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Sample records for growth crystal field

  1. Phase-Field Simulations of Crystal Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plapp, Mathis

    2010-07-01

    This course gives an elementary introduction to the phase-field method and to its applications for the modeling of crystal growth. Two different interpretations of the phase-field variable are given and discussed. It can be seen as a physical order parameter that characterizes a phase transition, or as a smoothed indicator function that tracks domain boundaries. Elementary phase-field models for solidification and epitaxial growth are presented and are applied to the dendritic growth of a pure substance and the step-flow growth on a vicinal surface.

  2. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo

    2014-10-06

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  3. Crystal growth under microgravity conditions with using of magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feonychev, A.; Bondareva, N.

    The peculiarities of melt flows and crystal growth by the Bridgman and floating zone methods aboard spacecrafts under the action of steady axial or rotating magnetic field are considered. Steady magnetic field can minimize adverse effect of residual accelerations and vibrations on dopant segregation in crystals growing by the Bridgman method but it requires using strong magnetic fields, which induces specific oscillations. Under strong convection in terrestrial conditions steady magnetic field gives positive effect. Under growth of small-sized crystals by the floating zone method in microgravity conditions an use of steady magnetic field brings into dramatic increase of radial segregation due to convective vortex to free fluid surface. The flows being created by rotating magnetic field and resultant under combination of Marangoni convection with rotating magnetic field were studied for wide range of parameters including the regimes of oscillatory (turbulent) convection. Mathematical model and computer program was tested by published results of two experiments. The dependence of transition from laminar to oscillatory flow was obtained for different boundary conditions, geometric parameters of fluid and intensity of magnetic field. Specific oscillations with very low frequency and oscillations of the beating type had been discovered under the action rotating magnetic field on Marangoni convection. The mutual influence of rotating magnetic field and thermocapillary convection on flow stability was noted. Use of rotating magnetic field under crystal growth by floating zone method leads to reduction of azimuth velocity which is responsible for origin of oscillatory convection and striation of crystals. It was shown on concrete examples that there is a possibility to reduce radial segregation under optimization of rotating velocity and intensity of magnetic field. For the Bridgman method (in general for ampoule methods of crystal growth), the use of rotating magnetic

  4. Faceting transitions in crystal growth and heteroepitaxial growth in the anisotropic phase-field crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Chen, Zheng; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Tao; Du, Xiu-Juan

    2012-11-01

    We modify the anisotropic phase-field crystal model (APFC), and present a semi-implicit spectral method to numerically solve the dynamic equation of the APFC model. The process results in the acceleration of computations by orders of magnitude relative to the conventional explicit finite-difference scheme, thereby, allowing us to work on a large system and for a long time. The faceting transitions introduced by the increasing anisotropy in crystal growth are then discussed. In particular, we investigate the morphological evolution in heteroepitaxial growth of our model. A new formation mechanism of misfit dislocations caused by vacancy trapping is found. The regular array of misfit dislocations produces a small-angle grain boundary under the right conditions, and it could significantly change the growth orientation of epitaxial layers.

  5. Electromagnetic Field Effects in Semiconductor Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dulikravich, George S.

    1996-01-01

    This proposed two-year research project was to involve development of an analytical model, a numerical algorithm for its integration, and a software for the analysis of a solidification process under the influence of electric and magnetic fields in microgravity. Due to the complexity of the analytical model that was developed and its boundary conditions, only a preliminary version of the numerical algorithm was developed while the development of the software package was not completed.

  6. Semiconductor Crystal Growth in Static and Rotating Magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Martin

    2004-01-01

    Magnetic fields have been applied during the growth of bulk semiconductor crystals to control the convective flow behavior of the melt. A static magnetic field established Lorentz forces which tend to reduce the convective intensity in the melt. At sufficiently high magnetic field strengths, a boundary layer is established ahead of the solid-liquid interface where mass transport is dominated by diffusion. This can have a significant effect on segregation behavior and can eliminate striations in grown crystals resulting from convective instabilities. Experiments on dilute (Ge:Ga) and solid solution (Ge-Si) semiconductor systems show a transition from a completely mixed convective state to a diffusion-controlled state between 0 and 5 Tesla. In HgCdTe, radial segregation approached the diffusion limited regime and the curvature of the solid-liquid interface was reduced by a factor of 3 during growth in magnetic fields in excess of 0.5 Tesla. Convection can also be controlled during growth at reduced gravitational levels. However, the direction of the residual steady-state acceleration vector can compromise this effect if it cannot be controlled. A magnetic field in reduced gravity can suppress disturbances caused by residual transverse accelerations and by random non-steady accelerations. Indeed, a joint program between NASA and the NHMFL resulted in the construction of a prototype spaceflight magnet for crystal growth applications. An alternative to the suppression of convection by static magnetic fields and reduced gravity is the imposition of controlled steady flow generated by rotating magnetic fields (RMF)'s. The potential benefits of an RMF include homogenization of the melt temperature and concentration distribution, and control of the solid-liquid interface shape. Adjusting the strength and frequency of the applied magnetic field allows tailoring of the resultant flow field. A limitation of RMF's is that they introduce deleterious instabilities above a

  7. Magnetic field controlled FZ single crystal growth of intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, R.; Behr, G.; Gerbeth, G.; Priede, J.; Uhlemann, H.-J.; Fischer, F.; Schultz, L.

    2005-02-01

    Intermetallic rare-earth-transition-metal compounds with their coexistence of magnetic ordering and superconductivity are still of great scientific interest. The crystal growth of bulk single crystals is very often unsuccessful due to an unfavorable solid-liquid interface geometry enclosing concave fringes. The aim of the work is the contactless control of heat and material transport during floating-zone single crystal growth of intermetallic compounds. This control is provided by a tailored design of the electromagnetic field and the resulting electromagnetically driven convection. Numerical simulations for the determination of the electromagnetic field configuration induced by the RF heater coil and the solution of the coupled heat and hydrodynamic equations were done for the model substance Ni with and without additional magnetic field. As a result, an innovative magnetic two-phase stirrer system has been developed which enables the controlled influence on the melt ranging from intensive inwards/outwards flows to flows almost at rest. The selection of parameters necessary for the desired fluid flow is determined from numerical simulation. The basis for the calculations are the process-related fluid flow conditions which are determined by the mode of heating, heat radiation at the free surface and material parameters. This treatment of the problem leads to the customised magnetic field for the special intermetallic compound. The application of the new magnetic system leads to a distinct improvement of the solid-liquid interface validated on experiments with the model substance Nickel.

  8. Magnetic Field Applications in Semiconductor Crystal Growth and Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin; Ramachandran, Narayanan; Grugel, Richard; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Traveling Magnetic Field (TMF) technique, recently proposed to control meridional flow in electrically conducting melts, is reviewed. In particular, the natural convection damping capability of this technique has been numerically demonstrated with the implication of significantly improving crystal quality. Advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, are discussed. Finally, results of experiments with mixing metallic alloys in long ampoules using TMF is presented

  9. Effect of an electric field on nucleation and growth of crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurov, V. M.; Guchenko, S. A.; Gyngazova, M. S.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the electric field strength on nucleation and growth of the crystals of ammonium halides and alkali metal sulfates has been studied. The optimal electric field strength for NH4Cl and NH4Br crystals was found to be 15 kV/cm, and for NH4I, it equaled 10 kV/cm. No effect of the electric field strength on the crystal growth was found for alkali metal sulfates. This difference is analyzed in terms of the crystal growth thermodynamics. In case, when the electric field is small and the Gibbs energy is of a significant value, the influence of the electric field at the crystal growth is negligible. A method to estimate the critical radius of homogeneous nucleation of the crystal is suggested.

  10. Bridgman Growth of Germanium Crystals in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Walker, J. S.; Szofran, F. R.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A series of (100)-oriented gallium-doped germanium crystals have been grown by the Bridgman method and under the influence of a rotating magnetic field (RMF). The RMF has a marked affect on the interface shape, changing it from concave to nearly flat. The onset of time-dependent flow instabilities occurs when the critical magnetic Taylor number is exceeded, and this can be observed by noting the appearance of striations in the grown crystals. The critical magnetic Taylor number is a sensitive function of the aspect ratio and, as the crystal grows under a constant applied magnetic field, the induced striations change from nonperiodic to periodic, undergo a period-doubling transition, and then cease to exist. Also, by pulsing the RMF on and off, it is shown that intentional interface demarcations can be introduced.

  11. Bridgman Growth of Germanium Crystals in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Szofran, F. R.; Cobb, S. D.; Schweizer, M.; Walker, J. S.

    2005-01-01

    A series of (100)-oriented gallium-doped germanium crystals has been grown by the vertical Bridgman method and under the influence of a rotating magnetic field (RMF). Time-dependent flow instabilities occur when the critical magnetic Taylor number (Tm(sup c)) is exceeded, and this can be observed by noting the appearance of striations in the grown crystals. Tm(sup c) decreases as the aspect ratio of the melt increases, and approaches the theoretical limit expected for an infinite cylinder. Intentional interface demarcations are introduced by pulsing the RMF on and off The RMF has a marked affect on the interface shape, changing it from concave to nearly flat as the RMF strength is increased.

  12. Bridgman Growth of Germanium Crystals in a Rotating Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Walker, J. S.; Schweizer, M.; Cobb, S. D.; Szofran, F. R.

    2004-01-01

    A series of (100)-oriented gallium-doped germanium crystals have been grown by the Bridgman method and under the influence of a rotating magnetic field (RMF). Time-dependent flow instabilities occur when the critical magnetic Taylor number (Tm(sup c) is exceeded, and this can be observed by noting the appearance of striations in the grown crystals. The experimental data indicate that Tm(sup c) increases as the aspect ratio of the melt decreases. Modeling calculations predicting Tm(sup c) as a function of aspect ratio are in reasonable agreement with the experimental data. The RMF has a marked affect on the interface shape, changing it from concave to nearly flat as the RMF strength is increased. Also, by pulsing the RMF on and off, it is shown that intentional interface demarcations can be introduced.

  13. Polymer crystallization in a temperature gradient field with controlled crystal growth rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, D.; Taskar, A. N.; Casale, O.

    1971-01-01

    A method is described for studying the influence of a temperature gradient on the crystallization of quiescent polymer melts. The apparatus used consists of two brass plates with embedded electrical resistance heaters and cooling coils. The crystallizations experiments were conducted by placing polymer specimens between the paltes, and manually adjusting heaters and cooling fluids for temperature control. Linear polyethylene, isotactic polyprophylene, and a high density polyethylene were used. It is concluded that the role of a temperature gradient in producing oriented crystallization is in producing conditions which lead the spherulitic growth pattern to proceed primarily in one direction. Steep gradients diminish the penetration of supercooling and favors oriented growth.

  14. A phase-field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Henager, Charles H.

    2014-02-02

    In this study, we present a new numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model takes into account the buoyancy induced convective flow and its effect on the crystal growth process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase-field method. Two novel phase-field models are developed to model the crystal growth interface in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups: 1) fixed wall temperature profile setup and 2) time-dependent temperature profile setup. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. This model is used to investigate the effect of furnace operational conditions on crystal growth interface profiles and growth velocities. For a simple case of macroscopic radial growth, the phase-field model is validated against an analytical solution. Crystal growth in vertical gradient furnaces with two temperature profile setups have been also investigated using the developed model. The numerical simulations reveal that for a certain set of temperature boundary conditions, the heat transport in the melt near the phase interface is diffusion dominant and advection is suppressed.

  15. A phase-field/Monte-Carlo model describing organic crystal growth from solution. Investigation of the diffusion-influenced growth of hydroquinone crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundin, J.; Yürüdü, C.; Ulrich, J.; Emmerich, H.

    2009-08-01

    In this paper work we present a phase-field/Monte-Carlo hybrid algorithm for the simulation of solutal growth of organic crystals. The algorithm is subsequently used for an investigation of diffusion effects on the growth mechanisms. This method combines a two-scale phase-field model of the liquid phase epitaxial growth and a Monte-Carlo algorithm of the 2D nucleation and thus is faster than previous purely Monte Carlo simulations of crystal growth. The inclusion of supersaturation and diffusion in the method allows the study of crystal growth under various growth conditions. Parameters used in the hybrid algorithm are bound to the energetic parameters of crystal faces, which can be estimated from a detailed study of the actual crystal structure based on a connected nets analysis, which allows the prediction of the shape and morphology of real crystals. The study of the diffusion effect is carried out based on an example of a hydroquinone crystal, which grows from the water solution at various supersaturations. The dependencies of the growth rate and the nucleation rate on the supersaturation indicate the change of the growth mechanism from spiral growth to 2D nucleation. The difference in the growth rate for various faces is in agreement with the crystal morphologies derived from the attachment energy method and observed experimentally. The main result of the simulation is the evaluation of engineering limits for choosing appropriate external process conditions.

  16. Dynamic control over the heat field during LBO crystal growth by High temperature solution method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, A.; Vlezko, V.; Kokh, K.; Kononova, N.; Villeval, Ph.; Lupinski, D.

    2012-12-01

    The paper presents LiB3O5 crystal growth under oscillating temperature regime provided by sequential switching of the heaters placed around the crucible. First results have demonstrated the ability to grow high-quality crystals under dynamicaly changed (rotating) heat field confirming the possibility to control over heat-mass-transfer processes by proposed contact free method.

  17. Models of Mass Transport During Microgravity Crystal Growth of Alloyed Semiconductors in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    Alloyed semiconductor crystals, such as germanium-silicon (GeSi) and various II-VI alloyed crystals, are extremely important for optoelectronic devices. Currently, high-quality crystals of GeSi and of II-VI alloys can be grown by epitaxial processes, but the time required to grow a certain amount of single crystal is roughly 1,000 times longer than the time required for Bridgman growth from a melt. Recent rapid advances in optoelectronics have led to a great demand for more and larger crystals with fewer dislocations and other microdefects and with more uniform and controllable compositions. Currently, alloyed crystals grown by bulk methods have unacceptable levels of segregation in the composition of the crystal. Alloyed crystals are being grown by the Bridgman process in space in order to develop successful bulk-growth methods, with the hope that the technology will be equally successful on earth. Unfortunately some crystals grown in space still have unacceptable segregation, for example, due to residual accelerations. The application of a weak magnetic field during crystal growth in space may eliminate the undesirable segregation. Understanding and improving the bulk growth of alloyed semiconductors in microgravity is critically important. The purpose of this grant to to develop models of the unsteady species transport during the bulk growth of alloyed semiconductor crystals in the presence of a magnetic field in microgravity. The research supports experiments being conducted in the High Magnetic Field Solidification Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and future experiments on the International Space Station.

  18. Magnetic field controlled single crystal growth and surface modification of titanium alloys exposed for biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Regina; Uhlemann, Margitta; Wendrock, Horst; Gerbeth, Gunter; Büchner, Bernd

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work is growth and characterisation of Ti55Nb45 (wt%) single crystals by floating-zone single crystal growth of intermetallic compounds using two-phase radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic heating. Thereby, the process and, in particular, the flow field in the molten zone is influenced by additional magnetic fields. The growth of massive intermetallic single crystals is very often unsuccessful due to an unfavourable solid-liquid interface geometry enclosing concave fringes. It is generally known that the crystallization process stability is enhanced if the crystallization interface is convex. For this, a tailored magnetic two-phase stirrer system has been developed, which enables a controlled influence on the melt ranging from intensive inwards to outwards flows. Since Ti is favourably light, strong and biocompatible, it is one of the few materials that naturally match the requirements for implantation in the human body. Therefore, the magnetic system was applied to crystal growth of Ti alloys. The grown crystals were oriented and cut to cubes with the desired crystallographic orientations [1 0 0] and [1 0 1] normally on a plane. The electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was applied to clearly determine crystal orientation and to localize grain boundaries. The formation of oxidic nanotubes on Ti surfaces in dependence of the grain orientation was investigated, performed electrochemically by anodic oxidation from fluoride containing electrolyte.

  19. Recent developments in Liquid Phase Electroepitaxial growth of bulk crystals under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dost, Sadik; Lent, Brian; Sheibani, Hamdi; Liu, Yongcai

    2004-05-01

    This review article presents recent developments in Liquid Phase Electroepitaxial (LPEE) growth of bulk single crystals of alloy semiconductors under an applied static magnetic field. The growth rate in LPEE is proportional to the applied electric current. However, at higher electric current levels the growth becomes unstable due to the strong convection occurring in the liquid zone. In order to address this problem, a significant body of research has been performed in recent years to suppress and control the natural convection for the purpose of prolonging the growth process to grow larger crystals. LPEE growth experiments show that the growth rate under an applied static magnetic field is also proportional and increases with the field intensity level. The modeling of LPEE growth under magnetic field was also the subject of interest. Two-dimensional mathematical models developed for the LPEE growth process predicted that the natural convection in the liquid zone would be suppressed almost completely with increasing the magnetic field level. However, experiments and also three-dimensional models have shown that there is an optimum magnetic field level below which the growth process is stable and the convection in the liquid zone is suppressed, but above such a field level the convective flow becomes very strong and leads to unstable growth with unstable interfaces. To cite this article: S. Dost et al., C. R. Mecanique 332 (2004).

  20. Semiconductor crystal growth in crossed electric and magnetic fields: Center Director's Discretionary Fund

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.

    1996-01-01

    A unique growth cell was designed in which crossed electric and magnetic fields could be separately or simultaneously applied during semiconductor crystal growth. A thermocouple was inserted into an InSb melt inside the growth cell to examine the temperature response of the fluid to applied electromagnetic fields. A static magnetic field suppressed time-dependent convection when a destabilizing thermal field was applied. The simultaneous application of electric and magnetic fields resulted in forced convection in the melt. The InSb ingots grown in the cell were polycrystalline. An InGaSb crystal, 0.5 cm in diameter and 23-cm long, was grown without electromagnetic fields applied. The axial composition results indicated that complete mixing in the melt occurred for this large aspect ratio.

  1. Application of a rotating magnetic field to semiconductor crystal growth in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senchenkov, A. S.; Barmin, I. V.

    2003-12-01

    To eliminate the tremendous influence of the residual accelerations on homogeneity of the crystal growing in a space experiment, a rotating magnetic field (RMF) is used. A number of the experiments have been performed in space within the RMF both in the frame of the Russian national program and together with European scientists. In the paper some theoretical and experimental results illustrating the effectiveness of RMF application to crystal growth under microgravity conditions are presented. Tables 2, Figs 5, Refs 8.

  2. Self-Aligned Growth of Organic Semiconductor Single Crystals by Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Kotsuki, Kenji; Obata, Seiji; Saiki, Koichiro

    2016-01-19

    We proposed a novel but facile method for growing organic semiconductor single-crystals via solvent vapor annealing (SVA) under electric field. In the conventional SVA growth process, nuclei of crystals appeared anywhere on the substrate and their crystallographic axes were randomly distributed. We applied electric field during the SVA growth of 2,7-dioctyl[1]benzothieno[3,2-b][1]benzothiophene (C8-BTBT) on the SiO2/Si substrate on which a pair of electrodes had been deposited beforehand. Real-time observation of the SVA process revealed that rodlike single crystals grew with their long axes parallel to the electric field and bridged the prepatterned electrodes. As a result, C8-BTBT crystals automatically formed a field effect transistor (FET) structure and the mobility reached 1.9 cm(2)/(V s). Electric-field-assisted SVA proved a promising method for constructing high-mobility single-crystal FETs at the desired position by a low-cost solution process. PMID:26695105

  3. Phase field modelling of strain induced crystal growth in an elastic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghmach, Rabia; Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Munch, Etienne; Biben, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    When a crystal phase grows in an amorphous matrix, such as a crystallisable elastomer, containing cross-links and/or entanglements, these "topological constraints" need to be pushed away from the crystal phase to allow further crystallization. The accumulation of these topological constraints in the vicinity of the crystal interface may store elastic energy and affect the phase transition. To evaluate the consequences of such mechanism, we introduce a phase field model based on the Flory theory of entropic elasticity. We show that the growth process is indeed sensibly affected, in particular, an exponential increase of the surface energy with the displacement of the interface is induced. This explains the formation of stable nano-crystallites as it is observed in the Strain Induced Crystallization (SIC) of natural rubber. Although simple, the model developed here is able to account for many interesting features of SIC, for instance, the crystallite shapes and their sizes which depend on the applied deformation.

  4. Phase field modelling of strain induced crystal growth in an elastic matrix.

    PubMed

    Laghmach, Rabia; Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Munch, Etienne; Biben, Thierry

    2015-06-28

    When a crystal phase grows in an amorphous matrix, such as a crystallisable elastomer, containing cross-links and/or entanglements, these "topological constraints" need to be pushed away from the crystal phase to allow further crystallization. The accumulation of these topological constraints in the vicinity of the crystal interface may store elastic energy and affect the phase transition. To evaluate the consequences of such mechanism, we introduce a phase field model based on the Flory theory of entropic elasticity. We show that the growth process is indeed sensibly affected, in particular, an exponential increase of the surface energy with the displacement of the interface is induced. This explains the formation of stable nano-crystallites as it is observed in the Strain Induced Crystallization (SIC) of natural rubber. Although simple, the model developed here is able to account for many interesting features of SIC, for instance, the crystallite shapes and their sizes which depend on the applied deformation. PMID:26133455

  5. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1993-01-01

    Proteins account for 50% or more of the dry weight of most living systems and play a crucial role in virtually all biological processes. Since the specific functions of essentially all biological molecules are determined by their three-dimensional structures, it is obvious that a detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. At the present time, protein crystallography has no substitute, it is the only technique available for elucidating the atomic arrangements within complicated biological molecules. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting and promising projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. There is a pressing need to better understand protein crystal growth, and to develop new techniques that can be used to enhance the size and quality of protein crystals. There are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor that might be expected to alter crystal growth processes in space is the elimination of density-driven convective flow. Another factor that can be readily controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystal in a gravitational field. Another potential advantage of microgravity for protein crystal growth is the option of doing containerless crystal growth. One can readily understand why the microgravity environment established by Earth-orbiting vehicles is perceived to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. The near term objectives of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  6. In-situ observation of electric-field-induced acceleration in crystal growth of tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyanoquinodimethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Masatoshi; Kuniyoshi, Shigekazu; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Iizuka, Masaaki; Nakamura, Masakazu; Kudo, Kazuhiro

    2013-04-01

    In-situ observations of vapor-phase growth of tetrathiafulvalene (TTF)-tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) crystals under an electric field were conducted without influencing the actual crystal growth process. The shortest incubation time of TTF-TCNQ nuclei and the highest initial growth rate of the crystals are obtained on the anode side and in high electric field regions. It is demonstrated that the distribution of molecules thermally diffusing on the substrate surface is controlled by an external electric field. These results indicate the potential for selective growth of highly conductive organic wires for micro- and nanoscale wiring in organic nanodevices.

  7. Effect of vertical magnetic field on convection and segregation in vertical Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Adornato, Peter M.; Brown, Robert A.

    1988-01-01

    A previous finite-element analysis of vertical Bridgman growth for dilute and nondilute alloys is extended to include the effect of a vertically-aligned magnetic field in the limit of zero magnetic Reynolds number. Calculations are presented for growth of a dilute gallium-germanium alloy in a vertically stabilized Bridgman-Stockbarger system and in a furnace with a uniform temperature gradient imposed along the ampoule. Steady cellular convection driven by radial temperature gradients causes good axial and radial mixing in both systems without a magnetic field. A weak magnetic field decreases the intensity of convection and the effectiveness of solute mixing. The radial nonuniformity is greatest for an intermediate field strength. Stronger fields suppress flow recirculation completely, and lead to uniform solute segregation across the crystal and to diffusion-controlled axial segregation.

  8. Bridgman crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, Frederick

    1990-01-01

    The objective of this theoretical research effort was to improve the understanding of the growth of Pb(x)Sn(1-x)Te and especially how crystal quality could be improved utilizing the microgravity environment of space. All theoretical growths are done using the vertical Bridgman method. It is believed that improved single crystal yields can be achieved by systematically identifying and studying system parameters both theoretically and experimentally. A computational model was developed to study and eventually optimize the growth process. The model is primarily concerned with the prediction of the thermal field, although mass transfer in the melt and the state of stress in the crystal were of considerable interest. The evolution is presented of the computer simulation and some of the important results obtained. Diffusion controlled growth was first studied since it represented a relatively simple, but nontheless realistic situation. In fact, results from this analysis prompted a study of the triple junction region where the melt, crystal, and ampoule wall meet. Since microgravity applications were sought because of the low level of fluid movement, the effect of gravitational field strength on the thermal and concentration field was also of interest. A study of the strength of coriolis acceleration on the growth process during space flight was deemed necessary since it would surely produce asymmetries in the flow field if strong enough. Finally, thermosolutal convection in a steady microgravity field for thermally stable conditions and both stable and unstable solutal conditions was simulated.

  9. A binary phase field crystal study for liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanli; Peng, Yingying; Chen, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    The liquid phase heteroepitaxial growth on predefined crystalline substrate is studied with binary phase field crystal (PFC) model. The purpose of this paper focuses on changes of the morphology of epitaxial films, influences of substrate vicinal angles on epitaxial growth, characteristics of islands growth on both sides of the substrate as well. It is found that the morphology of epitaxial films undergoes the following transitions: layer-by-layer growth, islands formation, mismatch dislocations nucleation and climb towards the film-substrate interface. Meanwhile, the density of steps and islands has obviously direct ratio relations with the vicinal angles. Also, preferential regions are found when islands grow on both sides of the substrate. For thinner substrate, the arrangement of islands is more orderly and the appearance of preferential growth is more obvious than that of thicker substrate. Also, the existing of preferential regions is much more valid for small substrate vicinal angles in contrast for big substrate vicinal angles.

  10. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gyula I; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-15

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model. PMID:21386517

  11. Polymorphism, crystal nucleation and growth in the phase-field crystal model in 2D and 3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, Gyula I.; Tegze, György; Pusztai, Tamás; Tóth, Gergely; Gránásy, László

    2010-09-01

    We apply a simple dynamical density functional theory, the phase-field crystal (PFC) model of overdamped conservative dynamics, to address polymorphism, crystal nucleation, and crystal growth in the diffusion-controlled limit. We refine the phase diagram for 3D, and determine the line free energy in 2D and the height of the nucleation barrier in 2D and 3D for homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation by solving the respective Euler-Lagrange (EL) equations. We demonstrate that, in the PFC model, the body-centered cubic (bcc), the face-centered cubic (fcc), and the hexagonal close-packed structures (hcp) compete, while the simple cubic structure is unstable, and that phase preference can be tuned by changing the model parameters: close to the critical point the bcc structure is stable, while far from the critical point the fcc prevails, with an hcp stability domain in between. We note that with increasing distance from the critical point the equilibrium shapes vary from the sphere to specific faceted shapes: rhombic dodecahedron (bcc), truncated octahedron (fcc), and hexagonal prism (hcp). Solving the equation of motion of the PFC model supplied with conserved noise, solidification starts with the nucleation of an amorphous precursor phase, into which the stable crystalline phase nucleates. The growth rate is found to be time dependent and anisotropic; this anisotropy depends on the driving force. We show that due to the diffusion-controlled growth mechanism, which is especially relevant for crystal aggregation in colloidal systems, dendritic growth structures evolve in large-scale isothermal single-component PFC simulations. An oscillatory effective pair potential resembling those for model glass formers has been evaluated from structural data of the amorphous phase obtained by instantaneous quenching. Finally, we present results for eutectic solidification in a binary PFC model.

  12. Phase-field study of crystal growth in three-dimensional capillaries: Effects of crystalline anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Debierre, Jean-Marc; Guérin, Rahma; Kassner, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Phase-field simulations are performed to explore the thermal solidification of a pure melt in three-dimensional capillaries. Motivated by our previous work for isotropic or slightly anisotropic materials, we focus here on the more general case of anisotropic materials. Different channel cross sections are compared (square, hexagonal, circular) to reveal the influence of geometry and the effects of a competition between the crystal and the channel symmetries. In particular, a compass effect toward growth directions favored by the surface energy is identified. At given undercooling and anisotropy, the simulations generally show the coexistence of several growth modes. The relative stability of these growth modes is tested by submitting them to a strong spatiotemporal noise for a short time, which reveals a subtle hierarchy between them. Similarities and differences with experimental growth modes in confined geometry are discussed qualitatively. PMID:27575207

  13. Phase-field study of crystal growth in three-dimensional capillaries: Effects of crystalline anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debierre, Jean-Marc; Guérin, Rahma; Kassner, Klaus

    2016-07-01

    Phase-field simulations are performed to explore the thermal solidification of a pure melt in three-dimensional capillaries. Motivated by our previous work for isotropic or slightly anisotropic materials, we focus here on the more general case of anisotropic materials. Different channel cross sections are compared (square, hexagonal, circular) to reveal the influence of geometry and the effects of a competition between the crystal and the channel symmetries. In particular, a compass effect toward growth directions favored by the surface energy is identified. At given undercooling and anisotropy, the simulations generally show the coexistence of several growth modes. The relative stability of these growth modes is tested by submitting them to a strong spatiotemporal noise for a short time, which reveals a subtle hierarchy between them. Similarities and differences with experimental growth modes in confined geometry are discussed qualitatively.

  14. Two-dimensional liquid crystalline growth within a phase-field-crystal model.

    PubMed

    Tang, Sai; Praetorius, Simon; Backofen, Rainer; Voigt, Axel; Yu, Yan-Mei; Wang, Jincheng

    2015-07-01

    By using a two-dimensional phase-field-crystal (PFC) model, the liquid crystalline growth of the plastic triangular phase is simulated with emphasis on crystal shape and topological defect formation. The equilibrium shape of a plastic triangular crystal (PTC) grown from an isotropic phase is compared with that grown from a columnar or smectic-A (CSA) phase. While the shape of a PTC nucleus in the isotropic phase is almost identical to that of the classical PFC model, the shape of a PTC nucleus in CSA is affected by the orientation of stripes in the CSA phase, and irregular hexagonal, elliptical, octagonal, and rectangular shapes are obtained. Concerning the dynamics of the growth process, we analyze the topological structure of the nematic order, which starts from nucleation of +1/2 and -1/2 disclination pairs at the PTC growth front and evolves into hexagonal cells consisting of +1 vortices surrounded by six satellite -1/2 disclinations. It is found that the orientational and the positional order do not evolve simultaneously; the orientational order evolves behind the positional order, leading to a large transition zone, which can span over several lattice spacings. PMID:26274192

  15. Two-dimensional liquid crystalline growth within a phase-field-crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Sai; Praetorius, Simon; Backofen, Rainer; Voigt, Axel; Yu, Yan-Mei; Wang, Jincheng

    2015-07-01

    By using a two-dimensional phase-field-crystal (PFC) model, the liquid crystalline growth of the plastic triangular phase is simulated with emphasis on crystal shape and topological defect formation. The equilibrium shape of a plastic triangular crystal (PTC) grown from an isotropic phase is compared with that grown from a columnar or smectic-A (CSA) phase. While the shape of a PTC nucleus in the isotropic phase is almost identical to that of the classical PFC model, the shape of a PTC nucleus in CSA is affected by the orientation of stripes in the CSA phase, and irregular hexagonal, elliptical, octagonal, and rectangular shapes are obtained. Concerning the dynamics of the growth process, we analyze the topological structure of the nematic order, which starts from nucleation of +1/2 and -1/2 disclination pairs at the PTC growth front and evolves into hexagonal cells consisting of +1 vortices surrounded by six satellite -1/2 disclinations. It is found that the orientational and the positional order do not evolve simultaneously; the orientational order evolves behind the positional order, leading to a large transition zone, which can span over several lattice spacings.

  16. Crystal growth of pure substances: Phase-field simulations in comparison with analytical and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nestler, B.; Danilov, D.; Galenko, P.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model for non-isothermal solidification in multicomponent systems [SIAM J. Appl. Math. 64 (3) (2004) 775-799] consistent with the formalism of classic irreversible thermodynamics is used for numerical simulations of crystal growth in a pure material. The relation of this approach to the phase-field model by Bragard et al. [Interface Science 10 (2-3) (2002) 121-136] is discussed. 2D and 3D simulations of dendritic structures are compared with the analytical predictions of the Brener theory [Journal of Crystal Growth 99 (1990) 165-170] and with recent experimental measurements of solidification in pure nickel [Proceedings of the TMS Annual Meeting, March 14-18, 2004, pp. 277-288; European Physical Journal B, submitted for publication]. 3D morphology transitions are obtained for variations in surface energy and kinetic anisotropies at different undercoolings. In computations, we investigate the convergence behaviour of a standard phase-field model and of its thin interface extension at different undercoolings and at different ratios between the diffuse interface thickness and the atomistic capillary length. The influence of the grid anisotropy is accurately analyzed for a finite difference method and for an adaptive finite element method in comparison.

  17. Travelling magnetic fields applied to bulk crystal growth from the melt: The step from basic research to industrial scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudolph, Peter

    2008-04-01

    After introduction of various types of magnetic fields in crystal growth, their main pros and cons for crystallization processes are discussed. It is shown that their further developments towards industrial maturity are bound up with the cardinal demands—increase of the process output, improvement of the crystal quality, and reduction of costs. In a further section, the advantages of travelling magnetic fields are presented. The central chapter is devoted to the target of the current KRISTMAG˜ project—the development of an internal heater-magnet module for coupled generation of temperature and a travelling magnetic field, suitable for incorporation into industrial Czochralski pullers and vertical gradient freeze equipments. Amplitude, frequency and phase shift of the three-phase current are all adjustable and are combined with a dc component to control the crystallization process effectively. Results of accompanying numeric modelling are presented. The current state of crystal growth experiments in travelling magnetic field and first encouraging results are given.

  18. Convection patterns and temperature fields of ammonothermal GaN bulk crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuda, Yoshio; Sato, Osamu; Tomida, Daisuke; Yokoyama, Chiaki

    2016-05-01

    The natural convection heat transfer in an ammonothermal process for growing GaN bulk single crystals has been examined numerically. We consider only one crystal to simplify the calculation and discuss the relationship between convection patterns and temperature fields. Two types of convection patterns are observed owing to the difference in the crystal radius. When the convection pattern is transformed, the crystal surface temperature decreases as the crystal radius increases.

  19. Melt Motion Due to Peltier Marking During Bridgman Crystal Growth with an Axial Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sellers, C. C.; Walker, John S.; Szofran, Frank R.; Motakef, Shariar

    2000-01-01

    This paper treats a liquid-metal flow inside an electrically insulating cylinder with electrically conducting solids above and below the liquid region. There is a uniform axial magnetic field, and there is an electric current through the liquid and both solids. Since the lower liquid-solid interface is concave into the solid and since the liquid is a better electrical conductor than the adjacent solid, the electric current is locally concentrated near the centerline. The return to a uniform current distribution involves a radial electric current which interacts with the axial magnetic field to drive an azimuthal flow. The axial variation of the centrifugal force due to the azimuthal velocity drives a meridional circulation with radial and axial velocities. This problem models the effects of Peltier marking during the vertical Bridgman growth of semiconductor crystals with an externally applied magnetic field, where the meridional circulation due to the Peltier Current may produce important mixing in the molten semiconductor.

  20. Multilayer thin film growth on crystalline and quasicrystalline surfaces: A phase-field crystal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muralidharan, Srevatsan; Khodadad, Raika; Sullivan, Ethan; Haataja, Mikko

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we explore the effects of misfit strain fields on both heterogeneous nucleation behavior and anisotropic growth of islands at submonolayer coverages and compositional patterning at complete monolayer coverage via simulations of a phase-field crystal model. In particular, deposition on top of a herringbone structure and quasicrystalline (QC) substrate are considered, the former representing a system with spatially periodic misfit strain fields arising from the presence of surface dislocations, and the latter representing a system which inherently possesses a wide range of local, aperiodic misfit patterns. In the case of single-component systems, we demonstrate that misfit strain fields lead to heterogeneous nucleation behavior and anisotropic island growth. In the case of QC substrate, a wide range of morphologies, such as coexistence of locally hexagonally ordered atomic clusters within a larger scale arrangement with overall QC symmetry and so-called “starfish” aggregates, is observed in a pure system at submonolayer coverages when the adlayer-substrate interaction strength and lattice mismatch are tuned. In the case of bulk-immiscible binary systems at complete monolayer coverage, strain-stabilized compositional domains emerge at low line tension values for both substrates. Interestingly, the compositional domains on the QC substrate inherit their symmetries at sufficiently low line tension values, while at larger line tension values, the domain structure begins to resemble the classical spinodal microstructure. Such domain structures should be readily observable in colloidal systems in which attractive interparticle and particle-substrate interactions can be tuned.

  1. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into an adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  2. Liquid encapsulated crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Low-defect crystals are grown in a closed ampoule under a layer of encapsulant. After crystal growth, the crystal is separated from the melt and moved into the layer of encapsulant and cooled to a first temperature at which crystal growth stops. The crystal is then moved into the inert gas ambient in the ampoule and further cooled. The crystal can be separated from the melt by decanting the melt into and adjacent reservoir or by rotating the ampoule to rotate the crystal into the encapsulant layer.

  3. Investigating the role of oriented nucleus in polymer shish-kebab crystal growth via phase-field method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaodong; Ouyang, Jie; Su, Jin; Zhou, Wen

    2014-03-01

    The phase-field method has been developed to simulate the shish-kebab crystal growth in polymer crystallization by introducing the oriented nucleus. With the help of this developed phase-field model, the role of oriented nucleus in polymer shish-kebab crystal growth has been investigated. It appears that the growth mechanisms of shish-kebab crystal on a preformed oriented nucleus may be attributed to epitaxial growth and lattice match. First the oriented nucleus (early shish) further grows into stable shish entity through epitaxial growth, and then lattice match supplies the sites for kebabs and epitaxial lateral growth from these sites forms the kebabs. It also has been verified that kebabs can be grown on oriented nucleus in the total absence of any flow. Therefore, with regard to flow induced shish-kebab crystal, the oriented nucleus plays a major role in the growth of shish-kebab morphology and the flow mainly helps to generate the oriented nucleus. Besides, when the nucleus possesses a rod-like profile, the kebabs are generally parallel and equidistantly distributed, and the well-defined interval between adjacent kebabs is strongly influenced by the orientation angle of the rod-like nucleus. On the other hand, when the nucleus is slightly curved and presents a thread-like profile, the distribution of kebabs on the shish is no longer equidistant and the influence of orientation angle on the kebab density becomes weak.

  4. Growth of dopamine crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Vidya; Patki, Mugdha

    2016-05-01

    Many nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals have been identified as potential candidates in optical and electro-optical devices. Use of NLO organic crystals is expected in photonic applications. Hence organic nonlinear optical materials have been intensely investigated due to their potentially high nonlinearities, and rapid response in electro-optic effect compared to inorganic NLO materials. There are many methods to grow organic crystals such as vapor growth method, melt growth method and solution growth method. Out of these methods, solution growth method is useful in providing constraint free crystal. Single crystals of Dopamine have been grown by evaporating the solvents from aqueous solution. Crystals obtained were of the size of orders of mm. The crystal structure of dopamine was determined using XRD technique. Images of crystals were obtained using FEG SEM Quanta Series under high vacuum and low KV.

  5. Mercury iodide crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadoret, R.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the Mercury Iodide Crystal Growth (MICG) experiment is the growth of near-perfect single crystals of mercury Iodide (HgI2) in a microgravity environment which will decrease the convection effects on crystal growth. Evaporation and condensation are the only transformations involved in this experiment. To accomplish these objectives, a two-zone furnace will be used in which two sensors collect the temperature data (one in each zone).

  6. The Design of a Transparent Vertical Multizone Furnace: Application to Thermal Field Tuning and Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvual, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful in scientific and commercial applications for determining the optimized process parameters for crystal growth.

  7. A three-dimensional phase field model coupled with lattice kinetics solver for modeling crystal growth in furnaces with accelerated crucible rotation and traveling magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Guang; Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie

    2014-11-01

    In this study, which builds on other related work, we present a new three-dimensional numerical model for crystal growth in a vertical solidification system. This model accounts for buoyancy, accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT), and traveling magnetic field (TMF) induced convective flow and their effect on crystal growth and the chemical component's transport process. The evolution of the crystal growth interface is simulated using the phase field method. A semi-implicit lattice kinetics solver based on the Boltzmann equation is employed to model the unsteady incompressible flow. A one-way coupled concentration transport model is used to simulate the component fraction variation in both the liquid and solid phases, which can be used to check the quality of the crystal growth.

  8. Directional growth by low electric-field-controlled crystallization of bulk amorphous lithium tetraborate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. J.; Kim, J. E.; Yang, Y. S.

    2004-12-01

    Highly oriented rod-shaped crystals were grown during crystallization of bulk amorphous Li2B4O7 under a low ac electric field of ˜5V/mm. The crystal c axis that is the long direction of rods and perpendicular to the flat surface of the sample is parallel to the applied electric-field direction. The oriented crystals, with an alignment within a declined angle of ˜15°, are so long along the c direction compared with those of other directions that the geometrical structure of each rod is quasi-one-dimensional. The measured electromechanical coupling coefficient of kt=0.47 is comparable to that of single-crystal Li2B4O7.

  9. Protein crystal growth - Growth kinetics for tetragonal lysozyme crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, M. L.; Snyder, R. S.; Naumann, R.

    1986-01-01

    Results are reported from theoretical and experimental studies of the growth rate of lysozyme as a function of diffusion in earth-gravity conditions. The investigations were carried out to form a comparison database for future studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of space. A diffusion-convection model is presented for predicting crystal growth rates in the presence of solutal concentration gradients. Techniques used to grow and monitor the growth of hen egg white lysozyme are detailed. The model calculations and experiment data are employed to discuss the effects of transport and interfacial kinetics in the growth of the crystals, which gradually diminished the free energy in the growth solution. Density gradient-driven convection, caused by presence of the gravity field, was a limiting factor in the growth rate.

  10. Influence of rotating magnetic fields on THM growth of CdZnTe crystals under microgravity and ground conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelian, Carmen; Duffar, Thierry

    2015-11-01

    The influence of rotating magnetic fields (RMF) on species transport and interface stability during the growth of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te:In crystals by using the traveling heater method (THM), under microgravity and terrestrial conditions, is numerically investigated. The numerical results are compared to ground and space experiments. The modeling of THM under ground conditions shows very deleterious effects of the natural convection on the morphological stability of the growth interface. The vertical flow transports the liquid of low Te concentration from the dissolution interface to the growth interface, which is consequently destabilized. The suppression of this flow, in low-gravity conditions, results in higher morphological stability of the growth interface. Application of RMF induces a two flow cell pattern, which has a destabilizing effect on the growth interface. Simulations performed by varying the magnetic field induction in the range of 1 - 3 mT show optimal conditions for the growth with a stable interface at low strength of the magnetic field (B = 1 mT). Computations of indium distribution show a better homogeneity of crystals grown under purely diffusive conditions. Rotating magnetic fields of B = 1 mT induce low intensity convection, which generates concentration gradients near the growth interface. These numerical results are in agreement with experiments performed during the FOTON M4 space mission, showing good structural quality of Cd0.96Zn0.04Te crystals grown at very low gravity level. Applying low intensity rotating magnetic fields in ground experiments has no significant influence on the flow pattern and solute distribution. At high intensity of RMF (B = 50 mT), the buoyancy convection is damped near the growth front, resulting in a more stable advancing interface. However, convection is strengthening in the upper part of the liquid zone, where the flow becomes unsteady. The multi-cellular unsteady flow generates temperature oscillations, having

  11. Diffusion-Controlled Anisotropic Growth of Stable and Metastable Crystal Polymorphs in the Phase-Field Crystal Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegze, G.; Gránásy, L.; Tóth, G. I.; Podmaniczky, F.; Jaatinen, A.; Ala-Nissila, T.; Pusztai, T.

    2009-07-01

    We use a simple density functional approach on a diffusional time scale, to address freezing to the body-centered cubic (bcc), hexagonal close-packed (hcp), and face-centered cubic (fcc) structures. We observe faceted equilibrium shapes and diffusion-controlled layerwise crystal growth consistent with two-dimensional nucleation. The predicted growth anisotropies are discussed in relation with results from experiment and atomistic simulations. We also demonstrate that varying the lattice constant of a simple cubic substrate, one can tune the epitaxially growing body-centered tetragonal structure between bcc and fcc, and observe a Mullins-Sekerka-Asaro-Tiller-Grinfeld-type instability.

  12. Control of Convection by Dynamic Magnetic Fields for VB, FZ and THM Crystal Growth Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, Konstantin

    2000-01-01

    The Traveling Magnetic Field (TMF) technique, recently proposed to control meridional flow in electrically conducting melts is reviewed. In particular, the natural convection damping capability of this technique has been numerically demonstrated with the implication of significantly improving crystal quality. Advantages of the traveling magnetic field, in comparison to the more mature rotating magnetic field method, are discussed. Finally, a detailed one-dimensional planar TMF model has been developed and is presented.

  13. Determination of forced convection parameters by interferometric imaging of the concentration field during growth of KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Sunil; Muralidhar, K.

    2011-07-01

    Growth of a potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal from its aqueous solution has been considered under forced convection conditions. The KDP crystal is grown in a conventional top hanging geometry. Forced convection conditions are created by rotating the crystal about a vertical axis. The rotational RPM is varied in a cycle, creating an accelerated rotation (AR) paradigm. The effect of varying the rotational RPM on the concentration field around the crystal was investigated. Mach-Zehnder interferometry was adopted as an optical technique to image the evolving concentration fields. Six different experiments were performed to obtain the specific set of time periods and rotation rates of the acceleration cycle that result in a uniform concentration field around the growing crystal. The Reynolds number, an index of the strength of forced convection, was optimized through the experiments. The optimized parameters of the accelerated rotation cycle were found to be as follows: maximum rotation rate of 32 RPM, spin up period=40 s, spin down period=40 s, steady period=40 s, and stationary period=40 s. The parametric study further revealed that concentration was highly sensitive to the maximum rotation rate adopted during the AR cycle. It did not depend crucially on the time periods that could be varied by as much as ±25% around the respective average values. Finally, a KDP crystal was grown using the optimized forced convection parameters and the crystal quality was found to be good.

  14. Dynamics of three-dimensional convection in microgravity crystal growth: g-jitter with steady magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeckel, Andrew; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2004-03-01

    We present results from three-dimensional simulations of the flow induced by transient acceleration (g-jitter) in microgravity crystal growth. Transient accelerations in both axial and transverse directions are considered for a simple prototype of a vertical Bridgman crystal growth system. We also consider the effects of applying a steady magnetic field in axial or transverse directions to suppress the flow. In most cases, application of a magnetic field suppresses flow oscillations, but for transverse jitter at intermediate frequencies, flow oscillations are increased. This counter-intuitive effect is a dynamic one, in which boundary layer formation under the influence of a magnetic field shortens the time scale of momentum transfer, allowing the flow to respond more quickly to the time variation of acceleration. The effect of the magnetic field on an enclosed flow with electrically insulating boundary conditions is to preferentially suppress the velocity component tangential to the magnetic field. The ability to filter a single velocity component by application of a specified magnetic field could be useful for simultaneously improving both axial and radial segregation in semiconductor crystal growth.

  15. An unforeseen polymorph of coronene by the application of magnetic fields during crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potticary, Jason; Terry, Lui R.; Bell, Christopher; Papanikolopoulos, Alexandros N.; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Engelkamp, Hans; Collins, Andrew M.; Fontanesi, Claudio; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Crampin, Simon; da Como, Enrico; Hall, Simon R.

    2016-05-01

    The continued development of novel drugs, proteins, and advanced materials strongly rely on our ability to self-assemble molecules in solids with the most suitable structure (polymorph) in order to exhibit desired functionalities. The search for new polymorphs remains a scientific challenge, that is at the core of crystal engineering and there has been a lack of effective solutions to this problem. Here we show that by crystallizing the polyaromatic hydrocarbon coronene in the presence of a magnetic field, a polymorph is formed in a β-herringbone structure instead of the ubiquitous γ-herringbone structure, with a decrease of 35° in the herringbone nearest neighbour angle. The β-herringbone polymorph is stable, preserves its structure under ambient conditions and as a result of the altered molecular packing of the crystals, exhibits significant changes to the optical and mechanical properties of the crystal.

  16. An unforeseen polymorph of coronene by the application of magnetic fields during crystal growth

    PubMed Central

    Potticary, Jason; Terry, Lui R.; Bell, Christopher; Papanikolopoulos, Alexandros N.; Christianen, Peter C. M.; Engelkamp, Hans; Collins, Andrew M.; Fontanesi, Claudio; Kociok-Köhn, Gabriele; Crampin, Simon; Da Como, Enrico; Hall, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    The continued development of novel drugs, proteins, and advanced materials strongly rely on our ability to self-assemble molecules in solids with the most suitable structure (polymorph) in order to exhibit desired functionalities. The search for new polymorphs remains a scientific challenge, that is at the core of crystal engineering and there has been a lack of effective solutions to this problem. Here we show that by crystallizing the polyaromatic hydrocarbon coronene in the presence of a magnetic field, a polymorph is formed in a β-herringbone structure instead of the ubiquitous γ-herringbone structure, with a decrease of 35° in the herringbone nearest neighbour angle. The β-herringbone polymorph is stable, preserves its structure under ambient conditions and as a result of the altered molecular packing of the crystals, exhibits significant changes to the optical and mechanical properties of the crystal. PMID:27161600

  17. Thermoelectric Magnetohydrodynamic Flow During Crystal Growth with a Moderate or Weak Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khine, Y. Y.; Walker, John S.; Szofran, Frank R.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This paper treats a steady, axisymmetric melt motion in a cylindrical ampoule with a uniform, axial magnetic field and with an electric current due to a radial temperature variation along the crystal-melt interface, where the values of the absolute thermoelectric power for the crystal and melt are different. The radial component of the thermoelectric current in the melt produces an azimuthal body force, and the axial variation of the centrifugal force due to the azimuthal motion drives a meridional circulation with radial and axial velocities. For moderate magnetic field strengths, the azimuthal velocity and magnetic field produce a radial induced electric field which partially cancels the Seebeck electromotive force in the melt, so that the thermoelectric current and the melt motion are coupled. For weak magnetic fields, the thermoelectric current is decoupled from the melt motion, which is an ordinary hydrodynamic flow driven by a known azimuthal body force. The results show how the flow varies with the strength of the magnetic field and with the magnitude of the temperature variation along the crystal-melt interface. They also define the parameter ranges for which the simpler weak-field decoupled analysis gives accurate predictions.

  18. Crystal growth and crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    1998-01-01

    Selected topics that may be of interest for both crystal-structure and crystal-growth communities are overviewed. The growth of protein crystals, along with that of some other compounds, is one of the topics, and recent insights into related phenomena are considered as examples of applications of general principles. The relationship between crystal growth shape and structure is reviewed and an attempt to introduce semiquantitative characterization of binding for proteins is made. The concept of kinks for complex structures is briefly discussed. Even at sufficiently low supersaturations, the fluctuation of steps may not be sufficient to implement the Gibbs-Thomson law if the kink density is low enough. Subsurface ordering of liquids and growth of rough interfaces from melts is discussed. Crystals growing in microgravity from solution should be more perfect if they preferentially trap stress-inducing impurities, thus creating an impurity-depleted zone around themselves. Evidently, such a zone is developed only around the crystals growing in the absence of convection. Under terrestrial conditions, the self-purified depleted zone is destroyed by convection, the crystal traps more impurity and grows stressed. The stress relief causes mosaicity. In systems containing stress-inducing but poorly trapped impurities, the crystals grown in the absence of convection should be worse than those of their terrestrial counterparts.

  19. Total immersion crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Andrew D. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Crystals of wide band gap materials are produced by positioning a holder receiving a seed crystal at the interface between a body of molten wide band gap material and an overlying layer of temperature-controlled, encapsulating liquid. The temperature of the layer decreases from the crystallization temperature of the crystal at the interface with the melt to a substantially lower temperature at which formation of crystal defects does not occur, suitably a temperature of 200 to 600 C. After initiation of crystal growth, the leading edge of the crystal is pulled through the layer until the leading edge of the crystal enters the ambient gas headspace which may also be temperature controlled. The length of the column of liquid encapsulant may exceed the length of the crystal such that the leading edge and trailing edge of the crystal are both simultaneously with the column of the crystal. The crystal can be pulled vertically by means of a pulling-rotation assembly or horizontally by means of a low-angle withdrawal mechanism.

  20. Protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy uses laser technology to reveal a defect, a double-screw dislocation, on the surface of this crystal of canavalin, a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. When a crystal grows, attachment kinetics and transport kinetics are competing for control of the molecules. As a molecule gets close to the crystal surface, it has to attach properly for the crystal to be usable. NASA has funded investigators to look at those attachment kinetics from a theoretical standpoint and an experimental standpoint. Dr. Alex McPherson of the University of California, Irvine, is one of those investigators. He uses X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy in his laboratory to answer some of the many questions about how protein crystals grow. Atomic force microscopy provides a means of looking at how individual molecules are added to the surface of growing protein crystals. This helps McPherson understand the kinetics of protein crystal growth. McPherson asks, How fast do crystals grow? What are the forces involved? Investigators funded by NASA have clearly shown that such factors as the level of supersaturation and the rate of growth all affect the habit [characteristic arrangement of facets] of the crystal and the defects that occur in the crystal.

  1. MCT crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    1988-01-01

    Convection and segregation in directional solidification and crystal growth by the Bridgman-Stockbarger technique are traditionally treated by assuming axisymmetric thermal condition on the ampoule wall. It is, however, difficult to achieve such a condition in an experimental setup. Any deviation from an axisymmetric temperature field on the wall of a vertical ampoule represents a horizontal temperature gradient. The horizontal density gradient that results from thermal expansion in the melt under this condition must lead on earth to some buoyance-driven convection, no matter what the axial (vertical) temperature distribution that is imposed on the melt. The magnitude of such convective flows for conditions representative of the MSFC mercury-cadmium-telluride (MCT) Bridgman setup is studied.

  2. Numerical model of protein crystal growth in a diffusive field such as the microgravity environment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroaki; Sasaki, Susumu; Takahashi, Sachiko; Inaka, Koji; Wada, Yoshio; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Tomoyuki; Kamigaichi, Shigeki

    2013-11-01

    It is said that the microgravity environment positively affects the quality of protein crystal growth. The formation of a protein depletion zone and an impurity depletion zone due to the suppression of convection flow were thought to be the major reasons. In microgravity, the incorporation of molecules into a crystal largely depends on diffusive transport, so the incorporated molecules will be allocated in an orderly manner and the impurity uptake will be suppressed, resulting in highly ordered crystals. Previously, these effects were numerically studied in a steady state using a simplified model and it was determined that the combination of the diffusion coefficient of the protein molecule (D) and the kinetic constant for the protein molecule (β) could be used as an index of the extent of these depletion zones. In this report, numerical analysis of these depletion zones around a growing crystal in a non-steady (i.e. transient) state is introduced, suggesting that this model may be used for the quantitative analysis of these depletion zones in the microgravity environment. PMID:24121357

  3. Phase field crystal study of nano-crack growth and branch in materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yingjun, Gao; Zhirong, Luo; Lilin, Huang; Hong, Mao; Chuanggao, Huang; Kui, Lin

    2016-06-01

    The phase field crystal (PFC) method is a new multiscale method, which can reproduce physical phenomena on an atomic level and on a diffusion time scale for the microstructure evolution of materials. The morphology of microcrack propagation and the branch of single crystal materials under tensile strain with a fixed grip condition are simulated by using PFC coupling with an external field method. The results show that microcrack propagation depends a lot on the applied strain. The crack starts to grow and branch when the strain reaches a critical value for biaxial tension. The temperature parameter may also have an effect on crack propagation and the branch. In order to indicate the connection between the PFC results and materials behavior, the energy balance approach is used to analyze the mechanism of crack extension, and also the critical value of the strain for crack extension is obtained. The simulated results are in good agreement with other simulation results and experimental results.

  4. Faceted growth of primary Al{sub 2}Cu crystals during directional solidification in high magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Chuanjun; Ren, Zhongming; Shen, Yu; Wang, Qiuliang; Dai, Yinming; Wang, Hui

    2013-10-21

    The high magnetic field is widely used to modify the crystal morphology. In this work, the effect of the magnetic field on growing behavior of faceted crystals in the Al-40 wt. %Cu alloy was investigated using directional solidification technique. It was found that the faceted growth of primary Al{sub 2}Cu phase was degraded and the primary spacing was reduced upon applying the magnetic field. Additionally, the length of the mushy zone first decreased and then increased with increase of the magnetic field intensity. The quantitative analysis reveals that the shear stress induced by the fluid motion is insufficient to break the atom bonds at the solid-liquid interface. However, both of the thermoelectric magnetic convection (TEMC) and the thermoelectric magnetic force (TEMF) cause dendrites to fracture and reduce the primary spacing. The two effects also weaken the faceting growth. Moreover, the instability of the solid-liquid interface is generated by the TEMF, which further leads to degrade the faceted growth. The length of mushy zone was changed by the TEMC and reached the minimum in the magnetic field of 0.5 T, which is in good agreement with the predicted value (0.83 T)

  5. Crystal Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duval, Walter M. B.; Batur, Celal; Bennett, Robert J.

    1997-01-01

    We present an innovative design of a vertical transparent multizone furnace which can operate in the temperature range of 25 C to 750 C and deliver thermal gradients of 2 C/cm to 45 C/cm for the commercial applications to crystal growth. The operation of the eight zone furnace is based on a self-tuning temperature control system with a DC power supply for optimal thermal stability. We show that the desired thermal profile over the entire length of the furnace consists of a functional combination of the fundamental thermal profiles for each individual zone obtained by setting the set-point temperature for that zone. The self-tuning system accounts for the zone to zone thermal interactions. The control system operates such that the thermal profile is maintained under thermal load, thus boundary conditions on crystal growth ampoules can be predetermined prior to crystal growth. Temperature profiles for the growth of crystals via directional solidification, vapor transport techniques, and multiple gradient applications are shown to be easily implemented. The unique feature of its transparency and ease of programming thermal profiles make the furnace useful for scientific and commercial applications for the determination of process parameters to optimize crystal growth conditions.

  6. Influence of the three dimensionality of the HF electromagnetic field on resistivity variations in Si single crystals during FZ growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnieks, G.; Muiznieks, A.; Buligins, L.; Raming, G.; Mühlbauer, A.; Lüdge, A.; Riemann, H.

    2000-06-01

    Three-dimensional numerical modelling is carried out to analyse the floating zone crystal growth with the needle-eye technique used for the production of high-quality silicon single crystals with large diameters ( ⩾100 mm ). Since the pancake inductor has only one turn, the EM field and the distribution of heat sources and EM forces are only roughly axisymmetric. The non-symmetry together with crystal rotation reflects itself on the hydrodynamic, thermal and dopant concentration fields in the molten zone and causes variations of resistivity in the grown single crystal, which are known as the so-called rotational striations. The non-symmetric high-frequency electromagnetic field of the pancake inductor is calculated by boundary element method. The obtained non-symmetric power distribution on the free melt surface and the corresponding EM forces are used for the coupled calculation of the 3D steady-state hydrodynamic and temperature fields in the molten zone on a body fitted structured 3D grid by a commercial program package with control volume approach. The buoyancy, Marangoni and EM forces are considered. The afterwards calculated corresponding 3D dopant concentration field is used to derive the variations of resistivity in a longitudinal cut of the grown crystal. The results are compared with experimental measurements (photo-scanning method) and with results of 2D transient flow calculations. Rotational striations are found in both 3D-calculated and experimental resistivity distributions and show a qualitative agreement. A Fourier analysis for the resistivity variations is performed and the observed differences are explained by modelling limitations.

  7. Quartz crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Baughman, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    A process for growing single crystals from an amorphous substance that can undergo phase transformation to the crystalline state in an appropriate solvent. The process is carried out in an autoclave having a lower dissolution zone and an upper crystallization zone between which a temperature differential (.DELTA.T) is maintained at all times. The apparatus loaded with the substance, solvent, and seed crystals is heated slowly maintaining a very low .DELTA.T between the warmer lower zone and cooler upper zone until the amorphous substance is transformed to the crystalline state in the lower zone. The heating rate is then increased to maintain a large .DELTA.T sufficient to increase material transport between the zones and rapid crystallization. .alpha.-Quartz single crystal can thus be made from fused quartz in caustic solvent by heating to 350.degree. C. stepwise with a .DELTA.T of 0.25.degree.-3.degree. C., increasing the .DELTA.T to about 50.degree. C. after the fused quartz has crystallized, and maintaining these conditions until crystal growth in the upper zone is completed.

  8. Growth, spectral property and crystal field analysis of Cr3+-doped Na2Mg5(MoO4)6 crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lizhen; Li, Linyun; Huang, Yisheng; Sun, Shijia; Lin, Zhoubin; Wang, Guofu

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports the growth and spectral properties of Cr3+:Na2Mg5(MoO4)6 crystals. The Na2Mg5(MoO4)6 crystal was grown from a flux of Na2Mo2O7 by the top seeded solution growth method. The absorption cross-sections are 0.692 × 10-19 cm2 at 507 nm and 1.151 × 10-19 cm2 at 736 nm, respectively. The emission cross-section is 1.62 × 10-19 cm2 at 914 nm with FWHM of 192 nm. Based on the absorption and emission spectra, the crystal field strength Dq, the Racah parameters B and C, effective phonon energy ℏω and the Huang-Rhys factor S were calculated. The spectral properties of Cr3+:Na2Mg5(MoO4)6 crystal demonstrate a good potential for tunable laser material.

  9. Hydrothermal Growth of Polyscale Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrappa, Kullaiah

    In this chapter, the importance of the hydrothermal technique for growth of polyscale crystals is discussed with reference to its efficiency in synthesizing high-quality crystals of various sizes for modern technological applications. The historical development of the hydrothermal technique is briefly discussed, to show its evolution over time. Also some of the important types of apparatus used in routine hydrothermal research, including the continuous production of nanosize crystals, are discussed. The latest trends in the hydrothermal growth of crystals, such as thermodynamic modeling and understanding of the solution chemistry, are elucidated with appropriate examples. The growth of some selected bulk, fine, and nanosized crystals of current technological significance, such as quartz, aluminum and gallium berlinites, calcite, gemstones, rare-earth vanadates, electroceramic titanates, and carbon polymorphs, is discussed in detail. Future trends in the hydrothermal technique, required to meet the challenges of fast-growing demand for materials in various technological fields, are described. At the end of this chapter, an Appendix 18.A containing a more or less complete list of the characteristic families of crystals synthesized by the hydrothermal technique is given with the solvent and pressure-temperature (PT) conditions used in their synthesis.

  10. Protein crystal growth tray assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A protein crystal growth tray assembly includes a tray that has a plurality of individual crystal growth chambers. Each chamber has a movable pedestal which carries a protein crystal growth compartment at an upper end. The several pedestals for each tray assembly are ganged together for concurrent movement so that the solutions in the various pedestal growth compartments can be separated from the solutions in the tray's growth chambers until the experiment is to be activated.

  11. Crystal growth of CdTe in space and thermal field effects on mass flux and morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1988-01-01

    The primary, long-range goals are the development of vapor phase crystal growth experiments, and the growth of technologically useful crystals in space. The necessary ground-based studies include measurements of the effects of temperature variations on the mass flux and crystal morphology in vapor-solid growth processes. For in-situ mass flux measurements dynamic microbalance techniques will be employed. Crystal growth procedures and equipment will be developed to be compatible with microgravity conditions and flight requirements. Emphasis was placed on the further development of crystal growth and the investigation of relevant transport properties of CdTe. The dependence of the mass flux on source temperature was experimentally established. The CdTe synthesis and pretreatment procedures are being developed that yield considerable improvements in mass transport rates, and mass fluxes which are independent of the amount of source material. A higher degree of stoichiometric control of CdTe than before was achieved during this period of investigation. Based on this, a CdTe crystal growth experiment, employing physical vapor transport, yielded very promising results. Optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the boule contained several large sized crystal grains of a high degree of crystallinity. Further characterization studies of CdTe crystals are in progress. The reaction chamber, furnace dimensions, and ampoule location of the dynamic microbalance system were modified in order to minimize radiation effects on the balance performance.

  12. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenblum, William M.; Delucas, Lawrence J.; Wilson, William W.

    1989-01-01

    Major advances have been made in several of the experimental aspects of protein crystallography, leaving protein crystallization as one of the few remaining bottlenecks. As a result, it has become important that the science of protein crystal growth is better understood and that improved methods for protein crystallization are developed. Preliminary experiments with both small molecules and proteins indicate that microgravity may beneficially affect crystal growth. For this reason, a series of protein crystal growth experiments using the Space Shuttle was initiated. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth. Various optical techniques are being utilized to monitor the crystal growth process from the incipient or nucleation stage and throughout the growth phase. The eventual goal of these studies is to develop a system which utilizes optical monitoring for dynamic control of the crystallization process.

  13. Crystal Field Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. J.; Ng, Betty

    2007-09-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction; 1. Crystal field splitting mechanisms D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 2. Empirical crystal fields D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 3. Fitting crystal field parameters D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 4. Lanthanide and actinide optical spectra G. K. Liu; 5. Superposition model D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 6. Effects of electron correlation on crystal field splitting M. F. Reid and D. J. Newman; 7. Ground state splittings in S-state ions D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 8. Invariants and moments Y. Y. Yeung; 9. Semiclassical model K. S. Chan; 10. Transition intensities M. F. Reid; Appendix 1. Point symmetry D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; Appendix 2. QBASIC programs D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; Appendix 3. Accessible program packages Y. Y. Yeung, M. F. Reid and D. J. Newman; Appendix 4. Computer package CST Cz. Rudowicz; Bibliography; Index.

  14. Dependence of Pentacene Crystal Growth on Dielectric Roughness for Fabrication of Flexible Field-Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Yang, C; Kim, S; Jang, M; Park, C

    2010-01-01

    The dependence of pentacene nanostructures on gate dielectric surfaces were investigated for flexible organic field-effect transistor (OFET) applications. Two bilayer types of polymer/aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) gate dielectrics were fabricated on commercial Al foils laminated onto a polymer back plate. Some Al foils were directly used as gate electrodes, and others were smoothly polished by an electrolytic etching. These Al surfaces were then anodized and coated with poly({alpha}-methyl styrene) (PAMS). For PAMS/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectrics onto etched Al foils, surface roughness up to 1 nm could be reached, although isolated dimples with a lateral diameter of several micrometers were still present. On PAMS/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectrics (surface roughness >40 nm) containing mechanical grooves of Al foil, average hole mobility ({mu}FET) of 50 nm thick pentacene-FETs under the low operating voltages (|V| < 6 V) was {approx}0.15 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. In contrast, pentacene-FETs employing the etched Al gates exhibited {mu}FET of 0.39 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}, which was comparable to that of reference samples with PAMS/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectrics onto flat sputtered Al gates. Conducting-probe atomic force microscopy and two-dimensional X-ray diffraction of pentacene films with various thicknesses revealed different out-of-plane and in-plane crystal orderings of pentacene, depending on the surface roughness of the gate dielectrics.

  15. Computational analyses of crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakhoul, Youssef M.

    1987-01-01

    Two important aspects of Hg/Cd/Te crystal growth processes are discussed. First, the thermal field and second, the fluid movement in the melt zone. The thermal analysis includes numerical calculation of axisymmetric heat conduction within the sample. It also includes a three-dimensional radiation model to calculate the radiative heat exchange between the furnace and the crystal as determined by the complex geometry of the furnace and the adiabatic shield. The thermal analysis also includes a crystal conductivity which is dependent on temperature and composition. To tackle the fluid flow aspect of the problem, an attempt was made to use a newly developed incompressible flow code based on the slight compressibility, and hence the finite sound speed, of all real fluids.

  16. Modeling of Czochralski crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Ramachandran, P.A.; Dudukovic, M.P. . Chemical Reaction Engineering Lab.)

    1991-05-01

    The manufacture of high quality silicon crystals especially for power device applications requires the understanding and full quantification of the relationship between the process variables and the crystal properties. This cannot be achieved solely by experimental work and a systematic modeling study is needed. This document presents the results of such a study. A detailed finite element program was developed for the heat transfer in the crystal and the melt of the CZ process. A model was developed to predict the oxygen content of the CZ grown silicon as a function of the operating variables: crucible rotation rate, crystal rotation, crucible temperature and the heat flux to the melt. Preliminary work was also done to assess the effect of the magnetic field on the crystal oxygen content. A complete thermal stress a model was developed for the calculation of the resolved shear stresses in the crystal as a function of its growth history. Multivariable control theory was applied to CZ process and new control methods were suggested. 46 refs., 47 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Physical vapor transport crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoel, Dave W.; Anderson, Elmer; Wu, Maw-Kuen; Cheng, H. Y.

    1987-01-01

    The goals of this research are two-fold: to study effective means of growing ZnSe crystals of good optical quality and to determine the advantages of growing such crystals in microgravity. As of this date the optimal conditions for crystal growth have not been determined. However, successful growth runs were made in two furnances and the results are given.

  18. Crystal growth of artificial snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimura, S.; Oka, A.; Taki, M.; Kuwano, R.; Ono, H.; Nagura, R.; Narimatsu, Y.; Tanii, J.; Kamimiytat, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Snow crystals were grown onboard the space shuttle during STS-7 and STS-8 to facilitate the investigation of crystal growth under conditions of weightlessness. The experimental design and hardware are described. Space-grown snow crystals were polyhedrons looking like spheres, which were unlike snow crystals produced in experiments on Earth.

  19. An Apparatus for Growth of Small Crystals From Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitrovic, Mico M.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an apparatus for crystal growth that was designed to study growth kinetics of small crystals from solutions and to obtain crystals of various substances. Describes the use of the apparatus in laboratory practical experiments in the field of crystal growth physics within the course "Solid State Physics". (JRH)

  20. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Smith, Craig D.; Smith, H. Wilson; Vijay-Kumar, Senadhi; Senadhi, Shobha E.; Ealick, Steven E.; Carter, Daniel C.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The crystals of most proteins or other biological macromolecules are poorly ordered and diffract to lower resolutions than those observed for most crystals of simple organic and inorganic compounds. Crystallization in the microgravity environment of space may improve crystal quality by eliminating convection effects near growing crystal surfaces. A series of 11 different protein crystal growth experiments was performed on U.S. Space Shuttle flight STS-26 in September 1988. The microgravity-grown crystals of gamma-interferon D1, porcine elastase, and isocitrate lyase are larger, display more uniform morphologies, and yield diffraction data to significantly higher resolutions than the best crystals of these proteins grown on earth.

  1. Protein Crystals and their Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Recent results on binding between protein molecules in crystal lattice, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties and strength and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed in the first half of this paper (Sea 2-4). In the second par&, some basic approaches to solubility of proteins are followed by overview on crystal nucleation and growth (Sec 5). It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source for scattering of crystal number ultimately appearing in the batch. Frequency at which new molecules join crystal lattice is measured by kinetic coefficient and related to the observable crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria to discriminate diffusion and kinetic limited growth are discussed on this basis in Sec 7. In Sec 8, creation of defects is discussed with the emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal I;erfection.

  2. Protein crystals and their growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent results on the associations between protein molecules in crystal lattices, crystal-solution surface energy, elastic properties, strength, and spontaneous crystal cracking are reviewed and discussed. In addition, some basic approaches to understanding the solubility of proteins are followed by an overview of crystal nucleation and growth. It is argued that variability of mixing in batch crystallization may be a source of the variation in the number of crystals ultimately appearing in the sample. The frequency at which new molecules join a crystal lattice is measured by the kinetic coefficient and is related to the observed crystal growth rate. Numerical criteria used to discriminate diffusion- and kinetic-limited growth are discussed on this basis. Finally, the creation of defects is discussed with an emphasis on the role of impurities and convection on macromolecular crystal perfection.

  3. Crystallization with oils: a new dimension in macromolecular crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chayen, Naomi E.

    1999-01-01

    The crystal growth of biological macromolecules is a complicated process involving numerous parameters. This paper presents an approach which employs the use of oil as a major aid to crystal growth, and which has opened up a new dimension in the field of macromolecular crystallization. The presence of oil is a parameter which can contribute to the accuracy, the cleanliness and to the increase in the reproducibility of the experiments. Furthermore, the oil has a role in the protection of the trials during the course of their duration and in maintaining the stability of the resulting crystals. The use of oil also applies to the crystallization of membrane proteins. The results of a wide range of experiments which exploit the presence of oil to abet macromolecular crystal growth using both vapour diffusion and microbatch are presented.

  4. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, C. E.; Clifford, D. W.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages of protein crystallization in space, and the applications of protein crystallography to drug design, protein engineering, and the design of synthetic vaccines are examined. The steps involved in using protein crystallography to determine the three-dimensional structure of a protein are discussed. The growth chamber design and the hand-held apparatus developed for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques (hanging-drop method) are described; the experimental data from the four Shuttle missions are utilized to develop hardware for protein crystal growth in space and to evaluate the effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  5. Direct flow crystal growth system

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.; Milanovich, Fred P.

    1992-01-01

    A crystal is grown in a constantly filtered solution which is flowed directly into the growing face of a crystal. In a continuous flow system, solution at its saturation temperature is removed from a crystal growth tank, heated above its saturation temperature, filtered, cooled back to its saturation temperature, and returned to the tank.

  6. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  7. Cessation of growth in crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falcón Rodríguez, C.; Aguilera Morales, S.; Falcón Rodríguez, F.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model that explains the cessation of growth of protein crystals as a consequence of the increment of bond weakness between adjacent protein molecules is presented. It is assumed that the main factor increasing the bond weakness is the concentration of precipitating salts generally used in protein crystal growth practice.

  8. Protein crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delucas, Lawrence J.; Bugg, Charles E.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment in space are described with special attention given to the crystal growth facilities and the techniques used in Space Shuttle experiments. The properties of large space-grown crystals of gamma interferon, elastase, lathyros ochrus lectin I, and few other proteins grown on various STS flights are described. A comparison of the microgravity-grown crystals with the bast earth-grown crystals demonstrated that the space-grown crystals are more highly ordered at the molecular level than their earth-grown counterparts. When crystallization conditions were optimized, the microgravity-grown protein crystals were larger, displayed more uniform morphologies, and yielded diffraction data to significantly higher resolution than their earth-grown counterparts.

  9. Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    In order to rapidly and efficiently grow crystals, tools were needed to automatically identify and analyze the growing process of protein crystals. To meet this need, Diversified Scientific, Inc. (DSI), with the support of a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract from NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center, developed CrystalScore(trademark), the first automated image acquisition, analysis, and archiving system designed specifically for the macromolecular crystal growing community. It offers automated hardware control, image and data archiving, image processing, a searchable database, and surface plotting of experimental data. CrystalScore is currently being used by numerous pharmaceutical companies and academic and nonprofit research centers. DSI, located in Birmingham, Alabama, was awarded the patent Method for acquiring, storing, and analyzing crystal images on March 4, 2003. Another DSI product made possible by Marshall SBIR funding is VaporPro(trademark), a unique, comprehensive system that allows for the automated control of vapor diffusion for crystallization experiments.

  10. Automated protein crystal growth facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donald, Stacey

    1994-01-01

    A customer for the protein crystal growth facility fills the specially designed chamber with the correct solutions, fills the syringes with their quenching solutions, and submits the data needed for the proper growth of their crystal. To make sure that the chambers and syringes are filled correctly, a NASA representative may assist the customer. The data needed is the approximate growth time, the growth temperature, and the desired crystal size, but this data can be changed anytime from the ground, if needed. The chambers are gathered and placed into numbered slots in special drawers. Then, data is entered into a computer for each of the chambers. Technicians map out when each chamber's growth should be activated so that all of the chambers have enough time to grow. All of this data is up-linked to the space station when the previous growth session is over. Anti-vibrational containers need to be constructed for the high forces encountered during the lift off and the landing of the space shuttle, and though our team has not designed these containers, we do not feel that there is any reason why a suitable one could not be made. When the shuttle reaches the space station, an astronaut removes a drawer of quenched chambers from the growth facility and inserts a drawer of new chambers. All twelve of the drawers can be replaced in this fashion. The optical disks can also be removed this way. The old drawers are stored for the trip back to earth. Once inside the growth facility, a chamber is removed by the robot and placed in one of 144 active sites at a time previously picked by a technician. Growth begins when the chamber is inserted into an active site. Then, the sensing system starts to determine the size of the protein crystal. All during the crystal's growth, the customer can view the crystal and read all of the crystal's data, such as growth rate and crystal size. When the sensing system determines that the crystal has reached the predetermined size, the robot is

  11. 3D modeling of the molten zone shape created by an asymmetric HF EM field during the FZ crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudevics, A.; Muiznieks, A.; Ratnieks, G.; Riemann, H.

    2005-06-01

    In the modern industrial floating zone (FZ) silicon crystal growth process by the needle-eye technique, the high frequency (HF) electromagnetic (EM) field plays a crucial role. The EM field melts a rotating poly silicon feed rod and maintains the zone of molten silicon, which is held by the rotating single crystal. To model such a system, the 2D axi-symmetric models can be used, however, due to the system's asymmetry (e.g., the asymmetry of the HF inductor) the applicability of such models is restricted. Therefore, the modeling of FZ process in three dimensions (3D) is necessary. This paper describes a new complex 3D mathematical model of the FZ crystal growth and a correspondingly developed software package Shape3D. A 3D calculation example for the realistic FZ system is also presented. Figs 25, Refs 9.

  12. Crystal growth inside an octant.

    PubMed

    Olejarz, Jason; Krapivsky, P L

    2013-08-01

    We study crystal growth inside an infinite octant on a cubic lattice. The growth proceeds through the deposition of elementary cubes into inner corners. After rescaling by the characteristic size, the interface becomes progressively more deterministic in the long-time limit. Utilizing known results for the crystal growth inside a two-dimensional corner, we propose a hyperbolic partial differential equation for the evolution of the limiting shape. This equation is interpreted as a Hamilton-Jacobi equation, which helps in finding an analytical solution. Simulations of the growth process are in excellent agreement with analytical predictions. We then study the evolution of the subleading correction to the volume of the crystal, the asymptotic growth of the variance of the volume of the crystal, and the total number of inner and outer corners. We also show how to generalize the results to arbitrary spatial dimension. PMID:24032777

  13. Surrogate Seeds For Growth Of Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-01-01

    Larger crystals of higher quality grown. Alternative method for starting growth of crystal involves use of seed crystal of different material instead of same material as solution. Intended for growing single-crystal proteins for experiments but applicable in general to growth of crystals from solutions and to growth of semiconductor or other crystals from melts.

  14. Plenum type crystal growth process

    DOEpatents

    Montgomery, Kenneth E.

    1992-01-01

    Crystals are grown in a tank which is divided by a baffle into a crystal growth region above the baffle and a plenum region below the baffle. A turbine blade or stirring wheel is positioned in a turbine tube which extends through the baffle to generate a flow of solution from the crystal growing region to the plenum region. The solution is pressurized as it flows into the plenum region. The pressurized solution flows back to the crystal growing region through return flow tubes extending through the baffle. Growing crystals are positioned near the ends of the return flow tubes to receive a direct flow of solution.

  15. Dynamically controlled crystal growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Terry L. (Inventor); Kim, Larry J. (Inventor); Harrington, Michael (Inventor); DeLucas, Lawrence J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Crystal growth can be initiated and controlled by dynamically controlled vapor diffusion or temperature change. In one aspect, the present invention uses a precisely controlled vapor diffusion approach to monitor and control protein crystal growth. The system utilizes a humidity sensor and various interfaces under computer control to effect virtually any evaporation rate from a number of different growth solutions simultaneously by means of an evaporative gas flow. A static laser light scattering sensor can be used to detect aggregation events and trigger a change in the evaporation rate for a growth solution. A control/follower configuration can be used to actively monitor one chamber and accurately control replicate chambers relative to the control chamber. In a second aspect, the invention exploits the varying solubility of proteins versus temperature to control the growth of protein crystals. This system contains miniature thermoelectric devices under microcomputer control that change temperature as needed to grow crystals of a given protein. Complex temperature ramps are possible using this approach. A static laser light scattering probe also can be used in this system as a non-invasive probe for detection of aggregation events. The automated dynamic control system provides systematic and predictable responses with regard to crystal size. These systems can be used for microgravity crystallization projects, for example in a space shuttle, and for crystallization work under terrestial conditions. The present invention is particularly useful for macromolecular crystallization, e.g. for proteins, polypeptides, nucleic acids, viruses and virus particles.

  16. Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroh, Henry C., III

    1999-01-01

    The shuttle flight experiment "In Situ Monitoring of Crystal Growth Using MEPHISTO" was accomplished during STS-87 as part of the fourth flight of the United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-4), which was flown from November 19 to December 5, 1997. The data returned from that flight are just now beginning to yield quantitative results. This project is an international collaboration: the furnace system known as MEPHISTO was built in France by CNES (French National Space Agency) and CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission); the principal investigator, Prof. Reza Abbaschian, is from the University of Florida at Gainesville; and numerical and analytical modeling support includes collaborators from the University of New South Wales, Australia, the University of Wisconsin at Milwaukee, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, and the NASA Lewis Research Center. MEPHISTO is a French acronym that translates into English as Materials for the Study of Interesting Phenomena of Solidification on Earth and in Orbit. Since this was the fourth flight of the MEPHISTO furnace, the experiment is referred to as MEPHISTO-4. MEPHISTO-4 was a directional solidification experiment that studied the liquid-to-solid transformation of bismuth alloyed with tin. Directional solidification is a freezing technique common to the processing of the electronic materials used in integrated circuits and detectors, such as silicon and germanium. When liquids are frozen on Earth, they must be cooled. The cooling causes stirring because of density variations in the liquid. This stirring, known as natural convection, influences the quality of the resulting solid. During freezing, regions of high and low concentrations of tin are created. This introduces another important phenomenon: diffusion, or the movement by molecular action of matter from regions of high concentration to regions of lower concentration. In MEPHISTO-4, it is tin that diffuses from the high-concentration region in front of the

  17. 3D mathematical model system for melt hydrodynamics in the silicon single crystal FZ-growth process with rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacis, K.; Muiznieks, A.; Ratnieks, G.

    2005-06-01

    A system of three-dimensional numerical models is described to analyse the melt hydrodynamics in the floating zone crystal growth by the needle-eye technique under a rotating magnetic field for the production of high quality silicon single crystals of large diameters big( 100dots 200 mm big). Since the pancake inductor has only one turn, the high frequency (HF) electromagnetic (EM) field and the distribution of heat sources and EM forces on the melt free surface have distinct asymmetric features. This asymmetry together with the displacement of the crystal and feed rod axis and crystal rotation manifests itself as three dimensional hydrodynamic, thermal and dopant concentration fields in the molten zone and causes variations of resistivity in the grown single crystal, which are known as the so-called rotational striations. Additionally, the rotating magnetic field can be used to influence the melt hydrodynamics and to reduce the flow asymmetry. In the present 3D model system, the shape of the molten zone is obtained from symmetric FZ shape calculations. The asymmetric HF EM field is calculated by the 3D boundary element method. The low-frequency rotating magnetic field and a corresponding force density distribution in the melt are calculated by the 3D finite element method. The obtained asymmetric HF field power distribution on the free melt surface, the corresponding HF EM forces and force density of the rotating magnetic field are used for the coupled calculation of 3D steady-state hydrodynamic and temperature fields in the molten zone on a body fitted structured 3D grid by a commercial program package with a control volume approach. Beside the EM forces, also the buoyancy and Marangoni forces are considered. After HD calculations a corresponding 3D dopant concentration field is calculated and used to derive the variations resistivity in the grown crystal. The capability of the system of models is illustrated by a calculation example of a realistic FZ system

  18. Protein crystal growth in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The overall scientific goals and rationale for growing protein crystals in microgravity are discussed. Data on the growth of human serum albumin crystals which were produced during the First International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-1) are presented. Potential scientific advantages of the utilization of Space Station Freedom are discussed.

  19. Czochralski crystal growth: Modeling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudukovic, M. P.; Ramachandran, P. A.; Srivastava, R. K.; Dorsey, D.

    1986-01-01

    The modeling study of Czochralski (Cz) crystal growth is reported. The approach was to relate in a quantitative manner, using models based on first priniciples, crystal quality to operating conditions and geometric variables. The finite element method is used for all calculations.

  20. Monitoring Crystal Growth From Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental system for monitoring growth of triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals from solution is being studied. System consists of outer cell containing distilled water heated and stirred to maintain constant temperature to within plus or minus 0.1 degrees C, inner (growth) cell containing supersaturated solution of TGS, and seed crystal mounted in plastic-covered stainless-steel sting equiped with controlled cooling mechanism and temperature sensors.

  1. Protein crystal growth (5-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    Proteins (enzymes, hormones, immunoglobulins) account for 50 pct. or more of the dry weight of most living systems. A detailed understanding of the structural makeup of a protein is essential to any systematic research pertaining to it. Most macromolecules are extremely difficult to crystallize, and many otherwise exciting projects have terminated at the crystal growth stage. In principle, there are several aspects of microgravity that might be exploited to enhance protein crystal growth. The major factor is the elimination of density driven convective flow. Other factors that can be controlled in the absence of gravity is the sedimentation of growing crystals in a gravitational field, and the potential advantage of doing containerless crystal growth. As a result of these theories and facts, one can readily understand why the microgravity environment of an Earth orbiting vehicle seems to offer unique opportunities for the protein crystallographer. This perception has led to the establishment of the Protein Crystal Growth in a Microgravity Environment (PCG/ME) project. The results of experiments already performed during STS missions have in many cases resulted in large protein crystals which are structurally correct. Thus, the near term objective of the PCG/ME project is to continue to improve the techniques, procedures, and hardware systems used to grow protein crystals in Earth orbit.

  2. In-situ temperature field measurements and direct observation of crystal/melt at vertical Bridgman growth of lead chloride under stationary and dynamic arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Král, Robert; Nitsch, Karel

    2015-10-01

    Influence of growth conditions, i.e. temperature gradient in the furnace and the pulling rate, on the position and the shape of the crystal/melt interface during vertical Bridgman growth was studied. The position and the shape of the crystal/melt interface are a key factor for describing the final quality of growing crystal. Following two methods for characterization of its position and shape were used: (i) direct observation and (ii) direct temperature field measurement during simulated vertical Bridgman growth. As a model compound a lead chloride is used. Three different ampoule positions in two different temperature gradients in the furnace and two experimental arrangements - stationary (0 mm/h pulling rate) and dynamic (3 mm/h pulling rate) were analyzed. Obtained temperature data were projected as 2D planar cut under radial symmetry and denoted as isolevels. Their further conversion by linear approximation into isotherms allowed detail analysis of heat conditions in the system during simulated growth by comparison of isotherms 500 °C (m.p. of lead chloride) at different growth conditions.

  3. The impact of space research on semiconductor crystal growth technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Crystal growth experiments in reduced gravity environment and related ground-based research have contributed significantly to the establishment of a scientific basis for semiconductor growth from the melt. NASA-sponsored research has been instrumental in the introduction of heat pipes for heat and mass transfer control in crystal growth and in the development of magnetic field induced melt stabilization, approaches primarily responsible for recent advances in crystal growth technology.

  4. Containerless protein crystal growth method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhim, Won-Kyu; Chung, Sang K.

    1991-01-01

    A method of growing protein crystals from levitated drops is introduced and unique features of containerless approach in 1-g and micro-G laboratories are discussed. Electrostatic multidrop levitation system which is capable of simultaneous four drop levitation is described. A method of controlling protein saturation level in a programmed way is introduced and discussed. Finally, some of the unique features of containerless approach of protein crystal growth in space are discussed and summarized.

  5. Bioengineering single crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Hsuan; Park, Alexander; Joester, Derk

    2011-02-16

    Biomineralization is a "bottom-up" synthesis process that results in the formation of inorganic/organic nanocomposites with unrivaled control over structure, superior mechanical properties, adaptive response, and the capability of self-repair. While de novo design of such highly optimized materials may still be out of reach, engineering of the biosynthetic machinery may offer an alternative route to design advanced materials. Herein, we present an approach using micro-contact-printed lectins for patterning sea urchin embryo primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) in vitro. We demonstrate not only that PMCs cultured on these substrates show attachment to wheat germ agglutinin and concanavalin A patterns but, more importantly, that the deposition and elongation of calcite spicules occurs cooperatively by multiple cells and in alignment with the printed pattern. This allows us to control the placement and orientation of smooth, cylindrical calcite single crystals where the crystallographic c-direction is parallel to the cylinder axis and the underlying line pattern. PMID:21265521

  6. Crystal growth of a binary compound semiconductor under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiraoka, Y.; Ikegami, K.; Maekawa, T.; Matsumoto, S.; Yoda, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    We investigate the possibilities of growing a uniform binary compound crystal in space numerically, proposing a new crystal growth method. We develop a numerical calculation method of the growth of binary crystals. The calculation method is applied to the crystal growth analysis of an InAs-GaAs binary semiconductor and the effect of buoyancy convection induced under microgravity conditions on the crystal growth process is investigated. We find that the concentration field is disturbed and, as a result, the solution—crystal interface is deformed by buoyancy convection even when the gravitational acceleration is as low as 10 -6 g, which is supposed to be the gravity level in the International Space Station. We also find that the direction of residual gravity has a strong effect on the concentration field in the solution and the crystal growth process.

  7. Optical analysis of crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Passeur, Andrea; Harper, Sabrina

    1994-01-01

    Processing and data reduction of holographic images from Spacelab presents some interesting challenges in determining the effects of microgravity on crystal growth processes. Evaluation of several processing techniques, including the Computerized Holographic Image Processing System and the image processing software ITEX150, will provide fundamental information for holographic analysis of the space flight data.

  8. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Canavalin. The major storage protein of leguminous plants and a major source of dietary protein for humans and domestic animals. It is studied in efforts to enhance nutritional value of proteins through protein engineerings. It is isolated from Jack Bean because of it's potential as a nutritional substance. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Alex McPherson.

  9. Crystal growth in fused solvent systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Noone, M. J.; Spear, K. E.; White, W. B.; Henry, E. C.

    1973-01-01

    Research is reported on the growth of electronic ceramic single crystals from solution for the future growth of crystals in a microgravity environment. Work included growth from fused or glass solvents and aqueous solutions. Topics discussed include: crystal identification and selection; aqueous solution growth of triglycine sulphate (TGS); and characterization of TGS.

  10. Nucleation-trap crystallizer for growth of crystals from solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnal, A. K.; Saxena, A.; Ganesamoorthy, S.; Bhaumik, Indranil; Wadhawan, V. K.; Bhat, H. L.; Gupta, P. K.

    2006-12-01

    Stability of the solution against spurious nucleation plays a dominant role in the growth of crystals at high growth rates requiring high levels of supersaturation. If any spurious nucleation does occur during a growth run, it becomes practically impossible to grow a very large crystal. A novel nucleation-trap crystallizer has been developed and used for the growth of crystals from aqueous solution so as to trap any unwanted nuclei and the particles that appear and settle at the bottom of the crystallizer during the growth process. In this crystallizer, any particles and nuclei nucleating during the growth are forced into the nucleation trap (or well) and subsequently by manipulating the temperature of the well; the growth of the nuclei is arrested. DKDP and ammonium acid phthalate crystals were grown in the developed system. X-ray rocking curve measurements on DKDP and ammonium acid phthalate crystals yielded FWHM of 89.1 and 29.71 arcsec, respectively.

  11. Development of the β-BaB2O4 crystal growth technique in the heat field of three-fold axis symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokh, A. E.; Bekker, T. B.; Vlezko, V. A.; Kokh, K. A.

    2011-03-01

    In our earlier works we have shown the efficiency of β-BaB2O4 crystal growth in the heat field of three-fold axis symmetry. In order to involve the whole body of the high temperature solution in the convective motion it is very important to achieve vertical temperature distribution with the ‘hot points' at the lower part of the growth crucible. At the same time to prevent crystal overgrowth and contact with the crucible wall, the temperature of the latter at the high temperature solution surface must be higher than the crystallization temperature. In order to accomplish such temperature distribution two-zone heating furnace with three heating sectors in each zone has been developed. Load commutator executes power distribution on heating sectors during the growth run. We suppose that developed heating furnace and the system of thermoregulation allow one to achieve stable thermo-gravitational convection in the whole body of high temperature solution, thus substantially delaying the onset of constitutional undercooling.

  12. Silicon crystal growth in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khattak, C. P.; Schmid, F.

    1982-01-01

    The most developed process for silicon crystal growth is the Czochralski (CZ) method which was in production for over two decades. In an effort to reduce cost of single crystal silicon for photovoltaic applications, a directional solidification technique, Heat Exchanger Method (HEM), was adapted. Materials used in HEM and CZ furnaces are quite similar (heaters, crucibles, insulation, etc.). To eliminate the cost of high purity argon, it was intended to use vacuum operation in HEM. Two of the major problems encountered in vacuum processing of silicon are crucible decomposition and silicon carbide formation in the melt.

  13. Growth of Solid Solution Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Szofran, Frank R.; Gillies, Donald C.; Watring, Dale A.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of the study is to establish the effects of processing semiconducting, solid solution, single crystals in a microgravity environment on the metallurgical, compositional, electrical, and optical characteristics of the crystals. The alloy system being investigated is the solid solution semiconductor Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, with x-values appropriate for infrared detector applications in the 8 to 14 mm wavelength region. Both melt and Te-solvent growth are being performed. The study consists of an extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research effort followed by flight experimentation where appropriate. The ground-based portion of the investigation also includes the evaluation of the relative effectiveness of stabilizing techniques, such as applied magnetic fields, for suppressing convective flow during the melt growth of the crystals.

  14. Crystal-field effects in fluoride crystals for optical refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hehlen, Markus P

    2010-01-01

    The field of optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids has recently seen an important breakthrough. The cooling of a YLiF{sub 4} (YLF) crystal doped with 5 mol% Yb3+ to 155 K by Seletskiy et al [NPhot] has surpassed the lowest temperatures ({approx}170 K for {approx}100 mW cooling capacity) that are practical with commercial multi-stage thermoelectric coolers (TEC) [Glaister]. This record performance has advanced laser cooling into an application relevant regime and has put first practical optical cryocoolers within reach. The result is also relevant from a material perspective since for the first time, an Yb3+-doped crystal has outperformed an Yb3+-doped glass. The record temperature of 208 K was held by the Yb3+-doped fluorozirconate glass ZBLAN. Advanced purification and glass fabrication methods currently under development are expected to also advance ZBLAN:Yb3+ to sub-TEC temperatures. However, recent achievements with YLF:Yb3+ illustrate that crystalline materials may have two potentially game-changing advantajes over glassy materials. First, the crystalline environment reduces the inhomogeneous broadening of the Yb3+ electronic transitions as compared to a glassy matrix. The respective sharpening of the crystal-field transitions increases the peak absorption cross section at the laser excitation wavelength and allows for more efficient pumping of the Yb3+ ions, particularly at low temperatures. Second, many detrimental impurities present in the starting materials tend to be excluded from the crystal during its slow growth process, in contrast to a glass where all impurities present in the starting materials are included in the glass when it is formed by temperature quenching a melt. The ultra high purity required for laser cooling materials [PRB] therefore may be easier to realize in crystals than in glasses. Laser cooling occurs by laser excitation of a rare-earth ion followed by anti-Stokes luminescence. Each such laser-cooling cycle extracts

  15. Crystal growth and annealing method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.; Sparrow, Robert

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing. An embodiment of the present invention comprises a secondary heater incorporated into a conventional crystal growth and annealing apparatus. The secondary heater supplies heat to minimize the temperature gradients in the crystal during the annealing process. The secondary heater can mount near the bottom of the crucible to effectively maintain appropriate temperature gradients.

  16. Protein crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugg, Charles E.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystal growth is a major experimental problem and is the bottleneck in widespread applications of protein crystallography. Research efforts now being pursued and sponsored by NASA are making fundamental contributions to the understanding of the science of protein crystal growth. Microgravity environments offer the possibility of performing new types of experiments that may produce a better understanding of protein crystal growth processes and may permit growth environments that are more favorable for obtaining high quality protein crystals. A series of protein crystal growth experiments using the space shuttle was initiated. The first phase of these experiments was focused on the development of micro-methods for protein crystal growth by vapor diffusion techniques, using a space version of the hanging drop method. The preliminary space experiments were used to evolve prototype hardware that will form the basis for a more advanced system that can be used to evaluate effects of gravity on protein crystal growth.

  17. Dendritic Growth in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Joshua; Garg, Shila

    2000-03-01

    The experimental study of the onset of electrohydrodynamic convection (EHC) through a dendritic growth is reported. If a magnetic Freedericksz-distorted liquid crystal of negative dielectric anisotropy is subjected to an electric field parallel to the magnetic field, EHC sets in through the nucleation of dendrites [1,2]. Measurements of tip speeds of the dendrites as a function of applied voltage at a fixed magnetic field are made. The goal is to explore the effect of the magnetic and electric fields on the dendritic growth. In addition, pattern dynamics is monitored once the final state of spatio-temporal chaos is reached by the system. [1] J. T. Gleeson, Nature 385, 511 (1997). [2] J. T. Gleeson, Physica A 239, 211 (1997). This research was supported by NSF grants DMR 9704579 and DMR 9619406.

  18. Unifying the crystallization behavior of hexagonal and square crystals with the phase-field-crystal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yang; Zheng, Chen; Jing, Zhang; Yongxin, Wang; Yanli, Lu

    2016-03-01

    By employing the phase-field-crystal models, the atomic crystallization process of hexagonal and square crystals is investigated with the emphasis on the growth mechanism and morphological change. A unified regime describing the crystallization behavior of both crystals is obtained with the thermodynamic driving force varying. By increasing the driving force, both crystals (in the steady-state) transform from a faceted polygon to an apex-bulged polygon, and then into a symmetric dendrite. For the faceted polygon, the interface advances by a layer-by-layer (LL) mode while for the apex-bulged polygonal and the dendritic crystals, it first adopts the LL mode and then transits into the multi-layer (ML) mode in the later stage. In particular, a shift of the nucleation sites from the face center to the area around the crystal tips is detected in the early growth stage of both crystals and is rationalized in terms of the relation between the crystal size and the driving force distribution. Finally, a parameter characterizing the complex shape change of square crystal is introduced. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 54175378, 51474176, and 51274167), the Natural Science Foundation of Shaanxi Province, China (Grant No. 2014JM7261), and the Doctoral Foundation Program of Ministry of China (Grant No. 20136102120021).

  19. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in protein crystallization and those parameters which influence the growth process and crystalline perfection were studied. The analysis of the flows around growing crystals is detailed. The preliminary study of the growth of isocitrate lyase and the crystal morphologies found are discussed. Preliminary results of controlled nucleation studies are presented.

  20. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study the effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality. The application of graphoepitaxy (artificial epitaxy) to proteins is detailed. The development of a method for the control of nucleation is discussed. The factor affecting the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals is presented.

  1. Hanging drop crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, Robert J. (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Bugg, Charles E. (Inventor); Suddath, Fred L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    This invention relates generally to control systems for controlling crystal growth, and more particularly to such a system which uses a beam of light refracted by the fluid in which crystals are growing to detect concentration of solutes in the liquid. In a hanging drop apparatus, a laser beam is directed onto drop which refracts the laser light into primary and secondary bows, respectively, which in turn fall upon linear diode detector arrays. As concentration of solutes in drop increases due to solvent removal, these bows move farther apart on the arrays, with the relative separation being detected by arrays and used by a computer to adjust solvent vapor transport from the drop. A forward scattering detector is used to detect crystal nucleation in drop, and a humidity detector is used, in one embodiment, to detect relative humidity in the enclosure wherein drop is suspended. The novelty of this invention lies in utilizing angular variance of light refracted from drop to infer, by a computer algorithm, concentration of solutes therein. Additional novelty is believed to lie in using a forward scattering detector to detect nucleating crystallites in drop.

  2. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  3. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOEpatents

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D.

    1992-01-01

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  4. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of low gravity on the growth of protein crystals and those parameters which will affect growth and crystal quality was studied. The proper design of the flight hardware and experimental protocols are highly dependent on understanding the factors which influence the nucleation and growth of crystals of biological macromolecules. Thus, those factors are investigated and the body of knowledge which has been built up for small molecule crystallization. These data also provide a basis of comparison for the results obtained from low-g experiments. The flows around growing crystals are detailed. The preliminary study of the growth of isocitrate lyase, the crystal morphologies found and the preliminary x ray results are discussed. The design of two apparatus for protein crystal growth by temperature control are presented along with preliminary results.

  5. Preparation for microgravity science investigation of compound semiconductor crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fripp, A. L.; Debnam, W. J.; Clark, I. O.; Crouch, R. K.; Carlson, F. M.

    1985-01-01

    Preparatory work on Bridgman directional solidification (BDS) of PbSnTe crystals prior to microgravity crystal growth experiments on Shuttle flights are reported. Gravitational effects become important in crystal growth when density gradients are present. The situation is critical in BDS of PbSnTe because of the necessity of obtaining homogeneous compositional distributions, which can be disturbed when convective processes occur. Numerical models have been defined which quantify the effects of convection in the crystal growth solution. The models were verified by earth-based crystal-growth tests in a two-zone furnace using equal concentrations of each of the elements. Data are provided to demonstrate the differences in composition among crystals grown at different orientations to the gravitational field vector.

  6. Analytics of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, W. R.; Chang, C. E.; Shlichta, P. J.; Chen, P. S.; Kim, C. K.

    1974-01-01

    Two crystal growth processes considered for spacelab experiments were studied to anticipate and understand phenomena not ordinarily encountered on earth. Computer calculations were performed on transport processes in floating zone melting and on growth of a crystal from solution in a spacecraft environment. Experiments intended to simulate solution growth at micro accelerations were performed.

  7. Compact spaceflight solution crystal-growth system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trolinger, James D.; Lal, Ravindra; Vikram, Chandra; Witherow, William

    1991-01-01

    A versatile, miniaturized, stand alone, crystal solution growth chamber design is presented which is based on fiber optics, diode lasers, and holographic optical elements in conjunction with knowledge gained from previous Spacelab work. Diagnostics instrumentation is based on a crystal growth monitor, a growth/dissolution monitor with feedback, solution diagnostics, multiple wavelength holography, and single wavelength or color Schlieren with video recording.

  8. Modelling the growth of feather crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, H.J.; Hunt, J.D.; Evans, P.V.

    1997-02-01

    An existing numerical model of dendritic growth has been adapted to model the growth of twinned columnar dendrites (feather crystals) in a binary aluminium alloy, Examination of the effect of dendrite tip angle on growth has led to an hypothesis regarding the stability of a pointed tip morphology in these crystals.

  9. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  10. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  11. Optical Diagnostics of Solution Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, T. G.; Lal, R. B.

    1996-01-01

    Non-contact optical techniques such as, optical heterodyne, ellipsometry and interferometry, for real time in-situ monitoring of solution crystal growth are demonstrated. Optical heterodyne technique has the capability of measuring the growth rate as small as 1A/sec. In a typical Michelson interferometer set up, the crystal is illuminated by a Zeeman laser with frequency omega(sub 1) and the reference beam with frequency omega(sub 2). As the crystal grows, the phase of the rf signal changes with respect to the reference beam and this phase change is related to the crystal growth rate. This technique is demonstrated with two examples: (1) by measuring the copper tip expansion/shrinkage rate and (2) by measuring the crystal growth rate of L-Arginine Phosphate (LAP). The first test shows that the expansion/shrinkage rate of copper tip was fast in the beginning, and gets slower as the expansion begins to stabilize with time. In crystal growth, the phase change due the crystal growth is measured using a phase meter and a strip chart recorder. Our experimental results indicate a varied growth rate from 69.4 to 92.6A per sec. The ellipsometer is used to study the crystal growth interface. From these measurements and a theoretical modeling of the interface, the various optical parameters can be deduced. Interferometry can also be used to measure the growth rate and concentration gradient in the vicinity of the crystal.

  12. Advanced protein crystal growth programmatic sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the costs of various APCG (Advanced Protein Crystal Growth) program options and to determine the parameters which, if changed, impact the costs and goals of the programs and to what extent. This was accomplished by developing and evaluating several alternate programmatic scenarios for the microgravity Advanced Protein Crystal Growth program transitioning from the present shuttle activity to the man tended Space Station to the permanently manned Space Station. These scenarios include selected variations in such sensitivity parameters as development and operational costs, schedules, technology issues, and crystal growth methods. This final report provides information that will aid in planning the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth Program.

  13. Zinc Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michael, B. P.; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Lilleleht, Lembit U.

    2003-06-01

    We report one of the first direct measurements of the efficiency of vapor-to-crystalline-solid growth in a microgravity environment aboard NASA's Reduced Gravity Research Facility. Zinc vapor is produced from a heater in a vacuum chamber containing argon gas. Vapor-phase nucleation is induced by cooling as the vapor expands away from the heat source, and its onset is easily detected visually by the appearance of a cloud of solid, crystalline zinc particles. The size distribution of these particles is monitored in situ by photon correlation spectroscopy. Samples were also extracted from the vapor for later analysis by scanning electron microscopy. The initial, rapid increase in the particle size distribution as a function of time is used to calculate the sticking efficiency for zinc atoms at growing crystal sites. Only a few of every 105 zinc atoms that collide with the grain surfaces are incorporated into the growing crystals. If the large (>10 μm) graphite or SiC grains extracted from meteorites grow with comparable efficiency, then such materials could not have formed on timescales compatible with circumstellar outflows. However, these grains could have formed in equilibrium in stellar atmospheres prior to the initiation of the outflow.

  14. Investigation of crystal growth from solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyagawa, I.

    1975-01-01

    Growth of organic compounds from solution, in particular Rochelle salt and triglycine sulphate, was investigated. Ground-based experiments showed that gravity-driven convection currents in the growth solution influenced defect production in crystals, degraded ferroelectric quality, and indicated that an experiment done in a zero-gravity environment would be beneficial. A crystal of Rochelle salt was grown on board Skylab-4. The quality of this crystal was compared to earth-grown crystals and its unusual features were studied. A typical defect produced in this convection-free environment was a long straight tube extending in the direction of the c crystal axis. These tubes were much longer and more regularly arranged than in similar earth-grown crystals. The crystal was actually several crystals with corresponding axes parallel to each other. Ferroelectric hysteresis experiments showed that some parts of the crystal had many defects, while other parts were of extremely good quality.

  15. Effect of Interaction of the Temperature Field and Supersaturation on the Morphology of the Solid-Vapor Interface in Crystal Growth by Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grasza, K.; Palosz, W.; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An in-situ study of the morphology of the solid-vapor interface during iodine crystal growth was done. The conditions for terrace growth, flat faces formation and retraction, competition between sources of steps, formation of protrusions, surface roughening, and defect overgrowth are demonstrated and discussed.

  16. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Tai, C.Y.; Chen, P.C.

    1995-04-01

    Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) processes are most commonly utilized to remove sulfur dioxide from stack gases of coal- or oil-fired plants. In the simple slurry technology, SO{sub 2} is absorbed by a slurry of lime/limestone to form calcium sulfite crystals of acicular habit and its strong agglomeration, requiring large clarifiers and filters to dewater the sludge to make an acceptable landfill. Crystal growth and agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrate crystals from solution were studied by reacting Ca(OH){sub 2} with NaHSO{sub 3} in a pH-stat semibatch crystallizer. Single platelet crystals and agglomerates of platelet crystals were produced in the pH range from 5.80 to 6.80. The crystallization mechanism changed from primary nucleation to crystal growth in the progressive precipitation. Using the titration curves, the growth rate was calculated from the titration rate at the final stage of operation. The crystal growth rates of calcium sulfate hemihydrate crystals were found to obey the parabolic rate law in the low supersaturation range. Another point to be noted is that the precipitates of calcium sulfite hemihydrate in agitated suspensions have a tendency to form agglomerates. It was found that the degree of agglomeration is a weak function of relative supersaturation and magma density, while the pH value is a key factor that affects the degree of agglomeration. Addition of EDTA also has an effect on the agglomeration of calcium sulfite hemihydrates.

  17. Innovation in crystal growth: A personal perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullin, J. B.

    2008-04-01

    The evolution of crystal growth has been crucially dependent on revolutionary innovations and initiatives involving ideas, technology and communication. A personal perspective is presented on some of these aspects in connection with the early history of semiconductors that have helped evolve our knowledge and advance the science and technology of crystal growth. The presentation considers examples from work on germanium, silicon, indium antimonide, gallium arsenide, indium phosphide, gallium phosphide and mercury cadmium telluride. In connection with metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), the influence of adduct purification for alkyls is noted together with the growth of Hg xCd 1-xTe. The role of crystal growth organisations together with initiatives in the publication of the Journal of Crystal Growth (JCG) and the pivotal role of the International Organisation of Crystal Growth (IOCG) are also highlighted in the quest for scientific excellence.

  18. Development of a laser-Doppler system for measurement of velocity fields in PVT crystal growth systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, O. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Lin, J. T.; Kim, G. T.; Singh, N. B.

    1991-01-01

    A laser-Doppler velocimetry (LDV) system capable of measuring velocities as low as 10 exp -5 m/s is presented, and a calibration system for determining the accuracy of the LDV system at these velocities is described. The results obtained in mercurous chloride crystal grown in cylindrical ampoules at 300 C, using physical vapor transport (PVT) methods, are presented. It is concluded that the overall flow pattern observed is a unicellular, asymmetric pattern between Rayleigh number of 125 and 250.

  19. Fluid mechanics in crystal growth - The 1982 Freeman scholar lecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ostrach, S.

    1983-01-01

    An attempt is made to unify the current state of knowledge in crystal growth techniques and fluid mechanics. After identifying important fluid dynamic problems for such representative crystal growth processes as closed tube vapor transport, open reactor vapor deposition, and the Czochralski and floating zone melt growth techniques, research results obtained to date are presented. It is noted that the major effort to date has been directed to the description of the nature and extent of bulk transport under realistic conditions, where bulk flow determines the heat and solute transport which strongly influence the temperature and concentration fields in the vicinity of the growth interface. Proper treatment of near field, or interface, problems cannot be given until the far field, or global flow, involved in a given crystal growth technique has been adequately described.

  20. Economic analysis of crystal growth in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulrich, D. R.; Chung, A. M.; Yan, C. S.; Mccreight, L. R.

    1972-01-01

    Many advanced electronic technologies and devices for the 1980's are based on sophisticated compound single crystals, i.e. ceramic oxides and compound semiconductors. Space processing of these electronic crystals with maximum perfection, purity, and size is suggested. No ecomonic or technical justification was found for the growth of silicon single crystals for solid state electronic devices in space.

  1. Optical diagnostics of solution crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Yongkee; Reddy, B. R.; George, Tharayil G.; Lal, Ravindra B.

    1995-01-01

    Solution crystal growth monitoring of LAP/TGS crystals by various optical diagnostics systems, such as conventional and Mach-Zehnder (M-Z) interferometers, optical heterodyne technique, and ellipsometry, is under development. The study of the dynamics of the crystal growth process requires a detailed knowledge of crystal growth rate and the concentration gradient near growing crystals in aqueous solution. Crystal growth rate can be measured using conventional interferometry. Laser beam reflections from the crystal front as well as the back surface interfere with each other, and the fringe shift due to the growing crystal yields information about the growth rate. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 6 A/sec for LAP crystals grown from solution. Single wavelength M-Z interferometry is in use to calculate the concentration gradient near the crystal. Preliminary investigation is in progress using an M-Z interferometer with 2 cm beam diameter to cover the front region of the growing crystal. In the optical heterodyne technique, phase difference between two rf signals (250 KHZ) is measured of which one is a reference signal, and the other growth signal, whose phase changes due to a change in path length as the material grows. From the phase difference the growth rate can also be calculated. Our preliminary results indicate a growth rate of 1.5 A/sec. the seed and solution temperatures were 26.46 C and 27.92 C respectively, and the solution was saturated at 29.0 C. an ellipsometer to measure the growth rate and interface layer is on order from JOBIN YVON, France. All these systems are arranged in such a manner that measurements can be made either sequentially or simultaneously. These techniques will be adapted for flight experiment.

  2. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described.

  3. Crystal Shape Evolution in Detached Bridgman Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, M. P.; Mazuruk, K.

    2013-01-01

    Detached (or dewetted) Bridgman crystal growth defines that process in which a gap exists between a growing crystal and the crucible wall. Existence of the gap provides several advantages, including no sticking of the crystal to the crucible wall, reduced thermal and mechanical stresses, reduced dislocations, and no heterogeneous nucleation by the crucible. Numerical calculations are used to determine the conditions in which a gap can exist. According to crystal shape stability theory, only some of these gap widths will be dynamically stable. Beginning with a crystal diameter that differs from stable conditions, the transient crystal growth process is analyzed. In microgravity, dynamic stability depends only on capillary effects and is decoupled from heat transfer. Depending on the initial conditions and growth parameters, the crystal shape will evolve towards the crucible wall, towards a stable gap width, or towards the center of the crucible, collapsing the meniscus. The effect of a tapered crucible on dynamic stability is also described

  4. Diffusion, Viscosity and Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    1996-01-01

    The diffusivity of TriGlycine Sulfate (TGS), Potassium Dihydrogen Phosphate (KDP), Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADF) and other compounds of interest to microgravity crystal growth, in supersaturated solutions as a function of solution concentration, 'age' and 'history was studied experimentally. The factors that affect the growth of crystals from water solutions in microgravity have been examined. Three non-linear optical materials have been studied, potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and triglycine sulfate (TGC). The diffusion coefficient and viscosity of supersaturated water solutions were measured. Also theoretical model of diffusivity and viscosity in a metastable state, model of crystal growth from solution including non-linear time dependent diffusivity and viscosity effect and computer simulation of the crystal growth process which allows simulation of the microgravity crystal growth were developed.

  5. Laser Irradiated Growth of Protein Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Hiroaki; Takano, Kazufumi; Hosokawa, Youichiroh; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Yoshimura, Masashi; Tsunaka, Yasuo; Morikawa, Masaaki; Kanaya, Shigenori; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Kai, Yasushi; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2003-07-01

    We succeeded in the first ever generation of protein crystals by laser irradiation. We call this process Laser Irradiated Growth Technique (LIGHT). Effective crystallization was confirmed by applying an intense femtosecond laser. The crystallization period was dramatically shortened by LIGHT. In addition, protein crystals were obtained by LIGHT from normally uncrystallized conditions. These results indicate that intense femtosecond laser irradiation generates crystal nuclei; protein crystals can then be grown from the nuclei that act as seeds in a supersaturated solution. The nuclei formation is possible primarily due to nonlinear nucleation processes of an intense femtosecond laser with a peak intensity of over a gigawatt (GW).

  6. Crystal field and magnetic properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flood, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility measurements have been made in the temperature range 1.3 to 4.2 K on powdered samples of ErH3. The susceptibility exhibits Curie-Weiss behavior from 4.2 to 2 K, and intercepts the negative temperature axis at theta = 1.05 + or - 0.05 K, indicating that the material is antiferromagnetic. The low field effective moment is 6.77 + or - 0.27 Bohr magnetons per ion. The magnetization exhibits a temperature independent contribution, the slope of which is (5 + or - 1.2) x 10 to the -6th Weber m/kg Tesla. The saturation moment is 3.84 + or - 1 - 0.15 Bohr magnetons per ion. The results can be qualitatively explained by the effects of crystal fields on the magnetic ions. No definitive assignment of a crystal field ground state can be given, nor can a clear choice between cubically or hexagonally symmetric crystal fields be made. For hexagonal symmetry, the first excited state is estimated to be 86 to 100 K above the ground state. For cubic symmetry, the splitting is on the order of 160 to 180 K.

  7. Transport and Growth Kinetics in Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otalora, F.; Garcia-Ruiz, J. M.; Carotenuto, L.; Castagnolo, D.; Novella, M. L.; Chernov, A. A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic coupling between mass transport and incorporation of growth units into the surface of a crystal growing from solution in microgravity is used to derive quantitative information on the crystal growth kinetics. To this end, new procedures for experiment preparation, interferometric data processing and model fitting have been developed. The use of experimental data from the bulk diffusive maw transport together with a model for steady state stagnant crystal growth allows the detailed quantitative understanding of the kinetics of both the concentration depletion zone around the crystal and the growth of the crystal interface. The protein crystal used in the experiment is shown to be growing in the mixed kinetic regime (0.2 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second less than beta R/D less than 0.9 x 10(exp -6) centimeters per second).

  8. Microscopic kinetic model for polymer crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Wenbing

    2011-03-01

    Linear crystal growth rates characterize the net result of competition between growth and melting at the liquid-solid interfaces. The rate equation for polymer crystal growth can be derived with a barrier term for crystal growth and with a driving force term of excess lamellar thickness, provided that growth and melting share the same rate-determining steps at the growth front. Such an ansatz can be verified by the kinetic symmetry between growth and melting around the melting point of lamellar crystals, as made in our recent dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. The profile of the growth/melting front appears as wedge-shaped, with the free energy barrier for intramolecular secondary crystal nucleation at its top, and with the driving force gained via instant thickening at its bottom. Such a scenario explains unique phenomena on polymer crystal growth, such as chain folding, regime transitions, molecular segregation of polydisperse polymers, self-poisoning with integer-number chain-folding of short chains, and colligative growth rates of binary mixtures of two chain lengths. Financial support from NNSFC No. 20825415 and NBRPC No. 2011CB606100 is acknowledged.

  9. Large-size germanium crystal growth for rare event physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Dongming; Wang, Guojian; Mei, Hao; Guan, Yutong; Yang, Gang; Govani, Jayesh; Cubed Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    Cosmogenic production in germanium crystals grown on the surface can limit the sensitivity for the next generation deep underground experiments in searching for rare event physics beyond the Standard Model. One of the best solutions to eliminate unwanted cosmogenics is to produce the germanium crystals and detectors in an underground environment. The goal of this project is to create state-of-the-art detectors to advance neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter exploration research and technology while simultaneously paving the way for infrastructure to support an underground laboratory for zone refining, crystal growth, and detector fabrication. The greatest challenge in the growth of germanium crystals is a lack of precise control of individual crystal properties such as the impurity distribution, the dislocation density, and the crystalline structure. With knowledge gained from the pioneers in the field of crystal growth, the researchers have developed a novel technique to grow detector-grade crystals. In this paper, we will report detector-grade large-size germanium crystal growth at the University of South Dakota. Cosmogenic production in germanium crystals grown on the surface can limit the sensitivity for the next generation deep underground experiments in searching for rare event physics beyond the Standard Model. One of the best solutions to eliminate unwanted cosmogenics is to produce the germanium crystals and detectors in an underground environment. The goal of this project is to create state-of-the-art detectors to advance neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter exploration research and technology while simultaneously paving the way for infrastructure to support an underground laboratory for zone refining, crystal growth, and detector fabrication. The greatest challenge in the growth of germanium crystals is a lack of precise control of individual crystal properties such as the impurity distribution, the dislocation density, and the

  10. Materials discovery through crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zur Loye, Hans-Conrad

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of new materials and associated desirable properties has been a driving force behind chemical innovation for centuries. When we look at some of the many recent technological advances, and how widespread and significant their impact has been, we appreciate how much they have relied on new materials. The increase in hard drive storage capacity due to new giant magneto-resistive materials, the ever-shrinking cell phone due to improved microwave dielectric materials, the enhancement in lithium battery storage capacity due to new intercalation materials, or the improved capacitor due to new ferroelectric materials are all excellent examples. How were these materials discovered? While there is no single answer, in all cases there was a First-Material, the archetype in which the phenomenon was first observed, the one that led to further investigations and the subsequent preparation of improved 2nd or 3rd generation materials. It is this First-Material, the archetype, that was discovered - often via crystal growth.

  11. Protein-crystal growth experiment (planned)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujita, S.; Asano, K.; Hashitani, T.; Kitakohji, T.; Nemoto, H.; Kitamura, S.

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a microgravity environment on protein crystal growth, a system was developed using 5 cubic feet Get Away Special payload canister. In the experiment, protein (myoglobin) will be simultaneously crystallized from an aqueous solution in 16 crystallization units using three types of crystallization methods, i.e., batch, vapor diffusion, and free interface diffusion. Each unit has two compartments: one for the protein solution and the other for the ammonium sulfate solution. Compartments are separated by thick acrylic or thin stainless steel plates. Crystallization will be started by sliding out the plates, then will be periodically recorded up to 120 hours by a still camera. The temperature will be passively controlled by a phase transition thermal storage component and recorded in IC memory throughout the experiment. Microgravity environment can then be evaluated for protein crystal growth by comparing crystallization in space with that on Earth.

  12. Crack propagation driven by crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    A. Royne; Paul Meaking; A. Malthe-Sorenssen; B. Jamtveit; D. K. Dysthe

    2011-10-01

    Crystals that grow in confinement may exert a force on their surroundings and thereby drive crack propagation in rocks and other materials. We describe a model of crystal growth in an idealized crack geometry in which the crystal growth and crack propagation are coupled through the stress in the surrounding bulk solid. Subcritical crack propagation takes place during a transient period, which may be very long, during which the crack velocity is limited by the kinetics of crack propagation. When the crack is sufficiently large, the crack velocity becomes limited by the kinetics of crystal growth. The duration of the subcritical regime is determined by two non-dimensional parameters, which relate the kinetics of crack propagation and crystal growth to the supersaturation of the fluid and the elastic properties of the surrounding material.

  13. Crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, R. P.; Gaur, S. S.; Sheehan, M. E.; Nancollas, G. H.

    1988-02-01

    The kinetics of crystal growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate has been investigated up to very large extents of growth over a range of supersaturations maintained using the Constant Composition technique. It is suggested that the initial rapid growth of aged seed crystals resulting in marked lattice perfection, reduces the density of growth sites on the crystal surfaces. A method for the preparation of perfected crystallites of calcium oxalate monohydrate through pregrowth of aged crystals has been developed. At large extents of growth with respect to initial seed crystals ( > 200% for aged crystals and 30-60% for pregrown crystals), the rates of crystallization at constant supersaturation undergo marked increases accompanying the formulation of secondary nuclei. These nucleation thresholds depend both upon supersaturation and upon the initial specific surface area of the crystallites and may be important factors in the formation of calcium oxalate stones in vivo. Experiments in whole urine suggest that the kinetics of growth, secondary nucleation, aggregation and cementation of particles may be important factors in kidney stone formation.

  14. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth on STS-26

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Mission Specialist George (Pinky) D. Nelson uses a 35 mm camera to photograph a protein crystal grown during the STS-26 Protein Crystal Growth (PCG-II-01) experiment. The protein crystal growth (PCG) carrier is shown deployed from the PCG Refrigerator/Incubator Mocule (R/IM) located in the middeck forward locker. The R/IM contained three Vapor Diffusion Apparatus (VDS) trays (one of which is shown). A total of sixty protein crystal samples were processed during the STS-26 mission.

  15. Asteroid core crystallization by inward dendritic growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haack, Henning; Scott, Edward R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The physics of the asteroid core crystallization process in metallic asteroids is investigated, with special attention given to the initial conditions for core crystallization, the manner of crystallization, the mechanisms acting in the stirring of the liquid, and the effects of elements such as sulfur on crystallization of Fe-Ni. On the basis of theoretical considerations and the published data on iron meteorites, it is suggested that the mode of crystallization in asteroid core was different from the apparent outward concentric crystallization of the earth core, in that the crystallization of asteroidal cores commenced at the base of the mantle and proceeded inward. The inward crystallization resulted in complex dendritic growth. These dendrites may have grown to lengths of hundreds of meters or perhaps even as large as the core radius, thereby dividing the core into separate magma chambers.

  16. Effects of impurities on crystal growth in fructose crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Y. D.; Shiau, L. D.; Berglund, K. A.

    1989-10-01

    The influence of impurities on the crystallization of anhydrous fructose from aqueous solution was studied. The growth kinetics of fructose crystals in the fructose-water-glucose and fructose-water-difructose dianhydrides systems were investigated using photomicroscopic contact nucleation techniques. Glucose is the major impurity likely to be present in fructose syrup formed during corn wet milling, while several difructose dianhydrides are formed in situ under crystallization conditions and have been proposed as a cause in the decrease of overall yields. Both sets of impurities were found to cause inhibition of crystal growth, but the mechanisms responsible in each case are different. It was found that the presence of glucose increases the solubility of fructose in water and thus lowers the supersaturation of the solution. This is probably the main effect responsible for the decrease of crystal growth. Since the molecular structures of difructose dianhydrides are similar to that of fructose, they are probably "tailor-made" impurities. The decrease of crystal growth is probably caused by the incorporation of these impurities into or adsorption to the crystal surface which would accept fructose molecules in the orientation that existed in the difructose dianhydride.

  17. The Nucleation and Growth of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining crystals of suitable size and high quality continues to be a major bottleneck in macromolecular crystallography. Currently, structural genomics efforts are achieving on average about a 10% success rate in going from purified protein to a deposited crystal structure. Growth of crystals in microgravity was proposed as a means of overcoming size and quality problems, which subsequently led to a major NASA effort in microgravity crystal growth, with the agency also funding research into understanding the process. Studies of the macromolecule crystal nucleation and growth process were carried out in a number of labs in an effort to understand what affected the resultant crystal quality on Earth, and how microgravity improved the process. Based upon experimental evidence, as well as simple starting assumptions, we have proposed that crystal nucleation occurs by a series of discrete self assembly steps, which 'set' the underlying crystal symmetry. This talk will review the model developed, and its origins, in our laboratory for how crystals nucleate and grow, and will then present, along with preliminary data, how we propose to use this model to improve the success rate for obtaining crystals from a given protein.

  18. On growth rate hysteresis and catastrophic crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Cecília; Rocha, Fernando A.; Damas, Ana M.; Martins, Pedro M.

    2013-04-01

    Different crystal growth rates as supersaturation is increasing or decreasing in impure media is a phenomenon called growth rate hysteresis (GRH) that has been observed in varied systems and applications, such as protein crystallization or during biomineralization. We have recently shown that the transient adsorption of impurities onto newly formed active sites for growth (or kinks) is sensitive to the direction and rate of supersaturation variation, thus providing a possible explanation for GRH [6]. In the present contribution, we expand on this concept by deriving the analytical expressions for transient crystal growth based on the energetics of growth hillock formation and kink occupation by impurities. Two types of GRH results are described according to the variation of kink density with supersaturation: for nearly constant density, decreasing or increasing supersaturation induce, respectively, growth promoting or inhibiting effects relative to equilibrium conditions. This is the type of GRH measured by us during the crystallization of egg-white lysozyme. For variable kink density, slight changes in the supersaturation level may induce abrupt variations in the crystal growth rate. Different literature examples of this so-called 'catastrophic' crystal growth are discussed in terms of their fundamental consequences.

  19. Research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 11 Feb. 1992 to 10 Aug. 1993 on research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth is reported. Work on chemical impurity characterization and mass spectroscopy is described.

  20. Onboard photo: Crystal Growth Furnace experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Space Shuttle Columbia (STS-50) astronaut Bornie Dunbar wears protective goggles to assemble a zeolite sample cartridge for the Crystal Growth Furnace (CGF) in the United States Microgravity Laboratory-1 (USML-1) science module.

  1. The Growth of Large Single Crystals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baer, Carl D.

    1990-01-01

    Presented is an experiment which demonstrates principles of experimental design, solubility, and crystal growth and structure. Materials, procedures and results are discussed. Suggestions for adapting this activity to the high school laboratory are provided. (CW)

  2. Silicon carbide - Progress in crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, J. Anthony

    1987-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of two processes for producing large-area high-quality single crystals of SiC is described: (1) a modified Lely process for the growth of the alpha polytypes (e.g., 6H SiC) initially developed by Tairov and Tsvetkov (1978, 1981) and Ziegler et al. (1983), and (2) a process for the epitaxial growth of the beta polytype on single-crystal silicon or other substrates. Growth of large-area cubic SiC on Si is described together with growth of defect-free beta-SiC films on alpha-6H SiC crystals and TiC lattice. Semiconducting qualities of silicon carbide crystals grown by various techniques are discussed.

  3. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Porcine Elastase. This enzyme is associated with the degradation of lung tissue in people suffering from emphysema. It is useful in studying causes of this disease. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  4. Structural consequences of hen egg-white lysozyme orthorhombic crystal growth in a high magnetic field: validation of X-ray diffraction intensity, conformational energy searching and quantitative analysis of B factors and mosaicity.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Shinya; Yamada, Yusuke; Sato, Takao; Tanaka, Nobuo; Matsui, Takuro; Sazaki, Gen; Nakajima, Kazuo; Matsuura, Yoshiki

    2005-03-01

    atoms, the average B factor in the 10 T crystal shows an improvement of 1.8 angstroms(2) over that for the 0 T control; subsequently, the difference in diffraction intensity between the 10 T and 0 T crystals corresponds to an increase of 22.6% at the resolution limit. The mosaicity of the 10 T crystal was better than that of the 0 T crystal. More highly isotropic values of 0.0065, 0.0049 and 0.0048 degrees were recorded along the a, b and c axes, respectively. Anisotropic mosaicity analysis indicated that crystal growth is most perfect in the direction that corresponds to the favoured growth direction of the crystal, and that the crystal grown in the magnetic field had domains that were three times the volume of those of the control crystal. Overall, the magnetic field has improved the quality of these crystals and the diffracted intensity has increased significantly with the magnetic field, leading to a higher resolution. PMID:15735330

  5. Growth Of Oriented Crystals At Polymerized Membranes

    DOEpatents

    Charych, Deborah H. , Berman, Amir

    2000-01-25

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the growth and alignment of crystals at biopolymeric films. The methods and compositions of the present invention provide means to generate a variety of dense crystalline ceramic films, with totally aligned crystals, at low temperatures and pressures, suitable for use with polymer and plastic substrates.

  6. Convection effects in protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Glyn O.

    1988-01-01

    Protein crystals for X-ray diffraction study are usually grown resting on the bottom of a hanging drop of a saturated protein solution, with slow evaporation to the air in a small enclosed cell. The evaporation rate is controlled by hanging the drop above a reservoir of water, with its saturation vapor pressure decreased by a low concentration of a passive solute. The drop has a lower solute concentration, and its volume shrinks by evaporation until the molecular concentrations match. Protein crystals can also be grown from a seed crystal suspended or supported in the interior of a supersaturated solution. The main analysis of this report concerns this case because it is less complicated than hanging-drop growth. Convection effects have been suggested as the reason for the apparent cessation of growth at a certain rather small crystal size. It seeems that as the crystal grows, the number of dislocations increases to a point where further growth is hindered. Growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting space vehicle has been proposed as a method for obtaining larger crystals. Experimental observations of convection effects during the growth of protein crystals have been reported.

  7. Interface control and snow crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jessica; Schaposnik, Laura P.

    2016-02-01

    The growth of snow crystals is dependent on the temperature and saturation of the environment. In the case of dendrites, Reiter's local two-dimensional model provides a realistic approach to the study of dendrite growth. In this paper we obtain a new geometric rule that incorporates interface control, a basic mechanism of crystallization that is not taken into account in the original Reiter model. By defining two new variables, growth latency and growth direction, our improved model gives a realistic model not only for dendrite but also for plate forms.

  8. Interface control and snow crystal growth.

    PubMed

    Li, Jessica; Schaposnik, Laura P

    2016-02-01

    The growth of snow crystals is dependent on the temperature and saturation of the environment. In the case of dendrites, Reiter's local two-dimensional model provides a realistic approach to the study of dendrite growth. In this paper we obtain a new geometric rule that incorporates interface control, a basic mechanism of crystallization that is not taken into account in the original Reiter model. By defining two new variables, growth latency and growth direction, our improved model gives a realistic model not only for dendrite but also for plate forms. PMID:26986434

  9. Field emission and growth of fullerene nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rinzler, A.G.; Hafner, J.H.; Nilolaev, P.; Colbert, D.T.; Smalley, R.E.

    1994-11-01

    Efforts to control the growth of individual carbon nanotubes from nanotube seed crystals have led to a characterization of their field-induced electron emission behavior. The application of a bias voltage in the growth apparatus was motivated by the prolific formation of nanotubes in the carbon are growth method, in which the electric field appears to play a central role. The authors report here the ability to achieve various tube tip configurations by the controlled application of voltage, heat and chemicals to an individual nanotube, and that these states are well characterized by the emission currents they induce.

  10. A Multiscale simulation method for ice crystallization and frost growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Miad

    2015-11-01

    Formation of ice crystals and frost is associated with physical mechanisms at immensely separated scales. The primary focus of this work is on crystallization and frost growth on a cold plate exposed to the humid air. The nucleation is addressed through Gibbs energy barrier method based on the interfacial energy of crystal and condensate as well as the ambient and surface conditions. The supercooled crystallization of ice crystals is simulated through a phase-field based method where the variation of degree of surface tension anisotropy and its mode in the fluid medium is represented statistically. In addition, the mesoscale width of the interface is quantified asymptotically which serves as a length-scale criterion into a so-called ``Adaptive'' AMR (AAMR) algorithm to tie the grid resolution at the interface to local physical properties. Moreover, due to the exposure of crystal to humid air, a secondary non-equilibrium growth process contributes to the formation of frost at the tip of the crystal. A Monte-Carlo implementation of Diffusion Limited Aggregation method addresses the formation of frost during the crystallization. Finally, a virtual boundary based Immersed Boundary Method (IBM) is adapted to address the interaction of ice crystal with convective air during its growth.

  11. Simulation study of twisted crystal growth in organic thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Alta; Haataja, Mikko

    2015-10-01

    Many polymer and organic small-molecule thin films crystallize with microstructures that twist or curve in a regular manner as crystal growth proceeds. Here we present a phase-field model that energetically favors twisting of the three-dimensional crystalline orientation about and along particular axes, allowing morphologies such as banded spherulites, curved dendrites, and "s"- or "c"-shaped needle crystals to be simulated. When twisting about the fast-growing crystalline axis is energetically favored and spherulitic growth conditions are imposed, crystallization occurs in the form of banded spherulites composed of radially oriented twisted crystalline fibers. Due to the lack of symmetry, twisting along the normal growth direction leads to heterochiral banded spherulites with opposite twist handedness in each half of the spherulite. When twisting is instead favored about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate and along the normal growth direction under diffusion-limited single-crystalline growth conditions, crystallization occurs in the form of curved dendrites with uniformly rotating branches. We show that the rate at which the branches curve affects not only the morphology but also the overall kinetics of crystallization, as the total crystallized area at a given time is maximized for a finite turning rate.

  12. Simulation study of twisted crystal growth in organic thin films.

    PubMed

    Fang, Alta; Haataja, Mikko

    2015-10-01

    Many polymer and organic small-molecule thin films crystallize with microstructures that twist or curve in a regular manner as crystal growth proceeds. Here we present a phase-field model that energetically favors twisting of the three-dimensional crystalline orientation about and along particular axes, allowing morphologies such as banded spherulites, curved dendrites, and "s"- or "c"-shaped needle crystals to be simulated. When twisting about the fast-growing crystalline axis is energetically favored and spherulitic growth conditions are imposed, crystallization occurs in the form of banded spherulites composed of radially oriented twisted crystalline fibers. Due to the lack of symmetry, twisting along the normal growth direction leads to heterochiral banded spherulites with opposite twist handedness in each half of the spherulite. When twisting is instead favored about the axis perpendicular to the plane of the substrate and along the normal growth direction under diffusion-limited single-crystalline growth conditions, crystallization occurs in the form of curved dendrites with uniformly rotating branches. We show that the rate at which the branches curve affects not only the morphology but also the overall kinetics of crystallization, as the total crystallized area at a given time is maximized for a finite turning rate. PMID:26565254

  13. Growth kinetics and morphology of polymer crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Akihiko

    2007-03-01

    Originating from the nature of chain folding, polymer single crystals are quite unique in the growth kinetics and morphology. The developments of the understanding in the past 50 years are discussed and the unsolved important issues will be suggested. Polymer single crystals are thin lamellae with the thickness in the order of 10nm determined by the period of chain folding, which keeps a constant value for the isothermal crystallization. The growth of polymer single crystals is modeled by the kinetics of creation and annihilation of growth steps on a rectangular substrate with the pre-determined thickness. The growth face is therefore regarded as a one-dimensional substrate and the kinks and anti-kinks on the substrate correspond to the growth steps propagating in the opposite directions. The kinetic equations of those kinks proposed by Seto and Frank well describe the transition of growth regime as a crossover from single nucleation to multi-nucleation on the basis of the standard model of chain-folded polymer crystallization with surface nucleation proposed by Lauritzen and Hoffman. However, the analysis of the growth kinetics and morphology of single crystals having curved growth front suggests an unusual behavior of the step propagation velocity. The anomaly can be accounted for by a self-poisoning of the growth step interrupted by polymer chains with folding shorter than required. An entropic barrier of pinning proposed by Sadler and Gilmer is a possible candidate of the self-poisoning and is in accordance with recent computer simulation results suggesting the kinetics on a rugged free energy landscape having a resemblance to protein folding. Therefore, the quantitative evaluation of the kinetic barriers of surface nucleation and pinning has been an important issue. In addition, examination of the kinetics of melting will have valuable information because melting of a crystal must be free from nucleation but can still be limited by the entropic barrier.

  14. Ultraslow growth rates of giant gypsum crystals

    PubMed Central

    Van Driessche, A. E. S.; García-Ruíz, J. M.; Tsukamoto, K.; Patiño-Lopez, L. D.; Satoh, H.

    2011-01-01

    Mineralogical processes taking place close to equilibrium, or with very slow kinetics, are difficult to quantify precisely. The determination of ultraslow dissolution/precipitation rates would reveal characteristic timing associated with these processes that are important at geological scale. We have designed an advanced high-resolution white-beam phase-shift interferometry microscope to measure growth rates of crystals at very low supersaturation values. To test this technique, we have selected the giant gypsum crystals of Naica ore mines in Chihuahua, Mexico, a challenging subject in mineral formation. They are thought to form by a self-feeding mechanism driven by solution-mediated anhydrite-gypsum phase transition, and therefore they must be the result of an extremely slow crystallization process close to equilibrium. To calculate the formation time of these crystals we have measured the growth rates of the {010} face of gypsum growing from current Naica waters at different temperatures. The slowest measurable growth rate was found at 55 °C, 1.4 ± 0.2 × 10-5 nm/s, the slowest directly measured normal growth rate for any crystal growth process. At higher temperatures, growth rates increase exponentially because of decreasing gypsum solubility and higher kinetic coefficient. At 50 °C neither growth nor dissolution was observed indicating that growth of giant crystals of gypsum occurred at Naica between 58 °C (gypsum/anhydrite transition temperature) and the current temperature of Naica waters, confirming formation temperatures determined from fluid inclusion studies. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of applying advanced optical techniques in laboratory experiments to gain a better understanding of crystal growth processes occurring at a geological timescale. PMID:21911400

  15. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The solubility and growth mechanism of canavalin were studied, and the applicability of the Schlieren technique to protein crystal growth was investigated. Canavalin which may be crystallized from a basic solution by the addition of hydrogen (H+) ions was shown to have normal solubility characteristics over the range of temperatures (5 to 25 C) and pH (5 to 7.5) studied. The solubility data combined with growth rate data gathered from the seeded growth of canavalin crystals indicated that the growth mechanism at high supersaturation ratios (>1.28) is screw dislocation like. A Schlieren apparatus was constructed and flow patterns were observed in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate), lysozyme, and canavalin. The critical parameters were identified as the change in density with concentration (dp/dc) and the change in index of refraction with concentration (dn/dc). Some of these values were measured for the materials listed.

  16. Crystal growth and furnace analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dakhoul, Youssef M.

    1986-01-01

    A thermal analysis of Hg/Cd/Te solidification in a Bridgman cell is made using Continuum's VAST code. The energy equation is solved in an axisymmetric, quasi-steady domain for both the molten and solid alloy regions. Alloy composition is calculated by a simplified one-dimensional model to estimate its effect on melt thermal conductivity and, consequently, on the temperature field within the cell. Solidification is assumed to occur at a fixed temperature of 979 K. Simplified boundary conditions are included to model both the radiant and conductive heat exchange between the furnace walls and the alloy. Calculations are performed to show how the steady-state isotherms are affected by: the hot and cold furnace temperatures, boundary condition parameters, and the growth rate which affects the calculated alloy's composition. The Advanced Automatic Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF), developed by NASA, is also thermally analyzed using the CINDA code. The objective is to determine the performance and the overall power requirements for different furnace designs.

  17. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    This Final Technical Report for NASA Grant NAG8-774 covers the period from April 27, 1989 through December 31, 1992. It covers five main topics: fluid flow studies, the influence of growth conditions on the morphology of isocitrate lyase crystals, control of nucleation, the growth of lysozyme by the temperature gradient method and graphoepitaxy of protein crystals. The section on fluid flow discusses the limits of detectability in the Schlieren imaging of fluid flows around protein crystals. The isocitrate lyase study compares crystals grown terrestrially under a variety of conditions with those grown in space. The controlling factor governing the morphology of the crystals is the supersaturation. The lack of flow in the interface between the drop and the atmosphere in microgravity causes protein precipitation in the boundary layer and a lowering of the supersaturation in the drop. This lowered supersaturation leads to improved crystal morphology. Preliminary experiments with lysozyme indicated that localized temperature gradients could be used to nucleate crystals in a controlled manner. An apparatus (thermonucleator) was designed to study the controlled nucleation of protein crystals. This apparatus has been used to nucleate crystals of materials with both normal (ice-water, Rochelle salt and lysozyme) and retrograde (horse serum albumin and alpha chymotrypsinogen A) solubility. These studies have lead to the design of an new apparatus that small and more compatible with use in microgravity. Lysozyme crystals were grown by transporting nutrient from a source (lysozyme powder) to the crystal in a temperature gradient. The influence of path length and cross section on the growth rate was demonstrated. This technique can be combined with the thermonucleator to control both nucleation and growth. Graphoepitaxy utilizes a patterned substrate to orient growing crystals. In this study, silicon substrates with 10 micron grooves were used to grow crystals of catalase

  18. Phase-Field Crystals with Elastic Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovic, Peter; Provatas, Nikolas; Haataja, Mikko

    2006-06-09

    We report on a novel extension of the recently introduced phase-field crystal (PFC) method [Elder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 245701 (2002)], which incorporates elastic interactions as well as crystal plasticity and diffusive dynamics. In our model, elastic interactions are mediated through wave modes that propagate on time scales many orders of magnitude slower than atomic vibrations but still much faster than diffusive time scales. This allows us to preserve the quintessential advantage of the PFC model: the ability to simulate atomic-scale interactions and dynamics on time scales many orders of magnitude longer than characteristic vibrational time scales. We demonstrate the two different modes of propagation in our model and show that simulations of grain growth and elastoplastic deformation are consistent with the microstructural properties of nanocrystals.

  19. Study on crystal-melt interface shape of sapphire crystal growth by the KY method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weina; Lu, Jijun; Chen, Hongjian; Yan, Wenbo; Min, Chunhua; Lian, Qingqing; Wang, Yunman; Cheng, Peng; Liu, Caichi; Xu, Yongliang

    2015-12-01

    In this article, the influence of the flow field structure and temperature gradient of forefront interface on the shape of crystal-melt interface which may reflect the interface stability were analyzed through the method of numerical simulation by using CGSim software. In order to get a suitable interface shape and grow high-quality sapphire crystal, the heater arrangement should be adjusted during the KY process. The results indicate that the effect of Marangoni convection cannot be neglected at the last stage, the crystal-melt interface is governed by the flow field structure and the temperature gradient in melt at the crystal-melt interface. The phenomenon of shoulder concave appears at the stage of shoulder turning and interface inversion appears at the last stage during the crystal growth is discussed. Adjusting heater arrangement may effectively optimize the shape of crystal-melt interface.

  20. Growth and characterization of diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Siva Sankari, R.; Perumal, Rajesh Narayana

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate (DACS) is one of the most promising inorganic dielectric crystals with exceptional mechanical properties. Good quality crystals of DACS were grown by using solution method in a period of 30 days. The grown crystals were subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis in order to establish their crystalline nature. Thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis were performed for the crystal. Several solid state physical parameters have been determined for the grown crystals. The dielectric constant and the dielectric loss and AC conductivity of the grown crystal were studied as a function of frequency and temperature has been calculated and plotted. - Highlights: • Diammonium copper disulphate is grown for the first time and CCDC number obtained. • Thermal analysis is done to see the stability range of the crystals. • Band gap and UV cut off wavelength of the crystal are determined to be 2.4 eV and 472.86 nm, respectively. • Dielectric constant, dielectric loss and AC conductivity are plotted as a function of applied field. - Abstract: Diammonium copper disulphate hexahydrate is one of the most promising inorganic crystals with exceptional dielectric properties. A good quality crystal was harvested in a 30-day period using solution growth method. The grown crystal was subjected to various characterization techniques like single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo gravimetric, differential thermal analysis, FTIR, and UV–vis–NIR analysis. Unit cell dimensions of the grown crystal have been identified from XRD studies. Functional groups of the title compounds have been identified from FTIR studies. Thermal stability of the samples was checked by TG/DTA studies. Band gap of the crystal was calculated. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss were studied as a function of frequency of the applied field. AC conductivity was plotted as a function

  1. Solution growth of crystals in zero gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, R. B.

    1982-01-01

    A series of experiments will be performed in which triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals will be grown by a low-temperature solution growth technique in the microgravity environment of the orbital Spacelab. Triglycine sulfate (TGS) crystals will be grown in the Fluid Experiment System (FES) facility on Spacelab 3 by slowly extracting heat at a controlled rate through a seed crystal of TGS suspended on an insulated sting in a saturated solution of TGS. The FES rack assembly designed for SL-3 is shown in Figure I-1, and a detailed view of the test cell layout is presented in Figure I-2. Variations in the liquid density, solution concentration and temperature around the growing crystal will be studied using a variety of techniques, such as schlieren, shadowgraph, and interferometric measurements. Growth in Earth gravity will also be studied by the same optical techniques, and in both cases the resulting crystalline features will be compared and correlated with the growth conditions.

  2. Two puzzling aspects of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, M. L.; Saville, D. A.

    1988-01-01

    A study is presented of several mechanisms which may reduce crystal growth rates and or terminate crystal growth. It is found that salt gradients which change the local chemical potential of the protein are insufficient to account for the slow crystal growth rates which have been reported. Contaminants which adsorb protein from solution may reduce the effective protein concentration, but the impurity's concentration and its affinity for protein are unknown. Association of protein molecules in bulk solution can reduce the monomer concentration significantly, but extant theory and experiment are not sensitive enough to determine the actual concentration of aggregates in solution. For systems of interest, shear-induced effects were found to be too weak to interfere with normal binding of incoming protein molecules. Although we found that most crystal growth occurs in a regime where both interfacial kinetics and diffusion influence crystal growth, the role of mass transfer rates on the terminal size of crystals is unknown, primarily because no data exist which cover the size range of interest (0.1 mm to 1 mm in length).

  3. Growth rate dispersion of small ammonium alum crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodossiev, N.

    1987-01-01

    The growth rates of small (below 60 μm) and large (about 1 mm) crystals of ammonium alum was measured during batch crystallization from aqueous solutions. The growth rate distribution of small crystals is close to normal. With increasing supersaturation the growth rate of the large crystals increases more rapidly than that of small crystals.

  4. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lyase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lyase. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator for STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  5. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lysase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lysase. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  6. Growth of crystals for synchrotron radiation Mössbauer investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotrbova, M.; Hejduk, J.; Malnev, V. V.; Seleznev, V. N.; Yagupov, S. V.; Andronova, N. V.; Chechin, A. I.; Mikhailov, A. Yu.

    1991-10-01

    Iron borate crystals (FeBO 3) were flux grown at the Physical Institute (Prague) and at Simferopol State University. During the crystal growth procedure the temperature regime was held constant to 0.1°C accuracy. Crystals were investigated with the help of a double crystal X-ray diffractometer DRON-2 (SiO 2(30 overline33)FeBO 3(444), MoK α 1 radiation). The rocking curve measurements were carried out in a constant magnetic field of 1kG. Most of the crystal surface has a rocking curve 10″-15″ wide. Some parts of some crystals with the area 1 × 1 mm 2 have rocking curves of 3″-4″ width and can be considered ideal.

  7. Growth Modes and Energetics of 101 Face Lysozyme Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, Sridhar; Forsythe, Elizabeth L.; Pusey, L.

    2004-01-01

    From analyses of lysozyme 101 face growth rate data using a 2D nucleation model for layer-by-layer growth, we find the effective barrier for crystal growth to be gamma = 1.0 +/- 0.2 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule. The magnitude of the effective barrier is 2.4 +/- 0.5 k(sub beta)T, at 22 C. We also find that beyond a critical solution supersaturation, sigma(sub c), crystal growth rates are more accurately described by a kinetic roughening hypothesis. Beyond sigma(sub c), crystals grow by the continuous addition of molecules anywhere on the crystal surface rather than layer-by-layer. The magnitude of the critical supersaturation (sigma(sub c), = 1.7 +/- 0.2) for a crossover from a layer-by-layer to continuous growth is found to be statistically independent of the solution conditions that vary with buffer pH, temperature or precipitant concentration. Using the experimentally determined values for gamma and sigma(sub c), we find the crystal growth unit to be comprised of 7 +/- 3 molecules. The energy barrier, E(sub c), for the continuous addition of the growth Units is 6.2 +/- 0.3 x 10(exp -13) erg/molecule or 15 +/1 1 k(sub beta)T at 22C.

  8. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    During the fifth semi-annual period under this grant we have pursued the following activities: (1) Characterization of the purity and further purification of lysozyme solutions, these efforts are summarized in Section 2; (2) Crystal growth morphology and kinetics studies with tetragonal lysozyme, our observation on the dependence of lysozyme growth kinetics on step sources and impurities has been summarized in a manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; (3) Numerical modelling of the interaction between bulk transport and interface kinetics, for a detailed summary of this work see the manuscript which was accepted for publication in the Journal of Crystal Growth; and (4) Light scattering studies, this work has been summarized in a manuscript that has been submitted for publication to the Journal of Chemical Physics.

  9. Sublimation Growth of Titanium Nitride Crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Li; Edgar, J H; Kenik, Edward A; Meyer III, Harry M

    2009-01-01

    The sublimation-recondensation growth of titanium nitride crystal with N/Ti ratio of 0.99 on tungsten substrate is reported. The growth rate dependence on temperature and pressure was determined, and the calculated activation energy is 775.8 29.8kJ/mol. The lateral and vertical growth rates changed with the time of growth and the fraction of the tungsten substrate surface covered. The orientation relationship of TiN (001) || W (001) with TiN [100] || W [110], a 45o angle between TiN [100] and W [100], occurs not only for TiN crystals deposited on W (001) textured tungsten but also for TiN crystals deposited on randomly orientated tungsten. This study demonstrates that this preferred orientational relationship minimizes the lattice mismatch between the TiN and tungsten.

  10. Macromolecular Crystal Growth by Means of Microfluidics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWoerd, Mark; Ferree, Darren; Spearing, Scott; Monaco, Lisa; Molho, Josh; Spaid, Michael; Brasseur, Mike; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We have performed a feasibility study in which we show that chip-based, microfluidic (LabChip(TM)) technology is suitable for protein crystal growth. This technology allows for accurate and reliable dispensing and mixing of very small volumes while minimizing bubble formation in the crystallization mixture. The amount of (protein) solution remaining after completion of an experiment is minimal, which makes this technique efficient and attractive for use with proteins, which are difficult or expensive to obtain. The nature of LabChip(TM) technology renders it highly amenable to automation. Protein crystals obtained in our initial feasibility studies were of excellent quality as determined by X-ray diffraction. Subsequent to the feasibility study, we designed and produced the first LabChip(TM) device specifically for protein crystallization in batch mode. It can reliably dispense and mix from a range of solution constituents into two independent growth wells. We are currently testing this design to prove its efficacy for protein crystallization optimization experiments. In the near future we will expand our design to incorporate up to 10 growth wells per LabChip(TM) device. Upon completion, additional crystallization techniques such as vapor diffusion and liquid-liquid diffusion will be accommodated. Macromolecular crystallization using microfluidic technology is envisioned as a fully automated system, which will use the 'tele-science' concept of remote operation and will be developed into a research facility for the International Space Station as well as on the ground.

  11. Research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1995-01-01

    The growth of single crystals of zinc selenide was carried out by both closed ampoule physical vapor transport and effusive ampoule physical vapor transport (EAPVT). The latter technique was shown to be a much more efficient method for the seeded growth of zinc selenide, resulting in higher transport rates. Furthermore, EAPVT work on CdTe has shown that growth onto (n 11) seeds is advantageous for obtaining reduced twinning and defect densities in II-VI sphalerite materials.

  12. Lead chloride crystal growth from boiling solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veintemillas-Verdaguer, S.; Rodríguez-Clemente, R.; Torrent-Burgues, J.

    1993-03-01

    Lead chloride single crystals can be grown from boiling solutions using KNO3-H20 solutions as a solvent. Crystals of 1 mm size produced by gel-growth technique were used as seeds. The solubility of PbC12 increases almost linearly with the KNO3 molality being 0.63m in a 7m KNO3 aqueous solutions at 105°C and pH = 2.6; this increase is related to the decrease of the activity coefficient of lead chloride in these solutions. In the first experiments, the supersaturation was attained by solvent extraction, but due to the simultaneous changes in the concentration of the KNO3 mineralizer during the extraction, the growth rate was irregular and defective crystals were obtained. The experimental set-up was therefore modified and a transport technique was added to the system in order to feed the boiling reactor continuously with fresh lead chloride solution. The growth of the crystals takes place at constant concentration of KNO3 in these new conditions. With this experimental modification, isometric PbCI2 crystals of up to lcm size were obtained in three weeks. The observed morphology is close to that calculated by Woensdregt and Hartmann [J. Crystal Growth 87(1988)561].

  13. Protein Crystal Growth Dynamics and Impurity Incorporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chernov, Alex A.; Thomas, Bill

    2000-01-01

    The general concepts and theories of crystal growth are proven to work for biomolecular crystallization. This allowed us to extract basic parameters controlling growth kinetics - free surface energy, alpha, and kinetic coefficient, beta, for steps. Surface energy per molecular site in thermal units, alpha(omega)(sup 2/3)/kT approx. = 1, is close to the one for inorganic crystals in solution (omega is the specific molecular volume, T is the temperature). Entropic restrictions on incorporation of biomolecules into the lattice reduce the incorporation rate, beta, by a factor of 10(exp 2) - 10(exp 3) relative to inorganic crystals. A dehydration barrier of approx. 18kcal/mol may explain approx. 10(exp -6) times difference between frequencies of adding a molecule to the lattice and Brownian attempts to do so. The latter was obtained from AFM measurements of step and kink growth rates on orthorhombic lysozyme. Protein and many inorganic crystals typically do not belong to the Kossel type, thus requiring a theory to account for inequivalent molecular positions within its unit cell. Orthorhombic lysozyme will serve as an example of how to develop such a theory. Factors deteriorating crystal quality - stress and strain, mosaicity, molecular disorder - will be reviewed with emphasis on impurities. Dimers in ferritin and lysozyme and acetylated lysozyme, are microheterogeneous i.e. nearly isomorphic impurities that are shown to be preferentially trapped by tetragonal lysozyme and ferritin crystals, respectively. The distribution coefficient, K defined as a ratio of the (impurity/protein) ratios in crystal and in solution is a measure of trapping. For acetylated lysoyzme, K = 2.15 or, 3.42 for differently acetylated forms, is independent of both the impurity and the crystallizing protein concentration. The reason is that impurity flux to the surface is constant while the growth rate rises with supersaturation. About 3 times lower dimer concentration in space grown ferritin and

  14. Method for solid state crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Nolas, George S.; Beekman, Matthew K.

    2013-04-09

    A novel method for high quality crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates is presented. The synthesis of high quality pure phase crystals has been complicated by the simultaneous formation of both clathrate type-I and clathrate type-II structures. It was found that selective, phase pure, single-crystal growth of type-I and type-II clathrates can be achieved by maintaining sufficient partial pressure of a chemical constituent during slow, controlled deprivation of the chemical constituent from the primary reactant. The chemical constituent is slowly removed from the primary reactant by the reaction of the chemical constituent vapor with a secondary reactant, spatially separated from the primary reactant, in a closed volume under uniaxial pressure and heat to form the single phase pure crystals.

  15. Protein Crystal Growth Apparatus for Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor); Dowling, Timothy E. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    Apparatus for growing protein crystals under microgravity environment includes a plurality of protein growth assemblies stacked one above the other within a canister. Each of the protein growth assemblies includes a tray having a number of spaced apart growth chambers recessed below an upper surface. the growth chambers each having an upstanding pedestal and an annular reservoir about the pedestal for receiving a wick and precipitating agents. A well is recessed below the top of each pedestal to define a protein crystal growth receptacle. A flexible membrane is positioned on the upper surface of each tray and a sealing plate is positioned above each membrane, each sealing plate having a number of bumpers corresponding in number and alignment to the pedestals for forcing the membrane selectively against the upper end of the respective pedestal to seal the reservoir and the receptacle when the sealing plate is forced down.

  16. Crack growth in single-crystal silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Crack growth in single-crystal silicon at room temperature in air was evaluated by double torsion (DT) load-relaxation method and monitored by acoustic emission (AE) technique. Both DT and AE methods indicated lack of subcritical crack growth in silicon. At the critical stress intensity factor, the crack front was found to be jumping several times in a 'mirror' region and then followed by fast crack growth in a 'hackle' region. Hackle marks were found to be associated with plastic deformation at the tip of the fast moving crack. No dislocation etch pits were found in the 'mirror' region, in which crack growth may result from interatomic bonds broken at the crack tip under stress without any plastic deformation. Acoustic emission appears to be spontaneously generated from both interatomic bonds broken and dislocation generation at the moving crack tip during the crack growth in single-crystal silicon.

  17. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    The long-term stability of the interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been improved. Growth or dissolution of a crystal on a 100 A scale can now be clearly distinguished from dimensional changes occurring within the optical path of the interferometer. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the local interfacial displacement at several widely-spaced positions on the crystal surface with high local depth resolution, has already yielded novel results. We found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) the mean growth step density is greater at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed to interpret the large body of data in a unified way. The results strongly suggests that (1) the ion to lysozyme ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter on the order of 10 microns. The computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization (see the First Report) has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies. These results show that some elements of a moving boundary problem must be incorporated into the model in order to obtain a more realistic description. Our experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions has been extensively tested. Scattering intensity measurements with a true Rayleigh scatterer produced systematically increased forward scattering, indicating problems with glare. These have been resolved. Preliminary measurements with supersaturated lysozyme solutions revealed that the scatterers grow with time. Work has begun on a computer program

  18. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A crystal growth apparatus is presented. It utilizes a vapor diffusion method for growing protein crystals, and particularly such an apparatus wherein a ball mixer is used to mix the fluids that form a drop within which crystals are grown. Particular novelty of this invention lies in utilizing a ball mixer to completely mix the precipitate and protein solutions prior to forming the drop. Additional novelty lies in details of construction of the vials, the fluid deployment system, and the fluid storage system of the preferred embodiment.

  19. Biomolecular Modification of Inorganic Crystal Growth

    SciTech Connect

    De Yoreo, J J

    2007-04-27

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures are an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over materials synthesis. Conversely, the failure to prevent or limit tissue mineralization in the vascular, skeletal, and urinary systems is a common source of disease. Understanding the mechanisms by which organisms direct or limit crystallization has long been a central challenge to the biomineralization community. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for either inhibiting crystallization or initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineralizing surfaces. In particular, biomolecules that present carboxyl groups to the growing crystal have been implicated as primary modulators of growth. Here we review the results from a combination of in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular modeling (MM) studies to investigate the effect of specific interactions between carboxylate-rich biomolecules and atomic steps on crystal surfaces during the growth of carbonates, oxalates and phosphates of calcium. Specifically, we how the growth kinetics and morphology depend on the concentration of additives that include citrate, simple amino acids, synthetic Asp-rich polypeptides, and naturally occurring Asp-rich proteins found in both functional and pathological mineral tissues. The results reveal a consistent picture of shape modification in which stereochemical matching of modifiers to specific atomic steps drives shape modification. Inhibition and other changes in growth kinetics are shown to be due to a range of mechanisms that depend on chemistry and molecular size. Some effects are well described by classic crystal growth theories, but others, such as step acceleration due to peptide charge and hydrophylicity, were previously unrealized

  20. Numerical investigation of the influence of EM-fields on fluid motion and resistivity distribution during floating-zone growth of large silicon single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raming, G.; Muižnieks, A.; Mühlbauer, A.

    2001-08-01

    The floating-zone-process with needle-eye inductor is a complex process with many coupled parameters that have nonlinear influence on the process stability and resistivity distribution in the silicon single crystal. To fulfill the requirements of semiconductor industry for tighter specification of resistivity distribution, additional means like magnetic fields can be used to reach a more homogeneous resistivity distribution without disturbing process stability. The current paper analyses the influence of static and alternating fields on the fluid motion and macroscopic and microscopic resistivity profile by means of numerical calculations. It is found that with a lower frequency of the HF-inductor current and with an additional AC-field the radial resistivity profile can be made more homogeneous. Rotating magnetic fields give only a slightly more homogeneous resistivity profile. DC-fields do not change the radial resistivity distribution qualitatively, but suppress all flow oscillations and therefore axial microscopic resistivity variations.

  1. Effect of power arrangement on the crystal shape during the Kyropoulos sapphire crystal growth process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Hung; Chen, Jyh-Chen; Lu, Chung-Wei; Liu, Che-Ming

    2012-08-01

    The Kyropoulos (KY) method is commonly used to grow large sized sapphire single crystals. The shape of the sapphire crystal thus grown is determined by the heater arrangement and the power reduction history in the Kyropoulos furnace. In order to grow high-quality sapphire single crystal, the heater arrangement should allow different power inputs in different sections in order to control the thermal field in the melt during the growth process. In this study, a numerical computation is performed to investigate the effects of the heater arrangement on the thermal and flow transport, the shape of the crystal-melt interface, and the power requirements during the Kyropoulos sapphire crystal growth process in a resistance heated furnace. Four different power ratio arrangements in a three-zone heater are considered. The results show that for the power arrangements considered herein, the temperature gradients along the crystallization front do not exceed 0.05 K/mm, and that, after the growth of the crown, the crystal maintains an almost constant diameter. The remelting phenomenon may occur during growth when the input power of the upper side of the heater is higher than that of the lower side of the heater.

  2. Phosphorus and other trace elements from secondary olivine in composite mantle xenoliths (CMX) from Cima Volcanic Field (CVF; California, USA): implications for crystal growth kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziotis, Ioannis; Asimow, Paul; Ntaflos, Theodoros; Boyce, Jeremy; Koroneos, Antonios; Perugini, Diego; Liu, Yongsheng; Klemme, Stephan; Berndt, Jasper

    2015-04-01

    Phosphorus(P)-rich zones in olivine may reflect excess incorporation of P during rapid growth; zoning patterns may then record growth rate variations (Milman-Barris et al., 2008; Stolper et al., 2009). We report data on interior cuts of two CMX from alkali basalt flows (Mukasa & Wilshire, 1997) in the CVF with second-generation P-rich olivines. In Ci-1-196, a dark layer (~200 μm wide) between lherzolite and websterite is interpreted as a rapidly crystallized melt layer (ML), consisting of Ol+Gl+Pl+Spl+Cpx+Ap+Ilm. Glass (~15 vol%) is variable in composition (P2O5 ≤1.2 wt%, Li 8.22-20.0 ppm). Olivines in the layer have 0.03-0.62 wt% P2O5; P-rich Ol (P2O5 >0.1 wt%) are Fo85-89.3. The lowest P concentrations are consistent with equilibrium with liquid parental to Gl, but the higher concentrations are not. Li concentrations, zoned from 3.84 to 4.90 ppm (core-rim), indicate equilibrium incorporation during crystal growth from a small, evolving melt pool and preservation of this rapidly relaxing gradient. REEs are mostly consistent with equilibrium growth from liquids evolving towards the observed LREE-enriched glass. Most of the clinopyroxenes are diopsides with some augites. Apatite inclusions occur in the rim of P-rich Fo85 and in An54. In Ki-5-301, a dark-coloured area of irregular shape (~200 μm wide) is present along the contact between lherzolite and orthopyroxenite, consisting of Ol+Pl+Gl+Cpx+Spl+Ilm+Ap. It resembles a tabular dyke but is connected to melt-patches infiltrating the host rock. Widespread Glass in the layer has variable composition with two populations not related by fractional crystallization: 1) P2O5 1.02-1.09 wt% and 2) P2O51.62-2.35 wt% (a Gl inclusion in Ol has P2O5 3.57 wt% may have captured melt from the P-rich boundary layer at the interface with the rapidly growing olivine). REEs cluster in the same two groups. Li is as low as 3.66 ppm group 1 and 3-4× higher (9.64-13.3 ppm) in group 2. Olivine occurs as small idiomorphic crystals

  3. Growth rate study of canavalin single crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demattei, R. C.; Feigelson, R. S.

    1989-01-01

    The dependence on supersaturation of the growth rate of single crystals of the protein canavalin is studied. In the supersaturation ranges studied, the rate-limiting step for growth is best described by a screw dislocation mechanism associated with interface attachment kinetics. Using a ln-ln plot, the growth-rate data is found to fit a predictive relationship of the form G = 0.012 x the supersaturation to the 6.66, which, together with the solubility curves, allows the growth rate to be estimated under a variety of conditions.

  4. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  5. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-01-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8-133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared. PMID:26976527

  6. Controlled Growth of Rubrene Nanowires by Eutectic Melt Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Jeyon; Hyon, Jinho; Park, Kyung-Sun; Cho, Boram; Baek, Jangmi; Kim, Jueun; Lee, Sang Uck; Sung, Myung Mo; Kang, Youngjong

    2016-03-01

    Organic semiconductors including rubrene, Alq3, copper phthalocyanine and pentacene are crystallized by the eutectic melt crystallization. Those organic semiconductors form good eutectic systems with the various volatile crystallizable additives such as benzoic acid, salicylic acid, naphthalene and 1,3,5-trichlorobenzene. Due to the formation of the eutectic system, organic semiconductors having originally high melting point (Tm > 300 °C) are melted and crystallized at low temperature (Te = 40.8–133 °C). The volatile crystallizable additives are easily removed by sublimation. For a model system using rubrene, single crystalline rubrene nanowires are prepared by the eutectic melt crystallization and the eutectic-melt-assisted nanoimpinting (EMAN) technique. It is demonstrated that crystal structure and the growth direction of rubrene can be controlled by using different volatile crystallizable additives. The field effect mobility of rubrene nanowires prepared using several different crystallizable additives are measured and compared.

  7. Minimal physical requirements for crystal growth self-poisoning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitelam, Stephen; Dahal, Yuba Raj; Schmit, Jeremy D.

    2016-02-01

    Self-poisoning is a kinetic trap that can impair or prevent crystal growth in a wide variety of physical settings. Here we use dynamic mean-field theory and computer simulation to argue that poisoning is ubiquitous because its emergence requires only the notion that a molecule can bind in two (or more) ways to a crystal; that those ways are not energetically equivalent; and that the associated binding events occur with sufficiently unequal probability. If these conditions are met then the steady-state growth rate is in general a non-monotonic function of the thermodynamic driving force for crystal growth, which is the characteristic of poisoning. Our results also indicate that relatively small changes of system parameters could be used to induce recovery from poisoning.

  8. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1994-01-01

    A high-resolution microscopic interferometric setup for the monitoring of protein morphologies has been developed. Growth or dissolution of a crystal can be resolved with a long-term depth resolution of 200 A and a lateral resolution of 2 microns. This capability of simultaneously monitoring the interfacial displacement with high local depth resolution has yielded several novel results. We have found with lysozyme that (1) the normal growth rate is oscillatory, and (2) depending on the impurity content of the solution, the growth step density is either greater or lower at the periphery of a facet than in its center. The repartitioning of Na plus and Cl minus ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied for a wide range of crystallization conditions. A nucleation-growth-repartitioning model was developed, to interpret the large body of data in unified way. The results strongly suggest that (1) the ion to lysozyne ratio in the crystal depends mostly on kinetic rather than crystallographic parameters, and (2) lysozyme crystals possess a salt-rich core with a diameter electron microscopy results appear to confirm this finding, which could have far-reaching consequences for x-ray diffraction studies. A computational model for diffusive-convective transport in protein crystallization has been applied to a realistic growth cell geometry, taking into account the findings of the above repartitioning studies and our kinetics data for the growth of lysozyme. The results show that even in the small cell employed, protein concentration nonuniformities and gravity-driven solutal convection can be significant. The calculated convection velocities are of the same order to magnitude as those found in earlier experiments. As expected, convective transport, i.e., at Og, lysozyme crystal growth remains kinetically limited. The salt distribution in the crystal is predicted to be non-uniform at both 1g and 0g, as a consequence of protein depletion in the solution. Static and

  9. Method for crystal growth control

    DOEpatents

    Yates, Douglas A.; Hatch, Arthur E.; Goldsmith, Jeff M.

    1981-01-01

    The growth of a crystalline body of a selected material is controlled so that the body has a selected cross-sectional shape. The apparatus is of the type which includes the structure normally employed in known capillary die devices as well as means for observing at least the portion of the surfaces of the growing crystalline body and the meniscus (of melt material from which the body is being pulled) including the solid/liquid/vapor junction in a direction substantially perpendicular to the meniscus surface formed at the junction when the growth of the crystalline body is under steady state conditions. The cross-sectional size of the growing crystalline body can be controlled by determining which points exhibit a sharp change in the amount of reflected radiation of a preselected wavelength and controlling the speed at which the body is being pulled or the temperature of the growth pool of melt so as to maintain those points exhibiting a sharp change at a preselected spatial position relative to a predetermined reference position. The improvement comprises reference object means positioned near the solid/liquid/vapor junction and capable of being observed by the means for observing so as to define said reference position so that the problems associated with convection current jitter are overcome.

  10. Growth of Solid Solution Single Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, Sandor L.; Szofran, F. R.; Gillies, Donald C.; Watring, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    The solidification of a solid solution semiconductor, having a wide separation between liquidus and serious has been extensively studied in ground based, high magnetic field and Spacelab experiments. Two alloys of mercury cadmium telluride have been studied; mercury cadmium telluride with 80.0 mole percent of HgTe and 84.8 mole percent respectively. These alloys are extremely difficult to grow by directional solidification on earth due to high solutal and thermal density differences that give rise to fluid flow and consequent loss of interface shape and composition. Diffusion controlled growth is therefore impossible to achieve in conventional directional solidification. The ground based experiments consisted of growing crystals in several different configurations of heat pipe furnaces, NASA's Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF), and a similar furnace incorporated in a superconducting magnet capable of operating at up to 5T. The first microgravity experiment took place during the flight of STS-62 in March 1994, with the AADSF installed on the second United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-2). The alloy was solidified at 3/4 inch per day over a 9 day period, and for the first time a detailed evaluation was performed of residual acceleration effects. The second flight experiment took place in the fourth United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-4) in November 1997. Due to contamination of the furnace system by a previously processed sample, the sample was not received until May 1998, and the preliminary analysis shows that the conditions prevailing during the experiment were quite different from the requirements requested prior to the mission. Early results are indicating that the sample may not accomplish the desired objectives. As with the USMP-2 mission, the results of the ground based experiments were compared with the crystal grown in orbit under microgravity conditions. On the earth, it has been demonstrated that the

  11. Fluorination of Metal Phthalocyanines: Single-Crystal Growth, Efficient N-Channel Organic Field-Effect Transistors, and Structure-Property Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui; Ye, Jun; Hu, Peng; Wei, Fengxia; Du, Kezhao; Wang, Ning; Ba, Te; Feng, Shuanglong; Kloc, Christian

    2014-12-01

    The fluorination of p-type metal phthalocyanines produces n-type semiconductors, allowing the design of organic electronic circuits that contain inexpensive heterojunctions made from chemically and thermally stable p- and n-type organic semiconductors. For the evaluation of close to intrinsic transport properties, high-quality centimeter-sized single crystals of F16CuPc, F16CoPc and F16ZnPc have been grown. New crystal structures of F16CuPc, F16CoPc and F16ZnPc have been determined. Organic single-crystal field-effect transistors have been fabricated to study the effects of the central metal atom on their charge transport properties. The F16ZnPc has the highest electron mobility (~1.1 cm2 V-1 s-1). Theoretical calculations indicate that the crystal structure and electronic structure of the central metal atom determine the transport properties of fluorinated metal phthalocyanines.

  12. Fluorination of Metal Phthalocyanines: Single-Crystal Growth, Efficient N-Channel Organic Field-Effect Transistors, and Structure-Property Relationships

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hui; Ye, Jun; Hu, Peng; Wei, Fengxia; Du, Kezhao; Wang, Ning; Ba, Te; Feng, Shuanglong; Kloc, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The fluorination of p-type metal phthalocyanines produces n-type semiconductors, allowing the design of organic electronic circuits that contain inexpensive heterojunctions made from chemically and thermally stable p- and n-type organic semiconductors. For the evaluation of close to intrinsic transport properties, high-quality centimeter-sized single crystals of F16CuPc, F16CoPc and F16ZnPc have been grown. New crystal structures of F16CuPc, F16CoPc and F16ZnPc have been determined. Organic single-crystal field-effect transistors have been fabricated to study the effects of the central metal atom on their charge transport properties. The F16ZnPc has the highest electron mobility (~1.1 cm2 V−1 s−1). Theoretical calculations indicate that the crystal structure and electronic structure of the central metal atom determine the transport properties of fluorinated metal phthalocyanines. PMID:25524460

  13. A Critical Assessment of Protein Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc

    1997-01-01

    Experiments to grow higher diffraction quality protein crystals in the microgravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft are one of the most frequently flown space experiments. Ground-based research has shown that convective flows occur even about protein crystals growing in the Earth's gravitational field. Further, this research has shown that the resultant flow velocities can cause growth cessation, and probably affect the measured X-ray data quality obtained. How flow deleteriously affects protein crystal growth (PCG) is still not known, and is the subject of ongoing research. Failing a rational method for ameliorating flow effects on Earth, one can, through NASA and other nations space agency sponsored programs, carry out protein crystal growth in the microgravity environment of an orbiting spacecraft. Early first generation PCG hardware was characterized by a very low success rate and a steep design learning curve. Subsequent hardware designs have improved upon their predecessors. Now the crystal grower has a wide variety of hardware configurations and crystal growth protocols to choose from, many of which implement "standard" laboratory protein crystal growth methods. While many of these are first or early second generation hardware the success rate, defined as growing crystals giving data better than has been obtained on Earth, is at least 20% overall and may be considerably higher if one only considers latter experiments. There are a large number of protein crystals grown every year, with hundreds of structures determined. Those crystallized in microgravity represent a small proportion of this total, and there is concern that the costs of the microgravity PCG program(s) do not justify such limited returns. Empirical evidence suggests that optimum crystal growth conditions in microgravity differ from those determined on Earth, further exacerbating the chances of success. Microgravity PCG is probably best suited for "mature" crystallizations, where one has

  14. Crack Growth in Single-Crystal Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.; Leipold, M. H.

    1986-01-01

    Report describes experiments on crack growth in single-crystal silicon at room temperature in air. Crack growth in (111) cleavage plane of wafers, 50 by 100 by 0.76 mm in dimension, cut from Czochralski singlecrystal silicon studied by double-torsion load-relaxation method and by acoustic-emission measurements. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray topography also employed. Results aid in design and fabrication of silicon photovoltaic and microelectronic devices.

  15. Optical monitoring of protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudry, A.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of using various optical techniques for detecting the onset of nucleation in protein crystal growth was investigated. Direct microscopy, general metrologic techniques, light scattering, ultraviolet absorption, and interferometry are addressed along with techniques for determining pH value. The necessity for collecting basic data on the optical properties of the growth solution as a prerequisite to the evaluation of monitoring techniques is pointed out.

  16. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1988-01-01

    The solubility and growth of the protein canavalin, and the application of the schlieren technique to study fluid flow in protein crystal growth systems were investigated. These studies have resulted in the proposal of a model to describe protein crystal growth and the preliminary plans for a long-term space flight experiment. Canavalin, which may be crystallized from a basic solution by the addition of hydrogen (H+) ions, was shown to have normal solubility characteristics over the range of temperatures (5 to 25 C) and pH (5 to 7.5) studies. The solubility data combined with growth rate data gathered from the seeded growth of canavalin crystals indicated that the growth rate limiting step is a screw dislocation mechanism. A schlieren apparatus was constructed and flow patterns were observed in Rochelle salt (sodium potassium tartrate), lysozyme, and canavalin. The critical parameters were identified as the change in density with concentration (dp/dc) and the change in index of refraction with concentration (dn/dc). Some of these values were measured for the materials listed. The data for lyrozyme showed non-linearities in plots of optical properties and density vs. concentration. In conjunction with with W. A. Tiller, a model based on colloid stability theory was proposed to describe protein crystallization. The model was used to explain observations made by ourselves and others. The results of this research has lead to the development for a preliminary design for a long-term, low-g experiment. The proposed apparatus is univeral and capable of operation under microprocessor control.

  17. Iminodiacetic acid doped ferroelectric triglycine sulphate crystal: Crystal growth and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Chitharanjan; Narayana Moolya, B.; Dharmaprakash, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    Single crystals of iminodiacetic acid (HN(CH 2COOH) 2) doped triglycine sulphate (IDATGS) crystals have been grown from aqueous solution containing 1-10 mol% of iminodiacetic acid at constant temperature by slow evaporation technique. The effects of different amounts of doping entities on the growth habit have been investigated. X-ray powder diffraction pattern for pure and doped TGS was collected to determine the lattice parameters. The grown crystals were subjected to Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy studies to find the presence of various functional groups qualitatively. The dielectric permittivity has been studied as a function of temperature. An increase in the transition temperature (49.2-49.7 °C) of IDATGS crystals is observed. The dielectric constant ( ε‧ max) of IDATGS crystals vary in the range 922-2410 compared to pure TGS ( Tc=49.12 °C and ε‧ max=3050). Curie Weiss constants Cp and Cf in the paraelectric and ferroelectric phases were determined. The transition temperature ( Tc) is found to decrease with increase in dopant concentration. P- E hysteresis studies show the presence of internal bias field in the crystal. Piezoelectric measurements were also carried out at room temperature. Domain patterns on b-cut plates were observed using scanning electron microscope. The micro hardness studies reveal that the doped crystals are harder than the pure TGS crystals. The low dielectric constant, higher transition temperature, internal bias field and hardness suggest that IDATGS crystals could be a potential material for IR detectors.

  18. Crystal growth furnace safety system validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackowski, D. W.; Hartfield, R.; Bhavnani, S. H.; Belcher, V. M.

    1994-01-01

    The findings are reported regarding the safe operation of the NASA crystal growth furnace (CGF) and potential methods for detecting containment failures of the furnace. The main conclusions are summarized by ampoule leak detection, cartridge leak detection, and detection of hazardous species in the experiment apparatus container (EAC).

  19. Meniscus Imaging for Crystal-Growth Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachs, E. M.

    1983-01-01

    Silicon crystal growth monitored by new video system reduces operator stress and improves conditions for observation and control of growing process. System optics produce greater magnification vertically than horizontally, so entire meniscus and melt is viewed with high resolution in both width and height dimensions.

  20. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Isocitrate Lysase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of Earth grown and Space grown Isocitrate Lysase crystals. Target enzyme for fungicides. A better understanding of this enzyme should lead to the discovery of more potent fungicides to treat serious crop diseases such as rice blast. It regulates the flow of metabolic intermediates required for cell growth. Principal Investigator was Charles Bugg.

  1. A clarified gel for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, P. G.; Simpson, N. R.

    1985-01-01

    A procedure for preparing clarified sodium silicate gels suitable for crystal growth is described. In the method described here, the silicate stock is clarified by pretreating it with cation exchange resins before preparing the gels. Also, a modified recipe is proposed for preparing gels to achieve improved transparency.

  2. Spacelab 3 vapor crystal growth experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnepple, W.; Vandenberg, L.; Skinner, N.; Ortale, C.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Challenger, with Spacelab 3 as its payload, was launched into orbit April 29, 1985. The mission, number 51-B, emphasized materials processing in space, although a wide variety of experiments in other disciplines were also carried onboard. One of the materials processing experiments on this flight is described, specifically the growth of single crystals of mercuric iodide by physical vapor transport.

  3. Growth of Organic Crystals by Ostwald Ripening

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egbert, W.; Podsiadly, C.; Naumann, R.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this investigation is to evaluate the growth of various organic crystals by chemical precipitation and Ostwald ripening. Six precipitation reactors were flown on STS-51A. Five of the reactors contained proprietary materials. The sixth contained urea dissolved in ethanol with toluene as the precipitating agent. The size distribution will be analyzed and compared with a similar model being developed.

  4. Apparatus for monitoring crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanual M.

    1981-01-01

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

  5. Method of monitoring crystal growth

    DOEpatents

    Sachs, Emanual M.

    1982-01-01

    A system and method are disclosed for monitoring the growth of a crystalline body from a liquid meniscus in a furnace. The system provides an improved human/machine interface so as to reduce operator stress, strain and fatigue while improving the conditions for observation and control of the growing process. The system comprises suitable optics for forming an image of the meniscus and body wherein the image is anamorphic so that the entire meniscus can be viewed with good resolution in both the width and height dimensions. The system also comprises a video display for displaying the anamorphic image. The video display includes means for enhancing the contrast between any two contrasting points in the image. The video display also comprises a signal averager for averaging the intensity of at least one preselected portions of the image. The value of the average intensity, can in turn be utilized to control the growth of the body. The system and method are also capable of observing and monitoring multiple processes.

  6. Crystal growth in a microgravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroes, Roger L. (Inventor); Reiss, Donald A. (Inventor); Lehoczky, Sandor L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    Gravitational phenomena, including convection, sedimentation, and interactions of materials with their containers all affect the crystal growth process. If they are not taken into consideration they can have adverse effects on the quantity and quality of crystals produced. As a practical matter, convection, and sedimentation can be completely eliminated only under conditions of low gravity attained during orbital flight. There is, then, an advantage to effecting crystallization in space. In the absence of convection in a microgravity environment cooling proceeds by thermal diffusion from the walls to the center of the solution chamber. This renders control of nucleation difficult. Accordingly, there is a need for a new improved nucleation process in space. Crystals are nucleated by creating a small localized region of high relative supersaturation in a host solution at a lower degree of supersaturation.

  7. Patterned growth of single-crystal 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride nanowire arrays for field-emission and optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Huanhuan; Zhang, Xiujuan; Yang, Yang; Shao, Zhibin; Deng, Wei; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Yu; Jie, Jiansheng

    2015-07-01

    3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) organic nanostructures possess extraordinary electronic and optoelectronic properties. However, it remains a challenge to achieve patterned growth of PTCDA nanowire (NW) arrays for integrated device applications. Here, we demonstrated the high-density, large-area, uniform, and cross-aligned growth of single-crystalline PTCDA NW arrays by using Au nanoparticles (NPs) as the growth templates. The high surface energy of Au NPs led to the cross-aligned growth of organic NWs, enabling the growth of PTCDA NW arrays with any desirable patterns by pre-patterning the Au films on a Si substrate. The PTCDA NW arrays as field emitters show good performance with a large emission current density and high emission stability. Furthermore, photodetectors based on PTCDA NW arrays were constructed via a simple in-situ growth approach, which exhibited high sensitivity to a wideband light ranging from 400-800 nm and surpassed the individual NW-based photodetectors in terms of higher photocurrent and faster response speed. Successful applications of PTCDA NW arrays in field emission and photodetectors show a great potential application of organic NW arrays in future efficient electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  8. Patterned growth of single-crystal 3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride nanowire arrays for field-emission and optoelectronic devices.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huanhuan; Zhang, Xiujuan; Yang, Yang; Shao, Zhibin; Deng, Wei; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Yu; Jie, Jiansheng

    2015-07-24

    3, 4, 9, 10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) organic nanostructures possess extraordinary electronic and optoelectronic properties. However, it remains a challenge to achieve patterned growth of PTCDA nanowire (NW) arrays for integrated device applications. Here, we demonstrated the high-density, large-area, uniform, and cross-aligned growth of single-crystalline PTCDA NW arrays by using Au nanoparticles (NPs) as the growth templates. The high surface energy of Au NPs led to the cross-aligned growth of organic NWs, enabling the growth of PTCDA NW arrays with any desirable patterns by pre-patterning the Au films on a Si substrate. The PTCDA NW arrays as field emitters show good performance with a large emission current density and high emission stability. Furthermore, photodetectors based on PTCDA NW arrays were constructed via a simple in-situ growth approach, which exhibited high sensitivity to a wideband light ranging from 400-800 nm and surpassed the individual NW-based photodetectors in terms of higher photocurrent and faster response speed. Successful applications of PTCDA NW arrays in field emission and photodetectors show a great potential application of organic NW arrays in future efficient electronic and optoelectronic devices. PMID:26135069

  9. Fluid Physics and Macromolecular Crystal Growth in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helliwell, John R.; Snell, Edward H.; Chayen, Naomi E.; Judge, Russell A.; Boggon, Titus J.; Pusey, M. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    " is often historically used to describe these microgravity experiments. This is somewhat inaccurate as the field involves the study of many varied biological molecules including viruses, proteins, DNA, RNA and complexes of those structures. For this reason we use the term macromolecular crystal growth. In this chapter we review a series of diagnostic microgravity crystal growth experiments carried out principally using the European Space Agency (ESA) Advanced Protein Crystallization Facility (APCF). We also review related research, both experimental and theoretical, on the aspects of microgravity fluid physics that affect microgravity protein crystal growth. Our experiments have revealed some surprises that were not initially expected. We discuss them here in the context of practical lessons learnt and how to maximize the limited microgravity opportunities available.

  10. Surface Phenomena and Parameters of Crystal Growth: Simple Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, A. A.

    2010-07-22

    Basic concepts of crystal growth and their practical use to semi-quantitatively estimate growth processes are explained: surface energy and free energy, driving force of crystallization, atomically rough vs smooth interface structure and the corresponding normal vs layer-by-layer growth modes, application of the activated complex concept to derive kinetic coefficient characterizing crystal growth rate at a given driving force. The Reader is supposed to be familiar with general physics and chemistry. No specific knowledge in crystal growth is required.

  11. Nucleation and growth control in protein crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Nyce, Thomas A.; Meehan, Edward J.; Sowers, Jennifer W.; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1990-01-01

    The five topics summarized in this final report are as follows: (1) a technique for the expedient, semi-automated determination of protein solubilities as a function of temperature and application of this technique to proteins other than lysozyme; (2) a small solution cell with adjustable temperature gradients for the growth of proteins at a predetermined location through temperature programming; (3) a microscopy system with image storage and processing capability for high resolution optical studies of temperature controlled protein growth and etching kinetics; (4) growth experiments with lysozyme in thermosyphon flow ; and (5) a mathematical model for the evolution of evaporation/diffusion induced concentration gradients in the hanging drop protein crystallization technique.

  12. Aluminum nitride bulk crystal growth in a resistively heated reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalmau, Rafael Federico

    A resistively heated reactor capable of temperatures in excess of 2300°C was used to grow aluminum nitride (AlN) bulk single crystals from an AlN powder source by physical vapor transport (PVT) in nitrogen atmosphere. AlN crystals were grown at elevated temperatures by two different methods. Self-seeded crystals were obtained by spontaneous nucleation on the crucible walls, while seeded growth was performed on singular and vicinal (0001) surfaces of silicon carbide (SiC) seeds. During self-seeded growth experiments a variety of crucible materials, such as boron nitride, tungsten, tantalum, rhenium, tantalum nitride, and tantalum carbide, were evaluated. These studies showed that the morphology of crystals grown by spontaneous nucleation strongly depends on the growth temperature and contamination in the reactor. Crucible selection had a profound effect on contamination in the crystal growth environment, influencing nucleation, coalescence, and crystal morphology. In terms of high-temperature stability and compatibility with the growth process, the best results for AlN crystal growth were obtained in crucibles made of sintered tantalum carbide or tantalum nitride. In addition, contamination from the commercially purchased AlN powder source was reduced by presintering the powder prior to growth, which resulted in a drastic reduction of nearly all impurities. Spontaneously grown single crystals up to 15 mm in size were characterized by x-ray diffraction, x-ray topography, glow discharge mass spectrometry, and secondary ion mass spectrometry. Average dislocation densities were on the order of 103 cm -3, with extended areas virtually free of dislocations. High resolution rocking curves routinely showed peak widths as narrow as 7 arcsec, indicating a high degree of crystalline perfection. Low-temperature partially polarized optical reflectance measurements were used to calculate the crystal-field splitting parameter of AlN, Deltacr = -230 meV, and a low-temperature (1

  13. High-purity silicon crystal growth investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciszek, T. F.; Schuyler, T.; Hurd, J. L.; Fearheiley, M.; Evans, C.; Elder, R.

    1986-01-01

    Information is given on evaporation and segregation contributions to impurity profiles of floating zone crystals (FZ); high-purity silicon float zoning (FZ); minority-carrier lifetime measurement of heavily doped silicon crystals; the effect of some crystal growth parameters on minority-carrier lifetime; and defect investigations by X-ray topography in graphical and tabular form. It was concluded that evaporation contributes substantially to impurity reduction when FZ or cold-crucible growth is conducted in a vacuum; boron and gallium may be more favorable dopants than indium or aluminum for obtaining high minority-carrier lifetimes; minority-carrier lifetimes greater than 100 microseconds are feasible at a 2 times 10 to the 17th power cm-3 doping level; minority-carrier lifetime decreases with increasing crystal cooling rate and also with the presence of dislocations; the method used to clean silicon feed rods affects lifetime; and microdefect densities in dislocation-free FZ crystals appear to be lower with Ga doping than with B doping.

  14. Drop deployment system for crystal growth apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor); Pusey, Marc L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a crystal growth apparatus (10) generally used for growing protein crystals wherein a vapor diffusion method is used for growing the crystals. In this apparatus, a precipitating solution and a solution containing dissolved crystalline material are stored in separate vials (12, 14), each having a resilient diaphragm (28) across one end and an opening (24) with a puncturable septum (26) thereacross at an opposite end. The vials are placed in receptacles (30) having a manifold (41) with a manifold diaphragm (42) in contact with the vial diaphragm at one end of the receptacle and a hollow needle (36) for puncturing the septum at the other end of the manifold. The needles of each vial communicate with a ball mixer (40) that mixes the precipitate and protein solutions and directs the mixed solution to a drop support (64) disposed in a crystal growth chamber (16), the drop support being a tube with an inner bevelled surface (66) that provides more support for the drop (68) than the tubes of the prior art. A sealable storage region (70) intermediate the drop support and mixer provides storage of the drop (68) and the grown crystals.

  15. Hydrothermal crystal growth of oxides for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillen, Colin David

    2007-12-01

    The manipulation of light has proven to be an integral part of today's technology-based society. In particular, there is great interest in obtaining coherent radiation in all regions of the optical spectrum to advance technology in military, medical, industrial, scientific and consumer fields. Exploring new crystal growth techniques as well as the growth of new optical materials is critical in the advancement of solid state optics. Surprisingly, the academic world devotes little attention to the growth of large crystals. This shortcoming has left gaps in the optical spectrum inaccessible by solid state devices. This dissertation explores the hydrothermal crystal growth of materials that could fill two such gaps. The first gap exists in the deep-UV region, particularly below 200 nm. Some materials such as LiB3O5 and beta-BaB2O4 can generate coherent light at wavelengths as low as 205 nm. The growth of these materials was explored to investigate the feasibility of the hydrothermal method as a new technique for growing these crystals. Particular attention was paid to the descriptive chemistry surrounding these systems, and several novel structures were elucidated. The study was also extended to the growth of materials that could be used for the generation of coherent light as low as 155 nm. Novel synthetic schemes for Sr2Be2B2O7 and KBe2BO 3F2 were developed and the growth of large crystals was explored. An extensive study of the structures, properties and crystal growth of related compounds, RbBe2BO3F2 and CsBe2BO 3F2, was also undertaken. Optimization of a number of parameters within this family of compounds led to the hydrothermal growth of large, high quality single crystal at rates suitable for large-scale growth. The second gap in technology is in the area of high average power solid state lasers emitting in the 1 mum and eye-safe (>1.5 mum) regions. A hydrothermal technique was developed to grow high quality crystals of Sc 2O3 and Sc2O3 doped with suitable

  16. A novel crystal growth technique from the melt: Levitation-Assisted Self-Seeding Crystal Growth Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galazka, Zbigniew; Uecker, Reinhard; Fornari, Roberto

    2014-02-01

    A novel melt crystal growth technique was developed and applied for growing bulk In2O3 single crystals. In this new method the In2O3 starting material inside an inductively heated metal crucible is subjected to a controlled decomposition in such a way that a certain amount of free metallic indium forms. As a result, the electromagnetic field from an RF coil couples also to the In2O3 starting material, in addition to the metal crucible, which facilitates the melting. Liquid In2O3 has good electrical conductivity so that eddy currents are induced in the melt close to the crucible wall. This in turn induces a counter magnetic field that ultimately leads to levitation of a portion of the molten In2O3. The amount of the levitated material depends on the mutual RF coil-crucible position, their configurations as well as other components of a growth furnace. A consequence of the partial levitation of In2O3 melt is the formation of a liquid neck between the levitated and the quiescent melt portions. This neck is crucial as it acts as a seed during the crystallization process. The neck can be further shaped by controlled overheating or soaking. By cooling down, two single crystals are formed on the opposite sides of the seed. We named this new crystal growth technique “Levitation-Assisted Self-Seeding Crystal Growth Method”. It is in principle applicable to any oxides whose melts are electrically conductive. Thanks to this method we have successfully grown truly bulk In2O3 single crystals from the melt for the first time worldwide.

  17. Growth of single crystals by vapor transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemeier, H.

    1978-01-01

    The primary objectives of the program were to establish basic vapor transport and crystal growth properties and to determine thermodynamic, kinetic and structural parameters relevant to chemical vapor transport systems for different classes of materials. An important aspect of these studies was the observation of the effects of gravity-caused convection on the mass transport rate and crystal morphology. These objectives were accomplished through extensive vapor transport, thermochemical and structural studies on selected Mn-chalcogenides, II-VI and IV-VI compounds.

  18. FNAS/advanced protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz

    1992-01-01

    A scintillation method is presented for determination of the temperature dependence of the solubility, S(T), of proteins in 50-100 micro-l volumes of solution. S(T) data for lysozyme and horse serum albumin were obtained for various combinations of pH and precipitant concentrations. The resulting kinetics and equilibrium information was used for dynamic control, that is the separation of nucleation and growth stages in protein crystallization. Individual lysozyme and horse serum albumin crystals were grown in 15-20 micro-l solution volumes contained in x-ray capillaries.

  19. Laser crystallization and localized growth of nanomaterials for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In, Jungbin; Ryu, Sang-Gil; Lee, Daeho; Ahn, Sanghoon; Zheng, Andy Cheng; Hwang, David Jae-Seok; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.

    2013-09-01

    Laser-assisted localized growth of semiconducting nanostructures is reported. As is the case of conventional crystal growth, localized laser enables three kinds of crystal growth: (1) melt growth (recrystallization) of amorphous silicon nanopillars by pulsed laser; (2) vapor growth (chemical vapor deposition) of germanium nanowires; (3) solution growth (hydrothermal growth) of zinc oxide nanowires. The results not only demonstrate programmable and digital fabrication of laser-assisted crystal growth, but also reveal unusual growth chacracteristics (grain morphologies, growth kinetics). Related to solar applications, it is suggested that these structures can act as epitaxial seeds for growth of coarse grains and as multi-spectral centers for enhanced and engineered light absorption.

  20. Convective flow effects on protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Monaco, Lisa A.

    1993-01-01

    The experimental setup for the in-situ high resolution optical monitoring of protein crystal growth/dissolution morphologies was substantially improved. By augmenting the observation system with a temperature-controlled enclosure, laser illumination for the interferometric microscope, and software for pixel by pixel light intensity recording, a height resolution of about two unit cells for lysozyme can now be obtained. The repartitioning of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions between lysozyme solutions and crystals was studied. Quite unexpectedly, it was found that the longer crystals were in contact with their solution, the lower was their ion content. The development of a model for diffusive-convective transport and resulting distribution of the growth rate on facets was completed. Results obtained for a realistic growth cell geometry show interesting differences between 'growth runs' at 1g and 0g. The kinematic viscosity of lysozyme solutions of various supersaturations and salt concentrations was monitored over time. In contrast to the preliminary finding of other authors, no changes in viscosity were found over four days. The experimental setup for light scattering investigations of aggregation and nucleation in protein solutions was completed, and a computer program for the evaluation of multi-angle light scattering data was acquired.

  1. Protein crystal growth in low gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    This research involved (1) using the Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) in a study on the growth of lysozyme crystals and (2) refinement of the design of the Thermonucleator which controls the supersaturation required for the nucleation and growth of protein crystals separately. AFM studies of the (110) tetragonal face confirmed that lysozyme crystals grow by step propagation. There appears to be very little step pile up in the growth regimes which we studied. The step height was measured at = 54A which was equal to the (110) interpane spacing. The AFM images showed areas of step retardation and the formation of pits. These defects ranged in size from 0.1 to 0.4 mu. The source of these defects was not determined. The redesign of the Thermonucleator produced an instrument based on thermoelectric technology which is both easier to use and more amenable to use in a mu g environment. The use of thermoelectric technology resulted in a considerable size reduction which will allow for the design of a multi-unit growth apparatus. The performance of the new apparatus was demonstrated to be the same as the original design.

  2. Method of controlling defect orientation in silicon crystal ribbon growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leipold, M. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The orientation of twinning and other effects in silicon crystal ribbon growth is controlled by use of a starting seed crystal having a specific (110) crystallographic plane and (112) crystallographic growth direction.

  3. Crystal growth and annealing for minimized residual stress

    DOEpatents

    Gianoulakis, Steven E.

    2002-01-01

    A method and apparatus for producing crystals that minimizes birefringence even at large crystal sizes, and is suitable for production of CaF.sub.2 crystals. The method of the present invention comprises annealing a crystal by maintaining a minimal temperature gradient in the crystal while slowly reducing the bulk temperature of the crystal. An apparatus according to the present invention includes a thermal control system added to a crystal growth and annealing apparatus, wherein the thermal control system allows a temperature gradient during crystal growth but minimizes the temperature gradient during crystal annealing.

  4. Lead isotope variation with growth zoning in a galena crystal

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cannon, R.S., Jr.; Pierce, A.P.; Delevaux, M.H.

    1963-01-01

    A large crystal of lead sulfide from Picher, Oklahoma, has significant differences in isotopic composition of lead in successive growth zones. Lead isotope ratios in the parent ore-fluid evidently changed with time during crystal growth. The growth history of this crystal, interpreted quantitatively, points to a tentative hypothesis of genesis of Mississippi Valley deposits of lead and zinc.

  5. Determining crystal growth kinetic parameters using optical fibre sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerkamp, M.; Lamb, D. W.; Lye, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    The capability of an 'intrinsic exposed core optical fibre sensor' (IECOFS) as a monitoring device of scale formation has been evaluated. The IECOFS has been used to measure kinetics parameters of calcium carbonate heterogeneous crystal growth such as the activation energy, the crystal growth rate and the induction time. The IECOFS was able to evaluate crystal growth inhibition through the use of chemical inhibitors.

  6. Studying Crystal Growth With the Peltier Effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, David J., Jr.; Dressler, B.; Silberstein, R. P.; Poit, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Peltier interface demarcation (PID) shown useful as aid in studying heat and mass transfer during growth of crystals from molten material. In PID, two dissimilar "metals" solid and liquid phases of same material. Current pulse passed through unidirectionally solidifying sample to create rapid Peltier thermal disturbance at liquid/solid interface. Disturbance, measured by thermocouple stationed along path of solidification at or near interface, provides information about position and shape of interface.

  7. Sealed silica pressure ampoules for crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holland, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    The properties of vitreous silica and the mechanics of thick walled pressure vessels are reviewed with regard to the construction of sealed silica crucibles such as are used in the growth of mercury-cadmium telluride crystals. Data from destructive rupture tests are reported, failure modes discussed, and recommendations for design given. Ordinary commercial clear vitreous silica from flame fused quartz can withstand a surface stress of 20 MPa or more in this application.

  8. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Gamma-Interferon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Gamma-Interferon. Stimulates the body's immune system and is used clinically in the treatment of cancer. Potential as an anti-tumor agent against solid tumors as well as leukemia's and lymphomas. It has additional utility as an anti-ineffective agent, including antiviral, anti-bacterial, and anti-parasitic activities. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Charles Bugg.

  9. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  10. Simulation of optical diagnostics for crystal growth: models and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banish, Michele R.; Clark, Rodney L.; Kathman, Alan D.; Lawson, Shelah M.

    1991-12-01

    A computer simulation of a two-color holographic interferometric (TCHI) optical system was performed using a physical (wave) optics model. This model accurately simulates propagation through time-varying, 2-D or 3-D concentration and temperature fields as a wave phenomenon. The model calculates wavefront deformations that can be used to generate fringe patterns. This simulation modeled a proposed TriGlycine sulphate TGS flight experiment by propagating through the simplified onion-like refractive index distribution of the growing crystal and calculating the recorded wavefront deformation. The phase of this wavefront was used to generate sample interferograms that map index of refraction variation. Two such fringe patterns, generated at different wavelengths, were used to extract the original temperature and concentration field characteristics within the growth chamber. This proves feasibility for this TCHI crystal growth diagnostic technique. This simulation provides feedback to the experimental design process.