Caivano, R; Chiumento, C; Fusco, V

    2014-08-01

    Due to the anatomical changes frequently occurring during the course of head and neck (H&N) cancer radiotherapy, the dose distribution, which was actually delivered to the patient, might significantly differ from that planned. The aim of this paper is to investigate these volumetric changes and the resulting dosimetric implications on organs at risk (OARs) and clinical target volumes (CTVs) by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans throughout the treatment. Ten H&N patients, treated by Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy, were analyzed. CTVs and OARs were delineated on four CBCT, acquired at the 10(th), 15(th), 20(th) and 25(th) treatment session, and then compared with the ones at planning CT. The planned beams were applied to each CBCT to recalculate the dose distribution and the corresponding dose volume histograms were compared with those generated on planning CT. To evaluate the HU discrepancies between the conventional CT and CBCT images we used a Catphan(r) 504, observing a maximum discrepancy of about 30 HU. We evaluated the impact of this HU difference in dose calculation and a not clinically relevant error, within 2.8%, was estimated. No inhomogeneity correction was used. The results showed an increased CTV mean dose (Dmean) of about 3% was found, without significant reduction in volume. Due to the parotids' shrinkage (up to 42%), significant dosimetric increases were observed: ipsilateral gland at 15th CBCT (Dmean by 18%; V30 by 31%); controlateral gland at the 10(th) CBCT (Dmean by 12.2%; V30 by 18.7%). For the larynx, a significant increase of volume was found at the 20th (15.7%) and 25th CBCT (13.3%) but it complied with dose constraint. The differences observed for the spinal cord and mandible maximum doses were not clinically relevant. In conclusion, the dosimetric analysis on CBCT can help clinicians to monitor treatment progress and to evaluate whether and when a new plan is necessary. The main benefit of replanning could be to preserve the

  1. Growth performance of crossbred naked neck and normal feathered laying hens kept in tropical villages.

    PubMed

    Adomako, K; Olympio, O S; Hagan, J K; Hamidu, J A

    2014-01-01

    1. Two experiments were conducted to develop naked neck (Na/na) and normal feathered (na/na) crossbreds and compare their growth performance, linear body measurements and carcass characteristics in the first and second filial generations. 2. In the first experiment, 4 indigenous naked neck males (Na/na) were mated to 36 Lohmann commercial females (na/na) in a ratio of 1:9. The two genotypes (Na/na, na/na) were allocated randomly according to batches of hatch, sire lines and sex to three different villages. 3. In the second experiment, 10 males and 100 females of F1 Na/na birds were selected and mated inter se in a ratio of 1:10. The three genotypes (Na/Na, Na/na and na/na) were compared in a randomised complete block design experiment, with the three villages, hatch and sex as blocks and the three genotypes as treatments. F1 Na/na birds had significantly higher (P < 0.05) feed conversion ratio, body weight, body weight gain, linear body measurements, survivability and carcass yield than their na/na counterparts. 4. In the F2 generation, Na/Na and Na/na birds had significantly higher (P < 0.05) feed conversion ratio, body weight, body weight gain, linear body measurements, survivability and carcass yield compared to their na/na counterparts. 5. The birds showing the naked neck phenotype appeared to show superior performance compared to normal feathered birds and could be exploited for potential utilisation in local poultry production. PMID:25192492

  2. G-protein-coupled receptor cell signaling pathways mediating embryonic chick retinal growth cone collapse induced by lysophosphatidic acid and sphingosine-1-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Fincher, Jarod; Whiteneck, Canaan; Birgbauer, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In the development of the nervous system, one of the critical aspects is the proper navigation of axons to their targets, i.e. the problem of axonal guidance. We used the chick visual system as a model to investigate the role of the lysophospholipids lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) as potential axon guidance cues. We showed that both LPA and S1P cause a specific, dose-dependent growth cone collapse of retinal neurons in vitro in the chick model system, with slight differences compared to the mouse but very similar to observations in Xenopus. Because LPA and S1P receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors, we analyzed the intracellular signaling pathways using pharmacological inhibitors in chick retinal neurons. Blocking rho kinase (ROCK) prevented growth cone collapse by LPA and S1P, while blocking PLC or chelating calcium had no effect on growth cone collapse. Inhibition of Gi/o with pertussis toxin resulted in a partial reduction of growth cone collapse, both with LPA and with S1P. Inhibition of p38 blocked growth cone collapse mediated by LPA but not S1P. Thus, in addition to the involvement of the G12/13-ROCK pathway, LPA- and S1P-induced collapse of chick retinal growth cones has a partial requirement for Gi/o. PMID:25138637

  3. Targeting Toll-like receptor 2 inhibits growth of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Farnebo, Lovisa; Shahangian, Arash; Lee, Yunqin; Shin, June Ho; Scheeren, Ferenc A.; Sunwoo, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Infection-driven inflammation has been proposed to be involved in the tumorigenesis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Oral HNSCC is often colonized with microbes such as gram-positive bacteria and yeast, where ligands derived from their wall components have been shown to specifically bind to Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Although TLR2 has been described to be expressed in oral HNSCC, its function has not been well characterized. Here, we show the expression of TLR2 in both HNSCC cell lines and primary patient-derived HNSCC xenograft tumors. Activation of TLR2 with a yeast-derived ligand of TLR2, zymosan, promoted organoid formation in an ex vivo model of tumor growth, while blockade with anti-TLR2 antibodies inhibited organoid formation. Zymosan also induced phosphorylation of ERK and the p65 subunit of NF-κB, which was inhibited in the presence of anti-TLR2 antibodies, indicating that this receptor is functional in HNSCC and that the signaling through these pathways is intact. TLR2 blockade also inhibited growth of human xenografted tumors in immunodeficient mice. In summary, our data show that TLR2 is a functional receptor expressed in human HNSCC that plays a direct pro-tumorigenic role, and that it can be therapeutically targeted with blocking antibodies to reduce tumor growth. PMID:25846753

  4. Rac1 Modulates Stimulus-evoked Ca2+ Release in Neuronal Growth Cones via Parallel Effects on Microtubule/Endoplasmic Reticulum Dynamics and Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The small G protein Rac regulates cytoskeletal protein dynamics in neuronal growth cones and has been implicated in axon growth, guidance, and branching. Intracellular Ca2+ is another well known regulator of growth cone function; however, effects of Rac activity on intracellular Ca2+ metabolism have not been well characterized. Here, we investigate how Rac1 activity affects release of Ca2+ from intracellular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stores stimulated by application of serotonin (5-hydroxytriptamine). We also address how Rac1 effects on microtubule assembly dynamics affect distribution of Ca2+ release sites. Multimode fluorescent microscopy was used to correlate microtubule and ER behavior, and ratiometric imaging was used to assess intracellular Ca2+ dynamics. We report that Rac1 activity both promotes Ca2+ release and affects its spatial distribution in neuronal growth cones. The underlying mechanism involves synergistic Rac1 effects on microtubule assembly and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Rac1 activity modulates Ca2+ by 1) enhancing microtubule assembly which in turn promotes spread of the ER-based Ca2+ release machinery into the growth cone periphery, and 2) by increasing ROS production which facilitated inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent Ca2+ release. These results cast Rac1 as a key modulator of intracellular Ca2+ function in the neuronal growth cone. PMID:19570918

  5. Stepwise Progress in Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor/Radiation Studies for Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harari, Paul M.

    2007-10-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval of four new epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors for cancer therapy (cetuximab, panitumumab, gefitinib, and erlotinib) over the last 3 years is a remarkable milestone in oncology. Indeed, molecular inhibition of EGFR signaling represents one of the most promising current arenas for the development of molecular-targeted cancer therapies. Epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors from both the monoclonal antibody and tyrosine kinase inhibitor class have demonstrated clinical activity in the treatment of a broad spectrum of common human malignancies. For the discipline of radiation oncology, the 2006 report of a phase III trial demonstrating a survival advantage for advanced head and neck cancer patients with the addition of weekly cetuximab during a 7-week course of radiation is particularly gratifying. Indeed, this is the first phase III trial to confirm a survival advantage with the addition of a molecular-targeted agent to radiation. Furthermore, this result seems to have been achieved with only a modest increment in overall treatment toxicity and with very high compliance to the prescribed treatment regimen. Nevertheless, much remains to be learned regarding the rational integration of EGFR inhibitors into cancer treatment regimens, as well as methods to optimize the selection of patients most likely to benefit from EGFR inhibitor strategies.

  6. Wallenda/DLK protein levels are temporally downregulated by Tramtrack69 to allow R7 growth cones to become stationary boutons.

    PubMed

    Feoktistov, Alexander I; Herman, Tory G

    2016-08-15

    Dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK) promotes growth cone motility and must be restrained to ensure normal development. PHR (Pam/Highwire/RPM-1) ubiquitin ligases therefore target DLK for degradation unless axon injury occurs. Overall DLK levels decrease during development, but how DLK levels are regulated within a developing growth cone has not been examined. We analyzed the expression of the fly DLK Wallenda (Wnd) in R7 photoreceptor growth cones as they halt at their targets and become presynaptic boutons. We found that Wnd protein levels are repressed by the PHR protein Highwire (Hiw) during R7 growth cone halting, as has been observed in other systems. However, as R7 growth cones become boutons, Wnd levels are further repressed by a temporally expressed transcription factor, Tramtrack69 (Ttk69). Previously unobserved negative feedback from JNK also contributes to Wnd repression at both time points. We conclude that neurons deploy additional mechanisms to downregulate DLK as they form stable, synaptic connections. We use live imaging to probe the effects of Wnd and Ttk69 on R7 bouton development and conclude that Ttk69 coordinates multiple regulators of this process. PMID:27402706

  7. Lysophospholipid receptors LPA1–3 are not required for the inhibitory effects of LPA on mouse retinal growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Birgbauer, Eric; Chun, Jerold

    2016-01-01

    One of the major requirements in the development of the visual system is axonal guidance of retinal ganglion cells toward correct targets in the brain. A novel class of extracellular lipid signaling molecules, lysophospholipids, may serve as potential axon guidance cues. They signal through cognate G protein-coupled receptors, at least some of which are expressed in the visual system. Here we show that in the mouse visual system, a lysophospholipid known as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is inhibitory to retinal neurites in vitro when delivered extracellularly, causing growth cone collapse and neurite retraction. This inhibitory effect of LPA is both active in the nanomolar range and specific compared to the related lysophospholipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). Knockout mice lacking three of the five known LPA receptors, LPA1–3, continue to display retinal growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in response to LPA, demonstrating that these three receptors are not required for these inhibitory effects and indicating the existence of one or more functional LPA receptors expressed on mouse retinal neurites that can mediate neurite retraction. PMID:26966392

  8. ECRG4 inhibits growth and invasiveness of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    XU, TING; XIAO, DAJIANG; ZHANG, XIN

    2013-01-01

    ECRG4 has been shown to be a candidate tumor suppressor in several tumors, but its role in head and neck cancer remains poorly understood. In the present study, the effect of ECRG4 on head and neck cancer was investigated in vitro and in vivo. pFLAG-CMV-2-ECRG4 was stably transfected into squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) M2 cell lines to overexpress the ECRG4 gene. Real-time PCR and western blot analysis were performed to detect gene and protein expression, respectively. An MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to detect the growth of M2 cells. Matrigel™ invasion and scratch assays were applied to observe the invasion and migration of the cells. A tumorigenicity assay was applied to test the tumor growth and cervical lymph node metastasis in vivo. Based on the data, pFLAG-CMV-2-ECRG4 significantly increased the expression of ECRG4 in the M2 cells. The constructed plasmid inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in the M2 cells. The growth rate and metastasis of the tumor cells in xenografts were suppressed following the overexpression of ECRG4 in nude mice. These data suggest that ECRG4 plays a significant role in the regulation of growth and metastasis in SCCHN, providing new clues for the diagnosis and therapy of SCCHN. PMID:23833667

  9. In vivo imaging of growth cone and filopodial dynamics: evidence for contact-mediated retraction of filopodia leading to the tiling of sibling processes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael W; Macagno, Eduardo R

    2007-02-10

    In the leech embryo, the peripheral comb cell (CC) sends out many nonoverlapping, growth cone-tipped processes that grow in parallel and serve as a scaffold for the migrating myocytes of the later-developing oblique muscle layer. To explore how the parallel arrangement is generated we first examined the arrangement of CC cytoskeletal components by expressing a tubulin-binding protein and actin, both tagged with fluorescent reporters. This revealed that the growth cones were compartmentalized into F-actin-rich filopodia and a microtubule-rich central region. Time-lapse analysis with a 2-photon laser scanning microscope revealed that the growth cones of the CC are highly dynamic, undergoing rapid filopodial extension and retraction. Measurements of filopodial lifespan and length revealed that most filopodia at the leading edge of the growth cone achieved significantly longer lifespans and length than lateral filopodia. Furthermore, for the short-lived lateral filopodia, apparent interaction with a neighboring process was found to be a significant predictor of their nearly immediate (within 2-4 minutes) retraction. When contact was experimentally prevented by ablating individual CCs, the filopodia from the growth cones of adjacent segmental neighbors were found to be significantly lengthened in the direction of the removed homolog. Treatment with low doses of cytochalasin D to disrupt F-actin assembly led to filopodial retraction and growth cone collapse and resulted in the bifurcation of many CC processes, numerous crossover errors, and the loss of parallelism. These findings indicate the existence of a contact-mediated repulsive interaction between processes of the CC. PMID:17177256

  10. JAK kinase inhibition abrogates STAT3 activation and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Sen, Malabika; Pollock, Netanya I; Black, John; DeGrave, Kara A; Wheeler, Sarah; Freilino, Maria L; Joyce, Sonali; Lui, Vivian W Y; Zeng, Yan; Chiosea, Simion I; Grandis, Jennifer R

    2015-03-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been implicated in cell proliferation and survival of many cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AZD1480, an orally active pharmacologic inhibitor of JAK1/JAK2, has been tested in several cancer models. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of AZD1480 were evaluated in HNSCC preclinical models to test the potential use of JAK kinase inhibition for HNSCC therapy. AZD1480 treatment decreased HNSCC proliferation in HNSCC cell lines with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values ranging from 0.9 to 4 μM in conjunction with reduction of pSTAT3(Tyr705) expression. In vivo antitumor efficacy of AZD1480 was demonstrated in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models derived from two independent HNSCC tumors. Oral administration of AZD1480 reduced tumor growth in conjunction with decreased pSTAT3(Tyr705) expression that was observed in both PDX models. These findings suggest that the JAK1/2 inhibitors abrogate STAT3 signaling and may be effective in HNSCC treatment approaches. PMID:25810010

  11. The growth and characterization of GaN films on cone-shaped patterned sapphire by MOCVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jing; Hongling, Xiao; Xiaoliang, Wang; Cuimei, Wang; Qingwen, Deng; Zhidong, Li; Jieqin, Ding; Zhanguo, Wang; Xun, Hou

    2013-11-01

    GaN films are grown on cone-shaped patterned sapphire substrates (CPSSs) by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, and the influence of the temperature during the middle stage of GaN growth on the threading dislocation (TD) density of GaN is investigated. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD) and cathode-luminescence (CL) were used to characterize the GaN films. The XRD results showed that the edge-type dislocation density of GaN grown on CPSS is remarkably reduced compared to that of GaN grown on conventional sapphire substrates (CSSs). Furthermore, when the growth temperature in the middle stage of GaN grown on CPSS decreases, the full width at half maximum of the asymmetry (102) plane of GaN is reduced. This reduction is attributed to the enhancement of vertical growth in the middle stage with a more triangular-like shape and the bending of TDs. The CL intensity spatial mapping results also showed the superior optical properties of GaN grown on CPSS to those of GaN on CSS, and that the density of dark spots of GaN grown on CPSS induced by nonradiative recombination is reduced when the growth temperature in the middle stage decreases.

  12. Biochemical properties of Na+/K(+)-ATPase in axonal growth cone particles isolated from fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Hernández, J

    1994-08-01

    Axonal growth cones (AGC) isolated from fetal rat brain have an important specific activity of N+/K(+)-ATPase. Kinetic assays of the enzyme in AGC showed that Km values for ATP or K+ are similar to those reported for the adult brain enzyme. For Na+ the affinity (Km) was lower. Vmax for the three substrates was several times lower in AGC as compared to the adult value. We also observed two apparent inhibition constants of Na+/K(+)-ATPase by ouabain, one of low affinity, possibly corresponding to the alpha 1 isoform and another of high affinity which is different to that described for the alpha 2 isoform of the enzyme. These results support an important role for the sodium pump in the maintainance of volume and cationic balance in neuronal differentiating structures. The functional differences observed also suggest that the enzymatic complex of Na+/K(+)-ATPase in AGC is in a transitional state towards the adult configuration. PMID:7817790

  13. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2014-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Overexpression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A-Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316

  14. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Over-expression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A–Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316

  15. Cdc42 and Actin Control Polarized Expression of TI-VAMP Vesicles to Neuronal Growth Cones and Their Fusion with the Plasma MembraneV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Philipp; Rudge, Rachel; Irinopoulou, Theano; Danglot, Lydia; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile; Galli, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Tetanus neurotoxin-insensitive vesicle-associated membrane protein (TI-VAMP)-mediated fusion of intracellular vesicles with the plasma membrane is crucial for neurite outgrowth, a pathway not requiring synaptobrevin-dependent exocytosis. Yet, it is not known how the TI-VAMP membrane trafficking pathway is regulated or how it is coordinated with cytoskeletal dynamics within the growth cone that guide neurite outgrowth. Here, we demonstrate that TI-VAMP, but not synaptobrevin 2, concentrates in the peripheral, F-actin-rich region of the growth cones of hippocampal neurons in primary culture. Its accumulation correlates with and depends upon the presence of F-actin. Moreover, acute stimulation of actin remodeling by homophilic activation of the adhesion molecule L1 induces a site-directed, actin-dependent recruitment of the TI-VAMP compartment. Expression of a dominant-positive mutant of Cdc42, a key regulator of cell polarity, stimulates formation of F-actin- and TI-VAMP-rich filopodia outside the growth cone. Furthermore, we report that Cdc42 activates exocytosis of pHLuorin tagged TI-VAMP in an actin-dependent manner. Collectively, our data suggest that Cdc42 and regulated assembly of the F-actin network control the accumulation and exocytosis of TI-VAMP-containing membrane vesicles in growth cones to coordinate membrane trafficking and actin remodeling during neurite outgrowth. PMID:16381811

  16. Method comparison of automated matching software-assisted cone-beam CT and stereoscopic kilovoltage x-ray positional verification image-guided radiation therapy for head and neck cancer: a prospective analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, Clifton D.; Scarbrough, Todd J.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Rasch, Coen R. N.; Choi, Mehee; Ting, Joe Y.; Wang, Samuel J.; Papanikolaou, Niko; Rosenthal, David I.

    2009-12-01

    We sought to characterize interchangeability and agreement between cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and digital stereoscopic kV x-ray (KVX) acquisition, two methods of isocenter positional verification currently used for IGRT of head and neck cancers (HNC). A cohort of 33 patients were near-simultaneously imaged by in-room KVX and CBCT. KVX and CBCT shifts were suggested using manufacturer software for the lateral (X), vertical (Y) and longitudinal (Z) dimensions. Intra-method repeatability, systematic and random error components were calculated for each imaging modality, as were recipe-based PTV expansion margins. Inter-method agreement in each axis was compared using limits of agreement (LOA) methodology, concordance analysis and orthogonal regression. 100 daily positional assessments were performed before daily therapy in 33 patients with head and neck cancer. Systematic error was greater for CBCT in all axes, with larger random error components in the Y- and Z-axis. Repeatability ranged from 9 to 14 mm for all axes, with CBCT showing greater repeatability in 2/3 axes. LOA showed paired shifts to agree 95% of the time within ±11.3 mm in the X-axis, ±9.4 mm in the Y-axis and ±5.5 mm in the Z-axis. Concordance ranged from 'mediocre' to 'satisfactory'. Proportional bias was noted between paired X- and Z-axis measures, with a constant bias component in the Z-axis. Our data suggest non-negligible differences in software-derived CBCT and KVX image-guided directional shifts using formal method comparison statistics. A correction was made to the first line of page 7404 of this article on 26 November 2009. The corrected electronic version is identical to the print version.

  17. Automated identification of axonal growth cones in time-lapse image sequences.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Thomas M; Hooker, Andrew; Spilker, Mary E; Li, Nianzhen; Boggy, Gregory J; Vicini, Paolo; Folch, Albert

    2006-03-15

    The isolation and purification of axon guidance molecules has enabled in vitro studies of the effects of axon guidance molecule gradients on numerous neuronal cell types. In a typical experiment, cultured neurons are exposed to a chemotactic gradient and their growth is recorded by manual identification of the axon tip position from two or more micrographs. Detailed and statistically valid quantification of axon growth requires evaluation of a large number of neurons at closely spaced time points (e.g. using a time-lapse microscopy setup). However, manual tracing becomes increasingly impractical for recording axon growth as the number of time points and/or neurons increases. We present a software tool that automatically identifies and records the axon tip position in each phase-contrast image of a time-lapse series with minimal user involvement. The software outputs several quantitative measures of axon growth, and allows users to develop custom measurements. For, example analysis of growth velocity for a dissociated E13 mouse cortical neuron revealed frequent extension and retraction events with an average growth velocity of 0.05 +/- 0.14 microm/min. Comparison of software-identified axon tip positions with manually identified axon tip positions shows that the software's performance is indistinguishable from that of skilled human users. PMID:16174535

  18. Effect of semisynthetic extracellular matrix-like hydrogel containing hepatocyte growth factor on repair of femoral neck defect in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Guo, Lin; Huang, Lanfeng; Zhao, Dewei; Zhen, Ruixin; Hu, Xiaoning; Yuan, Xiaolin

    2015-01-01

    Using tissue engineering technology research to develop organized artificial bone, then repair bone defect. This work aims to investigate the role of semisynthetic extracellular matrix-like hydrogel (sECMH) containing hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on repair of femoral neck defect in rabbits. 18 New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. According to autologous paired comparison method, the left and right sides of rabbit were used as control and experimental side, respectively. The models of bilateral femoral neck bone defect were established. In experimental side, sECMH containing HGF was implanted in the defect area. In control side, no material was implanted in the defect area. At the 2nd, 4th and 8th week after surgery, the gross observation, histological examination and molybdenum target (Mo-target) X-ray examination were performed on the specimens to study the repair of femoral neck defect. In gross observation, there was no macroscopic difference of femoral neck specimen between the 2nd and 4th postoperative week. At the 8th week, the defect orifice was closed with immature cortical bone, with unblocked marrow cavity. HE staining results showed that, at the 4th week, there were more new vessels in defect area of experimental side, compared with control side. At the 8th week, in experimental side there was immature cortical bone connecting the fracture end in defect area, with visible bone marrow cells. Mo-target X-ray examination found that, at the 8th week, the bone tissue repair in experimental side was better than control side. As a new drug delivery system, sECMH containing HGF has good application prospect in bone tissue repair. PMID:26221278

  19. Uncertainties and CTV to PTV margins quantitative assessment using cone-beam CT technique in clinical application for prostate, and head and neck irradiation tumours.

    PubMed

    Juan-Senabre, X J; López-Tarjuelo, J; Conde-Moreno, A; Santos-Serra, A; Sánchez-Iglesias, A L; Quirós-Higueras, J D; de Marco Blancas, N; Calzada-Feliu, S; Ferrer-Albiach, C

    2011-11-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the magnitude of systematic and random errors from a subset of 100 prostate and 26 head and neck (H&N) cancer patients treated with conventional conformal radiotherapy and using image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). After treatment, the uncertainties involved and the CTV to PTV margin were evaluated. MATERIAL AND METHODS An Elekta Synergy® linear accelerator was used, taking advantage of 3D on-board computed tomography. IGRT with no-action level (NAL) protocol was applied, reporting the 3D translation and rotation corrections. A statistical study was performed to analyse systematic, random and interobserver uncertainties, and, finally, to obtain the CTV to PTV margins. RESULTS The H&N patients' uncertainties found were smaller than those of prostate patients. The CTV to PTV margins assessed, following the guidelines found in the literature, in the three dimensions of space (right-left, superior-inferior, anterior-posterior) were (5.3, 3.5, 3.2) mm for H&N and (7.3, 7.0, 9.0) mm for prostate cancer treatments. CONCLUSIONS It was found that assessing all the involved uncertainties within radiation treatments was very revealing; their quality improves using IGRT techniques and performing extensive data analysis. PMID:22082648

  20. Liposome encapsulated curcumin-difluorinated (CDF) inhibits the growth of cisplatin resistant head and neck cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Basak, Saroj K; Zinabadi, Alborz; Wu, Arthur W; Venkatesan, Natarajan; Duarte, Victor M; Kang, James J; Dalgard, Clifton L; Srivastava, Meera; Sarkar, Fazlul H; Wang, Marilene B; Srivatsan, Eri S

    2015-07-30

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer, with 600,000 new cases every year worldwide. Although chemotherapeutics exist, five-year survival is only 50%. New strategies to overcome drug resistance are required to improve HNSCC treatment. Curcumin-difluorinated (CDF), a synthetic analog of curcumin, was packaged in liposomes and used to evaluate growth inhibition of cisplatin resistant HNSCC cell lines CCL-23R and UM-SCC-1R generated from the parental cell lines CCL-23 and UM-SCC-1 respectively. Growth inhibition in vitro and expression levels of the CD44 (cancer stem cell marker), cytokines, and growth factors were investigated after liposomal CDF treatment. The in vivo growth inhibitory effect of liposomal CDF was evaluated in the nude mice xenograft tumor model of UM-SCC-1R and the inhibition of CD44 was measured. Treatment of the resistant cell lines in vitro with liposomal CDF resulted in a statistically significant growth inhibition (p < 0.05). The nude mice xenograft study showed a statistically significant tumor growth inhibition of UM-SCC-1R cells and a reduction in the expression of CD44 (p < 0.05), indicating an inhibitory effect of liposomal CDF on CSCs. Our results demonstrate that delivery of CDF through liposomes may be an effective method for the treatment of cisplatin resistant HNSCC. PMID:26098778

  1. EMA: a developmentally regulated cell-surface glycoprotein of CNS neurons that is concentrated at the leading edge of growth cones.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, N L; Parkinson, D; Wayne, D B; Heuser, J E; Pearlman, A L

    1992-08-01

    To identify cell-surface molecules that mediate interactions between neurons and their environment during neural development, we used monoclonal antibody techniques to define a developmentally regulated antigen in the central nervous system of the mouse. The antibody we produced (2A1) immunolabels cells throughout the central nervous system; we analyzed its distribution in the developing cerebral cortex, where it is expressed on cells very soon after they complete mitosis and leave the periventricular proliferative zone. Expression continues into adult life. The antibody also labels the epithelium of the choroid plexus and the renal proximal tubules, but does not label neurons of the peripheral nervous system in the dorsal root ganglia. In dissociated cell culture of embryonic cerebral cortex, 2A1 labels the surface of neurons but not glia. Immunolabeling of neurons in tissue culture is particularly prominent on the edge of growth cones, including filopodia and the leading edge of lamellipodia, when observed with either immunofluorescence or freeze-etch immunoelectron microscopy. Immunopurification with 2A1 of a CHAPS-extracted membrane preparation from brains of neonatal mice produces a broad (32-36 kD) electrophoretic band and a less prominent 70 kD band that are sensitive to N-glycosidase but not endoglycosidase H. Thus the 2A1 antibody recognizes a developmentally regulated, neuronal cell surface glycoprotein (or glycoproteins) with complex N-linked oligosaccharide side chains. We have termed the glycoprotein antigen EMA because of its prominence on the edge membrane of growth cones. EMA is similar to the M6 antigen (Lagenaur et al: J. Neurobiol. 23:71-88, 1992) in apparent molecular weight, distribution in tissue sections, and immunoreactivity on Western blots, suggesting that the two antigens are similar or identical. Expression of EMA is a very early manifestation of neuronal differentiation; its distribution on growth cones suggests a role in mediating the

  2. RNA-binding proteins and translational regulation in axons and growth cones

    PubMed Central

    Hörnberg, Hanna; Holt, Christine

    2013-01-01

    RNA localization and regulation play an important role in the developing and adult nervous system. In navigating axons, extrinsic cues can elicit rapid local protein synthesis that mediates directional or morphological responses. The mRNA repertoire in axons is large and dynamically changing, yet studies suggest that only a subset of these mRNAs are translated after cue stimulation, suggesting the need for a high level of translational regulation. Here, we review the role of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) as local regulators of translation in developing axons. We focus on their role in growth, guidance, and synapse formation, and discuss the mechanisms by which they regulate translation in axons. PMID:23734093

  3. Effects of crystallographic plane and co-deposited element on the growth of ion-sputter induced Si nano-cone arrays: a mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sheng-Chi; Qiu, Ying; Hao, Hong-Chen; Lu, Ming

    2015-06-01

    Self-organized Si nano-cone arrays induced by Ar+ ion sputtering on different Si crystallographic planes with different co-deposited alien atoms are investigated. The Si planes are (100), (110), and (111) ones, and the alien elements are Ta, Mo, Fe, and C, respectively. It is found that the growth of Si nano-cone arrays is insensitive to the initial crystallographic plane, but depends strongly on the co-deposited element. For the same Ar+ ion dose and sample temperature, the smaller the activation energy between the co-deposited element and Si is, the larger the average cone height and base diameter are. It is found that the preferential sputtering does not play an important role in the nano-cone formation. A model based on the concepts of classical surface-curvature-dependent sputtering yield and the formation of stationary silicide is proposed, which explains the observed results. The results of microstructural and compositional analysis support the proposed model.

  4. Differentiation of neuronal growth cones: specialization of filopodial tips for adhesive interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, H C; Lankford, K L; Klein, W L

    1985-01-01

    Adhesive contacts made by filopodia of developing neurons are important in neurite growth and in the formation of synaptic junctions. In the present work, filopodial interactions of cultured chicken retina neurons were studied by using video-enhanced contrast, differential interference contrast (VEC-DIC) microscopy and the high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM). Use of the HVEM to examine whole mounts of fixed cells showed that filopodia in older cultures developed an appearance that might be expected of nascent synapses, becoming enlarged at their endings and accumulating organelles resembling synaptic vesicles. VEC-DIC microscopy, used to observe the motility and adhesive properties of filopodia in living cells, showed there was a particularly high affinity between filopodia tips. Contacting filopodia typically repositioned themselves so they could attach at a tip-to-tip position, occasionally bending as much as 90 degrees to achieve this preferred orientation. Interacting filopodia frequently remained together as they pushed or pulled on each other, moved laterally together, or stretched tightly and underwent intense vibratory movements. Such linked motility occurred even when apparent gaps existed between the filopodia. Examination of these gaps with the HVEM revealed filamentous structures linking the apposed membranes. The filamentous links were 10-13 nm in diameter and 30-100 nm long. Although it has not yet been established that the filaments reflect the native configuration of the interconnecting materials, the structures seem likely to be associated with the strongly adhesive behavior of the filopodial tips. The possible significance of these structural and functional properties of filopodia tips to axon growth and synapse formation is discussed. Images PMID:3865227

  5. The Disruption of the Cytoskeleton during Semaphorin 3A induced Growth Cone Collapse Correlates with Differences in Actin Organization and Associated Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A; Bridgman, Paul C

    2010-01-01

    Repulsive guidance cues induce growth cone collapse or collapse and retraction. Collapse results from disruption and loss of the actin cytoskeleton. Actin rich regions of growth cones contain binding proteins that influence filament organization, such as Arp2/3, cortactin, and fascin, but little is known about the role that these proteins play in collapse. Here we show that Semaphorin 3A (Sema 3A), which is repulsive to mouse dorsal root ganglion neurons, has unequal effects on actin binding proteins and their associated filaments. The immunofluorescence staining intensity of Arp-2 and cortactin decreases relative to total protein, while in unextracted growth cones fascin increases. Fascin and myosin IIB staining redistribute and show increased overlap. The degree of actin filament loss during collapse correlates with filament superstructures detected by rotary shadow electron microscopy. Collapse results in the loss of branched f-actin meshworks, while actin bundles are partially retained to varying degrees. Taken together with the known affects of Sema 3A on actin, this suggests a model for collapse that follows a sequence; depolymerization of actin meshworks followed by partial depolymerization of fascin associated actin bundles and their movement to the neurite to complete collapse. The relocated fascin associated actin bundles may provide the substrate for actomyosin contractions that produce retraction. PMID:19513995

  6. Optogenetic control of PIP3: PIP3 is sufficient to induce the actin-based active part of growth cones and is regulated via endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Kakumoto, Toshiyuki; Nakata, Takao

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3) is highly regulated in a spatiotemporal manner and plays multiple roles in individual cells. However, the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3 in developing neurons remain unclear because of a lack of techniques for manipulating PIP3 spatiotemporally. We addressed this issue by combining optogenetic control and observation of endogenous PIP3 signaling. Endogenous PIP3 was abundant in actin-rich structures such as growth cones and "waves", and PIP3-rich plasma membranes moved actively within growth cones. To study the role of PIP3 in developing neurons, we developed a PI3K photoswitch that can induce production of PIP3 at specific locations upon blue light exposure. We succeeded in producing PIP3 locally in mouse hippocampal neurons. Local PIP3 elevation at neurite tips did not induce neurite elongation, but it was sufficient to induce the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia. Interestingly, ectopic PIP3 elevation alone activated membranes to form actin-based structures whose behavior was similar to that of growth-cone-like "waves". We also found that endocytosis regulates effective PIP3 concentration at plasma membranes. These results revealed the local dynamics and primary functions of PIP3, providing fundamental information about PIP3 signaling in neurons. PMID:23951027

  7. Cone Heads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coy, Mary

    2005-01-01

    The author, a middle school art teacher, describes a sculpture project lesson involving Cone Heads (sculptures made from cardboard cones). Discussion of caricatures with exaggerated facial features and interesting profiles helped students understand that the more expressive the face, the better. This project took approximately four to five…

  8. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alternative Names Pain - neck; Neck stiffness; Cervicalgia; Whiplash Images Neck pain Whiplash Location of whiplash pain References ... pubmed/19272509 . Read More Diskectomy Foraminotomy Laminectomy Spinal fusion Patient Instructions Spine surgery - discharge Update Date 3/ ...

  9. Expression of Wnt Receptors in Adult Spiral Ganglion Neurons: Frizzled 9 Localization at Growth Cones of Regenerating Neurites

    PubMed Central

    Shah, S. M.; Kang, Y.-J.; Christensen, B. L.; Feng, A. S.; Kollmar, R.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about signaling pathways, besides those of neurotrophic factors, that are operational in adult spiral ganglion neurons. In patients with sensorineural hearing loss, such pathways could eventually be targeted to stimulate and guide neurite outgrowth from the remnants of the spiral ganglion towards a cochlear implant, thereby improving the fidelity of sound transmission. To systematically identify neuronal receptors for guidance cues in the adult cochlea, we conducted a genome-wide cDNA microarray screen with two-month-old CBA/CaJ mice. A meta-analysis of our data and those from older mice in two other studies revealed the presence of neuronal transmembrane receptors that represent all four established guidance pathways—ephrin, netrin, semaphorin, and slit—in the mature cochlea as late as 15 months. In addition, we observed the expression of all known receptors for the Wnt morphogens, whose neuronal guidance function has only recently been recognized. In situ hybridizations located the mRNAs of the Wnt receptors frizzled 1, 4, 6, 9, and 10 specifically in adult spiral ganglion neurons. Finally, frizzled 9 protein was found in the growth cones of adult spiral ganglion neurons that were regenerating neurites in culture. We conclude from our results that adult spiral ganglion neurons are poised to respond to neurite damage, owing to the constitutive expression of a large and diverse collection of guidance receptors. Wnt signaling, in particular, emerges as a candidate pathway for guiding neurite outgrowth towards a cochlear implant after sensorineural hearing loss. PMID:19716861

  10. Combined Inhibition of c-Src and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Abrogates Growth and Invasion of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Koppikar, Priya; Choi, Seung-Ho; Egloff, Ann Marie; Cai, Quan; Suzuki, Shinsuke; Freilino, Maria; Nozawa, Hiroshi; Thomas, Sufi M.; Gooding, William E.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Increased expression and/or activation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in many cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Src family kinases, including c-Src, mediate a variety of intra- or extracellular signals that contribute to tumor formation and progression. This study was undertaken to elucidate the role of c-Src in the growth and invasion of HNSCC and to determine the effects of combined targeting of EGFR and Src kinases in HNSCC cell lines. Experimental design HNSCC cells were engineered to stably express a dominant-active (DA) form of c-Src and investigated in cell growth and invasion assays. The biochemical effects of combined treatment with the Src inhibitor, AZD0530, a potent, orally active Src inhibitor with Bcr/Abl activity and the EGFR kinase inhibitor, gefitinib, were examined as well as the consequences of dual Src/EGFR targeting on the growth and invasion of a panel of HNSCC cell lines. Results HNSCC cells expressing DA c-Src demonstrated increased growth and invasion compared with vector-transfected controls. Combined treatment with AZD0530 and gefitinib resulted in greater inhibition of HNSCC cell growth and invasion compared with either agent alone. Conclusions These results suggest that increased expression and activation of c-Src promotes HNSCC progression where combined targeting of EGFR and c-Src may be an efficacious treatment approach. PMID:18594011

  11. Observing scoria cone growth and lava flow development in the Bocca Nuova crater, Mount Etna, Sicily (2012), using repeat terrestrial laser scanner measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slatcher, N.; James, M. R.; Calvari, S.; Ganci, G.; Browning, J.

    2012-12-01

    In July 2012, following the cessation of the 2011 - 2012 sequence of fire fountaining events from the flanks of the South East crater, magmatic activity began in the Bocca Nuova summit crater of Mount Etna (Sicily). The activity was characterised by mild Strombolian explosions and gentle lava effusion, and began constructing a small scoria cone within the crater. Here, we present analysis of a sequence of terrestrial laser scans, time-lapse camera and satellite data that captured scoria cone growth and lava flow development between 17 - 21 July, 2012. Activity over the observation period comprised Strombolian explosions at a recurrence interval of ~1 - 10 seconds, and a short lava flow (approximately 20 m wide and 120 m long) emanating from the vent region. On 17, 19 and 21 July, a Riegl LPM-321 terrestrial laser scanner (TLS) was deployed on the western rim of the Bocca Nuova, ~350m from the active vent and used to capture a single scan on each day to cover the cone, lava flow and crater wall. High-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from these scans were used to calculate volumetric change and growth rate of the cone. A maximum elevation gain of ~15 m and an increase in volume of ~84000 m3 (equivalent to 0.24 m3s-1) was observed over the four-day period. The lava flow was also repeatedly scanned at 10-minute intervals over a 90-minute period on 21 July. By combining these TLS data with concurrently collected thermal and visual imagery, a detailed time-series analysis of flow velocities and decimetric topographic changes will be used to assess lava flux and estimate rheological properties.

  12. Epidermal growth factor receptor variant III mediates head and neck cancer cell invasion via STAT3 activation

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Shinsuke; Morgan, Sarah E.; Thomas, Sufi M.; Sen, Malabika; Leeman-Neill, Rebecca J.; Kuan, Chien-Tsun; Bigner, Darrell; Gooding, William E.; Lai, Stephen Y.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) is frequently over-expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) where aberrant signaling downstream of this receptor contributes to tumor growth. EGFR variant III (EGFRvIII) is the most commonly altered form of EGFR and contains a truncated ligand-binding domain. We previously reported that EGFRvIII is expressed in up to 40% of HNSCC tumors where it is associated with increased proliferation, tumor growth and chemoresistance to anti-tumor drugs including the EGFR targeting monoclonal antibody cetuximab. Cetuximab was FDA-approved in 2006 for HNSCC but has not been shown to prevent invasion or metastasis. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the mechanisms of EGFRvIII-mediated cell motility and invasion in HNSCC. We found that EGFRvIII induced HNSCC cell migration and invasion in conjunction with increased STAT3 activation, which was not abrogated by cetuximab treatment. Further investigation demonstrated that EGF-induced expression of the STAT3 target gene HIF1-α, was abolished by cetuximab in HNSCC cells expressing wild-type EGFR under hypoxic conditions, but not in EGFRvIII-expressing HNSCC cells. These results suggest that EGFRvIII mediates HNSCC cell migration and invasion via increased STAT3 activation and induction of HIF1-α, which contribute to cetuximab resistance in EGFRvIII-expressing HNSCC tumors. PMID:20622897

  13. Surface Orientation Affects the Direction of Cone Growth by Leptolyngbya sp. Strain C1, a Likely Architect of Coniform Structures Octopus Spring (Yellowstone National Park)

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Kristina; Gonzalez, Nicolas I.; Stewart, Joshua; Ospino, Frank; Nguyen, Dickie; Cho, David T.; Ghahremani, Nahal; Spear, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Laminated, microbially produced stromatolites within the rock record provide some of the earliest evidence for life on Earth. The chemical, physical, and biological factors that lead to the initiation of these organosedimentary structures and shape their morphology are unclear. Modern coniform structures with morphological features similar to stromatolites are found on the surface of cyanobacterial/microbial mats. They display a vertical element of growth, can have lamination, can be lithified, and observably grow with time. To begin to understand the microbial processes and interactions required for cone formation, we determined the phylogenetic composition of the microbial community of a coniform structure from a cyanobacterial mat at Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park, and reconstituted coniform structures in vitro. The 16S rRNA clone library from the coniform structure was dominated by Leptolyngbya sp. Other cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria were present in much lower abundance. The same Leptolyngbya sp. identified in the clone library was also enriched in the laboratory and could produce cones in vitro. When coniform structures were cultivated in the laboratory, the initial incubation conditions were found to influence coniform morphology. In addition, both the angle of illumination and the orientation of the surface affected the angle of cone formation demonstrating how external factors can influence coniform, and likely, stromatolite morphology. PMID:23241986

  14. TGFβ3-mediated induction of Periostin facilitates head and neck cancer growth and is associated with metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xing; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Xu; Shen, Zongze; Lv, Zhongjing; Li, Zhihui; Wei, Wenyi; Chen, Wantao

    2016-01-01

    The matrix-specific protein periostin (POSTN) is up-regulated in human cancers and associated with cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Although the stroma of cancer tissues is the main source of POSTN, it is still unclear how POSTN plays a role to facilitate the interplay between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in head and neck cancer (HNC), thereby promoting tumorigenesis via modifying the tumor microenvironment. Herein, we have performed studies to investigate POSTN and its role in HNC microenvironment. Our results indicated that POSTN was significantly up-regulated in HNCs, especially in the tissues with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, POSTN was highly enriched in the stroma of cancer tissues and produced mainly by CAFs. More importantly, we have pinpointed TGF-β3 as the major upstream molecular that triggers the induction of POSTN in CAFs. As such, during the interaction between fibroblasts and cancer cells, the increased stromal POSTN induced by TGF-β3 directly accelerated the growth, migration and invasion of cancer cells. Hence, our study has provided a novel modulative role for POSTN on HNC progression and further reveals POSTN as an effective biomarker to predict metastasis as well as a potential cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26857387

  15. TGFβ3-mediated induction of Periostin facilitates head and neck cancer growth and is associated with metastasis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xing; Yan, Ming; Zhang, Jianjun; Wang, Xu; Shen, Zongze; Lv, Zhongjing; Li, Zhihui; Wei, Wenyi; Chen, Wantao

    2016-01-01

    The matrix-specific protein periostin (POSTN) is up-regulated in human cancers and associated with cancer growth, metastasis and angiogenesis. Although the stroma of cancer tissues is the main source of POSTN, it is still unclear how POSTN plays a role to facilitate the interplay between cancer cells and cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) in head and neck cancer (HNC), thereby promoting tumorigenesis via modifying the tumor microenvironment. Herein, we have performed studies to investigate POSTN and its role in HNC microenvironment. Our results indicated that POSTN was significantly up-regulated in HNCs, especially in the tissues with lymph node metastasis. Moreover, POSTN was highly enriched in the stroma of cancer tissues and produced mainly by CAFs. More importantly, we have pinpointed TGF-β3 as the major upstream molecular that triggers the induction of POSTN in CAFs. As such, during the interaction between fibroblasts and cancer cells, the increased stromal POSTN induced by TGF-β3 directly accelerated the growth, migration and invasion of cancer cells. Hence, our study has provided a novel modulative role for POSTN on HNC progression and further reveals POSTN as an effective biomarker to predict metastasis as well as a potential cancer therapeutic target. PMID:26857387

  16. The Rat Homolog of the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene ZNF804A Is Highly Expressed during Brain Development, Particularly in Growth Cones

    PubMed Central

    Hinna, Katja Hvid; Rich, Karen; Fex-Svenningsen, Åsa; Benedikz, Eirikur

    2015-01-01

    A single nucleotide polymorphism in the ZNF804A gene, rs1344706, is associated with schizophrenia. The polymorphism has been suggested to alter fetal expression of ZNF804A. It has also been reported to be associated with altered cortical functioning and neural connectivity in the brain. Since developmental mechanisms are suggested in the pathophysiology for schizophrenia, expression of Zfp804A, the rat homolog of ZNF804A, was investigated in the developing rat brain. We found that expression of Zfp804A in most brain regions is developmentally regulated and peaks around birth, where after it decreases towards adult levels. This time point is developmentally the equivalent to the second trimester of fetal development in humans. An exception to this expression pattern is the hippocampus where the expression of Zfp804A appears to increase again in the adult brain. Using laser capture and quantitative PCR we found that Zfp804A mRNA expression in the adult rat hippocampus is highest in the CA1 sub region, where the overall firing rates of neurons is higher than in the CA3 region. In cultured cortical neurons Zfp804A mRNA expression peaked at day 4 and then decreased. The ZFP804A protein expression was therefore investigated with immunochemistry in such cultures. Interestingly, before day 4, the protein is mostly found in the perinuclear region of the cell but at day 4, ZFP804A was instead found throughout the cell and particularly in the growth cones. In conclusion we demonstrate that Zfp804A increases in the rat brain at the time of birth, coinciding with neuronal differentiation. We also show that ZFP804A is localized to growth cones of growing neurites. These data implicate ZFP804A in growth cone function and neurite elongation. The polymorphism rs1344706 lowers expression of ZNF804A during prenatal brain development. This may affect ZNF804A’s role in cone function and neurite elongation leading to synaptic deficits and altered neural connectivity. PMID:26148198

  17. Differential diagnostic value of computed tomography perfusion combined with vascular endothelial growth factor expression in head and neck lesions

    PubMed Central

    WANG, JIE; TANG, ZUOHUA; WANG, SHUYI; ZENG, WENJIAO; QIAN, WEN; WU, LINGJIE; WANG, WENZHONG; LUO, JIANFENG

    2016-01-01

    There are numerous types of head and neck lesions (HNLs), and conventional computed tomography (CT) has low specificity and sensitivity in the definitive and differential diagnosis of HNLs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the value of perfusion CT (CTP) combined with vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in the differentiation between malignant and benign HNLs. In total, 41 HNLs, which were pathologically confirmed, underwent CTP and VEGF expression analysis. All lesions were divided into three groups: Group A, benign hypovascular lesions; Group B, benign hypervascular lesions; and Group C, malignant lesions. Time density curve (TDC) and CTP parameters [maximum intensity projection (MIP), blood volume (BV), blood flow (BF), mean transit time and capillary permeability] were analyzed. The association between perfusion measurements and VEGF was assessed using Pearson's correlation. TDCs were classified into three types, and type I was more frequently identified in benign tumors (Groups A and B) compared with malignant tumors (Group C) (P=0.003). Malignant tumors primarily had a TDC of type II and III. MIP, BF and BV were all significantly higher in Groups B and C compared to Group A (P<0.01). VEGF expression of malignant tumors was significantly higher than benign tumors (P=0.007). No correlation was identified between VEGF and any CTP parameter. The present findings suggest that CTP combined with VEGF may differentiate between malignant and benign HNLs, and between benign hypovascular and hypervascular lesions. PMID:27123114

  18. JAK Kinase Inhibition Abrogates STAT3 Activation and Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Tumor Growth12

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Malabika; Pollock, Netanya I.; Black, John; DeGrave, Kara A.; Wheeler, Sarah; Freilino, Maria L.; Joyce, Sonali; Lui, Vivian W.Y.; Zeng, Yan; Chiosea, Simion I.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 has been implicated in cell proliferation and survival of many cancers including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). AZD1480, an orally active pharmacologic inhibitor of JAK1/JAK2, has been tested in several cancer models. In the present study, the in vitro and in vivo effects of AZD1480 were evaluated in HNSCC preclinical models to test the potential use of JAK kinase inhibition for HNSCC therapy. AZD1480 treatment decreased HNSCC proliferation in HNSCC cell lines with half maximal effective concentration (EC50) values ranging from 0.9 to 4 μM in conjunction with reduction of pSTAT3Tyr705 expression. In vivo antitumor efficacy of AZD1480 was demonstrated in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models derived from two independent HNSCC tumors. Oral administration of AZD1480 reduced tumor growth in conjunction with decreased pSTAT3Tyr705 expression that was observed in both PDX models. These findings suggest that the JAK1/2 inhibitors abrogate STAT3 signaling and may be effective in HNSCC treatment approaches. PMID:25810010

  19. Epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 enhances head and neck squamous cell carcinoma metastasis through fibronectin up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jinn-Yuan; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Chen, Shang-Hung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Ben-Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is a major cause of metastasis in many cancers, such as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, whether the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates EGF-enhanced HNSCC metastasis remains unclear. Interestingly, we found that EGF induced COX-2 expression mainly in HNSCC. The tumor cell transformation induced by EGF was repressed by COX-2 knockdown, and this repression was reversed by simultaneously treating the cells with EGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The down-regulation of COX-2 expression or inhibition of COX-2 activity significantly blocked EGF enhancement of cell migration and invasion, but the addition of PGE2 compensated for this inhibitory effect in COX-2-knockdown cells. COX-2 depletion inhibited EGF-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and fibronectin expression and Rac1/cdc42 activation. The inhibitory effect of COX-2 depletion on MMPs and the fibronectin/Rac1/cdc42 axis were reversed by co-treatment with PGE2. Furthermore, depletion of fibronectin impeded the COX-2-enhanced binding of HNSCC cells to endothelial cells and tumor cells metastatic seeding of the lungs. These results demonstrate that EGF-induced COX-2 expression enhances HNSCC metastasis via activation of the fibronectin signaling pathway. The inhibition of COX-2 expression and activation may be a potential strategy for the treatment of EGFR-mediated HNSCC metastasis. PMID:25595899

  20. Axl mediates acquired resistance of head and neck cancer cells to the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor erlotinib.

    PubMed

    Giles, Keith M; Kalinowski, Felicity C; Candy, Patrick A; Epis, Michael R; Zhang, Priscilla M; Redfern, Andrew D; Stuart, Lisa M; Goodall, Gregory J; Leedman, Peter J

    2013-11-01

    Elevated expression and activity of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with development and progression of head and neck cancer (HNC) and a poor prognosis. Clinical trials with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (e.g., erlotinib) have been disappointing in HNC. To investigate the mechanisms mediating resistance to these agents, we developed an HNC cell line (HN5-ER) with acquired erlotinib resistance. In contrast to parental HN5 HNC cells, HN5-ER cells exhibited an epithelial-mesenchymal (EMT) phenotype with increased migratory potential, reduced E-cadherin and epithelial-associated microRNAs (miRNA), and elevated vimentin expression. Phosphorylated receptor tyrosine kinase profiling identified Axl activation in HN5-ER cells. Growth and migration of HN5-ER cells were blocked with a specific Axl inhibitor, R428, and R428 resensitized HN5-ER cells to erlotinib. Microarray analysis of HN5-ER cells confirmed the EMT phenotype associated with acquired erlotinib resistance, and identified activation of gene expression associated with cell migration and inflammation pathways. Moreover, increased expression and secretion of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in HN5-ER cells suggested a role for inflammatory cytokine signaling in EMT and erlotinib resistance. Expression of the tumor suppressor miR-34a was reduced in HN5-ER cells and increasing its expression abrogated Axl expression and reversed erlotinib resistance. Finally, analysis of 302 HNC patients revealed that high tumor Axl mRNA expression was associated with poorer survival (HR = 1.66, P = 0.007). In summary, our results identify Axl as a key mediator of acquired erlotinib resistance in HNC and suggest that therapeutic inhibition of Axl by small molecule drugs or specific miRNAs might overcome anti-EGFR therapy resistance. PMID:24026012

  1. Healing of Experimentally Simulated Fractures: Contact Neck Growth, and Strength Evolution of the Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, F.; Dysthe, D.; Voisin, C.

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the physical processes operating in active fault zones, we conduct analogue laboratory experiments where we simulated a rough fracture that undergoes healing/shear cycles under dry condition or in the presence of a reactive fluid. This set-up is a surrogate for the healing/sealing of fractures and faults rocks, where fluid-rock interactions are operative at the millennium time scale. A rough slider of sodium chloride was left in contact with a flat glass plate under a constant normal load. The whole set-up was mounted on a microscope and left in a temperature-controlled box. The closure of the interface through several days was measured using high resolution displacement sensors and the contact surface was continuously imaged with a CCD camera. Under dry conditions, a small transient creep displacement perpendicularly to the fracture plane was measured. This deformation last for several minutes and finally stopped. Under fluid saturated conditions, a slow closure of the rough interface was measured over several days. This closure was concomitant with the growth of contact points, driven by surface tension forces. After 50 hours, up to 10% of the fracture surface was healed by this process. The force necessary to break the adhesion forces, allowing the sample to slide, was also measured after several periods of increasing holding times and showed a power law dependence with time. After each experiment, the fracture interface roughness was measured to nanometer resolution using white light interferometry. The morphology of the contacts was characterized by scaling relationships. Finally, we propose a macroscopic constitutive model of fracture closure and strength recovery, related to the dynamics of the contact asperities, which are seen to flatten and expand through time.

  2. Cross-talk Between Estrogen Receptor and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Egloff, Ann Marie; Rothstein, Mary E.; Seethala, Raja; Siegfried, Jill M.; Grandis, Jennifer Rubin.; Stabile, Laura P.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To characterize estrogen receptor (ER) expression and signaling in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines and patient tissues and evaluate ER and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) cross-activation in HNSCC. Experimental Design ER expression and signaling in HNSCC cell lines were assessed by immunoblotting. In vitro proliferation and invasion were evaluated in HNSCC cell lines in response to ER and EGFR ligands or inhibitors. ER and EGFR protein expression in patient tissues was assessed by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. Results Phospho-MAP kinase (P-MAPK) levels were significantly increased following combined estrogen (E2) and EGF treatment. Treatment of HNSCC cells with E2 and EGF significantly increased cell invasion compared to either treatment alone while inhibiting these two pathways resulted in reduced invasion compared to inhibiting either pathway alone. EGFR (P=0.008) and nuclear ERα (ERαnuc) (P<0.001) levels were significantly increased in HNSCC tumors (n=56) compared to adjacent mucosa (n=30) while ERβnuc levels did not differ (P=0.67). Patients with high ERαnuc and EGFR tumor levels had significantly reduced PFS compared to patients low tumor ERαnuc and EGFR levels (H.R. = 4.09, P = 0.01; Cox proportional hazards). In contrast, high ERβnuc tumor levels were not associated with reduced PFS alone or when combined with EGFR. Conclusions ERα and ERβ were expressed in HNSCC and stimulation with ER ligands resulted in both cytoplasmic signal transduction and transcriptional activation. ER and EGFR cross-talk was observed. Collectively, these studies indicate ER and EGFR together may contribute to HNSCC development and disease progression. PMID:19825947

  3. Existence of benefit finding and posttraumatic growth in people treated for head and neck cancer: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Harding, Sam; Sanipour, Fatimeh; Moss, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    Background. The impact of head and neck cancer (HNC) in long-term survivors differs widely among individuals, and a significant number of them suffer from the negative effects of disease, whereas others report significant positive effect. This systematic review investigated the evidence the implications of treatment for HNC and subsequent development of Benefit Finding (BF) or Posttraumatic Growth (PTG). Purpose. To understand how differing medical, psychological and social characteristics of HNC may lead to BF/PTG and subsequently inform post-treatment interventions to encourage positive outcomes. Method. In February 2012, five databases including Pubmed, and Psych Info, were searched, for peer-reviewed English-language publications. Search strings included key words pertaining to HNC, BF, and PTG. One thousand three hundred and sixty three publications were identified, reviewed, and reduced following Cochrane guidelines and inclusion/exclusion criteria specified by a group of maxillofacial consultants and psychologists. Publications were then quality assessed using the CASP Cohort Critical Appraisal tool. Findings. Five manuscripts met the search and selection criteria, and were sourced for review. All studies were identified as being level IIb evidence which is a medium level of quality. The majority of studies investigated benefit finding (80%) and were split between recruiting participant via cancer clinics and postal survey. They focused on the medical, psychological and social characteristics of the patient following completion of treatment for HNC. Conclusion. Demographic factors across the papers showed similar patterns of relationships across BF and PTG; that higher education/qualification and cohabitation/marriage are associated with increased BF/PTG. Similarly, overlap with disease characteristics and psychosocial factors where hope and optimism were both positively correlated with increased reported BF/PTG. PMID:24688840

  4. Presence of a Large β(1-3)Glucan Linked to Chitin at the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mother-Bud Neck Suggests Involvement in Localized Growth Control

    PubMed Central

    Blanco, Noelia; Arroyo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    Previous results suggested that the chitin ring present at the yeast mother-bud neck, which is linked specifically to the nonreducing ends of β(1-3)glucan, may help to suppress cell wall growth at the neck by competing with β(1-6)glucan and thereby with mannoproteins for their attachment to the same sites. Here we explored whether the linkage of chitin to β(1-3)glucan may also prevent the remodeling of this polysaccharide that would be necessary for cell wall growth. By a novel mild procedure, β(1-3)glucan was isolated from cell walls, solubilized by carboxymethylation, and fractionated by size exclusion chromatography, giving rise to a very high-molecular-weight peak and to highly polydisperse material. The latter material, soluble in alkali, may correspond to glucan being remodeled, whereas the large-size fraction would be the final cross-linked structural product. In fact, the β(1-3)glucan of buds, where growth occurs, is solubilized by alkali. A gas1 mutant with an expected defect in glucan elongation showed a large increase in the polydisperse fraction. By a procedure involving sodium hydroxide treatment, carboxymethylation, fractionation by affinity chromatography on wheat germ agglutinin-agarose, and fractionation by size chromatography on Sephacryl columns, it was shown that the β(1-3)glucan attached to chitin consists mostly of high-molecular-weight material. Therefore, it appears that linkage to chitin results in a polysaccharide that cannot be further remodeled and does not contribute to growth at the neck. In the course of these experiments, the new finding was made that part of the chitin forms a noncovalent complex with β(1-3)glucan. PMID:22366124

  5. Whiskers, cones and pyramids created in sputtering by ion bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wehner, G. K.

    1979-01-01

    A thorough study of the role which foreign atoms play in cone formation during sputtering of metals revealed many experimental facts. Two types of cone formation were distinquished, deposit cones and seed cones. Twenty-six combinations of metals for seed cone formation were tested. The sputtering yield variations with composition for combinations which form seed cones were measured. It was demonstrated that whisker growth becomes a common occurrence when low melting point material is sputter deposited on a hot nonsputtered high melting point electrode.

  6. [Fiddler's neck].

    PubMed

    Knierim, C; Goertz, W; Reifenberger, J; Homey, B; Meller, S

    2013-10-01

    The fiddler's neck is an uncommon variant of acne mechanica in violinists and violists. It is a single firm red-brown dermal nodule usually on the left side of neck. This special form of acne mechanica represents a therapeutic challenge since the triggering mechanical factors persist, unless they can be corrected by changes in positioning or modifications of the chin pad. A 72-year-old woman who had played the violin since childhood presented with a red-brown nodule on her neck for 18 months. Cushioning provided no relief. Excision of the affected area with primary closure represented one therapeutic option. Further supportive measures include improved posture to reduce the pressure between skin and instrument and interposing a neck cloth. PMID:23989244

  7. Neck pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... falls can cause severe neck injuries, such as vertebral fractures, whiplash, blood vessel injury, and even paralysis. Other ... fibromyalgia Cervical arthritis or spondylosis Ruptured disk ... spine from osteoporosis Spinal stenosis (narrowing of the spinal ...

  8. Hybrid Y Stenting with the Waffle-Cone

    PubMed Central

    Limbucci, Nicola; Nappini, Sergio; Renieri, Leonardo; Consoli, Arturo; Rosi, Andrea; Grillea, Giovanni; Bartolo, Marcello; Mangiafico, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Summary Endovascular treatment of wide-neck bifurcation aneurysms is challenging and often requires adjunctive techniques and devices. We report our experience with the hybrid Y stenting with the waffle-cone technique, combining Y stent-assisted coiling and waffle-cone stenting techniques. This approach has been described only in a single case report using a combination of open and closed cell stents. We describe four cases treated by hybrid Y stenting with the waffle-cone procedure with a variation from the originally reported technique, consisting in deploying two closed cell stents. All patients were successfully treated without complications. We propose hybrid Y stenting with the waffle-cone for the treatment of wide-neck bifurcation aneurysms as a bailout technique after failure of Y stent-assisted coiling. PMID:25496677

  9. Paleomagnetic, Anisortopy of Magnetic Susceptibility, and structural Data Bearing on Magma Emplacement and the growth of the Miocene Hrad Trosky a Monogenic Strombolian Cinder Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brister, A. R.; Petronis, M. S.; Lindline, J.; Van Wyk de Vries, B.; Rapprich, V.

    2012-12-01

    The Hrad (castle) Trosky is a 14th century medieval castle located in NE Bohemia, Czech Republic built on top of a monogenic Strombolian cinder-spatter cone. The Hrad Trosky Volcano belongs to a relatively well-preserved set of middle Miocene scoria cones in the Jičín Volcanic field. Volcanic activity occurred in the form of scattered Strombolian eruptions from multiple volcanic centers producing basanitic magmas mostly erupted along an east-west trend associated with the Lusatian fault. Erosion of the Hrad Trosky Volcano resulted in exceptional three dimensional exposure of the magma feeder conduit system. In order to gain a better understanding of the magma emplacement and subvolcanic deformation processes at the Hrad Trosky volcano we collected samples for a detailed, paleomagnetic, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), and structural study. AMS data provides information on magma flow patterns and improve our understanding of the kinematics of magma flow. Paleomagnetic data will be compared to the late Miocene expected field direction to discern any subvocanic deformation associated with subsequent intrusions during the growth of the volcanic system. Structural data, such as basic field mapping, fracture patterns, Reidel shears, and other kinematic indicator, should provide additional constraints on the details of volcanic construction and/or deformation. To asses the evolution of the Hrad Trosky volcano, we collected twenty-one sampling sites with eight to fourteen sample collected at each sites. These include fifteen sites in the magma conduit, five sites in lava flows, and one site scoria. In addition, we conducted five baked-contact tests to evaluate the stability of the remanence and the antiquity of the magnetization. Preliminary results are encouraging with AMS data yielding high susceptibility resultsand well defined principal susceptibility axes. Paleomagnetic data show a relatively simple demagnetization behavior that likely reflects a primary

  10. Retinoid metabolism and all-trans retinoic acid-induced growth inhibition in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Braakhuis, B. J.; Klaassen, I.; van der Leede, B. M.; Cloos, J.; Brakenhoff, R. H.; Copper, M. P.; Teerlink, T.; Hendriks, H. F.; van der Saag, P. T.; Snow, G. B.

    1997-01-01

    Retinoids can reverse potentially premalignant lesions and prevent second primary tumours in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Furthermore, it has been reported that acquired resistance to all-trans retinoic acid (RA) in leukaemia is associated with decreased plasma peak levels, probably the result of enhanced retinoid metabolism. The aim of this study was to investigate the metabolism of retinoids and relate this to growth inhibition in HNSCC. Three HNSCC cell lines were selected on the basis of a large variation in the all-trans RA-induced growth inhibition. Cells were exposed to 9.5 nM (radioactive) for 4 and 24 h, and to 1 and 10 microM (nonradioactive) all-trans RA for 4, 24, 48 and 72 h, and medium and cells were analysed for retinoid metabolites. At all concentrations studied, the amount of growth inhibition was proportional to the extent at which all-trans-, 13- and 9-cis RA disappeared from the medium as well as from the cells. This turnover process coincided with the formation of a group of as yet unidentified polar retinoid metabolites. The level of mRNA of cellular RA-binding protein II (CRABP-II), involved in retinoid homeostasis, was inversely proportional to growth inhibition. These findings indicate that for HNSCC retinoid metabolism may be associated with growth inhibition. Images Figure 6 PMID:9231918

  11. Human rhomboid family-1 gene RHBDF1 participates in GPCR-mediated transactivation of EGFR growth signals in head and neck squamous cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huafei; Thomas, Sufi M.; Yan, Zhen-Wen; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Vogt, Andreas; Li, Lu-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is an activated oncogene in many cancers. It can be transactivated by ligands of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). We show here that a novel gene, human rhomboid family-1 (RHBDF1), which was recently reported to have a pivotal role in epithelial cancer cell growth in culture and in xenograft tumors, participates in the modulation of GPCR-mediated EGFR transactivation. The RHBDF1 protein localizes mainly in the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing the RHBDF1 gene in head and neck squamous cancer cell line 1483 cells with siRNA causes an inhibition of gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) -induced phosphorylation of EGFR and EGFR-dependent signaling proteins p44/42 MAPK and AKT, accompanied by an inhibition of GRP-induced survival, proliferation, and invasion of the cells. The EGFR signaling pathway itself remains intact, however, as the cells remain responsive to exogenous EGF. In addition, RHBDF1 gene silencing disrupts GRP-stimulated secretion of EGFR ligand TGF-α, but not the production of latent TGF-α, whereas engineered overexpression of RHBDF1 markedly accelerates the secretion of TGF-α. These findings are consistent with the view that RHBDF1 is critically involved in a GPCR ligand-stimulated process leading to the activation of latent EGFR ligands.—Zou, H., Thomas, S. M., Yan, Z.-W., Grandis, J. R., Vogt, A., Li, L.-Y. Human rhomboid family-1 gene RHBDF1 participates in GPCR-mediated transactivation of EGFR growth signals in head and neck squamous cancer cells. PMID:18832597

  12. Tumour growth rates in squamous carcinoma of the head and neck measured by in vivo bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and flow cytometry.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, G.; Cooke, T. G.; Cooke, L. D.; Stanton, P. D.; Bowie, G.; Stell, P. M.

    1992-01-01

    The cell kinetics of 82 squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck were studied by in vivo administration of the thymidine analogue, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdUrd). Ploidy, BrdUrd labelling index (LI), duration of S-phase (Ts), potential doubling time (Tpot) and S-phase fraction (SPF) were measured by flow cytometry on 50 microns paraffin embedded sections. The range of values obtained compared well with other in vivo cell kinetic studies of head and neck cancer. Aneuploid tumours had a significantly higher BrdUrd labelling index and SPF, and a short Tpot than diploid tumours. To validate the use of 50 microns sections for measuring cell kinetic parameters by flow cytometry a comparison of values obtained by 50 microns sections and small blocks of tissue was made. No significant difference was found between the two methods. Reproducibility of values between two consecutive thick sections was also good. We conclude that reproducible cell kinetic measurements can be made in tumour samples using 50 microns sections of BrdUrd labelled tissue. PMID:1586597

  13. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove a sample of abnormal tissue from the cervix. The ... Cold knife cone biopsy is done to detect cervical cancer or early changes that lead to cancer. ...

  14. Cold knife cone biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003910.htm Cold knife cone biopsy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A cold knife cone biopsy (conization) is surgery to remove ...

  15. An Orally Bioavailable, Indole-3-glyoxylamide Based Series of Tubulin Polymerization Inhibitors Showing Tumor Growth Inhibition in a Mouse Xenograft Model of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Colley, Helen E; Muthana, Munitta; Danson, Sarah J; Jackson, Lucinda V; Brett, Matthew L; Harrison, Joanne; Coole, Sean F; Mason, Daniel P; Jennings, Luke R; Wong, Melanie; Tulasi, Vamshi; Norman, Dennis; Lockey, Peter M; Williams, Lynne; Dossetter, Alexander G; Griffen, Edward J; Thompson, Mark J

    2015-12-10

    A number of indole-3-glyoxylamides have previously been reported as tubulin polymerization inhibitors, although none has yet been successfully developed clinically. We report here a new series of related compounds, modified according to a strategy of reducing aromatic ring count and introducing a greater degree of saturation, which retain potent tubulin polymerization activity but with a distinct SAR from previously documented libraries. A subset of active compounds from the reported series is shown to interact with tubulin at the colchicine binding site, disrupt the cellular microtubule network, and exert a cytotoxic effect against multiple cancer cell lines. Two compounds demonstrated significant tumor growth inhibition in a mouse xenograft model of head and neck cancer, a type of the disease which often proves resistant to chemotherapy, supporting further development of the current series as potential new therapeutics. PMID:26580420

  16. Superior performance of cone beam tomography in detecting a calcaneus fracture

    PubMed Central

    Lohse, Christian; Catala-Lehnen, Philip; Regier, Marc; Heiland, Max

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography is a state-of-the-art imaging tool, initially developed for dental and maxillofacial application. With its high resolution and low radiation dose, cone beam tomography has been expanding its application fields, for example, to diagnosis of traumata and fractures in the head and neck area. In this study, we demonstrate superior and satisfactory performance of cone beam tomography for the imaging of a calcaneus fracture in comparison to conventional X-ray and computed tomography. PMID:26605132

  17. Neck Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... get better. No 7. Did you have a whiplash-type injury in the past, or do you have pain and/or stiffness every day in your neck, hands, knees, hips or other joints? Yes Your pain may be from DEGENERATIVE CERVICAL ARTHRITIS, a disorder that affects the bones and ...

  18. Cone Early Maturity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hop cone early maturity is thought to be caused by diffuse infections of cone, just prior to harvest, by Podosphaera macularis. The disease is best managed by limiting the amount of leaf infection by P. macularis prior to bloom. The yield and quality reductions associated with Hop cone early matur...

  19. Exploring the topographic evolution of cinder cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrowsmith, R.; Zibart, S.; Gleeman, E.; Alfano, F.; Clarke, A. B.; De'Michieli Vitturi, M.; Dekko, R.

    2013-12-01

    The simple original form and monogenetic character of cinder cones make them interesting targets for the study of landscape evolution. Topographic metrics such as cone height-width ratios and histograms of topographic slope yield useful and portable characterizations of cinder cone relative ages. We explored the topographic evolution of cinder cones by simulating surface processes using numerical and physical experimentation approaches and by collecting high resolution topography over exemplary elements of the San Francisco Volcanic field in northern Arizona. We identified a clear distinction in cone form development between those composed of transport-limited cinder only and those with a capping hard agglutinated rim. We employed a fully 2 dimensional numerical implementation of non linear diffusion with spatially variable transport rates. The agglutinate was idealized as an annulus of diminished transport rate. In the laboratory, we used a simple erosion model consisting of fine mist over a cone of fine sand. The agglutinate was represented with a spray adhesive cap. Non-agglutinated cones show a steady decrease in height and increase in width over time, resulting in a lower height-to-width ratios and greater rounding of profiles than agglutinated cones. The presence of an agglutinate top lessens the degree of rounding, producing a concave profile with a resistant 'neck' as the cone flank erodes, in contrast with non-agglutinated cones which develop into convex-concave profiles. The resistant agglutinate protects itself and the material directly underneath it from erosion; this material stays in place while the sediments around it are transported downslope. The slope distributions start out as bimodal: flat and angle of repose. In the non-agglutinated case, the rounding of the cone and broadening of the base produces a more continuous slope distribution with overall progressive slope decrease from the angle of repose and slope increase from the flat base. The

  20. Neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Non-specific neck pain has a postural or mechanical basis and affects about two thirds of people at some stage, especially in middle age. Acute neck pain resolves within days or weeks, but may become chronic in about 10% of people. Whiplash injuries follow sudden acceleration–deceleration of the neck, such as in road traffic or sporting accidents. Up to 40% of people continue to report symptoms 15 years after the accident, although this varies between countries. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for people with non-specific neck pain without severe neurological deficit? What are the effects of treatments for acute whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for chronic whiplash injury? What are the effects of treatments for neck pain with radiculopathy? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 91 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of the evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: acupuncture, biofeedback, drug treatments (analgesics, antidepressants, epidural steroid injections, muscle relaxants, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs]), early mobilisation, early return to normal activity, exercise, heat or cold, manipulation (alone or plus exercise), mobilisation, multimodal treatment, patient education, percutaneous radiofrequency neurotomy

  1. Growth inhibition of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells by sgRNA targeting the cyclin D1 mRNA based on TRUE gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Satoshi; Oridate, Nobuhiko; Nashimoto, Masayuki; Fukuda, Satoshi; Tamura, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) exhibits increased expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1). Previous studies have shown a correlation between poor prognosis of HNSCC and cyclin D1 overexpression. tRNase ZL-utilizing efficacious gene silencing (TRUE gene silencing) is one of the RNA-mediated gene expression control technologies that have therapeutic potential. This technology is based on a unique enzymatic property of mammalian tRNase ZL, which is that it can cleave any target RNA at any desired site by recognizing a pre-tRNA-like complex formed between the target RNA and an artificial small guide RNA (sgRNA). In this study, we designed several sgRNAs targeting human cyclin D1 mRNA to examine growth inhibition of HNSCC cells. Transfection of certain sgRNAs decreased levels of cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in HSC-2 and HSC-3 cells, and also inhibited their proliferation. The combination of these sgRNAs and cisplatin showed more than additive inhibition of cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that TRUE gene silencing of cyclin D1 leads to inhibition of the growth of HNSCC cells and suggest that these sgRNAs alone or combined with cisplatin may be a useful new therapy for HNSCCs. PMID:25437003

  2. Mechanisms of growth cone repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Krull, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    Research conducted in the last century suggested that chemoattractants guide cells or their processes to appropriate locations during development. Today, we know that many of the molecules involved in cellular guidance can act as chemorepellents that prevent migration into inappropriate territories. Here, we review some of the early seminal experiments and our current understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. PMID:20711492

  3. The effect of red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles on head and neck squamous cell viability and growth

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Christopher E; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Given their low toxicity and natural presence in the human diet, selenium nanoparticles have been established as potential candidates for the treatment of numerous cancers. Red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles (rSeNPs) were synthesized and characterized in this study. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells were cultured and exposed to rSeNPs at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 μg rSeNP/mL media for 1–3 days. The toxicity of rSeNP toward HNSCC and HDFs was analyzed. Results indicated that the particles were approximately four times as cytotoxic toward HNSCC compared to HDFs, with their respective IC50 values at 19.22 and 59.61 μg rSeNP/mL media. Using statistical analysis, an effective dosage range for killing HNSCC cells while simultaneously minimizing damage to HDFs over a 3-day incubation period was established at 20–55 μg rSeNP/mL media. Observations showed that doses of rSeNP <5 μg rSeNP/mL media resulted in cell proliferation. Transmission electron microscopy images of HNSCC and HDF cells, both treated with rSeNPs, revealed that the rSeNPs became localized in the cytoplasm near the lysosomes and mitochondria. Analysis of cell morphology showed that the rSeNPs primarily induced HNSCC apoptosis. Collectively, these results indicated that rSeNPs are a promising option for treating HNSCC without adversely affecting healthy cells and without resorting to the use of harmful chemotherapeutics. PMID:27536104

  4. The effect of red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles on head and neck squamous cell viability and growth.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Christopher E; Webster, Thomas J

    2016-01-01

    Given their low toxicity and natural presence in the human diet, selenium nanoparticles have been established as potential candidates for the treatment of numerous cancers. Red-allotrope selenium nanoparticles (rSeNPs) were synthesized and characterized in this study. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and human dermal fibroblast (HDF) cells were cultured and exposed to rSeNPs at concentrations ranging from 0.01 to 100 μg rSeNP/mL media for 1-3 days. The toxicity of rSeNP toward HNSCC and HDFs was analyzed. Results indicated that the particles were approximately four times as cytotoxic toward HNSCC compared to HDFs, with their respective IC50 values at 19.22 and 59.61 μg rSeNP/mL media. Using statistical analysis, an effective dosage range for killing HNSCC cells while simultaneously minimizing damage to HDFs over a 3-day incubation period was established at 20-55 μg rSeNP/mL media. Observations showed that doses of rSeNP <5 μg rSeNP/mL media resulted in cell proliferation. Transmission electron microscopy images of HNSCC and HDF cells, both treated with rSeNPs, revealed that the rSeNPs became localized in the cytoplasm near the lysosomes and mitochondria. Analysis of cell morphology showed that the rSeNPs primarily induced HNSCC apoptosis. Collectively, these results indicated that rSeNPs are a promising option for treating HNSCC without adversely affecting healthy cells and without resorting to the use of harmful chemotherapeutics. PMID:27536104

  5. The role of collapsing and cone rafting on eruption style changes and final cone morphology: Los Morados scoria cone, Mendoza, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Németh, Karoly; Risso, Corina; Nullo, Francisco; Kereszturi, Gabor

    2011-06-01

    Payún Matru Volcanic Field is a Quaternary monogenetic volcanic field that hosts scoria cones with perfect to breached morphologies. Los Morados complex is a group of at least four closely spaced scoria cones (Los Morados main cone and the older Cones A, B, and C). Los Morados main cone was formed by a long lived eruption of months to years. After an initial Hawaiian-style stage, the eruption changed to a normal Strombolian, conebuilding style, forming a cone over 150 metres high on a northward dipping (˜4°) surface. An initial cone gradually grew until a lava flow breached the cone's base and rafted an estimated 10% of the total volume. A sudden sector collapse initiated a dramatic decompression in the upper part of the feeding conduit and triggered violent a Strombolian style eruptive stage. Subsequently, the eruption became more stable, and changed to a regular Strombolian style that partially rebuilt the cone. A likely increase in magma flux coupled with the gradual growth of a new cone caused another lava flow outbreak at the structurally weakened earlier breach site. For a second time, the unstable flank of the cone was rafted, triggering a second violent Strombolian eruptive stage which was followed by a Hawaiian style lava fountain stage. The lava fountaining was accompanied by a steady outpour of voluminous lava emission accompanied by constant rafting of the cone flank, preventing the healing of the cone. Santa Maria is another scoria cone built on a nearly flat pre-eruption surface. Despite this it went through similar stages as Los Morados main cone, but probably not in as dramatic a manner as Los Morados. In contrast to these examples of large breached cones, volumetrically smaller cones, associated to less extensive lava flows, were able to heal raft/collapse events, due to the smaller magma output and flux rates. Our evidence shows that scoria cone growth is a complex process, and is a consequence of the magma internal parameters (e.g. volatile

  6. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... another common cause of neck pain. Whiplash, a soft tissue injury to the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing ...

  7. Study of Microorganism Growth Pattern in Nasal Pack of Patients Visiting the Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, I; Pokharel, M; Dhakal, A; Amatya, R Cm; Madhup, S; Sherchan, J B

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal packs are utilized nearly by otorhinolaryngologists for controlling epistaxis and post nasal procedures. Complications have been reported due to them; therefore the use of antibiotics is a common practice among otorhinolaryngologists. Objective To detect microbiological flora associated with nasal packing and find evidence to support the benefit of systemic antibiotics with it. Method A prospective, analytical study was conducted on 51 patients presenting to the Department of ENT, KUSMS from June to September 2015 who required nasal packing. Approval of the local Institutional review committee (IRC) was taken. The mid part of the pack was collected in a sterile bottle under aseptic technique and sent to microbiology department. Specimen collection, culture, identification tests were done according to the guidelines by American Society for Microbiology. Data were collected using the individual patient records and Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.0. Result Among the 51 cultures; 33 (64.7%) were positive. In 18 (35.3%) cultures no organism was grown. Statistical analysis did not show significance between duration of pack kept with microbial growth (p=0.051) or the type of pack kept (p=0.212) .It showed significance with foul smell of the pack to the growth (p <0.001). Conclusion Microbiological flora was associated with nasal pack. Antibiotic soaked nasal packs have lesser incidence of positive bacterial growth when compared with plain nasal packs. Nasal packs kept for less than 48 hours have lesser incidence of positive bacterial growth when compared with nasal packs kept for more than 48 hours. Therefore, administering systemic antibiotics in cases when we plan to keep the pack for longer duration is recommended. PMID:27423279

  8. Dihydroartemisinin as a Putative STAT3 Inhibitor, Suppresses the Growth of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Targeting Jak2/STAT3 Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jia, Lifeng; Song, Qi; Zhou, Chenyang; Li, Xiaoming; Pi, Lihong; Ma, Xiuru; Li, Hui; Lu, Xiuying; Shen, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Developing drugs that can effectively block STAT3 activation may serve as one of the most promising strategy for cancer treatment. Currently, there is no putative STAT3 inhibitor that can be safely and effectively used in clinic. In the present study, we investigated the potential of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) as a putative STAT3 inhibitor and its antitumor activities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The inhibitory effects of DHA on STAT3 activation along with its underlying mechanisms were studied in HNSCC cells. The antitumor effects of DHA against HNSCC cells were explored both in vitro and in vivo. An investigation on cooperative effects of DHA with cisplatin in killing HNSCC cells was also implemented. DHA exhibited remarkable and specific inhibitory effects on STAT3 activation via selectively blocking Jak2/STAT3 signaling. Besides, DHA significantly inhibited HNSCC growth both in vitro and in vivo possibly through induction of apoptosis and attenuation of cell migration. DHA also synergized with cisplatin in tumor inhibition in HNSCC cells. Our findings demonstrate that DHA is a putative STAT3 inhibitor that may represent a new and effective drug for cancer treatment and therapeutic sensitization in HNSCC patients. PMID:26784960

  9. Dihydroartemisinin as a Putative STAT3 Inhibitor, Suppresses the Growth of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma by Targeting Jak2/STAT3 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Lifeng; Song, Qi; Zhou, Chenyang; Li, Xiaoming; Pi, Lihong; Ma, Xiuru; Li, Hui; Lu, Xiuying; Shen, Yupeng

    2016-01-01

    Developing drugs that can effectively block STAT3 activation may serve as one of the most promising strategy for cancer treatment. Currently, there is no putative STAT3 inhibitor that can be safely and effectively used in clinic. In the present study, we investigated the potential of dihydroartemisinin (DHA) as a putative STAT3 inhibitor and its antitumor activities in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The inhibitory effects of DHA on STAT3 activation along with its underlying mechanisms were studied in HNSCC cells. The antitumor effects of DHA against HNSCC cells were explored both in vitro and in vivo. An investigation on cooperative effects of DHA with cisplatin in killing HNSCC cells was also implemented. DHA exhibited remarkable and specific inhibitory effects on STAT3 activation via selectively blocking Jak2/STAT3 signaling. Besides, DHA significantly inhibited HNSCC growth both in vitro and in vivo possibly through induction of apoptosis and attenuation of cell migration. DHA also synergized with cisplatin in tumor inhibition in HNSCC cells. Our findings demonstrate that DHA is a putative STAT3 inhibitor that may represent a new and effective drug for cancer treatment and therapeutic sensitization in HNSCC patients. PMID:26784960

  10. Combination of Anti-HER3 Antibody MM-121/SAR256212 and Cetuximab Inhibits Tumor Growth in Preclinical Models of Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (HNSCC)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ning; Wang, Dongsheng; Hu, Zhongliang; Shin, Hyung Ju C.; Qian, Guoqing; Rahman, Mohammad Aminur; Zhang, Hongzheng; Amin, A.R.M. Ruhul; Nannapaneni, Sreenivas; Wang, Xiaojing; Chen, Zhengjia; Garcia, Gabriela; MacBeath, Gavin; Shin, Dong M.; Khuri, Fadlo R.; Ma, Jun; Chen, Zhuo G.; Saba, Nabil F.

    2014-01-01

    The EGFR monoclonal antibody cetuximab is the only approved targeted agent for treating head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Yet resistance to cetuximab has hindered its activity in this disease. Intrinsic or compensatory HER3 signaling may contribute to cetuximab resistance. To investigate the therapeutic benefit of combining MM-121/SAR256212, an anti-HER3 monoclonal antibody, with cetuximab in HNSCC, we initially screened twelve HNSCC cell lines for total and phosphorylated levels of the four HER receptors. We also investigated the combination of MM-121 with cetuximab in preclinical models of HNSCC. Our results revealed that HER3 is widely expressed and activated in HNSCC cell lines. MM-121 strongly inhibited phosphorylation of HER3 and AKT. When combined with cetuximab, MM-121 exerted a more potent anti-tumor activity through simultaneously inhibiting the activation of HER3 and EGFR and consequently the downstream PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways in vitro. Both high and low doses of MM-121 in combination with cetuximab significantly suppressed tumor growth in xenograft models and inhibited activations of HER3, EGFR, AKT and ERK in vivo. Our current work is the first report on this new combination in HNSCC and supports the concept that HER3 inhibition may play an important role in future therapy of HNSCC. Our results open the door for further mechanistic studies to better understand the role of HER3 in resistance to EGFR inhibitors in HNSCC. PMID:24748655

  11. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K

    2015-12-22

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  12. Inhibition of p300 lysine acetyltransferase activity by luteolin reduces tumor growth in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Selvi, Ruthrotha B.; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Shanmugam, Muthu K.; Li, Feng; Ramakrishnan, Gowsica B.; Siveen, Kodappully Sivaraman; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Zayed, M. Emam; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Basha, Jeelan; Bhat, Akshay; Vasudevan, Madavan; Dharmarajan, Arunasalam; Sethi, Gautam; Kundu, Tapas K.

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin acetylation is attributed with distinct functional relevance with respect to gene expression in normal and diseased conditions thereby leading to a topical interest in the concept of epigenetic modulators and therapy. We report here the identification and characterization of the acetylation inhibitory potential of an important dietary flavonoid, luteolin. Luteolin was found to inhibit p300 acetyltransferase with competitive binding to the acetyl CoA binding site. Luteolin treatment in a xenografted tumor model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), led to a dramatic reduction in tumor growth within 4 weeks corresponding to a decrease in histone acetylation. Cells treated with luteolin exhibit cell cycle arrest and decreased cell migration. Luteolin treatment led to an alteration in gene expression and miRNA profile including up-regulation of p53 induced miR-195/215, let7C; potentially translating into a tumor suppressor function. It also led to down-regulation of oncomiRNAs such as miR-135a, thereby reflecting global changes in the microRNA network. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the inhibition of histone acetylation and gene expression was established using chromatin immunoprecipitation on promoters of differentially expressed genes. A network of dysregulated genes and miRNAs was mapped along with the gene ontology categories, and the effects of luteolin were observed to be potentially at multiple levels: at the level of gene expression, miRNA expression and miRNA processing. PMID:26517526

  13. WE-G-18A-03: Cone Artifacts Correction in Iterative Cone Beam CT Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, H; Folkerts, M; Jiang, S; Jia, X; Wang, X; Bai, T; Lu, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: For iterative reconstruction (IR) in cone-beam CT (CBCT) imaging, data truncation along the superior-inferior (SI) direction causes severe cone artifacts in the reconstructed CBCT volume images. Not only does it reduce the effective SI coverage of the reconstructed volume, it also hinders the IR algorithm convergence. This is particular a problem for regularization based IR, where smoothing type regularization operations tend to propagate the artifacts to a large area. It is our purpose to develop a practical cone artifacts correction solution. Methods: We found it is the missing data residing in the truncated cone area that leads to inconsistency between the calculated forward projections and measured projections. We overcome this problem by using FDK type reconstruction to estimate the missing data and design weighting factors to compensate the inconsistency caused by the missing data. We validate the proposed methods in our multi-GPU low-dose CBCT reconstruction system on multiple patients' datasets. Results: Compared to the FDK reconstruction with full datasets, while IR is able to reconstruct CBCT images using a subset of projection data, the severe cone artifacts degrade overall image quality. For head-neck case under a full-fan mode, 13 out of 80 slices are contaminated. It is even more severe in pelvis case under half-fan mode, where 36 out of 80 slices are affected, leading to inferior soft-tissue delineation. By applying the proposed method, the cone artifacts are effectively corrected, with a mean intensity difference decreased from ∼497 HU to ∼39HU for those contaminated slices. Conclusion: A practical and effective solution for cone artifacts correction is proposed and validated in CBCT IR algorithm. This study is supported in part by NIH (1R01CA154747-01)

  14. Effects of water restriction on the growth performance, carcass characteristics and organ weights of naked neck and ovambo chickens of southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Chikumba, N; Chimonyo, M

    2014-07-01

    In semi-arid areas of Southern Africa, dehydration can compromise the performance and welfare of local chickens, particularly during the growing period when confinement is curtailed and birds are left to scavenge for feed and water. The effect of water restriction on the growth performance was compared in Naked Neck (NNK) and Ovambo (OVB) chickens that are predominant in Southern Africa. A total of 54 eight-wk-old pullets each of NNK and OVB chickens with an initial average weight of 641±10 g/bird were randomly assigned to three water intake treatments, each having six birds for 8 wk. The water restriction treatments were ad libitum, 70% of ad libitum and 40% of ad libitum intake. Nine experimental pens with a floor space of 3.3 m(2) per strain were used. The pens were housed in an open-sided house with cement floor deep littered with a 20 cm layer of untreated wood shavings. Feed was provided ad libitum. Average daily water intake (ADWI), BW at 16 weeks of age (FBW), ADG, ADFI, feed conversion ratio (FCR) and water to feed ratios (WFR) were determined. Ovambo chickens had superior (p<0.05) FBW, ADG and ADWI than NNK chickens. Body weight of birds at 16 weeks of age, ADG, ADFI, ADWI, and WFR declined progressively (p<0.05) with increasing severity of water restriction while FCR values increased (p<0.05) as the severity of water restriction increased. Naked Neck chickens had better FCR at the 40% of ad libitum water intake level than Ovambo chickens. The dressing percentage per bird was higher in water restricted birds than those on ad libitum water consumption, irrespective of strain. Heart weight was significantly lower in birds on 40% of ad libitum water intake than those on ad libitum and 70% of ad libitum water intake, respectively. In conclusion, NNK chickens performed better than OVB chickens under conditions of water restriction and would be ideal to raise for meat and egg production in locations where water shortages are a major challenge. PMID:25050039

  15. The dual mTORC1 and mTORC2 inhibitor AZD8055 inhibits head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell growth in vivo and in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qiang; Song, Xin-mao; Ji, Yang-yang; Jiang, Hui; Xu, Lin-gen

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •AZD8055 induces significant cytotoxic effects in cultured HNSCC cells. •AZD8055 blocks mTORC1 and mTORC2 activation in cultured HNSCC cells. •JNK activation is required for AZD8055-induced HNSCC cell death. •AZD8055 inhibits Hep-2 cell growth in vivo, and was more efficient than rapamycin. -- Abstract: The serine/threonine kinase mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) promotes cell survival and proliferation, and is constitutively activated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Thus mTOR is an important target for drug development in this disease. Here we tested the anti-tumor ability of AZD8055, the novel mTOR inhibitor, in HNSCC cells. AZD8055 induced dramatic cell death of HNSCC lines (Hep-2 and SCC-9) through autophagy. AZD8055 blocked both mTOR complex (mTORC) 1 and mTORC2 activation without affecting Erk in cultured HNSCC cells. Meanwhile, AZD8055 induced significant c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, which was also required for cancer cell death. JNK inhibition by its inhibitors (SP 600125 and JNK-IN-8), or by RNA interference (RNAi) alleviated AZD8055-induced cell death. Finally, AZD8055 markedly increased the survival of Hep-2 transplanted mice through a significant reduction of tumor growth, without apparent toxicity, and its anti-tumor ability was more potent than rapamycin. Meanwhile, AZD8055 administration activated JNK while blocking mTORC1/2 in Hep-2 tumor engrafts. Our current results strongly suggest that AZD8055 may be further investigated for HNSCC treatment in clinical trials.

  16. Irradiation-Induced Regulation of Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor Type-1 and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Six Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma Lines of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Artman, Tuuli; Schilling, Daniela; Multhoff, Gabriele

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: It has been shown that plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 (PAI-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) are involved in neo-angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the irradiation-induced regulation of PAI-1 and VEGF in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines of varying radiation sensitivity. Methods and Materials: Six cell lines derived from SCCHN were investigated in vitro. The colorimetric AlamarBlue assay was used to detect metabolic activity of cell lines during irradiation as a surrogate marker for radiation sensitivity. PAI-1 and VEGF secretion levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay 24, 48, and 72 h after irradiation with 0, 2, 6, and 10 Gy. The direct radioprotective effect of exogenous PAI-1 was measured using the clonogenic assay. For regulation studies, transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1), hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha (HIF-1alpha), hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha (HIF-2alpha), or both HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha were downregulated using siRNA. Results: Although baseline levels varied greatly, irradiation led to a comparable dose-dependent increase in PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all six cell lines. Addition of exogenous stable PAI-1 to the low PAI-1-expressing cell lines, XF354 and FaDu, did not lead to a radioprotective effect. Downregulation of TGF-beta1 significantly decreased VEGF secretion in radiation-sensitive XF354 cells, and downregulation of HIF-1alpha and HIF-2alpha reduced PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in radiation-resistant SAS cells. Conclusions: Irradiation dose-dependently increased PAI-1 and VEGF secretion in all SCCHN cell lines tested regardless of their basal levels and radiation sensitivity. In addition, TGF-beta1 and HIF-1alpha could be partly responsible for VEGF and PAI-1 upregulation after irradiation.

  17. Violacein, an indole-derived purple-colored natural pigment produced by Janthinobacterium lividum, inhibits the growth of head and neck carcinoma cell lines both in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Masuelli, Laura; Pantanella, Fabrizio; La Regina, Giuseppe; Benvenuto, Monica; Fantini, Massimo; Mattera, Rosanna; Di Stefano, Enrica; Mattei, Maurizio; Silvestri, Romano; Schippa, Serena; Manzari, Vittorio; Modesti, Andrea; Bei, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    Violacein (VIO; 3-[1,2-dihydro-5-(5-hydroxy-1H-indol-3-yl)-2-oxo-3H-pyrrol-3-ylidene]-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-one), an indole-derived purple-colored pigment, produced by a limited number of Gram-negative bacteria species, including Chromobacterium violaceum and Janthinobacterium lividum, has been demonstrated to have anti-cancer activity, as it interferes with survival transduction signaling pathways in different cancer models. Head and neck carcinoma (HNC) represents the sixth most common and one of the most fatal cancers worldwide. We determined whether VIO was able to inhibit head and neck cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. We provide evidence that VIO treatment of human and mouse head and neck cancer cell lines inhibits cell growth and induces autophagy and apoptosis. In fact, VIO treatment increased PARP-1 cleavage, the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, the inhibition of ERK1 and ERK2 phosphorylation, and the expression of light chain 3-II (LC3-II). Moreover, VIO was able to induce p53 degradation, cytoplasmic nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) accumulation, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. VIO induced a significant increase in ROS production. VIO administration was safe in BALB/c mice and reduced the growth of transplanted salivary gland cancer cells (SALTO) in vivo and prolonged median survival. Taken together, our results indicate that the treatment of head and neck cancer cells with VIO can be useful in inhibiting in vivo and in vitro cancer cell growth. VIO may represent a suitable tool for the local treatment of HNC in combination with standard therapies. PMID:26462840

  18. Garcinol, a polyisoprenylated benzophenone modulates multiple proinflammatory signaling cascades leading to the suppression of growth and survival of head and neck carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Shanmugam, Muthu K; Chen, Luxi; Chatterjee, Snehajyoti; Basha, Jeelan; Kumar, Alan Prem; Kundu, Tapas K; Sethi, Gautam

    2013-08-01

    Constitutive activation of proinflammatory transcription factors such as STAT3 and NF-κB plays a pivotal role in the proliferation and survival of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC). Thus, the agents that can modulate deregulated STAT3 and NF-κB activation have a great potential both for the prevention and treatment of HNSCC. In the present report, we investigated the potential effects of garcinol, an active component of Garcinia indica on various inflammatory mediators involved in HNSCC progression using cell lines and xenograft mouse model. We found that garcinol inhibited constitutively activated STAT3 in HNSCC cells in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which correlated with the suppression of the upstream kinases (c-Src, JAK1, and JAK2) in HNSCC cells. Also, we noticed that the generation of reactive oxygen species is involved in STAT3 inhibitory effect of garcinol. Furthermore, garcinol exhibited an inhibitory effect on the constitutive NF-κB activation, mediated through the suppression of TGF-β-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) and inhibitor of IκB kinase (IKK) activation in HNSCC cells. Garcinol also downregulated the expression of various gene products involved in proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis that led to the reduction of cell viability and induction of apoptosis in HNSCC cells. When administered intraperitoneally, garcinol inhibited the growth of human HNSCC xenograft tumors in male athymic nu/nu mice. Overall, our results suggest for the first time that garcinol mediates its antitumor effects in HNSCC cells and mouse model through the suppression of multiple proinflammatory cascades. PMID:23803415

  19. Integrating Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Assay With Clinical Parameters Improves Risk Classification for Relapse and Survival in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Christine H.; Hammond, Elizabeth M.; Trotti, Andy M.; Wang Huijun; Spencer, Sharon; Zhang Huazhong; Cooper, Jay; Jordan, Richard; Rotman, Marvin H.; Ang, K. Kian

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression has been consistently found to be an independent predictor of local-regional relapse (LRR) after radiotherapy. We assessed the extent by which it can refine risk classification for overall survival (OS) and LRR in patients with head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Materials: EGFR expression in locally advanced HNSCC was measured by immunohistochemistry in a series of patients randomized to receive accelerated or conventional radiation regimens in a Phase III trial. Subsequently, data of the two series were pooled (N = 533) for conducting a recursive partitioning analysis that incorporated clinical parameters (e.g., performance status, primary site, T and N categories) and four molecular markers (EGFR, p53, Ki-67, and microvessel density). Results: This study confirmed that patients with higher than median levels of tumor EGFR expression had a lower OS (relative risk [RR]: 1.90, p = 0.0010) and a higher LRR (RR: 1.91, p = 0.0163). Of the four markers analyzed, only EGFR was found to contribute to refining classification of patients into three risk classes with distinct OS and LRR outcomes. The addition of EGFR to three clinical parameters could identify patients having up to a fivefold difference in the risk of LRR. Conclusions: Adding pretreatment EGFR expression data to known robust clinical prognostic variables improved the estimation of the probability for OS and LRR after radiotherapy. Its use for stratifying or selecting patients with defined tumor feature and pattern of relapse for enrollment into clinical trials testing specific therapeutic strategy warrants further investigation.

  20. Novel Immunogenic HLA-A*0201-restricted Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-specific T-cell Epitope in Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Andrade Filho, Pedro A.; López-Albaitero, Andrés; Gooding, William; Ferris, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Therapeutic targeting of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which is highly overexpressed and correlated with poor prognosis in colorectal and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCCHN), has shown clinical efficacy using the blocking mAbs, cetuximab or panitumumab, but only in 10% to 20% of patients. Clinical responsiveness is correlated with certain Fcγ receptor genotypes, suggesting immune activity may contribute to therapeutic efficacy. In addition, cetuximab-resistant tumor cells exhibit ubiquitination and degradation of EGFR, which would increase its processing as a tumor antigen for cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) lysis. Thus, T cell-based immunotherapy might enhance the antitumor efficacy of EGFR-specific mAbs, but CTL epitopes are poorly defined. To permit combinatorial EGFR-targeted immunotherapy, we identified a novel immunogenic wild-type sequence peptide, EGFR853 – 861 and modified its anchor sequence to enhance HLA-A*0201 binding and stimulation of cross-reactive anti-wild–type EGFR853 – 861-specific CTL. Cross-reactivity was also observed with HER2861 – 869. EGFR853 – 861-specific CTL recognition of SCCHN cells was increased by incubation of tumor cells with cetuximab, which led to EGFR degradation. In addition, EGFR853 – 861-specific CTLs were elevated in the circulation of SCCHN patients as compared with healthy control peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Thus, a novel, immunogenic EGFR-encoded CTL epitope may be incorporated into vaccines and would be useful for combinatorial immunotherapy with EGFR-specific mAbs in cancer patients. PMID:19952953

  1. 2017 Eclipse Shadow Cones

    NASA Video Gallery

    A solar eclipse occurs when the Moon's shadow falls on the Earth. The shadow comprises two concentric cones called the umbra and the penumbra. Within the smaller, central umbra, the Sun is complete...

  2. Lunar cinder cones.

    PubMed

    McGetchin, T R; Head, J W

    1973-04-01

    Data on terrestrial eruptions of pyroclastic material and ballistic considerations suggest that in the lunar environment (vacuum and reduced gravity) low-rimmed pyroclastic rings are formed rather than the high-rimmed cinder cones so abundant on the earth. Dark blanketing deposits in the Taurus-Littrow region (Apollo 17 landing area) are interpreted as being at least partly composed of lunar counterparts of terrestrial cinder cones. PMID:17757977

  3. Vredefort shatter cones revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaysen, L. O.; Reimold, W. U.

    1999-03-01

    Shatter cones have been described from a number of circular and polygonal structures worldwide, the origin of which has been alternatively ascribed to the impacts of large extraterrestrial projectiles or to catastrophic endogenic processes. Despite their association with enigmatic, catastrophic processes, the nature of shatter cones and the physics involved in their formation have not been comprehensively researched. Results of detailed field and laboratory studies of shatter cones from three areas in the collar of the Vredefort Dome in South Africa are presented. Vredefort shatter cones are directly related to a widely displayed fracture phenomenon, termed ``multiply striated joint sets (MSJS)''. MSJs are planar to curviplanar fractures occuring at spacings of <1 to several millimeters. The joint sets have a fractal character. When a new measurement protocol is used in the field, involving study of all joint surfaces and all steps and striae exposed on these surfaces, new information is gained on the genesis and significance of the MSJS and on their relationship to striated conical fractures. The internal constitution of a rock specimen with MSJS was examined in detail, by documenting the precise geometry of many fractures in a suite of parallel thin sections transecting the specimen. The steps and striae on shatter cone surfaces have the characteristics of displacement fractures (microfaults), along which evidence of melting is observed. Shatter cone and MSJS surfaces are often covered with glassy films; we evaluate whether these fracture phenomena are linked to the formation of pseudotachylitic (friction) melt. Our field and petrographic observations can be interpreted as consistent with the generation of shatter cones/MSJS relatively late in the formation of the Vredefort structure. This scenario contrasts sharply with the widely held view that shatter cones are formed during the early ``compression'' phase of a shock event that affected horizontal strata.

  4. Dysregulation of MicroRNA-34a Expression in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Promotes Tumor Growth and Tumor Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Bhavna; Yadav, Arti; Lang, James; Teknos, Theodoros N.; Kumar, Pawan

    2012-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRs) are small non-coding RNAs that play an important role in cancer development where they can act as oncogenes or as tumor-suppressors. miR-34a is a tumor-suppressor that is frequently downregulated in a number of tumor types. However, little is known about the role of miR-34a in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods and Results miR-34a expression in tumor samples, HNSCC cell lines and endothelial cells was examined by real time PCR. Lipofectamine-2000 was used to transfect miR-34a in HNSCC cell lines and human endothelial cells. Cell-proliferation, migration and clonogenic survival was examined by MTT, Xcelligence system, scratch assay and colony formation assay. miR-34a effect on tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis was examined by in vivo SCID mouse xenograft model. Our results demonstrate that miR-34a is significantly downregulated in HNSCC tumors and cell lines. Ectopic expression of miR-34a in HNSCC cell lines significantly inhibited tumor cell proliferation, colony formation and migration. miR-34a overexpression also markedly downregulated E2F3 and survivin levels. Rescue experiments using microRNA resistant E2F3 isoforms suggest that miR-34a-mediated inhibition of cell proliferation and colony formation is predominantly mediated by E2F3a isoform. In addition, tumor samples from HNSCC patients showed an inverse relationship between miR-34a and survivin as well as miR-34a and E2F3 levels. Overexpression of E2F3a completely rescued survivin expression in miR-34a expressing cells, thereby suggesting that miR-34a may be regulating survivin expression via E2F3a. Ectopic expression of miR-34a also significantly inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis in a SCID mouse xenograft model. Interestingly, miR-34a inhibited tumor angiogenesis by blocking VEGF production by tumor cells as well as directly inhibiting endothelial cell functions. Conclusions Taken together, these findings suggest that dysregulation of miR-34a

  5. Head, Neck, and Oral Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ... Neck and Oral Pathology Head, Neck and Oral Pathology Close to 42,000 Americans will be diagnosed ...

  6. Neck Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... the neck, is also called neck sprain or strain. Treatment depends on the cause, but may include applying ice, taking pain relievers, getting physical therapy or wearing a cervical collar. You rarely need surgery.

  7. Neck dissection - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000659.htm Neck dissection - discharge To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neck dissection is surgery to remove the lymph nodes in ...

  8. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... increases your risk. In fact, 85 percent of head and neck cancers are linked to tobacco use, including smoking ...

  9. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Head and neck cancer includes cancers of the mouth, nose, sinuses, salivary glands, throat, and lymph nodes in the ... swallowing A change or hoarseness in the voice Head and neck cancers are twice as common in men. Using ...

  10. Metadherin Regulation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression Is Dependent Upon the PI3K/Akt Pathway in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Gang-cai; Yu, Chang-yun; She, Li; Tan, Hao-lei; Li, Guo; Ren, Su-ling; Su, Zhong-wu; Wei, Ming; Huang, Dong-hai; Tian, Yong-quan; Su, Ri-na; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Our previous study indicated overexpression of metadherin (MTDH) is an adverse prognostic factor in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and promotes SCCHN cell proliferation and invasion. However, its mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have indicated that MTDH is a cancer-metastasis-associated molecule that participates in the process of angiogenesis. Therefore, the study is aimed to investigate that whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as one of the most potent proangiogenic cytokines, is regulated by MTDH and the role of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Protein Kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway in this process of regulation and the clinical significance of both MTDH and VEGF in SCCHN. Immunohistochemistry was used to assay the expression of MTDH and VEGF in a cohort of 189 SCCHN patients with intact follow-up information. The expression of MTDH was then upregulated or inhibited by lentivirus-mediated MTDH Complementary deoxyribonucleic acid or MTDH short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) to observe the resulting alterations in VEGF expression and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in SCCHN cell lines. In addition, the PI3K/Akt pathway was modulated to observe the resulting changes in the MTDH-mediated expression of VEGF. The immunohistochemistry data showed that MTDH expression is positively correlated with VEGF expression in SCCHN tissues. Moreover, the overexpression of MTDH in SCCHN Tu686 and 5-8F cells led to increases in the expression of VEGF, and this effect was accompanied by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of MTDH led to decreased VEGF expression. In addition, inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway reversed the upregulation of VEGF resulting from MTDH overexpression. Moreover, the survival analysis revealed that VEGF is an independent prognostic factor, and a combined survival analysis based on both MTDH and VEGF showed synergistic effects in the prognosis evaluation of

  11. Metadherin regulation of vascular endothelial growth factor expression is dependent upon the PI3K/Akt pathway in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Gang-Cai; Yu, Chang-Yun; She, Li; Tan, Hao-Lei; Li, Guo; Ren, Su-Ling; Su, Zhong-Wu; Wei, Ming; Huang, Dong-Hai; Tian, Yong-Quan; Su, Ri-Na; Liu, Yong; Zhang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Our previous study indicated overexpression of metadherin (MTDH) is an adverse prognostic factor in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) and promotes SCCHN cell proliferation and invasion. However, its mechanism remains unclear. Recent studies have indicated that MTDH is a cancer-metastasis-associated molecule that participates in the process of angiogenesis. Therefore, the study is aimed to investigate that whether vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), as one of the most potent proangiogenic cytokines, is regulated by MTDH and the role of the phosphatidylinositide 3-kinases/Protein Kinase B (PI3K/Akt) pathway in this process of regulation and the clinical significance of both MTDH and VEGF in SCCHN.Immunohistochemistry was used to assay the expression of MTDH and VEGF in a cohort of 189 SCCHN patients with intact follow-up information. The expression of MTDH was then upregulated or inhibited by lentivirus-mediated MTDH Complementary deoxyribonucleic acid or MTDH short hairpin ribonucleic acid (shRNA) to observe the resulting alterations in VEGF expression and the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in SCCHN cell lines. In addition, the PI3K/Akt pathway was modulated to observe the resulting changes in the MTDH-mediated expression of VEGF.The immunohistochemistry data showed that MTDH expression is positively correlated with VEGF expression in SCCHN tissues. Moreover, the overexpression of MTDH in SCCHN Tu686 and 5-8F cells led to increases in the expression of VEGF, and this effect was accompanied by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Conversely, shRNA-mediated knockdown of MTDH led to decreased VEGF expression. In addition, inhibition of the Akt signaling pathway reversed the upregulation of VEGF resulting from MTDH overexpression. Moreover, the survival analysis revealed that VEGF is an independent prognostic factor, and a combined survival analysis based on both MTDH and VEGF showed synergistic effects in the prognosis evaluation of SCCHN patients

  12. [Deep neck infections].

    PubMed

    Nowak, Katarzyna; Szyfter, Witold

    2006-01-01

    Deep neck infection is relatively rare but potentially life threatening complication of common oropharyngeal infections. This retrospective study was aimed at analyzing the occurrence of complications, diagnostic methods and proper management of deep neck infection. A review was conducted in 32 cases who were diagnosed as having deep neck infection from 1995 to 2005. The causes of deep neck infections were tonsillitis (16 cases), tooth diseases (6 cases), paratonsillar abscess (4 cases), parotitis (1 case), pussy lymphonodes after tonsillectomy (2 cases), pussy congenital neck cyst (1 case), chronic otitis media (1 case), parotitis (1 case), foreign body of the esophagus (1 case). All the puss bacterial cultivation were positive. All the patients were treated by different ways of chirurgical drainage and use of large dosage of antibiotics. Deep neck infection should be suspected in patients with long lasting fever and painful swelling of the neck and treatment should begin quick as possible. PMID:17152800

  13. Magma supply rates inferred from cinder cone volumes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bemis, K. G.; Borgia, A.; Neri, M.; Kervyn, M.

    2010-12-01

    Revisiting the question of how cinder cones grow suggests the possibility of inferring magma supply rates from cinder cones sizes. We start with a conceptual model of cinder cone growth: (1) Eruption volume flux increases rapidly and then decreases exponentially. (2) Cinder cones get steeper during the initiation of the eruption and then maintain a constant steepness. (3) The initial basal diameter varies with volume flux into the cone. Based on these constraints, we propose a general form for the relationship between cinder cone volume and magma supply rate: V = Q(exp(-t/b)/b - exp(-t/a)/a), where V is volume (in m3), Q is the maximum potential magma flux (in m3/s), t is time (in s), a is a damping factor (in s) controlling the decline in volume flux, and b is a factor controlling the initial increase in volume flux. Then we use the data available on the growth of cinder cones from four modern eruptions to show the relevance of our model and to constrain the supply curves. All four modern cones (Paricutin, Mexico which erupted 1943-1974; Tolbachik, Kamchatka which erupted in 1975-1976; Cono del Laghetto, Mount Etna, Italy which formed in 2001; and a small cone on the summit of Oldoinyo Lengai, Tanzania, which formed during the 2007 eruption) show the basic growth pattern: initial rapid growth followed by declining growth (Figure 1). The regression results yeild the following magma supply rates: The southern Tolbachik cones have the largest predicted magma supply at ~100 m3/s. Paricutin and Laghetto are around 9 m3/s. The Oldoinyo Lengai cone has a magma supply of ~0.5 m3/s. The northern Tolbachik cone has the lowest magma supply of ~0.1 m3/s. In contrast, the damping factor a is generally on the order of 107 (it varies from 8 x 106 at southern Tolbachik to 4 x 107 at northern Tolbachik). The parameter b controlling the initial increase is generally small (<1). The predicted magma supply does not seem to be very sensitive to either parameter. Thus we suggest that

  14. Forgotten triangles of neck

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Manpreet; Vashistha, Arpit; Chaudhary, Manoj; Kaur, Gagandeep

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to add some more information in the present scientific literature on these nearly forgotten triangles of surgical importance. The neck is an area that lends itself to anatomical geometry, such as triangles. Many triangles of the neck have been described, and some are well-known, yet, some have been nearly forgotten, i.e., Lesser's triangle, Farabeuf triangle, Pirogoff's triangle, and Beclard's triangle. From the anatomic and surgical point of view, the neck is an amazingly interesting place. It is like a connection where crucial functional units meet and pass. Added surgical landmarks are always helpful to the surgeon while dealing with the neck. Described triangles of neck in this article are always reliable and constant landmarks for head and neck surgeons

  15. American Head and Neck Society

    MedlinePlus

    American Head & Neck Society Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education American Head & Neck Society | AHNS Head and Neck Cancer Research & Education About AHNS ... and Announcements Copyright ©2016 · American Head and Neck Society · Privacy and Return Policy Managed by BSC Management, ...

  16. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  17. Neck skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Duplechain, J Kevin

    2014-05-01

    The author of this article uses the pulsed ablative CO2 laser for resurfacing of the neck and face, based on the gold standard status of the CO2 laser and a novel post-treatment plan that greatly reduces adverse effects traditionally associated with fully ablative resurfacing. The croton oil peel is an inexpensive and effective modality for rejuvenating neck skin. The use of either technique as an adjunct to neck lift surgery, with or without facelift surgery, permits surgeons to fulfill the expectations of patients who want the skin of their face and neck to be homogeneous and more attractive. PMID:24745383

  18. Progressive cone dystrophies.

    PubMed

    François, J; De Rouck, A; De Laey, J J

    1976-01-01

    Patients with progressive generalized cone dystrophy often present nystagmus (or strabism) and complain of photophobia, decrease in visual acuity or disturbances in colour perception. The most classic fundus abnormality is the bull's eye maculopathy or a pallor of the optic disc. Minimal macular changes are sometimes seen, which may progress to a bull's eye type of macular degeneration. The photopic ERG is always very affected, whereas at first the scotopic ERG seems normal. Progressive deterioration of the visual functions is accompanied by increasing fundus lesions and rod involvement, as suggested by the modifications of the dark adaptation curve and the scotopic ERG. However, the progression of typical generalized cone dysfunction is very slow. On the contrary, in some cases of so-called Stargardt's disease with peripheral participation, a very rapid progression has been observed. In such cases a normal ERG does not necessarily mean that the disease will remain localized to the macular area. No definite prognosis can be made on one single ERG. In 3 cases with sector pigmentary retinopathy the photopic ERG was more affected than the scotopic ERG. However, these cases are probably primary cone-rod dystrophies. Although there is no electrophysiological control, our clinical impression is that the evolution, if possible, is very slow. PMID:1066593

  19. Shatter cones: Diagnostic impact signatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mchone, J. F.; Dietz, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Uniquely fractured target rocks known as shatter cones are associated with more than one half the world's 120 or so presently known impact structures. Shatter cones are a form of tensile rock failure in which a positive conical plug separates from a negative outer cup or mold and delicate ornaments radiating from an apex are preserved on surfaces of both portions. Although distinct, shatter cones are sometimes confused with other striated geologic features such as ventifacts, stylolites, cone-in-cone, slickensides, and artificial blast plumes. Complete cones or solitary cones are rare, occurrences are usually as swarms in thoroughly fractured rock. Shatter cones may form in a zone where an expanding shock wave propagating through a target decays to form an elastic wave. Near this transition zone, the expanding primary wave may strike a pebble or other inhomogeneity whose contrasting transmission properties produce a scattered secondary wave. Interference between primary and secondary scattered waves produce conical stress fields with axes perpendicular to the plane of an advancing shock front. This model supports mechanism capable of producing such shatter cone properties as orientation, apical clasts, lithic dependence, and shock pressure zonation. Although formational mechanics are still poorly understood, shatter cones have become the simplest geologic field criterion for recognizing astroblemes (ancient terrestrial impact structures).

  20. Increase in neuropilin-1 on the surface of growth cones and putative raft domains in neuronal NG108-15 cells co-cultured with vascular smooth muscle SM-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Ryoichi; Kyuka, Ayumi; Jinno, Miwa; Nishio, Satomi; Matsusaka, Mamoru; Nishida, Tomoki; Endo, Yasuhisa

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying autonomic innervation to its targets involve various chemical factors, but have not yet been elucidated in detail. We constructed a co-culture system of neuronal cells and vascular smooth muscle cells to investigate the mechanisms underlying innervation of the vasculature. A co-culture with the vascular smooth muscle cell line, SM-3 significantly promoted cell viability, neurite extension, and neuropilin-1 (Nrp-1) mRNA expression in the cholinergic neuronal cell line, NG108-15. Furthermore, immunocytochemistry with or without a detergent treatment revealed that a co-culture with SM-3 cells or culturing with the conditioned medium of SM-3 cells translocated Nrp-1 onto the cell surface of growth cones rather than varicosities of NG108-15 cells. Immunofluorescent microscopy combined with a cold detergent treatment or cholesterol depletion revealed that Nrp-1 accumulated in putative raft domains in the plasma membrane of NG108-15 cells co-cultured with SM-3 cells. The results of the present study suggest that some soluble factors from smooth muscle cells may affect the localization of Nrp-1 in cholinergic neuronal cells, which may, in turn, be involved in the autonomic innervation of blood vessels. PMID:25416424

  1. Perfusion Estimated With Rapid Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Correlates Inversely With Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression and Pimonidazole Staining in Head-and-Neck Cancer: A Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, Stephanie B.; Betts, Guy; Bonington, Suzanne C.; Homer, Jarrod J.; Slevin, Nick J.; Kershaw, Lucy E.; Valentine, Helen; West, Catharine M.L.; Buckley, David L.

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To analyze, in a pilot study, rapidly acquired dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI data with a general two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model and correlate parameters obtained with measurements of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Eight patients were scanned before surgery. The DCE-MRI data were acquired with 1.5-s temporal resolution and analyzed using the two-compartment exchange tracer kinetic model to obtain estimates of parameters including perfusion and permeability surface area. Twelve to 16 h before surgery, patients received an intravenous injection of pimonidazole. Samples taken during surgery were used to determine the level of pimonidazole staining using immunohistochemistry and VEGF expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Correlations between the biological and imaging data were examined. Results: Of the seven tumors fully analyzed, those that were poorly perfused tended to have high levels of pimonidazole staining (r = -0.79, p = 0.03) and VEGF expression (r = -0.82, p = 0.02). Tumors with low permeability surface area also tended to have high levels of hypoxia (r = -0.75, p = 0.05). Hypoxic tumors also expressed higher levels of VEGF (r = 0.82, p = 0.02). Conclusions: Estimates of perfusion obtained with rapid DCE-MRI data in patients with head-and-neck cancer correlate inversely with pimonidazole staining and VEGF expression.

  2. Development of crystal supporting system for diameter of 400 mm silicon crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, T.; Machida, N.; Takase, N.; Takano, K.; Matsubara, J.; Shiraishi, Y.; Kuramoto, M.; Yamagishi, H.

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this project is the development of a crystal supporting system (CSS) for silicon crystals with large diameters of 400 mm. Amongst the many technical problems the one that the Super Silicon Crystal Research Institute Corp. (SSi) has directed its energies is to support a weight in excess of the ability of the Dash neck to support this weight. After considering various solutions, we developed a CSS that mechanically supports the silicon subsidiary cone formed between the Dash neck and crystal shoulder. Using this method, an approximately 400 kg ingot was successfully grown from 500 kg of molten silicon in a 36-in. quartz crucible. We confirmed that the CSS mechanism worked correctly through the entire crystal growth process. This paper presents some of the anticipated problems in the mechanical supporting method and the corresponding solutions. Finally, results from real crystal growth to test and verify machine operation are reported.

  3. Enhanced light trapping in periodically truncated cone silicon nanowire structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kai, Qiu; Yuhua, Zuo; Tianwei, Zhou; Zhi, Liu; Jun, Zheng; Chuanbo, Li; Buwen, Cheng

    2015-10-01

    Light trapping plays an important role in improving the conversion efficiency of thin-film solar cells. The good wideband light trapping is achieved using our periodically truncated cone Si nanowire (NW) structures, and their inherent mechanism is analyzed and simulated by FDTD solution software. Ordered cylinder Si NW structure with initial size of 80 nm and length of 200 nm is grown by pattern transfer and selective epitaxial growth. Truncated cone Si NW array is then obtained by thermal oxidation treatment. Its mean reflection in the range of 300-900 nm is lowered to be 5% using 140 nm long truncated cone Si NW structure, compared with that of 20% using cylinder counterparts. It indicates that periodically truncated Si cone structures trap the light efficiently to enhance the light harvesting in a wide spectral range and have the potential application in highly efficient NW solar cells. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51072194, 61021003, 61036001, 61376057).

  4. Loss-cone-driven ion cyclotron waves in the magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denton, Richard E.; Hudson, Mary K.; Roth, Ilan

    1992-01-01

    The study examines the theoretical properties of linear ion cyclotron waves propagating in the magnetosphere at arbitrary angles to the background magnetic field. It is found that in some cases the linear wave growth of modes with oblique propagation can dominate that of the parallel propagating electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) wave. The growth rate of the loss-cone-driven mode depends strongly on the depth of the loss cone. A simple analytical theory which explains the scaling of the growth rate of the oblique mode with respect to various parameters is presented. The loss-cone-driven mode is an electromagnetic mode which is preferentially nearly linearly polarized. The wave field which results from the oblique mode in its perferentially nearly linearly polarized form are nearly perpendicular to B0 and are such that they may be difficult to distinguish from those of a linearly polarized parallel propgating EMIC wave.

  5. Cone on Olympus Mons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03078 Cone on Olympus Mons

    This image shows just a small part of the eastern flank of Olympus Mons. On the far left side of the image a small volcanic cone can be seen. The shadow helps to identify this feature.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 15.7N, Longitude 229.7E. 18 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  7. The Holographic Entropy Cone

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-21

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phasemore » space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.« less

  8. The holographic entropy cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Ning; Nezami, Sepehr; Ooguri, Hirosi; Stoica, Bogdan; Sully, James; Walter, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We initiate a systematic enumeration and classification of entropy inequalities satisfied by the Ryu-Takayanagi formula for conformal field theory states with smooth holographic dual geometries. For 2, 3, and 4 regions, we prove that the strong subadditivity and the monogamy of mutual information give the complete set of inequalities. This is in contrast to the situation for generic quantum systems, where a complete set of entropy inequalities is not known for 4 or more regions. We also find an infinite new family of inequalities applicable to 5 or more regions. The set of all holographic entropy inequalities bounds the phase space of Ryu-Takayanagi entropies, defining the holographic entropy cone. We characterize this entropy cone by reducing geometries to minimal graph models that encode the possible cutting and gluing relations of minimal surfaces. We find that, for a fixed number of regions, there are only finitely many independent entropy inequalities. To establish new holographic entropy inequalities, we introduce a combinatorial proof technique that may also be of independent interest in Riemannian geometry and graph theory.

  9. Making An Impact: Shatter Cones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Lisa M.; Plautz, Michael R.; Crews, Jeffrey W.

    2004-01-01

    In 1990, a group of geologists discovered a large number of shatter cones in southwestern Montana. Shatter cones are a type of metamorphosed rock often found in impact structures (the remains of a crater after a meteor impact and years of Earth activity). Scientists have discovered only 168 impact craters around the world. If rocks could talk,…

  10. Aerodynamic Rear Cone for Trucks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullman, J.

    1985-01-01

    Wind-inflated cone reduces turbulence that ordinarily occurs in air just behind square-back truck traveling at high speed. Wind around truck would enter slits in folded cone and automatically deploy it. Energy lost to air turbulence greatly reduced, and fuel consumed by truck reduced accordingly. In addition, less air turbulence means less disturbance to nearby vehicles on highway.

  11. Light capture by human cones.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, B; Makous, W

    1989-01-01

    1. The variation in visual efficiency of light with varying pupillary entry (the Stiles-Crawford effect) was measured to determine the proportion of light incident on the cones that escapes them without recovery by other cones. 2. The variation in detectability of interference fringes with varying pupillary entry of the interfering beams was measured to determine the proportion of incident light that was recaptured by cones in the dark stripes after escaping cones in the bright stripes of the fringes. 3. By exclusion, these observations determine the variation, with varying pupillary entry, in the proportion of incident light that was captured and absorbed by the first cones it entered. 4. Some 70-90% of the light absorbed by the cones when it passes through the centre of the pupil, is entirely lost to the visual system if it passes instead through the margin of the (dilated) pupil. 5. Over half the light that cones absorb when the light enters the margin of the pupil is light that has previously passed through other cones. 6. If the spread of recaptured light is assumed to be Gaussian, its standard deviation is at most one minute of visual angle. 7. Such recaptured light makes a previously unknown contribution to the various Stiles-Crawford effects. PMID:2607444

  12. Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... head and neck cancer. Poor oral and dental hygiene . Poor care of the mouth and teeth has ... sore throat Foul mouth odor not explained by hygiene Hoarseness or change in voice Nasal obstruction or ...

  13. Talar neck fractures.

    PubMed

    Berlet, G C; Lee, T H; Massa, E G

    2001-01-01

    Clinical management of talar neck fractures is complex and fraught with complications. As Gaius Julius Caesar stated: "The die is cast"; often the outcome of a talar neck fracture is determined at the time of injury. The authors believe, however, that better results can be achieved by following some simple guidelines. The authors advocate prompt and precise anatomic surgical reduction, preferring the medial approach with secondary anterolateral approach. Preservation of blood supply can be achieved by a thorough understanding of vascular pathways and efforts to stay within appropriate surgical intervals. The authors advocate bone grafting of medial neck comminution (if present) to prevent varus malalignment and rigid internal fixation to allow for joint mobilization postoperatively. These guidelines may seem simple, but when dealing with the complexity of talar neck fractures, the foot and ankle surgeon needs to focus and rely on easily grasped concepts to reduce poor outcomes. PMID:11465133

  14. Neck-Tongue Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nancy; Dougherty, Carrie

    2016-04-01

    Neck-tongue syndrome (NTS) is a headache disorder often initiated by rapid axial rotation of the neck resulting in unilateral neck and/or occipital pain and transient ipsilateral tongue sensory disturbance. In this review, we examine reported cases of NTS since its initial description in 1980 to highlight the significance of this condition in the differential diagnosis of headache in patients presenting with neck pain and altered tongue sensation. The anatomical basis of NTS centers on the C1-C2 facet joint, C2 ventral ramus, and inferior oblique muscle in the atlanto-axial space. NTS may be categorized as complicated (secondary to another disease process) or uncomplicated (hereditary, related to trauma, or idiopathic). Diagnosis is based on clinical suspicion after a thorough history and physical without a pathognomonic radiologic finding. It is typically treated conservatively with medications, local injections, immobilization with cervical collars, or physical therapy; rarely is surgical intervention pursued. PMID:26984539

  15. Melanoma - neck (image)

    MedlinePlus

    This melanoma on the neck is variously colored with a very darkly pigmented area found centrally. It has irregular ... be larger than 0.5 cm. Prognosis in melanoma is best defined by its depth on resection.

  16. Torticollis (wry neck) (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Torticollis is a form of dystonia (prolonged muscle contractions) in which the neck muscles, particularly the sternocleidomastoid muscle, contract involuntarily causing the head to turn. Torticollis may occur without known cause (idiopathic), ...

  17. TCGA head Neck

    Cancer.gov

    Investigators with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network have discovered genomic differences – with potentially important clinical implications – in head and neck cancers caused by infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV).

  18. J incision in neck dissections.

    PubMed

    Acar, A; Dursun, G; Aydin, O; Akbaş, Y

    1998-01-01

    Metastasis in the neck lymph system of primary tumours of the head and neck is frequently seen. In order to prevent this metastasis, neck dissection is carried out by various types of skin incisions. In this study, types of skin incision used in neck dissections were defined, and the advantages, disadvantages and results of J incisions, which have been performed on 320 radical neck dissection patients in our clinic between 1985-1996, were compared with those of other incision types. PMID:9538447

  19. Geological constraints on the dynamic emplacement of cone-sheets - The Ardnamurchan cone-sheet swarm, NW Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Lucie; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Krumbholz, Michael; Delcamp, Audray

    2015-11-01

    Cone-sheets are a significant constituent of many central volcanoes, where they contribute to volcano growth by intrusion and through flank eruptions, although the exact emplacement mechanisms are still controversially discussed. In particular, it is not yet fully resolved whether cone-sheets propagate as magma-driven, opening-mode fractures or as shear fractures, and to what extent pre-existing host-rock structures and different stress fields influence cone-sheet emplacement. To shed further light on the role of these parameters in cone-sheet emplacement, we use detailed field and remote sensing data of the classic Ardnamurchan cone-sheet swarm in NW-Scotland, and we show that the cone-sheets primarily propagated as opening-mode fractures in the σ1-σ2 plane of the volcanic stress field. In addition, more than one third of the Ardnamurchan cone-sheet segments are parallel to lineaments that form a conjugate set of NNW and WNW striking fractures and probably reflect the regional NW-SE orientation of σ1 during emplacement in the Palaeogene. Cone-sheets exploit these lineaments within the NE and SW sectors of the Ardnamurchan central complex, which indicates that the local volcanic stress field dominated during sheet propagation and only allowed exploitation of host-rock discontinuities that were approximately parallel to the sheet propagation path. In addition, outcrop-scale deflections of cone-sheets into sills and back into cone-sheets (also referred to as "staircase" geometry) are explained by the interaction of stresses at the propagating sheet tip with variations in host-rock strength, as well as the influence of sheet-induced strain. As a consequence, cone-sheets associated with sill-like segments propagate as mixed-mode I/II fractures. Hence, cone-sheet emplacement requires a dynamic model that takes into account stress fields at various scales and the way propagating magma interacts with the host rock and its inherent variations in rock strength.

  20. Transonic Flow Past Cone Cylinders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, George E

    1955-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for transonic flow post cone-cylinder, axially symmetric bodies. The drag coefficient and surface Mach number are studied as the free-stream Mach number is varied and, wherever possible, the experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions. Interferometric results for several typical flow configurations are shown and an example of shock-free supersonic-to-subsonic compression is experimentally demonstrated. The theoretical problem of transonic flow past finite cones is discussed briefly and an approximate solution of the axially symmetric transonic equations, valid for a semi-infinite cone, is presented.

  1. Origins of Small Volcanic Cones on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fagents, S. A.; Pace, K.; Greeley, R.

    2002-01-01

    Studies of volcanic cones identified in the MGS data indicate a range of possible origins, from primary vent constructs (cinder cones, tuff cones) to rootless cones formed by lava-ice interaction. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  2. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Walters, B R B; Ding, G X; Kramer, R; Kawrakow, I

    2009-07-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12 x 0.12 x 0.12 cm3, with 17 x 17 x 17 microm3 microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/ MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens (approximately 8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only approximately 50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment. PMID:19673190

  3. Skeletal dosimetry in cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, B. R. B.; Ding, G. X.; Kramer, R.; Kawrakow, I.

    2009-07-15

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is a relatively new patient imaging technique that has proved invaluable for treatment target verification and patient positioning during image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT). It has been shown that CBCT results in additional dose to bone that may amount to 10% of the prescribed dose. In this study, voxelized human phantoms, FAX06 (adult female) and MAX06 (adult male), are used together with phase-space data collected from a realistic model of a CBCT imager to calculate dose in the red bone marrow (RBM) and bone surface cells (BSCs), the two organs at risk within the bone spongiosa, during simulated head and neck, chest and pelvis CBCT scans. The FAX06/MAX06 phantoms model spongiosa based on micro-CT images, filling the relevant phantom voxels, which are 0.12x0.12x0.12 cm{sup 3}, with 17x17x17 {mu}m{sup 3} microvoxels to form a micromatrix of trabecular bone and bone marrow. FAX06/MAX06 have already been implemented in an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo code to simulate radiation transport in the phantoms; however, this study required significant modifications of the code to allow use of phase-space data from a simulated CBCT imager as a source and to allow scoring of total dose, RBM dose and BSC dose on a voxel-by-voxel basis. In simulated CBCT scans, the BSC dose is significantly greater than the dose to other organs at risk. For example, in a simulated head and neck scan, the average BSC dose is 25% higher than the average dose to eye lens ({approx}8.3 cGy), and 80% greater than the average dose to brain (5.7 cGy). Average dose to RBM, on the other hand, is typically only {approx}50% of the average BSC dose and less than the dose to other organs at risk (54% of the dose to eye lens and 76% of dose to brain in a head and neck scan). Thus, elevated dose in bone due to CBCT results in elevated BSC dose. This is potentially of concern when using CBCT in conjunction with radiotherapy treatment.

  4. miR-512-5p Suppresses Tumor Growth by Targeting hTERT in Telomerase Positive Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yong; Tao, Ze-zhang

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase activation has very important implications for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), but the regulatory mechanisms of telomerase in HNSCC remain unclear. In our present study, we found that miR-512-5P was markedly downregulated in telomerase-positive HNSCC cell lines. Both in vitro and in vivo assays revealed that miR-512-5P mimic attenuated HNSCC cell proliferation, and tumor growth in nude mice, which exerts its tumor suppressor function through elevated apoptosis, inhibition of the telomerase activity, decrease of telomere-binding proteins and shortening of telomere length by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) downregulation. Furthermore, the dual-luciferase reporter gene assay results demonstrated that hTERT was a direct target of miR-512-5P. We conclude that the frequently miR-512-5P overexpression can regulate hTERT and function as a tumor suppressor in HNSCC. Therefore, miR-512-5P may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for miR-based HNSCC therapy. PMID:26258591

  5. Rootless cone eruption processes informed by dissected tephra deposits and conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, P.; Brown, R. J.; Thordarson, T.; Llewellin, E. W.; Fielding, K.

    2015-09-01

    Rootless cones result from the explosive interaction between lava flows and underlying water-saturated sediment or volcaniclastic deposits. Rootless explosions can represent a significant far-field hazard during basaltic eruptions, but there are few detailed studies of their deposits. A rootless cone field in the 8.5 Ma Ice Harbor flow field of the Columbia River Basalt Province, NW USA, is revealed by sections through rootless conduit and cone structures. The Ice Harbor lava flow hosting the rootless cones was emplaced across a floodplain or lacustrine environment that had recently been mantled by a layer of silicic volcanic ash from a major explosive eruption. Our observations indicate a two-stage growth model for the rootless cones: (1) initial explosions generated sediment-rich tephra emplaced by fallout and pyroclastic density currents and (2) later weaker explosions that generated spatter-rich fountains. Variable explosive activity resulted in a wide range of pyroclast morphologies and vesicularities. Cross-sections through funnel-shaped conduits also show how the conduits were constructed and stabilised. The growth model is consistent with decreasing water availability with time, as inferred for rootless cones described in Iceland. The Ice Harbor rootless cones provide further lithological data to help distinguish between rootless cone-derived tephra and tephra generated above an erupting dyke.

  6. Treatment of Neck Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hurwitz, Eric L.; Cheng, Ivan; Carroll, Linda J.; Nordin, Margareta; Guzman, Jaime; Peloso, Paul; Holm, Lena W.; Côthé, Pierre; Hogg-Johnson, Sheilah; van der Velde, Gabrielle; Cassidy, J. David; Haldeman, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Study Design Best evidence synthesis. Objective To identify, critically appraise, and synthesize literature from 1980 through 2006 on surgical interventions for neck pain alone or with radicular pain in the absence of serious pathologic disease. Summary of Background Data There have been no comprehensive systematic literature or evidence-based reviews published on this topic. Methods We systematically searched Medline for literature published from 1980 to 2006 on percutaneous and open surgical interventions for neck pain. Publications on the topic were also solicited from experts in the field. Consensus decisions were made about the scientific merit of each article; those judged to have adequate internal validity were included in our Best Evidence Synthesis. Results Of the 31,878 articles screened, 1203 studies were relevant to the Neck Pain Task Force mandate and of these, 31 regarding treatment by surgery or injections were accepted as scientifically admissible. Radiofrequency neurotomy, cervical facet injections, cervical fusion and cervical arthroplasty for neck pain without radiculopathy are not supported by current evidence. We found there is support for short-term symptomatic improvement of radicular symptoms with epidural corticosteroids. It is not clear from the evidence that long-term out comes are improved with the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy compared to non operative measures. However, relatively rapid and substantial symptomatic relief after surgical treatment seems to be reliably achieved. It is not evident that one open surgical technique is clearly superior to others for radiculopathy. Cervical foramenal or epidural injections are associated with relatively frequent minor adverse events (5%–20%); however, serious adverse events are very uncommon (<1%). After open surgical procedures on the cervical spine, potentially serious acute complications are seen in approximately 4% of patients. Conclusion Surgical treatment and limited

  7. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) blockade with U3-1287/AMG888 enhances the efficacy of radiation therapy in lung and head and neck carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunrong; Brand, Toni M; Iida, Mari; Huang, Shyhmin; Armstrong, Eric A; van der Kogel, Albert; Wheeler, Deric L

    2013-09-01

    HER3 is a member of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) family of receptor tyrosine kinases. In the present study, we investigated the capacity of the HER3 blocking antibody, U3-1287/AMG888, to modulate the in vitro and in vivo radiation response of human squamous cell carcinomas of the lung and head and neck. We screened a battery of cell lines from these tumors for HER3 expression and demonstrated that all cell lines screened exhibited expression of HER3. Importantly, U3-1287/AMG888 treatment could block both basal HER3 activity and radiation induced HER3 activation. Proliferation assays indicated that HER3 blockade could decrease the proliferation of both HNSCC cell line SCC6 and NSCLC cell line H226. Further, we demonstrated that U3-1287/AMG888 can sensitize cells to radiation in clonogenic survival assays, in addition to increasing DNA damage as detected via λ-H2AX immunofluorescence. To determine if U3-1287/AMG888 could enhance radiation sensitivity in vivo we performed tumor growth delay experiments using SCC6, SCC1483, and H226 xenografts. The results of these experiments indicated that the combination of U3-1287/AMG888 and radiation could decrease tumor growth in studies using single or fractionated doses of radiation. Analysis of HER3 expression in tumor samples indicated that radiation treatment activated HER3 in vivo and that U3-1287/AMG888 could abrogate this activation. Immunohistochemistry analysis of SCC6 tumors treated with both U3-1287/AMG888 and a single dose of radiation demonstrated that various cell survival and proliferation markers could be reduced. Collectively our findings suggest that U3-1287/AMG888 in combination with radiation has an impact on cell and tumor growth by increasing DNA damage and cell death. These findings suggest that HER3 may play an important role in response to radiation therapy and blocking its activity in combination with radiation may be of therapeutic benefit in human tumors. PMID:23998444

  8. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma; Salivary Gland Cancer; Head and Neck Sarcoma; Paraganglioma of Head and Neck; Chordoma of Head and Neck; Chondrosarcoma of Head and Neck; Angiofibroma of Head and Neck

  9. Shatter cones: (Mis)understood?

    PubMed

    Osinski, Gordon R; Ferrière, Ludovic

    2016-08-01

    Meteorite impact craters are one of the most common geological features in the solar system. An impact event is a near-instantaneous process that releases a huge amount of energy over a very small region on a planetary surface. This results in characteristic changes in the target rocks, from vaporization and melting to solid-state effects, such as fracturing and shock metamorphism. Shatter cones are distinctive striated conical fractures that are considered unequivocal evidence of impact events. They are one of the most used and trusted shock-metamorphic effects for the recognition of meteorite impact structures. Despite this, there is still considerable debate regarding their formation. We show that shatter cones are present in several stratigraphic settings within and around impact structures. Together with the occurrence of complete and "double" cones, our observations are most consistent with shatter cone formation due to tensional stresses generated by scattering of the shock wave due to heterogeneities in the rock. On the basis of field mapping, we derive the relationship D sc = 0.4 D a, where D sc is the maximum spatial extent of in situ shatter cones, and D a is the apparent crater diameter. This provides an important, new, more accurate method to estimate the apparent diameter of eroded complex craters on Earth. We have reestimated the diameter of eight well-known impact craters as part of this study. Finally, we suggest that shatter cones may reduce the strength of the target, thus aiding crater collapse, and that their distribution in central uplifts also records the obliquity of impact. PMID:27532050

  10. Shatter cones: (Mis)understood?

    PubMed Central

    Osinski, Gordon R.; Ferrière, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    Meteorite impact craters are one of the most common geological features in the solar system. An impact event is a near-instantaneous process that releases a huge amount of energy over a very small region on a planetary surface. This results in characteristic changes in the target rocks, from vaporization and melting to solid-state effects, such as fracturing and shock metamorphism. Shatter cones are distinctive striated conical fractures that are considered unequivocal evidence of impact events. They are one of the most used and trusted shock-metamorphic effects for the recognition of meteorite impact structures. Despite this, there is still considerable debate regarding their formation. We show that shatter cones are present in several stratigraphic settings within and around impact structures. Together with the occurrence of complete and “double” cones, our observations are most consistent with shatter cone formation due to tensional stresses generated by scattering of the shock wave due to heterogeneities in the rock. On the basis of field mapping, we derive the relationship Dsc = 0.4 Da, where Dsc is the maximum spatial extent of in situ shatter cones, and Da is the apparent crater diameter. This provides an important, new, more accurate method to estimate the apparent diameter of eroded complex craters on Earth. We have reestimated the diameter of eight well-known impact craters as part of this study. Finally, we suggest that shatter cones may reduce the strength of the target, thus aiding crater collapse, and that their distribution in central uplifts also records the obliquity of impact. PMID:27532050

  11. Selective Uptake and Imaging of Aptamer- and Antibody-Conjugated Hollow Nanospheres Targeted to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors Overexpressed in Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the binding affinity and selective targeting of aptamer- and antibody-coated hollow gold nanospheres (HAuNS) targeted to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR). EGFR-targeting aptamers were conjugated to HAuNS (apt-HAuNS) by attaching a thiol-terminated single-stranded DNA to the HAuNS and then adding the complementary RNA targeted to EGFR. Apt-HAuNS was characterized in terms of size, surface charge, absorption, and number of aptamers per particle. The in vivo pharmacokinetics, in vivo biodistribution, and micro-SPECT/CT imaging of 111In-labeled apt-HAuNS and anti-EGFR antibody (C225)-conjugated HAuNS were evaluated in nude mice bearing highly malignant human OSC-19 oral tumors. 111In-labeled PEG-HAuNS was used as a control (n = 5/group). Apt-HAuNS did not have an altered absorbance profile or size (λmax = 800 nm; diameter = 55 nm) compared to C225-HAuNS or PEG-HAuNS. The surface charge became more negative upon conjugation of the aptamer (−51.4 vs −19.0 for PEG-HAuNS and −25.0 for C225-HAuNS). The number of aptamers/particle was ∼250. In vitro cell binding and in vivo biodistribution showed selective binding of the apt-HAuNS to EGFR. μSPECT/CT imaging confirmed that there was more tumor uptake of apt-HAuNS than C225-HAuNS. Aptamer is a promising ligand for image-guided delivery of nanoparticles for treatment of tumor cells overexpressing EGFR. PMID:24754567

  12. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  13. Small Molecules in the Cone Snail Arsenal.

    PubMed

    Neves, Jorge L B; Lin, Zhenjian; Imperial, Julita S; Antunes, Agostinho; Vasconcelos, Vitor; Olivera, Baldomero M; Schmidt, Eric W

    2015-10-16

    Cone snails are renowned for producing peptide-based venom, containing conopeptides and conotoxins, to capture their prey. A novel small-molecule guanine derivative with unprecedented features, genuanine, was isolated from the venom of two cone snail species. Genuanine causes paralysis in mice, indicating that small molecules and not just polypeptides may contribute to the activity of cone snail venom. PMID:26421741

  14. Developmental biomechanics of neck musculature

    PubMed Central

    Lavallee, Amy V.; Ching, Randal P.; Nuckley, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Neck mechanics is central to head injury prevention since it is the musculoskeletal neck, which dictates the position and movement of the head. In the US, traumatic injury is the leading cause of death for children; however prevention is hampered by the lack of data concerning the mechanics of the immature head-and-neck. Thus, the objective of this study was to quantify neck muscle strength and endurance across the maturation spectrum and correlate these with head-and-neck anthropometry. A factorial study was performed on 91 human subjects measuring head-and-neck anthropometry and neck strength and endurance in three bending directions (flexion, extension, and lateral) as a function of age (6–23 years). Using a custom device, neck maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) force was measured in triplicate. Next, neck muscle endurance (sustained effort) was measured as the subjects’ ability to maintain 70% of peak force over 30 s. Linear regression of peak force and endurance as a function of age revealed each direction to significantly (p<0.0001) increase with age. The MVC force, averaged across all directions and normalized to the adult values, exhibits the following maturation curve: %MVC Force= −0.0879(age)2+6.018(age)+8.120. Neck muscle strength, similar between young males and females, becomes disparate in adolescence and adulthood with males exhibiting greater strength. Bending direction differences were also found with extension strength being the greatest regardless of age and sex. Furthermore, neck circumference appears predictive of neck strength and endurance in children. Together, these relationships may facilitate improved design of injury prevention interventions. PMID:23127787

  15. Transient wake and trajectory of free falling cones with various apex angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yaqing; Hamed, Ali M.; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The early free-fall stages of cones with a density ratio 1.18 and apex angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° were studied using a wireless 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer to describe the cone 3D motions, while the induced flow in the near wake was captured using particle image velocimetry. The Reynolds number based on the cone diameter and the velocity at which the cone reaches the first local velocity maximum is found to set the limit between two distinctive states. Before this Re is reached the departure from the vertical path and cone rotations are insignificant, while relatively rapid growth is observed after this Re. Sequences of vertical velocity, swirling strength, LES-decomposed velocity, and pressure fields shows the formation and growth of a large and initially symmetric recirculation bubble at the cone base and highlights the presence of a symmetric 3D vortex rollup dominating the near-wake in the early stages of the fall. Later, the shear layer at the edge of the wake manifests in the shedding of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices that, due to the nature of the recirculation bubble, reorganize to constitute a part of the rollup. Later in the fall, the wake loses its symmetry and shows a high population of vortical structures leading to turbulence. The asymmetric wake leads to strong interactions between the flow field and the cone creating complex feedback loops.

  16. Journey of water in pine cones

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kahye; Yeom, Eunseop; Seo, Seung-Jun; Kim, Kiwoong; Kim, Hyejeong; Lim, Jae-Hong; Joon Lee, Sang

    2015-01-01

    Pine cones fold their scales when it rains to prevent seeds from short-distance dispersal. Given that the scales of pine cones consist of nothing but dead cells, this folding motion is evidently related to structural changes. In this study, the structural characteristics of pine cones are studied on micro-/macro-scale using various imaging instruments. Raindrops fall along the outer scales to the three layers (bract scales, fibers and innermost lignified structure) of inner pine cones. However, not all the layers but only the bract scales get wet and then, most raindrops move to the inner scales. These systems reduce the amount of water used and minimize the time spent on structural changes. The result shows that the pine cones have structural advantages that could influence the efficient motion of pine cones. This study provides new insights to understand the motion of pine cones and would be used to design a novel water transport system. PMID:25944117

  17. Interventional radiology neck procedures.

    PubMed

    Zabala Landa, R M; Korta Gómez, I; Del Cura Rodríguez, J L

    2016-05-01

    Ultrasonography has become extremely useful in the evaluation of masses in the head and neck. It enables us to determine the anatomic location of the masses as well as the characteristics of the tissues that compose them, thus making it possible to orient the differential diagnosis toward inflammatory, neoplastic, congenital, traumatic, or vascular lesions, although it is necessary to use computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging to determine the complete extension of certain lesions. The growing range of interventional procedures, mostly guided by ultrasonography, now includes biopsies, drainages, infiltrations, sclerosing treatments, and tumor ablation. PMID:27138033

  18. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer This page ... and neck cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer Abitrexate (Methotrexate) ...

  19. Head and Neck Cancer: Symptoms and Signs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Symptoms and Signs Request Permissions Print to PDF Head and Neck Cancer - Symptoms and Signs Approved by the Cancer. ... Cancer Research and Advocacy Survivorship Blog About Us Head and Neck Cancer Guide Cancer.Net Guide Head and Neck ...

  20. Light-cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, M. B.

    2009-09-15

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {delta}=0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx_equal}22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  1. Evaluation of Radiation Dose and Image Quality for the Varian Cone Beam Computed Tomography System

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Harry C.Y.; Wu, Vincent W.C.; Liu, Eva S.F.; Kwong, Dora L.W.

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To compare the image quality and dosimetry on the Varian cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system between software Version 1.4.13 and Version 1.4.11 (referred to as 'new' and 'old' protocols, respectively, in the following text). This study investigated organ absorbed dose, total effective dose, and image quality of the CBCT system for the head-and-neck and pelvic regions. Methods and Materials: A calibrated Farmer chamber and two standard cylindrical Perspex CT dosimetry phantoms with diameter of 16 cm (head phantom) and 32 cm (body phantom) were used to measure the weighted cone-beam computed tomography dose index (CBCTDIw) of the Varian CBCT system. The absorbed dose of different organs was measured in a female anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) and the total effective dose was estimated according to International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Publication 103. The dose measurement and image quality were studied for head-and-neck and pelvic regions, and comparison was made between the new and old protocols. Results: The values of the new CBCTDIw head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 36.6 and 29.4 mGy, respectively. The total effective doses from the new head-and-neck and pelvic protocols were 1.7 and 8.2 mSv, respectively. The absorbed doses of lens for the new 200{sup o} and old 360{sup o} head-and-neck protocols were 3.8 and 59.4 mGy, respectively. The additional secondary cancer risk from daily CBCT might be up to 2.8%. Conclusions: The new Varian CBCT provided volumetric information for image guidance with acceptable image quality and lower radiation dose. This imaging tool gave a better standard for patient daily setup verification.

  2. Inside the cone of protection

    SciTech Connect

    Stahmann, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Although lightning cones of protection and cones of attraction have been used for over 100 years, much confusion still remains as to their effectiveness, particularly as applied to personnel protection. At Kennedy Space Center, a 1:1 cone of protection with a straight side is standard for structure or equipment protection. However, at the launch pad, where a 400-foot lightning lightning rod on top of an insulating mast is used for pad lightning protection, the idea developed that personnel within a 400-foot radius of this mast would be safe from lightning and those outside it would not. Since it is obvious that a person 395 feet (120.4 m.) from the mast is only slightly safer than one at 405 feet (123.5 m.), an investigation was initiated to calculate the probabilities of a person being struck by lightning as he moves closer to the mast inside the cone of protection. Since the risk does not go to zero outside the structure, the risk level can then be estimated. To arrive at the expected strike frequency, it was necessary to measure the strike frequencies at KSC. Krider and others have found a mean area density of cloud-to-ground lightning at KSC of about 4.6 + or - 3.1 flashes per sq km per month in the summer. An overall frequency is estimated as about 20 flashes per sq km per year. With these data, the risk of exposure at various distances from the lightning mast can be calculated. Assuming continuous exposure during thunderstorms, this risk varies from about one strike per person in 1,400 years near the tower to one stroke per person in 300 years at about 400 foot (122 m.).

  3. Cardiac cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Manzke, Robert . E-mail: robert.manzke@philips.com

    2005-10-15

    This doctoral thesis addresses imaging of the heart with retrospectively gated helical cone-beam computed tomography (CT). A thorough review of the CT reconstruction literature is presented in combination with a historic overview of cardiac CT imaging and a brief introduction to other cardiac imaging modalities. The thesis includes a comprehensive chapter about the theory of CT reconstruction, familiarizing the reader with the problem of cone-beam reconstruction. The anatomic and dynamic properties of the heart are outlined and techniques to derive the gating information are reviewed. With the extended cardiac reconstruction (ECR) framework, a new approach is presented for the heart-rate-adaptive gated helical cardiac cone-beam CT reconstruction. Reconstruction assessment criteria such as the temporal resolution, the homogeneity in terms of the cardiac phase, and the smoothness at cycle-to-cycle transitions are developed. Several reconstruction optimization approaches are described: An approach for the heart-rate-adaptive optimization of the temporal resolution is presented. Streak artifacts at cycle-to-cycle transitions can be minimized by using an improved cardiac weighting scheme. The optimal quiescent cardiac phase for the reconstruction can be determined automatically with the motion map technique. Results for all optimization procedures applied to ECR are presented and discussed based on patient and phantom data. The ECR algorithm is analyzed for larger detector arrays of future cone-beam systems throughout an extensive simulation study based on a four-dimensional cardiac CT phantom. The results of the scientific work are summarized and an outlook proposing future directions is given. The presented thesis is available for public download at www.cardiac-ct.net.

  4. Loss cone-driven cyclotron maser instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yun; Yi, Sibaek; Lim, Dayeh; Kim, Hee-Eun; Seough, Jungjoon; Yoon, Peter H.

    2013-11-01

    The weakly (or mildly) relativistic cyclotron maser instability has been successfully applied to explain the Earth's auroral kilometric radiation and other radio sources in nature and laboratory. Among the most important physical parameters that determine the instability criteria is the ratio of plasma-to-electron cyclotron frequencies, ωp/Ω. It is therefore instructive to consider how the normalized maximum growth rate, γmax/Ω, varies as a function of ωp/Ω. Although many authors have already discussed this problem, in order to complete the analysis, one must also understand how the radiation emission angle corresponding to the maximum growth, θmax, scales with ωp/Ω, since the propagation angle determines the radiation beaming pattern. Also, the behavior of the frequency corresponding to the maximum growth rate at each harmonic, (ωmax-sΩ)/Ω, where s=1,2,3,ċ , as a function of ωp/Ωis of importance for a complete understanding of the maser excitation. The present paper computes these additional quantities for the first time, making use of a model loss cone electron distribution function.

  5. Bursting the Taylor cone bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhao; Truscott, Tadd

    2014-11-01

    A soap bubble fixed on a surface and placed in an electric field will take on the shape of a cone rather than constant curvature (dome) when the electrical field is not present. The phenomenon was introduced by J. Zeleny (1917) and studied extensively by C.T. Wilson & G.I. Taylor (1925). We revisit the Taylor cone problem by studying the deformation and bursting of soap bubbles in a point charge electric field. A single bubble takes on the shape of a cone in the electric field and a high-speed camera equipped with a micro-lens is used to observe the unsteady dynamics at the tip. Rupture occurs as a very small piece of the tip is torn away from the bubble toward the point charge. Based on experiments, a theoretical model is developed that predicts when rupture should occur. This study may help in the design of foam-removal techniques in engineering and provide a better understanding of an electrified air-liquid interface.

  6. Prescriptionless light-cone integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, A. T.; Schmidt, A. G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Perturbative quantum gauge field theory as seen within the perspective of physical gauge choices such as the light-cone gauge entails the emergence of troublesome poles of the type (k\\cdot n)^{-α} in the Feynman integrals. These come from the boson field propagator, where α = 1,2,\\cdots and n^{μ} is the external arbitrary four-vector that defines the gauge proper. This becomes an additional hurdle in the computation of Feynman diagrams, since any graph containing internal boson lines will inevitably produce integrands with denominators bearing the characteristic gauge-fixing factor. How one deals with them has been the subject of research over decades, and several prescriptions have been suggested and tried in the course of time, with failures and successes. However, a more recent development at this fronteer which applies the negative dimensional technique to compute light-cone Feynman integrals shows that we can altogether dispense with prescriptions to perform the calculations. An additional bonus comes to us attached to this new technique, in that not only it renders the light-cone prescriptionless but, by the very nature of it, it can also dispense with decomposition formulas or partial fractioning tricks used in the standard approach to separate pole products of the type (k\\cdot n)^{-α}[(k-p)\\cdot n]^{-β} (β = 1,2,\\cdots ). In this work we demonstrate how all this can be done.

  7. Light-cone quantization of quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J. ); Pauli, H.C. )

    1991-06-01

    We discuss the light-cone quantization of gauge theories from two perspectives: as a calculational tool for representing hadrons as QCD bound-states of relativistic quarks and gluons, and also as a novel method for simulating quantum field theory on a computer. The light-cone Fock state expansion of wavefunctions at fixed light cone time provides a precise definition of the parton model and a general calculus for hadronic matrix elements. We present several new applications of light-cone Fock methods, including calculations of exclusive weak decays of heavy hadrons, and intrinsic heavy-quark contributions to structure functions. A general nonperturbative method for numerically solving quantum field theories, discretized light-cone quantization,'' is outlined and applied to several gauge theories, including QCD in one space and one time dimension, and quantum electrodynamics in physical space-time at large coupling strength. The DLCQ method is invariant under the large class of light-cone Lorentz transformations, and it can be formulated such at ultraviolet regularization is independent of the momentum space discretization. Both the bound-state spectrum and the corresponding relativistic light-cone wavefunctions can be obtained by matrix diagonalization and related techniques. We also discuss the construction of the light-cone Fock basis, the structure of the light-cone vacuum, and outline the renormalization techniques required for solving gauge theories within the light-cone Hamiltonian formalism.

  8. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: new translational therapies.

    PubMed

    Prince, Anthony; Aguirre-Ghizo, Julio; Genden, Eric; Posner, Marshall; Sikora, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma includes cancers of the mouth, throat, larynx, and lymph nodes of the neck. Although early disease is amenable to single-modality treatment with surgery or radiation, patients with advanced disease have a dramatically worse prognosis, despite potentially morbid/toxic treatment regimens involving surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or all 3 modalities. The present review seeks to provide an overview of current understanding and treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma for the nonspecialist clinician or basic/translational researcher, followed by an overview of major translational approaches to the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Translational research topics addressed include targeted molecular therapy, immunotherapy, minimally invasive robotic surgery, and ablation of dormant/residual tumor cells. Despite the many potentially promising avenues of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma research, only 2 new treatment approaches (antiepidermal growth factor receptor therapy and robotic surgery) have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in the past 30 years. Focused research programs involving integrated teams of clinicians, basic scientists, and translational clinician-researchers have the potential to accelerate discovery and change treatment paradigms for patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:21105129

  9. Fundamental conical defects: The d-cone, its e-cone, and its p-cone.

    PubMed

    Seffen, Keith A

    2016-07-01

    We consider well-known surface disclinations by cutting, joining, and folding pieces of paper card. The resulting shapes have a discrete, folded vertex whose geometry is described easily by Gauss's mapping, in particular, we can relate the degree of angular excess, or deficit, to the size of fold line rotations by the area enclosed by the vector diagram of these rotations. This is well known for the case of a so-called "d-cone" of zero angular deficit, and we formulate the same for a general disclination. This method allows us to observe kinematic properties in a meaningful way without needing to consider equilibrium. Importantly, the simple vector nature of our analysis shows that some disclinations are primitive; and that other types, such as d-cones, are amalgamations of them. PMID:27575208

  10. ERGs, cone-isolating VEPs and analytical techniques in children with cone dysfunction syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John P; Crognale, Michael A; Weiss, Avery H

    2003-05-01

    Photoreceptor and post-receptoral function in children with congenital and acquired cone disorders was measured by full-field electroretinogram (ERG) and transient visual evoked potentials (VEPs). Subjects were five rod monochromats (RM), five with cone dystrophy (CD), and 30 controls. Patients were diagnosed by clinical findings, ERGs, and standard color vision tests. VEP stimuli were check reversals and color grating onsets that stimulated each photoreceptor type (L-, M-, or S-cones) or post-receptoral pathways (L-M, white/black). VEP signal-to-noise ratios (S/N) were calculated by Fourier analysis of VEP epochs. All RM patients showed extinguished cone ERGs. A near normal S-cone VEP was recorded from a blue-cone rod monochromat without any signal from the L- or M-cone stimuli. Two other RM patients were classified as incomplete RM based on a low-level VEP signal from either L- or M-cone stimuli. CD patients had mildly to severely reduced ERGs and VEPs were abnormal to all cone-isolating stimuli. The VEP S/N ratio was not significantly correlated with the amount of rod contrast in the color stimuli. Color VEPs provide an objective assessment of macular cone function in children with cone dysfunction syndromes that is more sensitive to residual central cone function than standard full-field ERGs. VEP techniques may be useful in the early detection of cone loss in children, especially in children who do not tolerate ERG testing. PMID:12737507

  11. [Grading of head and neck neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Agaimy, A; Weichert, W

    2016-07-01

    Tumors of the head and neck form a heterogeneous group of benign and malignant neoplasms with significant differences in biological behavior and therapeutic strategies. Squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the larynx, pharynx and oral cavity represent the most frequent and, thus, clinically most important malignant neoplasms in this anatomical region. Similar to other neoplasms, grading of head and neck malignancies is based on evaluation of the tumor histology usually including both architectural and cytological features; however, the current consensus grading for head and neck SCC is of limited prognostic and therapeutic value and the reproducibility is low. Therefore, novel grading criteria have been proposed that are based on additional parameters, such as the type of tumor growth pattern at the invasive front (so-called tumor budding). These novel algorithms, however, have not yet been officially endorsed into guidelines. Salivary gland (SG) neoplasms, although less frequent, constitute a second important pathologically and clinically complex group of tumors at this location. In contrast to SCC, grading of these tumors is of high clinical importance. Based on the large variety of carcinoma entities of the SG, both entity-specific (e. g. mucoepidermoid carcinoma) algorithms but also algorithms, which are solely based on the recognition of a specific carcinoma variant with subsequent automatic assignment of the tumor grade (e. g. acinic cell carcinoma and salivary duct carcinoma) are in use. In the sinonasal tract, grading is important for non-intestinal type adenocarcinoma and esthesioneuroblastoma. In this article the most important grading schemes and criteria for head and neck malignancies are presented and their prognostic and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:27342593

  12. Isolating prompt photons with narrow cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, S.; Fontannaz, M.; Guillet, J. Ph.; Pilon, E.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the isolation of prompt photons in hadronic collisions by means of narrow isolation cones and the QCD computation of the corresponding cross sections. We reconsider the occurence of large perturbative terms with logarithmic dependence on the cone size and their impact on the fragmentation scale dependence. We cure the apparent perturbative violation of unitarity for small cone sizes, which had been noticed earlier in next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculations, by resumming the leading logarithmic dependence on the cone size. We discuss possible implications regarding the implementation of some hollow cone variants of the cone criterion, which simulate the experimental difficulty to impose isolation inside the region filled by the electromagnetic shower that develops in the calorimeter.

  13. Bladder neck contracture

    PubMed Central

    Simhan, Jay; Ramirez, Daniel; Morey, Allen F.

    2014-01-01

    Bladder neck contracture (BNC) is a well-described complication of the surgical treatment of benign and malignant prostate conditions. Nevertheless, etiologies of BNC development are highly dependent on the primary treatment modality undertaken with BNC also occurring after pelvic radiation. The treatment options for BNC can range from simple, office-based dilation procedures to more invasive, complex abdomino-perineal reconstructive surgery. Although numerous strategies have been described, a patient-specific approach is usually necessary in the management of these complex patients. In this review, we highlight various therapeutic maneuvers described for the management of BNC and further delineate a tailored approach utilized at our institution in these complicated patients. PMID:26816768

  14. Cone opsins, colour blindness and cone dystrophy: Genotype-phenotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Gardner, J C; Michaelides, M; Hardcastle, A J

    2016-01-01

    X-linked cone photoreceptor disorders caused by mutations in the OPN1LW (L) and OPN1MW (M) cone opsin genes on chromosome Xq28 include a range of conditions from mild stable red-green colour vision deficiencies to severe cone dystrophies causing progressive loss of vision and blindness. Advances in molecular genotyping and functional analyses of causative variants, combined with deep retinal phenotyping, are unravelling genetic mechanisms underlying the variability of cone opsin disorders. PMID:27245533

  15. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1991-01-01

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form n output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated.

  16. Nested-cone transformer antenna

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1991-05-28

    A plurality of conical transmission lines are concentrically nested to form an output antenna for pulsed-power, radio-frequency, and microwave sources. The diverging conical conductors enable a high power input density across a bulk dielectric to be reduced below a breakdown power density at the antenna interface with the transmitting medium. The plurality of cones maintain a spacing between conductors which minimizes the generation of high order modes between the conductors. Further, the power input feeds are isolated at the input while enabling the output electromagnetic waves to add at the transmission interface. Thus, very large power signals from a pulse rf, or microwave source can be radiated. 6 figures.

  17. Cancer in the neck: Evaluation and treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, D.L.; Ballantyne, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 21 selections. Some of the titles are: Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of melanoma; Basic principles of radiobiology in head and neck oncology; Head and neck cancer: Radiotherapeutic precepts in the management of the neck; and Morbidity of modified neck dissection.

  18. Identification of appropriate cone length to avoid positive cone margin in high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Naotake; Nishio, Shin; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify key factors for predicting positive cone margin and appropriate cone length. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the margin status of patients who received conization with high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, along with other factors such as patient age, parity, preoperative cytology, size of disease, type of transformation zone, and cone length from patient records. Cut-off value of cone length was analyzed in women younger than 40 years old because we design conization with minimum length especially for women who wish for future pregnancy. Cut-off value of cone length was defined as length corresponds to estimated probability of positive cone margin equal to 0.1 by logistic regression analysis with variables selected by stepwise methods. Results Among 300 patients, 75 patients had positive cone margin. Multivariable analysis revealed that squamous cell carcinoma at preoperative cytology (p=0.001), 2 or more quadrant disease (p=0.011), and shorter cone length (p<0.001) were risk factors for positive cone margin. Stepwise methods identified cone length and size of lesion as important variables. With this condition, cut-off value of cone length was estimated as 15 mm in single quadrant disease and 20 mm in 2 or more quadrant disease, respectively. Conclusion We identified the independent risk factors of positive cone margin and identified the cut-off value of cone length to avoid positive cone margin in women younger than 40 years old. Conization should be performed not only according to colposcopic findings including type of transformation zone but size of disease and cone length. PMID:27401478

  19. Patterning the Cone Mosaic Array in Zebrafish Retina Requires Specification of Ultraviolet-Sensitive Cones

    PubMed Central

    Raymond, Pamela A.; Colvin, Steven M.; Jabeen, Zahera; Nagashima, Mikiko; Barthel, Linda K.; Hadidjojo, Jeremy; Popova, Lilia; Pejaver, Vivek R.; Lubensky, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors in teleost fish are organized in precise, crystalline arrays in the epithelial plane of the retina. In zebrafish, four distinct morphological/spectral cone types occupy specific, invariant positions within a regular lattice. The cone lattice is aligned orthogonal and parallel to circumference of the retinal hemisphere: it emerges as cones generated in a germinal zone at the retinal periphery are incorporated as single-cell columns into the cone lattice. Genetic disruption of the transcription factor Tbx2b eliminates most of the cone subtype maximally sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths and also perturbs the long-range organization of the cone lattice. In the tbx2b mutant, the other three cone types (red, green, and blue cones) are specified in the correct proportion, differentiate normally, and acquire normal, planar polarized adhesive interactions mediated by Crumbs 2a and Crumbs 2b. Quantitative image analysis of cell adjacency revealed that the cones in the tbx2b mutant primarily have two nearest neighbors and align in single-cell-wide column fragments that are separated by rod photoreceptors. Some UV cones differentiate at the dorsal retinal margin in the tbx2b mutant, although they are severely dysmorphic and are eventually eliminated. Incorporating loss of UV cones during formation of cone columns at the margin into our previously published mathematical model of zebrafish cone mosaic formation (which uses bidirectional interactions between planar cell polarity proteins and anisotropic mechanical stresses in the plane of the retinal epithelium to generate regular columns of cones parallel to the margin) reproduces many features of the pattern disruptions seen in the tbx2b mutant. PMID:24465536

  20. [Lymphatic malformations in the head and neck area].

    PubMed

    Wiegand, S; Werner, J A

    2016-02-01

    Lymphatic malformations are congenital malformations of the lymphatic system. They are mainly located in the head and neck area, and grow proportional to the patients' body growth. Depending on the morphology, it can be distinguished between macrocystic, microcystic and mixed lymphatic malformations. Due to their infiltrative growth, microcystic lymphatic malformations are particularly difficult to treat. Therapeutic approaches include conventional surgical resection, laser therapy, sclerotherapy and systemic drug therapies. PMID:26820157

  1. Compositional variations within scoria cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, Mel; Wolff, John

    2003-02-01

    Basaltic to andesitic monogenic scoria cones from the southern Cascades exhibit large chemical variations within the products of single eruptions. Two types of chemical variations occur within cones. First, there are several instances where the chemistry of the late-stage lava flow is significantly different from that of the scoria. The two magma types cannot be related to each other by fractional crystallization, and instead seem to be derived from different sources. Second, chemical variations occur within the scoria, most easily recognized in ratios of large ion lithophile elements to high field strength elements. Repeatedly, an ocean-island basalt like component has erupted contemporaneously with the dominant calc-alkaline compositions, requiring two distinct mantle sources (one ocean-island basalt source and one mid-ocean-ridge basalt source) as well as the variable addition of slab-derived fluids. Such variations within the scoria suggest that either magma chambers do not exist and the melt migrates from the source through dike-like structures without homogenization, or that magma chambers are inefficient in their ability to mix liquids. Small volumes of basalt, which may normally be thermally challenged to reach the surface, might ascend through the crust through pathways recently traveled by previous melt batches, causing pairs of magmas to erupt at each vent.

  2. Replaceable filters and cones for flared-tubing connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, L. E.; Howland, B. T.

    1970-01-01

    Connector is modified by machining the cone from one end before the fitting is bored to accommodate a metallic-filament type of slip-in filter. Thus, when surface of the cone is damaged, only the cone needs replacement.

  3. The structure and emplacement of cinder cone fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Settle, M.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines the structure and emplacement of cinder cone fields. Terrestrial cinder cone fields occur in volcanic provinces upon the flanks of major volcanoes or within relatively flat-lying volcanic fields. Measurements of cone shape and distribution were made in three volcano cone fields and three platform cone fields, and it was found that modal average values of cone basal diameter are on the order of 300 to 400 m within volcano cone fields and 900 to 1000 m within platform cone fields. The average morphometric parameters for the six fields indicate that cone diameter is positively correlated with cone separation distance, and that the size and spacing of cinder cones formed on the flanks of volcanoes is less than the size and spacing of cones constructed in volcanic fields.

  4. Panoramic cone beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Jenghwa; Zhou Lili; Wang Song; Clifford Chao, K. S.

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is the main imaging tool for image-guided radiotherapy but its functionality is limited by a small imaging volume and restricted image position (imaged at the central instead of the treatment position for peripheral lesions to avoid collisions). In this paper, the authors present the concept of ''panoramic CBCT,'' which can image patients at the treatment position with an imaging volume as large as practically needed. Methods: In this novel panoramic CBCT technique, the target is scanned sequentially from multiple view angles. For each view angle, a half scan (180 deg. + {theta}{sub cone} where {theta}{sub cone} is the cone angle) is performed with the imaging panel positioned in any location along the beam path. The panoramic projection images of all views for the same gantry angle are then stitched together with the direct image stitching method (i.e., according to the reported imaging position) and full-fan, half-scan CBCT reconstruction is performed using the stitched projection images. To validate this imaging technique, the authors simulated cone-beam projection images of the Mathematical Cardiac Torso (MCAT) thorax phantom for three panoramic views. Gaps, repeated/missing columns, and different exposure levels were introduced between adjacent views to simulate imperfect image stitching due to uncertainties in imaging position or output fluctuation. A modified simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (modified SART) was developed to reconstruct CBCT images directly from the stitched projection images. As a gold standard, full-fan, full-scan (360 deg. gantry rotation) CBCT reconstructions were also performed using projection images of one imaging panel large enough to encompass the target. Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and geometric distortion were evaluated to quantify the quality of reconstructed images. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate the effect of scattering on the image quality and

  5. Cone penetrometer demonstration standard startup review checklist

    SciTech Connect

    KRIEG, S.A.

    1998-11-09

    Startup readiness for the Cone Penetrometer Demonstration in AX Tank Farm will be verified through the application of a Standard Startup Review Checklist. This is a listing of those items essential to demonstrating readiness to start the Cone Penetrometer Demonstration in AX Tank Farm.

  6. Recoverin depletion accelerates cone photoresponse recovery

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Jingjing; Keim, Jennifer; Kastenhuber, Edda; Gesemann, Matthias; Neuhauss, Stephan C. F.

    2015-01-01

    The neuronal Ca2+-binding protein Recoverin has been shown to regulate phototransduction termination in mammalian rods. Here we identify four recoverin genes in the zebrafish genome, rcv1a, rcv1b, rcv2a and rcv2b, and investigate their role in modulating the cone phototransduction cascade. While Recoverin-1b is only found in the adult retina, the other Recoverins are expressed throughout development in all four cone types, except Recoverin-1a, which is expressed only in rods and UV cones. Applying a double flash electroretinogram (ERG) paradigm, downregulation of Recoverin-2a or 2b accelerates cone photoresponse recovery, albeit at different light intensities. Exclusive recording from UV cones via spectral ERG reveals that knockdown of Recoverin-1a alone has no effect, but Recoverin-1a/2a double-knockdowns showed an even shorter recovery time than Recoverin-2a-deficient larvae. We also showed that UV cone photoresponse kinetics depend on Recoverin-2a function via cone-specific kinase Grk7a. This is the first in vivo study demonstrating that cone opsin deactivation kinetics determine overall photoresponse shut off kinetics. PMID:26246494

  7. System design description cone penetrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Seda, R.Y., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-12

    The system design description documents in detail the design of the cone penetrometer system. The systems includes the cone penetrometer physical package, raman spectroscopy package and moisture sensor package. Information pertinent to the system design, development, fabrication and testing is provided.

  8. The AKR emission cone at low frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calvert, W.

    1981-01-01

    It is noted that certain of the ISEE-1 observations between the plasmasphere and the auroral zone have revealed the emission cone of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) unaffected by plasmaspheric refraction. At some distance from the source, the cone produced a sharp low-frequency boundary in the AKR signals, which was displaced above the cyclotron frequency. The variation of this boundary, together with other aspects of the AKR signals, suggested that the AKR emission cone closed toward a hollow, roughly 45 deg limit cone with decreasing frequency, duplicating the behavior previously found with ISIS-1 at the opposite end of the AKR spectrum. It is pointed out that the hollow limit cone at low frequencies is a new feature, not previously reported.

  9. Unique characteristics of cones in Central Elysium Planitia, Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noguchi, Rina; Kurita, Kei

    2015-06-01

    Martian magmatism within recent several hundreds of millions years is still controversial. Central Elysium Planitia (CEP) is suspected as a site of the latest magmatism on Mars, but hot debates have been caused as for the origin of this flat plain. Cones in CEP are expected to be a key to resolve this controversy. In previous works, there are 2 models proposed for the origin of CEP cones: volcanic rootless cone (e.g. Jaeger et al., 2007) and periglacial pingo (e.g. Burr et al., 2002; Page et al., 2009). In this study, we described detail morphology, distribution and size of CEP cones by using high-resolution images and topographic data. CEP cones are classified into 3 morphological types: Single Cone (SC), Double Cone (DC), and Lotus Fruit Cone (LC). DC has an inner cone in the summit crater of the outer cone, and LC has several inner cones in the summit crater of the outer cone. Several cones have moat structure around the edifice with peripheral rise. DCs and LCs are located in very flat areas of Athabasca Valles in the vicinity of Cerberus Fossae, while SCs distribute in the entire region of CEP. We compared CEP cones with terrestrial rootless cones and pingos in aerial photos. In Lake Myvatn, Iceland, there exist rootless cones which resemble DCs and LCs in CEP. Based on the similarities with terrestrial analogies, we concluded that the most feasible origin of CEP cones is rootless cones.

  10. Elastic cone for Chinese calligraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Fenglei; Li, Haisheng

    2014-01-01

    The brush plays an important role in creating Chinese calligraphy. We regard a single bristle of a writing brush as an elastic rod and the brush tuft absorbing ink as an elastic cone, which naturally deforms according to the force exerted on it when painting on a paper, and the brush footprint is formed by the intersection region between the deformed tuft and the paper plane. To efficiently generate brush strokes, this paper introduces interpolation and texture mapping approach between two adjacent footprints, and automatically applies bristle-splitting texture to the stroke after long-time painting. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is effective and reliable. Users can create realistic calligraphy in real time.

  11. Rim formation is not a prerequisite for distribution of cone photoreceptor outer segment proteins

    PubMed Central

    Conley, Shannon M.; Al-Ubaidi, Muayyad R.; Han, Zongchao; Naash, Muna I.

    2014-01-01

    Retinal degeneration slow (RDS/PRPH2) is critical for the formation of the disc/lamella rim in photoreceptor outer segments (OSs), but plays a different role in rods vs. cones. Without RDS, rods fail to form OSs, however, cones lacking RDS (in the rds−/−/Nrl−/−) exhibit balloon-like OSs devoid of lamellae. We show that distribution of most proteins in the lamella and PM domains is preserved even in the absence of RDS, rim, and lamella structures. However, the rim protein prominin-1 exhibits altered trafficking and OS localization, suggesting that proper targeting and distribution of rim proteins may require RDS. Our ultrastructural studies show that in cones, OS formation is initiated by the growth of opsin-containing membrane with RDS-mediated rim formation as a secondary step. This is directly opposite to rods and significantly advances our understanding of the role of the rim in cone OS morphogenesis. Furthermore, our results suggest that the unique folded lamella architecture of the cone OS may maximize density or proximity of phototransduction proteins, but is not required for OS function or for protein distribution and retention in different membrane domains.—Conley, S. M., Al-Ubaidi, M. R., Han, Z., Naash, M. I. Rim formation is not a prerequisite for distribution of cone photoreceptor outer segment proteins. PMID:24736412

  12. Detecting short-term evolution of Etnean scoria cones: a LIDAR-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaciai, Alessandro; Behncke, Boris; Favalli, Massimiliano; Neri, Marco; Tarquini, Simone; Boschi, Enzo

    2010-12-01

    The 2001 and 2002-2003 flank eruptions on Mount Etna (Italy) were characterized by intense explosive activity which led to the formation of two large monogenetic scoria cones (one from each eruption) on the upper southern flank of the volcano. Continuous monitoring of Etna, especially during flank eruptions, has provided detailed information on the growth of these cones. They differ in genesis, shape, and size. A set of high resolution (1 m) digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from light detection and ranging (LIDAR) data collected during four different surveys (2004, 2005, 2006, and 2007) has been used to map morphology and to extract the morphometric parameters of the scoria cones. By comparing LIDAR-derived DEMs with a pre-eruption (1998) 10 m DEM, the volume of the two scoria cones was calculated for the first time. Comparison of the LIDAR-derived DEMs revealed in unprecedented detail morphological changes during scoria cone degradation. In particular, the morphologically more exposed and structurally weaker 2002-2003 cone was eroded rapidly during the first few years after its emplacement mainly due to gravitational instability of slopes and wind erosion.

  13. Self-assembled and etched cones on laser ablated polymer surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, N. S.; Prabhu, R. D.; Martin, J. J.; Zhou, L.; Headrick, R. L.

    2006-07-01

    At least two different routes lead to conical structures on laser ablated polymer surfaces. These were investigated by studying laser ablation on the surfaces of different classes of polymers. Cones appeared readily in strongly absorbing polymers such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) and polyimide (PI), but only within narrow laser parameters in nylon 6, and rarely in poly(chlorotrifluoroethylene), the last two being weak ultraviolet (UV) absorbers. Self-assembled, close-packed cones occurred in PET, in which heat generated due to absorbed laser energy creates a thin, chemically stable, viscoelastic, highly compliant layer (above the glass transition temperature). Surface structure in such polymers evolves from nodules through donuts into ripples and finally to cones as the energy deposited per unit area on the surface (total fluence) is increased using a combination of single pulse fluence and number of pulses. A phase transition from a ripple phase to a cone phase is thought to occur as the thickness of the viscoelastic surface layer increases above a critical value. Cones began to appear from almost the beginning of the irradiation process at random locations in PI, a polymer whose surface irreversibly turns into a hard solid upon exposure to either or both UV and heat. It is proposed that the radiation hardened spots serve as nuclei, a cone "grows" out of this as the material surrounding this nuclei is ablated. The initial sparse occurrence of cones in PI-like polymers, and the increase in their number density with total fluence until the surface is densely packed with cones can be explained by a nucleation and growth model.

  14. Modal content of living human cone photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhuolin; Kocaoglu, Omer P.; Turner, Timothy L.; Miller, Donald T.

    2015-01-01

    Decades of experimental and theoretical investigations have established that photoreceptors capture light based on the principles of optical waveguiding. Yet considerable uncertainty remains, even for the most basic prediction as to whether photoreceptors support more than a single waveguide mode. To test for modal behavior in human cone photoreceptors in the near infrared, we took advantage of adaptive-optics optical coherence tomography (AO-OCT, λc = 785 nm) to noninvasively image in three dimensions the reflectance profile of cones. Modal content of reflections generated at the cone inner segment and outer segment junction (IS/OS) and cone outer segment tip (COST) was examined over a range of cone diameters in 1,802 cones from 0.6° to 10° retinal eccentricity. Second moment analysis in conjunction with theoretical predictions indicate cone IS and OS have optical properties consistent of waveguides, which depend on segment diameter and refractive index. Cone IS was found to support a single mode near the fovea (≤3°) and multiple modes further away (>4°). In contrast, no evidence of multiple modes was found in the cone OSs. The IS/OS and COST reflections share a common optical aperture, are most circular near the fovea, show no orientation preference, and are temporally stable. We tested mode predictions of a conventional step-index fiber model and found that in order to fit our AO-OCT results required a lower estimate of the IS refractive index and introduction of an IS focusing/tapering effect. PMID:26417509

  15. Dirac cone and double zero materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. T.; Huang, Xueqin; Lai, Yun; Hang, Zhi Hong; Zheng, Huihuo

    2011-10-01

    Materials with zero permittivity and zero permeability (double zero) possess very interesting wave manipulation characteristics. Systems with Dirac cones in the band structure also possess amazing wave transport properties. These two classes of material are actually related to each other. We show that dielectric photonic crystals can be designed and fabricated which exhibit Dirac cones at k = 0 at a finite frequency. A subset of such materials behave as if they have zero permittivity and zero permeability at the Dirac point, as well as exhibiting properties intrinsic to a Dirac cone.

  16. Phototransduction in mouse rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingbin; Yau, King-Wai

    2010-01-01

    Phototransduction is the process by which light triggers an electrical signal in a photoreceptor cell. Image-forming vision in vertebrates is mediated by two types of photoreceptors: the rods and the cones. In this review, we provide a summary of the success in which the mouse has served as a vertebrate model for studying rod phototransduction, with respect to both the activation and termination steps. Cones are still not as well-understood as rods partly because it is difficult to work with mouse cones due to their scarcity and fragility. The situation may change, however. PMID:17226052

  17. Dirac cone and double zero materials

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C. T.; Huang Xueqin; Hang Zhihong; Zheng Huihuo; Lai Yun

    2011-10-03

    Materials with zero permittivity and zero permeability (double zero) possess very interesting wave manipulation characteristics. Systems with Dirac cones in the band structure also possess amazing wave transport properties. These two classes of material are actually related to each other. We show that dielectric photonic crystals can be designed and fabricated which exhibit Dirac cones at k = 0 at a finite frequency. A subset of such materials behave as if they have zero permittivity and zero permeability at the Dirac point, as well as exhibiting properties intrinsic to a Dirac cone.

  18. Electrical coupling between cones in turtle retina.

    PubMed Central

    Detwiler, P B; Hodgkin, A L

    1979-01-01

    1. The electrical coupling between cones of known spectral sensitivity in the peripheral part of the turtle's retina was studied by passing current through a micro-electrode inserted into one cone and recording with a second micro-electrode inserted into a neighbouring cone. 2. Spatial sensitivity profiles were determined by recording flash responses to a long narrow strip of light which was moved across the impaled cones in orthogonal directions. These measurements gave both the length constant lambda of electrical spread in the cone network and the separation of the two cones. 3. The cone separation determined from the spatial profiles agreed closely with that measured directly by injecting a fluorescent dye into two cones. 4. The length constant lambda varied from 18 to 39 micron with a mean of 25 micron for red-sensitive cones and 26 micron for green-sensitive cones. 5. The majority of cone pairs studied were electrically coupled provided they had the same spectral sensitivity and were separated by less than 60 micron: thirty-two out of thirty-six red-red pairs, two out of two green-green pairs, none out of eight red-green pairs: no blue cones were observed. 6. The strength of electrical coupling was expressed as a mutual resistance defined as the voltage in one cell divided by the current flowing into the other. Mutual resistances decreased from a maximum value of about 30 M omega at separations close to zero to 0.2 M omega, the lower limit of detectable coupling at separations of about 60 micron. Mutual resistances were always positive and were independent of which cell was directly polarized. The coupling seemed to be ohmic and any rectification or non-linearity probably arose in the cone membranes rather than in the coupling resistances. 7. The results were analysed in terms of the Lamb & Simon (1977) theories of square and hexagonal lattices, which approximate to the continuous sheet model except in the case of the cone to which current is applied. 8. The

  19. Distribution and specificity of S-cone ("blue cone") signals in subcortical visual pathways.

    PubMed

    Martin, Paul R; Lee, Barry B

    2014-03-01

    We review here the distribution of S-cone signals and properties of S-cone recipient receptive fields in subcortical pathways. Nearly everything we know about S-cone signals in the subcortical visual system comes from the study of visual systems in cats and primates (monkeys); in this review, we concentrate on results from macaque and marmoset monkeys. We discuss segregation of S-cone recipient (blue-on and blue-off) receptive fields in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus and describe their receptive field properties. We treat in some detail the question of detecting weak S-cone signals as an introduction for newcomers to the field. Finally, we briefly consider the question on how S-cone signals are distributed among nongeniculate targets. PMID:24555883

  20. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    This chapter is devoted to the growth of ZnO. It starts with various techniques to grow bulk samples and presents in some detail the growth of epitaxial layers by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and pulsed laser deposition (PLD). The last section is devoted to the growth of nanorods. Some properties of the resulting samples are also presented. If a comparison between GaN and ZnO is made, very often the huge variety of different growth techniques available to fabricate ZnO is said to be an advantage of this material system. Indeed, growth techniques range from low cost wet chemical growth at almost room temperature to high quality MOCVD growth at temperatures above 1, 000∘C. In most cases, there is a very strong tendency of c-axis oriented growth, with a much higher growth rate in c-direction as compared to other crystal directions. This often leads to columnar structures, even at relatively low temperatures. However, it is, in general, not straight forward to fabricate smooth ZnO thin films with flat surfaces. Another advantage of a potential ZnO technology is said to be the possibility to grow thin films homoepitaxially on ZnO substrates. ZnO substrates are mostly fabricated by vapor phase transport (VPT) or hydrothermal growth. These techniques are enabling high volume manufacturing at reasonable cost, at least in principle. The availability of homoepitaxial substrates should be beneficial to the development of ZnO technology and devices and is in contrast to the situation of GaN. However, even though a number of companies are developing ZnO substrates, only recently good quality substrates have been demonstrated. However, these substrates are not yet widely available. Still, the situation concerning ZnO substrates seems to be far from low-cost, high-volume production. The fabrication of dense, single crystal thin films is, in general, surprisingly difficult, even when ZnO is grown on a ZnO substrate. However

  1. Exploring biomarkers in head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Langer, Corey J

    2012-08-15

    Personalized medicine based on predictive markers linked to drug response, it is hoped, will lead to improvements in outcomes and avoidance of unnecessary treatment in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Recent research has shown that expression of ERCC1 may predict resistance to treatment with platinum agents. Future testing for this marker may help select the optimal type of chemotherapy. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with less aggressive disease and better prognosis in locally advanced SCCHN treated with chemoradiation or radiation alone; HPV-positive patients may ultimately benefit from less intensive, less toxic therapy. K-RAS mutations, occurring in about 40% of colorectal cancers and associated with lack of benefit from epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies in this disease, are found in <5% of SCCHN patients, making routine testing for K-RAS mutations unwarranted at this time. Virtually all head and neck tumors overexpress EGFR, which limits the usefulness of EGFR expression as a marker for treatment selection. Although the incidence of EGFR tyrosine kinase domain mutations is very rare, a better understanding of the role of EGFR mutations, expression, amplification, and downstream effects in SCCHN may help define the role of EGFR in this setting. These observations caution against extrapolating results obtained with biomarkers in other types of cancer to SCCHN. Validation of each biomarker in the context of SCCHN clinical trials will be required before a specific marker can be incorporated into daily practice. PMID:22281752

  2. How Strombolian is a “Strombolian” scoria cone? Some irregularities in scoria cone architecture from the Transmexican Volcanic Belt, near Volcán Ceboruco, (Mexico) and Al Haruj (Libya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ulrike; Németh, Károly

    2006-07-01

    Scoria cone modelling focuses on ballistic (no-drag) ejection that are termed Strombolian as a result of weak-intensity, strongly intermittent activity associated with bursting of gas bubbles resulting ballistic emplacement of clasts 10+ cm. Particles with a size < 10 cm are normally unable to follow ballistic trajectories instead depositing from sub-Plinian eruption clouds. The Neogene volcanic field near Volcán Ceboruco in the San Pedro-Ceboruco graben, Mexico includes fissure fed flows, domes, and monogenetic scoria cones. The scoria cones near Ceboruco consist of normal (proximal) to inverse (distal) graded welded and/or non-welded scoria lapilli and coarse ash. The grain size pattern observed from scoria cones at Ceboruco is not consistent with the classic ballistic model of cone growth. Instead it is more consistent with recently proposed model where cones grow by accumulation of clasts falling from a sustained eruption column. Al Haruj a Miocene to Holocene intracontinental basaltic volcanic field in Libya preserves pyroclastic rocks indicating hot emplacement from eruptions of scoria cones and lava fountains. However, craters are commonly wide and surrounded by rims of strongly welded tephra, they closely resemble maar-structures. It is inferred that magmatic fragmentation of the uprising melt often has changed to phreatomagmatic interaction leading to enigmatic explosive events that have removed the top of the volcanic cones and produced maar-like depressions. In the two fields at least four different types of scoria cones have been distinguished that indicates a far greater diversity in eruptive mechanisms of scoria cones than those proposed by earlier researchers.

  3. [Head and neck cancer--history].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, Anna; Szyfter, Krzysztof; Szyfter, Witold; Florek, Ewa

    2012-01-01

    According to epidemiological data head and neck cancers constitute for 12% of all malignancies in the world. It is estimated that a total of 400 000 cases of the mouth and throat and of 160 000 cases of laryngeal cancer, 300 000 people die each year. History of head and neck cancers developed and underwent many changes at the turn of the century. Treatment, pathogenesis and possessed state of knowledge on the subject has changed. Starting from the ancient times there were texts on how to treat and examine patients. The Edwin Smith and Ebers Papyrus are two of the oldest medical documents describing the treatment of cancer patients. Hippocrates was the first person who used the word "cancer" and probably he was the first who divided the tumors into benign and malignant. In a document known as the Doctrine of Hippocrates he described skin cancer and cancer treatments. Over the next centuries, medical science did not develop because of religious concerns about autopsy and surgical procedures. The 17th century is a period in which there were a lot of new information about how to treat such oral cancer. Cancer of the tongue was removed by cauterization, which in the 18th century was replaced by the use of surgical instruments. In the same age glossectomy has been accepted as the treatment of choice performed in the treatment of cancer. The 19th century brought a major breakthrough in the treatment of surgical, diagnostic, anesthetic techniques and understanding of the pathological mechanisms. Histological evaluation of tumors has become mandatory and standard practice in the assessment of cancer. Laryngectomy and neck lymph nodes removal has become commonplace. Modified Radical Neck Dissection (MRND), became popularized as another cancer treatment technique. Describing ways to treat cancer, radiotherapy can not be ignored - there are several new techniques such as Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT) and hypofractionation currently used. Chemotherapy and the

  4. Dose reduction of cone beam CT scanning for the entire oral and maxillofacial regions with thyroid collars

    PubMed Central

    Qu, XM; Li, G; Sanderink, GCH; Zhang, ZY; Ma, XC

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of thyroid collars on radiation dose during cone beam CT (CBCT) scanning. Methods Average tissue-absorbed dose for a NewTom 9000 CBCT scanner (Quantitative Radiology, Verona, Italy) was measured using thermoluminescent dosemeter chips in a phantom. The scans were carried out with and without thyroid collars. Effective organ dose and total effective dose were derived using International Commission on Radiological Protection 2007 recommendations. Results The effective organ doses for the thyroid gland and oesophagus were 31.0 µSv and 2.4 µSv, respectively, during CBCT scanning without a collar around the neck. When the thyroid collars were used loosely around the neck, no effective organ dose reduction was observed. When one thyroid collar was used tightly on the front of the neck, the effective organ dose for the thyroid gland and oesophagus were reduced to 15.9 µSv (48.7% reduction) and 1.4 µSv (41.7% reduction), respectively. Similar organ dose reduction (46.5% and 41.7%) was achieved when CBCT scanning was performed with two collars tightly on the front and back of the neck. However, the differences to the total effective dose were not significant among the scans with and without collars around the neck (p = 0.775). Conclusions Thyroid collars can effectively reduce the radiation dose to the thyroid and oesophagus if used appropriately. PMID:22707330

  5. Homologies among Coniferophyte cones: further observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grauvogel-Stamm, Léa; Galtier, Jean

    1998-04-01

    A reinvestigation of the Triassic conifer pollen cone of Darneya shows evidence that clusters of pollen sacs are attached (adnate), at regular intervals, to the upper side of the stalk and that the distribution of stomata is restricted to the apical part of the abaxial side of the peltate scale. These features and others, such as the commissure visible on the stalk and the scale, suggest a dual nature of the male scale complex of Darneya which therefore is interpreted as an abaxial bract fused with an adaxial fertile shoot bearing several clusters of pollen sacs. This conifer pollen cone is thus considered as a compound strobilus (inflorescence) homologous with the female cone of the conifers and therefore with the cones, both male and female, of the cordaites.

  6. Nonlinear Resonance Cones and Converging Plasma Blobs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agmon, Nathan; Pribyl, Patrick; Gekelman, Walter; Wise, Joe; Katz, Cami; Ha, Chis; Baker, Bob

    2013-10-01

    Electric field resonance cones have been shown to create density disturbances in cold, magnetized plasmas. Two circular antennas in the LAPTAG experimental plasma device were used to create converging, nonlinear resonance cones. The nonlinear electrostatic field is produced by large amplitude RF (ERF/nkTe >> 1). A movable probe, powered by a computerized motor and consisting of three mutually orthogonal electric dipoles, is used to measure the electric field of the cones which become distorted at large amplitudes. A 2D movable Langmuir probe was used to determine localized density perturbations after turn-off of the RF power. A density blob moving at 3-5 times the ion sound speed has been observed to propagate away (for at least 20 cm) from the focus of the cone. Two ring antennas produced colliding blobs. The physics of the collision will be described. Work performed at the Basic Plasma Science Facility supported by DOE and NSF.

  7. Shatter Cones from the MEMIN Impact Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, J.; Kenkmann, T.

    2015-09-01

    We recovered shatter cone fragments from the MEMIN cratering experiments in sandstone, quartzite and limestone blocks. We analyzed the conical to hyperboloid, curved and striated fracture surfaces with SEM, WLI and produced µm-accurate 3D models.

  8. Some inversion formulas for the cone transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzioglu, Fatma

    2015-11-01

    Several novel imaging applications have lead recently to a variety of Radon type transforms, where integration is made over a family of conical surfaces. We call them cone transforms (in 2D they are also called V-line or broken ray transforms). Most prominently, they are present in the so called Compton camera imaging that arises in medical diagnostics, astronomy, and lately in homeland security applications. Several specific incarnations of the cone transform have been considered separately. In this paper, we address the most general (and overdetermined) cone transform, obtain integral relations between cone and Radon transforms in {{{R}}}n, and a variety of inversion formulas. In many applications (e.g., in homeland security), the signal to noise ratio is very low. So, if overdetermined data is collected (as in the case of Compton imaging), attempts to reduce the dimensionality might lead to essential elimination of the signal. Thus, our main concentration is on obtaining formulas involving overdetermined data.

  9. Cone photoreceptor mosaic disruption associated with Cys203Arg mutation in the M-cone opsin

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Joseph; Baraas, Rigmor C.; Wagner-Schuman, Melissa; Rha, Jungtae; Siebe, Cory A.; Sloan, Christina; Tait, Diane M.; Thompson, Summer; Morgan, Jessica I. W.; Neitz, Jay; Williams, David R.; Foster, David H.; Neitz, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Missense mutations in the cone opsins have been identified as a relatively common cause of red/green color vision defects, with the most frequent mutation being the substitution of arginine for cysteine at position 203 (C203R). When the corresponding cysteine is mutated in rhodopsin, it disrupts proper folding of the pigment, causing severe, early onset retinitis pigmentosa. While the C203R mutation has been associated with loss of cone function in color vision deficiency, it is not known what happens to cones expressing this mutant opsin. Here, we used high-resolution retinal imaging to examine the cone mosaic in two individuals with genes encoding a middle-wavelength sensitive (M) pigment with the C203R mutation. We found a significant reduction in cone density compared to normal and color-deficient controls, accompanying disruption in the cone mosaic in both individuals, and thinning of the outer nuclear layer. The C203R mosaics were different from that produced by another mutation (LIAVA) previously shown to disrupt the cone mosaic. Comparison of these mosaics provides insight into the timing and degree of cone disruption and has implications for the prospects for restoration of vision loss associated with various cone opsin mutations. PMID:19934058

  10. DEFORMATION OF SCORIA CONE BY CONDUIT PRESSURIZATION

    SciTech Connect

    E.S. Gaffney; B. Damjanac; D. Krier; G. Valentine

    2005-08-26

    A simplified mechanical model is used to simulate the deformation of a scoria cone due to pressurization of magma in a feeder conduit. The scoria cone is modeled as consisting of a cone of stabilized scoria with an axial region of loose scoria (height h{sub 1}), all overlying a vertically oriented cylindrical conduit intruded into rhyolite tuff country rock. For our analyses, the conduit is filled with basalt magma, usually with the upper length (h{sub 2}) solidified. The style of deformation of the cone depends on both h{sub 1} and h{sub 2}. If magma is prevented from hydrofracturing out of the conduit (as, for example, might be the case if the magma is surrounded by a solidified, but plastically deformable layer acting as a gasket backed up by the brittle country rock) pressures in the magma can build to 10s of MPa. When h{sub 1} is 100 m, not unusual for a small isolated basaltic cinder cone, the magma pressure needed to destabilize the cone when molten magma extends all the way to the original ground surface (h{sub 2} = 0) is only about one-third of the pressure when the upper part of the conduit is solidified (h{sub 2} = 25m). In the former case, almost the entire upper third of the cone is at failure in tension when the configuration becomes unstable. In the latter case, small portions of the surface of the cone are failing in tension when instability occurs, but a large volume in the central core of the cone is failing in shear or compressions. These results may provide insight into the status of volcanic plumbing, either past or present, beneath scoria cones. Field observations at the Lathrop Wells volcano in southern Nevada identify structures at the outer edge just below the crater rim that appear to be inward-dipping listric normal faults. This may indicate that, near the end of its active stage, the cone was close to failing in this fashion. A companion paper suggests that such a failure could have been quite energetic had it occurred.

  11. Deformation of Scoria Cone by Conduit Pressurization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, E. S.; Damjanac, B.; Krier, D.; Valentine, G.

    2005-12-01

    A simplified mechanical model is used to simulate the deformation of a scoria cone due to pressurization of magma in a feeder conduit. The scoria cone is modelled as consisting of a cone of stabilized scoria with an axial region of loose scoria (height h1), all overlying a vertically oriented cylindrical conduit intruded into rhyolite tuff country rock. For our analyses, the conduit is filled with basalt magma, usually with the upper length (h2) solidified. The style of deformation of the cone depends on both h1 and h2. If magma is prevented from hydrofracturing out of the conduit (as, for example, might be the case if the magma is surrounded by a solidified, but plastically deformable layer acting as a gasket backed up by the brittle country rock) pressures in the magma can build to 10s of MPa. When h1 is 100 m, not unusual for a small isolated basaltic cinder cone, the magma pressure needed to destabilize the cone when molten magma extends all the way to the original ground surface (h2 = 0) is only about one-third of the pressure when the upper part of the conduit is solidified (h2 = 25m). In the former case, almost the entire upper third of the cone is at failure in tension when the configuration becomes unstable. In the latter case, small portions of the surface of the cone are failing in tension when instability occurs, but a large volume in the central core of the cone is failing in shear or compression. These results may provide insight into the status of volcanic plumbing, either past or present, beneath scoria cones. Field observations at the Lathrop Wells volcano in southern Nevada identify structures at the outer edge just below the crater rim that appear to be inward-dipping listric normal faults. This may indicate that, near the end of its active stage, the cone was close to failing in this fashion. Such a failure could have been quite energetic had it occurred.

  12. Loading errors in cone-plate rheometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    Errors arising from the under- and overfilling of cone-plate geometries have been investigated for combinations of smooth and micro-roughened cone-plate geometries. We observed experimentally that 0.1 ml deviations in the loading volume, such as can occur due to subjective filling or evaporation, will proportionally change the measured viscosity by 2-3%. We also give a simple method to avoid these errors during routine measurements.

  13. Measurement for natural dental neck data of normal adults and its clinical significance on guiding implant restoration

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxu; Gu, Fang; Wang, Junjun; Zhou, Chengyuan; Xia, Junnan; Qin, Hongwei; Yang, Jianjun

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Provide reference basis for the clinical implant restoration to select implant diameter through measuring each data of 7 teeth in the dental neck of bilateral upper and lower jaws of the young volunteers with normal dentition. Methods: Select 30 healthy young volunteers with complete dentition but no malocclusion, take cone beam CT (CBCT), measure the mesiodistal and buccolingual distance of the tooth root at 1.5 mm from 14 teeth (bilateral upper and lower jaws) to alveolar crest, trace out the outline of each tooth neck in this layer, calculate the cross sectional area and roundness of each tooth neck according to pixel value calibration, and then carry out statistical processing. Results: Complete the data collection and processing of mesiodistal length, buccolingual width, cross sectional area, and cross sectional roundness of the dental neck at 1.5 mm from these seven teeth of the bilateral upper and lower jaws to the alveolar crest of 30 volunteers, and calculate the mean value, variance, and reference value range of medical science of each index. Conclusion: CBCT can effectively obtain the image information of the dental neck. Through mimics 10.0 and Photoshop CS3, it is possible to accurately calculate the dental neck length and width, and cross sectional area of each tooth according to CBCT image information. This result can provide reference basis for the implant restoration of the clinical teeth. PMID:26628955

  14. Evaluation of the Painful Dual Taper Modular Neck Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty: Do They All Require Revision?

    PubMed

    Kwon, Young-Min

    2016-07-01

    Although dual taper modular-neck total hip arthroplasty (THA) design with additional neck-stem modularity has the potential to optimize hip biomechanical parameters by facilitating adjustments of leg length, femoral neck version and offset, there is increasing concern regarding this stem design as a result of the growing numbers of adverse local tissue reactions due to fretting and corrosion at the neck-stem taper junction. Implant factors such as taper cone angle, taper surface roughness, taper contact area, modular neck taper metallurgy, and femoral head size play important roles in influencing extent of taper corrosion. There should be a low threshold to conduct a systematic clinical evaluation of patients with dual-taper modular-neck stem THA using systematic risk stratification algorithms as early recognition and diagnosis will ensure prompt and appropriate treatment. Although specialized tests such as metal ion analysis and cross-sectional imaging modalities such as metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MARS MRI) are useful in optimizing clinical decision-making, overreliance on any single investigative tool in the clinical decision-making process for revision surgery should be avoided. PMID:27118353

  15. Trial of Postoperative Radiation, Cisplatin, and Panitumumab in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Cancer of Head; Cancer of Head and Neck; Cancer of Neck; Cancer of the Head; Cancer of the Head and Neck; Cancer of the Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Head Cancer; Head Neoplasms; Head, Neck Neoplasms; Neck Cancer; Neck Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Head; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Neoplasms, Neck; Neoplasms, Upper Aerodigestive Tract; UADT Neoplasms; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Neoplasms

  16. Photonic Landau levels on cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schine, Nathan; Ryou, Albert; Gromov, Andrey; Sommer, Ariel; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-05-01

    We present the first experimental realization of a bulk magnetic field for optical photons. By using a non-planar ring resonator, we induce an image rotation on each round trip through the resonator. This results in a Coriolis/Lorentz force and a centrifugal anticonfining force, the latter of which is cancelled by mirror curvature. Using a digital micromirror device to control both amplitude and phase, we inject arbitrary optical modes into our resonator. Spatial- and energy- resolved spectroscopy tracks photonic eigenstates as residual trapping is reduced, and we observe photonic Landau levels as the eigenstates become degenerate. We show that there is a conical geometry of the resulting manifold for photon dynamics and present a measurement of the local density of states that is consistent with Landau levels on a cone. While our work already demonstrates an integer quantum Hall material composed of photons, we have ensured compatibility with strong photon-photon interactions, which will allow quantum optical studies of entanglement and correlation in manybody systems including fractional quantum Hall fluids.

  17. Misidentification of Mycobacterium fortuitum in an immunocompetent patient presenting with a unilateral neck mass

    PubMed Central

    Kanzara, Todd; Hall, Andy; Namnyak, Simon; Owa, Tony

    2014-01-01

    A 31-year-old African man with a blameless medical history presented with an enlarging neck swelling of 6 months duration. He was systemically well with normal heamatobiochemistry. MRI of the neck demonstrated abnormal signalling in the subcutaneous fat overlying the posterior spinal muscles in the midline and the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. Scanty growth of Rhodococcus equi was reported from a turbid fine needle aspirate of the neck on two separate occasions. The swelling progressed despite numerous antibiotic combinations which necessitated surgical debridement. Analysis of debrided tissue using 16S rDNA surprisingly identified Mycobacterium fortuitum, not R equi, thereby resolving our diagnostic conundrum. PMID:24744071

  18. Microspectrophotometric evidence for cone monochromacy in sharks.

    PubMed

    Hart, Nathan Scott; Theiss, Susan Michelle; Harahush, Blake Kristin; Collin, Shaun Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Sharks are apex predators, and their evolutionary success is in part due to an impressive array of sensory systems, including vision. The eyes of sharks are well developed and function over a wide range of light levels. However, whilst close relatives of the sharks-the rays and chimaeras-are known to have the potential for colour vision, an evolutionary trait thought to provide distinct survival advantages, evidence for colour vision in sharks remains equivocal. Using single-receptor microspectrophotometry, we measured the absorbance spectra of visual pigments located in the retinal photoreceptors of 17 species of shark. We show that, while the spectral tuning of the rod (wavelength of maximum absorbance, λ(max) 484-518 nm) and cone (λ(max) 532-561 nm) visual pigments varies between species, each shark has only a single long-wavelength-sensitive cone type. This suggests that sharks may be cone monochromats and, therefore, potentially colour blind. Whilst cone monochromacy on land is rare, it may be a common strategy in the marine environment: many aquatic mammals (whales, dolphins and seals) also possess only a single, green-sensitive cone type. It appears that both sharks and marine mammals may have arrived at the same visual design by convergent evolution. The spectral tuning of the rod and cone pigments of sharks is also discussed in relation to their visual ecology. PMID:21212930

  19. Microspectrophotometric evidence for cone monochromacy in sharks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Nathan Scott; Theiss, Susan Michelle; Harahush, Blake Kristin; Collin, Shaun Patrick

    2011-03-01

    Sharks are apex predators, and their evolutionary success is in part due to an impressive array of sensory systems, including vision. The eyes of sharks are well developed and function over a wide range of light levels. However, whilst close relatives of the sharks—the rays and chimaeras—are known to have the potential for colour vision, an evolutionary trait thought to provide distinct survival advantages, evidence for colour vision in sharks remains equivocal. Using single-receptor microspectrophotometry, we measured the absorbance spectra of visual pigments located in the retinal photoreceptors of 17 species of shark. We show that, while the spectral tuning of the rod (wavelength of maximum absorbance, λmax 484-518 nm) and cone (λmax 532-561 nm) visual pigments varies between species, each shark has only a single long-wavelength-sensitive cone type. This suggests that sharks may be cone monochromats and, therefore, potentially colour blind. Whilst cone monochromacy on land is rare, it may be a common strategy in the marine environment: many aquatic mammals (whales, dolphins and seals) also possess only a single, green-sensitive cone type. It appears that both sharks and marine mammals may have arrived at the same visual design by convergent evolution. The spectral tuning of the rod and cone pigments of sharks is also discussed in relation to their visual ecology.

  20. Vaginal cone use in passive and active phases in patients with stress urinary incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Haddad, Jorge Milhem; Ribeiro, Ricardo Muniz; Bernardo, Wanderley Marques; Abrão, Maurício Simões; Baracat, Edmund Chada

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate vaginal cone therapy in two phases, passive and active, in women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: A prospective study was conducted at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, São Paulo University, Brazil. Twenty-four women with a clinical and urodynamic diagnosis of stress urinary incontinence were treated with vaginal cones in a passive phase (without voluntary contractions of the pelvic floor) and an active phase (with voluntary contractions), each of which lasted three months. Clinical complaints, a functional evaluation of the pelvic floor, a pad test, and bladder neck mobility were analyzed before and after each phase. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients completed the treatment. The reduction in absolute risk with the pad test was 0.38 (p<0.034) at the end of the passive phase and 0.67 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk with the pelvic floor evaluation was 0.62 (p<0.0001) at the end of the passive phase and 0.77 (p<0.0001) at the end of the active phase. The reduction in absolute risk of bladder neck mobility was 0.38 (p<0.0089) at the end of the passive phase and 0.52 (p<0.0005) at the end of the active phase. Complete reversal of symptomatology was observed in 12 (57.1%) patients, and satisfaction was expressed by 19 (90.4%). CONCLUSION: Using vaginal cones in the passive phase, as other researchers did, was effective. Inclusion of the active phase led to additional improvement in all of the study parameters evaluated in women with stress urinary incontinence. Randomized studies are needed, however, to confirm these results. PMID:21789381

  1. Evaluation of lens absorbed dose with Cone Beam IGRT procedures.

    PubMed

    Palomo, R; Pujades, M C; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona, V; Lliso, F; Candela-Juan, C; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the absorbed dose to the eye lenses due to the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system used to accurately position the patient during head-and-neck image guided procedures. The on-board imaging (OBI) systems (v.1.5) of Clinac iX and TrueBeam (Varian) accelerators were used to evaluate the imparted dose to the eye lenses and some additional points of the head. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard-Dose Head protocol from Varian. Doses were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were calibrated at the beam quality used to reduce their energy dependence. Average dose to the lens due to the OBI systems of the Clinac iX and the TrueBeam were 0.71  ±  0.07 mGy/CBCT and 0.70  ±  0.08 mGy/CBCT, respectively. The extra absorbed dose received by the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the 500 mGy threshold established by ICRP for cataract formation (ICRP 2011 Statement on Tissue Reactions). However, the incremental effect of several CBCT acquisitions during the whole treatment should be taken into account. PMID:26457404

  2. 3D modelling of the Tejeda Caldera cone-sheet swarm, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samrock, Lisa K.; Jensen, Max J.; Burchardt, Steffi; Troll, Valentin R.; Mattsson, Tobias; Geiger, Harri

    2015-04-01

    . 2011, and references therein), and we discuss the implications of this architecture for the feeding system of the Tejeda volcano and the associated temporal variations of cone-sheet emplacement. References: Burchardt, S., Tanner, D.C., Troll, V.R., Krumbholz, M., Gustafsson, L.E. (2011) Three-dimensional geometry of concentric intrusive sheet swarms in the Geitafell and the Dyrfjöll volcanoes, eastern Iceland. Geochemistry, Geophysics, Geosystems 12(7): Q0AB09. Burchardt, S., Troll, V.R., Mathieu, L., Emeleus, H.C., Donaldson, C.H. (2013) Ardnamruchan 3D cone-sheet architecture explained by a single elongate magma chamber. Scientific Reports 3:2891. Schirnick, C. (1996) Formation of an intracaldera cone sheet dike swarm (Tejeda Caldera, Gran Canaria) (Dissertation). Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel, Germany. Schirnick, C., van den Bogaard, P., Schmincke, H.-U. (1999) Cone-sheet formation and intrusive growth of an oceanic island - The Miocene Tejeda complex on Gran Canaria (Canary Islands). Geology, 27: 207-210.

  3. Neck control after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate neck control outcomes after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection in node-positive head and neck cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed medical records of fifty patients with node-positive head and neck cancer who received definitive radiochemotherapy. Twelve patients subsequently underwent neck dissection for suspicious recurrent or persistent disease. A median dose of 70 Gy (range 60-70.6) was delivered to involved nodes. Response evaluation was performed at a median of 5 weeks after completion of radiotherapy. Results Neck failure was observed in 11 patients and the 3-year regional control (RC) rate was 77.1%. Neck dissection was performed in 10 of the 11 patients; seven of these cases were successfully salvaged, and the ultimate rate of neck control was 92%. The remaining two patients who received neck dissection had negative pathologic results. On univariate analysis, initial nodal size > 2 cm, a less-than-complete response at the primary site, post-radiotherapy nodal size > 1.5 cm, and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were associated with RC. On multivariate analysis, less-than-complete primary site response and post-radiotherapy nodal necrosis were identified as independent prognostic factors for RC. Conclusions The neck failure rate after definitive radiochemotherapy without planned neck dissection was 22%. Two-thirds of these were successfully salvaged with neck dissection and the ultimate neck control rate was 92%. Our results suggest that planned neck dissection might not be necessary in patients with complete response of primary site, no evidence of residual lesion > 1.5 cm, or no necrotic lymph nodes at the 1-2 months follow-up evaluation after radiotherapy. PMID:22313843

  4. Submicrometer Hollow Bioglass Cones Deposited by Radio Frequency Magnetron Sputtering: Formation Mechanism, Properties, and Prospective Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Popa, A C; Stan, G E; Besleaga, C; Ion, L; Maraloiu, V A; Tulyaganov, D U; Ferreira, J M F

    2016-02-01

    This work reports on the unprecedented magnetron sputtering deposition of submicrometric hollow cones of bioactive glass at low temperature in the absence of any template or catalyst. The influence of sputtering conditions on the formation and development of bioglass cones was studied. It was shown that larger populations of well-developed cones could be achieved by increasing the argon sputtering pressure. A mechanism describing the growth of bioglass hollow cones is presented, offering the links for process control and reproducibility of the cone features. The composition, structure, and morphology of the as-synthesized hollow cones were investigated by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), grazing incidence geometry X-ray diffraction (GIXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM)-selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The in vitro biological performance, assessed by degradation tests (ISO 10993-14) and cytocompatibility assays (ISO 10993-5) in endothelial cell cultures, was excellent. This allied with resorbability and the unique morphological features make the submicrometer hollow cones interesting candidate material devices for focal transitory permeabilization of the blood-brain barrier in the treatment of carcinoma and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26836256

  5. Cone-Deciphered Modes of Problem Solving Action (MPSA Cone): Alternative Perspectives on Diversified Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Su-Huei

    A conceptual framework of the modes of problem-solving action has been developed on the basis of a simple relationship cone to assist individuals in diversified professions in inquiry and implementation of theory and practice in their professional development. The conceptual framework is referred to as the Cone-Deciphered Modes of Problem Solving…

  6. Shape of scoria cones on Mars: Insights from numerical modeling of ballistic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brož, Petr; Čadek, Ondřej; Hauber, Ernst; Rossi, Angelo Pio

    2014-11-01

    Morphological observations of scoria cones on Mars show that their cross-sectional shapes are different from those on Earth. Due to lower gravity and atmospheric pressure on Mars, particles are spread over a larger area than on Earth. Hence, erupted volumes are typically not large enough for the flank slopes to attain the angle of repose, in contrast to Earth where this is common. The distribution of ejected material forming scoria cones on Mars, therefore, is ruled mainly by ballistic distribution and not by redistribution of flank material by avalanching after the static angle of repose is reached. As a consequence, the flank slopes of the Martian scoria cones do not reach the critical angle of repose in spite of a large volume of ejected material. Therefore, the topography of scoria cones on Mars is governed mainly by ballistic distribution of ejected particles and is not influenced by redistribution of flank material by avalanching. The growth of a scoria cone can be studied numerically by tracking the ballistic trajectories and tracing the cumulative deposition of repeatedly ejected particles. We apply this approach to a specific volcanic field, Ulysses Colles on Mars, and compare our numerical results with observations. The scoria cones in this region are not significantly affected by erosion and their morphological shape still preserves a record of physical conditions at the time of eruption. We demonstrate that the topography of these scoria cones can be rather well (with accuracy of ∼10 m) reproduced provided that the ejection velocities are a factor of ∼2 larger and the ejected particles are about ten times finer than typical on Earth, corresponding to a mean particle velocity of ∼92 m/s and a real particle size of about 4 mm. This finding is in agreement with previous theoretical works that argued for larger magma fragmentation and higher ejection velocities on Mars than on Earth due to lower gravity and different environmental conditions.

  7. Cone inputs to murine striate cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ekesten, Björn; Gouras, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Background We have recorded responses from single neurons in murine visual cortex to determine the effectiveness of the input from the two murine cone photoreceptor mechanisms and whether there is any unique selectivity for cone inputs at this higher region of the visual system that would support the possibility of colour vision in mice. Each eye was stimulated by diffuse light, either 370 (strong stimulus for the ultra-violet (UV) cone opsin) or 505 nm (exclusively stimulating the middle wavelength sensitive (M) cone opsin), obtained from light emitting diodes (LEDs) in the presence of a strong adapting light that suppressed the responses of rods. Results Single cells responded to these diffuse stimuli in all areas of striate cortex. Two types of responsive cells were encountered. One type (135/323 – 42%) had little to no spontaneous activity and responded at either the on and/or the off phase of the light stimulus with a few impulses often of relatively large amplitude. A second type (166/323 – 51%) had spontaneous activity and responded tonically to light stimuli with impulses often of small amplitude. Most of the cells responded similarly to both spectral stimuli. A few (18/323 – 6%) responded strongly or exclusively to one or the other spectral stimulus and rarely in a spectrally opponent manner. Conclusion Most cells in murine striate cortex receive excitatory inputs from both UV- and M-cones. A small fraction shows either strong selectivity for one or the other cone mechanism and occasionally cone opponent responses. Cells that could underlie chromatic contrast detection are present but extremely rare in murine striate cortex. PMID:19014590

  8. Origin and Impact of Phototransduction Noise in Primate Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Angueyra, Juan Manuel; Rieke, Fred

    2013-01-01

    Noise in the responses of cone photoreceptors sets a fundamental limit to visual sensitivity, yet the origin of noise in mammalian cones and its relation to behavioral sensitivity are poorly understood. Our work here on primate cones improves understanding of these issues in three ways. First, we find that cone noise is not dominated by spontaneous photopigment activation or by quantal fluctuations in photon absorption but instead by other sources, namely channel noise and fluctuations in cGMP. Second, we find that adaptation in cones, unlike that in rods, affects signals and noise differently. This difference helps explain why thresholds for rod- and cone-mediated signals have different dependencies on background light level. Third, past estimates of noise in mammalian cones are too high to explain behavioral sensitivity. Our measurements indicate a lower level of cone noise, and thus help reconcile physiological and behavioral estimates of cone noise and sensitivity. PMID:24097042

  9. Light responses of primate and other mammalian cones

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li-Hui; Luo, Dong-Gen; Yau, King-Wai

    2014-01-01

    Retinal cones are photoreceptors for daylight vision. For lower vertebrates, cones are known to give monophasic, hyperpolarizing responses to light flashes. For primate cones, however, they have been reported to give strongly biphasic flash responses, with an initial hyperpolarization followed by a depolarization beyond the dark level, now a textbook dogma. We have reexamined this primate-cone observation and, surprisingly, found predominantly monophasic cone responses. Correspondingly, we found that primate cones began to adapt to steady light at much lower intensities than previously reported, explainable by a larger steady response to background light for a monophasic than for a biphasic response. Similarly, we have found a monophasic cone response for several other mammalian species. Thus, a monophasic flash response may in fact be the norm for primate and other mammalian cones as for lower-vertebrate cones. This revised information is important for ultimately understanding human retinal signal processing and correlating with psychophysical data. PMID:24550304

  10. Immunotherapy With MK-3475 in Surgically Resectable Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Cancer of Head and Neck; Head and Neck Cancer; Neoplasms, Head and Neck; Carcinoma, Squamous Cell of Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck; Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Head and Neck

  11. Cone-angle-dependent generalized weighting scheme for 16-slice helical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jiang; Dong, Yanting; Simoni, Piero; Toth, Thomas; Slack, Christopher L.; Grekowicz, Brian; Seidenschnur, George; Shaughnessy, Charlie

    2002-05-01

    Since the recent introduction of multi-slice helical computed tomography (MHCT), new clinical applications have experienced tremendous growth in recent years. MHCT offers improved volume coverage, faster scan speed, more isotropic spatial resolution, and reduced x-ray tube loading. Similar to the single slice helical CT, the projection data collected in MHCT is inherently inconsistent due to the constant table motion. In addition, cone beam effects in MHCT produce additional complexity and image artifacts. Although the cone angle is quite smaller even for the 16-slice configuration, the impact on image artifacts cannot be ignored. Many reconstruction algorithms have been proposed and investigated recently to combat image artifacts associated with the MHCT data acquisition. In this paper, we propose a cone-angle dependent generalized weighting scheme for 16-slice helical CT that allows the production of MHCT images with only 2D backprojection. The cone-angle dependency of the algorithm suppresses image artifacts due to the cone beam effect and the generalized weighting portion enables interpolation be performed with conjugate samples for the 16-slice helical dataset. With the proposed algorithm, image artifacts are significantly reduced.

  12. Multiple dendrochronological responses to the eruption of Cinder Cone, Lassen Volcanic National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheppard, P.R.; Ort, M.H.; Anderson, K.C.; Clynne, M.A.; May, E.M.

    2009-01-01

    Two dendrochronological properties – ring width and ring chemistry – were investigated in trees near Cinder Cone in Lassen Volcanic National Park, northeastern California, for the purpose of re-evaluating the date of its eruption. Cinder Cone is thought to have erupted in AD 1666 based on ring-width evidence, but interpreting ring-width changes alone is not straightforward because many forest disturbances can cause changes in ring width. Old Jeffrey pines growing in Cinder Cone tephra and elsewhere for control comparison were sampled. Trees growing in tephra show synchronous ring-width changes at AD 1666, but this ring-width signal could be considered ambiguous for dating the eruption because changes in ring width can be caused by other events. Trees growing in tephra also show changes in ring phosphorus, sulfur, and sodium during the late 1660s, but inter-tree variability in dendrochemical signals makes dating the eruption from ring chemistry alone difficult. The combination of dendrochemistry and ring-width signals improves confidence in dating the eruption of Cinder Cone over the analysis of just one ring-growth property. These results are similar to another case study using dendrochronology of ring width and ring chemistry at Parícutin, Michoacán, Mexico, a cinder cone that erupted beginning in 1943. In both cases, combining analysis with ring width and ring chemistry improved confidence in the dendro-dating of the eruptions.

  13. Strain engineering of Dirac cones in graphyne

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Gaoxue; Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Ravindra; Si, Mingsu

    2014-05-26

    6,6,12-graphyne, one of the two-dimensional carbon allotropes with the rectangular lattice structure, has two kinds of non-equivalent anisotropic Dirac cones in the first Brillouin zone. We show that Dirac cones can be tuned independently by the uniaxial compressive strain applied to graphyne, which induces n-type and p-type self-doping effect, by shifting the energy of the Dirac cones in the opposite directions. On the other hand, application of the tensile strain results into a transition from gapless to finite gap system for the monolayer. For the AB-stacked bilayer, the results predict tunability of Dirac-cones by in-plane strains as well as the strain applied perpendicular to the plane. The group velocities of the Dirac cones show enhancement in the resistance anisotropy for bilayer relative to the case of monolayer. Such tunable and direction-dependent electronic properties predicted for 6,6,12-graphyne make it to be competitive for the next-generation electronic devices at nanoscale.

  14. Fast electron generation in cones with ultraintense laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Van Woerkom, L.; Chowdhury, E.; Link, A.; Offermann, D.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Schumacher, D. W.; Akli, K. U.; Stephens, R. B.; Bartal, T.; Beg, F. N.; Chawla, S.; King, J. A.; Ma, T.; Chen, C. D.; Freeman, R. R.; Hey, D.; Key, M. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Patel, P. K.

    2008-05-15

    Experimental results from copper cones irradiated with ultraintense laser light are presented. Spatial images and total yields of Cu K{sub {alpha}} fluorescence were measured as a function of the laser focusing properties. The fluorescence emission extends into the cone approximately 300 {mu}m from the cone tip and cannot be explained by ray tracing including cone wall absorption. In addition, the total fluorescence yield from cones is an order of magnitude higher than for equivalent mass foil targets. Indications are that the physics of the laser-cone interaction is dominated by preplasma created from the long duration, low-energy prepulse from the laser.

  15. Pure bending of a solid cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renton, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    The problems of torsion, axial loading and shear of a solid cone were solved around the turn of the century by Michell and Föppl. Surprisingly, no solution to the problem of the elastic response of a cone to the only other possible resultant applied to its apex seems to have been published until now. The method used here is based on certain theoretical considerations related to the author's work on generalizing the engineering theory of beams. This means that the result is derived rather than being the result of a trial-and-error process. A comparison is made with the usual engineering theory as modified for variable bending stiffness. The two analyses give the same results at the limit as the cone angle tends to zero.

  16. Cone photopigment bleaching abnormalities in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Elsner, A E; Burns, S A; Lobes, L A; Doft, B H

    1987-04-01

    We have used a color-matching technique to obtain estimates of the optical density of cone photopigments as a function of retinal illuminance in patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). We found that the half-bleach illuminance of some patients is abnormally high. That is, it takes more light to bleach an equivalent amount of photopigment in these patients. Since low illuminance color matches for these patients are normal, this implies that these patients have normal amounts of photopigment, but the photopigment is not bleaching normally. This result clearly points to abnormalities in the outer retina of these diabetic patients. The most likely causes of this abnormality are either decreases in the ability of the cones to absorb light, or an increased rate of regeneration of the cone photopigments. PMID:3557875

  17. On the transient dynamics of the wake and trajectory of free falling cones with various apex angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamed, Ali M.; Jin, Yaqing; Chamorro, Leonardo P.

    2015-11-01

    The early free fall stages of cones with a density ratio 1.18 and apex angles of 30°, 45°, 60°, and 90° were studied using a wireless 3-axis gyroscope and accelerometer to describe the cone 3D motions, while particle image velocimetry was used to capture the induced flow in the near wake. The Reynolds number based on the cones diameter and the velocity at which the cone reaches the first local velocity maximum is found to consistently set the limit between two distinctive states. Relatively rapid growth in the cone nutation and departure from the vertical axis is observed after this Re is reached. Sequences of vertical velocity, swirling strength, LES-decomposed velocity, and pressure fields show the formation and growth of a large and initially symmetric recirculation bubble at the cone base. Those also highlight the presence of a symmetric 3D vortex rollup dominating the near wake in the early stages of the fall. A shear layer develops at the edge of the wake and manifests in the periodic shedding of Kelvin-Helmholtz vortices that, due to the nature of the recirculation bubble, reorganize to constitute a part of the rollup. Later in the fall, the wake loses symmetry and shows high population of vortical structures leading to turbulence. The asymmetric wake leads to strong interactions between the flow field and the cone evidenced by the shedding of a part of the 3D large-scale vortex rollup. This shedding process along with the cone rotation around its own axis provides a possible explanation of the helical wake structure observed in other studies.

  18. ON and OFF S-cone pathways have different long-wave cone inputs.

    PubMed

    McLellan, J S; Eskew, R T

    2000-01-01

    Three experiments compared thresholds for S-cone increments and decrements under steady and transient adaptation conditions, to investigate whether stimuli of both polarities are detected by the same cone-opponent psychophysical mechanism. The results could not be accounted for by a standard model of the S-cone detection pathway [Polden & Mollon (1980) Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, B, 210, 235-272]. In particular, a transient tritanopia detection paradigm that measured threshold elevation following the offset of long-wavelength fields produced different field sensitivities for S-cone increment and decrement tests. The decrement field sensitivity function was shifted to shorter wavelengths relative to the increment function. L-cone opponency is apparently stronger for S-cone increments than for decrements. The most plausible substrates of the two different psychophysical detection mechanisms are the ON and OFF channels. The results suggest that S-ON (bistratified) and S-OFF ganglion cells receive different relative amounts of L- and M-cone input. PMID:10915885

  19. Lightcone: Light-cone generating script

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernyk, Max

    2014-03-01

    Lightcone works with simulated galaxy data stored in a relational database to rearrange the data in a shape of a light-cone; simulated galaxy data is expected to be in a box volume. The light-cone constructing script works with output from the SAGE semi-analytic model, but will work with any other model that has galaxy positions (and other properties) saved per snapshots of the simulation volume distributed in time. The database configuration file is set up for PostgreSQL RDBMS, but can be modified for use with any other SQL database.

  20. Sedimentary Biosignatures of Social Organization in Cone-Forming Filamentous Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tice, M. M.; Gong, J.; Zeng, Z.; Sneed, J.; Wehner, M.; Sparks, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    Conical mats consisting of centimeter-scale steep-sided cones growing above flat basal films form some of the most distinctive fossil microbial communities in the geologic record. Cones have been hypothesized to form by the initially random motion of filamentous bacteria into small tangled clumps followed by the phototactic motion of the same bacteria up resulting slopes. More recent models of cone development suggest that they form in response to growth in stagnant fluids where diffusion limits exchange of nutrients and wastes with the environment. Determining the biological and environmental factors that promote cone formation will be important for interpreting the geological record of fossil mats and stromatolites, on Earth and potentially on Mars. Here we report the results of new experiments demonstrating complex social organization of cone-forming communities and a novel biosignature of the growth of such communities on sandy sediments, as well as detection of that biosignature in 3.2 Ga fossil mats of the Moodies Group (Barberton greenstone belt, South Africa). In order to investigate the processes involved in cone formation, we grew cultures of a filamentous cyanobacterium originally isolated from tufted cones in Yellowstone National Park, Montana, U.S.A. (Leptolyngbya sp. Y-WT-2000 Cl 1). During early mat development, filaments coat sand grain surfaces and aggregate into ~100-μm-long tufts, or mutually aligned bundles of filaments. Tufts are highly motile, bridging sand grains and merging to form larger tufts. After 10-14 days of growth, tufts aggregate during the early morning into centers composed of many tufts that wave vertically and along the sand surface. Centers move across the sediment surface during the middle of the day and merge along bridging tufts. These bridges transmit force to the underlying sediment and are capable of rolling sand grains. At this stage, mats are composed of small mobile centers that disperse along streams of co

  1. Head and neck position sense.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Bridget; McNair, Peter; Taylor, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic minor cervical strains are common place in high-impact sports (e.g. tackling) and premature degenerative changes have been documented in sports people exposed to recurrent impact trauma (e.g. scrummaging in rugby) or repetitive forces (e.g. Formula 1 racing drivers, jockeys). While proprioceptive exercises have been an integral part of rehabilitation of injuries in the lower limb, they have not featured as prominently in the treatment of cervical injuries. However, head and neck position sense (HNPS) testing and re-training may have relevance in the management of minor sports-related neck injuries, and play a role in reducing the incidence of ongoing pain and problems with function. For efficacious programmes to be developed and tested, fundamental principles associated with proprioception in the cervical spine should be considered. Hence, this article highlights the importance of anatomical structures in the cervical spine responsible for position sense, and how their interaction with the CNS affects our ability to plan and execute effective purposeful movements. This article includes a review of studies examining position sense in subjects with and without pathology and describes the effects of rehabilitation programmes that have sought to improve position sense. In respect to the receptors providing proprioceptive information for the CNS, the high densities and complex arrays of spindles found in cervical muscles suggest that these receptors play a key role. There is some evidence suggesting that ensemble encoding of discharge patterns from muscle spindles is relayed to the CNS and that a pattern recognition system is used to establish joint position and movement. Sensory information from neck proprioceptive receptors is processed in tandem with information from the vestibular system. There are extensive anatomical connections between neck proprioceptive inputs and vestibular inputs. If positional information from the vestibular system is inaccurate or

  2. Basaltic Cone Suggests Constructional Origin of Some Guyots.

    PubMed

    Christensen, M N; Gilbert, C M

    1964-01-17

    A basaltic cinder cone was built beneath the waters of Mono Lake in Pleistocene time. This cone is now exposed. Its internal structure, external form, and petrography suggest that it was constructed with a flat top. PMID:17753148

  3. Shatter Cones Formed in a MEMIN Impact Cratering Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenkmann, T.; Poelchau, M. H.; Trullenque, G.; Hoerth, T.; Schäfer, F.; Thoma, K.; Deutsch, A.

    2012-09-01

    Experimentally formed shatter cones help to constrain the physical boundary conditions required for their formation. We produced shatter cones in porous sandstone at 4.3 kJ shock loading. Their surfaces contain vesicular melt films.

  4. ES1 is a mitochondrial enlarging factor contributing to form mega-mitochondria in zebrafish cones

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takamasa; Wada, Yasutaka; Kawamura, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Total mass of mitochondria increases during cell proliferation and differentiation through mitochondrial biogenesis, which includes mitochondrial proliferation and growth. During the mitochondrial growth, individual mitochondria have been considered to be enlarged independently of mitochondrial fusion. However, molecular basis for this enlarging process has been poorly understood. Cone photoreceptor cells in the retina possess large mitochondria, so-called mega-mitochondria that have been considered to arise via the enlarging process. Here we show that ES1 is a novel mitochondria-enlarging factor contributing to form mega-mitochondria in cones. ES1 is specifically expressed in cones and localized to mitochondria including mega-mitochondria. Knockdown of ES1 markedly reduced the mitochondrial size in cones. In contrast, ectopic expression of ES1 in rods significantly increased both the size of individual mitochondria and the total mass of the mitochondrial cluster without changing the number of them. RNA-seq analysis showed that ERRα and its downstream mitochondrial genes were significantly up-regulated in the ES1-expressing rods, suggesting facilitation of mitochondrial enlargement via ERRα-dependent processes. Furthermore, higher energy state was detected in the ES1-expressing rods, indicating that the enlarged mitochondria by ES1 are capable of producing high energy. ES1 is the mitochondrial protein that is first found to promote enlargement of individual mitochondria. PMID:26926452

  5. ES1 is a mitochondrial enlarging factor contributing to form mega-mitochondria in zebrafish cones.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Takamasa; Wada, Yasutaka; Kawamura, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Total mass of mitochondria increases during cell proliferation and differentiation through mitochondrial biogenesis, which includes mitochondrial proliferation and growth. During the mitochondrial growth, individual mitochondria have been considered to be enlarged independently of mitochondrial fusion. However, molecular basis for this enlarging process has been poorly understood. Cone photoreceptor cells in the retina possess large mitochondria, so-called mega-mitochondria that have been considered to arise via the enlarging process. Here we show that ES1 is a novel mitochondria-enlarging factor contributing to form mega-mitochondria in cones. ES1 is specifically expressed in cones and localized to mitochondria including mega-mitochondria. Knockdown of ES1 markedly reduced the mitochondrial size in cones. In contrast, ectopic expression of ES1 in rods significantly increased both the size of individual mitochondria and the total mass of the mitochondrial cluster without changing the number of them. RNA-seq analysis showed that ERRα and its downstream mitochondrial genes were significantly up-regulated in the ES1-expressing rods, suggesting facilitation of mitochondrial enlargement via ERRα-dependent processes. Furthermore, higher energy state was detected in the ES1-expressing rods, indicating that the enlarged mitochondria by ES1 are capable of producing high energy. ES1 is the mitochondrial protein that is first found to promote enlargement of individual mitochondria. PMID:26926452

  6. Effects of scoria-cone eruptions upon nearby human communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ort, M.H.; Elson, M.D.; Anderson, K.C.; Duffield, W.A.; Hooten, J.A.; Champion, D.E.; Waring, G.

    2008-01-01

    Scoria-cone eruptions are typically low in volume and explosivity compared with eruptions from stratovolcanoes, but they can affect local populations profoundly. Scoria-cone eruption effects vary dramatically due to eruption style, tephra blanket extent, climate, types of land use, the culture and complexity of the affected group, and resulting governmental action. A comparison of a historic eruption (Pari??cutin, Me??xico) with prehistoric eruptions (herein we primarily focus on Sunset Crater in northern Arizona, USA) elucidates the controls on and effects of these variables. Long-term effects of lava flows extend little beyond the flow edges. These flows, however, can be used for defensive purposes, providing refuges from invasion for those who know them well. In arid lands, tephra blankets serve as mulches, decreasing runoff and evaporation, increasing infiltration, and regulating soil temperature. Management and retention of these scoria mulches, which can open new areas for agriculture, become a priority for farming communities. In humid areas, though, the tephra blanket may impede plant growth and increase erosion. Cultural responses to eruptions vary, from cultural collapse, through fragmentation of society, dramatic changes, and development of new technologies, to little apparent change. Eruptions may also be viewed as retribution for poor behavior, and attempts are made to mollify angry gods. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  7. A multiscale filter for noise reduction of low-dose cone beam projections.

    PubMed

    Yao, Weiguang; Farr, Jonathan B

    2015-08-21

    The Poisson or compound Poisson process governs the randomness of photon fluence in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging systems. The probability density function depends on the mean (noiseless) of the fluence at a certain detector. This dependence indicates the natural requirement of multiscale filters to smooth noise while preserving structures of the imaged object on the low-dose cone beam projection. In this work, we used a Gaussian filter, exp(-x2/2σ(2)(f)) as the multiscale filter to de-noise the low-dose cone beam projections. We analytically obtained the expression of σ(f), which represents the scale of the filter, by minimizing local noise-to-signal ratio. We analytically derived the variance of residual noise from the Poisson or compound Poisson processes after Gaussian filtering. From the derived analytical form of the variance of residual noise, optimal σ(2)(f)) is proved to be proportional to the noiseless fluence and modulated by local structure strength expressed as the linear fitting error of the structure. A strategy was used to obtain the reliable linear fitting error: smoothing the projection along the longitudinal direction to calculate the linear fitting error along the lateral direction and vice versa. The performance of our multiscale filter was examined on low-dose cone beam projections of a Catphan phantom and a head-and-neck patient. After performing the filter on the Catphan phantom projections scanned with pulse time 4 ms, the number of visible line pairs was similar to that scanned with 16 ms, and the contrast-to-noise ratio of the inserts was higher than that scanned with 16 ms about 64% in average. For the simulated head-and-neck patient projections with pulse time 4 ms, the visibility of soft tissue structures in the patient was comparable to that scanned with 20 ms. The image processing took less than 0.5 s per projection with 1024   ×   768 pixels. PMID:26247344

  8. Fusobacterial head and neck infections in children.

    PubMed

    Brook, Itzhak

    2015-07-01

    Fusobacterium species are increasingly recognized as a cause of head and neck infections in children. These infections include acute and chronic otitis, sinusitis, mastoiditis, and tonsillitis; peritonsillar and retropharyngeal abscesses; Lemierre syndrome; post-anginal cervical lymphadenitis; and periodontitis. They can also be involved in brain abscess and bacteremia associated with head and neck infections. This review describes the clinical spectrum of head and neck fusobacterial infection in children and their management. PMID:25980688

  9. Paragangliomas of the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Woolen, Sean; Gemmete, Joseph J

    2016-05-01

    Paragangliomas of the head and neck are rare vascular skull-base tumors derived from the paraganglionic system with an estimated incidence of 1:30,000 accounting for 3% of all paragangliomas. The most common paraganglioma locations of the head and neck in descending order are the carotid body, jugular, tympanic, and vagal paragangliomas. This article discusses the clinical characterics, normal anatamy, imaging findings and protocols, pathology, staging, and differential diagnosis for paragangliomas of the head and neck. PMID:27154608

  10. Funnel cone for focusing intense ion beams on a target

    SciTech Connect

    Bieniosek, F.M.; Henestroza, E.; Ni, P.

    2009-10-05

    We describe a funnel cone for concentrating an ion beam on a target. The cone utilizes the reflection characteristic of ion beams on solid walls to focus the incident beam andincrease beam intensity on target. The cone has been modeled with the TRIM code. A prototype has been tested and installed for use in the 350-keV K+ NDCX target chamber.

  11. Distribution of cone photoreceptors in the mammalian retina.

    PubMed

    Szél, A; Röhlich, P; Caffé, A R; van Veen, T

    1996-12-15

    The retina of mammals contains various amounts of cone photoreceptors that are relatively evenly distributed and display a radially or horizontally oriented area of peak density. In most mammalian species two spectrally different classes of cone can be distinguished with various histochemical and physiological methods. These cone classes occur in a relatively constant ratio, middle-to-longwave sensitive cones being predominant over short-wave cones. Recent observations do not support the idea that each cone subpopulation is uniformly distributed across the retina. With appropriate type-specific markers, unexpected patterns of colour cone topography have been revealed in certain species. In the mouse and the rabbit, the "standard" uniform pattern was found to be confined exclusively to the dorsal retina. In a ventral zone of variable width all cones express short-wave pigment, a phenomenon whose biological significance is not known yet. Dorso-ventral asymmetries have been described in lower vertebrates, matching the spectral distribution of light reaching the retina from various sectors of the visual field. It is not clear, however, whether the retinal cone fields in mammals carry out a function similar to that of their counterparts in fish and amphibians. Since in a number of mammalian species short-wave cones are the first to differentiate, and the expression of the short-wave pigment seems to be the default pathway of cone differentiation, we suggest that the short-wave sensitive cone fields are rudimentary areas conserving an ancestral stage of the photopigment evolution. PMID:9016448

  12. Epigenomic landscapes of retinal rods and cones

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Alisa; Luo, Chongyuan; Davis, Fred P; Mukamel, Eran A; Henry, Gilbert L; Nery, Joseph R; Urich, Mark A; Picard, Serge; Lister, Ryan; Eddy, Sean R; Beer, Michael A; Ecker, Joseph R; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Rod and cone photoreceptors are highly similar in many respects but they have important functional and molecular differences. Here, we investigate genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation and chromatin accessibility in mouse rods and cones and correlate differences in these features with gene expression, histone marks, transcription factor binding, and DNA sequence motifs. Loss of NR2E3 in rods shifts their epigenomes to a more cone-like state. The data further reveal wide differences in DNA methylation between retinal photoreceptors and brain neurons. Surprisingly, we also find a substantial fraction of DNA hypo-methylated regions in adult rods that are not in active chromatin. Many of these regions exhibit hallmarks of regulatory regions that were active earlier in neuronal development, suggesting that these regions could remain undermethylated due to the highly compact chromatin in mature rods. This work defines the epigenomic landscapes of rods and cones, revealing features relevant to photoreceptor development and function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11613.001 PMID:26949250

  13. Performance analysis of cone detection algorithms.

    PubMed

    Mariotti, Letizia; Devaney, Nicholas

    2015-04-01

    Many algorithms have been proposed to help clinicians evaluate cone density and spacing, as these may be related to the onset of retinal diseases. However, there has been no rigorous comparison of the performance of these algorithms. In addition, the performance of such algorithms is typically determined by comparison with human observers. Here we propose a technique to simulate realistic images of the cone mosaic. We use the simulated images to test the performance of three popular cone detection algorithms, and we introduce an algorithm which is used by astronomers to detect stars in astronomical images. We use Free Response Operating Characteristic (FROC) curves to evaluate and compare the performance of the four algorithms. This allows us to optimize the performance of each algorithm. We observe that performance is significantly enhanced by up-sampling the images. We investigate the effect of noise and image quality on cone mosaic parameters estimated using the different algorithms, finding that the estimated regularity is the most sensitive parameter. PMID:26366758

  14. Dirac Cones in Periodically Modulated Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yuanzhao; Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2016-06-01

    We show by a degenerate k · p perturbation theory and group theory that Dirac cones in the Brillouin-zone center can be materialized for the electronic bands of periodically modulated quantum wells. We examine in particular the periodic modulation of the C4v and C6v symmetries. The analytical conclusions are confirmed by numerical calculations using the finite element method.

  15. Final design report for cone penetrometer platform

    SciTech Connect

    Seda, R.Y., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-13

    The final design report documents the completion of the design review meetings for acceptance of the cone penetrometer from the vendor. All design comments have been dispositioned and closed. Open items dealt with completion of the safety assessment,operational procedures, operational testing and readiness review.

  16. Bipolar Hemarthroplasty Using Cementless Conical Stem for Treatment of Dorr Type B and C Femoral Neck Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jeong Hoon; Jung, Sung

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The current study aims to evaluate the clinical and the radiological outcome of bipolar hemiarthroplasty using cementless cone stem to treat osteoporotic femoral neck fracture and compare the results according to the proximal femur geometry. Materials and Methods Seventy-five hips (75 patients) that underwent bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem between September 2006 and December 2011 were analyzed. The minimum follow-up period was 3 years. Thirty-three hips were classified as type B and 41 as type C. The clinical outcome was assessed using Harris hip score and the walking ability score. Radiographic evaluation was performed to evaluate the stability of the prosthesis. Results At the most recent follow up, the mean Harris hip score was 86 (range, 70-92) and 65% recovered to preoperative ambulatory status. In the radiographic exam, stable stem fixation was achieved in all cases. For the complications, eight hips developed deep vein thrombosis while three hips showed heterotopic ossification. Dislocation and delayed deep infection occurred in one hip resepectively. There were no significance differences in Harris hip score and walking ability score when the type B group was compare with the type C. Conclusion Bipolar hemiarthroplasty with cementless cone stem showed an excellent early outcome both clinically and radiographically regardless of the shape of the proximal femur. We believe this prosthesis can provide early stability to the Dorr type B and C femur and is an effective treatment for treating osteoporotic femoral neck fracture. PMID:27536631

  17. Stages of rootless cone formation observed within the Raudhólar cone group, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitch, E. P.; Hamilton, C.; Fagents, S. A.; Thordarson, T.

    2013-12-01

    Secondary (rootless) cones form when lava interacts explosively with water contained in the substrate, and represent a largely degassed, end-member system that can elucidate mechanisms of magma-water interactions in the absence of primary degassing-induced fragmentation. Rootless cones are well documented in Iceland. The Raudhólar rootless cone group, located within the ~5200-year-old Ellidaá lava flow on the south-eastern outskirts of Reykjavík, was extensively quarried during the Second World War and now provides excellent cross-sections through the tephra sequences. Taking advantage of this exposure, we performed detailed stratigraphic, grain-size, and componentry analyses, which suggest that the energetics of rootless explosions vary substantially during cone formation. The lower unit contains the most substrate sediment and is characterized by dilute pyroclastic density current deposits. The middle unit is dominated by a succession of bed-pairs, each containing a finer-grained lower layer and coarser-grained upper layer. In the upper unit, the succession grades into a welded section that caps the cone. The abundance of substrate sediment generally decreases upwards within the cone, which suggests that the efficiency of lava-substrate mixing decreased with time. In addition, clast size generally increases upwards within the cone, implying that the fragmentation energy also decreased as the rootless eruption progressed. Both lines of evidence suggest that the explosions decreased in intensity with time, likely due to the depletion of available groundwater. However, alternating fine- and coarse-grained beds imply cycles of increased and decreased fragmentation efficiency, which we attribute to groundwater recharge and depletion during the event. Therefore, this study presents a detailed look at rootless cone formation and provides the foundation for future work on this important, yet understudied, system.

  18. Visual Cone Arrestin 4 Contributes to Visual Function and Cone Health

    PubMed Central

    Deming, Janise D.; Pak, Joseph S.; Brown, Bruce M.; Kim, Moon K.; Aung, Moe H.; Eom, Yun Sung; Shin, Jung-a; Lee, Eun-Jin; Pardue, Machelle T.; Craft, Cheryl Mae

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Visual arrestins (ARR) play a critical role in shutoff of rod and cone phototransduction. When electrophysiological responses are measured for a single mouse cone photoreceptor, ARR1 expression can substitute for ARR4 in cone pigment desensitization; however, each arrestin may also contribute its own, unique role to modulate other cellular functions. Methods A combination of ERG, optokinetic tracking, immunohistochemistry, and immunoblot analysis was used to investigate the retinal phenotypes of Arr4 null mice (Arr4−/−) compared with age-matched control, wild-type mice. Results When 2-month-old Arr4−/− mice were compared with wild-type mice, they had diminished visual acuity and contrast sensitivity, yet enhanced ERG flicker response and higher photopic ERG b-wave amplitudes. In contrast, in older Arr4−/− mice, all ERG amplitudes were significantly reduced in magnitude compared with age-matched controls. Furthermore, in older Arr4−/− mice, the total cone numbers decreased and cone opsin protein immunoreactive expression levels were significantly reduced, while overall photoreceptor outer nuclear layer thickness was unchanged. Conclusions Our study demonstrates that Arr4−/− mice display distinct phenotypic differences when compared to controls, suggesting that ARR4 modulates essential functions in high acuity vision and downstream cellular signaling pathways that are not fulfilled or substituted by the coexpression of ARR1, despite its high expression levels in all mouse cones. Without normal ARR4 expression levels, cones slowly degenerate with increasing age, making this a new model to study age-related cone dystrophy. PMID:26284544

  19. Flexible cone impact dynamics based on space probe-cone docking mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Huang, YiYong; Chen, XiaoQian; Zhang, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical model of docking impact dynamics based on flexible cone is presented according to Föppl-von Kármán's non-linear differential equations and Hertz contact theory. Finite difference technique is used to solve this theoretical model. Results of the theoretical model show good agreement with the experimental and ANSYS/LS-DYNA simulation results. In addition, the influence of flexible cone parameters on impact process is discussed based on theoretical model systemically.

  20. Algorithm for recalculating the generatrix lines of a finitely generated fuzzy cone after adding a generatrix to its dual cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baskov, O. V.

    2015-02-01

    The problem of finding the generatrix lines of a fuzzy cone that is dual to a given finitely generated fuzzy cone is studied. Given the generatrix lines of mutually dual fuzzy cones, one or several generatrix lines are added to one of them. An algorithm for finding the generatrix lines of its dual fuzzy cone is described. The algorithm can be applied to multicriteria optimization problems.

  1. Bleached pigment activates transduction in salamander cones

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We have used suction electrode recording together with rapid steps into 0.5 mM IBMX solution to investigate changes in guanylyl cyclase velocity produced by pigment bleaching in isolated cones of the salamander Ambystoma tigrinum. Both backgrounds and bleaches accelerate the time course of current increase during steps into IBMX. We interpret this as evidence that the velocity of the guanylyl cyclase is increased in background light or after bleaching. Our results indicate that cyclase velocity increases nearly linearly with increasing percent pigment bleached but nonlinearly (and may saturate) with increasing back-ground intensity. In cones (as previously demonstrated for rods), light-activated pigment and bleached pigment appear to have somewhat different effects on the transduction cascade. The effect of bleaching on cyclase rate is maintained for at least 15-20 min after the light is removed, much longer than is required after a bleach for circulating current and sensitivity to stabilize in an isolated cone. The effect on the cyclase rate can be completely reversed by treatment with liposomes containing 11-cis retinal. The effects of bleaching can also be partially reversed by beta-ionone, an analogue of the chromophore 11- cis-retinal which does not form a covalent attachment to opsin. Perfusion of a bleached cone with beta-ionone produces a rapid increase in circulating current and sensitivity, which rapidly reverses when the beta-ionone is removed. Perfusion with beta-ionone also causes a partial reversal of the bleach-induced acceleration of cyclase velocity. We conclude that bleaching produces an "equivalent background" excitation of the transduction cascade in cones, perhaps by a mechanism similar to that in rods. PMID:8786347

  2. Spectral Tuning of Deep Red Cone Pigments†

    PubMed Central

    Amora, Tabitha L.; Ramos, Lavoisier S.; Galan, Jhenny F.; Birge, Robert R.

    2008-01-01

    Visual pigments are G-protein-coupled receptors that provide a critical interface between organisms and their external environment. Natural selection has generated vertebrate pigments that absorb light from the far-UV (360 nm) to the deep red (630 nm) while using a single chromophore, in either the A1 (11-cis-retinal) or A2 (11-cis-3,4-dehydroretinal) form. The fact that a single chromophore can be manipulated to have an absorption maximum across such an extended spectral region is remarkable. The mechanisms of wavelength regulation remain to be fully revealed, and one of the least well-understood mechanisms is that associated with the deep red pigments. We investigate theoretically the hypothesis that deep red cone pigments select a 6-s-trans conformation of the retinal chromophore ring geometry. This conformation is in contrast to the 6-s-cis ring geometry observed in rhodopsin and, through model chromophore studies, the vast majority of visual pigments. Nomographic spectral analysis of 294 A1 and A2 cone pigment literature absorption maxima indicates that the selection of a 6-s-trans geometry red shifts M/LWS A1 pigments by ~1500 cm−1 (~50 nm) and A2 pigments by ~2700 cm−1 (~100 nm). The homology models of seven cone pigments indicate that the deep red cone pigments select 6-s-trans chromophore conformations primarily via electrostatic steering. Our results reveal that the generation of a 6-s-trans conformation not only achieves a significant red shift but also provides enhanced stability of the chromophore within the deep red cone pigment binding sites. PMID:18370404

  3. Perturbation theory in light-cone quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Langnau, A.

    1992-01-01

    A thorough investigation of light-cone properties which are characteristic for higher dimensions is very important. The easiest way of addressing these issues is by analyzing the perturbative structure of light-cone field theories first. Perturbative studies cannot be substituted for an analysis of problems related to a nonperturbative approach. However, in order to lay down groundwork for upcoming nonperturbative studies, it is indispensable to validate the renormalization methods at the perturbative level, i.e., to gain control over the perturbative treatment first. A clear understanding of divergences in perturbation theory, as well as their numerical treatment, is a necessary first step towards formulating such a program. The first objective of this dissertation is to clarify this issue, at least in second and fourth-order in perturbation theory. The work in this dissertation can provide guidance for the choice of counterterms in Discrete Light-Cone Quantization or the Tamm-Dancoff approach. A second objective of this work is the study of light-cone perturbation theory as a competitive tool for conducting perturbative Feynman diagram calculations. Feynman perturbation theory has become the most practical tool for computing cross sections in high energy physics and other physical properties of field theory. Although this standard covariant method has been applied to a great range of problems, computations beyond one-loop corrections are very difficult. Because of the algebraic complexity of the Feynman calculations in higher-order perturbation theory, it is desirable to automatize Feynman diagram calculations so that algebraic manipulation programs can carry out almost the entire calculation. This thesis presents a step in this direction. The technique we are elaborating on here is known as light-cone perturbation theory.

  4. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography-Guided Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    SciTech Connect

    Moehlenbruch, Markus; Nelles, Michael; Thomas, Daniel; Willinek, Winfried; Gerstner, Andreas; Schild, Hans H.; Wilhelm, Kai

    2010-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the feasibility of a flat-detector C-arm-guided radiographic technique (cone-beam computed tomography [CBCT]) for percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG) insertion. Eighteen patients (13 men and 5 women; mean age 62 years) in whom percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) had failed underwent CBCT-guided PRG insertion. PEG failure or unsuitability was caused by upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction in all cases. Indications for gastrostomy were esophageal and head and neck malignancies, respectively. Before the PRG procedure, initial C-arm CBCT scans were acquired. Three- and 2-dimensional soft-tissue reconstructions of the epigastrium region were generated on a dedicated workstation. Subsequently, gastropexy was performed with T-fasteners after CBCT-guided puncture of the stomach bubble, followed by insertion of an 14F balloon-retained catheter through a peel-away introducer. Puncture of the stomach bubble and PRG insertion was technically successful in all patients without alteration of the epigastric region. There was no malpositioning of the tube or other major periprocedural complications. In 2 patients, minor complications occurred during the first 30 days of follow-up (PRG malfunction: n = 1; slight infection: n = 1). Late complications, which were mainly tube disturbances, were observed in 2 patients. The mean follow-up time was 212 days. CBCT-guided PRG is a safe, well-tolerated, and successful method of gastrostomy insertion in patients in whom endoscopic gastrostomy is not feasible. CBCT provides detailed imaging of the soft tissue and surrounding structures of the epigastric region in one diagnostic tour and thus significantly improves the planning of PRG procedures.

  5. Responsible use of cone beam computed tomography: minimising medico-legal risks.

    PubMed

    Noffke, C E E; Farman, A G; Van der Linde, A; Nel, S

    2013-07-01

    This communication highlights some of the ethical and possible legal responsibilities which pertain to the taking, reading, reporting, and communication of findings from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans. The importance of knowledge of head and neck anatomy and pathology to reduce the likelihood of incorrect interpretation is emphasised. Failure to detect critical findings in any diagnostic image can potentially result in medico-legal consequences. CBCT is no exception to this rule. Dental schools are advised to include CBCT imaging as a diagnostic tool in their under- and postgraduate curricula thereby equipping graduates to use 3D imaging in general and CBCT in particular. Existing dental practitioners are advised to seek continuing education on 3D imaging as part of their required lifelong learning. PMID:23971277

  6. The inviscid stability of supersonic flow past a sharp cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duck, Peter W.; Shaw, Stephen J.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of lateral curvature on the development of supersonic laminar inviscid boundary-layer flow on a sharp cone with adiabatic wall conditions are investigated analytically, with a focus on the linear temporal inviscid stability properties. The derivation of the governing equations and of a 'triply generalized' inflexion condition is outlined, and numerical results for freestream Mach number 3.8 are presented in extensive graphs and characterized in detail. A third instability mode related to the viscous mode observed by Duck and Hall (1990) using triple-deck theory is detected and shown to be more unstable and to have larger growth rates than the second mode in some cases. It is found that the 'sonic' neutral mode is affected by the lateral curvature and becomes a supersonic neutral mode.

  7. Current philosophy in the surgical management of neck metastases for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Coskun, H. Hakan; Medina, Jesus E.; Robbins, K. Thomas; Silver, Carl E.; Strojan, Primož; Teymoortash, Afshin; Pellitteri, Phillip K.; Rodrigo, Juan P.; Stoeckli, Sandro J.; Shaha, Ashok R.; Suçrez, Carlos; Hartl, Dana M.; de Bree, Remco; Takes, Robert P.; Hamoir, Marc; Pitman, Karen T.; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Ferlito, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Neck dissection is an important treatment for metastases from upper aerodigestive carcinoma; an event that markedly reduces survival. Since its inception, the philosophy of the procedure has undergone significant change from one of radicalism to the current conservative approach. Furthermore, nonsurgical modalities have been introduced, and, in many situations, have supplanted neck surgery. The refinements of imaging the neck based on the concept of neck level involvement has encouraged new philosophies to evolve that seem to benefit patient outcomes particularly as this relates to diminished morbidity. The purpose of this review was to highlight the new paradigms for surgical removal of neck metastases using an evidence-based approach. PMID:24623715

  8. Liquid encapsulated Czochralski growth of low dislocation GaAs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. G.; Chen, R. T.; Holmes, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    The availability of high-quality, large-diameter GaAs substrates is key to the successful development and production of high-speed GaAs devices and high-efficiency GaAs solar cells. The liquid encapsulated Czochralski (LEC) technique has provided a means for producing large-diameter GaAs. Progress in improving the LEC growth process which has resulted in 3-inch GaAs crystals with exceptionally low dislocation densities and reduced propensity for twinning is reported. Undoped, semi-insulating GaAs ingots were grown in a Melbourn high-pressure LEC system. The effects of seed perfection, seed necking, cone angle, melt stoichiometry, ambient pressure, thickness of the B2O3 encapsulating layer, and diameter control on the dislocation density were investigated. The material was characterized by preferential etching and X-ray topography. It is shown that 3-inch diameter substrates can be produced with dislocation densities as low as 6000 per sq cm through proper selection and control of growth parameters. Also, the incidence of twinning can be reduced significantly by growing from slightly As-rich melts.

  9. Characterizing the Human Cone Photoreceptor Mosaic via Dynamic Photopigment Densitometry.

    PubMed

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Hofer, Heidi; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    Densitometry is a powerful tool for the biophysical assessment of the retina. Until recently, this was restricted to bulk spatial scales in living humans. The application of adaptive optics (AO) to the conventional fundus camera and scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) has begun to translate these studies to cellular scales. Here, we employ an AOSLO to perform dynamic photopigment densitometry in order to characterize the optical properties and spectral types of the human cone photoreceptor mosaic. Cone-resolved estimates of optical density and photosensitivity agree well with bulk estimates, although show smaller variability than previously reported. Photopigment kinetics of individual cones derived from their selective bleaching allowed efficient mapping of cone sub-types in human retina. Estimated uncertainty in identifying a cone as long vs middle wavelength was less than 5%, and the total time taken per subject ranged from 3-9 hours. Short wavelength cones were delineated in every subject with high fidelity. The lack of a third cone-type was confirmed in a protanopic subject. In one color normal subject, cone assignments showed 91% correspondence against a previously reported cone-typing method from more than a decade ago. Combined with cone-targeted stimulation, this brings us closer in studying the visual percept arising from a specific cone type and its implication for color vision circuitry. PMID:26660894

  10. Characterizing the Human Cone Photoreceptor Mosaic via Dynamic Photopigment Densitometry

    PubMed Central

    Sabesan, Ramkumar; Hofer, Heidi; Roorda, Austin

    2015-01-01

    Densitometry is a powerful tool for the biophysical assessment of the retina. Until recently, this was restricted to bulk spatial scales in living humans. The application of adaptive optics (AO) to the conventional fundus camera and scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO) has begun to translate these studies to cellular scales. Here, we employ an AOSLO to perform dynamic photopigment densitometry in order to characterize the optical properties and spectral types of the human cone photoreceptor mosaic. Cone-resolved estimates of optical density and photosensitivity agree well with bulk estimates, although show smaller variability than previously reported. Photopigment kinetics of individual cones derived from their selective bleaching allowed efficient mapping of cone sub-types in human retina. Estimated uncertainty in identifying a cone as long vs middle wavelength was less than 5%, and the total time taken per subject ranged from 3–9 hours. Short wavelength cones were delineated in every subject with high fidelity. The lack of a third cone-type was confirmed in a protanopic subject. In one color normal subject, cone assignments showed 91% correspondence against a previously reported cone-typing method from more than a decade ago. Combined with cone-targeted stimulation, this brings us closer in studying the visual percept arising from a specific cone type and its implication for color vision circuitry. PMID:26660894

  11. Regulation of Mammalian Cone Phototransduction by Recoverin and Rhodopsin Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Keisuke; Chen, Jeannie; Khani, Shahrokh C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Cone photoreceptors function under daylight conditions and are essential for color perception and vision with high temporal and spatial resolution. A remarkable feature of cones is that, unlike rods, they remain responsive in bright light. In rods, light triggers a decline in intracellular calcium, which exerts a well studied negative feedback on phototransduction that includes calcium-dependent inhibition of rhodopsin kinase (GRK1) by recoverin. Rods and cones share the same isoforms of recoverin and GRK1, and photoactivation also triggers a calcium decline in cones. However, the molecular mechanisms by which calcium exerts negative feedback on cone phototransduction through recoverin and GRK1 are not well understood. Here, we examined this question using mice expressing various levels of GRK1 or lacking recoverin. We show that although GRK1 is required for the timely inactivation of mouse cone photoresponse, gradually increasing its expression progressively delays the cone response recovery. This surprising result is in contrast with the known effect of increasing GRK1 expression in rods. Notably, the kinetics of cone responses converge and become independent of GRK1 levels for flashes activating more than ∼1% of cone pigment. Thus, mouse cone response recovery in bright light is independent of pigment phosphorylation and likely reflects the spontaneous decay of photoactivated visual pigment. We also find that recoverin potentiates the sensitivity of cones in dim light conditions but does not contribute to their capacity to function in bright light. PMID:25673692

  12. Radiation therapy for head and neck neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.C.

    1990-01-01

    This book presents the clinical manifestations of disease, applied anatomy pertaining to the management of head and neck tumors, and results of conventional radiation therapy for uncommon tumors have been explored. It also contains an additional chapter on altered fractionation radiation therapy pertaining to irradiation of major head and neck tumors.

  13. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck. 572.33 Section 572.33 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES Hybrid III Test Dummy § 572.33 Neck....

  14. 49 CFR 572.33 - Neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... sensor of the six axis neck transducer and Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor... Fx is the force measured in lbs by the “X” axis force sensor (Channel Class 600) of the six axis neck... is vertical and coincides with the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal axis....

  15. Preventable Sternocleidomastoid Muscular Atrophy after Neck Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Nao; Sawai, Natsuko Yoshimura; Ishimoto, Shunsuke; Ogura, Hide; Aikawa, Tomonao; Kogo, Mikihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Modified radical neck dissection (mRND) [preserving the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) and the spinal accessory nerve] and supraomohyoid neck dissection have become common surgical procedures for treating head and neck cancer. Postoperative severe asymmetry of the neck and severe atrophy of the SCM, however, have been demonstrated. Methods: Using computed tomographic images, cross-sectional areas of the SCMs were measured in 99 patients with carcinoma of the oral cavity who underwent unilateral mRND or supraomohyoid neck dissection. An asymmetry index was used. Results: Innervation to the SCM was preserved in 91 patients. The spinal accessory nerve and the innervation were sacrificed in 3 patients; the innervation was repaired in 5 patients. Sacrifice of innervation to the SCM resulted in extremely severe asymmetry. Repair of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 40%. Preservation of the innervation prevented severe asymmetry in 75% at the middle portion of the neck and in 56% at the lower portion after mRND. Conclusion: Preserving innervation to the SCM and gentle handling of the nerve during neck dissection could prevent severe asymmetry after neck dissection. PMID:26495217

  16. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  17. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  18. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  19. 49 CFR 572.113 - Neck assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...) Using neck brackets 78051-303 and -307, mount the head/neck assembly to the part 572 pendulum test... to the plane of motion of the pendulum's longitudinal centerline (see § 572.33, Figure 20, except... (horizontal surface at the base of the skull) rotation with respect to the pendulum's longitudinal...

  20. Micro focusing of fast electrons with opened cone targets

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Feng; Liu Xiaoxuan; Ding Wenjun; Du Fei; Li Yutong; Ma Jinglong; Liu Xiaolong; Chen Liming; Lu Xin; Dong Quanli; Wang Weimin; Wang Zhaohua; Wei Zhiyi; Liu Bicheng; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2012-01-15

    Using opened reentrant cone silicon targets, we have demonstrated the effect of micro focusing of fast electrons generated in intense laser-plasma interactions. When an intense femtosecond laser pulse is focused tightly onto one of the side walls of the cone, fast electron beam emitted along the side wall is observed. When a line focus spot, which is long enough to irradiate both of the side walls of the cone simultaneously, is used, two electron beams emitted along each side wall, respectively, are observed. The two beams should cross each other near the open tip of the cone, resulting in micro focusing. We use a two-dimensional Particle-In-Cell code to simulate the electron emission both in opened and closed cone targets. The simulation results of the opened cone targets are in agreement with the experimental observation while the results of the closed cone targets do not show the micro focusing effect.

  1. X-Linked Cone Dystrophy Caused by Mutation of the Red and Green Cone Opsins

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jessica C.; Webb, Tom R.; Kanuga, Naheed; Robson, Anthony G.; Holder, Graham E.; Stockman, Andrew; Ripamonti, Caterina; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Ogun, Olufunmilola; Devery, Sophie; Wright, Genevieve A.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Moore, Anthony T.; Michaelides, Michel; Hardcastle, Alison J.

    2010-01-01

    X-linked cone and cone-rod dystrophies (XLCOD and XLCORD) are a heterogeneous group of progressive disorders that solely or primarily affect cone photoreceptors. Mutations in exon ORF15 of the RPGR gene are the most common underlying cause. In a previous study, we excluded RPGR exon ORF15 in some families with XLCOD. Here, we report genetic mapping of XLCOD to Xq26.1-qter. A significant LOD score was detected with marker DXS8045 (Zmax = 2.41 [θ = 0.0]). The disease locus encompasses the cone opsin gene array on Xq28. Analysis of the array revealed a missense mutation (c. 529T>C [p. W177R]) in exon 3 of both the long-wavelength-sensitive (LW, red) and medium-wavelength-sensitive (MW, green) cone opsin genes that segregated with disease. Both exon 3 sequences were identical and were derived from the MW gene as a result of gene conversion. The amino acid W177 is highly conserved in visual and nonvisual opsins across species. We show that W177R in MW opsin and the equivalent W161R mutation in rod opsin result in protein misfolding and retention in the endoplasmic reticulum. We also demonstrate that W177R misfolding, unlike the P23H mutation in rod opsin that causes retinitis pigmentosa, is not rescued by treatment with the pharmacological chaperone 9-cis-retinal. Mutations in the LW/MW cone opsin gene array can, therefore, lead to a spectrum of disease, ranging from color blindness to progressive cone dystrophy (XLCOD5). PMID:20579627

  2. History of imaging in orthodontics from Broadbent to cone-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hans, Mark G; Palomo, J Martin; Valiathan, Manish

    2015-12-01

    The history of imaging and orthodontics is a story of technology informing biology. Advances in imaging changed our thinking as our understanding of craniofacial growth and the impact of orthodontic treatment deepened. This article traces the history of imaging in orthodontics from the invention of the cephalometer by B. Holly Broadbent in 1930 to the introduction of low-cost, low-radiation-dose cone-beam computed tomography imaging in 2015. PMID:26672697

  3. Scatter correction, intermediate view estimation and dose characterization in megavoltage cone-beam CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sramek, Benjamin Koerner

    neck phantoms. The conclusions of this investigation were: (1) the implementation of intermediate view estimation techniques to megavoltage cone-beam CT produced improvements in image quality, with the largest impact occurring for smaller numbers of initially-acquired projections, (2) the SPECS scatter correction algorithm could be successfully incorporated into projection data acquired using an electronic portal imaging device during megavoltage cone-beam CT image reconstruction, (3) a large range of SPECS parameters were shown to reduce cupping artifacts as well as improve reconstruction accuracy, with application to anthropomorphic phantom geometries improving the percent difference in reconstructed electron density for soft tissue from -13.6% to -2.0%, and for cortical bone from -9.7% to 1.4%, (4) dose measurements in the anthropomorphic phantoms showed consistent agreement between planar measurements using radiochromic film and point measurements using thermoluminescent dosimeters, and (5) a comparison of normalized dose measurements acquired with radiochromic film to those calculated using multiple treatment planning systems, accelerator-detector combinations, patient geometries and accelerator outputs produced a relatively good agreement.

  4. Establishment of a cone photoreceptor transplantation platform based on a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line

    PubMed Central

    Smiley, Sheila; Nickerson, Philip E.; Comanita, Lacrimioara; Daftarian, Narsis; El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Tsai, En Leh Samuel; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Yan, Keqin; Thurig, Sherry; Touahri, Yacine; Dixit, Rajiv; Aavani, Tooka; De Repentingy, Yves; Baker, Adam; Tsilfidis, Catherine; Biernaskie, Jeff; Sauvé, Yves; Schuurmans, Carol; Kothary, Rashmi; Mears, Alan J.; Wallace, Valerie A.

    2016-01-01

    We report successful retinal cone enrichment and transplantation using a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line. Using the putative cone photoreceptor-enriched transcript Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 136 (Ccdc136) GFP-trapped allele, we monitored developmental reporter expression, facilitated the enrichment of cones, and evaluated transplanted GFP-labeled cones in wildtype and retinal degeneration mutant retinas. GFP reporter and endogenous Ccdc136 transcripts exhibit overlapping temporal and spatial expression patterns, both initiated in cone precursors of the embryonic retina and persisting to the adult stage in S and S/M opsin+ cones as well as rod bipolar cells. The trapped allele does not affect cone function or survival in the adult mutant retina. When comparing the integration of GFP+ embryonic cones and postnatal Nrl−/− ‘cods’ into retinas of adult wildtype and blind mice, both cell types integrated and exhibited a degree of morphological maturation that was dependent on donor age. These results demonstrate the amenability of the adult retina to cone transplantation using a novel transgenic resource that can advance therapeutic cone transplantation in models of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26965927

  5. Establishment of a cone photoreceptor transplantation platform based on a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Sheila; Nickerson, Philip E; Comanita, Lacrimioara; Daftarian, Narsis; El-Sehemy, Ahmed; Tsai, En Leh Samuel; Matan-Lithwick, Stuart; Yan, Keqin; Thurig, Sherry; Touahri, Yacine; Dixit, Rajiv; Aavani, Tooka; De Repentingy, Yves; Baker, Adam; Tsilfidis, Catherine; Biernaskie, Jeff; Sauvé, Yves; Schuurmans, Carol; Kothary, Rashmi; Mears, Alan J; Wallace, Valerie A

    2016-01-01

    We report successful retinal cone enrichment and transplantation using a novel cone-GFP reporter mouse line. Using the putative cone photoreceptor-enriched transcript Coiled-Coil Domain Containing 136 (Ccdc136) GFP-trapped allele, we monitored developmental reporter expression, facilitated the enrichment of cones, and evaluated transplanted GFP-labeled cones in wildtype and retinal degeneration mutant retinas. GFP reporter and endogenous Ccdc136 transcripts exhibit overlapping temporal and spatial expression patterns, both initiated in cone precursors of the embryonic retina and persisting to the adult stage in S and S/M opsin(+) cones as well as rod bipolar cells. The trapped allele does not affect cone function or survival in the adult mutant retina. When comparing the integration of GFP(+) embryonic cones and postnatal Nrl(-/-) 'cods' into retinas of adult wildtype and blind mice, both cell types integrated and exhibited a degree of morphological maturation that was dependent on donor age. These results demonstrate the amenability of the adult retina to cone transplantation using a novel transgenic resource that can advance therapeutic cone transplantation in models of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:26965927

  6. MATRIX METALLOPROTEASES IN HEAD AND NECK CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Eben L.; Matrisian, Lynn M.

    2010-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteases (MMPs) are a collection of enzymes capable of cleaving extracellular matrix components, growth factors, and cell-surface receptors. MMPs modulate most aspects of tumorigenesis and are highly expressed in cancer compared with normal tissues. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) express high levels of MMPs in vivo and that inhibition of these enzymes in vitro and in mouse models decreases invasion and metastasis. However, the clinical trials for MMP inhibitors have failed to demonstrate a significant survival advantage in most cancers. The disparity between preclinical and clinical studies has led to the reevaluation of how MMP functions in cancer and the design of clinical trials for molecularly targeted agents. Mouse model data and analysis of HNSCC tumor specimens suggests that membrane type-1 MMP (MT1-MMP) may be a critical enzyme in tumor cell invasion and survival in vivo. This accumulated data provide evidence for development of selective MT1-MMP inhibitors as therapy in HNSCC. PMID:16470875

  7. Avian ultraviolet/violet cones as magnetoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Bischof, Hans-Joachim; Nießner, Christine; Peichl, Leo; Wiltschko, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    In a recent paper, we described the localization of cryptochrome 1a in the retina of domestic chickens, Gallus gallus, and European robins, Erithacus rubecula: Cryptochrome 1a was found exclusively along the membranes of the disks in the outer segments of the ultraviolet/violet single cones. Cryptochrome has been suggested to act as receptor molecule for the avian magnetic compass, which would mean that the UV/V cones have a double function: they mediate vision in the short-wavelength range and, at the same time, magnetic directional information. This has important implications and raises a number of questions, in particular, how the two types of input are separated. Here, we point out several possibilities how this could be achieved.  PMID:22446535

  8. Instantons on Calabi-Yau cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, Marcus

    2015-12-01

    The Hermitian Yang-Mills equations on certain vector bundles over Calabi-Yau cones can be reduced to a set of matrix equations; in fact, these are Nahm-type equations. The latter can be analysed further by generalising arguments of Donaldson and Kronheimer used in the study of the original Nahm equations. Starting from certain equivariant connections, we show that the full set of instanton equations reduce, with a unique gauge transformation, to the holomorphicity condition alone.

  9. 3D In Vivo Dosimetry Using Megavoltage Cone-Beam CT and EPID Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Elmpt, Wouter van Nijsten, Sebastiaan; Petit, Steven; Mijnheer, Ben; Lambin, Philippe; Dekker, Andre

    2009-04-01

    Purpose: To develop a method that reconstructs, independently of previous (planning) information, the dose delivered to patients by combining in-room imaging with transit dose measurements during treatment. Methods and Materials: A megavoltage cone-beam CT scan of the patient anatomy was acquired with the patient in treatment position. During treatment, delivered fields were measured behind the patient with an electronic portal imaging device. The dose information in these images was back-projected through the cone-beam CT scan and used for Monte Carlo simulation of the dose distribution inside the cone-beam CT scan. Validation was performed using various phantoms for conformal and IMRT plans. Clinical applicability is shown for a head-and-neck cancer patient treated with IMRT. Results: For single IMRT beams and a seven-field IMRT step-and-shoot plan, the dose distribution was reconstructed within 3%/3mm compared with the measured or planned dose. A three-dimensional conformal plan, verified using eight point-dose measurements, resulted in a difference of 1.3 {+-} 3.3% (1 SD) compared with the reconstructed dose. For the patient case, planned and reconstructed dose distribution was within 3%/3mm for about 95% of the points within the 20% isodose line. Reconstructed mean dose values, obtained from dose-volume histograms, were within 3% of prescribed values for target volumes and normal tissues. Conclusions: We present a new method that verifies the dose delivered to a patient by combining in-room imaging with the transit dose measured during treatment. This verification procedure opens possibilities for offline adaptive radiotherapy and dose-guided radiotherapy strategies taking into account the dose distribution delivered during treatment sessions.

  10. Self-Contact and Instabilities in the Anisotropic Growth of Elastic Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Norbert; Wittel, Falk K.; Amar, Martine Ben; Müller, Martin Michael; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2010-08-01

    We investigate the morphology of thin discs and rings growing in the circumferential direction. Recent analytical results suggest that this growth produces symmetric excess cones (e cones). We study the stability of such solutions considering self-contact and bending stress. We show that, contrary to what was assumed in previous analytical solutions, beyond a critical growth factor, no symmetric e cone solution is energetically minimal any more. Instead, we obtain skewed e cone solutions having lower energy, characterized by a skewness angle and repetitive spiral winding with increasing growth. These results are generalized to discs with varying thickness and rings with holes of different radii.

  11. Wide-Field Fundus Autofluorescence for Retinitis Pigmentosa and Cone/Cone-Rod Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Akio; Oishi, Maho; Ogino, Ken; Morooka, Satoshi; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2016-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa and cone/cone-rod dystrophy are inherited retinal diseases characterized by the progressive loss of rod and/or cone photoreceptors. To evaluate the status of rod/cone photoreceptors and visual function, visual acuity and visual field tests, electroretinogram, and optical coherence tomography are typically used. In addition to these examinations, fundus autofluorescence (FAF) has recently garnered attention. FAF visualizes the intrinsic fluorescent material in the retina, which is mainly lipofuscin contained within the retinal pigment epithelium. While conventional devices offer limited viewing angles in FAF, the recently developed Optos machine enables recording of wide-field FAF. With wide-field analysis, an association between abnormal FAF areas and visual function was demonstrated in retinitis pigmentosa and cone-rod dystrophy. In addition, the presence of "patchy" hypoautofluorescent areas was found to be correlated with symptom duration. Although physicians should be cautious when interpreting wide-field FAF results because the peripheral parts of the image are magnified significantly, this examination method provides previously unavailable information. PMID:26427426

  12. The NLO jet vertex in the small-cone approximation for kt and cone algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colferai, D.; Niccoli, A.

    2015-04-01

    We determine the jet vertex for Mueller-Navelet jets and forward jets in the small-cone approximation for two particular choices of jet algoritms: the kt algorithm and the cone algorithm. These choices are motivated by the extensive use of such algorithms in the phenomenology of jets. The differences with the original calculations of the small-cone jet vertex by Ivanov and Papa, which is found to be equivalent to a formerly algorithm proposed by Furman, are shown at both analytic and numerical level, and turn out to be sizeable. A detailed numerical study of the error introduced by the small-cone approximation is also presented, for various observables of phenomenological interest. For values of the jet "radius" R = 0 .5, the use of the small-cone approximation amounts to an error of about 5% at the level of cross section, while it reduces to less than 2% for ratios of distributions such as those involved in the measure of the azimuthal decorrelation of dijets.

  13. [What makes "Head-and-Neck-Cancers" recur: Tumorinvasion "revisited"].

    PubMed

    Simon, C; Koitschev, A; Plinkert, P K

    2007-03-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) are common cancers with a relatively poor prognosis. Locoregionale recurrences are regularly encountered and associated with a detrimental outcome. Studies of the last few years report that not only tumor staging and grading influence locoregional control but also histologic and biological markers. One such histological marker is coined "worst pattern of invasion". It describes a histologic growth pattern consisting of invading tumor cell islands and strands that are dispatched from the invasion front (POI typ 4 and 5). Additional features of invasion are perineural invasion and extracapsular nodal extension. Besides histological markers there are molecular characteristics that include the expression of gene families involved in extracellular matrix degradation. The data suggest that head and neck cancers differ with respect to their invasive growth capacity and thus their ability to generate locoregionale recurrences. It appears that locoregionale control is a consequence of this growth pattern. This may explain, why in recent clincial studies the prognostic marker "pattern-of-invasion" outweights even such well established prognosticators such as "surgical margins". PMID:17351878

  14. Optically guided neuronal growth at near-infrared wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, D. J.; Lake, T. K.; Agate, B.; Garcés-Chávez, V.; Dholakia, K.; Gunn-Moore, F.

    2006-08-01

    Recent work has indicated the potential of light to guide the growth cones of neuronal cells using a Ti:Sapphire laser at 800 nm (Ehrlicher et al, PNAS, 2002). We have developed an optical set-up that has allowed, for the first time, the direct comparison of this process at near infrared wavelengths. A high number of growth cones were studied in order to provide a detailed statistical analysis. Actively extending growth cones of the neuroblastoma cell-line, NG108, can be guided at not only 780 nm, but also at 1064 nm. These wavelengths are an appropriate choice for guidance experiments, as wavelengths in the visible spectrum and UV are highly absorbing by cells and lead to death by phototoxicity and thermal stress. At 780 nm, 47% of actively extending growth cones were found to turn towards the focused incident light by at least 30° (n=32 growth cones). At 1064 nm, 61% of cells were successfully guided (n=31 growth cones). This suggests that the light detection mechanism within the cell is not due a single protein with a defined activity wavelength as occurs for example with the photoreceptor family of opsin proteins in the mammalian eye. We present two novel mechanisms of light induced neuronal guidance which are not related to temperature increases, or optical tweezing of the growth cone. We are also now identifying the signaling pathways that mediate this phenomenon.

  15. Chemotherapy advances in locally advanced head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Georges, Peter; Rajagopalan, Kumar; Leon, Chady; Singh, Priya; Ahmad, Nadir; Nader, Kamyar; Kubicek, Gregory J

    2014-12-10

    The management of locally advanced unresectable head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) continues to improve. One of the major advances in the treatment of HNSCC was the addition of chemotherapy to radiation in the treatment of non-surgical patients. The majority of the data regarding chemotherapy in HNSCC involve cisplatin chemotherapy with concurrent radiation. However, several new approaches have included targeted therapy against epidermal growth factor receptor and several recent studies have explored the role of induction chemotherapy in the treatment of HNSCC. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the role of chemotherapy in the treatment of locally advanced HNSCC. PMID:25493232

  16. Numerical Simulation of Taylor Cone-Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, Ronne

    The Taylor cone-jet is a particular type of electrohydrodynamic phenomenon where electrostatic stresses and surface tension effects shape the interface of the jet in a peculiar conical shape. A thin jet is issued from the cone apex that further breaks up into a fine aerosol. Due to its monodispersive properties, this fine aerosol has found a number of applications, ranging from mass spectrometry, colloidal space propulsion, combustion, nano-fabrication, coating/painting, and many others. In this study, a general non-dimensional analysis is performed to derive the governing equations and boundary conditions. In accordance with the observations of Gamero-Castano (2010), noting that droplet electric potential is insensitive to the flow rate conditions, a particular set of characteristic parameters is proposed, based on the terminal jet diameter. In order to solve the non-dimensional set of governing equations and boundary conditions, a numerical method combining the Boundary Element Method and the Finite Volume Method is developed. Results of electric current have shown good agreement with numerical and experimental data available in the literature. The main feature of the algorithm developed is related to the decoupling of the electrostatic from the hydrodynamic problem, allowing us to accurately prescribe the far field electric potential boundary conditions away from the hydrodynamic computational domain used to solve the hydrodynamics of the transition region near the cone apex.

  17. Reconfiguration of broad leaves into cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Laura

    2013-11-01

    Flexible plants, fungi, and sessile animals are thought to reconfigure in the wind and water to reduce the drag forces that act upon them. Simple mathematical models of a flexible beam immersed in a two-dimensional flow will also exhibit this behavior. What is less understood is how the mechanical properties of a leaf in a three-dimensional flow will passively allow roll up and reduce drag. This presentation will begin by examining how leaves roll up into drag reducing shapes in strong flow. The dynamics of the flow around the leaf of the wild ginger Hexastylis arifolia are described using particle image velocimetry. The flows around the leaves are compared with those of simplified sheets using 3D numerical simulations and physical models. For some reconfiguration shapes, large forces and oscillations due to strong vortex shedding are produced. In the actual leaf, a stable recirculation zone is formed within the wake of the reconfigured cone. In physical and numerical models that reconfigure into cones, a similar recirculation zone is observed with both rigid and flexible tethers. These results suggest that the three-dimensional cone structure in addition to flexibility is significant to both the reduction of vortex-induced vibrations and the forces experienced by the leaf.

  18. Long polymers near wedges and cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N -step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d =2 ), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d =3 , of sizes ranging up to N =106 steps. We find that the critical exponent γα, which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α , is in good agreement with the theory for d =2 . We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γα, as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions.

  19. Long polymers near wedges and cones.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N-step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d=2), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d=3, of sizes ranging up to N=10(6) steps. We find that the critical exponent γ(α), which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α, is in good agreement with the theory for d=2. We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γ(α), as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions. PMID:26764719

  20. Analytic image reconstruction from partial data for a single-scan cone-beam CT with scatter correction

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Jonghwan; Pua, Rizza; Cho, Seungryong; Kim, Insoo; Han, Bumsoo

    2015-11-15

    proposed scanning method and image reconstruction algorithm can effectively estimate the scatter in cone-beam projections and produce tomographic images of nearly scatter-free quality. The authors believe that the proposed method would provide a fast and efficient CBCT scanning option to various applications particularly including head-and-neck scan.

  1. Correlation between Trunk Posture and Neck Reposition Sense among Subjects with Forward Head Neck Postures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Suk; Chung, Hyung Kuk; Park, Sun Wook

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To assess the correlation of abnormal trunk postures and reposition sense of subjects with forward head neck posture (FHP). Methods. In all, postures of 41 subjects were evaluated and the FHP and trunk posture including shoulder, scapular level, pelvic side, and anterior tilting degrees were analyzed. We used the head repositioning accuracy (HRA) test to evaluate neck position senses of neck flexion, neck extension, neck right and left side flexion, and neck right and left rotation and calculated the root mean square error in trials for each subject. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients and regression analysis were used to assess the degree of correlation between the trunk posture and HRA value, and a significance level of α = 0.05 was considered. Results. There were significant correlations between the HRA value of right side neck flexion and pelvic side tilt angle (p < 0.05). If pelvic side tilting angle increases by 1 degree, right side neck flexion increased by 0.76 degrees (p = 0.026). However, there were no significant correlations between other neck motions and trunk postures. Conclusion. Verifying pelvic postures should be prioritized when movement is limited due to the vitiation of the proprioceptive sense of neck caused by FHP. PMID:26583125

  2. CRALBP supports the mammalian retinal visual cycle and cone vision

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yunlu; Shen, Susan Q.; Jui, Jonathan; Rupp, Alan C.; Byrne, Leah C.; Hattar, Samer; Flannery, John G.; Corbo, Joseph C.; Kefalov, Vladimir J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the cellular retinaldehyde–binding protein (CRALBP, encoded by RLBP1) can lead to severe cone photoreceptor–mediated vision loss in patients. It is not known how CRALBP supports cone function or how altered CRALBP leads to cone dysfunction. Here, we determined that deletion of Rlbp1 in mice impairs the retinal visual cycle. Mice lacking CRALBP exhibited M-opsin mislocalization, M-cone loss, and impaired cone-driven visual behavior and light responses. Additionally, M-cone dark adaptation was largely suppressed in CRALBP-deficient animals. While rearing CRALBP-deficient mice in the dark prevented the deterioration of cone function, it did not rescue cone dark adaptation. Adeno-associated virus–mediated restoration of CRALBP expression specifically in Müller cells, but not retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, rescued the retinal visual cycle and M-cone sensitivity in knockout mice. Our results identify Müller cell CRALBP as a key component of the retinal visual cycle and demonstrate that this pathway is important for maintaining normal cone–driven vision and accelerating cone dark adaptation. PMID:25607845

  3. Subclinical Cervical Osteochondroma Presenting as Brown-Sequard Syndrome after Trivial Neck Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-Young; Park, Kwan-Woong; Shin, Dong-Seong

    2012-01-01

    Osteochondroma is a rare condition in the spine that may be indolent due to its slow growth. The authors present a case of 32-year-old man with subclinical osteochondroma in the cervical spine presenting as Brown-Sequard syndrome after trivial neck trauma. After resection of the tumor through hemilaminectomy, his symptoms were improved with mild residual sequelae. PMID:22737306

  4. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    abrasion and repassivation process with a subsequent cold welding at the titanium alloy modular interface. Surface layers of 10 - 30 μm titanium oxide were observed. Surface cracks caused by fretting or fretting corrosion finally lead to fatigue fracture of the titanium alloy modular neck adapters. Neck adapters made of cobalt chrome alloy show significantly reduced micromotions especially in case of contaminated cone connection. With a cobalt-chromium neck the micromotions can be reduced by a factor of 3 compared to the titanium neck. The incidence of fretting corrosion was also substantially lower with the cobalt-chromium neck configuration. Conclusions Failure of modular titanium alloy neck adapters can be initiated by surface micromotions due to surface contamination or highly loaded implant components. In the present study, the patients at risk were men with an average weight over 100 kg. Modular cobalt chrome neck adapters provide higher safety compared to titanium alloy material. PMID:20047653

  5. Radiation Dose From Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, Monica W.K. Leung, Lucullus H.T.; Wong, Wicger; Lam, Nelson

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a comprehensive study on organ absorbed doses and effective doses from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for three different treatment sites. Methods and Materials: An extensive set of dosimetric measurements were performed using a widely used CBCT system, the On-Board Imager (OBI). Measurements were performed using a female anthropomorphic phantom with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The effective doses to the body and the absorbed doses to 26 organs were reported using two different technical settings, namely, the standard mode and the low-dose mode. The measurements were repeated for three different scan sites: head and neck, chest, and pelvis. Comparisons of patient doses as well as image quality were performed among the standard mode CBCT, low-dose mode CBCT, and fan beam CT. Results: The mean skin doses from standard mode CBCT to head and neck, chest and pelvis were 6.7, 6.4, and 5.4 cGy per scan, respectively. The effective doses to the body from standard mode CBCT for imaging of head and neck, chest, and pelvis were 10.3, 23.7, and 22.7 mSv per scan, respectively. Patient doses from low-dose mode CBCT were approximately one fifth of those from standard mode CBCT. Conclusions: Patient position verification by standard mode CBCT acquired by OBI on a daily basis could increase the secondary cancer risk by up to 2% to 4%. Therefore lower mAs settings for daily CBCT should be considered, especially when bony anatomy is the main interest.

  6. SU-E-J-92: On-Line Cone Beam CT Based Planning for Emergency and Palliative Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Held, M; Morin, O; Pouliot, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate and develop the feasibility of on-line cone beam CT based planning for emergency and palliative radiotherapy treatments. Methods: Subsequent to phantom studies, a case library of 28 clinical megavoltage cone beam CT (MVCBCT) was built to assess dose-planning accuracies on MVCBCT for all anatomical sites. A simple emergency treatment plan was created on the MVCBCT and copied to its reference CT. The agreement between the dose distributions of each image pair was evaluated by the mean dose difference of the dose volume and the gamma index of the central 2D axial plane. An array of popular urgent and palliative cases was also evaluated for imaging component clearance and field-of-view. Results: The treatment cases were categorized into four groups (head and neck, thorax/spine, pelvis and extremities). Dose distributions for head and neck treatments were predicted accurately in all cases with a gamma index of >95% for 2% and 2 mm criteria. Thoracic spine treatments had a gamma index as low as 60% indicating a need for better uniformity correction and tissue density calibration. Small anatomy changes between CT and MVCBCT could contribute to local errors. Pelvis and sacral spine treatment cases had a gamma index between 90% and 98% for 3%/3 mm criteria. The limited FOV became an issue for large pelvis patients. Imaging clearance was difficult for cases where the tumor was positioned far off midline. Conclusion: The MVCBCT based dose planning and delivery approach is feasible in many treatment cases. Dose distributions for head and neck patients are unrestrictedly predictable. Some FOV restrictions apply to other treatment sites. Lung tissue is most challenging for accurate dose calculations given the current imaging filters and corrections. Additional clinical cases for extremities need to be included in the study to assess the full range of site-specific planning accuracies. This work is supported by Siemens.

  7. Rod- and cone-driven responses in mice expressing human L-cone pigment.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tina I; Atorf, Jenny; Neitz, Maureen; Neitz, Jay; Kremers, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The mouse is commonly used for studying retinal processing, primarily because it is amenable to genetic manipulation. To accurately study photoreceptor driven signals in the healthy and diseased retina, it is of great importance to isolate the responses of single photoreceptor types. This is not easily achieved in mice because of the strong overlap of rod and M-cone absorption spectra (i.e., maxima at 498 and 508 nm, respectively). With a newly developed mouse model (Opn1lw(LIAIS)) expressing a variant of the human L-cone pigment (561 nm) instead of the mouse M-opsin, the absorption spectra are substantially separated, allowing retinal physiology to be studied using silent substitution stimuli. Unlike conventional chromatic isolation methods, this spectral compensation approach can isolate single photoreceptor subtypes without changing the retinal adaptation. We measured flicker electroretinograms in these mutants under ketamine-xylazine sedation with double silent substitution (silent S-cone and either rod or M/L-cones) and obtained robust responses for both rods and (L-)cones. Small signals were yielded in wild-type mice, whereas heterozygotes exhibited responses that were generally intermediate to both. Fundamental response amplitudes and phase behaviors (as a function of temporal frequency) in all genotypes were largely similar. Surprisingly, isolated (L-)cone and rod response properties in the mutant strain were alike. Thus the LIAIS mouse warrants a more comprehensive in vivo assessment of photoreceptor subtype-specific physiology, because it overcomes the hindrance of overlapping spectral sensitivities present in the normal mouse. PMID:26245314

  8. Treatment of neglected femoral neck fracture

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anil K; Mukunth, R; Srivastava, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Intra-capsular femoral neck fractures are seen commonly in elderly people following a low energy trauma. Femoral neck fracture has a devastating effect on the blood supply of the femoral head, which is directly proportional to the severity of trauma and displacement of the fracture. Various authors have described a wide array of options for treatment of neglected/nonunion (NU) femoral neck fracture. There is lack of consensus in general, regarding the best option. This Instructional course article is an analysis of available treatment options used for neglected femoral neck fracture in the literature and attempt to suggest treatment guides for neglected femoral neck fracture. We conducted the “Pubmed” search with the keywords “NU femoral neck fracture and/or neglected femoral neck fracture, muscle-pedicle bone graft in femoral neck fracture, fibular graft in femoral neck fracture and valgus osteotomy in femoral neck fracture.” A total of 203 print articles were obtained as the search result. Thirty three articles were included in the analysis and were categorized into four subgroups based on treatment options. (a) treated by muscle-pedicle bone grafting (MPBG), (b) closed/open reduction internal fixation and fibular grafting (c) open reduction and internal fixation with valgus osteotomy, (d) miscellaneous procedures. The data was pooled from all groups for mean neglect, the type of study (prospective or retrospective), classification used, procedure performed, mean followup available, outcome, complications, and reoperation if any. The outcome of neglected femoral neck fracture depends on the duration of neglect, as the changes occurring in the fracture area and fracture fragments decides the need and type of biological stimulus required for fracture union. In stage I and stage II (Sandhu's staging) neglected femoral neck fracture osteosynthesis with open reduction and bone grafting with MPBG or Valgus Osteotomy achieves fracture union in almost 90% cases

  9. Correlation among scapular asymmetry, neck pain, and neck disability index (NDI) in young women with slight neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Su-Rim; Kang, Mi-Hee; Bahng, Sun-Young; An, Jin-Kyoung; Lee, Ji-Young; Park, Sang-Young; Kim, Seong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to investigate the correlations among scapular asymmetry, neck pain, and neck disability index in women in their 20s with slight neck pain. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 60 female students at U university in Gyeongsangbuk-do, South Korea, participated in this study. The lateral scapular slide test, which measures the distance between the thorax and scapula, was used to analyze the scapular asymmetry. The lateral scapular slide test was performed in three positions. The visual analogue scale and neck disability index were used to measure neck pain. [Results] In the lateral scapular slide test in position 3 (shoulder abduction at 90 degrees), the scapular left-right asymmetry and VAS showed a moderate positive linear relationship, with r=0.344. The VAS and NDI showed a moderate positive linear relationship, with r = 0.632. [Conclusion] Scapular asymmetry indicates imbalance of surrounding muscles of the scapula and is related to neck pain based on the results of measuring the distance from the thorax to the scapula. PMID:27313361

  10. Photovoltage of Rods and Cones in the Macaque Retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneeweis, David M.; Schnapf, Julie L.

    1995-05-01

    The kinetics, gain, and reliability of light responses of rod and cone photoreceptors are important determinants of overall visual sensitivity. In voltage recordings from photoreceptors in an intact primate retina, rods were found to be functionally isolated from each other, unlike the tightly coupled rods of cold-blooded vertebrates. Cones were observed to receive excitatory input from rods, which indicates that the cone pathway also processes rod signals. This input might be expected to degrade the spatial resolution of mesopic vision.

  11. Neck muscle function in violinists/violists with and without neck pain.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Anke; Claus, Andrew; Hodges, Paul W; Jull, Gwendolen A

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain is associated with changes in neuromuscular control of cervical muscles. Violin and viola playing requires good function of the flexor muscles to stabilize the instrument. This study investigated the flexor muscle behaviour in violin/viola players with and without neck pain using the craniocervical flexion test (CCFT). In total, 12 violin/viola players with neck pain, 21 violin/viola players without neck pain in the preceding 12 weeks and 21 pain-free non-musicians were included. Activity of the sternocleidomastoid muscles (SCM) was measured with surface electromyography (EMG) during the CCFT. Violin/viola players with neck pain displayed greater normalised SCM EMG amplitudes during CCFT than the pain-free musicians and non-musicians (P < 0.05). Playing-related neck pain in violinists/violists is associated with altered behaviour of the superficial neck flexor muscles consistent with neck pain, despite the specific use of the deep and superficial neck flexors during violin playing. PMID:26175099

  12. Head and neck mucosal melanoma: a review.

    PubMed

    Lourenço, Silvia V; Fernandes, Juliana D; Hsieh, Ricardo; Coutinho-Camillo, Claudia M; Bologna, Sheyla; Sangueza, Martin; Nico, Marcello M S

    2014-07-01

    Head and neck mucosal melanoma (MM) is an aggressive and rare neoplasm of melanocytic origin. To date, few retrospective series and case reports have been reported on MM. This article reviews the current evidence on head and neck MM and the molecular pathways that mediate the pathogenesis of this disease. Head and neck MM accounts for 0.7%-3.8% of all melanomas and involve (in decreasing order of frequency) the sinonasal cavity, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, and upper esophagus. Although many studies have examined MM of the head and neck and the underlying molecular pathways, individual genetic and molecular alterations were less investigated. Further studies are needed to complement existing data and to increase our understanding of melanocytes tumorigenesis. PMID:24423929

  13. Prevention of complications in neck dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kerawala, Cyrus J; Heliotos, Manolis

    2009-01-01

    Background The neck dissection has remained a pivotal aspect of head and neck cancer management for over a century. During this time its role has expanded from a purely therapeutic option into an elective setting, in part promoted by efforts to reduce its morbidity. Objectives This review will consider the potential complications of neck dissection and on the basis of the available evidence describe both their management and prevention. Conclusion Although the neck dissection continues to provide clinicians with a method of addressing cervical disease, its reliability and safety can only be assured if surgeons remain cognisant of the potential complications and aim to minimise such morbidity by appropriate management in the peri-operative period. PMID:19822010

  14. Drugs Approved for Head and Neck Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for head and neck cancer. The list includes generic names and brand names. The drug names link to NCI’s Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  15. Neck pain or spasms - self care

    MedlinePlus

    ... exercise: This may involve walking, riding a stationary bicycle, or swimming. These activities can help improve blood ... Alexander EP. History, physical examination, and differential diagnosis of neck pain. Phys Med Rehabil Clin N Am . Aug 2011;22(3): ...

  16. Aging small Canada geese by neck plumage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Higgins, K.F.; Schoonover, L.J.

    1969-01-01

    The neck plumage method, a new technique for separating immature from adult Canada geese (Branta canadensis) in the hand, was evaluated by comparison with the notched tail feather and cloacal examination methods. Two (1.4 percent) of 141 geese examined were misaged, resulting in a 6 percent error in the immature-adult ratio obtained by the neck plumage method. The neck plumage method is a rapid aging method and reasonable accuracy (94 percent) can be obtained. It can also be used to differentiate immatures from adults on the ground at distances up to 175 yards, but was almost impossible to use when geese were in flight. As yet, the neck plumage method has only been tested on the subspecies (B. c. hutchinsii-parvipes complex) in the Tall-Grass Prairie population of small Canada geese.

  17. Identifying Dirac cones in carbon allotropes with square symmetry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinying; Huang, Huaqing; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-11-14

    A theoretical study is conducted to search for Dirac cones in two-dimensional carbon allotropes with square symmetry. By enumerating the carbon atoms in a unit cell up to 12, an allotrope with octatomic rings is recognized to possess Dirac cones under a simple tight-binding approach. The obtained Dirac cones are accompanied by flat bands at the Fermi level, and the resulting massless Dirac-Weyl fermions are chiral particles with a pseudospin of S = 1, rather than the conventional S = 1∕2 of graphene. The spin-1 Dirac cones are also predicted to exist in hexagonal graphene antidot lattices. PMID:24320285

  18. Identifying Dirac cones in carbon allotropes with square symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jinying; Huang, Huaqing; Duan, Wenhui; Liu, Zhirong

    2013-11-14

    A theoretical study is conducted to search for Dirac cones in two-dimensional carbon allotropes with square symmetry. By enumerating the carbon atoms in a unit cell up to 12, an allotrope with octatomic rings is recognized to possess Dirac cones under a simple tight-binding approach. The obtained Dirac cones are accompanied by flat bands at the Fermi level, and the resulting massless Dirac-Weyl fermions are chiral particles with a pseudospin of S = 1, rather than the conventional S = 1/2 of graphene. The spin-1 Dirac cones are also predicted to exist in hexagonal graphene antidot lattices.

  19. Bat Eyes Have Ultraviolet-Sensitive Cone Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Brigitte; Glösmann, Martin; Peichl, Leo; Knop, Gabriel C.; Hagemann, Cornelia; Ammermüller, Josef

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian retinae have rod photoreceptors for night vision and cone photoreceptors for daylight and colour vision. For colour discrimination, most mammals possess two cone populations with two visual pigments (opsins) that have absorption maxima at short wavelengths (blue or ultraviolet light) and long wavelengths (green or red light). Microchiropteran bats, which use echolocation to navigate and forage in complete darkness, have long been considered to have pure rod retinae. Here we use opsin immunohistochemistry to show that two phyllostomid microbats, Glossophaga soricina and Carollia perspicillata, possess a significant population of cones and express two cone opsins, a shortwave-sensitive (S) opsin and a longwave-sensitive (L) opsin. A substantial population of cones expresses S opsin exclusively, whereas the other cones mostly coexpress L and S opsin. S opsin gene analysis suggests ultraviolet (UV, wavelengths <400 nm) sensitivity, and corneal electroretinogram recordings reveal an elevated sensitivity to UV light which is mediated by an S cone visual pigment. Therefore bats have retained the ancestral UV tuning of the S cone pigment. We conclude that bats have the prerequisite for daylight vision, dichromatic colour vision, and UV vision. For bats, the UV-sensitive cones may be advantageous for visual orientation at twilight, predator avoidance, and detection of UV-reflecting flowers for those that feed on nectar. PMID:19636375

  20. Hydroburst test of a carbon-carbon involute exit cone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    1986-01-01

    A hydroburst test of the aft portion of the PAM-D exit cone and the test procedure are described in detail. The hydrostatic pressure required to buckle the cone was 9.75 psi. Meanwhile, the PAM-D exit cone was modeled using the finite element method and a theoretical bucking pressure (8.76 psi) was predicted using the SPAR finite element code. The modeling technique employed is discussed. By comparing the theoretical to predicted critical pressures, this report verifies the modeling technique and calculates a material knockdown factor for the carbon-carbon exit cone.

  1. Dynamics on the cone: Closed orbits and superintegrability

    SciTech Connect

    Brihaye, Y.; Kosiński, P.

    2014-05-15

    The generalization of Bertrand’s theorem to the case of the motion of point particle on the surface of a cone is presented. The superintegrability of such models is discussed. The additional integrals of motion are analysed for the case of Kepler and harmonic oscillator potentials. -- Highlights: •Bertrand’s theorem is generalized to the case of the motion on a cone. •The superintegrability of the dynamics on a cone is discussed. •The W-algebra of integrals of motion for Kepler and harmonic oscillator problems on a cone is derived.

  2. Improved Jänecke mass formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Z.; Bao, M.; Zhao, Y. M.; Arima, A.

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we improve an empirical mass formula constructed by Jänecke and collaborators. This formula is enlightened by the Garvey-Kelson mass relations. The new version of the Jänecke formula reproduces 2275 atomic masses with neutron number N ≥10 and proton number Z ≥6 , at an average accuracy of 128 keV, by employing 576 parameters. The predictive power of our formula is exemplified by comparison with predicted results of other mass models.

  3. Cone-beam CT: applications in orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Steven L

    2008-10-01

    Radiographic images have always been an important part of orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. We have been limited by the two-dimensional nature of these radiographs as we pursue tooth movement in a three-dimensional fashion. This article shows the current and future uses and advantages of cone-beam CT in the practice of orthodontics. The use of this technology in the near future will change the way records are taken and treatment is rendered. With this added diagnostic knowledge, orthodontic treatment will assuredly become not only more high tech but also higher quality. PMID:18805230

  4. Bistatic scattering from a cone frustum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ebihara, W.; Marhefka, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    The bistatic scattering from a perfectly conducting cone frustum is investigated using the Geometrical Theory of Diffraction (GTD). The first-order GTD edge-diffraction solution has been extended by correcting for its failure in the specular region off the curved surface and in the rim-caustic regions of the endcaps. The corrections are accomplished by the use of transition functions which are developed and introduced into the diffraction coefficients. Theoretical results are verified in the principal plane by comparison with the moment method solution and experimental measurements. The resulting solution for the scattered fields is accurate, easy to apply, and fast to compute.

  5. Cone penetrometer: Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    Cone penetrometer technology (CPT) provides cost-effective, real-time data for use in the characterization of the subsurface. Recent innovations in this baseline technology allow for improved access to the subsurface for environmental restoration applications. The technology has been improved by both industry and government agencies and is constantly advancing due to research efforts. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science and Technology (formerly Technology Development) has contributed significantly to these efforts. This report focuses on the advancements made in conjunction with DOE`s support but recognizes Department of Defense (DOD) and industry efforts.

  6. Endodontic applications of cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    McClammy, Thomas V

    2014-07-01

    Cone-beam CT (CBCT) has made a dramatic contribution and has been quickly adopted in endodontics. It is a game changer in research and clinical applications. Although CBCT and its application in implantology is well known, the surgical placement of implants is now a factor in endodontics. This article illustrates unique applications of CBCT in implantology in a specialty endodontic facility. Endodontics creates the foundation for restorative dentistry for a healthy tooth, a well-treated endodontically treated tooth, or a well-placed dental implant. CBCT helps make this possible and predictable. PMID:24993923

  7. Cone Beam Computed Tomography - Know its Secrets

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Mohan; Shanavas, Muhammad; Sidappa, Ashwin; Kiran, Madhu

    2015-01-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is an advanced imaging modality that has high clinical applications in the field of dentistry. CBCT proved to be a successful investigative modality that has been used for dental and maxillofacial imaging. Radiation exposure dose from CBCT is 10 times less than from conventional CT scans during maxillofacial exposure. Furthermore, CBCT is highly accurate and can provide a three-dimensional volumetric data in axial, sagittal and coronal planes. This article describes the basic technique, difference in CBCT from CT and main clinical applications of CBCT. PMID:25859112

  8. Chronic neck pain and masticatory dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Catanzariti, Jean-François; Debuse, Thierry; Duquesnoy, Bernard

    2005-12-01

    Chronic nonspecific neck pain is a common problem in rheumatology and may resist conventional treatment. Pathophysiological links exist between the cervical spine and masticatory system. Occlusal disorders may cause neck pain and may respond to dental treatment. The estimated prevalence of occlusal disorders is about 45%, with half the cases being due to functional factors. Minor repeated masticatory dysfunction (MD) with craniocervical asymmetry is the most common clinical picture. The pain is usually located in the suboccipital region and refractory to conventional treatment. The time pattern may be suggestive, with nocturnal arousals or triggering by temporomandibular movements. MD should be strongly suspected in patients with at least two of the following: history of treated or untreated MD, unilateral temporomandibular joint pain and clicking, lateral deviation during mouth opening, and limitation of mouth opening (less than three fingerbreadths). Rheumatologists should consider MD among causes of neck pain, most notably in patients with abnormal craniocervical posture, signs linking the neck pain to mastication, and clinical manifestations of MD. Evidence suggesting that MD may cause neck pain has been published. However, studies are needed to determine whether treatment of MD can relieve neck pain. PMID:16226475

  9. Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention.

    PubMed

    Biétry, Damien; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis; Müller, Thomas; Zbären, Peter; Caversaccio, Marco; Arnold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention often present as serious emergency situations with the need for an immediate diagnosis and treatment. We report our study of the clinical evolution of this emergency condition. This study investigates the cases of sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention treated at our institution between 2000 and 2010. Patient records were collected in a retrospectively reviewed and analyzed database. The current literature was compared to our findings. We found 36 cases (10 female and 26 male). The neck injuries were superficial and profound in 16 and 20 patients, respectively. Twenty-two patients were seen by the Head and Neck surgeon. A surgical neck exploration was necessary in 19 cases. Tracheal, laryngeal, pharyngeal and vascular injuries were found in one, five, three and three cases, respectively. The hospital stay ranged from 1 to 47 days. All the patients underwent emergency psychiatric assessment and were subsequently referred for psychiatric treatment. One patient died in the emergency room from an additional arterial injury to the wrist. Sharp neck injuries in suicidal intention treated with an interdisciplinary medical, surgical and psychiatric emergency assessment and treatment have low mortality and morbidity. PMID:25543307

  10. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-05-24

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability ismore » exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3×107 s-1.« less

  11. Stability of drift-cyclotron loss-cone waves in H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, W. A.; Morales, G. J.

    2016-06-01

    The drift-cyclotron loss-cone mode was first studied in mirror machines. In such devices, particles with small pitch angles are not confined, creating a hole in the velocity distribution function that is a source of free energy and leads to micro-instabilities in the cyclotron-range of frequencies. In the edge region of tokamak devices operating under H-mode conditions, ion loss also occurs. In this case, gradient drift carries ions moving opposite to the plasma current preferentially into the divertor, creating a one-sided loss cone. A simple analysis shows that for the quiescent H-mode plasmas in DIII-D the critical gradient for instability is exceeded within 2 cm of the separatrix, and the maximum growth rate at the separatrix is 3  ×  107 s‑1.

  12. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Hao E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu; Shi, Feng; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun E-mail: xun.jia@utsouthwestern.edu; Wang, Xiaoyu; Cervino, Laura; Bai, Ti; Folkerts, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Compressed sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques are able to reconstruct cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from undersampled noisy data, allowing for imaging dose reduction. However, there are a few practical concerns preventing the clinical implementation of these techniques. On the image quality side, data truncation along the superior–inferior direction under the cone-beam geometry produces severe cone artifacts in the reconstructed images. Ring artifacts are also seen in the half-fan scan mode. On the reconstruction efficiency side, the long computation time hinders clinical use in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: Image quality improvement methods are proposed to mitigate the cone and ring image artifacts in IR. The basic idea is to use weighting factors in the IR data fidelity term to improve projection data consistency with the reconstructed volume. In order to improve the computational efficiency, a multiple graphics processing units (GPUs)-based CS-IR system was developed. The parallelization scheme, detailed analyses of computation time at each step, their relationship with image resolution, and the acceleration factors were studied. The whole system was evaluated in various phantom and patient cases. Results: Ring artifacts can be mitigated by properly designing a weighting factor as a function of the spatial location on the detector. As for the cone artifact, without applying a correction method, it contaminated 13 out of 80 slices in a head-neck case (full-fan). Contamination was even more severe in a pelvis case under half-fan mode, where 36 out of 80 slices were affected, leading to poorer soft tissue delineation and reduced superior–inferior coverage. The proposed method effectively corrects those contaminated slices with mean intensity differences compared to FDK results decreasing from ∼497 and ∼293 HU to ∼39 and ∼27 HU for the full-fan and half-fan cases, respectively. In terms of efficiency boost

  13. Towards the clinical implementation of iterative low-dose cone-beam CT reconstruction in image-guided radiation therapy: Cone/ring artifact correction and multiple GPU implementation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hao; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Feng; Bai, Ti; Folkerts, Michael; Cervino, Laura; Jiang, Steve B.; Jia, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Compressed sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction (IR) techniques are able to reconstruct cone-beam CT (CBCT) images from undersampled noisy data, allowing for imaging dose reduction. However, there are a few practical concerns preventing the clinical implementation of these techniques. On the image quality side, data truncation along the superior–inferior direction under the cone-beam geometry produces severe cone artifacts in the reconstructed images. Ring artifacts are also seen in the half-fan scan mode. On the reconstruction efficiency side, the long computation time hinders clinical use in image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). Methods: Image quality improvement methods are proposed to mitigate the cone and ring image artifacts in IR. The basic idea is to use weighting factors in the IR data fidelity term to improve projection data consistency with the reconstructed volume. In order to improve the computational efficiency, a multiple graphics processing units (GPUs)-based CS-IR system was developed. The parallelization scheme, detailed analyses of computation time at each step, their relationship with image resolution, and the acceleration factors were studied. The whole system was evaluated in various phantom and patient cases. Results: Ring artifacts can be mitigated by properly designing a weighting factor as a function of the spatial location on the detector. As for the cone artifact, without applying a correction method, it contaminated 13 out of 80 slices in a head-neck case (full-fan). Contamination was even more severe in a pelvis case under half-fan mode, where 36 out of 80 slices were affected, leading to poorer soft tissue delineation and reduced superior–inferior coverage. The proposed method effectively corrects those contaminated slices with mean intensity differences compared to FDK results decreasing from ∼497 and ∼293 HU to ∼39 and ∼27 HU for the full-fan and half-fan cases, respectively. In terms of efficiency boost

  14. [Necrotizing fasciitis of the neck].

    PubMed

    Kovacić, Marijan; Kovacić, Ivan; Delalija, Boris

    2013-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and rapidly progressive infection characterized by necrosis of the superficial fascia and spread on the surrounding skin or muscles, which can be fatal. It usually occurs in the limbs, abdominal wall and perineum. In this retrospective review, the authors present 15 patients with cervical necrotizing fasciitis. The patient mean age was 54.7 years and they had one or more comorbid health problems. Five of them had descending necrotizing mediastinitis and three had progressive sepsis with toxic shock syndrome. Broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotic therapy was administered to all patients immediately, and in three of them we used five-day intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for the signs of toxic shock syndrome. After positive computed tomography imaging for necrotizing fasciitis, we used surgical exploration and debridement of necrotic tissue. In five patients, the initial surgery also included mediastinal transcervical drainage. Preoperative tracheotomy was performed in six patients and delayed tracheotomy in one patient. Histopathologically, all cases showed extensive necrosis of debrided fascia and vascular thrombosis of the neck soft tissue. The mortality rate was 6.7% (1/15). The authors point to the importance of early diagnosis and timely surgical management, broad-spectrum antibiotics and intravenous immunoglobulin therapy when patients are too unstable to undergo surgery. PMID:24279256

  15. Cell kinetics of head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Kotelnikov, V M; Coon JS, I V; Haleem, A; Taylor S, I V; Hutchinson, J; Panje, W; Caldarelli, D D; Griem, K; Preisler, H D

    1995-05-01

    We measured the tumor cell proliferative rate in 26 patients with head and neck cancer, 22 of which were squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). Patients received sequential infusions of iododeoxyuridine and bromodeoxyuridine, after which the tumor was biopsied and studied. The percentage of labeled cells [labeling index (LI)] in well-differentiated SCCs was 20.4 +/- 2.7% (mean +/- SE) and 23.8 +/- 2.1% in moderately differentiated SCCs (P = 0.135). The LIs of two poorly differentiated SCCs were 39.4 and 55.9%. The LI was 2.5% in a high-grade lymphoepithelioma and 24.8% in a malignant lymphoma. In one well-differentiated and one poorly differentiated mucoepidermoid tumor, the LIs were 3.0% and 29.1%, respectively. S-phase duration time measurements ranged from 5.1-21.5 h (12.8 +/- 1.5). The calculated potential doubling times ranged from 18.8-84.5 h (47.3 +/- 6.7). The duration of G2 was between 90 and 180 min. To track the fate of labeled cells, in four patients a repeat biopsy was obtained 7-14 days after the iododeoxyuridine/bromodeoxyuridine infusion. These patients did not receive treatment between the biopsies. Due to the dilution of the label, most labeled cells in the second biopsy demonstrated a "fragmented" pattern resulting from repeated cell divisions. In two patients, however, 25% of cells in the second biopsy had undiluted label, suggesting that these cells had not divided after incorporating iododeoxyuridine/bromodeoxyuridine. On Day 7 labeled cells migrated to keratinized parts of tumors and to necrotic foci. Thus, the arrest of cell cycle transition, tumor cell differentiation, and cell death may be major routes of tumor cell loss from the proliferative compartment. This may explain the difference between very short potential doubling times and the actual rate of tumor growth. PMID:9816012

  16. Repositioning accuracy of two different mask systems-3D revisited: Comparison using true 3D/3D matching with cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Boda-Heggemann, Judit . E-mail: judit.boda-heggemann@radonk.ma.uni-heidelberg.de; Walter, Cornelia; Rahn, Angelika; Wertz, Hansjoerg; Loeb, Iris; Lohr, Frank; Wenz, Frederik

    2006-12-01

    Purpose: The repositioning accuracy of mask-based fixation systems has been assessed with two-dimensional/two-dimensional or two-dimensional/three-dimensional (3D) matching. We analyzed the accuracy of commercially available head mask systems, using true 3D/3D matching, with X-ray volume imaging and cone-beam CT. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients receiving radiotherapy (intracranial/head-and-neck tumors) were evaluated (14 patients with rigid and 7 with thermoplastic masks). X-ray volume imaging was analyzed online and offline separately for the skull and neck regions. Translation/rotation errors of the target isocenter were analyzed. Four patients were treated to neck sites. For these patients, repositioning was aided by additional body tattoos. A separate analysis of the setup error on the basis of the registration of the cervical vertebra was performed. The residual error after correction and intrafractional motility were calculated. Results: The mean length of the displacement vector for rigid masks was 0.312 {+-} 0.152 cm (intracranial) and 0.586 {+-} 0.294 cm (neck). For the thermoplastic masks, the value was 0.472 {+-} 0.174 cm (intracranial) and 0.726 {+-} 0.445 cm (neck). Rigid masks with body tattoos had a displacement vector length in the neck region of 0.35 {+-} 0.197 cm. The intracranial residual error and intrafractional motility after X-ray volume imaging correction for rigid masks was 0.188 {+-} 0.074 cm, and was 0.134 {+-} 0.14 cm for thermoplastic masks. Conclusions: The results of our study have demonstrated that rigid masks have a high intracranial repositioning accuracy per se. Given the small residual error and intrafractional movement, thermoplastic masks may also be used for high-precision treatments when combined with cone-beam CT. The neck region repositioning accuracy was worse than the intracranial accuracy in both cases. However, body tattoos and image guidance improved the accuracy. Finally, the combination of both mask

  17. Microcomputed tomography and shock microdeformation studies on shatter cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaag, Patrice Tristan; Reimold, Wolf Uwe; Hipsley, Christy Anna

    2016-08-01

    One of the aspects of impact cratering that are still not fully understood is the formation of shatter cones and related fracturing phenomena. Yet, shatter cones have been applied as an impact-diagnostic criterion for decades without the role of shock waves and target rock defects in their formation having been elucidated ever. We have tested the application of the nondestructive microcomputed tomography (μCT) method to visualize the interior of shatter cones in order to possibly resolve links between fracture patterns and shatter cone surface features (striations and intervening "valleys"). Shatter-coned samples from different impact sites and in different lithologies were investigated for their μCT suitability, with a shatter cone in sandstone from the Serra da Cangalha impact structure (Brazil) remaining as the most promising candidate because of the fracture resolution achieved. To validate the obtained CT data, the scanned specimen was cut into three orthogonal sets of thin sections. Scans with 13 μm resolution were obtained. μCT scans and microscopic analysis unraveled an orientation of subplanar fractures and related fluid inclusion trails, and planar fracture (PF) orientations in the interior of shatter cones. Planar deformation features (PDF) were observed predominantly near the shatter cone surface. Previously undescribed varieties of feather features (FF), in the form of lamellae emanating from curviplanar and curved fractures, as well as an "arrowhead"-like FF development with microlamellae originating from both sides of a PF, were observed. The timing of shatter cone formation was investigated by establishing temporal relations to the generation of various shock microscopic effects. Shatter cones are, thus, generated post- or syn-formation of PF, FF, subplanar fractures, and PDF. The earliest possible time for shatter cone formation is during the late stage of the compressional phase, that is, shock wave passage, of an impact event.

  18. Comparison of electromyographic activity and range of neck motion in violin students with and without neck pain during playing.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyue-nam; Kwon, Oh-yun; Ha, Sung-min; Kim, Su-jung; Choi, Hyun-jung; Weon, Jong-hyuck

    2012-12-01

    Neck pain is common in violin students during a musical performance. The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity in superficial neck muscles with neck motion when playing the violin as well as neck range of motion (ROM) at rest, between violin students with and without neck pain. Nine violin students with neck pain and nine age- and gender-matched subjects without neck pain were recruited. Muscle activity of the bilateral upper trapezius, sternocleidomastoid, and superficial cervical extensor muscles was measured using surface EMG. Kinematic data on neck motion while playing and active neck ROM were also measured using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. Independent t-tests were used to compare EMG activity with kinematic data between groups. These analyses revealed that while playing, both the angle of left lateral bending and leftward rotation of the cervical spine were significantly greater in the neck pain group than among those without neck pain. Similarly, EMG activity of the left upper trapezius, both cervical extensors, and both sternocleidomastoid muscles were significantly greater in the neck pain group. The active ROM of left axial rotation was significantly lower in the neck pain group. These results suggest that an asymmetric playing posture and the associated increased muscle activity as well as decreased neck axial rotation may contribute to neck pain in violin students. PMID:23247874

  19. Alteration of Lipid Profile in Patients with Head and Neck Malignancy.

    PubMed

    Poorey, Vijay Kumar; Thakur, Pooja

    2016-06-01

    Lipids are the major cell membrane components, essential for various biological functions including cell growth and division for the maintenance of cell integrity of normal and malignant tissues. The changes in lipid profile have been associated since long with cancer and hypocholesterolemia has been observed in patients with cancers of various organs. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the alterations and clinical significance of plasma lipid profiles in untreated head and neck malignancies. The present case-control study comprises of newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed, 100 head and neck malignancy cases diagnosed between 1st July 2013 and 30th June 2014 in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Gandhi Medical College, Bhopal. Fasting blood samples were collected and the lipid profile studied. In present study, the authors found that there is a preponderance of head and neck malignancy in the age group of 41-60 years, males having the higher incidence. Malignancy involving oral cavity were the commonest and majority were well differentiated. Statistically, there was a highly significant reduction of mean serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides and high density lipoproteins (HDL) in the subjects of head and neck malignancy as compared to the control group. TC and HDL were also found significantly lower among those with habit of tobacco consumption. PMID:27340626

  20. Increased efficiency of short-pulse laser-generated proton beams from novel flat-top cone targetsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flippo, K. A.; d'Humières, E.; Gaillard, S. A.; Rassuchine, J.; Gautier, D. C.; Schollmeier, M.; Nürnberg, F.; Kline, J. L.; Adams, J.; Albright, B.; Bakeman, M.; Harres, K.; Johnson, R. P.; Korgan, G.; Letzring, S.; Malekos, S.; Renard-LeGalloudec, N.; Sentoku, Y.; Shimada, T.; Roth, M.; Cowan, T. E.; Fernández, J. C.; Hegelich, B. M.

    2008-05-01

    Ion-driven fast ignition (IFI) may have significant advantages over electron-driven FI due to the potentially large reduction in the amount of energy required for the ignition beam and the laser driver. Recent experiments at the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Trident facility employing novel Au flat-top cone targets have produced a fourfold increase in laser-energy to ion-energy efficiency, a 13-fold increase in the number of ions above 10MeV, and a few times increase in the maximum ion energy compared to Au flat-foil targets. Compared to recently published scaling laws, these gains are even greater. If the efficiency scales with intensity in accordance to flat-foil scaling, then, with little modification, these targets can be used to generate the pulse of ions needed to ignite thermonuclear fusion in the fast ignitor scheme. A proton energy of at least 30MeV was measured from the flat-top cone targets, and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations show that the maximum cutoff energy may be as high as 40-45MeV at modest intensity of 1×1019W/cm2 with 20J in 600fs. Simulations indicate that the observed energy and efficiency increase can be attributed to the cone target's ability to guide laser light into the neck to produce hot electrons and transport these electrons to the flat-top of the cone where they can be heated to much higher temperatures, creating a hotter, denser sheath. The PIC simulations also elucidate the critical parameters for obtaining superior proton acceleration such as the dependence on laser contrast/plasma prefill, as well as longitudinal and transverse laser pointing, and cone geometry. These novel cones have the potential to revolutionize inertial confinement fusion target design and fabrication via their ability to be mass produced. In addition, they could have an impact on the general physics community studying basic electron and radiation transport phenomena or as better sources of particle beams to study equations of state and warm dense

  1. Scatter corrections for cone beam optical CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olding, Tim; Holmes, Oliver; Schreiner, L. John

    2009-05-01

    Cone beam optical computed tomography (OptCT) employing the VISTA scanner (Modus Medical, London, ON) has been shown to have significant promise for fast, three dimensional imaging of polymer gel dosimeters. One distinct challenge with this approach arises from the combination of the cone beam geometry, a diffuse light source, and the scattering polymer gel media, which all contribute scatter signal that perturbs the accuracy of the scanner. Beam stop array (BSA), beam pass array (BPA) and anti-scatter polarizer correction methodologies have been employed to remove scatter signal from OptCT data. These approaches are investigated through the use of well-characterized phantom scattering solutions and irradiated polymer gel dosimeters. BSA corrected scatter solutions show good agreement in attenuation coefficient with the optically absorbing dye solutions, with considerable reduction of scatter-induced cupping artifact at high scattering concentrations. The application of BSA scatter corrections to a polymer gel dosimeter lead to an overall improvement in the number of pixel satisfying the (3%, 3mm) gamma value criteria from 7.8% to 0.15%.

  2. Conical singularities inside cone-jet electrosprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Alvaro G.; Loscertales, Ignacio G.; Barrero, Antonio

    2007-11-01

    In coaxial jet electrosprays inside liquid baths, a conductive liquid forms a cone-jet electrospray in a bath containing a dielectric liquid. An additional dielectric liquid is injected inside the Taylor cone forming a liquid meniscus. In certain circumstances, however, we have observed that the dielectric menisci present extremely sharp tips, without mass emission, that can be stabilized and made completely steady. In this presentation we will first explore the parametrical range of liquid properties, mainly viscosities and surface tensions, under which these sharp tips take place. Secondly, we have developed a simple analytical model for the very complex electro-hydrodynamical flow, which predicts the angle of the tip as a function of the liquid properties. Therefore, we are able to compare it with the results of the experiments. When the liquid meniscus is slowly fed, the cusped interface turns into a spout which flows coated by the conducting liquid forming the electrified coaxial jet which has been successfully employed for the production of double emulsions (Marin et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 014502, 2007).

  3. Light-cone quantization and hadron structure

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1996-04-01

    Quantum chromodynamics provides a fundamental description of hadronic and nuclear structure and dynamics in terms of elementary quark and gluon degrees of freedom. In practice, the direct application of QCD to reactions involving the structure of hadrons is extremely complex because of the interplay of nonperturbative effects such as color confinement and multi-quark coherence. In this talk, the author will discuss light-cone quantization and the light-cone Fock expansion as a tractable and consistent representation of relativistic many-body systems and bound states in quantum field theory. The Fock state representation in QCD includes all quantum fluctuations of the hadron wavefunction, including fax off-shell configurations such as intrinsic strangeness and charm and, in the case of nuclei, hidden color. The Fock state components of the hadron with small transverse size, which dominate hard exclusive reactions, have small color dipole moments and thus diminished hadronic interactions. Thus QCD predicts minimal absorptive corrections, i.e., color transparency for quasi-elastic exclusive reactions in nuclear targets at large momentum transfer. In other applications, such as the calculation of the axial, magnetic, and quadrupole moments of light nuclei, the QCD relativistic Fock state description provides new insights which go well beyond the usual assumptions of traditional hadronic and nuclear physics.

  4. Energy Scaling Law for the Regular Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olbermann, Heiner

    2016-04-01

    We consider a thin elastic sheet in the shape of a disk whose reference metric is that of a singular cone. That is, the reference metric is flat away from the center and has a defect there. We define a geometrically fully nonlinear free elastic energy and investigate the scaling behavior of this energy as the thickness h tends to 0. We work with two simplifying assumptions: Firstly, we think of the deformed sheet as an immersed 2-dimensional Riemannian manifold in Euclidean 3-space and assume that the exponential map at the origin (the center of the sheet) supplies a coordinate chart for the whole manifold. Secondly, the energy functional penalizes the difference between the induced metric and the reference metric in L^∞ (instead of, as is usual, in L^2). Under these assumptions, we show that the elastic energy per unit thickness of the regular cone in the leading order of h is given by C^*h^2|log h|, where the value of C^* is given explicitly.

  5. Femoral neck shortening after internal fixation of a femoral neck fracture.

    PubMed

    Zielinski, Stephanie M; Keijsers, Noël L; Praet, Stephan F E; Heetveld, Martin J; Bhandari, Mohit; Wilssens, Jean Pierre; Patka, Peter; Van Lieshout, Esther M M

    2013-07-01

    This study assesses femoral neck shortening and its effect on gait pattern and muscle strength in patients with femoral neck fractures treated with internal fixation. Seventy-six patients from a multicenter randomized controlled trial participated. Patient characteristics and Short Form 12 and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) scores were collected. Femoral neck shortening, gait parameters, and maximum isometric forces of the hip muscles were measured and differences between the fractured and contralateral leg were calculated. Variables of patients with little or no shortening, moderate shortening, and severe shortening were compared using univariate and multivariate analyses. Median femoral neck shortening was 1.1 cm. Subtle changes in gait pattern, reduced gait velocity, and reduced abductor muscle strength were observed. Age, weight, and Pauwels classification were risk factors for femoral neck shortening. Femoral neck shortening decreased gait velocity and seemed to impair gait symmetry and physical functioning. In conclusion, internal fixation of femoral neck fractures results in permanent physical limitations. The relatively young and healthy patients in our study seem capable of compensating. Attention should be paid to femoral neck shortening and proper correction with a heel lift, as inadequate correction may cause physical complaints and influence outcome. PMID:23823040

  6. Implosion of indirectly driven reentrant cone shell target

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. Stephens; S.P. Hatchett; R.E. Turner; K.A. Tanaka; R. Kodama

    2003-10-31

    In an x-ray driven reentrant cone fast ignition target the x-ray spectrum contains a high energy component that casuses preheating of the reentrant cone and mixing of the gold into the collapsing shell. Direct laser drive might avoid this problem.

  7. The Double Cone: A Mechanical Paradox or a Geometrical Constraint?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallitto, Aurelio Agliolo; Fiordilino, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Italian National Plan "Lauree Scientifiche" (PLS) in collaboration with secondary schools, we have investigated the mechanical paradox of the double cone. We have calculated the geometric condition for obtaining an upward movement. Based on this result, we have built a mechanical model with a double cone made of aluminum…

  8. Galileo Spacecraft Scan Platform Celestial Pointing Cone Control Gain Redesign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    In, C-H. C.; Hilbert, K. B.

    1994-01-01

    During September and October 1991, pictures of the Gaspra asteroid and neighboring stars were taken by the Galileo Optical Navigation (OPNAV) Team for the purpose of navigation the spacecraft for a successful Gaspra encounter. The star tracks in these pictures showed that the scan platform celestial pointing cone controller performed poorly in compensating for wobble-induced cone offsets.

  9. Scoria Cone Construction Mechanism, Lathrop Wells Volcano, Southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. Valentine; D. Krier; F. Perry; G. Heiken

    2005-01-18

    Scoria cones are commonly assumed to have been constructed by the accumulation of ballistically-ejected clasts from discrete and relatively coarse-grained Strombolian bursts and subsequent avalanching such that the cone slopes are at or near the angle of repose for loose scoria. The cone at the hawaiitic Lathrop Wells volcano, southern Nevada, contains deposits that are consistent with the above processes during early cone-building phases; these early deposits are composed mainly of coarse lapilli and fluidal bombs and are partially welded, indicating relatively little cooling during flight. However, the bulk of the cone is comprised of relatively fine-grained (ash and lapilli), planar beds with no welding, even within a few tens of meters of the vent. This facies is consistent with deposition by direct fallout from sustained eruption columns of relatively well-fragmented material, primarily mantling cone slopes and with a lesser degree of avalanching than is commonly assumed. A laterally extensive fallout deposit (up to 20 km from the vent) is inferred to have formed contemporaneously with these later cone deposits. This additional mechanism for construction of scoria cones may also be important at other locations, particularly where the magmas are relatively high in volatile content and where conditions promote the formation of abundant microlites in the rising mafic magma.

  10. Scoria cone construction mechanisms, Lathrop Wells volcano, southern Nevada, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentine, Greg A.; Krier, Don; Perry, Frank V.; Heiken, Grant

    2005-08-01

    Scoria cones are commonly assumed to have been constructed by the accumulation of ballistically ejected clasts from discrete, relatively coarse-grained Strombolian bursts and subsequent avalanching such that the cone slopes are at or near the angle of repose for loose scoria. The cone at the hawaiitic Lathrop Wells volcano, southern Nevada, contains deposits that are consistent with these processes during early cone-building phases; these early deposits are composed mainly of coarse lapilli and fluidal bombs and are partially welded, indicating relatively little cooling during flight. However, the bulk of the cone is composed of relatively fine-grained (ash and lapilli) planar beds with no welding, even within a few tens of meters of the vent. This facies is consistent with deposition by direct fallout from sustained eruption columns of relatively well-fragmented material, primarily mantling cone slopes and with a lesser degree of avalanching than is commonly assumed. A laterally extensive fallout deposit (as much as 20 km from the vent) is inferred to have formed contemporaneously with these later cone deposits. This additional mechanism for construction of scoria cones may also be important at other locations, particularly where the magmas are relatively high in volatile content and where conditions promote the formation of abundant microlites in the rising mafic magma.

  11. Different setup errors assessed by weekly cone-beam computed tomography on different registration in nasopharyngeal carcinoma treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jiqing; Chen, Wen; Yang, Huiyun; Hong, Jidong; Zhang, Zijian; Yang, Guangzheng; Li, Li; Wei, Rui

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the difference of setup errors on different registration in the treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma based on weekly cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty nasopharyngeal cancer patients scheduled to undergo intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were prospectively enrolled in the study. Each patient had a weekly CBCT before radiation therapy. In the entire study, 201 CBCT scans were obtained. The scans were registered to the planning CT to determine the difference of setup errors on different registration sites. Different registration sites were represented by bony landmarks. Nasal septum and pterygoid process represent head, cervical vertebrae 1–3 represent upper neck, and cervical vertebrae 4–6 represent lower neck. Patient positioning errors were recorded in the right–left (RL), superior–inferior (SI), and anterior–posterior (AP) directions over the course of radiotherapy. Planning target volume margins were calculated from the systematic and random errors. In this study, we can make a conclusion that there are setup errors in RL, SI, and AP directions of nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients undergoing IMRT. In addition, the head and neck setup error has the difference, with statistical significance, while patient setup error of neck is greater than that of head during the course of radiotherapy. In our institution, we recommend a planning target volume margin of 3.0 mm in RL direction, 1.3 mm in SI direction, and 2.6 mm in AP direction for nasopharyngeal cancer patients undergoing IMRT with weekly CBCT scans. PMID:26396530

  12. Two-Step Reactivation of Dormant Cones in Retinitis Pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon; Scott, Patrick A; Lu, Xiaoqin; Emery, Douglas; Liu, Yongqin; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, Michael R; Ross, Jason W; Kaplan, Henry J; Dean, Douglas C

    2016-04-12

    Most retinitis pigmentosa (RP) mutations arise in rod photoreceptor genes, leading to diminished peripheral and nighttime vision. Using a pig model of autosomal-dominant RP, we show glucose becomes sequestered in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and, thus, is not transported to photoreceptors. The resulting starvation for glucose metabolites impairs synthesis of cone visual pigment-rich outer segments (OSs), and then their mitochondrial-rich inner segments dissociate. Loss of these functional structures diminishes cone-dependent high-resolution central vision, which is utilized for most daily tasks. By transplanting wild-type rods, to restore glucose transport, or directly replacing glucose in the subretinal space, to bypass its retention in the RPE, we can regenerate cone functional structures, reactivating the dormant cells. Beyond providing metabolic building blocks for cone functional structures, we show glucose induces thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) to regulate Akt signaling, thereby shunting metabolites toward aerobic glucose metabolism and regenerating cone OS synthesis. PMID:27050517

  13. Unsupervised learning of cone spectral classes from natural images.

    PubMed

    Benson, Noah C; Manning, Jeremy R; Brainard, David H

    2014-06-01

    The first step in the evolution of primate trichromatic color vision was the expression of a third cone class not present in ancestral mammals. This observation motivates a fundamental question about the evolution of any sensory system: how is it possible to detect and exploit the presence of a novel sensory class? We explore this question in the context of primate color vision. We present an unsupervised learning algorithm capable of both detecting the number of spectral cone classes in a retinal mosaic and learning the class of each cone using the inter-cone correlations obtained in response to natural image input. The algorithm's ability to classify cones is in broad agreement with experimental evidence about functional color vision for a wide range of mosaic parameters, including those characterizing dichromacy, typical trichromacy, anomalous trichromacy, and possible tetrachromacy. PMID:24967877

  14. Unsupervised Learning of Cone Spectral Classes from Natural Images

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Noah C.; Manning, Jeremy R.; Brainard, David H.

    2014-01-01

    The first step in the evolution of primate trichromatic color vision was the expression of a third cone class not present in ancestral mammals. This observation motivates a fundamental question about the evolution of any sensory system: how is it possible to detect and exploit the presence of a novel sensory class? We explore this question in the context of primate color vision. We present an unsupervised learning algorithm capable of both detecting the number of spectral cone classes in a retinal mosaic and learning the class of each cone using the inter-cone correlations obtained in response to natural image input. The algorithm's ability to classify cones is in broad agreement with experimental evidence about functional color vision for a wide range of mosaic parameters, including those characterizing dichromacy, typical trichromacy, anomalous trichromacy, and possible tetrachromacy. PMID:24967877

  15. Shatter cones formed in large-scale experimental explosion craters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddy, D. J.; Davis, L. K.

    1977-01-01

    In 1968, a series of 0.5-ton and 100-ton TNT explosion experiments were conducted in granitic rock near Cedar City, Utah, as part of a basic research program on cratering and shock wave propagation. Of special interest was the formation of an important type of shock metamorphic feature, shatter cones. A description is presented of the first reported occurrence of shatter cones in high explosion trials. A background to shatter cone studies is presented and attention is given to the test program, geology and physical properties of the test medium, the observed cratering, and the formational pressures for shatter cones. The high explosion trials conducted demonstrate beyond any doubt, that shatter cones can be formed by shock wave processes during cratering and that average formational pressures in these crystalline rocks are in the 20-60 kb range.

  16. Two-Step Reactivation of Dormant Cones in Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lee, Sang Joon; Scott, Patrick A.; Lu, Xiaoqin; Emery, Douglas; Liu, Yongqin; Ezashi, Toshihiko; Roberts, Michael R.; Ross, Jason W.; Kaplan, Henry J.; Dean, Douglas C.

    2016-01-01

    Most Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP) mutations arise in rod photoreceptor genes, leading to diminished peripheral and nightime vision. Using a pig model of autosomal-dominant RP, we show glucose becomes sequestered in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), and thus is not transported to photoreceptors. The resulting starvation for glucose metabolites impairs synthesis of cone visual pigment -rich outer segments (OS), and then their mitochondrial-rich inner segments dissociate. Loss of these functional structures diminishes cone-dependent high-resolution central vision, which is utilized for most daily tasks. By transplanting wild-type rods, to restore glucose transport, or directly replacing glucose in the subretinal space, to bypass its retention in the RPE, we can regenerate cone functional structures, reactivating the dormant cells. Beyond providing metabolic building blocks for cone functional structures, we show glucose induces thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) to regulate Akt signaling, thereby shunting metabolites toward aerobic glucose metabolism and regenerating cone OS synthesis. PMID:27050517

  17. Granular flow along the interior surface of rotating cones

    SciTech Connect

    Pitts, J.H.; Walton, O.R.

    1984-04-26

    Relationships are developed between the effective cone half-angle, ..cap alpha../sub eff/, and the actual cone half-angle, ..cap alpha.., for subcritical flow of granular material along the inside surface of a rotating cone. Rotational speed must be high enough to keep the granular material against the wall. If ..cap alpha../sub eff/ is between the wall friction angle, phi/sub w/ and the angle of repose, phi/sub r/, the flowrate may be controlled at the exit and depends on the exit aperture area and the rotational speed. Laboratory experiments show that exit control is possible over the entire range of effective cone half-angles from phi/sub w/ < ..cap alpha../sub eff/ < phi/sub r/ and even beyond these limits. The most uniform thickness of granular material is obtained when the cone half-angle is close to phi/sub r/.

  18. Hypersonic boundary-layer transition measurements at Mach 10 on a large seven-degree cone at angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraru, Ciprian G.

    The ability to predict the onset of boundary-layer transition is critical for hypersonic flight vehicles. The development of prediction methods depends on a thorough comprehension of the mechanisms that cause transition. In order to improve the understanding of hypersonic boundary-layer transition, tests were conducted on a large 7° half-angle cone at Mach 10 in the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Wind Tunnel 9. Twenty-four runs were performed at varying unit Reynolds numbers and angles of attack for sharp and blunt nosetip configurations. Heat-transfer measurements were used to determine the start of transition on the cone. Increasing the unit Reynolds number caused a forward movement of transition on the sharp cone at zero angle of attack. Increasing nosetip radius delayed transition up to a radius of 12.7 mm. Larger nose radii caused the start of transition to move forward. At angles of attack up to 10°, transition was leeside forward for nose radii up to 12.7 mm and windside forward for nose radii of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm. Second-mode instability waves were measured on the sharp cone and cones with small nose radii. At zero angle of attack, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone were in earlier stages of development as the unit Reynolds number was decreased. The same trend was observed as the nosetip radius was increased. No second-mode waves were apparent for the cones with large nosetip radii. As the angle of attack was increased, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone moved to earlier stages of growth on the windward ray and later stages of growth on the leeward ray. RMS amplitudes of second-mode waves were computed. Comparison between maximum second-mode amplitudes and edge Mach numbers showed good correlation for various nosetip radii and unit Reynolds numbers. Using the e N method, initial amplitudes were estimated and compared to freestream noise in the second-mode frequency band. Correlations indicate

  19. Formation of shatter cones in MEMIN impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, J.; Kenkmann, T.

    2016-08-01

    Shatter cones are the only macroscopic feature considered as evidence for shock metamorphism. Their presence is diagnostic for the discovery and verification of impact structures. The occurrence of shatter cones is heterogeneous throughout the crater record and their geometry can diverge from the typical cone shape. The precise formation mechanism of shatter cones is still not resolved. In this study, we aim at better constraining the boundary conditions of shatter cone formation in impact experiments and test a novel approach to qualitatively and quantitatively describe shatter cone geometries by white light interferometry. We recovered several ejected fragments from MEMIN cratering experiments that show slightly curved, striated surfaces and conical geometries with apices of 36°-52°. These fragments fulfilling the morphological criteria of shatter cones were found in experiments with 20-80 cm sized target cubes of sandstone, quartzite and limestone, but not in highly porous tuff. Targets were impacted by aluminum, steel, and iron meteorite projectiles at velocities of 4.6-7.8 km s-1. The projectile sizes ranged from 2.5-12 mm in diameter and produced experimental peak pressures of up to 86 GPa. In experiments with lower impact velocities shatter cones could not be found. A thorough morphometric analysis of the experimentally generated shatter cones was made with 3D white light interferometry scans at micrometer accuracy. SEM analysis of the surfaces of recovered fragments showed vesicular melt films alternating with smoothly polished surfaces. We hypothesize that the vesicular melt films predominantly form at strain releasing steps and suggest that shatter cones are probably mixed mode fractures.

  20. Formation of shatter cones in MEMIN impact experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, J.; Kenkmann, T.

    2016-07-01

    Shatter cones are the only macroscopic feature considered as evidence for shock metamorphism. Their presence is diagnostic for the discovery and verification of impact structures. The occurrence of shatter cones is heterogeneous throughout the crater record and their geometry can diverge from the typical cone shape. The precise formation mechanism of shatter cones is still not resolved. In this study, we aim at better constraining the boundary conditions of shatter cone formation in impact experiments and test a novel approach to qualitatively and quantitatively describe shatter cone geometries by white light interferometry. We recovered several ejected fragments from MEMIN cratering experiments that show slightly curved, striated surfaces and conical geometries with apices of 36°-52°. These fragments fulfilling the morphological criteria of shatter cones were found in experiments with 20-80 cm sized target cubes of sandstone, quartzite and limestone, but not in highly porous tuff. Targets were impacted by aluminum, steel, and iron meteorite projectiles at velocities of 4.6-7.8 km s-1. The projectile sizes ranged from 2.5-12 mm in diameter and produced experimental peak pressures of up to 86 GPa. In experiments with lower impact velocities shatter cones could not be found. A thorough morphometric analysis of the experimentally generated shatter cones was made with 3D white light interferometry scans at micrometer accuracy. SEM analysis of the surfaces of recovered fragments showed vesicular melt films alternating with smoothly polished surfaces. We hypothesize that the vesicular melt films predominantly form at strain releasing steps and suggest that shatter cones are probably mixed mode fractures.

  1. Cone-based electrical resistivity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pidlisecky, Adam

    Determining the 3-D spatial distribution of subsurface properties is a critical part of managing the clean-up of contaminated sites. Most standard hydrologic methods sample small regions immediately adjacent to wells or testing devices. This provides data which are not representative of the entire region of interest. Furthermore, at many contaminated sites invasive methods are not acceptable, due to the risks associated with contacting and spreading the contaminants. To address these issues, I have developed a minimally invasive technology that provides information about the 3-D distribution of electrical conductivity. This new technique, cone-based electrical resistivity tomography (C-bert), integrates the existing technologies of resistivity cone penetration testing (RCPT) with electrical resistivity tomography. Development of this tool included the creation of new software and modeling algorithms, the design of field equipment, field testing, and processing and interpretation of the resulting data. I present a 2.5-D forward modeling algorithm that incorporates an effective correction for the errors caused by boundary effects and source singularities. The algorithm includes an optimization technique for acquiring the Fourier coefficients required for the solution. A 3-D inversion algorithm is presented that has two major improvements over existing algorithms. First, it includes a 3-D version of the boundary correction/source singularity correction developed for the 2.5-D problem. Second, the algorithm can handle any type of acquisition geometry; this was a requirement for the development of C-bert. C-bert involves placing several permanent current electrodes in the subsurface and using electrodes mounted on a cone penetrometer and at the surface to measure the resultant potential field. In addition to these measurements, we obtain the standard suite of RCPT data, including high resolution resistivity logs. The RCPT data can be used to generate a realistic

  2. Cone visual pigments of aquatic mammals.

    PubMed

    Newman, Lucy A; Robinson, Phyllis R

    2005-01-01

    It has long been hypothesized that the visual systems of animals are evolutionarily adapted to their visual environment. The entrance many millions of years ago of mammals into the sea gave these new aquatic mammals completely novel visual surroundings with respect to light availability and predominant wavelengths. This study examines the cone opsins of marine mammals, hypothesizing, based on previous studies [Fasick et al. (1998) and Levenson & Dizon (2003)], that the deep-dwelling marine mammals would not have color vision because the pressure to maintain color vision in the dark monochromatic ocean environment has been relaxed. Short-wavelength-sensitive (SWS) and long-wavelength-sensitive (LWS) cone opsin genes from two orders (Cetacea and Sirenia) and an additional suborder (Pinnipedia) of aquatic mammals were amplified from genomic DNA (for SWS) and cDNA (for LWS) by PCR, cloned, and sequenced. All animals studied from the order Cetacea have SWS pseudogenes, whereas a representative from the order Sirenia has an intact SWS gene, for which the corresponding mRNA was found in the retina. One of the pinnipeds studied (harp seal) has an SWS pseudogene, while another species (harbor seal) appeared to have an intact SWS gene. However, no SWS cone opsin mRNA was found in the harbor seal retina, suggesting a promoter or splice site mutation preventing transcription of the gene. The LWS opsins from the different species were expressed in mammalian cells and reconstituted with the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in order to determine maximal absorption wavelengths (lambda(max)) for each. The deeper dwelling Cetacean species had blue shifted lambda(max) values compared to shallower-dwelling aquatic species. Taken together, these findings support the hypothesis that in the monochromatic oceanic habitat, the pressure to maintain color vision has been relaxed and mutations are retained in the SWS genes, resulting in pseudogenes. Additionally, LWS opsins are retained in the

  3. Color opponency in cone-driven horizontal cells in carp retina. Aspecific pathways between cones and horizontal cells

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The spectral and dynamic properties of cone-driven horizontal cells in carp retina were evaluated with silent substitution stimuli and/or saturating background illumination. The aim of this study was to describe the wiring underlying the spectral sensitivity of these cells. We will present electrophysiological data that indicate that all cone- driven horizontal cell types receive input from all spectral cone types, and we will present evidence that all cone-driven horizontal cell types feedback to all spectral cone types. These two findings are the basis for a model for the spectral and dynamic behavior of all cone- driven horizontal cells in carp retina. The model can account for the spectral as well as the dynamic behavior of the horizontal cells. It will be shown that the strength of the feedforward and feedback pathways between a horizontal cell and a particular spectral cone type are roughly proportional. This model is in sharp contrast to the Stell model, where the spectral behavior of the three horizontal cell types is explained by a cascade of feedforward and feedback pathways between cones and horizontal cells. The Stell model accounts for the spectral but not for the dynamic behavior of the horizontal cells. PMID:1711573

  4. Biomechanical based image registration for head and neck radiation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Mayah, Adil; Moseley, Joanne; Hunter, Shannon; Velec, Mike; Chau, Lily; Breen, Stephen; Brock, Kristy

    2010-02-01

    Deformable image registration of four head and neck cancer patients was conducted using biomechanical based model. Patient specific 3D finite element models have been developed using CT and cone beam CT image data of the planning and a radiation treatment session. The model consists of seven vertebrae (C1 to C7), mandible, larynx, left and right parotid glands, tumor and body. Different combinations of boundary conditions are applied in the model in order to find the configuration with a minimum registration error. Each vertebra in the planning session is individually aligned with its correspondence in the treatment session. Rigid alignment is used for each individual vertebra and to the mandible since deformation is not expected in the bones. In addition, the effect of morphological differences in external body between the two image sessions is investigated. The accuracy of the registration is evaluated using the tumor, and left and right parotid glands by comparing the calculated Dice similarity index of these structures following deformation in relation to their true surface defined in the image of the second session. The registration improves when the vertebrae and mandible are aligned in the two sessions with the highest Dice index of 0.86+/-0.08, 0.84+/-0.11, and 0.89+/-0.04 for the tumor, left and right parotid glands, respectively. The accuracy of the center of mass location of tumor and parotid glands is also improved by deformable image registration where the error in the tumor and parotid glands decreases from 4.0+/-1.1, 3.4+/-1.5, and 3.8+/-0.9 mm using rigid registration to 2.3+/-1.0, 2.5+/-0.8 and 2.0+/-0.9 mm in the deformable image registration when alignment of vertebrae and mandible is conducted in addition to the surface projection of the body.

  5. Instantaneous Helical Axis Methodology to Identify Aberrant Neck Motion

    PubMed Central

    Ellingson, Arin M.; Yelisetti, Vishal; Schulz, Craig A.; Bronfort, Gert; Downing, Joseph; Keefe, Daniel F.; Nuckley, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Neck pain afflicts 30-50% of the U.S. population annually; however we currently have poor diagnostic differentiation techniques to inform individualized treatment. Planar neck kinematics has been shown to be correlated with neck pain, but neck motion is much more complex than pure planar activities. Our objective was to define a methodology for determining aberrant neck kinematics and assess it. Methods We examined a complex neck kinematic activity of neck circumduction, computed the pathway of motion using the instantaneous helical axis approach in 81 patients with non-specific neck pain and in 20 non-matched symptom free subjects. Neck circumduction, or rolling of the head, represents a complex neck kinematic activity, investigating the innate coupled motion of the cervical spine at the end ranges of motion in all directions. Instance of discontinuities in the helical axis patterns, or folds, were identified and labeled as occurrences of aberrant motion. Findings The instances of aberrant motion, or folds, which are nearly non-existent in the healthy sample group, are present in both the pre and post treatment neck pain patients. Following a treatment intervention of the symptomatic patients, pain and neck disability index decreased significantly (p<0.001) concomitant with a decrease in the number of folds (p=0.021). Interpretation The present study highlights a new technique using an instantaneous helical axis approach to detect subtle abnormalities in the pathway of motion of the head about the trunk, during a neck circumduction exercise. PMID:23911108

  6. Plasmonic corrugated cylinder-cone terahertz probe.

    PubMed

    Yao, Haizi; Zhong, Shuncong

    2014-08-01

    The spoof surface plasmon polariton (SPP) effect on the electromagnetic field distribution near the tip of a periodically corrugated metal cylinder-cone probe working at the terahertz regime was studied. We found that radially polarized terahertz radiation could be coupled effectively through a spoof SPP into a surface wave and propagated along the corrugated surface, resulting in more than 20× electric field enhancement near the tip of probe. Multiple resonances caused by the antenna effect were discussed in detail by finite element computation and theoretical analysis of dispersion relation for spoof SPP modes. Moreover, the key figures of merit such as the resonance frequency of the SPP can be flexibly tuned by modifying the geometry of the probe structure, making it attractive for application in an apertureless background-free terahertz near-field microscope. PMID:25121543

  7. Nose-cone calorimeter: PHENIX forward upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chvala, Ondrej

    2009-07-01

    PHENIX is a high rate experiment efficient at measuring rare processes, but has limited acceptance in azimuth and pseudorapidity ( η). The Nose Cone Calorimeter (NCC), a W-Si sampling calorimeter in the region of 0.9< η<3, is one of the upgrades which will significantly increase coverage in both azimuth and pseudorapidity. The NCC will expand PHENIX’s precision measurements of electromagnetic probes in η, reconstruct jets, perform a wide scope of correlation measurements, and enhance triggering capabilities. The detector will significantly contribute to measurements of γ-jet correlations, quarkonia production, and low- x nuclear structure functions. This report discusses details of the detector design and its performance concerning a sample of the physics topics which will benefit from the NCC. In view of recent funding difficulties, outlook of the activities is discussed.

  8. Nearest-neighbor analysis of small features on Mars: Applications to tumuli and rootless cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baloga, S. M.; Glaze, L. S.; Bruno, B. C.

    2007-03-01

    Fields of low relief cones, domes, and mounds on Mars have been interpreted as tumuli, rootless cones, and pingos. The spatial distribution of such features can be characterized by their nearest-neighbor (NN) distances. The NN distributions can provide insight into the physical processes that affected field formation and can possibly provide a future diagnostic of the feature type present on Mars. The conventional approach for analyzing the observed NN distribution is based on the Poisson probability distribution and uses one statistic, c. Our simulations of spatial randomness show that there is an unrecognized bias in c that often leads to erroneous conclusions. Three alternative extensions of the Poisson distribution are proposed here. The first accounts for a minimum threshold on the size of features discerned, the second considers the scavenging of the resources necessary to form neighboring features (e.g., inflation pressurization and subsurface volatiles), and the third models self-limiting growth of the feature population. Three statistical tests are proposed to improve the conventional NN analysis. We provide the critical regions needed to perform these tests for common sample sizes of these geologic features. Our methodology is applied to tumuli at Mauna Ulu, Hawaii, and conjectured tumuli and rootless cones on Mars. Each example exhibits a different aspect of spatial randomness. These applications suggest avenues for further field and theoretical studies to develop this approach as a remote-sensing diagnostic.

  9. Electron Kinematics near the Loss-Cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, L.; Aschwanden, M. J.

    2000-05-01

    With the upcoming launch of the HESSI satellite, we expect that problems of non-thermal electron transport and radiation signatures will once more be the subject of some attention, since this is an integral part of the calculation of the spectral and spatial behavior of the radiative signatures which will be observed by HESSI. Problems of particle transport in coronal magnetic traps are often treated by making simple geometrical and timescale arguments for the fractions of accelerated particles which are trapped and precipitate from coronal loops. Such arguments are used to calculate the populations of, for example, directly precipitating and trap-precipitating particles (which can in principle be identified from hard X-ray time-series), or coronal versus footpoint emission ratios (which can be studied from spatially resolved HXR data). Using numerical simulation and analytic arguments we have studied the dynamics of particles within coronal traps, paying particular attention to the behavior in the vicinity of the loss-cone. We find that over a broad range of normally-assumed coronal parameters, such as mirror-ratio, loop length and loop density, (a) electrons cannot pass easily from the trap region to the loss-cone, so that (b) there is no collisionless trap-precipitating component and (c) a large fraction of accelerated particles will lose their entire energy budget within the coronal loop. We discuss what this means for our current understanding of the solar flare environment and our interpretation of radiative signatures. This work was supported by the Yohkoh/SXT project at LMSAL (NASA grant NAS8-40801) and by the U.K. Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council.

  10. Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shyh-An

    2010-01-01

    Treatment for patients with head and neck cancer requires a multidisciplinary approach. Radiotherapy is employed as a primary treatment or as an adjuvant to surgery. Each specific subsite dictates the appropriate radiotherapy techniques, fields, dose, and fractionation scheme. Quality of life is also an important issue in the management of head and neck cancer. The radiation-related complications have a tremendous impact on the quality of life. Modern radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy and image-guided radiotherapy, can offer precise radiation delivery and reduce the dose to the surrounding normal tissues without compromise of target coverage. In the future, efforts should be made in the exploration of novel strategies to improve treatment outcome in patients with head and neck cancer. PMID:22550433

  11. Optimizing Stability in Femoral Neck Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Ye; Hao, Jiandong; Mauffrey, Cyril; Hammerberg, E Mark; Stahel, Philip F; Hak, David J

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing stability of femoral neck fracture fixation is important in obtaining a successful outcome. The mechanical problems and strategies for achieving optimal stability differ depending on patients' age and degree of osteoporosis. Femoral neck fractures in younger adults usually result from high-energy trauma and have a vertical fracture pattern. Strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include placing additional screws at right angles to the fracture plane and medial buttress plate augmentation. In elderly patients, screw position relative to the intact cortical femoral neck bone is of critical importance. Additional strategies for optimizing fixation stability in this group include the concept of length stable fixation, use of adjunctive calcium phosphate cement, and use of novel fixed angle fixation implants. PMID:26488776

  12. Neck kinematics and sternocleidomastoid muscle activation during neck rotation in subjects with forward head posture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Man-Sig

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study investigated differences in the kinematics of the neck and activation of the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscle during neck rotation between subjects with and without forward head posture (FHP). [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-eight subjects participated in the study (14 with FHP, 14 without FHP). Subjects performed neck rotation in two directions, left and right. The kinematics of rotation-lateral flexion movement patterns were recorded using motion analysis. Activity in the bilateral SCM muscles was measured using surface electromyography. Differences in neck kinematics and activation of SCM between the groups were analyzed by independent t-tests. [Results] Maintaining FHP increased the rotation-lateral flexion ratio significantly in both directions. The FHP group had significantly faster onset time for lateral flexion movement in both directions during neck rotation. Regarding the electromyography of the SCM muscles during neck rotation in both directions, the activity values of subjects with FHP were greater than those of subjects without FHP for the contralateral SCM muscles. [Conclusion] FHP can induce changes in movement in the frontal plane and SCM muscle activation during neck rotation. Thus, clinicians should consider movement in the frontal plane as well as in the sagittal plane when assessing and treating patients with forward head posture. PMID:26696712

  13. Work-related chronic neck impairment. Neck motion analysis in female traverse crane operators.

    PubMed

    Alund, M; Larsson, S E; Lewin, T

    1992-09-01

    Twenty-one female steel industry traverse crane operators with long-term sick-leave (3 (1-8) years) due to chronic neck disability underwent careful analysis of case history, physical status and electrogoniometric three-dimensional recordings of active neck motion. Results were compared with those from working female crane operators having identical work posture and tasks and, further, with a group of working female clerks. The sick-listed crane operators had previous frequent contacts with the primary health care because of complaints from the neck and back. In comparison with the reference groups, the sick-listed crane operators showed tenderness of the trapezius and levator scapulae muscles and a short neck stature in combination with impaired active neck motion range with reduced motion speed. The motion pattern was however unchanged. The findings are consistent with the clinical picture of chronic neck myalgia that persisted despite long-term absence from the previous exposure to high static work load upon the neck-shoulders. PMID:1411359

  14. Cetuximab: its unique place in head and neck cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Specenier, Pol; Vermorken, Jan B

    2013-01-01

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth most common cancer worldwide. At present, globally about 650,000 new cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) are diagnosed each year. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is almost invariably expressed in SCCHN. Overexpression of the EGFR is a strong and independent unfavorable prognostic factor in SCCHN. Cetuximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody, which binds with high affinity to the extracellular domain of the human EGFR, blocking ligand binding, resulting in inhibition of the receptor function. It also targets cytotoxic immune effector cells towards EGFR-expressing tumor cells (antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity). The addition of cetuximab to radiotherapy (RT) improves locoregional control and survival when compared to RT alone. The addition of cetuximab to platinum-based chemoradiation (CRT) is feasible but does not lead to an improved outcome. Cetuximab plus RT has never been compared prospectively to CRT, which therefore remains the standard treatment for patients with locoregionally advanced SCCHN for whom surgery is not considered the optimal treatment, provided they can tolerate CRT. The addition of cetuximab to platinum-based chemotherapy prolongs survival in patients with recurrent or metastatic SCCHN. The combination of a platinum-based regimen and cetuximab should be considered as the standard first line regimen for patients who can tolerate this treatment. PMID:23723688

  15. On the generation of the pulsating aurora by the loss cone driven whistler instability in the equatorial region

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Hawkins, J.G.; Lee, L.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Whistler waves are believed to play an important role in the generation of the pulsating aurora. Calculations in the literature show that either a loss cone or a thermal anisotropy in the hot plasma component of the magnetosphere can lead to the generation of incoherent whistler waves. In this paper, the authors have calculated the characteristics of incoherent whistler mode waves generated along the L = 5 geomagnetic field line, and considered the implications for the pulsating aurora if these waves play an important role in the pulsation mechanism. For the loss cone driven whistler instability, the growth rate along the L = 5 field line is largest just above the ionosphere where the loss cone angle is also large. However, the total amplification factor is actually much larger near the equator due to the more gradual magnetospheric variations and the smaller group velocity in this region. Thus, the largest wave growth from this process is expected in the same location where pitch angle scattering is believed to occur during auroral pulsations. The peak growth rate at the equator occurs at approximately 100 Hz, corresponding to {approximately} 1% of the local electron cyclotron frequency. This frequency is much smaller than the peak growth rate frequency at altitudes nearer to the ionosphere on the L = 5 field line. It is also in contrast to the frequently stated assumption that the whistler instability results in wave generation near the electron cyclotron frequency.

  16. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Thariat, Juliette; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2012-03-01

    Background: This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. Methods: Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox's proportional hazard model. Results: Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients, of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p < 0.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. Conclusions: With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge.

  17. Prediction of Neck Dissection Requirement After Definitive Radiotherapy for Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Thariat, Juliette; Ang, K. Kian; Allen, Pamela K.; Ahamad, Anesa; Williams, Michelle D.; Myers, Jeffrey N.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Ginsberg, Lawrence E.; Rosenthal, David I.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Morrison, William H.; Weber, Randal S.; Garden, Adam S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND This analysis was undertaken to assess the need for planned neck dissection in patients with a complete response (CR) of involved nodes after irradiation, and to determine the benefit of a neck dissection in those with less than CR by tumor site. METHODS Our cohort included 880 patients with T1-4, N1-3M0 squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx, larynx or hypopharynx who received treatment between 1994 and 2004. Survival curves were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier Method, comparisons of rates with the log-rank test and prognostic factors by Cox analyses. RESULTS Nodal CR occurred in 377 (43%) patients of whom 365 patients did not undergo nodal dissection. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate of patients with CR was 92%. Two hundred sixty-eight of the remaining patients (53%) underwent neck dissections. The 5-year actuarial regional control rate for patients without a CR was 84%. Those who had a neck dissection fared better with 5-year actuarial regional control rates of 90% and 76% for those operated and those not operated (p <.001). Variables associated with poorer regional control rates included higher T and N stage, non-oropharynx cancers, non-CR, both clinical and pathological. CONCLUSIONS With 92% 5-year neck control rate without neck dissection after CR, there is little justification for systematic neck dissection. The addition of a neck dissection resulted in higher neck control after partial response though patients with viable tumor on pathology specimens had poorer outcomes. The identification of that subgroup that benefits from additional treatment remains a challenge. PMID:22284033

  18. [Congenital neck mass. Diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Proto, F; Sarría-Echegaray, P; Epprecht-González, M P; Alba-Mesquida, J

    2016-01-01

    Congenital neck masses are a challenge for general practitioners and specialists. Although some of them are diagnosed in utero, most of them remain silent until complications appear in the adult age. The anatomical location, consistency and age are determinants in guiding the possible diagnosis. A midline infrahyoid mass may be a thyroglossal cyst, however a lateral neck mass is more possible to result in a brachial cyst. Complementary imaging studies are essential such as pathological tests like needle aspiration fine needle aspiration (FNA). PMID:26558520

  19. Hyperparathyroidism following head and neck irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, S.D.; Frame, B.; Miller, M.J.; Kleerskoper, M.; Block, M.A.; Parfitt, A.M.

    1980-02-01

    A history of head and neck irradiation in childhood or adolescence was found in 22 of 130 patients with primary hyperparathyroidism compared with only 12 of 400 control patients. Among 200 patients with a known history of childhood irradiation, biochemical or surgical evidence of hyperparathyroidism was found in ten, a prevalence of 5%. This is at least 30 times the prevalence of hyperparathyroidism in the general population. The data indicate that head and neck irradiation should be regarded as an important risk factor in the subsequent development of hyperparathyroidism.

  20. Approach to intensely enhancing neck nodes

    PubMed Central

    Karandikar, Amit; Gummalla, Krishna Mohan; Loke, Siu Cheng; Goh, Julian; Tan, Tiong Yong

    2016-01-01

    Cervical node evaluation is one of the most common problems encountered by a radiologist. Here, we present a pictorial review of intensely enhancing neck nodes. While enhancement in a cervical node is a common radiologic finding on contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan, only few conditions cause intense enhancement in cervical nodes. We discuss the common causes of intensely enhancing neck nodes along with pertinent radiologic features and key differentiating points that aid radiologists in reaching a diagnosis. In addition, we discuss certain potential non-nodal mimics, which need to be excluded. PMID:26782154

  1. Not just another pain in the neck.

    PubMed

    Campo, Theresa M; Bradbury-Golas, Kathleen; Lucasti, Christopher; Schumacher, William

    2012-01-01

    A 56-year-old man presents to the emergency department with complaints of neck pain with numbness to the right upper extremity. The complaints and symptoms initially appear to be cervical radiculopathy but further diagnostic testing during an inpatient hospitalization revealed an unusual diagnosis. The purpose of this article is to bring awareness to practitioners of the alternative and sometimes rare diagnosis of neck pain. A detailed history and physical examination accompanied with diagnostic testing and collaboration can ensure a definitive diagnosis and positive outcome. PMID:22561223

  2. PET-CT–guided surveillance of head and neck cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  3. PET-CT–Guided Surveillance of Head and Neck Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck who underwent PET-CT–guided surveillance had fewer operations but similar overall survival rates to those of patients who underwent planned neck dissection.

  4. Comfort effects of a new car headrest with neck support.

    PubMed

    Franz, M; Durt, A; Zenk, R; Desmet, P M A

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes the design of a neck-/headrest to increase car comfort. Two studies were undertaken to create a new comfortable headrest with neck support. In experiment one, neck- and headrest data were gathered using 35 test subjects. The pressure distribution, stiffness of the foam material and position of the head and neck support were determined. In experiment two a full adjustable final headrest with adjustable neck support was constructed and tested with 12 subjects using a new adjustable headrest under virtual reality driving conditions. Experiment two showed that the headrest with the new/adjustable neck support was favoured by the majority of the subjects. 83% were satisfied with the stiffness of the material. 92% were satisfied with the size of the neck- and headrest. All subjects mentioned that the neck support is a comfort benefit in calm traffic conditions or on the motorway. PMID:21944482

  5. Optics of cone photoreceptors in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus).

    PubMed

    Wilby, David; Toomey, Matthew B; Olsson, Peter; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M Carter; Oulton, Ruth; Kelber, Almut; Corbo, Joseph C; Roberts, Nicholas W

    2015-10-01

    Vision is the primary sensory modality of birds, and its importance is evident in the sophistication of their visual systems. Coloured oil droplets in the cone photoreceptors represent an adaptation in the avian retina, acting as long-pass colour filters. However, we currently lack understanding of how the optical properties and morphology of component structures (e.g. oil droplet, mitochondrial ellipsoid and outer segment) of the cone photoreceptor influence the transmission of light into the outer segment and the ultimate effect they have on receptor sensitivity. In this study, we use data from microspectrophotometry, digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic models of avian cone photoreceptors to quantitatively investigate the integrated optical function of the cell. We find that pigmented oil droplets primarily function as spectral filters, not light collection devices, although the mitochondrial ellipsoid improves optical coupling between the inner segment and oil droplet. In contrast, unpigmented droplets found in violet-sensitive cones double sensitivity at its peak relative to other cone types. Oil droplets and ellipsoids both narrow the angular sensitivity of single cone photoreceptors, but not as strongly as those in human cones. PMID:26423439

  6. Mach Cones in Three-Dimensional Yukawa Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Xin; Bhattacharjee, Amitava

    2006-10-01

    Mach cones have been observed in two-dimensional dusty plasma experiments (D. Samsonov et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., 83, 3649, 1999) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations assuming that the dust particles interact via a Yukawa potential (Z. W. Ma and A. Bhattacharjee, Phys. Plasmas, 9, 3349, 2002). We present new simulation results of Mach cones in three-dimensional Yukawa crystals excited by external laser forcing. As is well known, these crystals can be of the bcc and fcc type, and experiments have produced crystals with both types coexisting. Under a variety of conditions, our simulations show stable three-dimensional Mach cones with a tent structure. While the two-dimensional projection of these cones resemble the multiple cone structure of two-dimensional cones, they need larger dust charge and higher-amplitude forcing for their excitation. We present results on the effect of melting on these Mach cones, and their structures in the near-field and far-field regions.

  7. Optics of cone photoreceptors in the chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus)

    PubMed Central

    Wilby, David; Toomey, Matthew B.; Olsson, Peter; Frederiksen, Rikard; Cornwall, M. Carter; Oulton, Ruth; Kelber, Almut; Corbo, Joseph C.; Roberts, Nicholas W.

    2015-01-01

    Vision is the primary sensory modality of birds, and its importance is evident in the sophistication of their visual systems. Coloured oil droplets in the cone photoreceptors represent an adaptation in the avian retina, acting as long-pass colour filters. However, we currently lack understanding of how the optical properties and morphology of component structures (e.g. oil droplet, mitochondrial ellipsoid and outer segment) of the cone photoreceptor influence the transmission of light into the outer segment and the ultimate effect they have on receptor sensitivity. In this study, we use data from microspectrophotometry, digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy to inform electromagnetic models of avian cone photoreceptors to quantitatively investigate the integrated optical function of the cell. We find that pigmented oil droplets primarily function as spectral filters, not light collection devices, although the mitochondrial ellipsoid improves optical coupling between the inner segment and oil droplet. In contrast, unpigmented droplets found in violet-sensitive cones double sensitivity at its peak relative to other cone types. Oil droplets and ellipsoids both narrow the angular sensitivity of single cone photoreceptors, but not as strongly as those in human cones. PMID:26423439

  8. Transoral Endoscopic Head and Neck Surgery: The Contemporary Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, Gil Chai; Holsinger, Floyd Christopher; Li, Ryan J

    2015-12-01

    Traditional open surgical approaches are indicated for treatment of select tumor subsites of head and neck cancer, but can also result in major cosmetic and functional morbidity. Transoral surgical approaches have been used for head and neck cancer since the 1960s, with their application continuing to evolve with the changing landscape of this disease and recent innovations in surgical instrumentation. The potential to further reduce treatment morbidity with transoral surgery, while optimizing oncologic outcomes, continues to be investigated. This review examines current literature evaluating oncologic and quality-of-life outcomes achieved through transoral head and neck surgery. PMID:26568549

  9. The B3 Subunit of the Cone Cyclic Nucleotide-gated Channel Regulates the Light Responses of Cones and Contributes to the Channel Structural Flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ding, Xi-Qin; Thapa, Arjun; Ma, Hongwei; Xu, Jianhua; Elliott, Michael H; Rodgers, Karla K; Smith, Marci L; Wang, Jin-Shan; Pittler, Steven J; Kefalov, Vladimir J

    2016-04-15

    Cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels play a pivotal role in cone phototransduction, which is a process essential for daylight vision, color vision, and visual acuity. Mutations in the cone channel subunits CNGA3 and CNGB3 are associated with human cone diseases, including achromatopsia, cone dystrophies, and early onset macular degeneration. Mutations in CNGB3 alone account for 50% of reported cases of achromatopsia. This work investigated the role of CNGB3 in cone light response and cone channel structural stability. As cones comprise only 2-3% of the total photoreceptor population in the wild-type mouse retina, we used Cngb3(-/-)/Nrl(-/-) mice with CNGB3 deficiency on a cone-dominant background in our study. We found that, in the absence of CNGB3, CNGA3 was able to travel to the outer segments, co-localize with cone opsin, and form tetrameric complexes. Electroretinogram analyses revealed reduced cone light response amplitude/sensitivity and slower response recovery in Cngb3(-/-)/Nrl(-/-) mice compared with Nrl(-/-) mice. Absence of CNGB3 expression altered the adaptation capacity of cones and severely compromised function in bright light. Biochemical analysis demonstrated that CNGA3 channels lacking CNGB3 were more resilient to proteolysis than CNGA3/CNGB3 channels, suggesting a hindered structural flexibility. Thus, CNGB3 regulates cone light response kinetics and the channel structural flexibility. This work advances our understanding of the biochemical and functional role of CNGB3 in cone photoreceptors. PMID:26893377

  10. The evolution of surgery in the management of neck metastases

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, S; Chiesa, F; Lyubaev, V; Aidarbekova, A; Brzhezovskiy, V

    2006-01-01

    Summary In spite of advancement in science, molecular medicine and target therapies, surgical treatment of metastases using different techniques, from selective neck dissection to extended radical neck dissections, form a major part in the management of neck metastases. This is due to the fact that, so far, there is no treatment more effective for resectable neck metastases, than surgery. Since most head and neck cancer patients die due to loco-regional progression of disease, and a very large majority of them do not live long enough to develop distant metastases, the status of neck lymph nodes remains the single most important prognostic factor, in these cases. In the 100 years since George Washington Crile described Radical Neck Dissection, we now have a much better understanding of the biological and clinical behaviour of neck metastases. This has ultimately led to the conservative approaches of selective neck dissections depending on the primary site of the tumour, type of tumour and the characteristic features of the metastases themselves. A search of the literature on neck lymph nodes and neck dissections, on the internet and in old publications, not available in the electronic media, has been carried out. Using this as the basis, we arranged, in sequence, the dates of various landmarks in the treatment of head and neck cancer related to neck dissections to emphasize the overall process of evolution of neck dissection thereby showing how the field of head and neck surgery has travelled a long way from radical neck dissection to its modifications and further to selective neck dissections and sentinel node biopsies. The present understanding of the patterns of neck metastases enables us not only to adequately treat the neck metastases, but also to diagnose metastases from unknown primaries. Therefore, depending on the site of the primary tumour, it is now easy to predict the most probable route of metastatic spread and vice versa. This has enabled us to adopt

  11. From feeder dykes to scoria cones: the tectonically controlled plumbing system of the Rauðhólar volcanic chain, Northern Volcanic Zone, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friese, Nadine; Bense, Frithjof A.; Tanner, David C.; Gústafsson, Lúðvík E.; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2013-06-01

    The Rauðhólar volcanic chain, located in the Northern Volcanic Zone of Iceland, has been variably eroded such that, in the northern part, the original scoria cones are preserved, while the central and southern parts expose their shallow feeders. The chain thus offers insight into the inner workings of the near-surface feeder system of scoria cones. The volcanic chain was mapped in 3D using GPS. The en echelon-arranged volcanic chain can be divided into three parts: The southernmost part contains only plugs and necks with a thin pyroclastic cover as well as multi-tiered lava flows. The central part combines partially eroded scoria cones, (feeder) dyke intersections, and welded scoria interbedded within rootless and clastogenic lava flows; the welded scoria is composed of different kinds of lithics and bombs. The northern part preserves almost intact, overlapping scoria cones with voluminous lapilli-sized scoriaceous deposits. The overall dyke trend is orthogonal but shows radial patterns in individual cone complexes. Feeder dykes observed to depths of about 200 m below the volcanic chain are up to 8 m thick and flare in to conduits in the uppermost 20-50 m. The exposed shallow plumbing system shows that magma pathways through the volcanic edifice are very complex with incremental, repeated intrusions. We interpret the arcuate shape to be the result of a local change in the orientation of the stress field because the Rauðhólar volcanic chain is located within a major relay structure between volcanoes on the eastern Fremrinámur rift arm and a rift extension with grabens on the western periphery.

  12. Comparison of Cone Model Parameters for Halo Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Hyeonock; Moon, Y.-J.; Jang, Soojeong; Lee, Kyoung-Sun; Kim, Hae-Yeon

    2013-11-01

    Halo coronal mass ejections (HCMEs) are a major cause of geomagnetic storms, hence their three-dimensional structures are important for space weather. We compare three cone models: an elliptical-cone model, an ice-cream-cone model, and an asymmetric-cone model. These models allow us to determine three-dimensional parameters of HCMEs such as radial speed, angular width, and the angle [ γ] between sky plane and cone axis. We compare these parameters obtained from three models using 62 HCMEs observed by SOHO/LASCO from 2001 to 2002. Then we obtain the root-mean-square (RMS) error between the highest measured projection speeds and their calculated projection speeds from the cone models. As a result, we find that the radial speeds obtained from the models are well correlated with one another ( R > 0.8). The correlation coefficients between angular widths range from 0.1 to 0.48 and those between γ-values range from -0.08 to 0.47, which is much smaller than expected. The reason may be the different assumptions and methods. The RMS errors between the highest measured projection speeds and the highest estimated projection speeds of the elliptical-cone model, the ice-cream-cone model, and the asymmetric-cone model are 376 km s-1, 169 km s-1, and 152 km s-1. We obtain the correlation coefficients between the location from the models and the flare location ( R > 0.45). Finally, we discuss strengths and weaknesses of these models in terms of space-weather application.

  13. Directionality of individual cone photoreceptors in the parafoveal region.

    PubMed

    Morris, Hugh J; Blanco, Leonardo; Codona, Johanan L; Li, Simone L; Choi, Stacey S; Doble, Nathan

    2015-12-01

    The pointing direction of cone photoreceptors can be inferred from the Stiles-Crawford Effect of the First Kind (SCE-I) measurement. Healthy retinas have tightly packed cones with a SCE-I function peak either centered in the pupil or with a slight nasal bias. Various retinal pathologies can change the profile of the SCE-I function implying that the arrangement or the light capturing properties of the cone photoreceptors are affected. Measuring the SCE-I may reveal early signs of photoreceptor change before actual cell apoptosis occurs. In vivo retinal imaging with adaptive optics (AO) was used to measure the pointing direction of individual cones at eight retinal locations in four control human subjects. Retinal images were acquired by translating an aperture in the light delivery arm through 19 different locations across a subject's entrance pupil. Angular tuning properties of individual cones were calculated by fitting a Gaussian to the reflected intensity profile of each cone projected onto the pupil. Results were compared to those from an accepted psychophysical SCE-I measurement technique. The maximal difference in cone directionality of an ensemble of cones, ρ¯, between the major and minor axes of the Gaussian fit was 0.05 versus 0.29mm(-2) in one subject. All four subjects were found to have a mean nasal bias of 0.81mm with a standard deviation of ±0.30mm in the peak position at all retinal locations with mean ρ¯ value decreasing by 23% with increasing retinal eccentricity. Results show that cones in the parafoveal region converge towards the center of the pupillary aperture, confirming the anterior pointing alignment hypothesis. PMID:26494187

  14. Cone photoreceptor definition on adaptive optics retinal imaging

    PubMed Central

    Muthiah, Manickam Nick; Gias, Carlos; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Zhong, Joe; McClelland, Zoe; Sallo, Ferenc B; Peto, Tunde; Coffey, Peter J; da Cruz, Lyndon

    2014-01-01

    Aims To quantitatively analyse cone photoreceptor matrices on images captured on an adaptive optics (AO) camera and assess their correlation to well-established parameters in the retinal histology literature. Methods High resolution retinal images were acquired from 10 healthy subjects, aged 20–35 years old, using an AO camera (rtx1, Imagine Eyes, France). Left eye images were captured at 5° of retinal eccentricity, temporal to the fovea for consistency. In three subjects, images were also acquired at 0, 2, 3, 5 and 7° retinal eccentricities. Cone photoreceptor density was calculated following manual and automated counting. Inter-photoreceptor distance was also calculated. Voronoi domain and power spectrum analyses were performed for all images. Results At 5° eccentricity, the cone density (cones/mm2 mean±SD) was 15.3±1.4×103 (automated) and 13.9±1.0×103 (manual) and the mean inter-photoreceptor distance was 8.6±0.4 μm. Cone density decreased and inter-photoreceptor distance increased with increasing retinal eccentricity from 2 to 7°. A regular hexagonal cone photoreceptor mosaic pattern was seen at 2, 3 and 5° of retinal eccentricity. Conclusions Imaging data acquired from the AO camera match cone density, intercone distance and show the known features of cone photoreceptor distribution in the pericentral retina as reported by histology, namely, decreasing density values from 2 to 7° of eccentricity and the hexagonal packing arrangement. This confirms that AO flood imaging provides reliable estimates of pericentral cone photoreceptor distribution in normal subjects. PMID:24729030

  15. Dynamics of dikes versus cone sheets in volcanic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galland, Olivier; Burchardt, Steffi; Hallot, Erwan; Mourgues, Régis; Bulois, Cédric

    2015-04-01

    Igneous sheet intrusions of various shapes, such as dikes and cone sheets, coexist as parts of complex volcanic plumbing systems likely fed by common sources. How they form is fundamental regarding volcanic hazards, but yet no dynamic model simulates and predicts satisfactorily their diversity. Here we present scaled laboratory experiments that reproduced dikes and cone sheets under controlled conditions (Galland et al., 2014). Our models show that their formation is governed by a dimensionless ratio (Π1), which describes the shape of the magma source, and a dynamic dimensionless ratio (Π2), which compares the viscous stresses in the flowing magma to the host-rock strength. Plotting our experiments against these two numbers results in a phase diagram evidencing a dike and a cone-sheet field, separated by a sharp transition that fits a power law. This result shows that dikes and cone sheets correspond to distinct physical regimes of magma emplacement in the crust. For a given host-rock strength, cone sheets preferentially form when the source is shallow, relative to its lateral extent, or when the magma influx velocity (or viscosity) is high. Conversely, dikes form when the source is deep compared to its size, or when magma influx rate (or viscosity) is low. Both dikes and cone sheets may form from the same source, the shift from one regime to the other being then controlled by magma dynamics, i.e., different values of Π2. The extrapolated empirical dike-to-cone sheet transition is in good agreement with the occurrence of dikes and cone sheets in various natural volcanic settings. Galland, O., Burchardt, S., Hallot, E., Mourgues, R., Bulois, C., 2014. Dynamics of dikes versus cone sheets in volcanic systems. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 2014JB011059, 10.1002/2014jb011059.

  16. Accurate patient dosimetry of kilovoltage cone-beam CT in radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, George X.; Duggan, Dennis M.; Coffey, Charles W.

    2008-03-15

    The increased utilization of x-ray imaging in image-guided radiotherapy has dramatically improved the radiation treatment and the lives of cancer patients. Daily imaging procedures, such as cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), for patient setup may significantly increase the dose to the patient's normal tissues. This study investigates the dosimetry from a kilovoltage (kV) CBCT for real patient geometries. Monte Carlo simulations were used to study the kV beams from a Varian on-board imager integrated into the Trilogy accelerator. The Monte Carlo calculated results were benchmarked against measurements and good agreement was obtained. The authors developed a novel method to calibrate Monte Carlo simulated beams with measurements using an ionization chamber in which the air-kerma calibration factors are obtained from an Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory. The authors have introduced a new Monte Carlo calibration factor, f{sub MCcal}, which is determined from the calibration procedure. The accuracy of the new method was validated by experiment. When a Monte Carlo simulated beam has been calibrated, the simulated beam can be used to accurately predict absolute dose distributions in the irradiated media. Using this method the authors calculated dose distributions to patient anatomies from a typical CBCT acquisition for different treatment sites, such as head and neck, lung, and pelvis. Their results have shown that, from a typical head and neck CBCT, doses to soft tissues, such as eye, spinal cord, and brain can be up to 8, 6, and 5 cGy, respectively. The dose to the bone, due to the photoelectric effect, can be as much as 25 cGy, about three times the dose to the soft tissue. The study provides detailed information on the additional doses to the normal tissues of a patient from a typical kV CBCT acquisition. The methodology of the Monte Carlo beam calibration developed and introduced in this study allows the user to calculate both relative and absolute

  17. SU-E-J-69: Evaluation of the Lens Dose On the Cone Beam IGRT Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Palomo-Llinares, R; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona Meseguer, V; Lliso-Valverde, F; Candela-Juan, C; Perez-Calatayud, J; Pujades, M; Ballester, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: With the establishment of the IGRT as a standard technique, the extra dose that is given to the patients should be taken into account. Furthermore, it has been a recent decrease of the dose threshold in the lens, reduced to 0.5 Gy (ICRP ref 4825-3093-1464 on 21st April, 2011).The purpose of this work was to evaluate the extra dose that the lens is receive due to the Cone-Beam (CBCT) location systems in Head-and-Neck treatments. Methods: The On-Board Imaging (OBI) v 1.5 of the two Varian accelerators, one Clinac iX and one True Beam, were used to obtain the dose that this OBI version give to the lens in the Head-and-Neck location treatments. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard Dose Head protocol (100 kVp, 80 mA, 8 ms and 200 degree of rotation).The measurements were taken with thermoluminescence (TLD) EXTRAD (Harshaw) dosimeters placed in an anthropomorphic phantom over the eye and under 3 mm of bolus material to mimic the lens position. The center of the head was placed at the isocenter. To reduce TLD energy dependence, they were calibrated at the used beam quality. Results: The average lens dose at the lens in the OBI v 1.5 systems of the Clinac iX and the True Beam is 0.071 and 0.076 cGy/CBCT, respectively. Conclusions: The extra absorbed doses that receive the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the new ICRP recommended threshold for the lens. However, the addition effect of several CBCT acquisition during the whole treatment should be taken into account.

  18. The development and role of megavoltage cone beam computerized tomography in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Olivier

    External beam radiation therapy has now the ability to deliver doses that conform tightly to a tumor volume. The steep dose gradients planned in these treatments make it increasingly important to reproduce the patient position and anatomy at each treatment fraction. For this reason, considerable research now focuses on in-room three-dimensional imaging. This thesis describes the first clinical megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MVCBCT) system, which utilizes a conventional linear accelerator equipped with an amorphous silicon flat panel detector. The document covers the system development and investigation of its clinical applications over the last 4-5 years. The physical performance of the system was evaluated and optimized for soft-tissue contrast resolution leading to recommendations of imaging protocols to use for specific clinical applications and body sites. MVCBCT images can resolve differences of 5% in electron density for a mean dose of 9 cGy. Hence, the image quality of this system is sufficient to differentiate some soft-tissue structures. The absolute positioning accuracy with MVCBCT is better than 1 mm. The accuracy of isodose lines calculated using MVCBCT images of head and neck patients is within 3% and 3 mm. The system shows excellent stability in image quality, CT# calibration, radiation exposure and absolute positioning over a period of 8 months. A procedure for MVCBCT quality assurance was developed. In our clinic, MVCBCT has been used to detect non rigid spinal cord distortions, to position a patient with a paraspinous tumor close to metallic hardware, to position prostate cancer patients using gold markers or soft-tissue landmarks, to monitor head and neck anatomical changes and their dosimetric consequences, and to complement the convention CT for treatment planning in presence of metallic implants. MVCBCT imaging is changing the clinical practice of our department by increasingly revealing patient-specific errors. New verification

  19. Fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT and endoscopic video for image-guided procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daly, M. J.; Chan, H.; Prisman, E.; Vescan, A.; Nithiananthan, S.; Qiu, J.; Weersink, R.; Irish, J. C.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2010-02-01

    Methods for accurate registration and fusion of intraoperative cone-beam CT (CBCT) with endoscopic video have been developed and integrated into a system for surgical guidance that accounts for intraoperative anatomical deformation and tissue excision. The system is based on a prototype mobile C-Arm for intraoperative CBCT that provides low-dose 3D image updates on demand with sub-mm spatial resolution and soft-tissue visibility, and also incorporates subsystems for real-time tracking and navigation, video endoscopy, deformable image registration of preoperative images and surgical plans, and 3D visualization software. The position and pose of the endoscope are geometrically registered to 3D CBCT images by way of real-time optical tracking (NDI Polaris) for rigid endoscopes (e.g., head and neck surgery), and electromagnetic tracking (NDI Aurora) for flexible endoscopes (e.g., bronchoscopes, colonoscopes). The intrinsic (focal length, principal point, non-linear distortion) and extrinsic (translation, rotation) parameters of the endoscopic camera are calibrated from images of a planar calibration checkerboard (2.5×2.5 mm2 squares) obtained at different perspectives. Video-CBCT registration enables a variety of 3D visualization options (e.g., oblique CBCT slices at the endoscope tip, augmentation of video with CBCT images and planning data, virtual reality representations of CBCT [surface renderings]), which can reveal anatomical structures not directly visible in the endoscopic view - e.g., critical structures obscured by blood or behind the visible anatomical surface. Video-CBCT fusion is evaluated in pre-clinical sinus and skull base surgical experiments, and is currently being incorporated into an ongoing prospective clinical trial in CBCT-guided head and neck surgery.

  20. Chapter 45: Introduction to DAL: Cone Search Protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kent, B. R.; Plante, R.

    The cone search is the simplest of the VO protocols to implement and use. These services provide a basic research tool for data access and play an important role in the data access layer (DAL). As the first data access layer protocol used in the VO, the cone search aims to be simple so that data providers can quickly implement it as a powerful search tool. The requirements for using and publishing a cone search service, as well as required responses from the service will be described.

  1. Oscillatory flow in a cone-and-plate bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Chung, C A; Tzou, M R; Ho, R W

    2005-08-01

    Motivated by biometric applications, we analyze oscillatory flow in a cone-and-plate geometry. The cone is rotated in a simple harmonic way on a stationary plate. Based on assuming that the angle between the cone and plate is small, we describe the flow analytically by a perturbation method in terms of two small parameters, the Womersley number and the Reynolds number, which account for the influences of the local acceleration and centripetal force, respectively. Working equations for the shear stresses induced both by laminar primary and secondary flows on the plate surface are presented. PMID:16121530

  2. Attitude reorientation of spacecraft by means of impulse coning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of the impulse coning method of reorientation was studied. Maneuver cost is proportional to the product of fuel consumed and time expended during a maneuver. Assumptions included impulsive external control torques, rigid-body spacecraft, rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Also, coning maneuvers were constrained to have equal initial and final cone angles. Maneuver costs are presented for general reorientations as well as for spin-axis reorientations where final attitude about the spin axis is arbitrary.

  3. A reassessment of the Pennsylvanian lycophyte cone Triplosporite Brown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Barry A.; Bek, Jiří

    2014-06-01

    The type collection of the lycopsid cone species Triplosporite brownii Unger was re-examined to assess its in situ spores. The cones are monosporangiate with only microspores that possess both cingulum and zona. They equate to the dispersed miospore genus Lycospora and would be identified as Lycospora cf. pseudoannulata. Therefore, the genus Triplosporite Brown is shown to be a junior synonym to Lepidostrobus and a species emendation is given. A comparison is given with the other Lepidostrobus cones which yielded similar in situ microspores of the Lycospora pellucida Group.

  4. [A smoker with hoarseness and a swelling of his neck].

    PubMed

    van der Poel, N A; Vleming, M; Bok, J W

    2016-01-01

    A 68-year-old man was referred to the Department of Otolaryngology because of a swelling of his neck and hoarseness. CT imaging of his neck revealed a cystic mass in the larynx as well as in the neck, with an air-fluid level. The diagnosis 'laryngopyocele' was made. PMID:27096477

  5. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  6. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  7. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  8. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  9. 27 CFR 9.109 - Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Viticultural Areas § 9.109 Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the Northern Neck George Washington Birthplace...

  10. 49 CFR 572.163 - Neck assembly and test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Hybrid III Six-Year-Old Weighted Child Test Dummy § 572.163 Neck assembly and test procedure. The neck assembly is assembled and tested as specified in 49 CFR 572.123 (Subpart N). ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Neck assembly and test procedure. 572.163...

  11. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  12. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  13. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  14. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  15. 49 CFR 572.83 - Head-neck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Head-neck. 572.83 Section 572.83 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 9-Month Old Child § 572.83 Head-neck. The head-neck assembly shown in drawing 1049/A consists of parts specified as items 1 through 16...

  16. 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... ENT Doctor Near You 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer 50 Facts about Oral, Head and Neck Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... public relations staff at newsroom@entnet.org . Oral, Head and Neck Cancer most commonly refers to squamous ...

  17. Spatial distributions of cone inputs to cells of the parvocellular pathway investigated with cone-isolating gratings

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Barry B.; Shapley, Robert M.; Hawken, Michael J.; Sun, Hao

    2014-01-01

    Receptive fields of midget ganglion cells and parvocellular lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) neurons show color-opponent responses because they receive antagonistic input from the middle- and long-wavelength sensitive cones. It has been controversial as to whether this opponency can derive from random connectivity; if receptive field centers of cells near the fovea are cone-specific due to midget morphology, this would confer some degree of color opponency even with random cone input to the surround. A simple test of this mixed surround hypothesis is to compare spatial frequency tuning curves for luminance gratings and gratings isolating cone input to the receptive field center. If tuning curves for luminance gratings were bandpass, then with the mixed surround hypothesis tuning curves for gratings isolating the receptive field center cone class should also be bandpass, but to a lesser extent than for luminance. Tuning curves for luminance, chromatic, and cone-isolating gratings were measured in macaque retinal ganglion cells and LGN cells. We defined and measured a bandpass index to compare luminance and center cone-isolating tuning curves. Midget retinal ganglion cells and parvocellular LGN cells had bandpass indices between 0.1 and 1 with luminance gratings, but the index was usually near 1 (meaning low-pass tuning) when the receptive field center cone class alone was modulated. This is strong evidence for a considerable degree of cone-specific input to the surround. A fraction of midget and parvocellular cells showed evidence of incomplete specificity. Fitting the data with receptive field models revealed considerable intercell variability, with indications in some cells of a more complex receptive structure than a simple difference of Gaussians model. PMID:22330383

  18. Spatial distributions of cone inputs to cells of the parvocellular pathway investigated with cone-isolating gratings.

    PubMed

    Lee, Barry B; Shapley, Robert M; Hawken, Michael J; Sun, Hao

    2012-02-01

    Receptive fields of midget ganglion cells and parvocellular lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) neurons show color-opponent responses because they receive antagonistic input from the middle- and long-wavelength sensitive cones. It has been controversial as to whether this opponency can derive from random connectivity; if receptive field centers of cells near the fovea are cone-specific due to midget morphology, this would confer some degree of color opponency even with random cone input to the surround. A simple test of this mixed surround hypothesis is to compare spatial frequency tuning curves for luminance gratings and gratings isolating cone input to the receptive field center. If tuning curves for luminance gratings were bandpass, then with the mixed surround hypothesis tuning curves for gratings isolating the receptive field center cone class should also be bandpass, but to a lesser extent than for luminance. Tuning curves for luminance, chromatic, and cone-isolating gratings were measured in macaque retinal ganglion cells and LGN cells. We defined and measured a bandpass index to compare luminance and center cone-isolating tuning curves. Midget retinal ganglion cells and parvocellular LGN cells had bandpass indices between 0.1 and 1 with luminance gratings, but the index was usually near 1 (meaning low-pass tuning) when the receptive field center cone class alone was modulated. This is strong evidence for a considerable degree of cone-specific input to the surround. A fraction of midget and parvocellular cells showed evidence of incomplete specificity. Fitting the data with receptive field models revealed considerable intercell variability, with indications in some cells of a more complex receptive structure than a simple difference of Gaussians model. PMID:22330383

  19. Soft tissue tumors of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Katenkamp, D

    1987-01-01

    From the tumor register of the Institute of Pathology of Jena all soft tissue tumors of the head and neck collected between 1959 and 1984 were retrieved and reclassified. 562 out of 646 tumors (87%) were benign. Three quarter of these growths could be diagnosed as nerve sheath tumors (schwannomas and neurofibromas), hemangiomas, fibrohistiocytic tumors and lipomas. 84 tumors were malignant (13%). As the most frequent subtypes we found fibrohistiocytic sarcomas (malignant fibrous histiocytomas and atypical fibroxanthomas), muscularly differentiated sarcomas (rhabdo- and leiomyosarcomas) and unclassified sarcomas. The age and sex distribution as well as the localization and histologic peculiarities were analysed and compared with findings reported in the literature. The significance of knowing such data for diagnostic and differential diagnostic considerations is stressed and exemplified. PMID:3592924

  20. Transoral treatment strategies for head and neck tumors

    PubMed Central

    Arens, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of transoral endoscopic surgery has initiated a fundamental change in the treatment of head and neck cancer. The endoscopic approach minimizes the intraoperative trauma. Due to the lower burden for the patient and the savings potential these methods have gained wide acceptance. These transoral accesses routes allow experienced surgeons to reduce the morbidity of surgical resection with no deterioration of oncologic results. This suggests a further extension of the indication spectrum and a high growth potential for these techniques and equipment in the coming years. For selected patients with selected tumors the minimally invasive transoral surgery offers improved oncological and functional results. In the present paper, different surgical access routes are presented and their indications discussed. PMID:23320057