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Sample records for growth factor release

  1. Release characteristics of encapsulated formulations incorporating plant growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Slawomir; Schwartz, Liliana; Wiesman, Zeev; Markus, Arie; Wolf, David

    2002-05-01

    The release characteristics of encapsulated formulations containing a combination of plant growth factors (PGF)--plant hormones (IBA, paclobutrazol), nutrients (fertilizers, microelements), and fungicide (prochloraz)--were studied. The formulations were prepared by encapsulating the active ingredients in a polyethylene matrix and, in some cases, subsequently coating the product with polyurethane. Dissolution experiments were carried out with both coated and non-coated formulations to determine the sustained release patterns of the active ingredients. The PGF controlled-release systems obtained have been shown to promote development of root systems, vegetative growth, and reproductive development in cuttings, potted plants, or garden plants of various plant species. These beneficial effects are attributable to the lasting and balanced PGF availability provided by these systems. PMID:12009194

  2. Controlled release of growth factors for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Libiao; Zhou, Xinwei; Xu, Yufan; Zhang, Weiming; Liu, Cheng-Hsien; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    How to release growth factors (GFs) scientifically to promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation is one of the most significant research focuses in the field of regenerative medicine. In a controlled release system, growth factors, extracellular matrices or biomaterial carriers, and sometimes stem cells together form a geometric entirety. Biomaterial carriers provide GFs with a support structure to be adhered, immobilized, encapsulated or/and protected. As a unity, the release rate and rhythm of GFs on cells are normally very delicate and precise. Up to now, the best strategy for clinical applications is the combination systems that encapsulate GFs in microspheres, particularly the nano- or micro-encapsulation techniques integrated GFs with biomaterial carriers. In this mini review, we summarize the current progress in GF delivery systems for regenerative medicine and provide an outlook on two main aspects: one is the classes of stem cells and GFs that have been used frequently in regenerative medicine, including their respective application conditions and functions; the other is the controlled GF release systems, in which various GFs are released orderly and continuously without diffusing simply and rapidly, including their respective opportunities and challenges. PMID:25594403

  3. Growth hormone releasing factor-like immunoreactivity in human milk.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1986-03-28

    The presence of immunoreactive growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) in human milk has been demonstrated. By using sequential high performance liquid chromatography, it has been shown that most of the immunoreactivity co-elutes with the synthetic, hypothalamic-like, GRF (1-40). The concentrations of GRF detected (between 152 and 432 pg GRF/ml milk) exceed several fold its values in plasma. PMID:3083812

  4. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  5. Growth-promoting action and growth factor release by different platelet derivatives.

    PubMed

    Passaretti, F; Tia, M; D'Esposito, V; De Pascale, M; Del Corso, M; Sepulveres, R; Liguoro, D; Valentino, R; Beguinot, F; Formisano, P; Sammartino, G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Platelet derivatives are commonly used in wound healing and tissue regeneration. Different procedures of platelet preparation may differentially affect growth factor release and cell growth. Preparation of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is accompanied by release of growth factors, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and several cytokines. When compared with the standard procedure for platelet-rich plasma (PRP), PRF released 2-fold less PDGF, but >15-fold and >2-fold VEGF and TGFβ1, respectively. Also, the release of several cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFNγ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β and TNFα) was significantly increased in PRF-conditioned medium (CM), compared to PRP-CM. Incubation of both human skin fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with PRF-derived membrane (mPRF) or with PRF-CM enhanced cell proliferation by >2-fold (p<0.05). Interestingly, PRP elicited fibroblast growth at a higher extent compared to PRF. At variance, PRF effect on HUVEC growth was significantly greater than that of PRP, consistent with a higher concentration of VEGF in the PRF-CM. Thus, the procedure of PRP preparation leads to a larger release of PDGF, as a possible result of platelet degranulation, while PRF enhances the release of proangiogenic factors. PMID:23855408

  6. Electrospinning Growth Factor Releasing Microspheres into Fibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Tonya J.; Sundararaghavan, Harini G.

    2014-01-01

    This procedure describes a method to fabricate a multifaceted substrate to direct nerve cell growth. This system incorporates mechanical, topographical, adhesive and chemical signals. Mechanical properties are controlled by the type of material used to fabricate the electrospun fibers. In this protocol we use 30% methacrylated Hyaluronic Acid (HA), which has a tensile modulus of ~500 Pa, to produce a soft fibrous scaffold. Electrospinning on to a rotating mandrel produces aligned fibers to create a topographical cue. Adhesion is achieved by coating the scaffold with fibronectin. The primary challenge addressed herein is providing a chemical signal throughout the depth of the scaffold for extended periods. This procedure describes fabricating poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres that contain Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and directly impregnating the scaffold with these microspheres during the electrospinning process. Due to the harsh production environment, including high sheer forces and electrical charges, protein viability is measured after production. The system provides protein release for over 60 days and has been shown to promote primary nerve cell growth. PMID:25178038

  7. [Research advances in the controlled release of growth factor related to blood vessel tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Wu, Lili; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Yao, Kangde

    2006-08-01

    Growth factors play an important role in cell adhesion and proliferation as well as in tissue regeneration. By incorporating growth factors into polymer scaffolds, controlled release of them can be performed. The release mechanism is varied with the incorporation methods. In this paper, the latest advances in the controlled release of growth factors by blending, hydrogel, microsphere embedding and chemical bonding are reviewed. The potential application of ultrafine fibric embedding in growth factor delivery is described as well. PMID:17002137

  8. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  9. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  10. Research Advances in Tissue Engineering Materials for Sustained Release of Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-yang; Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Jing-jing; Xiao, Ze-cong; He, Chao-chao; Shi, Hong-xue; Li, Xiao-kun; Yang, Shu-lin; Xiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors are a class of cytokines that stimulate cell growth and are widely used in clinical practice, such as wound healing, revascularization, bone repair, and nervous system disease. However, free growth factors have a short half-life and are instable in vivo. Therefore, the search of excellent carriers to enhance sustained release of growth factors in vivo has become an area of intense research interest. The development of controlled-release systems that protect the recombinant growth factors from enzymatic degradation and provide sustained delivery at the injury site during healing should enhance the growth factor's application in tissue regeneration. Thus, this study reviews current research on commonly used carriers for sustained release of growth factors and their sustained release effects for preservation of their bioactivity and their accomplishment in tissue engineering approaches. PMID:26347885

  11. Growth-Factor Nanocapsules That Enable Tunable Controlled Release for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haijun; Du, Juanjuan; Wen, Jing; Liu, Yang; Montgomery, Scott R; Scott, Trevor P; Aghdasi, Bayan; Xiong, Chengjie; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Ruangchainikom, Monchai; Phan, Kevin; Weintraub, Gil; Raed, Alobaidaan; Murray, Samuel S; Daubs, Michael D; Yang, Xianjin; Yuan, Xu-Bo; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lu, Yunfeng

    2016-08-23

    Growth factors are of great potential in regenerative medicine. However, their clinical applications are largely limited by the short in vivo half-lives and the narrow therapeutic window. Thus, a robust controlled release system remains an unmet medical need for growth-factor-based therapies. In this research, a nanoscale controlled release system (degradable protein nanocapsule) is established via in situ polymerization on growth factor. The release rate can be finely tuned by engineering the surface polymer composition. Improved therapeutic outcomes can be achieved with growth factor nanocapsules, as illustrated in spinal cord fusion mediated by bone morphogenetic protein-2 nanocapsules. PMID:27227573

  12. Growth factor delivery: How surface interactions modulate release in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    King, William J.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively used to deliver growth factors to induce new bone formation. The pharmacokinetics of growth factor delivery has been a critical regulator of their clinical success. This review will focus on the surface interactions that control the non-covalent incorporation of growth factors into scaffolds and the mechanisms that control growth factor release from clinically relevant biomaterials. We will focus on the delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 from materials currently used in the clinical practice, but also suggest how general mechanisms that control growth factor incorporation and release delineated with this growth factor could extend to other systems. A better understanding of the changing mechanisms that control growth factor release during the different stages of preclinical development could instruct the development of future scaffolds for currently untreatable injuries and diseases. PMID:22433783

  13. Promoted growth of murine hair follicles through controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether or not the controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is effective in promoting the hair follicle growth of mice in second anagen of hair cycle. VEGF was incorporated into a biodegradable collagen hydrogel for its controlled release. Following implantation of the collagen hydrogel incorporating 0 or 2 microg of VEGF and injection of 0 or 2 microg of VEGF in the solution form into the back subcutis of mice, the hair follicle growth was evaluated photometrically and histologically in terms of the skin color of reverse side of the implanted or injected site, the skin thickness, and the area occupied by hair follicle tissue. Ten days later, the skin color of mice implanted with the collagen hydrogel incorporating 2 microg of VEGF was significantly darker than that injected with 2 pg of VEGF. The collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF increased the hair follicle area at the implanted site to a significantly greater extent than other agents while significant angiogenetic effect in the skin tissue was observed. VEGF-free, empty collagen hydrogels did not affect the skin darkness, hair follicle growth, and the angiogenesis. Moreover, the hair shaft length was significantly elongated by the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF, in marked contrast to other agents. Immunohistolchemicalstaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF promoted the proliferation of cells around the hair follicle more frequently than free VEGF. We concluded that the controlled release of VEGF more positively acted on the hair growth cycle of mice for hair growth than the injection of free VEGF. PMID:12013184

  14. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Kiara F; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-09-23

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine. PMID:27517970

  15. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  16. Controllable mineral coatings on scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurez-Gonzalez, Darilis

    The work presented in this document, focused on the development and characterization of mineral coatings on scaffold materials to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite. FTIR data confirmed the substitution of HCO3 in the mineral. As the extent of HCO3 substitution increased, the coating exhibited more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate. The mineral coatings provided an effective mechanism for bioactive growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) also bound to mineral coated scaffolds with lower efficiency (20%) and released with faster release kinetics compared to peptides growth factor. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in vitro and enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in an intramuscular sheep model. In addition to the use the mineral coatings for single growth factor release, we expanded the concept and bound both an angiogenic (rhVEGF) and osteogenic (mBMP2) growth factor by a simple double dipping process. Sustained release of both growth factors was demonstrated for over 60 days. Released rhVEGF enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in sheep and its biological activity was

  17. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  18. Scaffolds for Controlled Release of Cartilage Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Morille, Marie; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cell-based therapies using adult stem cells have attracted considerable interest in regenerative medicine. A tissue-engineered construct for cartilage repair should provide a support for the cell and allow sustained in situ delivery of bioactive factors capable of inducing cell differentiation into chondrocytes. Pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), made of biodegradable and biocompatible poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA), are a unique system which combines these properties in an adaptable and simple microdevice. This device relies on nanoprecipitation of proteins encapsulated in polymeric microspheres with a solid in oil in water emulsion-solvent evaporation process, and their subsequent coating with extracellular matrix protein molecules. Here, we describe their preparation process, and some of their characterization methods for an application in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26445838

  19. Effect of a bovine hypothalamic factor on the release and biosynthesis of growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, T; Sawano, S; Yamasaki, M

    1977-02-01

    Partial purification of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor (GRF) by acid extraction followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 has been attained from bovine hypothalami. When rat pituitaries were incubated in 2 ml Krebs Ringer-bicarbonate-glucose (KRBG) medium, a stimulatory effect of the GRF fraction on immunoreactive GH (IR-GH) release was observed, while that of the factor neither on GH synthesis nor release of the synthesized GH was demonstrated. Stimulation of the GH release was exerted maximally within 30 min of incubation. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D, at a concentration which inhibited protein and RNA synthesis to less than 5 and 20% of the control, respectively, were without effect on the stimulatory action of the factor on GH release. On the other hand, stimulation of GH synthesis was observed under incubation in 0.3 ml medium with the factor and enhancing effect of the factor on the IR-GH release was undetectable. These results suggest that stimulation of the release and synthesis of GH mediated by the hypothalamic GRF fraction is under influence of the pool size of incubation media. PMID:324757

  20. Identification of the major fibroblast growth factors released spontaneously in inflammatory arthritis as platelet derived growth factor and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, S C; Por, S B; Penny, R; Richter, M; Shelley, L; Breit, S N

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and proliferation of a number of important elements within the joint including the synovial fibroblasts. Elevated levels of a number of cytokines such as Il-1, IL-2, IL-6, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), transforming growth factor-beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been detected in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides. It seems likely that local release of such mediators may be responsible for the proliferation and overgrowth of connective tissue elements in these disorders. In order to ascertain whether there was evidence to suggest local production or release of fibroblast growth factors in the joint in inflammatory arthritis, and to determine their identity, cells were obtained from the synovial fluid of 15 patients with chronic inflammatory arthritides. All subjects' synovial fluid cells spontaneously released growth factor activity for fibroblasts. This was present in large amounts, being detectable in culture supernatants diluted to a titre of at least 1/625. By a series of depletion experiments using solid-phase bound antibodies to cytokines, it was possible to demonstrate that this activity was due to TNF-alpha and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Thus, this study showed for the first time that functionally active PDGF was released from synovial fluid cells. Both PDGF and TNF-alpha appeared to contribute in approximately equal amounts to this fibroblast growth factor activity, and were synergistic in effect. Thus this study provides evidence for the local production and release of these two cytokines and suggests that together they are the dominant factors in fibroblast proliferation within the synovial cavity. PMID:1914237

  1. Controlled Release of Growth Factors on Allograft Bone in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, WonHyoung; Ren, Peigen; Fasching, Rainer; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2008-01-01

    Allografts are important alternatives to autografts for treating defects after major bone loss. Bone growth factors have both local autocrine and paracrine effects and regulate the growth, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. To study the effects of prolonged, continuous, local delivery of growth factors on bone growth, we developed a new microelectromechanical system (MEMS) drug delivery device. Bone marrow cells from mice were seeded on mouse allograft discs and cultured in osteogenic media with osteogenic protein 1 (OP-1) and/or basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) delivered from MEMS devices for 6 weeks. We monitored bone formation by changes of bone volume using micro-CT scanning and release of osteocalcin using ELISA. The data suggest the MEMS devices delivered constant concentrations of OP-1 and FGF-2 to the media. Bone marrow cells grew on the allografts and increased bone volume. Addition of OP-1 increased bone formation whereas FGF-2 decreased bone formation. Local delivery of growth factors over a prolonged period modulated the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells on allograft bone. PMID:18509711

  2. A novel collagen/platelet-rich plasma (COL/PRP) scaffold: preparation and growth factor release analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Wang, Jingwei; Ren, Mingguang; Li, Lifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used in clinical practice for more than 20 years because it causes the release of many growth factors. However, the burst release pattern and short release period of PRP have become obstacles to its application. An optimal controllable release system is an urgent need for researchers. This study investigated whether collagen/PRP (COL/PRP) scaffolds can serve as a vehicle for the controllable release of growth factors. We fabricated a novel scaffold that integrates PRP activated by thrombin or collagen into type I collagen. The mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the COL/PRP scaffolds were not cytotoxic to L-929 fibroblasts. The PDGF and FGF content in the thrombin group was at a higher level and lasted for a long period of time. Collagen and thrombin played the same role in the release of TGF-β1 and VEGF. These data suggest that the novel COL/PRP scaffolds provide a carrier for the controllable release of growth factors and may be used in tissue- regenerative therapies. PMID:26951554

  3. Aptamer-functionalized superporous hydrogels for sequestration and release of growth factors regulated via molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Battig, Mark R; Huang, Yike; Chen, Niancao; Wang, Yong

    2014-09-01

    While the discovery of highly potent biologics has led to the development of promising therapies for various human diseases, biologics can cause severe toxicity if delivered inappropriately. Thus, great efforts have been made to synthesize polymeric systems for safe and efficient delivery of biologics. However, the application of polymeric delivery systems is often limited by problems such as harsh reaction conditions, low drug sequestration efficiency, and difficult drug release regulation. This study was aimed at developing a superporous material system with a hydrogel and an aptamer to overcome these challenges. The results have shown that the superporous hydrogel is capable of instantaneously and fully sequestering a large amount of growth factors, owing to the presence of superporous architectures and aptamers. Moreover, the sequestering and loading procedure does not involve any harsh conditions. The release kinetics of growth factors can be molecularly modulated by either changing the binding affinity of the aptamer or by using a triggering effector. Therefore, this study presents a promising superporous material for the delivery of highly potent biologics such as growth factors for clinical applications. PMID:24954732

  4. Dual-stage growth factor release within 3D protein-engineered hydrogel niches promotes adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Goodwin, Midori; Teasley, Eric S.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered biomimetic microenvironments from hydrogels are an emerging strategy to achieve lineage-specific differentiation in vitro. In addition to recapitulating critical matrix cues found in the native three-dimensional (3D) niche, the hydrogel can also be designed to deliver soluble factors that are present within the native inductive microenvironment. We demonstrate a versatile materials approach for the dual-stage delivery of multiple soluble factors within a 3D hydrogel to induce adipogenesis. We use a Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH) embedded with alginate microgels to deliver two pro-adipogenic soluble factors, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) with two distinct delivery profiles. We show that dual-stage delivery of FGF-1 and BMP-4 to human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) significantly increases lipid accumulation compared with the simultaneous delivery of both growth factors together. Furthermore, dual-stage growth factor delivery within a 3D hydrogel resulted in substantially more lipid accumulation compared to identical delivery profiles in 2D cultures. Gene expression analysis shows upregulation of key adipogenic markers indicative of brown-like adipocytes. These data suggest that dual-stage release of FGF-1 and BMP-4 within 3D microenvironments can promote the in vitro development of mature adipocytes. PMID:25309741

  5. Injectable gelatin derivative hydrogels with sustained vascular endothelial growth factor release for induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Tiejun; Ding, Chen; Ma, Chi; Sun, Hongchen; Li, Shirong; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Injectable biomaterials are attractive for soft tissue regeneration because they are handled in a minimally invasive manner and can easily adapt to complex defects. However, inadequate vascularization of the injectable constructs has long been a barrier, leading to necrosis or volume reduction after implantation. In this work, we developed a three-step process to synthesize injectable gelatin-derived hydrogels that are capable of controlling growth factor delivery to induce angiogenesis. In our approach, tyramine was first introduced into gelatin chains to provide enzymatic crosslinking points for gel formation after injection. Next, heparin, a polysaccharide with binding domains to many growth factors, was covalently linked to the tyramine-modified gelatin. Finally, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was incorporated into the gelatin derivative by binding with the heparin in the gelatin derivative, and an injectable gel with controlled VEGF release was formed by an enzymatic catalytic reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The gelation time, mechanical properties and degradation of the gel was readily tailored by the gelatin concentration and the ratio of H2O2/HRP. Binding VEGF to heparin stabilizes this growth factor, protects it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation and subsequently prolongs the sustained release. An in vitro release study and bioactivity assay indicated that the VEGF was released in a sustained manner with high bioactivity for over 3 weeks. Furthermore, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and animal experiments were performed to evaluate in vivo bioactivity of the VEGF released from the hydrogels. After 5 days of incubation on CAM, the number of blood vessels surrounding the heparin-modified hydrogels was increased by 2.4-fold compared with that of the control group. Deeper and denser cell infiltration and angiogenesis in the heparin-modified gelatin/VEGF gels were observed compared to

  6. Injectable gelatin derivative hydrogels with sustained vascular endothelial growth factor release for induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Tiejun; Ding, Chen; Ma, Chi; Sun, Hongchen; Li, Shirong; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Injectable biomaterials are attractive for soft tissue regeneration because they are handled in a minimally invasive manner and can easily adapt to complex defects. However, inadequate vascularization of the injectable constructs has long been a barrier, leading to necrosis or volume reduction after implantation. In this work, we developed a three-step process to synthesize injectable gelatin-derived hydrogels that are capable of controlling growth factor delivery to induce angiogenesis. In our approach, tyramine was first introduced into gelatin chains to provide enzymatical crosslinking points for gel formation after injection. Next, heparin, a polysaccharide with binding domains to many growth factors, was covalently linked to the tyramine-modified gelatin. Finally, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was incorporated into the gelatin derivative by binding with the heparin in the gelatin derivative, and an injectable gel with controlled VEGF release was formed by an enzymatic catalytic reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The gelation time, mechanical properties and degradation of the gel was readily tailored by the gelatin concentration and the ratio of H2O2/HRP. Binding VEGF to heparin stabilizes this growth factor, protects it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation, and subsequently prolongs the sustained release. An in vitro release study and bioactivity assay indicated that the VEGF was released in a sustained manner with high bioactivity for over 3 weeks. Furthermore, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and animal experiments were performed to evaluate in vivo bioactivity of the VEGF released from the hydrogels. After 5 days of incubation on CAM, the number of blood vessels surrounding the heparin-modified hydrogels was 2.4-fold increase than that of the control group. Deeper and denser cell infiltration and angiogenesis in the heparin-modified gelatin/VEGF gels were observed than in the controls

  7. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Release Following Electrical Stimulation in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Liebano, Richard Eloin; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis is an important phenomenon involved in the healing of chronic wounds, and it is mainly mediated by the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from endothelial cells. Electrical stimulation (ES) is a well-documented treatment used to assist the healing of chronic wounds. Due to the importance of VEGF in the healing process, and the need to know the mechanisms of action of ES involved in the process, this report aimed to determine by a literature review whether the VEGF release occurs following ES in human subjects. Recent Advances: The findings of this literature review suggest that ES releases VEGF, and this effect may be responsible for promoting angiogenesis after ES. Critical Issues: Despite the findings of this literature review on the release of VEGF by ES on wound healing are promising, a large number of studies are needed to confirm such effects. Future Directions: Further studies should be conducted to identify the best parameters and treatment schedule of ES to be used for the VEGF release. PMID:24761350

  8. Facile method to prepare silk fibroin/hyaluronic acid films for vascular endothelial growth factor release.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xunwei; Shi, Lijun; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Sun, Gang; He, Dannong

    2016-06-01

    A facile approach was proposed to prepare silk fibroin (SF) and hyaluronic acid (HA) composite films from aqueous solution without crosslinking or any post treatment. Only by controlling the HA content and film formation temperature during the film casting, the HA/SF films with different composition were prepared. The films were then characterized by structural characteristics, thermal stability, morphology, water stability, water absorption, mechanical properties. After immersing in water for 24h, all of the films showed good structural integrity. The degradation rate of the HA/SF films in protease XIV can be controlled by changing the film formation temperature and HA content. Decreasing the temperature and adding HA resulted in the rapid release of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) from the HA/SF films. Overall, the 5% HA/SF films formed at 37°C with more rapid VEGF release exhibited great potential in drug delivery, especially when the rapid vascularization was needed. PMID:27083373

  9. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  10. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  11. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  12. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries.

    PubMed

    Grasman, Jonathan M; Do, Duc M; Page, Raymond L; Pins, George D

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues. PMID:26344363

  13. Controlled-release of epidermal growth factor from cationized gelatin hydrogel enhances corneal epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kuniko; Sotozono, Chie; Hamuro, Junji; Yamasaki, Kenta; Kimura, Yu; Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2007-04-01

    We designed a new ophthalmic drug-delivery system for epidermal growth factor (EGF) from the biodegradable hydrogel of cationized gelatin. We placed a cationized gelatin hydrogel (CGH) with incorporated (125)I-labelled EGF in the conjunctival sac of mice and measured the residual radioactivity at different times to evaluate the in vivo profile of EGF release. Approximately 60-67% and 10-12% of EGF applied initially remained 1 and 7 days after application, respectively; whereas EGF delivered in topically applied solution or via EGF impregnation of soft contact lenses disappeared within the first day. We also placed CGH films with 5.0 mug of incorporated EGF on round corneal defects in rabbits to evaluate the healing process using image analysis software and to assess epithelial proliferation immunohistochemically by counting the number of Ki67-positive cells. The application of a CGH film with incorporated EGF resulted in a reduction in the epithelial defect in rabbit corneas accompanied by significantly enhanced epithelial proliferation compared with the reduction seen after the topical application of EGF solution or the placement of an EGF-free CGH film. The controlled release of EGF from a CGH placed over a corneal epithelial defect accelerated ocular surface wound healing. PMID:17289206

  14. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  15. Slow release of ions from internalized silver nanoparticles modifies the epidermal growth factor signaling response.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Kristen K; Maurer, Elizabeth I; Hussain, Saber M

    2014-11-01

    Due to their distinctive physiochemical properties, including a robust antibacterial activity and plasmonic capability, hundreds of consumer and medical products contain colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, even at sub-toxic dosages, AgNPs are able to disrupt cell functionality, through a yet unknown mechanism. Moreover, internalized AgNPs have the potential to prolong this disruption, even after the removal of excess particles. In the present study, we evaluated the impact, mechanism of action, and continual effects of 50 nm AgNP exposure on epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal transduction within a human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line. After AgNP expose, EGF signaling was initially obstructed due to the dissolution of particles into silver ions. However, at longer durations, the internalized AgNPs increased EGF signaling activity. This latter behavior correlated to sustained HaCaT stress, believed to be maintained through the continual dissolution of internalized AgNPs. This study raises concerns that even after exposure ceases, the retained nanomaterials are capable of acting as a slow-release mechanism for metallic ions; continually stressing and modifying normal cellular functionality. PMID:25260222

  16. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger Iii, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-03-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications. PMID:26030682

  17. Effect of centrifugation time on growth factor and MMP release of an experimental platelet-rich fibrin-type product.

    PubMed

    Eren, Gülnihal; Gürkan, Ali; Atmaca, Harika; Dönmez, Ayhan; Atilla, Gül

    2016-07-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) has a controlled release of growth factors due to the fibrin matrix structure. Different centrifugation protocols were suggested for PRF preparation. Since the derivation method of PRF can alter its contents, in the present study it is aimed to investigate the cell contents and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and-8 release from experimental PRF-type membranes obtained with different centrifugation times at 400 gravity. Three blood samples were collected from 20 healthy non-smoker volunteers. One tube was used for whole blood analyses. The other two tubes were centrifuged at 400 g for 10 minutes (group A) or 12 minutes (group B). Each experimental PRF-type membrane was placed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)and at 1, 24 and 72 hours, TGF-β1, PDGF-AB, VEGF, MMP-1 and -8 release amounts were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The blood cell count of membranes was determined by subtracting plasma supernatant and red blood cell (RBC) mixture from the whole blood cell counts. At 72 hours, the VEGF level of group B was statistically higher than that of group A (p = 0.040). The centrifugation time was not found to influence the release of other growth factors, enzymes and cell counts. Within the limits of the present study, it might be suggested that centrifugation time at a constant gravity has a significant effect on the VEGF levels released from experimental PRF-type membrane. It can be concluded that due to the importance of VEGF in the tissue healing process, membranes obtained at 12-minute centrifugation time may show a superior potential in wound healing. PMID:26830681

  18. Effects of a synthetic bioactive peptide on neurite growth and nerve growth factor release in chondroitin sulfate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Conovaloff, Aaron W; Beier, Brooke L; Irazoqui, Pedro P; Panitch, Alyssa

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has revealed robust dorsal root ganglia neurite growth in hydrogels of chondroitin sulfate. In the current work, it was determined whether addition of a synthetic bioactive peptide could augment neurite growth in these matrices via enhanced binding and sequestering of growth factors. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies revealed that addition of peptide slowed nerve growth factor diffusivity in chondroitin sulfate gels, but not in control gels of hyaluronic acid. Furthermore, cultures of chick dorsal root ganglia in gels of hyaluronic acid or chondroitin sulfate revealed enhanced growth in chondroitin sulfate gels only upon addition of peptide. Taken together, these results suggest a synergistic nerve growth factor-binding activity between this peptide and chondroitin sulfate. PMID:23507745

  19. Human growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor stimulates and somatostatin inhibits the release of rat GH variants.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, S; Friesen, H G

    1986-11-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) was used for the analysis of proteins secreted by male rat pituitary cells in monolayer culture in the presence of 10 nM human GH-releasing factor (hGRF) or 30 nM somatostatin (SRIF) or in the absence of these factors. More than 300 medium proteins were reproducibly detected either by fluorographic autoradiography or by silver staining. Immunoreactivity of each protein was examined after 2D PAGE followed by Western blotting and immunostaining with affinity-purified antirat GH (rGH) antibody. While there was a cluster of immunoreactive spots in the GH dimer range (40,000-50,000 mol wt), at least 16 medium proteins of mol wt 22,000 or less were also stained. Among these 16 proteins the release of 15 was stimulated and the release of 14 was inhibited by hGRF and SRIF, respectively. On the other hand, there were 3 proteins of approximate mol wt 16,000 whose secretion was regulated in a coordinate manner as rGH by the hypothalamic factors but which did not cross-react with anti-rGH antibodies. The increase or decrease in the radioactivity of each protein spot obtained from media after pituitary cells were incubated with [35S]methionine and hypothalamic factors was analyzed statistically. A pulse-chase study suggested that at least 7 of the hormonally regulated proteins, including rGH, were synthesized very rapidly. Finally, the 2D PAGE analysis of cell-free translation products of messenger RNA derived from male rat anterior pituitaries revealed the presence of about 40 rGH-immunoreactive proteins which included pre-GH. These data suggest that there are multiple forms of rGH-variants or rGH-related proteins. The biological significance(s) of all the rGH immunoreactive proteins and of the GRF- and SRIF-regulated pituitary proteins remains unclear. It is evident that a number of these proteins are synthesized and released rapidly by pituitary cells in culture. Furthermore, the presence of multiple genes for

  20. Effect of hypophysectomy and growth hormone replacement on hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing factor messenger ribonucleic Acid levels.

    PubMed

    Eccleston, L M; Powell, J F; Clayton, R N

    1991-12-01

    Abstract The mechanisms by which the pituitary gland, and growth hormone (GH) in particular, affect growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) gene expression have been addressed using the technique of in situ hybridization. Anatomically matched sections through the mediobasal hypothalamus of control and hypophysectomized male rats, with or without GH hormone replacement, were analysed to obtain information on GRF mRNA levels within the arcuate nucleus and around the ventromedial hypothalamus. Hypophysectomy resulted in a 70% increase in the amount of GRF mRNA per cell (P<0.001), within neurons in the arcuate nucleus. GH replacement and T4 replacement separately partially attenuated this increase (GH replacement P< 0.001 versus hypophysectomy, T4 replacement P<0.05 versus hypophysectomy). Additionally, after hypophysectomy there was an 80% increase in the number of cells expressing the GRF gene in neurons around the ventromedial hypothalamus, when compared to shamoperated controls (P<0.01). Both GH and T4 replacement separately partially attenuated this phenomenon (P<0.01 versus hypophysectomized animals). Hypothyroidism alone did not affect GRF mRNA levels in either the arcuate nucleus or in the area surrounding the ventromedial hypothalamus. These results show that hypophysectomy increases GRF mRNA levels in two separate ways: by increasing the amount of mRNA produced per cell within the arcuate nucleus, and by increasing the number of cells expressing the gene in the area surrounding the ventromedial hypothalamus. This increase in the number of GRF mRNA-containing cells after hypophysectomy could result from the recruitment of neurons which previously did not express the GRF gene, and may reflect the plasticity of the adult central nervous system in response to a changing endocrine environment. This could represent part of a sensor mechanism to drive the production of GRF in the arcuate nucleus in response to extreme disruption of the GRF/ GH feedback loop. PMID

  1. Magnetic field-responsive release of transforming growth factor beta 1 from heparin-modified alginate ferrogels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwi; Park, Honghyun; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2016-10-20

    Stimuli-responsive polymeric systems have been widely used for various drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Magnetic stimulation can be also exploited to regulate the release of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and cells from hydrogels in a controlled manner, on-demand. In the present study, alginate ferrogels containing iron oxide nanoparticles were fabricated via ionic cross-linking, and their various characteristics were investigated. The deformation of the ferrogels was dependent on the polymer concentration, calcium concentration, iron oxide concentration, and strength of magnetic field. To modulate the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) under magnetic stimulation, alginate was chemically modified with heparin, as TGF-β1 has a heparin-binding domain. Alginate was first modified with ethylenediamine, and heparin was then conjugated to the ethylenediamine-modified alginate via carbodiimide chemistry. Conjugation of heparin to alginate was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sustained release of TGF-β1 from alginate-g-heparin ferrogels was achieved, and application of a magnetic field to the ferrogels regulated TGF-β1 release, resultantly enhancing chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells, which were used as a model chondrogenic cell line. Alginate-based ferrogels that release drugs in a controlled manner may therefore be useful in many biomedical applications. PMID:27474590

  2. Release of angiogenic growth factors from cells encapsulated in alginate beads with bioactive glass.

    PubMed

    Keshaw, Hussila; Forbes, Alastair; Day, Richard M

    2005-07-01

    Attempts to stimulate therapeutic angiogenesis using gene therapy or delivery of recombinant growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), have failed to demonstrate unequivocal efficacy in human trials. Bioactive glass stimulates fibroblasts to secrete significantly increased amounts of angiogenic growth factors and therefore has a number of potential applications in therapeutic angiogenesis. The aim of this study was to assess whether it is possible to encapsulate specific quantities of bioactive glass and fibroblasts into alginate beads, which will secrete growth factors capable of stimulating angiogenesis. Human fibroblasts (CCD-18Co) were encapsulated in alginate beads with specific quantities of 45S5 bioactive glass and incubated in culture medium (0-17 days). The conditioned medium was collected and assayed for VEGF or used to assess its ability to stimulate angiogenesis by measuring the proliferation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. At 17 days the beads were lysed and the amount of VEGF retained by the beads measured. Fibroblasts encapsulated in alginate beads containing 0.01% and 0.1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass particles secreted increased quantities of VEGF compared with cells encapsulated with 0% or 1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass particles. Lysed alginate beads containing 0.01% and 0.1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass contained significantly more VEGF (p<0.01) compared with beads containing no glass particles. Endothelial cell proliferation was significantly increased (p<0.01) by conditioned medium collected from alginate beads containing 0.1% (w/v) 45S5 bioactive glass particles. The results of this study demonstrate that bioactive glass and fibroblasts can be successfully incorporated into alginate beads for use in delivering angiogenic growth factors. With further optimization, this technique offers a novel delivery device for stimulating therapeutic angiogenesis. PMID:15664644

  3. Entrapment of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a succinylated chitosan nanoparticle delivery system and release profile.

    PubMed

    Butko, Alison; Bonat Celli, Giovana; Paulson, Allan; Ghanem, Amyl

    2016-07-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) helps to regulate the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts, the proliferation of endothelial cells, and aids the development of angiogenesis. Its in vivo half-life is on the order of minutes due to extensive degradation and inactivation, which could be potentially reduced by controlled release vehicles. In this study, bFGF was entrapped into chitosan (CS) and N-succinyl-chitosan (SC) nanoparticles, with and without heparin, at two levels of initial loading, followed by further characterization of the particles. Release studies were conducted using radiolabeled bFGF-loaded nanoparticles. Both types of nanoparticles loaded similar amounts of bFGF (60.2 and 68.6% for CS and SC, respectively). The release profile varied greatly among the samples, and a burst release was observed in most cases, with the release amount approaching its final value in the first 6 h. The final amount released varied from 1.5 to 18% of the amount of bFGF-entrapped. The concomitant encapsulation of heparin and the use of SC as a nanoparticle matrix contributed to the largest amount of bFGF release (18%) over the time investigated. PMID:27146359

  4. Growth Hormone-Releaser Diet Attenuates Cognitive Dysfunction in Klotho Mutant Mice via Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Receptor Activation in a Genetic Aging Model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seok Joo; Chung, Yoon Hee; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Dang, Duy-Khanh; Nam, Yunsung; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Kim, Yong Sun; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been recognized that a defect in klotho gene expression accelerates the degeneration of multiple age-sensitive traits. Accumulating evidence indicates that aging is associated with declines in cognitive function and the activity of growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Methods In this study, we examined whether a GH-releaser diet could be effective in protecting against cognitive impairment in klotho mutant mice. Results The GH-releaser diet significantly induced the expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1 receptors in the hippocampus of klotho mutant mice. Klotho mutant mice showed significant memory impairments as compared with wild-type mice. In addition, the klotho mutation significantly decreased the expression of cell survival/antiapoptotic factors, including phospho-Akt (p-Akt)/phospho-glycogen synthase kinase3β (p-GSK3β), phospho-extracellular signal-related kinase (p-ERK), and Bcl-2, but significantly increased those of cell death/proapoptotic factors, such as phospho-c-jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), Bax, and cleaved caspase-3 in the hippocampus. Treatment with GH-releaser diet significantly attenuated both decreases in the expression of cell survival/antiapoptotic factors and increases in the expression of cell death/proapoptotic factors in the hippocampus of klotho mutant mice. In addition, klotho mutation-induced oxidative stress was significantly attenuated by the GH-releaser diet. Consequently, a GH-releaser diet significantly improved memory function in the klotho mutant mice. GH-releaser diet-mediated actions were significantly reversed by JB-1, an IGF-1 receptor antagonist. Conclusion The results suggest that a GH-releaser diet attenuates oxidative stress, proapoptotic changes and consequent dysfunction in klotho mutant mice by promoting IGF-1 expression and IGF-1 receptor activation. PMID:25309793

  5. Release of growth factors after mechanical and chemical pleurodesis for treatment of malignant pleural effusion: a randomized control study

    PubMed Central

    Hojski, Aljaz; Leitgeb, Maja; Crnjac, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Background Growth factors are key inducers of fibrosis but can also mediate inflammatory responses resulting in increasing pleural effusion and acute respiratory distress syndrome. The primary aim of the study was to analyse growth factors release after performing chemical and mechanical pleurodesis in the first 48 hours at the patients with malignant pleural effusion. The secondary endpoints were to evaluate the effectiveness of the both pleurodeses, symptoms release and the quality of life of patients after the treatment. Patients and methods. A prospective randomized study included 36 consecutive female patients with breast carcinoma and malignant pleural effusion in an intention-to-treat analysis. We treated 18 patients by means of thoracoscopic mechanical pleurodesis and 18 patients by chemical pleurodesis with talcum applied over a chest tube. We gathered the pleural fluid and serum samples in the following 48 hours under a dedicated protocol and tested them for growth factors levels. A quality of life and visual analogue pain score surveys were also performed. Results Median measured serum vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) level after chemical pleurodesis was 930.68 pg/ml (95% CI: 388.22–4656.65) and after mechanical pleurodesis 808.54 pg/ml. (95% CI: 463.20-1235.13) (p = 0.103). Median pleural levels of transforming growth factor (TGF) β1 were higher after performing mechanical pleurodesis (4814.00 pg/ml [95% CI: 2726.51–7292.94]) when compared to those after performing chemical pleurodesis (1976.50 pg/ml [95% CI: 1659.82–5136.26]) (p = 0.078). We observed similar results for fibroblast growth factor (FGF) β; the serum level was higher after mechanical pleurodesis (30.45 pg/ml [95% CI: 20.40–59.42]), compared to those after chemical pleurodesis (13.39 pg/ml [95% CI: 5.04 – 74.60]) (p = 0.076). Mechanical pleurodesis was equally effective as chemical pleurodesis in terms of hospital stay, pleural effusion re-accumulation, requiring of

  6. Selective release of cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors by minced skin in vitro supports the effectiveness of autologous minced micrografts technique for chronic ulcer repair.

    PubMed

    Pertusi, Ginevra; Tiberio, Rossana; Graziola, Francesca; Boggio, Paolo; Colombo, Enrico; Bozzo, Chiarella

    2012-01-01

    A new effective surgical procedure to repair chronic ulcers called minced micrografts technique has been recently reported. The technique consists in spreading a finely minced skin sample upon the wound bed. In this study, we investigate the in vitro release of cytokines (interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α, and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor), chemokines (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and growth-related oncogene-α), and growth factors (platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor, and nerve growth factor) by minced (referred to as the minced sample) vs. not minced (referred to as the whole sample) human skin biopsy samples from the same donor. Factor release in the culture medium at different time points was detected using a multiplexed protein assay. The minced sample, which could behave like the skin fragments used in vivo in the autologous minced micrografts technique, expressed higher levels of tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1α, platelet-derived growth factor, and basic fibroblast growth factor, and lower levels of interleukin-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, growth related oncogene-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor compared with the whole sample. In conclusion, mincing of healthy skin may allow appropriate regulation of the inflammatory phase of wound healing and could induce overexpression of some growth factors, which facilitates the proliferative phase of healing. PMID:22304391

  7. A tubular gelatin scaffold capable of the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor and mitomycin C.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jixiang; Yang, Fanwen; He, Fupo; Tian, Xiumei; Tang, Shuo; Chen, Xiaoming

    2015-11-01

    A tubular gelatin scaffold for the time-dependent controlled release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and mitomycin C (MMC) was fabricated. EGF was incorporated using silk fibroin carriers, and MMC was planted using polylactide (PLA) microspheres. The relationship between scaffold properties and crosslinking degrees was evaluated. As the crosslinking degree was increased from 23.7% to 65.3%, the mechanical properties of the scaffold obviously improved, and the compressive modulus increased to approximately 65kPa. The mass degradation of the scaffold was also controlled from 9 days to approximately 1 month. In vitro release tests indicated that the scaffold mainly released EGF in the early period and MMC in the later period. Urethral epithelial cells (UECs) and urethral scar derived fibroblast cells (UFCs) were coseeded in the scaffold at a ratio of 1:1. After 9 days of coculture, immunostaining results displayed that the proportion of UECs continuously increased to approximately 71%. These changes in cell proportion were confirmed by the results of Western blot analysis. Therefore, the scaffold promoted the growth but inhibited the regeneration of UFCs. This scaffold for time-dependent controlled release of multiple biofactors may be potentially useful in urethral reconstruction and other tissue engineering studies. PMID:26277717

  8. Basic fibroblast growth factor binds to subendothelial extracellular matrix and is released by heparitinase and heparin-like molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, P.; Doctrow, S.; Klagsbrun, M.; Svahn, C.M.; Folkman, J.; Vlodavsky, I. )

    1989-02-21

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits specific binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cultured endothelial cells. Binding was saturable as a function both of time and of concentration of {sup 125}I-bFGF. Scatchard analysis of FGF binding revealed the presence of about 1.5 x 10{sup 12} binding sites/mm{sup 2} ECM with an apparent k{sub D} of 610 nM. FGF binds to heparan sulfate (HS) in ECM as evidenced by (i) inhibition of binding in the presence of heparin or HS at 0.1-1 {mu}g/mL, but not by chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or hyaluronic acid at 10 {mu}g/mL, (ii) lack of binding to ECM pretreated with heparitinase, but not with chondroitinase ABC, and (iii) rapid release of up to 90% of ECM-bound FGF by exposure to heparin, HS, or heparitinase, but not to chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, or chondroitinase ABC. Oligosaccharides derived from depolymerized heparin, and as small as the tetrasaccharide, released the ECM-bound FGF, but there was little or no release of FGF by modified nonanticoagulant heparins such as totally desulfated heparin, N-desulfated heparin, and N-acetylated heparin. FGF released from ECM was biologically active, as indicated by its stimulation of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and 3T3 fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained in studies on release of endogenous FGF-like mitogenic activity from Descement's membranes of bovine corneas. It is suggested that ECM storage and release of bFGF provide a novel mechanism for regulation of capillary blood vessel growth. Whereas ECM-bound FGF may be prevented from acting on endothelial cells, its displacement by heparin-like molecules and/or HS-degrading enzymes may elicit a neovascular response.

  9. BIODEGRADABLE PHOTO-CROSSLINKED ALGINATE NANOFIBRE SCAFFOLDS WITH TUNEABLE PHYSICAL PROPERTIES, CELL ADHESIVITY AND GROWTH FACTOR RELEASE

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sung In; Jeon, Oju; Krebs, Melissa D.; Hill, Michael C.; Alsberg, Eben

    2012-01-01

    Nanofibrous scaffolds are of interest in tissue engineering due to their high surface area to volume ratio, interconnected pores, and architectural similarity to the native extracellular matrix. Our laboratory recently developed a biodegradable, photo-crosslinkable alginate biopolymer. Here, we show the capacity of the material to be electrospun into a nanofibrous matrix, and the ability to enhance cell adhesion and proliferation on these matrices by covalent modification with cell adhesion peptides. Additionally, the potential of covalently incorporating heparin into the hydrogels during the photopolymerisation process to sustain the release of a heparin binding growth factor via affinity interactions was demonstrated. Electrospun photo-crosslinkable alginate nanofibrous scaffolds endowed with cell adhesion ligands and controlled delivery of growth factors may allow for improved regulation of cell behaviour for regenerative medicine. PMID:23070945

  10. Chitosan scaffold enhances growth factor release in wound healing in von Willebrand disease

    PubMed Central

    Periayah, Mercy Halleluyah; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Saad, Arman Zaharil Mat; Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Hussein, Abdul Rahim; Karim, Faraizah Abdul; Rashid, Ahmad Hazri Abdul; Ujang, Zanariah

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan-derived biomaterials have been reported to adhere when in contact with blood by encouraging platelets to adhere, activate and aggregate at the sites of vascular injury, thus enhanced wound healing capacity. This study investigated platelet morphology changes and the expression level of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and platelet-derived growth factor-AB (PDGF-AB) in the adherence of two different types of chitosans in von Willebrand disease (vWD): N,O-carboxymethylchitosan (NO-CMC) and oligo-chitosan (O-C). Fourteen vWD voluntary subjects were recruited, and they provided written informed consent. Scanning electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay test procedures were employed to achieve the objective of the study. The results suggest that the O-C group showed dramatic changes in the platelet’s behaviors. Platelets extended filopodia and generated lamellipodia, leading to the formation of grape-like shaped aggregation. The platelet aggregation occurred depending on the severity of vWD. O-C was bound to platelets on approximately 90% of the surface membrane in vWD type 1; there was 70% and 50% coverage in vWD type II and III, respectively. The O-C chitosan group showed an elevated expression level of TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB. This finding suggests that O-C stimulates these mediators from the activated platelets to the early stage of restoring the damaged cells and tissues. This study demonstrated that the greater expression level of O-C assists in mediating the cytokine complex networks of TGF-β1 and PDGF-AB and induces platelet activities towards wound healing in vWD. With a better understanding of chitosan’s mechanisms of action, researchers are able to accurately develop novel therapies to prevent hemorrhage. PMID:26629055

  11. Cell Injury-Induced Release of Fibroblast Growth Factor 2: Relevance to Intracerebral Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Transplantations.

    PubMed

    Aizman, Irina; Vinodkumar, Deepti; McGrogan, Michael; Bates, Damien

    2015-07-15

    Beneficial effects of intracerebral transplantation of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and their derivatives are believed to be mediated mostly by factors produced by engrafted cells. However, the mesenchymal cell engraftment rate is low, and the majority of grafted cells disappear within a short post-transplantation period. Here, we hypothesize that dying transplanted cells can affect surrounding tissues by releasing their active intracellular components. To elucidate the type, amounts, and potency of these putative intracellular factors, freeze/thaw extracts of MSC or their derivatives were tested in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and bioassays. We found that fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and FGF1, but not vascular endothelial growth factor and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 levels were high in extracts despite being low in conditioned media. Extracts induced concentration-dependent proliferation of rat cortical neural progenitor cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells; these proliferative responses were specifically blocked by FGF2-neutralizing antibody. In the neuropoiesis assay with rat cortical cells, both MSC extracts and killed cells induced expression of nestin, but not astrocyte differentiation. However, suspensions of killed cells strongly potentiated the astrogenic effects of live MSC. In transplantation-relevant MSC injury models (peripheral blood cell-mediated cytotoxicity and high cell density plating), MSC death coincided with the release of intracellular FGF2. The data showed that MSC contain a major depot of active FGF2 that is released upon cell injury and is capable of acutely stimulating neuropoiesis and angiogenesis. We therefore propose that both dying and surviving grafted MSC contribute to tissue regeneration. PMID:25873141

  12. Live Staphylococcus aureus Induces Expression and Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Terminally Differentiated Mouse Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnzon, Carl-Fredrik; Rönnberg, Elin; Guss, Bengt; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells have been shown to express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), thereby implicating mast cells in pro-angiogenic processes. However, the mechanism of VEGF induction in mast cells and the possible expression of VEGF in fully mature mast cells have not been extensively studied. Here, we report that terminally differentiated peritoneal cell-derived mast cells can be induced to express VEGF in response to challenge with Staphylococcus aureus, thus identifying a mast cell–bacteria axis as a novel mechanism leading to VEGF release. Whereas live bacteria produced a robust upregulation of VEGF in mast cells, heat-inactivated bacteria failed to do so, and bacteria-conditioned media did not induce VEGF expression. The induction of VEGF was not critically dependent on direct cell–cell contact between bacteria and mast cells. Hence, these findings suggest that VEGF can be induced by soluble factors released during the co-culture conditions. Neither of a panel of bacterial cell-wall products known to activate toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling promoted VEGF expression in mast cells. In agreement with the latter, VEGF induction occurred independently of Myd88, an adaptor molecule that mediates the downstream events following TLR engagement. The VEGF induction was insensitive to nuclear factor of activated T-cells inhibition but was partly dependent on the nuclear factor kappa light-chain enhancer of activated B cells signaling pathway. Together, these findings identify bacterial challenge as a novel mechanism by which VEGF is induced in mast cells. PMID:27446077

  13. Effect of Control-released Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor Incorporated in β-Tricalcium Phosphate for Murine Cranial Model

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Azusa; Tajima, Satoshi; Tobita, Morikuni; Tanaka, Rica; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2014-01-01

    Background: β-Tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) is used clinically as a bone substitute, but complete osteoinduction is slow. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) is important in bone regeneration, but the biological effects are very limited because of the short half-life of the free form. Incorporation in gelatin allows slow release of growth factors during degradation. The present study evaluated whether control-released bFGF incorporated in β-TCP can promote bone regeneration in a murine cranial defect model. Methods: Bilateral cranial defects of 4 mm in diameter were made in 10-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats treated as follows: group 1, 20 μl saline as control; group 2, β-TCP disk in 20 μl saline; group 3, β-TCP disk in 50 μg bFGF solution; and group 4, β-TCP disk in 50 μg bFGF-containing gelatin hydrogel (n = 6 each). Histological and imaging analyses were performed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after surgery. Results: The computed tomography value was lower in groups 3 and 4, whereas the rate of osteogenesis was higher histologically in group 4 than in the other groups. The appearance of tartrate-resistant acid phosphate–positive cells and osteocalcin-positive cells and disappearance of osteopontin-positive cells occurred earlier in group 4 than in the other groups. Conclusions: These findings suggest that control-released bFGF incorporated in β-TCP can accelerate bone regeneration in the murine cranial defect model and may be promising for the clinical treatment of cranial defects. PMID:25289319

  14. Granzyme B Cleaves Decorin, Biglycan and Soluble Betaglycan, Releasing Active Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Wendy A.; Shackleford, Marlo; Vanden Hoek, Amanda; Zhao, Hongyan; Hackett, Tillie L.; Knight, Darryl A.; Granville, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Granzyme B (GrB) is a pro-apoptotic serine protease that contributes to immune-mediated target cell apoptosis. However, during inflammation, GrB accumulates in the extracellular space, retains its activity, and is capable of cleaving extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic extracellular role for GrB in cardiovascular disease, yet the pathophysiological consequences of extracellular GrB activity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify proteoglycan (PG) substrates of GrB and examine the ability of GrB to release PG-sequestered TGF-β1 into the extracellular milieu. Methods/Results Three extracellular GrB PG substrates were identified; decorin, biglycan and betaglycan. As all of these PGs sequester active TGF-β1, cytokine release assays were conducted to establish if GrB-mediated PG cleavage induced TGF-β1 release. Our data confirmed that GrB liberated TGF-β1 from all three substrates as well as from endogenous ECM and this process was inhibited by the GrB inhibitor 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. The released TGF-β1 retained its activity as indicated by the induction of SMAD-3 phosphorylation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells. Conclusion In addition to contributing to ECM degradation and the loss of tissue structural integrity in vivo, increased extracellular GrB activity is also capable of inducing the release of active TGF-β1 from PGs. PMID:22479366

  15. Platelet-released growth factors induce the antimicrobial peptide human beta-defensin-2 in primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Andreas; Lammel, Justus; Rademacher, Franziska; Groß, Justus; Siggelkow, Markus; Lippross, Sebastian; Klüter, Tim; Varoga, Deike; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Pufe, Thomas; Cremer, Jochen; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF) and its related clinically used formulations [e.g. Vivostat platelet-rich fibrin (PRF(®) )] are thrombocyte concentrate lysates that support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal and infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide expressed in human keratinocytes exhibiting potent antimicrobial activity against wound-related bacteria. In this study, we analysed the influence of PRGF on hBD-2 expression in human primary keratinocytes and the influence of Vivostat PRF(®) on hBD-2 expression in experimentally generated skin wounds in vivo. Treatment of primary keratinocytes with PRGF caused a significant increase in hBD-2 gene and protein expressions in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The use of blocking antibodies revealed that the PRGF-mediated hBD-2 induction was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Luciferase gene reporter assays indicated that the hBD-2 induction through PRGF required activation of the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1), but not of NF-kappaB. In concordance with these cell culture data, Vivostat PRF(®) induced hBD-2 expression when applied to experimentally generated skin wounds. Together, our results indicate that the induction of hBD-2 by thrombocyte concentrate lysates can contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of chronic and infected wounds. PMID:26843467

  16. Endothelial stress induces the release of vitamin D-binding protein, a novel growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, Marc-Andre; Desormeaux, Anik; Labelle, Andree; Soulez, Mathilde; Soulez, Gilles; Langelier, Yves; Pshezhetsky, Alexey V.; Hebert, Marie-Josee . E-mail: marie-josee.hebert.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca

    2005-12-23

    Endothelial cells (EC) under stress release paracrine mediators that facilitate accumulation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSCM) at sites of vascular injury. We found that medium conditioned by serum-starved EC increase proliferation and migration of VSCM in vitro. Fractionation of the conditioned medium followed by mass spectral analysis identified one bioactive component as vitamin D-binding protein (DBP). DBP induced both proliferation and migration of VSMC in vitro in association with increased phosphorylation of ERK 1/2. PD 98059, a biochemical inhibitor of ERK 1/2, abrogated these proliferative and migratory responses in VSMC. DBP is an important carrier for the vitamin-D sterols, 25-hydroxyvitamin-D, and 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin-D. Both sterols inhibited the activity of DBP on VSMC, suggesting that vitamin D binding sites are important for initiating the activities of DBP on VSMC. Release of DBP at sites of endothelial injury represents a novel pathway favoring accumulation of VSMC at sites of vascular injury.

  17. Calcium sulfate spinal cord scaffold: a study on degradation and fibroblast growth factor 1 loading and release.

    PubMed

    Åberg, Jonas; Eriksson, Olof; Spens, Erika; Nordblom, Jonathan; Mattsson, Per; Sjödahl, Johan; Svensson, Mikael; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-02-01

    Currently, there is no regenerative strategy for the spinal cord that is part of clinical standard of core. Current paths usually include combinations of scaffold materials and active molecules. In a recent study, a permanent dental resin scaffold for treatment of spinal cord injury was designed. The results from studies on rats were promising. However, for potential clinical use, a biodegradable scaffold material that facilitates drug delivery and the regeneration of the spinal cord needs to be developed. Also a biodegradable material is expected to allow a better evaluation of the efficacy of the surgical method. In this article, the suitability of hardened calcium sulfate cement (CSC) for use as degradable spinal cord scaffolds is investigated in bench studies and in vitro studies. Compressive strength, degradation and microstructure, and the loading capability of heparin-activated fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) via soaking were evaluated. The CSC could easily be injected into the scaffold mold and the obtained scaffolds had sufficient strength to endure the loads applied during surgery. When hardened, the CSC formed a porous microstructure suitable for loading of active substances. It was shown that 10 min of FGF1 soaking was enough to obtain a sustained active FGF1 release for 20-35 days. The results showed that CSC is a promising material for spinal cord scaffold fabrication, since it is biodegradable, has sufficient strength, and allows loading and controlled release of active FGF1. PMID:20624845

  18. Nitrogen balance and mineral excretion in growing male pigs injected with a human growth hormone-releasing factor analog.

    PubMed Central

    Dubreuil, P; Abribat, T; Brazeau, P; Lapierre, H

    1998-01-01

    A human growth hormone-releasing factor analog ([Desamino-Tyr1,D-Ala2,Ala15] hGRF(1-29) NH2) has been reported to reduce feed intake and increase growth and feed efficiency in a dose-dependent manner in growing pigs. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of this analog on nitrogen (N) balance and mineral excretion. Fifteen castrated male Yorkshire x Landrace pigs (45.9 +/- 1.4 kg) were randomly allotted to 2 groups: control (saline, n = 7) and GRF (6.66 micrograms/kg sc, TID, n = 8). The animals were injected for 20 consecutive days: feces and urine were collected during the last 10 d of injection. The animals had free access to water and food until satiety (approximately 15 min) at 07:00, 11:00, 15:00, 19:00, 23:00 and 07:00 h. The diet consisted of a hog fattening ration (18.0% crude protein). Blood samples were collected on the last day of the study by venipuncture. This analog increased (P < 0.05) insulin-like growth factor-1 and glucose serum concentrations and decreased (P < 0.05) serum urea nitrogen concentration and feed intake. The GRF-treated animals ingested less N, excreted less N in urine and feces to retain a similar amount of N than controls. The apparent coefficient of digestibility of the N has been slightly increased (P < 0.05) by GRF. Urinary excretion of P, K, and Cl decreased (P < 0.01) with GRF treatment. In conclusion, this GRF analog increased N digestibility and retention relative to N ingestion and reduced urinary N, P, K, and Cl excretion. PMID:9442933

  19. Actions and Interactions of Alcohol and Transforming Growth Factor ß1 on Prepubertal Hypothalamic Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Vinod K.; Hiney, Jill K.; Dees, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Alcohol (ALC) diminishes gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion and delays puberty. Glial transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) plays a role in glial-neuronal communications facilitating prepubertal GnRH secretion. We assessed the effects of acute ALC administration on TGFß1-induced GnRH gene expression in the brain preoptic area (POA), and release of the peptide from the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH). Furthermore, we assessed actions and interactions of TGFβ1 and ALC on an adhesion/signaling gene family involved in glial-neuronal communications. Methods Prepubertal female rats were administered ALC or water via gastric gavage at 0730 h. At 0900 h saline or TGFβ1 (100ng/3μl) was administered into the third ventricle. At 1500 h the POA was removed and frozen for gene expression analysis and repeated for protein assessments. In another experiment, the MBH was removed from ALC-free rats. After equilibration, tissues were incubated in Locke’s medium only or medium containing TGFß1 with or without 50 mM ALC for measurement of GnRH peptide released in vitro. Results TGFβ1 induced GnRH gene expression in the POA and this effect was blocked by ALC. We also described the presence and responsiveness of the TGFβ1 receptor in the POA and showed that acute ALC exposure not only altered the TGFß1 induced increase in TGFß-R1 protein expression but also the activation of receptor associated proteins, Smad2 and Smad3, key downstream components of the TGFß1 signaling pathway. Assessment of an adhesion/signaling family consisting of glial RPTPβ and neuronal Caspr1 and contactin showed that the neuronal components were induced by TGFβ1 and that ALC blocked these effects. Finally, TGFß1 was shown to induce release of the GnRH peptide in vitro, an action that was blocked by ALC. Conclusion We have demonstrated glial-derived TGFß1 induces GnRH gene expression in the POA, and stimulates release of the peptide from the MBH; actions necessary for

  20. Rat testicular germ cells and sertoli cells release different types of bioactive transforming growth factor beta in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Haagmans, Bart L; Hoogerbrugge, Jos W; Themmen, Axel PN; Teerds, Katja J

    2003-01-01

    Several in vivo studies have reported the presence of immunoreactive transforming growth factor-β's (TGF-β's) in testicular cells at defined stages of their differentiation. The most pronounced changes in TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 immunoreactivity occurred during spermatogenesis. In the present study we have investigated whether germ cells and Sertoli cells are able to secrete bioactive TGF-β's in vitro, using the CCl64 mink lung epithelial cell line as bioassay for the measurement of TGF-β. In cellular lysates, TGF-β bioactivity was only observed following heat-treatment, indicating that within these cells TGF-β is present in a latent form. To our surprise, active TGF-β could be detected in the culture supernatant of germ cells and Sertoli cells without prior heat-treatment. This suggests that these cells not only produce and release TGF-β in a latent form, but that they also release a factor which can convert latent TGF-β into its active form. Following heat-activation of these culture supernatant's, total TGF-β bioactivity increased 6- to 9-fold. Spermatocytes are the cell type that releases most bioactive TGF-β during a 24 h culture period, although round and elongated spermatids and Sertoli cells also secrete significant amounts of TGF-β. The biological activity of TGF-β could be inhibited by neutralizing antibodies against TGF-β1 (spermatocytes and round spermatids) and TGF-β2 (round and elongating spermatids). TGF-β activity in the Sertoli cell culture supernatant was inhibited slightly by either the TGF-β1 and TGF-β2 neutralizing antibody. These in vitro data suggest that germ cells and Sertoli cells release latent TGF-β's. Following secretion, the TGF-β's are converted to a biological active form that can interact with specific TGF-β receptors. These results strengthen the hypothesis that TGF-β's may play a physiological role in germ cell proliferation/differentiation and Sertoli cell function. PMID:12646048

  1. Pharmacodynamic evaluation of a PEGylated analogue of human growth hormone releasing factor in rats and pigs.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, M; Louveau, I; Esposito, P; Bertolino, M; Canali, S

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the in vivo efficacy of monoPEGylated GRF(1-29)NH(2) having one PEG(5000) chains attached to either lysine 12 or 21 as compared to the GRF(1-29)NH(2) in rats and pigs. This analogue termed GRF-1PEG(5000) was tested after a single intravenous administration in rats and after a single intravenous or subcutaneous injection in pigs. After 1 h administration, GH concentrations returned to values close to controls in the group of rats injected with GRF(1-29)NH(2). In animals injected with the same dose of GRF-1PEG(5000), the AUC values corresponding to the whole period 0.5-48 h and particularly to the 0.5-8 h period were higher than in the placebo or in the GRF(1-29)NH(2) groups. Interestingly, two additional peaks were observed at about 6 and 8 h following administration. An increase in the response of the endogenous GH peaks was also observed in pigs administered GRF-1PEG(5000) by intravenous route. When GRF-1PEG(5000) was administered subcutaneously to pigs, a significant increase, as compared to placebo and GRF(1-29)NH(2,) in both GH and IGF-I levels was observed. This new analogue might find therapeutic application in paediatric growth hormone deficiency or in aging. PMID:15125884

  2. Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and Urocortin 3 Stimulate Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Expression through the cAMP/CREB Pathway.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Sang Hoon; Ma, Elise L; Lee, Yunna; Taché, Yvette; Pothoulakis, Charalabos; Im, Eunok

    2015-10-23

    Colonic epithelium is the first line of defense against various pathological offenses in the gut. Previous studies have shown that the peptides of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) family modulate vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A production in other cells. Here we sought to investigate whether CRH and urocortin (Ucn) 3 regulate VEGF-A secretion in colonocytes through CRH receptors and to elucidate the underlying mechanism of action. CRH and Ucn 3 significantly increased the expression levels of VEGF-A mRNA and protein through CRH receptor 1 and 2, respectively, in human colonic epithelial cells and primary mouse intestinal epithelial cells. Underlying mechanisms involve activation of adenylyl cyclase with subsequent increase of intracellular cAMP level and increased DNA binding activity of transcription factor CREB on VEGF-A promoter region. Finally, genetic deficiency of CREB decreased intestinal inflammation and VEGF-A expression in a dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis model. These results show that activation of CRH receptors by CRH ligands stimulates VEGF-A expression in intestinal epithelial cells through the cAMP/CREB pathway. Since VEGF-A boosts inflammatory responses through angiogenesis, these data suggest that CREB may be a key effector of CRH and Ucn 3-dependent inflammatory angiogenesis. PMID:26350463

  3. The release of transforming growth factor-beta following haemorrhage: its role as a mediator of host immunosuppression.

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, A; Meldrum, D R; Perrin, M M; Chaudry, I H

    1993-01-01

    Haemorrhage in the absence of trauma is reported to induce a profound depression in cell-mediated immunity. Recent studies have drawn attention to the cytokine transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) that, while important in wound healing, also has marked immunosuppressive effects. The aim of this study was to determine whether: (1) haemorrhage induces an increase in circulating TGF-beta and if this is associated with the loss of host immunoresponsiveness; and (2) administration of monoclonal antibody (mAb) to TGF-beta following haemorrhage ablates these changes. To determine this, C3H/HeN mice were bled to and maintained at a mean arterial pressure of 35 mmHg for 1 hr. This required removing approximately 50% of the circulating blood volume. Following this period of hypotension, the mice were adequately resuscitated. Blood samples obtained at 24 and 72 hr, but not at 2 hr, following haemorrhage showed a significant elevation in plasma TGF-beta levels when compared to shams. At 24 hr, the increase of TGF-beta in the plasma was associated with decreases in both concanavalin A (Con A)-induced splenocyte proliferation and splenic macrophage antigen presentation. Treating animals with neutralizing antibody (animals received 200 micrograms mAb against bovine TGF-beta 1,2,3/mouse intraarterially) not only reduced the levels of TGF-beta in the blood at 24 hr, but also restored splenocyte functions, such as Con A-induced proliferation, interleukin-2 (IL-2) release, and the capacity of splenic macrophages to present antigen. However, elevated levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) seen in plasma during haemorrhage were only partially depressed by the antibody treatment. These results indicate that the release of TGF-beta contributes to the protracted (> or = 24 hr) suppression of cell-mediated immunity following haemorrhage. PMID:8406575

  4. Controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor using poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid microspheres: In vitro characterization and application in polycaprolactone fumarate nerve conduits

    PubMed Central

    Rui, Jing; Dadsetan, Mahrokh; Runge, M. Brett; Spinner, Robert J.; Yaszemski, Michael J.; Windebank, Anthony J.; Wang, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent angiogenic stimulator. Controlled release of such stimulators may enhance and guide the vascularization process, and when applied in a nerve conduit may play a role in nerve regeneration. We report the fabrication and in vitro characterization of VEGF encapsulating poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) microspheres and the in vivo application of nerve conduits supplemented with VEGF-containing microspheres. PLGA microspheres containing VEGF were prepared by the double emulsion-solvent evaporation technique. This yielded 83.16% of the microspheres with a diameter < 53 µm. VEGF content measured by ELISA indicated 93.79 ±10.64% encapsulation efficiency. Release kinetics were characterized by an initial burst release of 67.6±8.25% within the first 24 hours, followed by consistent release of approximately 0.34% per day for 4 weeks. Bioactivity of the released VEGF was tested by human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation assay. VEGF released at all time points enhanced HUVEC proliferation confirming that VEGF retained its bioactivity through the 4-week time period. When the microsphere delivery system was placed in a biosynthetic nerve scaffold, robust nerve regeneration was observed. This study established a novel system for controlled release of growth factors and enables in vivo studies of nerve conduits conditioned with this system. PMID:22019759

  5. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate the release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin and soluble IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate receptor from MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Confort, C; Rochefort, H; Vignon, F

    1995-09-01

    The growth of hormone-responsive MCF7 human breast cancer cells is controlled by steroid hormones and growth factors. By metabolic labeling of cells grown in steroid- and growth factor-stripped serum conditions, we show that insulin-like growth factors (IGF-I and IGF-II) increase by approximately 5-fold the release of several proteins including cathepsin D, alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, and soluble forms of the multifunctional IGF-II/mannose 6-phosphate (M6P) receptor. Two soluble forms of IGF-II/M6P receptors were detected, one major (approximately 260 kilodaltons) and one minor (approximately 85 kilodaltons) that probably represents a proteolytic fragment of the larger soluble molecule. IGFs increased receptor release in a dose-dependent fashion with 50-60% of newly synthesized receptor released at 5-10 nM IGFs. The release of IGF-II/M6P receptors correlated with the levels of secreted cathepsin D in different human breast cancer cells or in rats stable transfectants that are constitutively expressing variable levels of human cathepsin D. IGFs had a stronger effect on IGF-II/M6P receptor release, whereas estradiol treatment preferentially enhanced the release of protease and antiprotease. We thus demonstrate that in human breast cancer cells, IGFs not only act as strong mitogens but also regulate release of alpha 1-antichymotrypsin, IGF-II/M6P-soluble receptor, and cathepsin D; three proteins that potentially regulate cell proliferation and/or invasion. PMID:7649082

  6. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(9): 501-506] PMID:25644636

  7. Growth hormone-releasing peptide-biotin conjugate stimulates myocytes differentiation through insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Jin; Jeon, Jung Eun; Jeong, Se Kyoo; Yoon, Seok Jeong; Kwon, Seon Deok; Lim, Jina; Park, Keedon; Kim, Dae Yong; Ahn, Jeong Keun; Kim, Bong-Woo

    2015-09-01

    Based on the potential beneficial effects of growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-6 on muscle functions, a newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate was tested on cultured myoblast cells. Increased expression of myogenic marker proteins was observed in GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells. Additionally, increased expression levels of insulin-like growth factor-1 and collagen type I were observed. Furthermore, GHRP-6-biotin conjugate-treated cells showed increased metabolic activity, as indicated by increased concentrations of energy metabolites, such as ATP and lactate, and increased enzymatic activity of lactate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase. Finally, binding protein analysis suggested few candidate proteins, including desmin, actin, and zinc finger protein 691 as potential targets for GHRP6-biotin conjugate action. These results suggest that the newly synthesized GHRP-6-biotin conjugate has myogenic stimulating activity through, at least in part, by stimulating collagen type I synthesis and several key proteins. Practical applications of the GHRP-6-biotin conjugate could include improving muscle condition. PMID:25644636

  8. Safety and efficacy of sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor using gelatin hydrogel in patients with critical limb ischemia.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Motoyuki; Marui, Akira; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Takeda, Takahide; Yamamoto, Masaya; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Tanaka, Shiro; Yanagi, Shigeki; Ito-Ihara, Toshiko; Ikeda, Takafumi; Murayama, Toshinori; Teramukai, Satoshi; Katsura, Toshiya; Matsubara, Kazuo; Kawakami, Koji; Yokode, Masayuki; Shimizu, Akira; Sakata, Ryuzo

    2016-05-01

    As a form of therapeutic angiogenesis, we sought to investigate the safety and efficacy of a sustained-release system of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) using biodegradable gelatin hydrogel in patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI). We conducted a phase I-IIa study that analyzed 10 CLI patients following a 200-μg intramuscular injection of bFGF-incorporated gelatin hydrogel microspheres into the ischemic limb. Primary endpoints were safety and transcutaneous oxygen pressure (TcO2) at 4 and 24 weeks after treatment. During the follow-up, there was no death or serious procedure-related adverse event. After 24 weeks, TcO2 (28.4 ± 8.4 vs. 46.2 ± 13.0 mmHg for pretreatment vs after 24 weeks, p < 0.01) showed significant improvement. Regarding secondary endpoints, the distance walked in 6 min (255 ± 105 vs. 318 ± 127 m, p = 0.02), the Rutherford classification (4.4 ± 0.5 vs. 3.1 ± 1.4, p = 0.02), the rest pain scale (1.7 ± 1.0 vs. 1.2 ± 1.3, p = 0.03), and the cyanotic scale (2.0 ± 1.1 vs. 0.9 ± 0.9, p < 0.01) also showed improvement. The blood levels of bFGF were within the normal range in all patients. A subanalysis of patients with arteriosclerosis obliterans (n = 7) or thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) (n = 3) revealed that TcO2 had significantly improved in both subgroups. TcO2 did not differ between patients with or without chronic kidney disease. The sustained release of bFGF from biodegradable gelatin hydrogel may offer a safe and effective form of angiogenesis for patients with CLI. PMID:25861983

  9. Novel collagen/gelatin scaffold with sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor: clinical trial for chronic skin ulcers.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Naoki; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Niimi, Miyuki; Ito, Tatsuya; Aya, Rino; Fujitaka, Junpei; Tada, Harue; Teramukai, Satoshi; Murayama, Toshinori; Toyooka, Chikako; Miura, Kazumi; Takemoto, Satoru; Kanda, Norikazu; Kawai, Katsuya; Yokode, Masayuki; Shimizu, Akira; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2013-09-01

    Chronic skin ulcers such as diabetic ulcers and venous leg ulcers are increasing and are a costly problem in healthcare. We have developed a novel artificial dermis, collagen/gelatin sponge (CGS), which is capable of sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) for more than 10 days. The objective of this study was to investigate the safety and efficacy of CGS impregnated with bFGF in the treatment of chronic skin ulcers. Patients with chronic skin ulcers that had not healed in at least 4 weeks were treated with CGS impregnated with bFGF at 7 or 14 μg/cm(2) after debridement, and the wound bed improvement was assessed 14 days after application. Wound bed improvement was defined as a granulated and epithelialized area on day 14 with a proportion to the baseline wound area after debridement of 50% or higher. The wound area, the wound area on day 14, and the granulation area on day 14 were independently measured by blinded reviewers in a central review using digital images of wounds taken with a calibrator. Patients were followed up until 28 days after application to observe the adverse reactions related to the application of CGS. From May 2010 to June 2011, 17 patients were enrolled and, in 16 patients, the wound bed improved. Among the randomized patients in step 2, no significant difference was seen between the low-dose group and the high-dose group. No serious adverse reactions were observed. Adverse reactions with a clear causal relationship to the study treatment were mild and patients quickly recovered from them. This study is the first-in-man clinical trial of CGS and showed the safety and efficacy of CGS impregnated with bFGF in the treatment of chronic skin ulcers. This combination therapy could be a promising therapy for chronic skin ulcers. PMID:23541061

  10. Effects of rat growth hormone (rGH)-releasing factor and somatostatin on the release and synthesis of rGH in dispersed pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fukata, J.; Diamond, D.J.; Martin, J.B.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of rat hypothalamic GH-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin (SRIF) on the release and biosynthesis of rat GH were studied by RIA and quantitative immunoprecipitation using monolayer cultures of rat anterior pituitary cells. In kinetic studies, GRF stimulation of GH release appeared at the first sampling time (20-min incubation) and the effect began to diminish after 2-h incubation with GRF. On the other hand, total (cell plus medium) content of GH significantly increased only after 24-h incubation. To examine the GH-synthesizing effect of GRF more directly, newly synthesized GH labeled by (TVS)methionine during incubation with GRF was quantified by immunoprecipitation. The amount of immunoprecipitable GH increased significantly and specifically also only after 24-h incubation. When GH pools were labeled with (TVS)methionine under different schedules, the basal release of newly synthesized GH, which was labeled for 1 h immediately before chase incubation was lower during the first 15 min than stored GH which had been labeled earlier. Basal newly synthesized GH secretion exceeded stored GH secretion after 30 min. In this system, SRIF suppressed both the basal and stimulated release of GH but did not modify GH biosynthesis under either condition. Newly synthesized GH showed significant degradation during 24-h incubation; neither GRF nor SRIF affected the rate of GH degradation during the same incubation period.

  11. In vitro study of the role of thrombin in platelet rich plasma (PRP) preparation: utility for gel formation and impact in growth factors release

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Stephany Cares; Cunha Júnior, José Luiz Rosenberis; Montalvão, Silmara; da Silva, Letícia Queiroz; Paffaro, Aline Urban; da Silva, Francesca Aparecida Ramos; Rodrigues, Bruno Lima; Lana, José Fabio Santos Duarte; Annichino-Bizzacchi, Joyce Maria

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The use of PRP has been studied for different fields, with promising results in regenerative medicine. Until now, there is no study in the literature evaluating thrombin levels in serum, used as autologous thrombin preparation. Therefore, in the present study we evaluated the role played by different thrombin concentrations in PRP and the impact in the release of growth factors. Also, different activators for PRP gel formation were evaluated. Methods: Thrombin levels were measured in different autologous preparations: serum, L-PRP (PRP rich in leukocytes) and T-PRP (thrombin produced through PRP added calcium gluconate). L-PRP was prepared according to the literature, with platelets and leukocytes being quantified. The effect of autologous thrombin associated or not with calcium in PRP gel was determined by measuring the time of gel formation. The relationship between thrombin concentration and release of growth factors was determined by growth factors (PDGF-AA, VEGF and EGF) multiplex analysis. Results: A similar concentration of thrombin was observed in serum, L-PRP and T-PRP (8.13 nM, 8.63 nM and 7.56 nM, respectively) with a high variation between individuals (CV%: 35.07, 43 and 58.42, respectively). T-PRP and serum with calcium chloride showed similar results in time to promote gel formation. The increase of thrombin concentrations (2.66, 8 and 24 nM) did not promote an increase in growth factor release. Conclusions: The technique of using serum as a thrombin source proved to be the most efficient and reproducible for promoting PRP gel formation, with some advantages when compared to other activation methods, as this technique is easier and quicker with no need of consuming part of PRP. Noteworthy, PRP activation using different thrombin concentrations did not promote a higher release of growth factors, appearing not to be necessary when PRP is used as a suspension. PMID:27397996

  12. Chronic Ethanol consumption modulates growth factor release, mucosal cytokine production and microRNA expression in nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Asquith, Mark; Pasala, Sumana; Engelmann, Flora; Haberthur, Kristen; Meyer, Christine; Park, Byung; Grant, Kathleen A.; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic alcohol consumption has been associated with enhanced susceptibility to both systemic and mucosal infections. However, the exact mechanisms underlying this enhanced susceptibility remain incompletely understood. METHODS Using a nonhuman primate model of ethanol self-administration, we examined the impact of chronic alcohol exposure on immune homeostasis, cytokine and growth factor production in peripheral blood, lung and intestinal mucosa following twelve months of chronic ethanol exposure. RESULTS Ethanol exposure inhibited activation-induced production of growth factors HGF, G-CSF and VEGF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Moreover, ethanol significantly reduced the frequency of colonic Th1 and Th17 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, we did not observe differences in lymphocyte frequency or soluble factor production in the lung of ethanol-consuming animals. To uncover mechanisms underlying reduced growth factor and Th1/Th17 cytokine production, we compared expression levels of microRNAs in PBMC and intestinal mucosa. Our analysis revealed ethanol-dependent upregulation of distinct microRNAs in affected tissues (miR-181a and miR-221 in PBMC; miR-155 in colon). Moreover, we were able to detect reduced expression of the transcription factors STAT3 and ARNT, which regulate expression of VEGF, G-CSF and HGF and contain targets for these microRNAs. To confirm and extend these observations, PBMC were transfected with either mimics or antagomirs of miR181 and 221and protein levels of the transcription factors and growth factors were determined. Transfection of microRNA mimics led to a reduction in both STAT-3/ARNT as well as VEGF/HGF/G-CSF levels. The opposite outcome was observed when microRNA antagomirs were transfected CONCLUSION Chronic ethanol consumption significantly disrupts both peripheral and mucosal immune homeostasis, and this dysregulation may be mediated by changes in microRNA expression. PMID:24329418

  13. Evaluation of skeletal tissue repair, part 1: assessment of novel growth-factor-releasing hydrogels in an ex vivo chick femur defect model.

    PubMed

    Smith, E L; Kanczler, J M; Gothard, D; Roberts, C A; Wells, J A; White, L J; Qutachi, O; Sawkins, M J; Peto, H; Rashidi, H; Rojo, L; Stevens, M M; El Haj, A J; Rose, F R A J; Shakesheff, K M; Oreffo, R O C

    2014-10-01

    Current clinical treatments for skeletal conditions resulting in large-scale bone loss include autograft or allograft, both of which have limited effectiveness. In seeking to address bone regeneration, several tissue engineering strategies have come to the fore, including the development of growth factor releasing technologies and appropriate animal models to evaluate repair. Ex vivo models represent a promising alternative to simple in vitro systems or complex, ethically challenging in vivo models. We have developed an ex vivo culture system of whole embryonic chick femora, adapted in this study as a critical size defect model to investigate the effects of novel bone extracellular matrix (bECM) hydrogel scaffolds containing spatio-temporal growth factor-releasing microparticles and skeletal stem cells on bone regeneration, to develop a viable alternative treatment for skeletal degeneration. Alginate/bECM hydrogels combined with poly (d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PDLLGA)/triblock copolymer (10-30% PDLLGA-PEG-PDLLGA) microparticles releasing VEGF, TGF-β3 or BMP-2 were placed, with human adult Stro-1+ bone marrow stromal cells, into 2mm central segmental defects in embryonic chick femurs. Alginate/bECM hydrogels loaded with HSA/VEGF or HSA/TGF-β3 demonstrated a cartilage-like phenotype, with minimal collagen I deposition, comparable to HSA-only control hydrogels. The addition of BMP-2 releasing microparticles resulted in enhanced structured bone matrix formation, evidenced by increased Sirius red-stained matrix and collagen expression within hydrogels. This study demonstrates delivery of bioactive growth factors from a novel alginate/bECM hydrogel to augment skeletal tissue formation and the use of an organotypic chick femur defect culture system as a high-throughput test model for scaffold/cell/growth factor therapies for regenerative medicine. PMID:24937137

  14. Glioblastoma-derived Macrophage Colony-stimulating Factor (MCSF) Induces Microglial Release of Insulin-like Growth Factor-binding Protein 1 (IGFBP1) to Promote Angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Nijaguna, Mamatha Bangalore; Patil, Vikas; Urbach, Serge; Shwetha, Shivayogi D; Sravani, Kotha; Hegde, Alangar S; Chandramouli, Bangalore A; Arivazhagan, Arimappamagan; Marin, Philippe; Santosh, Vani; Somasundaram, Kumaravel

    2015-09-18

    Glioblastoma (grade IV glioma/GBM) is the most common primary adult malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis. To characterize molecular determinants of tumor-stroma interaction in GBM, we profiled 48 serum cytokines and identified macrophage colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) as one of the elevated cytokines in sera from GBM patients. Both MCSF transcript and protein were up-regulated in GBM tissue samples through a spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK)-dependent activation of the PI3K-NFκB pathway. Ectopic overexpression and silencing experiments revealed that glioma-secreted MCSF has no role in autocrine functions and M2 polarization of macrophages. In contrast, silencing expression of MCSF in glioma cells prevented tube formation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells elicited by the supernatant from monocytes/microglial cells treated with conditioned medium from glioma cells. Quantitative proteomics based on stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture showed that glioma-derived MCSF induces changes in microglial secretome and identified insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 1 (IGFBP1) as one of the MCSF-regulated proteins secreted by microglia. Silencing IGFBP1 expression in microglial cells or its neutralization by an antibody reduced the ability of supernatants derived from microglial cells treated with glioma cell-conditioned medium to induce angiogenesis. In conclusion, this study shows up-regulation of MCSF in GBM via a SYK-PI3K-NFκB-dependent mechanism and identifies IGFBP1 released by microglial cells as a novel mediator of MCSF-induced angiogenesis, of potential interest for developing targeted therapy to prevent GBM progression. PMID:26245897

  15. Shear stress-induced release of basic fibroblast growth factor from endothelial cells is mediated by matrix interaction via integrin alpha(v)beta3.

    PubMed

    Gloe, Torsten; Sohn, Hae Young; Meininger, Gerald A; Pohl, Ulrich

    2002-06-28

    Considering that chronic elevation of shear stress results in remodeling of the vasculature, we analyzed whether mechanical load could mediate basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) release and whether bFGF would act as mediator of shear stress-induced endothelial proliferation and differentiation. Supernatant media of shear stress-exposed endothelial cells (EC) contained significantly higher amounts of bFGF than medium from static cells. Released bFGF was fully intact with regard to its function as an inductor of proliferation and differentiation. Shear stress-conditioned media induced capillary-like structure formation, whereas static control medium did not. Likewise, only shear stress-conditioned medium induced proliferation of serum starved EC. Both capillary-like structure formation and proliferation could be inhibited by neutralization of bFGF or its receptor. The release of bFGF was subject to specific, integrin-mediated control, since inhibition of alpha(v)beta(3) integrin prevented it, whereas inhibition of alpha(5)beta(1) integrin had no effect. We conclude that shear stress induces the release of bFGF from EC in a tightly controlled manner. The release is dependent on specific cell-matrix interactions via alpha(v)beta(3) integrins. The effects on cell proliferation and differentiation suggest that release of bFGF is functionally significant and may represent a necessary initial step in adaptive remodeling processes induced by shear stress. PMID:11976347

  16. Hormonal regulation of rat hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNAs: effect of hypophysectomy and hormone replacement on growth-hormone-releasing factor, somatostatin and the insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wood, T L; Berelowitz, M; Gelato, M C; Roberts, C T; LeRoith, D; Millard, W J; McKelvy, J F

    1991-03-01

    Hormonal feedback regulation of hypothalamic peptides putatively involved in growth hormone (GH) regulation has been studied by measurement of steady-state mRNA levels in male hypophysectomized rats with or without thyroid hormone, corticosterone, testosterone or GH replacement. Hypothalamic GH-releasing factor (GRF) mRNA levels increased progressively following hypophysectomy to 420% of sham levels after 15 days while hypothalamic insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA levels decreased to less than 40% of sham levels. Whole hypothalamic somatostatin mRNA levels were not significantly different from sham. One week of continuous GH infusion restored hypothalamic IGF-I mRNA to levels (95%) indistinguishable from those in sham-operated controls but had no effect on either IGF-II or GRF mRNA. Thyroid hormone, corticosterone and testosterone treatment without GH had no effect on the hypophysectomy-induced reduction of either IGF-I or IGF-II mRNA levels but reversed the elevation of GRF mRNA. We conclude that hypothalamic IGF-I may be involved in GH feedback regulation and thus may function as a hypothalamic modulator of GH. In contrast, IGF-II may be regulated by one of the pituitary trophic hormones but not by GH or the target hormones tested. Finally, hypothalamic GRF mRNA regulation appears to be complex and may include target hormone feedback. PMID:1674982

  17. Repair of osteochondral defects with adipose stem cells and a dual growth factor-releasing scaffold in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il; Lee, Jin Ho

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the in vivo effectiveness of a TGF-beta(2) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-7-immobilized porous polycaprolactone (PCL)/F127 scaffold to enhance the healing of cartilage defect. An osteochondral defect was created on the patellar groove of the right distal femur of 12 rabbits and managed by one of the following methods: filling it with the scaffold only (Group I); the scaffold seeded with adipose stem cells (ASCs) (Group II); a TGF-beta(2) and BMP-7-immobilized scaffold (Group III); and a TGF-beta(2) and BMP-7-immobilized scaffold seeded with ASCs (Group IV). Each group had three rabbits. Nine weeks after the implantation, the implanted scaffolds were filled with yellowish, dense tissue, and had distinct margins with adjacent normal cartilage. The histological findings showed infiltration of foreign-body giant cells and blood vessel, more prominently in Groups III and IV. The presence of growth factor significantly increased the ICRS Macroscopic Score (p = 0.045) while the presence of ASC did not. The ICRS Visual Histological Score was not significantly affected by the presence of either growth factors or ASCs, showing similar values in all groups. In conclusion, the use of TGF-beta(2) and BMP-7-immobilized PCL/F127 scaffolds improved gross appearances of the osteochondral defects while not actually leading to better histological results and induced a greater degree of foreign body reaction. PMID:19957354

  18. Cells transformed by murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) release compounds with transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity resembling growth factors.

    PubMed

    Šupolíková, M; Staňová, A Vojs; Kúdelová, M; Marák, J; Zelník, V; Golais, F

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the medium of three cell lines transformed with murine herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) in vitro and in vivo, 68/HDF, 68/NIH3T3, and S11E, for the presence of compounds resembling growth factors of some herpesviruses which have displayed transforming and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in normal and tumor cells. When any of spent medium was added to cell culture we observed the onset of transformed phenotype in baby hamster kidney cells (BHK-21) cells and transformed phenotype suppressing activity in tumor human epithelial cells (HeLa). In media tested, we have identified the presence of putative growth factor related to MHV-68 (MHGF-68). Its bivalent properties have been blocked entirely by antisera against MHV-68 and two monoclonal antibodies against glycoprotein B (gB) of MHV-68 suggesting viral origin of MHGF-68. The results of initial efforts to separate MHGF-68 on FPLC Sephadex G15 column in the absence of salts revealed the loss of its transforming activity but transformed phenotype suppressing activity retained. On the other hand, the use of methanol-water mobile phase on RP-HPLC C18 column allowed separation of MHGF-68 to two compounds. Both separated fractions, had only the transforming activity to normal cells. Further experiments exploring the nature and the structure of hitherto unknown MHGF-68 are now in the progress to characterize its molecular and biological properties. PMID:26666191

  19. In vitro stress effect on degradation and drug release behaviors of basic fibroblast growth factor – poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Yan; Yu, Zeping; Lang, Yun; Hu, Juanyu; Li, Hong; Yan, Yonggang; Tu, Chongqi; Yang, Tianfu; Song, Yueming; Duan, Hong; Pei, Fuxing

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the degradation and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) release activity of bFGF – poly(lactic-co-glycolic-acid) microsphere (bFGF-PLGA MS) under stress in vitro, including the static pressure and shearing force-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. Method First, bFGF-PLGA MSs were created. Meanwhile, two self-made experimental instruments (static pressure and shearing force loading instruments) were initially explored to provide stress-simulating mechanical environment of the joint cavity. Then, bFGF-PLGA MSs were loaded into the two instruments respectively, to study microsphere degradation and drug release experiments. In the static pressure loading experiment, normal atmospheric pressure loading (approximately 0.1 MPa), 0.35 MPa, and 4.0 MPa pressure loading and shaking flask oscillation groups were designed to study bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and bFGF release. In the shearing force loading experiment, a pulsating pump was used to give the experimental group an output of 1,000 mL/min and the control group an output of 10 mL/min to carry out bFGF-PLGA MS degradation and drug release experiments. Changes of bFGF-PLGA MSs, including microsphere morphology, quality, weight-average molecular weight of polymer, and microsphere degradation and bFGF release, were analyzed respectively. Results In the static pressure loading experiment, bFGF-PLGA MSs at different pressure were stable initially. The trend of molecular weight change, quality loss, and bFGF release was consistent. Meanwhile, microsphere degradation and bFGF release rates in the 4.0 MPa pressure loading group were faster than those in the normal and 0.35 MPa pressure loading groups. It was the fastest in the shaking flask group, showing a statistically significant difference (P<0.0001). In the shearing force loading experiment, there were no distinctive differences in the rates of microsphere degradation and bFGF release between experimental and control group. Meanwhile

  20. Long-term depression of glutamate-induced gamma-aminobutyric acid release in cerebellum by insulin-like growth factor I.

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Alamancos, M A; Torres-Aleman, I

    1993-01-01

    We tested the possibility that insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) acts as a neuromodulator in the adult cerebellar cortex since previous observations indicated that IGF-I is located in the olivo-cerebellar system encompassing the inferior olive and Purkinje cells. We found that conjoint administration of IGF-I and glutamate through a microdialysis probe stereotaxically implanted into the cerebellar cortex and deep cerebellar nuclei greatly depressed the release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), which normally follows a glutamate pulse. This inhibition was dose-dependent and long-lasting. Moreover, the effect was specific for glutamate since KCl-induced GABA release was not modified by IGF-I. Basic fibroblast growth factor, another growth-related peptide present in the cerebellum, did not alter the response of GABA to glutamate stimulation. In addition, electrical stimulation of the inferior olivary complex significantly raised IGF-I levels in the cerebellar cortex. Interestingly, when the inferior olive was stimulated in conjunction with glutamate administration, GABA release by cerebellar cells in response to subsequent glutamate pulses was depressed in a manner reminiscent of that seen after IGF-I. These findings indicate that IGF-I produces a long-lasting depression of GABA release by Purkinje cells in response to glutamate. IGF-I might be present in climbing fiber terminals and/or cells within the cerebellar cortex and thereby might affect Purkinje cell function. Whether this IGF-I-induced impairment of glutamate stimulation of Purkinje cells underlies functionally plastic processes such as long-term depression is open to question. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8346260

  1. Nerve growth factor alters microtubule targeting agent-induced neurotransmitter release but not MTA-induced neurite retraction in sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Pittman, Sherry K; Gracias, Neilia G; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of anticancer treatment with the microtubule-targeted agents (MTAs), paclitaxel and epothilone B (EpoB); however, the mechanisms by which the MTAs alter neuronal function and morphology are unknown. We previously demonstrated that paclitaxel alters neuronal sensitivity, in vitro, in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). Evidence in the literature suggests that NGF may modulate the neurotoxic effects of paclitaxel. Here, we examine whether NGF modulates changes in neuronal sensitivity and morphology induced by paclitaxel and EpoB. Neuronal sensitivity was assessed using the stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), whereas morphology of established neurites was evaluated using a high content screening system. Dorsal root ganglion cultures, maintained in the absence or presence of NGF, were treated from day 7 to day 12 in culture with paclitaxel (300nM) or EpoB (30nM). Following treatment, the release of CGRP was stimulated using capsaicin or high extracellular potassium. In the presence of NGF, EpoB mimicked the effects of paclitaxel: capsaicin-stimulated release was attenuated, potassium-stimulated release was slightly enhanced and the total peptide content was unchanged. In the absence of NGF, both paclitaxel and EpoB decreased capsaicin- and potassium-stimulated release and the total peptide content, suggesting that NGF may reverse MTA-induced hyposensitivity. Paclitaxel and EpoB both decreased neurite length and branching, and this attenuation was unaffected by NGF in the growth media. These differential effects of NGF on neuronal sensitivity and morphology suggest that neurite retraction is not a causative factor to alter neuronal sensitivity. PMID:26883566

  2. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) Multilayer Membrane as a Sustained Releasing Growth Factor Delivery System for rhTGF-β3 in Articular Cartilage Repair.

    PubMed

    Yang, Soon Sim; Jin, Long Hao; Park, Sang-Hyug; Kim, Moon Suk; Kim, Young Jick; Choi, Byung Hyune; Lee, Chun Tek; Park, So Ra; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human transforming growth factor beta-3 (rhTGF-β3) is a key regulator of chondrogenesis in stem cells and cartilage formation. We have developed a novel drug delivery system that continuously releases rhTGF-β3 using a multilayered extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane. We hypothesize that the sustained release of rhTGF-β3 could activate stem cells and result in enhanced repair of cartilage defects. The properties and efficacy of the ECM multilayer-based delivery system (EMLDS) are investigated using rhTGF-β3 as a candidate drug. The bioactivity of the released rhTGF-ß3 was evaluated through chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using western blot and circular dichroism (CD) analyses in vitro. The cartilage reparability was evaluated through implanting EMLDS with endogenous and exogenous MSC in both in vivo and ex vivo models, respectively. In the results, the sustained release of rhTGF-ß3 was clearly observed over a prolonged period of time in vitro and the released rhTGF-β3 maintained its structural stability and biological activity. Successful cartilage repair was also demonstrated when rabbit MSCs were treated with rhTGF-β3-loaded EMLDS ((+) rhTGF-β3 EMLDS) in an in vivo model and when rabbit chondrocytes and MSCs were treated in ex vivo models. Therefore, the multilayer ECM membrane could be a useful drug delivery system for cartilage repair. PMID:27258120

  3. Extracellular Matrix (ECM) Multilayer Membrane as a Sustained Releasing Growth Factor Delivery System for rhTGF-β3 in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Hyug; Kim, Moon Suk; Kim, Young Jick; Choi, Byung Hyune; Lee, Chun Tek; Park, So Ra; Min, Byoung-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant human transforming growth factor beta-3 (rhTGF-β3) is a key regulator of chondrogenesis in stem cells and cartilage formation. We have developed a novel drug delivery system that continuously releases rhTGF-β3 using a multilayered extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane. We hypothesize that the sustained release of rhTGF-β3 could activate stem cells and result in enhanced repair of cartilage defects. The properties and efficacy of the ECM multilayer-based delivery system (EMLDS) are investigated using rhTGF-β3 as a candidate drug. The bioactivity of the released rhTGF-ß3 was evaluated through chondrogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) using western blot and circular dichroism (CD) analyses in vitro. The cartilage reparability was evaluated through implanting EMLDS with endogenous and exogenous MSC in both in vivo and ex vivo models, respectively. In the results, the sustained release of rhTGF-ß3 was clearly observed over a prolonged period of time in vitro and the released rhTGF-β3 maintained its structural stability and biological activity. Successful cartilage repair was also demonstrated when rabbit MSCs were treated with rhTGF-β3-loaded EMLDS ((+) rhTGF-β3 EMLDS) in an in vivo model and when rabbit chondrocytes and MSCs were treated in ex vivo models. Therefore, the multilayer ECM membrane could be a useful drug delivery system for cartilage repair. PMID:27258120

  4. Interaction of growth hormone-releasing hormone with the insulin-like growth-factors during prenatal development in the rat.

    PubMed

    Spatola, E; Pescovitz, O H; Marsh, K; Johnson, N B; Berry, S A; Gelato, M C

    1991-09-01

    The placenta is a chimeric organ that produces all the components of the hypothalamic-pituitary GH axis. We propose that placental GH-releasing hormone (GHRH) stimulates placental GH-like hormones which in turn stimulate production of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), IGF-I and IGF-II, and these placental IGFs are important for growth and development of the placenta as well as the fetus. To test this hypothesis, pregnant rats were given either GHRH antisera or preimmune sera ip from days 7-19 of gestation. Fetuses were killed on day 19, and IGF-I and IGF-II tissue and serum concentrations in the mother and fetus were measured by RIA. IGF-II receptor content was measured by Western analysis. IGF-I and IGF-II messenger (m) RNA levels were measured in the placentas as well as in the fetal livers. The GHRH antibody titer was highest at day 19 of gestation but continued to be present through day 20 of postnatal development. Although placental weights did not differ, antibody-treated animals had higher placental IGF-I and IGF-II levels (I, 108 +/- 6 (SD); II, 126 +/- 5 ng/g, respectively) vs. control animals (I, 88 +/- 2.5 (SD); II, 48 +/- 11 ng/g) in pooled specimens. The IGF-II receptor was also up-regulated in placentas from antibody-treated mothers. The fetuses of antibody-treated (A) mothers were larger than the controls (C) (A, 2.615 g; C, 2.49 g, P less than 0.05). Levels of both IGFs were significantly increased in livers of antibody treated fetuses (IGF-I: A, 15 +/- 1 (SD); C, 12 +/- 0.8 ng/g; and IGF-II: A, 295 +/- 10 (SD); C, 233 +/- 10 (SD) ng/g). In addition, the concentration of the IGF-II receptor in liver of antibody-treated fetuses was also increased. Further, pooled fetal sera from antibody-treated fetuses had higher levels of IGF-II than controls (A, 950 ng/ml; C, 700 ng/ml), and the circulating IGF-II receptor was increased as measured by Western analysis. In the liver, IGF-II mRNA levels of antibody-treated fetuses were increased to 117% of

  5. Prostaglandin E2 requirement for transforming growth factor beta 1 inhibition of elicited macrophage 14 kDa phospholipase A2 release.

    PubMed Central

    McCord, M.; Bolognese, B.; Marshall, L. A.

    1995-01-01

    1. Cultured elicited-peritoneal macrophages release a soluble type II 14 kDa phospholipase A2 (PLA2) over time, reaching a plateau by 20-24 h of incubation and maintaining these levels over 72 h. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is also produced but does not plateau until 48-72 h. 2. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta 1) reduces cellular 14 kDa PLA2 and its subsequent release by approximately half, but does not alter PGE2 production. Co-incubation of TGF beta 1 with indomethacin interfered, in a concentration-dependent manner, with the ability of TGF beta 1 to reduce cellular 14 kDa PLA2 and its subsequent release over 24 h. The regulation of TGF beta 1 was not specific to indomethacin since other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs had the same effect. This suggested that cyclooxygenase activity was essential for TGF beta 1 to exert its effect and indeed, the addition of exogenous PGE2 restored the TGF beta 1 action. 3. PGE2 alone exerted a concentration-dependent negative feedback action on elicited-macrophage 14 kDa PLA2 release. The inhibitory concentration (IC50 = approximately 180 ng PGE2 ml-1) approximated the PGE2 levels measured in the 24 h macrophage conditioned media (85-140 ng PGE2 ml-1) where PLA2 release began to plateau. Further, incubation of cells with indomethacin over 48 h resulted in the enhancement of 14 kDa PLA2 activity compared to that released from untreated cells. Forskolin failed to inhibit 14 kDa PLA2 release, suggesting PGE2 was not acting through an increase in adenylate cyclase. 4. Taken together, the data are consistent with the immunosuppressive aspects reported for both mediators during inflammation and demonstrates the requirement of PGE2 for TGF beta 1 action on the elicited macrophage. Images Figure 3 PMID:8590973

  6. An in vivo study on the effect of scaffold geometry and growth factor release on the healing of bone defects.

    PubMed

    Yilgor, P; Yilmaz, G; Onal, M B; Solmaz, I; Gundogdu, S; Keskil, S; Sousa, R A; Reis, R L; Hasirci, N; Hasirci, V

    2013-09-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that the extent of bone regeneration could be enhanced by using scaffolds with appropriate geometry, and that such an effect could be further increased by mimicking the natural timing of appearance of bone morphogenetic proteins BMP-2 and BMP-7 after fracture. Bioplotted poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) disks with four different fibre organizations were used to study the effect of 3D scaffold architecture on the healing of bone defects in a rat pelvis model. Moreover, one PCL construct was further modified by introducing a nanoparticulate sequential BMP-2/BMP-7 delivery system into this scaffold. Scaffolds and functionalized construct along with free nanocapsules were implanted using a rat iliac crest defect model. Six weeks post-implantation, the defects were evaluated by CT scan and histology. Analysis revealed that the basic architecture, having the highest pore volume for tissue ingrowth, presented the highest bone formation as determined by the bone mineral density (BMD) within the defect (144.2 ± 7.1); about four-fold higher than that of the empty defect (34.9 ± 10.7). It also showed the highest histological analysis scores with a high amount of bone formation within the defect, within the scaffold pores and along the outer surfaces of the scaffold. The basic scaffold carrying the BMP-2/BMP-7 delivery system showed significantly higher bone formation than the growth factor-free basic scaffold at 6 weeks (BMD 206.8 ± 15.7). Histological analysis also revealed new bone formation in close to or in direct contact with the construct interface. This study indicates the importance of open and interconnecting pore geometry on the better healing of bone defects, and that this effect could be further increased by supplying growth factors, as is the case in nature. PMID:22396311

  7. Bradykinin and nerve growth factor release the capsaicin receptor from PtdIns(4,5)P2-mediated inhibition.

    PubMed

    Chuang, H H; Prescott, E D; Kong, H; Shields, S; Jordt, S E; Basbaum, A I; Chao, M V; Julius, D

    2001-06-21

    Tissue injury generates endogenous factors that heighten our sense of pain by increasing the response of sensory nerve endings to noxious stimuli. Bradykinin and nerve growth factor (NGF) are two such pro-algesic agents that activate G-protein-coupled (BK2) and tyrosine kinase (TrkA) receptors, respectively, to stimulate phospholipase C (PLC) signalling pathways in primary afferent neurons. How these actions produce sensitization to physical or chemical stimuli has not been elucidated at the molecular level. Here, we show that bradykinin- or NGF-mediated potentiation of thermal sensitivity in vivo requires expression of VR1, a heat-activated ion channel on sensory neurons. Diminution of plasma membrane phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2) levels through antibody sequestration or PLC-mediated hydrolysis mimics the potentiating effects of bradykinin or NGF at the cellular level. Moreover, recruitment of PLC-gamma to TrkA is essential for NGF-mediated potentiation of channel activity, and biochemical studies suggest that VR1 associates with this complex. These studies delineate a biochemical mechanism through which bradykinin and NGF produce hypersensitivity and might explain how the activation of PLC signalling systems regulates other members of the TRP channel family. PMID:11418861

  8. A conjugate composed of nerve growth factor coupled to a non-toxic derivative of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A can inhibit neurotransmitter release in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chaddock, J A; Purkiss, J R; Duggan, M J; Quinn, C P; Shone, C C; Foster, K A

    2000-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor binding, internalisation and transportation of NGF has been identified as a potential route of delivery for other molecules. A derivative of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin type A (LHN) that retains catalytic activity but has significantly reduced cell-binding capability has been prepared and chemically coupled to NGF. Intact clostridial neurotoxins potently inhibit neurotransmitter release at the neuromuscular junction by proteolysis of specific components of the vesicle docking/fusion complex. Here we report that the NGF-LHN/A conjugate, when applied to PC12 cells, significantly inhibited neurotransmitter release and cleaved the type A toxin substrate. This work represents the successful use of NGF as a targeting moiety for the delivery of a neurotoxin fragment. PMID:11019785

  9. Antigen-mediated release of eosinophil growth stimulating factor from Trichinella spiralis sensitized spleen cells: a comparison of T. spiralis stage-specific antigen preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Bartelmez, S H; Dodge, W H; Bass, D A

    1982-01-01

    When non-adherent, Trichinella spiralis-sensitized mouse spleen cells were challenged in vitro with T. spiralis antigens, an eosinophil growth factor (Eo-GSF) was released into the culture medium. This factor was assayed by its ability to initiate eosinophil production in liquid cultures of syngeneic, non-adherent marrow cells obtained from unsensitized mice. Extracts of each parasite stage as well as excretory-secretory (ES) products of adult and muscle larva stages were compared for their ability to stimulate spleen cells to release Eo-GSF. All stages and ES products had this ability but most of the preparations had unique dose-optima and there was a very wide range with regard to the optimum dose (in microgram protein/ml): (i) preadult stage, 1 x 10(-5); (ii) muscle stage ES products, 1 x 10(-3); (iii) muscle stage, 1 x 10(-2); (iv) adult stage, 1 x 10(-2); (v) adult ES products, 1 x 10(-1); and (vi) newborn stage, 1.0. When the Eo-GSF-containing conditioned media derived from spleen cell cultures exposed to the optimum dosages were tested on the same population of marrow cells, three potency groups were identified. The rank order of potency was: muscle stage ES products greater than preadult, newborn and adult stages greater than muscles stage and adult ES products. Preliminary experiments revealed that this ranking was not maintained with regard to the release of neutrophil and macrophage growth factors by these preparations. PMID:6175563

  10. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a novel collagen/cellulose nanocrystals scaffold for achieving the sustained release of basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Weichang; Lan, Yong; Guo, Rui; Zhang, Yi; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Yuanming

    2015-01-01

    Tissue-engineered dermis is thought to be the best treatment for skin defects; however, slow vascularization of these biomaterial scaffolds limits their clinical application. Exogenous administration of angiogenic growth factors is highly desirable for tissue regeneration. In this study, biodegradable gelatin microspheres (GMs) containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were fabricated and incorporated into a porous collagen/cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) scaffold, as a platform for long-term release and consequent angiogenic boosting. The physicochemical properties of these scaffolds were examined and the in vitro release pattern of bFGF from scaffolds was measured by ELISA. Collagen/CNCs scaffolds with and without bFGF-GMs were incubated with human umbilical vein endothelial cells for 1 week, results showed that the scaffolds with bFGF-GMs significantly augmented cell proliferation. Then, four different groups of scaffolds were implanted subcutaneously into Sprague-Dawley rats to study angiogenesis in vivo via macroscopic observation, and hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical staining. The results suggested that the collagen/CNCs/bFGF-GMs scaffolds had a significantly higher number of newly formed and mature blood vessels, and the fastest degradation rate. This study demonstrated that collagen/CNCs/bFGF-GMs scaffolds have great potential in skin tissue engineering. PMID:25114196

  11. Novel epidermal growth factor receptor pathway mediates release of human β-defensin 3 from Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Jibran S; Zaidi, Syed F; Zhou, Yue; Sakurai, Hiroaki; Sugiyama, Toshiro

    2016-04-01

    Persistent Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in hostile gastric mucosa can result in gastric diseases. Helicobacter pylori induces to express antimicrobial peptides from gastric epithelial cells, especially human β-defensin 3 (hBD3), as an innate immune response, and this expression of hBD3 is mediated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. In this study, we found that phosphorylation of a serine residue of EGFR via transforming growth factor β-activated kinase-1 (TAK1), and subsequent p38α activation is essential for H. pylori-induced hBD3 release from gastric epithelial cells. We showed that this pathway was dependent on H. pylori type IV secretion system and was independent of H. pylori-derived CagA or peptidoglycan. H. pylori infection induced phosphorylation of serine residue of EGFR, and this phosphorylation was followed by internalization of EGFR; consequently, hBD3 was released at an early phase of the infection. In the presence of TAK1 or p38α inhibitors, synthesis of hBD3 was completely inhibited. Similar results were observed in EGFR-, TAK1- or p38α-knockdown cells. However, NOD1 knockdown in gastric epithelial cells did not inhibit hBD3 induction. Our study has firstly demonstrated that this novel EGFR activating pathway functioned to induce hBD3 at an early phase of H. pylori infection. PMID:26733497

  12. Pharmacologically active microcarriers associated with thermosensitive hydrogel as a growth factor releasing biomimetic 3D scaffold for cardiac tissue-engineering.

    PubMed

    Karam, Jean-Pierre; Muscari, Claudio; Sindji, Laurence; Bastiat, Guillaume; Bonafè, Francesca; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; Montero-Menei, N Claudia

    2014-10-28

    The challenge of tissue engineering of the infarcted heart is how to improve stem cell engraftment, survival, homing, and differentiation for myocardial repair. We here propose to integrate human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), a three-dimensional (3D) carrier of cells and growth factors, into an injectable hydrogel (HG), to obtain a system that stimulates the survival and/or differentiation of the grafted cells toward a cardiac phenotype. PAMs are biodegradable and non-cytotoxic poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres conveying cells on their 3D surface that deliver continuously and in a controlled manner a growth factor (GF) acting on the transported cells and on the microenvironment to improve engraftment. The choice of the appropriate GF and its protection during the formulation process and delivery are essential. In this study two GFs, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), have been encapsulated under a solid state in order to limit their interaction with the polymer and conserve their integrity. GF precipitation conditions and release profile from PAMs have been first investigated before combining them to ADSCs. The released IGF-1 and HGF induced the protein synthesis of cardiac differentiation markers GATA4, Nkx2.5, cTnI and CX43 after 1week in vitro. Moreover, the GFs accelerated cell cycle progression, as suggested by the increased expression of Cyclin D1 mRNA and the widespread distribution of Ki67 protein. Integrating PAMs within the thermosensitive P407 hydrogel increased their elastic properties but decreased the transcription of most cardiac markers. In contrast, CX43 expression increased in ADSC-PAM-GF complexes embedded within the hydrogel compared to the ADSCs cultured alone in the absence of P407. These results suggest that particulate scaffolds releasing HGF and IGF-1 may be beneficial for applications in tissue-engineering strategies for myocardial

  13. Combination of interferon-alpha and 5-fluorouracil inhibits endothelial cell growth directly and by regulation of angiogenic factors released by tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The combination therapy of interferon (IFN)-alpha and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) improved the prognosis of the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To determine the molecular mechanisms of the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects, we examined the direct anti-proliferative effects on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and indirect effects by regulating secretion of angiogenic factors from HCC cells. Methods The direct effects on HUVEC were examined by TUNEL, Annexin-V assays and cell cycles analysis. For analysis of the indirect effects, the apoptosis induced by the conditioned medium from HCC cell treated by IFN-alpha/5-FU and expression of angiogenic factors was examined. Results IFN-alpha and 5-FU alone had anti-proliferative properties on HUVEC and their combination significantly inhibited the growth (compared with control, 5-FU or IFN alone). TUNEL and Annexin-V assays showed no apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that IFN-alpha and 5-FU delayed cell cycle progression in HUVEC with S-phase accumulation. The conditioned medium from HuH-7 cells after treatment with IFN/5-FU significantly inhibited HUVEC growth and induced apoptosis, and contained high levels of angiopoietin (Ang)-1 and low levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and Ang-2. Knockdown of Ang-1 in HuH-7 cells abrogated the anti-proliferative effects on HUVEC while knockdown of Ang-2 partially rescue the cells. Conclusion These results suggested that IFN-alpha and 5-FU had direct growth inhibitory effects on endothelial cells, as well as anti-angiogenic effects through regulation of angiogenic factors released from HCC cells. Modulation of VEGF and Angs secretion by IFN-alpha and 5-FU may contribute to their anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor effects on HCC. PMID:19821965

  14. Acceleration of aneurysm healing by P(DLLA-co-TMC)-coated coils enabling the controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiujing; Gao, Yuyuan; Sun, Xinlin; Ji, Bin; Cui, Xubo; Liu, Yaqi; Zheng, Tao; Chen, Chengwei; Jiang, Xiaodan; Zhu, Aiping; Quan, Daping

    2014-08-01

    Since the introduction of the detachable coil in endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, the in-hospital mortality rate has been significantly decreased. Recurrence of the aneurysm remains the major drawback of using detachable coils. We prepared a bioactive coil coated with poly(d,l-lactide)-7co-(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (P(DLLA-co-TMC)), a novel copolymer for controlling the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Platinum coils were prepared by successive coating with cationic P(DLLA-co-TMC) and anionic heparin. Then, recombinant human VEGF-165 (rhVEGF) was immobilized by affinity binding to heparin. The morphological characteristics and sustained in vitro release of rhVEGF were examined using scanning electron microscopy and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. The efficacy of these novel coils modified by P(DLLA-co-TMC)/rhVEGF was tested using a common carotid artery aneurysm model in rats. Experimental aneurysms were embolized with unmodified, P(DLLA-co-TMC)/heparin-coated or P(DLLA-co-TMC)/rhVEGF-coated platinum coils (n = 18). The coils were removed on days 15, 30 and 90 after insertion, and the histological and immunohistochemical analysis of factor VIII was performed to confirm the presence of endothelial cells in the organized area. In addition, the controlled in vivo release of VEGF was confirmed by Western blotting analysis. The release of VEGF tended to increase during the whole period and no burst release was observed. In the group treated with P(DLLA-co-TMC)/rhVEGF-coated platinum coils, clot organization and endothelial cell proliferation were accelerated. The immunohistochemistry study showed that the expression of factor VIII was found in the P(DLLA-co-TMC)/rhVEGF-coated coil group but not in the other two groups. Furthermore, Western blotting analysis confirmed that the major released VEGF in the aneurysm sac was from the P(DLLA-co-TMC)/VEGF-coated coil. P(DLLA-co-TMC)/rhVEGF-coated platinum coils can

  15. Phospholipase C-delta extends intercellular signalling range and responses to injury-released growth factors in non-excitable cells

    PubMed Central

    Mi, L. Y.; Ettenson, D. S.; Edelman, E. R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives Intercellular communication in non-excitable cells is restricted to a limited range close to the signal source. Here, we have examined whether modification of the intracellular microenvironment could prolong the spatial proposition of signal generation and could increase cell proliferation. Material and methods Mathematical models and experimental studies of endothelial repair after controlled mechanical injury were used. The models predict the diffusion range of injury-released growth factors and identify important parameters involved in a signalling regenerative mode. Transfected human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used to validate model results, by examining intercellular calcium signalling range, cell proliferation and wound healing rate. Results The models predict that growth factors have a limited capacity of extracellular diffusion and that intercellular signals are specially sensitive to cell phospholipase C-delta (PLCδ) levels. As basal PLCδ levels are increased by transfection, a significantly increased intercellular calcium range, enhanced cell proliferation, and faster wound healing rate were observed. Conclusion Our in silico and in vitro studies demonstrated that non-excitable endothelial cells respond to stimuli in a complex manner, in which intercellular communication is controlled by physicochemical properties of the stimulus and by the cell microenvironment. Such findings may have profound implications for our understanding of the tight nature of autocrine cell growth control, compensation to stress states and response to altered microenvironment, under pathological conditions. PMID:18616695

  16. Control of growth factor binding and release in bisphosphonate functionalized hydrogels guides rapid differentiation of precursor cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kootala, Sujit; Zhang, Yu; Ghalib, Sara; Tolmachev, Vladimir; Hilborn, Jöns; Ossipov, Dmitri A

    2016-02-01

    An in situ cross-linkable hyaluronan hydrogel functionalized with bisphosphonate (BP) groups allows tunable release of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) determined by the amount of BP groups. The high affinity of matrix-anchored BP groups towards BMP-2 permits guided differentiation of entrapped progenitor cells in 3-D cultures. PMID:26610690

  17. Experiment K-7-22: Growth Hormone Regulation Synthesis and Secretion in Microgravity. Part 2; Hypothalamic Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor, Somatostatin Immunoreactivity, and Messenger RNA Levels in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawchenko, P. E.; Arias, C.; Krasnov, I.; Grindeland, R. E.; Vale, W.

    1994-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analyses of hypothalamic hormones carried out on tissue from rats flown on an earlier flight (Cosmos 1887) suggested preferential effects on hypophysiotropic principles involved in the regulation of growth hormone secretion and synthesis. We found that staining in the median eminence for peptides that provide both stimulatory (growth hormone-releasing factor, or GRF) and inhibitory (somatostatin, SS) influences on growth hormone secretion were depressed in flight animals relative to synchronous controls, while staining for other neuroendocrine peptides, cortocotropin-releasing factor and arginine vasopressin, were similar in these two groups. While this suggests some selective impact of weightlessness on the two principal central nervous system regulators of growth hormone dynamics, the fact that both GRF- and SS-immunoreactivity (IR) appeared affected in the same direction is somewhat problematic, and makes tentative any intimation that effects on CNS control mechanisms may be etiologically significant contributors to the sequelae of reduced growth hormone secretion seen in prolonged space flight. To provide an additional, and more penetrating, analysis we attempted in hypothalamic material harvested from animals flown on Cosmos 2044 to complement immunohistochemical analyses of GRF and SS staining with quantitative, in situ assessments of messenger RNAs encoding the precursors for both these hormones.

  18. BET Bromodomains Regulate Transforming Growth Factor-β-induced Proliferation and Cytokine Release in Asthmatic Airway Smooth Muscle*

    PubMed Central

    Perry, Mark M.; Durham, Andrew L.; Austin, Philip J.; Adcock, Ian M.; Chung, Kian Fan

    2015-01-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass is increased in asthma, and ASM cells from patients with asthma are hyperproliferative and release more IL-6 and CXCL8. The BET (bromo- and extra-terminal) family of proteins (Brd2, Brd3, and Brd4) govern the assembly of histone acetylation-dependent chromatin complexes. We have examined whether they modulate proliferation and cytokine expression in asthmatic ASM cells by studying the effect of BET bromodomain mimics JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762. ASM cells from healthy individuals and nonsevere and severe asthmatics were pretreated with JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 prior to stimulation with FCS and TGF-β. Proliferation was measured by BrdU incorporation. IL-6 and CXCL8 release was measured by ELISA, and mRNA expression was measured by quantitative RT-PCR. ChIP using a specific anti-Brd4 antibody and PCR primers directed against the transcriptional start site of IL-6 and CXCL8 gene promoters was performed. Neither JQ1/SGCBD01 nor I-BET762 had any effect on ASM cell viability. JQ1/SGCBD01 and I-BET762 inhibited FCS+TGF-β-induced ASM cell proliferation and IL-6 and CXCL8 release in healthy individuals (≥ 30 nm) and in nonsevere and severe asthma patients (≥100 nm), with the latter requiring higher concentrations of these mimics. JQ1/SGCBD01 reduced Brd4 binding to IL8 and IL6 promoters induced by FCS+TGF-β. Mimics of BET bromodomains inhibit aberrant ASM cell proliferation and inflammation with lesser efficiency in those from asthmatic patients. They may be effective in reducing airway remodeling in asthma. PMID:25697361

  19. Beta3-adrenergic receptors modulate vascular endothelial growth factor release in response to hypoxia through the nitric oxide pathway in mouse retinal explants.

    PubMed

    Dal Monte, Massimo; Filippi, Luca; Bagnoli, Paola

    2013-04-01

    Beta-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) play a role in angiogenic processes that characterize neovascularization-associated retinal diseases, but the role of β3-ARs has not been disclosed yet. We used ex vivo retinal explants to investigate the role of β3-ARs in regulating vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release associated with hypoxia. Whether nitric oxide (NO) mediates β3-AR regulation of VEGF release was also investigated. β3-AR activation was obtained using BRL 37344, whereas SR59230A, L-748,337, or specific siRNAs were used to block β3-ARs. Pharmacological approaches were used to interfere with the NO pathway. Western blot was used to determine β-AR levels. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure VEGF release. NO production was assessed by a colorimetric assay. We found that hypoxia upregulates β3-ARs. In addition, we observed that β3-AR activation with BRL 37344 increases VEGF release in response to hypoxia. Either β3-AR blocker or β3-AR silencing downregulates drastically hypoxic levels of VEGF. With experiments using NO synthase (NOS) blockade with L-NAME, NOS activation with fluvastatin or NO supplementation with SNAP, we demonstrated that β3-ARs and VEGF are functionally coupled via the NO pathway. In summary, the data presented here support the assumption that β3-ARs are involved in the regulation of angiogenic responses to hypoxia through the NO signalling, a key pathway in hypoxic/ischemic diseases. Although extrapolation of these data to the human situation is difficult, these findings may help to explore the possible role of β3-ARs in vascularization-associated disorders. PMID:23283573

  20. Does Platelet-Rich Plasma Freeze-Thawing Influence Growth Factor Release and Their Effects on Chondrocytes and Synoviocytes?

    PubMed Central

    Cavallo, Carola; Cenacchi, Annarita; Facchini, Andrea; Grigolo, Brunella; Kon, Elizaveta; Mariani, Erminia; Pratelli, Loredana; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2014-01-01

    PRP cryopreservation remains a controversial point. Our purpose was to investigate the effect of freezing/thawing on PRP molecule release, and its effects on the metabolism of chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PRP was prepared from 10 volunteers, and a half volume underwent one freezing/thawing cycle. IL-1β, HGF, PDGF AB/BB, TGF-β1, and VEGF were assayed 1 hour and 7 days after activation. Culture media of chondrocytes and synoviocytes were supplemented with fresh or frozen PRP, and, at 7 days, proliferation, gene expression, and secreted proteins levels were evaluated. Results showed that in the freeze-thawed PRP the immediate and delayed molecule releases were similar or slightly lower than those in fresh PRP. TGF-β1 and PDGF AB/BB concentrations were significantly reduced after freezing both at 1 hour and at 7 days, whereas HGF concentration was significantly lower in frozen PRP at 7 days. In fresh PRP IL-1β and HGF concentrations underwent a significant further increase after 7 days. Similar gene expression was found in chondrocytes cultured with both PRPs, whereas in synoviocytes HGF gene expression was higher in frozen PRP. PRP cryopreservation is a safe procedure, which sufficiently preserves PRP quality and its ability to induce proliferation and the production of ECM components in chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PMID:25136613

  1. Effect of intravenous bovine growth hormone or human pancreatic growth hormone-releasing factor on milk production and plasma hormones and metabolites in sheep.

    PubMed

    Hart, I C; Chadwick, P M; James, S; Simmonds, A D

    1985-05-01

    Although it is well known that exogenous bovine GH (bGH) increases milk yield in ruminants it has not been possible to determine whether an increase in endogenous GH secretion has the same effect. The recent isolation of human pancreatic GH-releasing factor (hpGRF-44) has enabled this comparison of the effects of bGH and hpGRF-44 on milk production in sheep. Three pairs of Dorset ewes underwent three 4-day treatments according to a Latin square design. Treatment 1 involved: 2-hourly i.v. injections (approximately 3.0 ml) of bGH (15 micrograms/kg; 1.8 units/mg); treatment 2: 2-hourly i.v. injections (approximately 3.0 ml) of hpGRF-44 (0.6 microgram/kg); treatment 3: 2-hourly i.v. injections (3.0 ml) of the vehicle. Treatment periods were separated by 10 days. Sheep were milked twice daily and the milk was analysed for fat, protein and lactose. Blood samples (5.0 ml) were taken before and at 15, 45, 75 and 100 min after every third injection throughout the 4 days. Plasma was analysed for insulin, glucose, urea and non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA). The changes in plasma GH stimulated by hpGRF-44 were consistent and repeatable throughout the 4 days of treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3921646

  2. Temporal growth factor release from platelet-rich plasma, trehalose lyophilized platelets, and bone marrow aspirate and their effect on tendon and ligament gene expression.

    PubMed

    McCarrel, Taralyn; Fortier, Lisa

    2009-08-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has generated substantial interest for tendon and ligament regeneration because of the high concentrations of growth factors in platelet alpha-granules. This study compared the temporal release of growth factors from bone marrow aspirate (BMA), PRP, and lyophilized platelet product (PP), and measured their effects on tendon and ligament gene expression. Blood and BMA were collected and processed to yield PRP and plasma. Flexor digitorum superficialis tendon (FDS) and suspensory ligament (SL) explants were cultured in 10% plasma in DMEM (control), BMA, PRP, or PP. TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were determined at 0, 24, and 96 h of culture using ELISA. Quantitative RT-PCR for collagen types I and III (COL1A1, COL3A1), cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), decorin, and matrix metalloproteinases-3 and 13 (MMP-3, MMP-13) was performed. TGF-beta1 and PDGF-BB concentrations were highest in PRP and PP. Growth factor quantity was unchanged in BMA, increased in PRP, and decreased in PP over 4 days. TGF-beta1 and platelet concentrations were positively correlated. Lyophilized PP and PRP resulted in increased COL1A1:COL3A1 ratio, increased COMP, and decreased MMP-13 expression. BMA resulted in decreased COMP and increased MMP-3 and MMP-13 gene expression. Platelet concentration was positively correlated with COL1A1, ratio of COL1A1:COL3A1, and COMP, and negatively correlated with COL3A1, MMP-13, and MMP-3. White blood cell concentration was positively correlated with COL3A1, MMP3, and MMP13, and negatively correlated with a ratio of COL1A1:COL3A1, COMP, and decorin. These findings support further in vivo investigation of PRP and PP for treatment of tendonitis and desmitis. PMID:19170097

  3. Mild and efficient strategy for site-selective aldehyde modification of glycosaminoglycans: tailoring hydrogels with tunable release of growth factor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shujiang; Oommen, Oommen P; Yan, Hongji; Varghese, Oommen P

    2013-07-01

    Aldehydes have been used as an important bioorthogonal chemical reporter for conjugation of large polymers and bioactive substances. However, generating aldehyde functionality on carbohydrate-based biopolymers without changing its native chemical structure has always persisted as a challenging task. The common methods employed to achieve this require harsh reaction conditions, which often compromise the structural integrity and biological function of these sensitive molecules. Here we report a mild and simple method to graft aldehydes groups on glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in a site-selective manner without compromising the structural integrity of the biopolymer. This regio-selective modification was achieved by conjugating the amino-glycerol moiety on the carboxylate residue of the polymer, which allowed selective cleavage of pendent diol groups without interfering with the C2-C3 diol groups of the native glucopyranose residue. Kinetic evaluation of this reaction demonstrated significant differences in second-order reaction rate for periodate oxidation (by four-orders of magnitude) between the two types of vicinal diols. We employed this chemistry to develop aldehyde modifications of sulfated and nonsulfated GAGs such as hyaluronic acid (HA), heparin (HP), and chondroitin sulfate (CS). We further utilized these aldehyde grafted GAGs to tailor extracellular matrix mimetic injectable hydrogels and evaluated its rheological properties. The composition of the hydrogels was also found to modulate release of therapeutic protein such as FGF-2, demonstrating controlled release (60%) for over 14 days. In short, our result clearly demonstrates a versatile strategy to graft aldehyde groups on sensitive biopolymers under mild conditions that could be applied for various bioconjugation and biomedical applications such as drug delivery and regenerative medicine. PMID:23721079

  4. Altered pituitary growth hormone (GH) regulation in streptozotocin-diabetic rats: a combined defect of hypothalamic somatostatin and GH-releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Olchovsky, D; Bruno, J F; Wood, T L; Gelato, M C; Leidy, J W; Gilbert, J M; Berelowitz, M

    1990-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus in the rat is associated with loss of pulsatile GH secretion. An interplay between hypothalamic GH-releasing factor (GRF) and inhibitory factor [somatostatin (SRIF)] secretion is thought to account for episodic pituitary GH release. An increase in SRIF tone/action or a decrease in GRF release/response in diabetic rats could account for the suppressed GH levels. Pituitaries from streptozotocin-diabetic rats contained less GH than controls (15.9 +/- 2.5 vs. 29.5 +/- 4.6 micrograms/mg; P less than 0.05) despite normal somatotrope representation, as demonstrated using immunofluorescence studies. Basal GH secretion from monolayer culture of dispersed anterior pituitary (AP) cells from diabetic rats was proportionately decreased (150 +/- 10 vs. 103 +/- 10 ng/10(5) cells; P less than 0.005). GRF (10(-11)-10(-8) M)-induced release of GH from AP cells was decreased in diabetic rats (maximum response to 10(-8) M GRF, 401 +/- 60 vs. 618 +/- 41 ng/10(5) cells; P less than 0.01); however, sensitivity to GRF was unchanged (EC50, 79 +/- 41 vs. 128 +/- 67 pM). By contrast, SRIF (10(-7)-10(-10)-induced inhibition of GRF (10(-8) M)-mediated GH release was impaired in AP cells of diabetic rats compared to that in controls (IC50, 112 +/- 33 vs. 55 +/- 31 pM; P less than 0.05) associated with a decrease in AP plasma membrane SRIF receptor concentration (63.4 +/- 15.6 vs. 160.3 +/- 13.7 fmol/mg protein; P less than 0.05), with no change in affinity. These findings are consistent with chronic exposure to increased hypothalamic SRIF influence. GH synthesis has been shown to be independent of SRIF regulation; however, insulin-like growth factor-I and GRF inhibit and stimulate GH synthesis, respectively. In diabetic rats insulin-like growth factor-I levels were decreased, appropriate to low GH status, in serum (290 +/- 66 vs. 1662 +/- 92 ng/ml; P less than 0.001) and hypothalamus (6.8 +/- 1.0 vs. 13.0 +/- 0.4 pg/mg wet wt; P less than 0.001) and, thus, did not seem to

  5. Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I and its analogues on bovine hydrogen peroxide release by neutrophils and blastogenesis by mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; McBride, B W; Trouten-Radford, L M; Burton, J H

    1993-11-01

    The biological potencies of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and two of its analogues were examined for hydrogen peroxide release by neutrophils and blastogenesis by mononuclear cells. The binding affinities of these peptides for bovine serum IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) and IGF-I receptors on bovine neutrophils and mononuclear cells were also investigated. Relative to control treatment containing no IGF-I, preincubation of neutrophils with 12.5 micrograms/l of IGF-I, des(1-3)IGF-I (an analogue of human IGF-I lacking the N-terminal tripeptide Gly-Pro-Glu) and long R3 IGF-I (an analogue of human IGF-I with arginine replacing glutamate at position 3 of human IGF-I and the N-terminal extension Met-Phe-Pro-Ala-Met-Pro-Leu-Ser-Ser-Leu-Phe-Val-Asn) increased the release of H2O2 by 65%, 64% and 32% respectively. However, the difference in stimulating the release of H2O2 between long R3 IGF-I and other two (IGF-I and des(1-3)IGF-I) was reduced at a dosage of 100 micrograms/l. In the absence or presence of 2.5% fetal calf serum (FCS), 100 micrograms/l of IGF-I, des(1-3)IGF-I but not long R3 IGF-I significantly stimulated thymidine incorporation into mononuclear cells. In addition, des(1-3)IGF-I was more potent than IGF-I in stimulating thymidine incorporation into mononuclear cells in the presence of 2.5% FCS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7508487

  6. A Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived Soluble Protein, p40, Stimulates Ligand Release from Intestinal Epithelial Cells to Transactivate Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor*

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fang; Liu, Liping; Dempsey, Peter J.; Tsai, Yu-Hwai; Raines, Elaine W.; Wilson, Carole L.; Cao, Hailong; Cao, Zheng; Liu, LinShu; Polk, D. Brent

    2013-01-01

    p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis, and preserves barrier function by transactivation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study is to determine the mechanisms by which p40 transactivates the EGFR in intestinal epithelial cells. Here we show that p40-conditioned medium activates EGFR in young adult mouse colon epithelial cells and human colonic epithelial cell line, T84 cells. p40 up-regulates a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 17 (ADAM17) catalytic activity, and broad spectrum metalloproteinase inhibitors block EGFR transactivation by p40 in these two cell lines. In ADAM17-deficient mouse colonic epithelial (ADAM17−/− MCE) cells, p40 transactivation of EGFR is blocked, but can be rescued by re-expression with WT ADAM17. Furthermore, p40 stimulates release of heparin binding (HB)-EGF, but not transforming growth factor (TGF)α or amphiregulin, in young adult mouse colon cells and ADAM17−/− MCE cells overexpressing WT ADAM17. Knockdown of HB-EGF expression by siRNA suppresses p40 effects on transactivating EGFR and Akt, preventing apoptosis, and preserving tight junction function. The effects of p40 on HB-EGF release and ADAM17 activation in vivo are examined after administration of p40-containing pectin/zein hydrogel beads to mice. p40 stimulates ADAM17 activity and EGFR activation in colonic epithelial cells and increases HB-EGF levels in blood from WT mice, but not from mice with intestinal epithelial cell-specific ADAM17 deletion. Thus, these data define a mechanism of a probiotic-derived soluble protein in modulating intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis through ADAM17-mediated HB-EGF release, leading to transactivation of EGFR. PMID:24043629

  7. Growth differentiation factor-15 promotes glutamate release in medial prefrontal cortex of mice through upregulation of T-type calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-Dong; Lu, Jun-Mei; Zhao, Qian-Ru; Hu, Changlong; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2016-01-01

    Growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15) has been implicated in ischemic brain injury and synapse development, but its involvement in modulating neuronal excitability and synaptic transmission remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the effects of GDF-15 on non-evoked miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) and neurotransmitter release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) in mice. Incubation of mPFC slices with GDF-15 for 60 min significantly increased the frequency of mEPSCs without effect on their amplitude. GDF-15 also significantly elevated presynaptic glutamate release, as shown by HPLC. These effects were blocked by dual TGF-β type I receptor (TβRI) and TGF-β type II receptor (TβRII) antagonists, but not by a TβRI antagonist alone. Meanwhile, GDF-15 enhanced pERK level, and inhibition of MAPK/ERK activity attenuated the GDF-15-induced increases in mEPSC and glutamate release. Blocking T-type calcium channels reduced the GDF-15 induced up-regulation of synaptic transmission. Membrane-protein extraction and use of an intracellular protein-transport inhibitor showed that GDF-15 promoted CaV3.1 and CaV3.3 α-subunit expression by trafficking to the membrane. These results confirm previous findings in cerebellar granule neurons, in which GDF-15 induces its neurobiological effects via TβRII and activation of the ERK pathway, providing novel insights into the mechanism of GDF-15 function in cortical neurons. PMID:27353765

  8. Pegylated peptides. V. Carboxy-terminal PEGylated analogs of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) display enhanced duration of biological activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Campbell, R M; Heimer, E P; Ahmad, M; Eisenbeis, H G; Lambros, T J; Lee, Y; Miller, R W; Stricker, P R; Felix, A M

    1997-06-01

    In the present study, human growth hormone-releasing factor (hGRF) and analogs were successfully pegylated at the carboxy-terminus using a novel solid- and solution-phase strategy. Following synthesis, these pegylated hGRF analogs were evaluated for in vitro and in vivo biological activity. Specifically, hGRF (1-29)-NH2, [Ala15]-hGRF (1-29)-NH2, [desNH2Tyr1, D-Ala2, Ala15]-hGRF(1-29)-NH2 and [His1, Val2, Gln8, Ala15, Leu27]-hGRF(1-32)-OH were each C-terminally extended using a Gly-Gly-Cys-NH2 spacer (previously demonstrated not to alter intrinsic biological activity), and then monopegylated via coupling to an activated dithiopyridyl-PEG reagent. PEG moieties of 750, 2000, 5000 or 10,000 molecular weight (MW) were examined to determine the effect of polymer weight on activity. Initial biological evaluations in vitro revealed that all C-terminally pegylated hGRF analogs retained high growth hormone (GH)-releasing potencies, regardless of the MW of PEG polymer employed. Two of these pegylated hGRF analogs, [desNH2Tyr1, D-Ala2, Ala15]-hGRF (1-29)-Gly-Gly-Cys(NH2)-S-Nle-PEG5000 and [His1, Val2, Gln8, Ala15, Leu27]-hGRF(1-32)-Gly-Cys(NH2)-S-Nle-PEG5000, were subsequently evaluated in both pig and mouse models and found to be highly potent (in vivo potency range = 12-55-fold that of native hGRF). Relative to their non-pegylated counterparts, these two pegylated hGRF analogs exhibited enhanced duration of activity. PMID:9266480

  9. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua; Takahashi, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-24

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  10. Sustained dual release of placental growth factor-2 and bone morphogenic protein-2 from heparin-based nanocomplexes for direct osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yun; Deng, Li-Zhi; Sun, Hai-Peng; Xu, Jia-Yun; Li, Yi-Ming; Xie, Xin; Zhang, Li-Ming; Deng, Fei-Long

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the direct osteogenic effect between placental growth factor-2 (PlGF-2) and bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2). Methods Three groups of PlGF-2/BMP-2-loaded heparin–N-(2-hydroxyl) propyl-3-trimethyl ammonium chitosan chloride (HTCC) nanocomplexes were prepared: those with 0.5 μg PlGF-2; with 1.0 μg BMP-2; and with 0.5 μg PlGF-2 combined with 1.0 μg BMP-2. The loading efficiencies and release profiles of these growth factors (GFs) in this nanocomplex system were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, their biological activities were evaluated using cell counting kit-8, cell morphology, and cell number counting assays, and their osteogenic activities were quantified using alkaline phosphatase and Alizarin Red S staining assays. Results The loading efficiencies were more than 99% for the nanocomplexes loaded with just PlGF-2 and for those loaded with both PlGF-2 and BMP-2. For the nanocomplex loaded with just BMP-2, the loading efficiency was more than 97%. About 83%–84% of PlGF-2 and 89%–91% of BMP-2 were stably retained on the nanocomplexes for at least 21 days. In in vitro biological assays, PlGF-2 exhibited osteogenic effects comparable to those of BMP-2 despite its dose in the experiments being lower than that of BMP-2. Moreover, the results implied that heparin-based nanocomplexes encapsulating two GFs have enhanced potential in the enhancement of osteoblast function. Conclusion PlGF-2-loaded heparin–HTCC nanocomplexes may constitute a promising system for bone regeneration. Moreover, the dual delivery of PlGF-2 and BMP-2 appears to have greater potential in bone tissue regeneration than the delivery of either GFs alone. PMID:27042064

  11. Growth factors for nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftcioglu, Neva; Kajander, E. Olavi

    1999-12-01

    Nanobacteria are novel microorganisms recently isolated from fetal bovine serum and blood of cows and humans. These coccoid, gram negative bacteria in alpha-2 subgroup of Proteobacteria grow slowly under mammalian cell culture conditions but not in common media for microbes. Now we have found two different kinds of culture supplement preparations that improve their growth and make them culturable in the classical sense. These are supernatant fractions of conditioned media obtained from 1 - 3 months old nanobacteria cultures and from about a 2 weeks old Bacillus species culture. Both improved multiplication and particle yields and the latter increased their resistance to gentamicin. Nanobacteria cultured with any of the methods shared similar immunological property, structure and protein pattern. The growth supporting factors were heat-stabile and nondialyzable, and dialysis improved the growth promoting action. Nanobacteria formed stony colonies in a bacteriological medium supplemented with the growth factors. This is an implication that nanobacterial growth is influenced by pre-existing bacterial flora.

  12. New microbial growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bok, S. H.; Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    A screening procedure was used to isolate from soil a Penicillium sp., two bacterial isolates, and a Streptomyces sp. that produced a previously unknown microbial growth factor. This factor was an absolute growth requirement for three soil bacteria. The Penicillium sp. and one of the bacteria requiring the factor, an Arthrobacter sp., were selected for more extensive study concerning the production and characteristics of the growth factor. It did not seem to be related to the siderochromes. It was not present in soil extract, rumen fluid, or any other medium component tested. It appears to be a glycoprotein of high molecular weight and has high specific activity. When added to the diets for a meadow-vole mammalian test system, it caused an increased consumption of diet without a concurrent increase in rate of weight gain.

  13. Growth factors in haemopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Jones, A L; Millar, J L

    1989-01-01

    Haemopoietic growth factors have for over two decades allowed experimentalists to grow haemopoietic bone marrow cells in vitro. With refinements in technique and the discovery of novel growth factors, all of the known haemopoietic lineages can now be grown in vitro. This has allowed a much greater understanding of the complex process of haemopoiesis from the haemopoietic stem cell to the mature, functioning end-cell. The in vivo action of these growth factors has been harder to investigate. Although recombinant technology has afforded us the much greater quantities necessary for in vivo work, problems remain with administration because of effects on other tissues. Interpretation of results is difficult because of the complex inter-relationships which exist between factors. Some of these have been defined in vitro and it appears likely that they also operate in vivo. Erythropoietin is a physiological regulator of erythropoiesis. It has been detected in vivo with levels responding appropriately to stress (i.e. elevated in anaemia) and, when administered in pharmacological doses, has been shown to correct anaemia. Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been detected in vivo and may influence the production and function of granulocytes and macrophages, although how it is regulated is unknown. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor are ore lineage-specific. Interleukin 3 (IL-3), although it has not been detected in vivo, may act on a primitive marrow precursor by expanding the population and making these cells more susceptible to other growth factors, such as GM-CSF. Interleukin 1 (IL-1) has been detected in vivo, does not appear to have any isolated action on bone marrow (except possibly radioprotection) but probably acts synergistically with other growth factors, such as G-CSF. Interleukins 2, 4, 5 and 6 have not been detected in vivo. All have effects on B-cells. In addition IL-2 is an essential

  14. Degradation of decorin by matrix metalloproteinases: identification of the cleavage sites, kinetic analyses and transforming growth factor-beta1 release.

    PubMed Central

    Imai, K; Hiramatsu, A; Fukushima, D; Pierschbacher, M D; Okada, Y

    1997-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is a ubiquitous proteoglycan comprised of a core protein attached to a single dermatan/chondroitin sulphate glycosaminoglycan chain. It may play a role in regulation of collagen fibrillogenesis and function as a reservoir of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) in the extracellular milieu. We have examined the susceptibility of DCN to five different matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs): MMP-1 (tissue collagenase), MMP-2 (gelatinase A), MMP-3 (stromelysin 1), MMP-7 (matrilysin) and MMP-9 (gelatinase B). MMP-2 and MMP-3 digest DCN into seven major fragments in a similar pattern. The N-terminal sequence of the two fragments generated by MMP-2 and MMP-3 is Leu211-Lys-Gly-Leu-Asn, but that of the others is Asp1-Glu-Ala-Ser-Gly. MMP-7 cleaves DCN into three major fragments which have the N-termini Asp1-Glu-Ala-Ser-Gly, Glu2-Ala-Ser-Gly-Ile and Leu244-His-Leu-Asp-Asn. Activities of MMP-1 and MMP-9 against DCN are negligible. The values of Km for the MMPs capable of degrading DCN are very similar (10-12 microM), but the kcat/Km value for MMP-7 (30.5 microM-1.h-1) is 4.5-fold higher than those for MMP-2 and MMP-3. Incubation of a DCN-TGF-beta1 complex with MMP-2, -3 or -7 results in release of TGF-beta1 from the complex. These data indicate proteolytic degradation of DCN by MMP-2, MMP-3 and MMP-7, and suggest the possibility that, under pathophysiological conditions, the digestion by the MMPs may induce tissue reactions mediated by TGF-beta1 released from DCN in the connective tissues. PMID:9148753

  15. Peptide growth factors, part B

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, D.; Sirbasku, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book discusses the following topics: Platelet-Derived Growth Factor;Nerve and Glial Growth Factors;PC12 Pheochromocytoma Cells;Techniques for the Study of Growth Factor Activity;Genetic Approaches and Biological Effects.

  16. Autocrine growth factors and solid tumor malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, J. H.; Karnes, W. E.; Cuttitta, F.; Walker, A.

    1991-01-01

    The ability of malignant cells to escape the constraint that normally regulate cell growth and differentiation has been a primary focus of attention for investigators of cancer cell biology. An outcome of this attention has been the discovery that the protein products of oncogenes play a role in the activation of growth signal pathways. A second outcome, possibly related to abnormal oncogene expression, has been the discovery that malignant cells frequently show an ability to regulate their own growth by the release of autocrine growth modulatory substances. Most important, the growth of certain malignant cell types has been shown to depend on autocrine growth circuits. A malignant tumor whose continued growth depends on the release of an autocrine growth factor may be vulnerable to treatment with specific receptor antagonists or immunoneutralizing antibodies designed to break the autocrine circuit. Information is rapidly emerging concerning autocrine growth factors in selected human solid tissue malignancy. Images PMID:1926844

  17. In vitro Therapeutic Effects of Low Level Laser at mRNA Level on the Release of Skin Growth Factors from Fibroblasts in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Khoo, Nooshafarin Kazemi; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Kashani, Iraj Ragerdi; Amanzadeh, Amir; Mostafavi, Ehsan; Sanati, Hassan; Habibi, Laleh; Talebi, Saeid; Abouzaripour, Morteza; Akrami, Seyed Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous in vitro reports suggest that Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) affects cellular processes by biostimulation, however most of them emphasize on using visible light lasers which have low penetration. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of infrared laser light (which is more useful in clinic because of its higher penetration) on secretion of Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF), Platelet Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF), as important growth factors in wound healing. Methods Fibroblasts were extracted from the skin of 7 diabetic and 7 nondiabetic mice and cultured. Cell cultures of experimental group were irradiated with single dose of LLLT (energy density of 1 J/cm 2) using an 810 nm continuous wave laser and the control group was not irradiated. Secretion of growth factors by skin fibroblasts were quantified through real time poly-merase chain reaction. Results Diabetic irradiated group showed significant increase in FGF (p = 0.017) expression, although PDGF increased and VEGF decreased in both diabetic and nondiabetic irradiated groups, but these variations were not statistically significant. Conclusion These results suggest that LLLT may play an important role in wound healing by stimulating the fibroblasts. PMID:24834313

  18. Predictors of Treatment Response to Tesamorelin, a Growth Hormone-Releasing Factor Analog, in HIV-Infected Patients with Excess Abdominal Fat

    PubMed Central

    Mangili, Alexandra; Falutz, Julian; Mamputu, Jean-Claude; Stepanians, Miganush; Hayward, Brooke

    2015-01-01

    Background Tesamorelin, a synthetic analog of human growth hormone-releasing factor, decreases visceral adipose tissue (VAT) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients with lipodystrophy. Objectives 1) To evaluate the utility of patient characteristics and validated disease-risk scores, namely indicator variables for the metabolic syndrome defined by the International Diabetes Federation (MetS-IDF) or the National Cholesterol Education Program (MetS-NCEP) and the Framingham Risk Score (FRS), as predictors of VAT reduction during tesamorelin therapy at 3 and 6 months, and 2) To explore the characteristics of patients who reached a threshold of VAT <140 cm2, a level associated with lower risk of adverse health outcomes, after 6 months of treatment with tesamorelin. Methods Data were analyzed from two Phase 3 studies in which HIV-infected patients with excess abdominal fat were randomized in a 2:1 ratio to receive tesamorelin 2 mg (n = 543) or placebo (n = 263) subcutaneously daily for 6 months, using ANOVA and ANCOVA models. Results Metabolic syndrome (MetS-IDF or MetS-NCEP) and FRS were significantly associated with VAT at baseline. Presence of metabolic syndrome ([MetS-NCEP), triglyceride levels >1.7 mmol/L, and white race had a significant impact on likelihood of response to tesamorelin after 6 months of therapy (interaction p-values 0.054, 0.063, and 0.025, respectively). No predictive factors were identified at 3 months. The odds of a VAT reduction to <140 cm2 for subjects treated with tesamorelin was 3.9 times greater than that of subjects randomized to placebo after controlling for study, gender, baseline body mass index (BMI) and baseline VAT (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.03; 7.44). Conclusions Individuals with baseline MetS-NCEP, elevated triglyceride levels, or white race were most likely to experience reductions in VAT after 6 months of tesamorelin treatment. The odds of response of VAT <140 cm2 was 3.9 times greater for tesamorelin

  19. Factors affecting sporoplasm release in Kudoa septempunctata.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Phil; Zenke, Kosuke; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-01

    The myxosporean parasite Kudoa septempunctata has been isolated from cultured olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and was recently identified as a cause of food poisoning in humans. Since the sporoplasm plays an important role in causing diarrhea by invading intestinal cells, the specific factors affecting the release of sporoplasm from spores should be determined. Thus, we investigated the effect of digestive and serum enzymes, fetal bovine serum (FBS), temperature, and the role of glucose in cell culture media on the release of sporoplasm. Sporoplasm release was observed in the groups treated with FBS and media containing glucose. In addition, 1,10-phenanthroline inhibited the release of sporoplasm in the FBS medium. These results indicate that K. septempunctata uses glucose for releasing its sporoplasm and that zinc or metalloprotease is related to the release mechanism. The present study provides important information for the development of agents to prevent sporoplasm release and the consequent food poisoning caused by K. septempunctata. PMID:25563617

  20. Multi-targeted neuroprotection by the HSV-2 gene ICP10PK includes robust bystander activity through PI3-K/Akt and/or MEK/ERK-dependent neuronal release of vascular endothelial growth factor and fractalkine

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Jennifer M.; Smith, Cynthia C.; Aurelian, Laure

    2013-01-01

    Hippocampal cultures infected with the ΔRR vector for the HSV-2 anti-apoptotic gene ICP10PK survive cell death triggered by a wide variety of insults. Survival includes robust protection of uninfected neurons, but the mechanism of this bystander activity is still unclear. Here we report that ICP10PK+ neurons release soluble factors that protect uninfected neurons from NMDA and MPP+-induced apoptosis. Release depends on ICP10PK-mediated activation of the Ras signaling pathways MEK/ERK and PI3-K/Akt, and it was not seen for cultures infected with the ICP10PK negative vector ΔPK. The released neuroprotective factors include vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fractalkine, the levels of which were significantly higher in conditioned media from hippocampal cultures infected with ΔRR (NCMΔRR) than ΔPK or phosphate-buffered saline (mock infection). VEGF neutralization inhibited the neuroprotective activity of NCMΔRR, indicating that the VEGF protective function is through neuron-neuron cross-talk. NCMΔRR also stimulated microglia to release increased levels of IL-10 and decreased levels of TNF-α that were protective for uninfected neurons. These release patterns were not seen for microglia given NCMΔRR in which fractalkine was neutralized, indicating that the fractalkine protective function is through bidirectional neuron-microglia communication. Collectively, the data indicate that ΔRR is a multiple target strategy to rescue neurons from excitotoxic injury. PMID:19891735

  1. Effect of Photobiomodulation on Transforming Growth Factor-β1, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-BB, and Interleukin-8 Release in Palatal Wounds After Free Gingival Graft Harvesting: A Randomized Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Lutfioğlu, Muge; Aydogdu, Ahmet; Saygun, N. Isil; Serdar, Muhittin A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the impact of photobiomodulation (PBM) on the healing of the donor palatal area following free gingival graft (FGG) harvesting by examining changes in transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, and interleukin (IL)-8 levels in palatal wound fluid (PWF). Material and methods: Thirty patients were selected and randomly assigned to receive PBM (laser group) or PBM sham (sham group) in the palatine area after FGG harvesting. A neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser (1064 nm) was applied to the test sites immediately after surgery and every 24 h thereafter for 4 days. PWF was collected on Days 7 and 12, and PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Results: PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels were significantly lower on Day 12 than on Day 7 for both groups. PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels of the laser group were significantly higher than those of sham group on Day 7 (p < 0.05). PWF TGF-β1 levels were also significantly higher in laser group than in the sham group on Day 12; however, differences in PDGF-BB and IL-8 levels between groups on Day 12 were statistically nonsignificant. Conclusions: Observed increases in PWF TGF-β1, PDGF-BB, and IL-8 levels suggest that PBM may accelerate wound healing by stimulating production of selected mediators. PMID:27088277

  2. Customized Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: design, fabrication, surface modification and sustained release of growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Bin; Wang, Min

    2010-01-01

    Integrating an advanced manufacturing technique, nanocomposite material and controlled delivery of growth factor to form multifunctional tissue engineering scaffolds was investigated in this study. Based on calcium phosphate (Ca–P)/poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) nanocomposite microspheres, three-dimensional Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds with customized architecture, controlled porosity and totally interconnected porous structure were successfully fabricated using selective laser sintering (SLS), one of the rapid prototyping technologies. The cytocompatibility of sintered Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds, as well as PHBV polymer scaffolds, was studied. For surface modification of nanocomposite scaffolds, gelatin was firstly physically entrapped onto the scaffold surface and heparin was subsequently immobilized on entrapped gelatin. The surface-modification improved the wettability of scaffolds and provided specific binding site between conjugated heparin and the growth factor recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). The surface-modified Ca–P/PHBV nanocomposite scaffolds loaded with rhBMP-2 significantly enhanced the alkaline phosphatase activity and osteogenic differentiation markers in gene expression of C3H10T1/2 mesenchymal stem cells. Together with osteoconductive nanocomposite material and controlled growth factor delivery strategies, the use of SLS technique to form complex scaffolds will provide a promising route towards individualized bone tissue regeneration. PMID:20504805

  3. Basic fibroblast growth factor (basic FGF) in isolated ovine thyroid follicles: thyrotropin stimulation and effects of basic FGF on DNA synthesis, iodine uptake and organification, and the release of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Hill, D J; Phillips, I D; Wang, J F; Becks, G P

    1994-01-01

    We examined the effects of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) on basic fibroblast growth factor (basic FGF) expression in isolated ovine thyroid follicles in vitro, and the effects of exogenous basic FGF on thyroid growth and function, to elucidate the significance of increased basic FGF expression during TSH-induced rat thyroid hyperplasia in vivo. Primary cultures of ovine thyroid follicles were maintained in serum-free Ham's modified F-12M medium containing transferrin, somatostatin, and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (designated 3H) with or without basic FGF alone, or in combination with TSH (100 microU/mL) and cortisol (10 nM). Following 48 h incubation, cells were harvested and total RNA prepared for the detection of basic FGF mRNA using Northern blot analysis and ribonuclease protection assay. Basic FGF in the cytoplasm and extracellular matrix fractions was quantified by radioimmunoassay. Basic FGF mRNA transcripts of 3.7, 3.0, and 2.2 kb, respectively, were found in thyroid follicles cultured in 3H medium, and the abundance of each increased between 2- and 3-fold following incubation with 10-50 microU/mL TSH, although higher concentrations of TSH were less effective. Similar results were seen using a more sensitive ribonuclease protection assay. Cells cultured in control, 3H medium contained 2.4 +/- 0.5 fmol immunoreactive basic FGF/micrograms cell DNA within the cytoplasm and 21.1 +/- 1.5 fmol/micrograms DNA within the extracellular matrix (mean +/- SD, n = 6). A significant increase (p < 0.05) in basic FGF content was seen in both cell compartments following incubation with 50 or 100 microU/mL TSH, while 250 microU/mL was less effective.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7519916

  4. Growth hormone, growth factors, and acromegaly

    SciTech Connect

    Ludecke, D.K.; Tolis, G.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains five sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Biochemistry and Physiology of GH and Growth Factors, Pathology of Acromegaly, Clinical Endocrinology of Acromegaly, Nonsurgical Therapy of Acromegaly, and Surgical Therapy of Acromegaly.

  5. An ex vivo model using human osteoarthritic cartilage demonstrates the release of bioactive insulin-like growth factor-1 from a collagen–glycosaminoglycan scaffold†

    PubMed Central

    Wardale, J; Mullen, L; Howard, D; Ghose, S; Rushton, N

    2015-01-01

    Biomimetic scaffolds hold great promise for therapeutic repair of cartilage, but although most scaffolds are tested with cells in vitro, there are very few ex vivo models (EVMs) where adult cartilage and scaffolds are co-cultured to optimize their interaction prior to in vivo studies. This study describes a simple, non-compressive method that is applicable to mammalian or human cartilage and provides a reasonable throughput of samples. Rings of full-depth articular cartilage slices were derived from human donors undergoing knee replacement for osteoarthritis and a 3 mm core of a collagen/glycosaminoglycan biomimetic scaffold (Tigenix, UK) inserted to create the EVM. Adult osteoarthritis chondrocytes were seeded into the scaffold and cultures maintained for up to 30 days. Ex vivo models were stable throughout experiments, and cells remained viable. Chondrocytes seeded into the EVM attached throughout the scaffold and in contact with the cartilage explants. Cell migration and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in the scaffold was enhanced by growth factors particularly if the scaffold was preloaded with growth factors. This study demonstrates that the EVM represents a suitable model that has potential for testing a range of therapeutic parameters such as numbers/types of cell, growth factors or therapeutic drugs before progressing to costly pre-clinical trials. © 2015 The Authors. Cell Biochemistry and Function Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Significance Pre-clinical trials of biomaterials for cartilage repair are very costly, and all too often, studies progress directly from in vitro studies using isolated cells to in vivo studies without investigating the interaction between the target tissue and the scaffold. Our study uses viable cartilage from adult human donors with osteoarthritis and therefore represents the exact scenario that the scaffold is designed for. The system is cheap and simple to set up and is suitable for a 48-well plate format

  6. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1993-01-01

    Long-term manned space travel will require a better understanding of skeletal muscle atrophy which results from microgravity. Astronaut strength and dexterity must be maintained for normal mission operations and for emergency situations. Although exercise in space slows the rate of muscle loss, it does not prevent it. A biochemical understanding of how gravity/tension/exercise help to maintain muscle size by altering protein synthesis and/or degradation rate should ultimately allow pharmacological intervention to prevent muscle atrophy in microgravity. The overall objective is to examine some of the basic biochemical processes involved in tension-induced muscle growth. With an experimental in vitro system, the role of exogenous and endogenous muscle growth factors in mechanically stimulated muscle growth are examined. Differentiated avian skeletal myofibers can be 'exercised' in tissue culture using a newly developed dynamic mechanical cell stimulator device which simulates different muscle activity patterns. Patterns of mechanical activity which significantly affect muscle growth and metabolic characteristics were found. Both exogenous and endogenous growth factors are essential for tension-induced muscle growth. Exogenous growth factors found in serum, such as insulin, insulin-like growth factors, and steroids, are important regulators of muscle protein turnover rates and mechanically-induced muscle growth. Endogenous growth factors are synthesized and released into the culture medium when muscle cells are mechanically stimulated. At least one family of mechanically induced endogenous factors, the prostaglandins, help to regulate the rates of protein turnover in muscle cells. Endogenously synthesized IGF-1 is another. The interaction of muscle mechanical activity and these growth factors in the regulation of muscle protein turnover rates with our in vitro model system is studied.

  7. Effect of different growth hormone-releasing factors on the concentrations of growth hormone, insulin and metabolites in the plasma of sheep maintained in positive and negative energy balance.

    PubMed

    Hart, I C; Chadwick, P M; Coert, A; James, S; Simmonds, A D

    1985-04-01

    Three experiments were conducted to compare the ability of different preparations of growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) to stimulate GH secretion in sheep maintained in positive and negative energy balance. In experiment 1 five sheep were injected (i.v.) with three preparations of human pancreatic GRF (hpGRF-44, hpGRF-40, hpGRF-29-NH2) and one preparation of rat hypothalamic GRF (rhGRF-29-NH2) all at 98.0 pmol/kg, or control vehicle, in a Latin square design when the animals either had free access to food or were fed half their maintenance requirements. Analysis of plasma samples, obtained before and for 150 min after injection, revealed that the reduced food intake resulted in the expected changes in body weight and circulating GH, insulin, glucose, urea and non-esterified fatty acids. The maximum post-injection concentrations of GH did not differ between either the two levels of feeding or the four GRF preparations but the mean post-injection concentration of GH was significantly higher for all GRF treatments on the restricted ration (P less than 0.001). The mean post-injection response to rhGRF-29-NH2 was less than that obtained with hpGRF-44 for sheep with food available ad libitum (P less than 0.05) and was clearly more persistent for all GRF treatments in animals fed the reduced diet (P less than 0.001). In experiment 2 the same five sheep were injected i.v. with rhGRF-29-NH2 (98.0 pmol/kg) when they had free access to food and after food had been withdrawn for 3 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2859343

  8. DNA Damage Response Proteins and Oxygen Modulate Prostaglandin E2 Growth Factor Release in Response to Low and High LET Ionizing Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Christopher P.; Tinganelli, Walter; Sharma, Neelam; Nie, Jingyi; Sicard, Cory; Natale, Francesco; King, Maurice; Keysar, Steven B.; Jimeno, Antonio; Furusawa, Yoshiya; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Fujimori, Akira; Durante, Marco; Nickoloff, Jac A.

    2015-01-01

    Common cancer therapies employ chemicals or radiation that damage DNA. Cancer and normal cells respond to DNA damage by activating complex networks of DNA damage sensor, signal transducer, and effector proteins that arrest cell cycle progression, and repair damaged DNA. If damage is severe enough, the DNA damage response (DDR) triggers programed cell death by apoptosis or other pathways. Caspase 3 is a protease that is activated upon damage and triggers apoptosis, and production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a potent growth factor that can enhance growth of surviving cancer cells leading to accelerated tumor repopulation. Thus, dying tumor cells can promote growth of surviving tumor cells, a pathway aptly named Phoenix Rising. In the present study, we surveyed Phoenix Rising responses in a variety of normal and established cancer cell lines, and in cancer cell lines freshly derived from patients. We demonstrate that IR induces a Phoenix Rising response in many, but not all cell lines, and that PGE2 production generally correlates with enhanced growth of cells that survive irradiation, and of unirradiated cells co-cultured with irradiated cells. We show that PGE2 production is stimulated by low and high LET ionizing radiation, and can be enhanced or suppressed by inhibitors of key DDR proteins. PGE2 is produced downstream of caspase 3 and the cyclooxygenases COX1 and COX2, and we show that the pan COX1–2 inhibitor indomethacin blocks IR-induced PGE2 production in the presence or absence of DDR inhibitors. COX1–2 require oxygen for catalytic activity, and we further show that PGE2 production is markedly suppressed in cells cultured under low (1%) oxygen concentration. Thus, Phoenix Rising is most likely to cause repopulation of tumors with relatively high oxygen, but not in hypoxic tumors. This survey lays a foundation for future studies to further define tumor responses to radiation and inhibitors of the DDR and Phoenix Rising to enhance the efficacy of

  9. Soluble Urokinase Receptor Is Released Selectively by Glioblastoma Cells That Express Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Variant III and Promotes Tumor Cell Migration and Invasion*♦

    PubMed Central

    Gilder, Andrew S.; Jones, Karra A.; Hu, Jingjing; Wang, Lei; Chen, Clark C.; Carter, Bob S.; Gonias, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Genomic heterogeneity is characteristic of glioblastoma (GBM). In many GBMs, the EGF receptor gene (EGFR) is amplified and may be truncated to generate a constitutively active form of the receptor called EGFRvIII. EGFR gene amplification and EGFRvIII are associated with GBM progression, even when only a small fraction of the tumor cells express EGFRvIII. In this study, we show that EGFRvIII-positive GBM cells express significantly increased levels of cellular urokinase receptor (uPAR) and release increased amounts of soluble uPAR (suPAR). When mice were xenografted with human EGFRvIII-expressing GBM cells, tumor-derived suPAR was detected in the plasma, and the level was significantly increased compared with that detected in plasma samples from control mice xenografted with EGFRvIII-negative GBM cells. suPAR also was increased in plasma from patients with EGFRvIII-positive GBMs. Purified suPAR was biologically active when added to cultures of EGFRvIII-negative GBM cells, activating cell signaling and promoting cell migration and invasion. suPAR did not significantly stimulate cell signaling or migration of EGFRvIII-positive cells, probably because cell signaling was already substantially activated in these cells. The activities of suPAR were replicated by conditioned medium (CM) from EGFRvIII-positive GBM cells. When the CM was preincubated with uPAR-neutralizing antibody or when uPAR gene expression was silenced in cells used to prepare CM, the activity of the CM was significantly attenuated. These results suggest that suPAR may function as an important paracrine signaling factor in EGFRvIII-positive GBMs, inducing an aggressive phenotype in tumor cells that are EGFRvIII-negative. PMID:25837250

  10. Nerve growth factor and asthma.

    PubMed

    Bonini, S; Lambiase, A; Lapucci, G; Properzi, F; Bresciani, M; Bracci Laudiero, M L; Mancini, M J; Procoli, A; Micera, A; Sacerdoti, G; Bonini, S; Levi-Schaffer, F; Rasi, G; Aloe, L

    2002-01-01

    An increasing body of evidence shows that nerve growth factor (NGF) exerts biological activity not only on the central and peripheral nervous system, but also on the immune system thereby influencing allergic diseases and asthma. (1) NGF circulating levels are increased in patients with allergic diseases and asthma, and are related to the severity of the inflammatory process and disease. In vernal keratoconjunctivitis, NGF plasma levels correlate with the number of mast cells infiltrating the conjunctiva, and NGF mRNA is increased in nasal mucosal scrapings of patients with allergic rhinitis who have high levels of NGF in serum and nasal fluids; NGF is further increased in nasal fluids after specific allergen challenge. (2) NGF is produced and released by several modulatory and effector cells of allergic inflammation and asthma, for example T-helper 2 lymphocytes, mast cells and eosinophils. (3) NGF receptors are expressed on the conjunctival epithelium of patients with allergic conjunctivitis and the number of NGF-receptor positive cells is increased in the conjunctiva of these patients. Indeed, local administration of NGF induces fibroblast activation and healing processes of human corneal ulcers, which suggests that NGF plays a role in tissue remodelling processes occurring in asthma. (4) NGF increases airway hyperreactivity to histamine in an animal model of asthma, while anti-NGF treatment reduces airway hyperreactivity induced by ovalbumin topical challenge in the sensitized mouse. PMID:12144547

  11. Metabolism of growth hormone releasing peptides.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Andreas; Delahaut, Philippe; Krug, Oliver; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Thevis, Mario

    2012-12-01

    New, potentially performance enhancing compounds have frequently been introduced to licit and illicit markets and rapidly distributed via worldwide operating Internet platforms. Developing fast analytical strategies to follow these new trends is one the most challenging issues for modern doping control analysis. Even if reference compounds for the active drugs are readily obtained, their unknown metabolism complicates effective testing strategies. Recently, a new class of small C-terminally amidated peptides comprising four to seven amino acid residues received considerable attention of sports drug testing authorities due to their ability to stimulate growth hormone release from the pituitary. The most promising candidates are the growth hormone releasing peptide (GHRP)-1, -2, -4, -5, -6, hexarelin, alexamorelin, and ipamorelin. With the exemption of GHRP-2, the entity of these peptides represents nonapproved pharmaceuticals; however, via Internet providers, all compounds are readily available. To date, only limited information on the metabolism of these substances is available and merely one metabolite for GHRP-2 is established. Therefore, a comprehensive in vivo (po and iv administration in rats) and in vitro (with human serum and recombinant amidase) study was performed in order to generate information on urinary metabolites potentially useful for routine doping controls. The urine samples from the in vivo experiments were purified by mixed-mode cation-exchange solid-phase extraction and analyzed by ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) separation followed by high-resolution/high-accuracy mass spectrometry. Combining the high resolution power of a benchtop Orbitrap mass analyzer for the first metabolite screening and the speed of a quadrupole/time-of-flight (Q-TOF) instrument for identification, urinary metabolites were screened by means of a sensitive full scan analysis and subsequently confirmed by high-accuracy product ion scan experiments. Two

  12. LH release and ovulatory response after intramuscular, intravenous, and intrauterine administration of β-nerve growth factor of seminal plasma origin in female llamas.

    PubMed

    Silva, M; Fernández, A; Ulloa-Leal, C; Adams, G P; Berland, M A; Ratto, M H

    2015-10-15

    The objective of the study was to compare the pituitary and ovarian responses after intramuscular, intravenous, or intrauterine administration of β-nerve growth factor (β-NGF) of seminal plasma origin (SP-NGF) in llamas. In experiment 1, mature female llamas with a growing follicle of 7 mm or greater were assigned randomly to four groups (n = 7/group) and given 2 mg of purified SP-NGF in a volume of 2 mL by (1) intramuscular administration, (2) intravenous administration, and (3) intrauterine infusion, or (4) intrauterine infusion of 2 mL of PBS (negative control). Because ovulations were not detected after intrauterine infusion in experiment 1, a second experiment was done to determine if a higher dose of SP-NGF given by intrauterine infusion, similar to a natural dose during copulation, will elicit an ovulatory response. In experiment 2, llamas with a growing follicle of 7 mm or greater were assigned randomly to three groups (n = 6/per group) given an intrauterine infusion of (1) 4 mL of raw seminal plasma, (2) 4 mL of PBS containing 20 mg of purified llama SP-NGF, or 3) 4 mL of PBS (negative control). In both experiments, the ovaries were examined daily by transrectal ultrasonography using a B-mode scanner and power Doppler mode to detect ovulation and to monitor CL growth, regression, and vascularization. Blood samples were collected to determine plasma LH and progesterone concentrations. In experiment 1, only llamas treated by intramuscular or intravenous administration of SP-NGF ovulated (7 of 7 and 6 of 7, respectively). Plasma LH concentration did not differ between the intramuscular and intravenous SP-NGF-treated groups, nor did CL diameter, CL vascularization, or plasma progesterone concentration profiles. In experiment 2, the ovulation rate was 100% for llamas treated by intrauterine infusion of raw seminal plasma or llama SP-NFG, whereas no ovulations were detected in females treated with PBS. Plasma LH concentrations did not differ between groups

  13. Comparison of the effect of calcium gluconate and batroxobin on the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 in canine platelet concentrates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The clinical use of autologous platelet concentrates (also known as platelet-rich plasma) on the field of regenerative therapy, in the last decade has been the subject of several studies especially in equine medicine and surgery. The objectives of this study was: 1) to describe and compare the cellular population in whole blood, lower fraction (A) and upper fraction (B) of platelet concentrates, 2) to measure and compare the transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) concentration in plasma and both platelet concentrates after be activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate and, 3) to determine correlations between cell counts in platelet concentrates and concentrations of TGF-β1. Blood samples were taken from 16 dogs for complete blood count, plasma collection and platelet concentrates preparation. The platelet concentrates (PC) were arbitrarily divided into two fractions, specifically, PC-A (lower fraction) and PC-B (upper fraction). The Platelet concentrates were analyzed by hemogram. After activated with calcium gluconate or batroxobin plus calcium gluconate, TGF-β1 concentration was determined in supernatants of platelet concentrates and plasma. Results There were differences statistically significant (P < 0.05) for the platelet count and leukocyte count and TGF-β1 concentration between whole blood, plasma and both platelet concentrates. A significant correlation was found between the number of platelets in both platelet concentrates and TGF-β1 concentration. Platelet collection efficiency was 46.34% and 28.16% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. TGF-β1 concentration efficiency for PC activated with calcium gluconate was 47.75% and 31.77%, for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. PC activated with batroxobin plus CG showed 46.87% and 32.24% for PC-A and PC-B, respectively. Conclusions The methodology used in this study allows the concentration of a number of platelets and TGF-β1 that might be acceptable for a biological

  14. Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Improves Neurotrophic Factors Release in Cultured Astroglia.

    PubMed

    Lin, FengQin; Zhou, YanZhen; Shi, WanLan; Wan, YanYing; Zhang, ZeGang; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG), one of the main ingredients of Polygonum multiflorum, has a great number of beneficial effects for health including anti-oxidant, free radicalscavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the potential effects of TSG on neurotrophic factors release remain unclear. In this study, rat primary astroglia cultures were applied to investigate TSG-mediated neurotrophic effects. The protein levels and production of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in astroglia and the culture medium were determined by western blotting assay and ELISA, respectively. Results indicated that TSG increased the production of neurotrophic factors in a concentration-dependent manner. At different time points of TSG treatment, the BDNF and NGF production in the culture medium was increased 48 h after treatment, while GDNF secretion was initially induced 24 h after TSG treatment. Consistent with the neurotrophic factors release, TSG significantly increased the BDNF, GDNF and NGF protein expressions in astroglia. Furthermore, TSG significantly induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and a specific ERK inhibitor-U0126 inhibited TSG-mediated secretion of BDNF, GDNF and NGF. Overall, this study demonstrated that TSG induces astroglia-derived neurotrophic factors release, suggesting TSG might hold a therapeutic potential for neurological disorders. PMID:26295829

  15. Growth Factors and Astrocytes Metabolism: Possible Roles for Platelet Derived Growth Factor.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Ricardo; Avila-Rodriguez, Marco; Vega-Vela, Nelson E; Echeverria, Valentina; González, Janneth; Hidalgo, Oscar A; Santos, Altair B; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Astrocytes exert multiple functions in the brain such as the development of blood-brain barrier characteristics, the promotion of neurovascular coupling, attraction of cells through the release of chemokines, clearance of toxic substances and generation of antioxidant molecules and growth factors. In this aspect, astrocytes secrete several growth factors (BDNF, GDNF, NGF, and others) that are fundamental for cell viability, oxidant protection, genetic expression and modulation of metabolic functions. The platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), which is expressed by many SNC cells, including astrocytes, is an important molecule that has shown neuroprotective potential, improvement of wound healing, regulation of calcium metabolism and mitochondrial function. Here we explore some of these astrocyte-driven functions of growth factors and their possible therapeutic uses in the context of neurodegeneration. PMID:26477707

  16. Effects of artemisinin sustained-release granules on mixed alga growth and microcystins production and release.

    PubMed

    Ni, Lixiao; Li, Danye; Hu, Shuzhen; Wang, Peifang; Li, Shiyin; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Acharya, Kumud

    2015-12-01

    To safely and effectively apply artemisinin sustained-release granules to control and prevent algal water-blooms, the effects of artemisinin and its sustained-release granules on freshwater alga (Scenedesmus obliquus (S. obliquus) and Microcystis aeruginosa (M. aeruginosa)), as well as the production and release of microcystins (MCs) were studied. The results showed that artemisinin sustained-release granules inhibited the growth of M. aeruginosa (above 95% IR) and S. obliquus (about 90% IR), with M. aeruginosa more sensitive. The artemisinin sustained-release granules had a longer inhibition effect on growth of pure algae and algal coexistence than direct artemisinin dosing. The artemisinin sustained-release granules could decrease the production and release of algal toxins due to the continued stress of artemisinin released from artemisinin sustained-release granules. There was no increase in the total amount of MC-LR in the algal cell culture medium. PMID:26432265

  17. Insulin-like growth factor-I regulates LH release by modulation of kisspeptin and NMDA-mediated neurotransmission in young and middle-aged female rats.

    PubMed

    Neal-Perry, Genevieve; Yao, Dachun; Shu, Jun; Sun, Yan; Etgen, Anne M

    2014-05-01

    This study investigated potential mechanisms by which age and IGF-I receptor (IGF-Ir) signaling in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus affect estradiol-positive feedback effects on GnRH neuronal activation and on kisspeptin and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced LH release and on the abundance of NMDA receptor subunits Nr1 and Nr2b and Kiss1r transcript and protein in the hypothalamus of young and middle-aged female rats. We infused vehicle, IGF-I, or JB-1, a selective antagonist of IGF-Ir, into the third ventricle of ovariectomized female rats primed with estradiol or vehicle and injected with vehicle, kisspeptin (3 or 30 nmol/kg), or NMDA (15 or 30 mg/kg). Regardless of dose, NMDA and kisspeptin resulted in significantly more LH release, GnRH/c-Fos colabeling, and c-Fos immunoreative cells in young than in middle-aged females. Estradiol priming significantly increased Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b receptor transcript and protein abundance in young but not middle-aged female hypothalamus. JB-1 attenuated kisspeptin and NMDA-induced LH release, numbers of GnRH/c-Fos and c-Fos cells, and Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b transcript and protein abundance in young females to levels observed in middle-aged females. IGF-I significantly enhanced NMDA and kisspeptin-induced LH release in middle-aged females without increasing numbers of GnRH/c-Fos or c-Fos immunoreactive cells. IGF-I infusion in middle-aged females also increased Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b protein and transcript to levels that were equivalent to young estradiol-primed females. These findings indicate that age-related changes in estradiol-regulated responsiveness to excitatory input from glutamate and kisspeptin reflect reduced IGF-Ir signaling. PMID:24617524

  18. Interstitial fibrosis and growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Lasky, J A; Brody, A R

    2000-01-01

    Interstitial pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is scarring of the lung caused by a variety of inhaled agents including mineral particles, organic dusts, and oxidant gases. The disease afflicts millions of individuals worldwide, and there are no effective therapeutic approaches. A major reason for this lack of useful treatments is that few of the molecular mechanisms of disease have been defined sufficiently to design appropriate targets for therapy. Our laboratory has focused on the molecular mechanisms through which three selected peptide growth factors could play a role in the development of IPF. Hundreds of growth factors and cytokines could be involved in the complex disease process. We are studying platelet-derived growth factor because it is the most potent mesenchymal cell mitogen yet described, transforming growth factor beta because it is a powerful inducer of extracellular matrix (scar tissue) components by mesenchymal cells, and tumor necrosis factor alpha because it is a pleiotropic cytokine that we and others have shown is essential for the development of IPF in animal models. This review describes some of the evidence from studies in humans, in animal models, and in vitro, that supports the growth factor hypothesis. The use of modern molecular and transgenic technologies could elucidate those targets that will allow effective therapeutic approaches. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10931794

  19. Growth factors in ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Lanfranconi, S; Locatelli, F; Corti, S; Candelise, L; Comi, G P; Baron, P L; Strazzer, S; Bresolin, N; Bersano, A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Data from pre-clinical and clinical studies provide evidence that colony-stimulating factors (CSFs) and other growth factors (GFs) can improve stroke outcome by reducing stroke damage through their anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects, and by promoting angiogenesis and neurogenesis. This review provides a critical and up-to-date literature review on CSF use in stroke. We searched for experimental and clinical studies on haemopoietic GFs such as granulocyte CSF, erythropoietin, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor (SCF), vascular endothelial GF, stromal cell-derived factor-1α and SCF in ischemic stroke. We also considered studies on insulin-like growth factor-1 and neurotrophins. Despite promising results from animal models, the lack of data in human beings hampers efficacy assessments of GFs on stroke outcome. We provide a comprehensive and critical view of the present knowledge about GFs and stroke, and an overview of ongoing and future prospects. PMID:20015202

  20. Superoxide radicals increase transforming growth factor-{beta}1 and collagen release from human lung fibroblasts via cellular influx through chloride channels

    SciTech Connect

    Qi Shufan Hartog, Gertjan J.M. den; Bast, Aalt

    2009-05-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. However, it remains unclear which ROS is the major cause. We hypothesize that superoxide elicits specific toxicity to human lung fibroblasts and plays an important role in the development of pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, superoxide generated from xanthine and xanthine oxidase activated lung fibroblasts by increasing the release of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen. This was associated with increased levels of intracellular superoxide. SOD and tempol, by scavenging respectively extracellular and intracellular superoxide, prevented the activation of fibroblasts induced by exposure to exogenous superoxide, whereas catalase did not. Moreover, hydrogen peroxide did not activate fibroblasts. Apparently, superoxide rather than hydrogen peroxide is involved in the regulation of TGF-{beta}1 and collagen release in lung fibroblasts. The chloride channel blocker, DIDS, inhibited the increase of intracellular superoxide levels induced by exogenous superoxide and consequently prevented the activation of fibroblasts. This suggests that the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels is essential for superoxide-induced activation of fibroblasts. ERK1/2 and p38 MAPKs are involved in the intracellular pathway leading to superoxide-induced fibroblasts activation. Superoxide possesses until now undiscovered specific pro-fibrotic properties in human lung fibroblasts. This takes place via the cellular influx of superoxide through chloride channels rather than via the formation of hydrogen peroxide.

  1. Polyelectrolyte Complex for Heparin Binding Domain Osteogenic Growth Factor Delivery.

    PubMed

    Wing Moon Lam, Raymond; Abbah, Sunny Akogwu; Ming, Wang; Naidu, Mathanapriya; Ng, Felly; Tao, Hu; Goh Cho Hong, James; Ting, Kang; Hee Kit, Wong

    2016-01-01

    During reconstructive bone surgeries, supraphysiological amounts of growth factors are empirically loaded onto scaffolds to promote successful bone fusion. Large doses of highly potent biological agents are required due to growth factor instability as a result of rapid enzymatic degradation as well as carrier inefficiencies in localizing sufficient amounts of growth factor at implant sites. Hence, strategies that prolong the stability of growth factors such as BMP-2/NELL-1, and control their release could actually lower their efficacious dose and thus reduce the need for larger doses during future bone regeneration surgeries. This in turn will reduce side effects and growth factor costs. Self-assembled PECs have been fabricated to provide better control of BMP-2/NELL-1 delivery via heparin binding and further potentiate growth factor bioactivity by enhancing in vivo stability. Here we illustrate the simplicity of PEC fabrication which aids in the delivery of a variety of growth factors during reconstructive bone surgeries. PMID:27585207

  2. Inhibition of oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor kinase triggers release of exosome-like extracellular vesicles and impacts their phosphoprotein and DNA content.

    PubMed

    Montermini, Laura; Meehan, Brian; Garnier, Delphine; Lee, Wan Jin; Lee, Tae Hoon; Guha, Abhijit; Al-Nedawi, Khalid; Rak, Janusz

    2015-10-01

    Cancer cells emit extracellular vesicles (EVs) containing unique molecular signatures. Here, we report that the oncogenic EGF receptor (EGFR) and its inhibitors reprogram phosphoproteomes and cargo of tumor cell-derived EVs. Thus, phosphorylated EGFR (P-EGFR) and several other receptor tyrosine kinases can be detected in EVs purified from plasma of tumor-bearing mice and from conditioned media of cultured cancer cells. Treatment of EGFR-driven tumor cells with second generation EGFR kinase inhibitors (EKIs), including CI-1033 and PF-00299804 but not with anti-EGFR antibody (Cetuximab) or etoposide, triggers a burst in emission of exosome-like EVs containing EGFR, P-EGFR, and genomic DNA (exo-gDNA). The EV release can be attenuated by treatment with inhibitors of exosome biogenesis (GW4869) and caspase pathways (ZVAD). The content of P-EGFR isoforms (Tyr-845, Tyr-1068, and Tyr-1173), ERK, and AKT varies between cells and their corresponding EVs and as a function of EKI treatment. Immunocapture experiments reveal the presence of EGFR and exo-gDNA within the same EV population following EKI treatment. These findings suggest that targeted agents may induce cancer cells to change the EV emission profiles reflective of drug-related therapeutic stress. We suggest that EV-based assays may serve as companion diagnostics for targeted anticancer agents. PMID:26272609

  3. Effect of vaccination against gonadotrophin-releasing factor on growth performance, carcass, meat and fat quality of male Duroc pigs for dry-cured ham production.

    PubMed

    Font-I-Furnols, M; Gispert, M; Soler, J; Diaz, M; Garcia-Regueiro, J A; Diaz, I; Pearce, M C

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare production, carcass and meat quality parameters, boar taint compounds and fat composition of green and dry-cured hams, between immunocastrated (IM), surgically castrated (CM) and female (FE) Duroc purebred pigs (n=75, 138.7±8.27kg). Liveweight and fat and muscle thicknesses were measured and average daily gain was calculated during growth. Carcass, meat and fat quality parameters were measured. Immunocastrated grew faster than CM or FE after the second dose of vaccine. IM had the lowest dressing percentage but similar % of ham and carcass lean to FE and CM. The effect of the immunocastration on carcass fatness depended on the location, did not affect fat and meat quality and reduced skatole and androstenone levels. Both in green and dry-cured ham, immunocastration slightly altered FA composition. Thus, Duroc pigs vaccinated with Improvac are suitable for the production of high quality dry-cured ham. PMID:22309935

  4. Central corticotropin releasing factor and social stress

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Tobias; Winberg, Svante

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions are a main source of stress in vertebrates. Social stressors, as well as other stressors, activate the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in glucocorticoid release. One of the main components of the HPA axis is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). The neuropeptide CRF is part of a peptide family including CRF, urocortin 1–3, urotensin 1–3, and sauvagine. The actions of the CRF family are mediated by at least two different receptors with different anatomical distribution and affinities for the peptides. The CRF peptides affect several behavioral and physiological responses to stress including aggression, feeding, and locomotor activity. This review will summarize recent research in vertebrates concerning how social stress interacts with components of the CRF system. Consideration will be taken to the different models used for social stress ranging from social isolation, dyadic interactions, to group dominance hierarchies. Further, the temporal effect of social stressor from acute, intermittent, to chronic will be considered. Finally, strains selected for specific behavior or physiology linked to social stress will also be discussed. PMID:23847465

  5. Treatment of true precocious puberty with a potent luteinizing hormone-releasing factor agonist: effect on growth, sexual maturation, pelvic sonography, and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

    PubMed

    Styne, D M; Harris, D A; Egli, C A; Conte, F A; Kaplan, S L; Rivier, J; Vale, W; Grumbach, M M

    1985-07-01

    We used the LHRH agonist D-Trp6-Pro6-N-ethylamide LHRH (LHRH-A) to treat 19 children (12 girls and 7 boys) with true precocious puberty. Fourteen patients had idiopathic true precocious puberty, 4 had a hamartoma of the tuber cinereum, and 1 had a hypothalamic astrocytoma. Basal gonadotropin secretion and responses to native LHRH decreased within 1 week of initiation LHRH-A therapy, and sex steroid secretion decreased within 2 weeks to or within the prepubertal range. Ultrasonographic evaluation of the uterus indicated a postmenarchal size and shape in all 11 girls studied before treatment, which reverted to prepubertal size and configuration in 5 girls during LHRH-A therapy. The enlarged ovaries decreased in size and the multiple ovarian follicular cysts regressed. Sexual characteristics ceased advancing or reverted toward the prepubertal state in all patients receiving therapy for 6-36 months. All 5 girls with menarche before therapy had no further menses. Three girls had hot flashes after LHRH-A-induced reduction of the plasma estradiol concentration. Height velocity, SDs above the mean height velocity for age, and SDs above the mean height for age decreased during LHRH-A therapy; the velocity of skeletal maturation decreased after 12 months of LHRH-A therapy and was sustained during continued therapy over 18-36 months. In 4 patients, a subnormal growth rate (less than 4.5 cm/yr) occurred during LHRH-A therapy. Six patients had cutaneous reactions of LHRH-A, but no demonstrable circulating antibodies to LHRH-A. In 2 patients in whom LHRH-A therapy was discontinued because of skin reactions, precocious sexual maturation resumed at the previous rate for the ensuing 6-12 months; subsequently, they were desensitized to LHRH-A, and during a second course of therapy, their secondary sexual development and sex steroid levels again quickly decreased. LHRH-A proved an effective and safe treatment for true precocious puberty in boys as well as girls with central

  6. The suppression of fibroblast growth factor 2/fibroblast growth factor 4-dependent tumour angiogenesis and growth by the anti-growth factor activity of dextran derivative (CMDB7).

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Yarmand, R.; Kourbali, Y.; Mabilat, C.; Morère, J. F.; Martin, A.; Lu, H.; Soria, C.; Jozefonvicz, J.; Crépin, M.

    1998-01-01

    Our previous studies showed that carboxymethyl benzylamide dextran (CMDB7) blocks basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2)-dependent cell proliferation of a human breast epithelial line (HBL100), suggesting its potential role as a potent antiangiogenic substance. The derived cell line (HH9), which was transformed with the hst/FGF4 gene, has been shown to be highly proliferative in vitro and to induce angiogenic tumours in nude mice. We show here that CMDB7 inhibits the mitogenic activities of the conditioned media from HBL 100 and HH9 cells in a dose-dependent manner. When HH9 cells were injected s.c. into nude mice, CMDB7 treatment (300 mg kg(-1) week(-1)) suppressed the tumour take and the tumour growth by about 50% and 80% respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis showed a highly significant decrease, by more than threefold, in the endothelial density of viable tumour regions, together with a significant increase in the necrosis area. This antiangiogenic activity of CMDB7 was further demonstrated by direct inhibition of calf pulmonary artery (CPAE) and human umbilical vein (HUVEC) endothelial cell proliferation and migration in vitro. In addition, we showed that CMDB7 inhibits specifically the mitogenic effects of the growth factors that bind to heparin such as FGF-2, FGF-4, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor (TGF-beta1), but not those of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1). These results demonstrate that CMDB7 inhibits FGF-2/FGF-4-dependent tumour growth and angiogenesis, most likely by disrupting the autocrine and paracrine effects of growth factors released from the tumour cells. Images Figure 4 PMID:9662260

  7. Growth factors in orthopedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zaharia, C; Despa, N; Simionescu, M; Jinga, V; Fleseriu, I

    2010-01-01

    Growth factors have represented an essential issue of interest for the researchers and clinicians in orthopedics and trauma over the last 40 years. In the last 10 to 15 years, the advances registered in this field have permitted the identification of the most active cellular and humoral factors as well as the improvement of their use in the orthopedic and trauma surgery. Their domain of application has been continuously enlarged and the results have been visible from the beginning. The authors present their appreciation on the actual state of this subject as well as their experience with results and related conclusions. PMID:20302195

  8. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 and fibroblast growth factors in rat growth plate.

    PubMed

    Jingushi, S; Scully, S P; Joyce, M E; Sugioka, Y; Bolander, M E

    1995-09-01

    Chondrocytes in the growth plate progress in an orderly fashion from resting through proliferating to hypertrophic cells. In the region of hypertrophic chondrocytes, the cartilage is invaded by capillary loops and endochondral ossification is initiated. It is currently believed that growth factors may regulate the proliferation and maturation of chondrocytes and the synthesis of extracellular matrix in the growth plate. The ordered sequence of proliferation and differentiation observed in the growth plate provides a unique opportunity to study the role of acidic fibroblast growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in the regulation of these processes. In this study, expression of the mRNA of these growth factors was examined using total RNA extracted from the physis and epiphysis of rat tibias. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 mRNA was detected by Northern hybridization. Expression of the genes encoding acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors was demonstrated by polymerase chain reaction amplification. In addition, using polyclonal antibodies against these growth factors, we localized them by immunohistochemical analysis. Strong intracellular staining with a predominantly nuclear pattern was observed in chondrocytes from the proliferating and upper hypertrophic zones. In contrast, chondrocytes in the resting zone stained only faintly for the presence of these growth factors. Some chondrocytes in the resting zone adjacent to the proliferating zone stained with these antibodies, and the antibodies also stained cells in the zone of Ranvier, which regulates latitudinal bone growth. Lastly, the location of transforming growth factor-beta 1 was examined further with use of a polyclonal antipeptide antibody specific for its extracellular epitope.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7472755

  9. Epidermal growth factor and growth in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a dose-dependent thickening of the epidermis in suckling mice. The cellular mechanisms underlying this thickening were analyzed by measuring the effect of EGF on the cell-cycle. Neonatal mice were given daily injections of either 2ug EGF/g body weight/day or an equivalent volume of saline, and on the seventh day received a single injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine. At various times the mice were perfused with fixative; 1um sections of skin were stained with a modification of Harris' hematoxylin and were autoradiographed. The sections were analyzed using three methods based on the dependence on time after injection of /sup 3/H-thymidine of: frequency of labelled mitoses, labelling index, and reciprocal grains/nucleus. It was found that EGF caused a two-fold increase in the cell production rate. The effect of exogenous EGF on the morphology of gastric mucosa and incisors of suckling mice was also studied. The gastric mucosa appeared thicker in EGF-treated animals, but the effect was not statistically significant. In contrast to its effect on epidermis and gastric mucosa, EGF caused a significant, dose-dependent decrease in the size of the incisors. Because the mouse submandibular salivary gland is the major source of EGF the effect of sialoadenectomy on female reproductive functions was examined. Ablation of the submandibular gland had no effect on: length of estrus cycle, ability of the female to produce litters, length of the gestation period, litter size, and weight of the litter at birth. There was also no effect on survival of the offspring or on age at which the eyelids separated.

  10. Mapping the human growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (GHRHR) gene to the short arm of chromosome 7(7p13-p21) near the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Vamvakopoulos, N.C. ); Kunz, J.; Olberding, U. ); Scherer, S.W. ); Sioutopoulou, O.T. ); Schneider, V.; Durkin, A.S.; Nierman, W.C. )

    1994-03-15

    In this report, the authors have assigned the human GHRHR gene to chromosome 7p13-p21, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA from well-defined human-rodent somatic cell hybrids. The GHRHR gene was assigned to human chromosome 7 by discordancy analysis (data not shown) of PCR amplification products from NIGMS mapping panel Nos. 1 and 2 DNA templates. The PCR primers (p[sub f], 5[prime]-GCTGCCTCATCACGCCACTGGAGTCCAC-3[prime]; and P[sub r], 5[prime]-CAGGTTTATTGGCTCCTCTGAGCCTTGG-3[prime]) amplified a 276-bp-long fragment from the 3[prime] untranslated region of the human GHRHR gene. Subsequently, they determined the location of the GHRHR gene within human chromosome 7 by PCR amplification of genomic DNA template from somatic cell hybrids that contain deletions of this chromosome. Amplification of the 276-bp DNA fragment was seen only in the cell lines that contained an intact chromosome 7 short arm. The lack of amplification using genomic DNA from 0044 Rag 1-15 and It A9 2-21-14 maps this gene to 7p13-p21. Additionally, the appropriate amplified product was observed from the human chromosome 4 containing NIGMS panel 2 cell line GM10115. This line was reported to have retained a small region of human chromosome 7 containing the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene that is mapped to 7p12-p13. The authors conclude that the human GHRHR gene maps to the small arm of chromosome 7 within 7p13-p21 and close to the EGFR gene. This assignment is consistent with the syntenic relationship between mouse chromosome 6 and human chromosome 7 in this region.

  11. Growth factor-eluting technologies for bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nyberg, Ethan; Holmes, Christina; Witham, Timothy; Grayson, Warren L

    2016-04-01

    Growth factors are essential orchestrators of the normal bone fracture healing response. For non-union defects, delivery of exogenous growth factors to the injured site significantly improves healing outcomes. However, current clinical methods for scaffold-based growth factor delivery are fairly rudimentary, and there is a need for greater spatial and temporal regulation to increase their in vivo efficacy. Various approaches used to provide spatiotemporal control of growth factor delivery from bone tissue engineering scaffolds include physical entrapment, chemical binding, surface modifications, biomineralization, micro- and nanoparticle encapsulation, and genetically engineered cells. Here, we provide a brief review of these technologies, describing the fundamental mechanisms used to regulate release kinetics. Examples of their use in pre-clinical studies are discussed, and their capacities to provide tunable, growth factor delivery are compared. These advanced scaffold systems have the potential to provide safer, more effective therapies for bone regeneration than the systems currently employed in the clinic. PMID:25967594

  12. Growth Factors and Tension-Induced Skeletal Muscle Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1994-01-01

    The project investigated biochemical mechanisms to enhance skeletal muscle growth, and developed a computer based mechanical cell stimulator system. The biochemicals investigated in this study were insulin/(Insulin like Growth Factor) IGF-1 and Steroids. In order to analyze which growth factors are essential for stretch-induced muscle growth in vitro, we developed a defined, serum-free medium in which the differentiated, cultured avian muscle fibers could be maintained for extended periods of time. The defined medium (muscle maintenance medium, MM medium) maintains the nitrogen balance of the myofibers for 3 to 7 days, based on myofiber diameter measurements and myosin heavy chain content. Insulin and IGF-1, but not IGF-2, induced pronounced myofiber hypertrophy when added to this medium. In 5 to 7 days, muscle fiber diameters increase by 71 % to 98% compared to untreated controls. Mechanical stimulation of the avian muscle fibers in MM medium increased the sensitivity of the cells to insulin and IGF-1, based on a leftward shift of the insulin dose/response curve for protein synthesis rates. (54). We developed a ligand binding assay for IGF-1 binding proteins and found that the avian skeletal muscle cultures produced three major species of 31, 36 and 43 kD molecular weight (54) Stretch of the myofibers was found to have no significant effect on the efflux of IGF-1 binding proteins, but addition of exogenous collagen stimulated IGF-1 binding protein production 1.5 to 5 fold. Steroid hormones have a profound effect on muscle protein turnover rates in vivo, with the stress-related glucocorticoids inducing rapid skeletal muscle atrophy while androgenic steroids induce skeletal muscle growth. Exercise in humans and animals reduces the catabolic effects of glucocorticoids and may enhance the anabolic effects of androgenic steroids on skeletal muscle. In our continuing work on the involvement of exogenrus growth factors in stretch-induced avian skeletal muscle growth, we

  13. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed. PMID:24212642

  14. Regulated release of serotonin from axonal growth cones isolated from the fetal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Mercado, R; Floran, B; Hernandez, J

    1998-01-01

    In the present work we propose an hypothetical model related to a molecular recognizing system for serotonin in isolated growth cone particles. This model is supported by previous results from our laboratory plus new ones which show that growth cones release serotonin tonically and such release can be stimulated by potassium in a calcium-dependent manner. The present results, together with other author's data, suggest a physiological basis for the putative role of serotonin as a trophic factor during nervous system development. PMID:9460708

  15. Regulation of pituitary MT1 melatonin receptor expression by gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) and early growth response factor-1 (Egr-1): in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sung-Eun; Wright, Ian K; Wyse, Cathy; Samson-Desvignes, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Pascale; Laroche, Serge; Hazlerigg, David G; Johnston, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melatonin receptor expression exhibits profound developmental changes through poorly understood mechanisms. In mammals, a current model suggests that pubertal reactivation of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) secretion down-regulates MT1 melatonin receptors in pituitary gonadotroph cells, via the induction of early growth response factor-1 (EGR-1). Here we have examined this model by testing the hypotheses that inhibition of Mt1 expression by GnRH occurs directly in gonadotroph cells, can be reversed in adulthood by blockade of GnRH receptors, and requires EGR-1. We first confirmed the endogenous expression of Mt1 mRNA in the αT3-1 gonadotroph cell line. Stimulation of these cells with a GnRH agonist resulted in a rapid increase of Egr-1 mRNA expression, which peaked after 30-60 minutes, and a more prolonged elevation of nuclear EGR-1 immunoreactivity. Moreover, the GnRH agonist significantly decreased Mt1 mRNA. We then treated adult male rats with the GnRH antagonist cetrorelix or saline. After 4 weeks of daily injections, cetrorelix significantly reduced serum LH concentration and testis weight, with histological analysis confirming absence of spermatogenesis. Despite the successful inhibition of GnRH signalling, pituitary Mt1 expression was unchanged. Next we studied the proximal region of the rat Mt1 promoter. Consistent with previous work, over-expression of the transcription factor PITX-1 increased Mt1-luciferase reporter activity; this effect was dependent on the presence of consensus PITX-1 promoter binding regions. Over-expression of EGR-1 inhibited PITX-1-stimulated activity, even following mutation of the consensus EGR-1 binding site. Finally, we studied Egr1-/- mice and observed no difference in pituitary Mt1 expression between Egr1-/- and wild-type litter mates. This work demonstrates that GnRH receptor activation directly down-regulates Mt1 expression in gonadotroph cells. However, pituitary Mt1 expression in adults is unaltered by blockade of

  16. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  17. The Role of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors and Fibroblast Growth Factors in Angiogenesis during Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Husseman, Jacob; Palacios, Sean D.; Rivkin, Alexander Z.; Oehl, Heinz; Ryan, Allen F.

    2012-01-01

    The middle ear response to otitis media includes transformation and hyperplasia of the mucosal epithelium and subepithelial connective tissue. Significant neovascularization is also noted, which occurs both to support the hypertrophied mucosa and to mediate the increased trafficking of leukocytes. We investigated the role of two known potent angiogenic growth factor families, the fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), in middle ear mucosal angiogenesis. DNA microarrays were used to evaluate the expression of FGFs and VEGFs, as well as their receptors and unique signaling proteins, in the middle ears of mice undergoing a complete course of acute bacterial otitis media. In addition, a member of each family was introduced to the middle ear submucosal compartment of the normal middle ears of guinea pigs, by a continuous-release osmotic minipump system over 1 week. During the course of bacterial otitis media, a significant regulation of a number of genes important for angiogenesis was identified. Histologic evaluation of middle ear mucosa following micropump infusion of both FGF1 and VEGF-A showed significant angiogenesis at the site of infusion in comparison to control saline infusion. These results support a role for FGFs and VEGFs in the neovascularization of the middle ear mucosa during otitis media, and offer a potential avenue for therapeutic intervention. PMID:22104377

  18. Rat growth-hormone release stimulators from fenugreek seeds.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sang Hee; Lee, Eun Ju; Kim, Ju Sun; Kang, Sam Sik; Ha, Hyekyung; Lee, Ho Young; Kim, Chungsook; Lee, Je-Hyun; Son, Kun Ho

    2008-09-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of MeOH extract from fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) seeds resulted in the isolation of two rat growth-hormone release stimulators in vitro, fenugreek saponin I (1) and dioscin (9), along with two new, i.e., 2 and 3, and five known analogues, i.e., 4-8. The structures of the new steroidal saponins, fenugreek saponins I, II, and III (1-3, resp.), were determined as gitogenin 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, sarsasapogenin 3-O-beta-D-xylopyranosyl-(1-->6)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, and gitogenin 3-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside, respectively. Fenugreek saponin I (1) and dioscin (9) caused ca. 12.5- and 17.7-fold stimulation of release, respectively, of rat growth hormone from rat pituitary cells, whereas gitogenin (5) showed moderate activity. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that steroidal saponins stimulate rat growth-hormone release in rat pituitary cells. PMID:18816528

  19. Algorithmic complexity of growth hormone release in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Prank, K.; Wagner, M.; Brabant, G.

    1996-12-31

    Most hormones are secreted in an pulsatile rather than in a constant manner. This temporal pattern of pulsatile hormone release plays an important role in the regulation of cellular function and structure. In healthy humans growth hormone (GH) secretion is characterized by distinct pulses whereas patients bearing a GH producing tumor accompanied with excessive secretion (acromegaly) exhibit a highly irregular pattern of GH release. It has been hypothesized that this highly disorderly pattern of GH release in acromegaly arises from random events in the GH-producing tumor under decreased normal control of GH secretion. Using a context-free grammar complexity measure (algorithmic complexity) in conjunction with random surrogate data sets we demonstrate that the temporal pattern of GH release in acromegaly is not significantly different from a variety of stochastic processes. In contrast, normal subjects clearly exhibit deterministic structure in their temporal patterns of GH secretion. Our results support the hypothesis that GH release in acromegaly is due to random events in the GH-producing tumorous cells which might become independent from hypothalamic regulation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Roles for Growth Factors in Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Witsch, Esther; Sela, Michael; Yarden, Yosef

    2011-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, cells receive fate-determining signals from their tissue surroundings, primarily in the form of polypeptide growth factors. Integration of these extracellular signals underlies tissue homeostasis. Although departure from homeostasis and tumor initiation are instigated by oncogenic mutations rather than by growth factors, the latter are the major regulators of all subsequent steps of tumor progression, namely clonal expansion, invasion across tissue barriers, angiogenesis, and colonization of distant niches. Here, we discuss the relevant growth factor families, their roles in tumor biology, as well as the respective downstream signaling pathways. Importantly, cancer-associated activating mutations that impinge on these pathways often relieve, in part, the reliance of tumors on growth factors. On the other hand, growth factors are frequently involved in evolvement of resistance to therapeutic regimens, which extends the roles for polypeptide factors to very late phases of tumor progression and offers opportunities for cancer therapy. PMID:20430953

  1. How does the pathophysiological context influence delivery of bone growth factors?☆

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaohua; Suárez-González, Darilis; Khalil, Andrew S.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    “Orthobiologics” represents an important category of therapeutics for the regeneration of bone defects caused by injuries or diseases, and bone growth factors are a particularly rapidly growing sub-category. Clinical application of bone growth factors has accelerated in the last two decades with the introduction of BMPs into clinical bone repair. Optimal use of growth factor-mediated treatments heavily relies on controlled delivery, which can substantially influence the local growth factor dose, release kinetics, and biological activity. The characteristics of the surrounding environment, or “context”, during delivery can dictate growth factor loading efficiency, release and biological activity. This review discusses the influence of the surrounding environment on therapeutic delivery of bone growth factors. We specifically focus on pathophysiological components, including soluble components and cells, and how they can actively influence the therapeutic delivery and perhaps efficacy of bone growth factors. PMID:25453269

  2. Peripheral activities of growth hormone-releasing hormone.

    PubMed

    Granata, R

    2016-07-01

    Growth hormone (GH)-releasing hormone (GHRH) is produced by the hypothalamus and stimulates GH synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary gland. In addition to its endocrine role, GHRH exerts a wide range of extrapituitary effects which include stimulation of cell proliferation, survival and differentiation, and inhibition of apoptosis. Accordingly, expression of GHRH, as well as the receptor GHRH-R and its splice variants, has been demonstrated in different peripheral tissues and cell types. Among the direct peripheral activities, GHRH regulates pancreatic islet and β-cell survival and function and endometrial cell proliferation, promotes cardioprotection and wound healing, influences the immune and reproductive systems, reduces inflammation, indirectly increases lifespan and adiposity and acts on skeletal muscle cells to inhibit cell death and atrophy. Therefore, it is becoming increasingly clear that GHRH exerts important extrapituitary functions, suggesting potential therapeutic use of the peptide and its analogs in a wide range of medical settings. PMID:26891937

  3. Growth factors from genes to clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Sara, V.R. ); Hall, K.; Low, H. )

    1990-01-01

    The last decade has witnessed an explosion in the identification of growth factors and their receptors. This has been greatly facilitated by recombinant DNA technology, which has provided the tools not only to identify these proteins at the gene level but also to produce recombinant proteins for evaluating their biological activities. With the help of such techniques, we are moving toward an understanding of the biosynthesis of growth factors and their receptors, structure-function relationships, as well as mechanisms for intracellular signal transmission. The possibility of modifying these factors has opened new fields of clinical application. In this paper, four major areas of growth factor research are presented: the characterization of growth factor genes and their protein products, growth factor receptors and signal transduction by the receptors to mediate biological action, the biological actions of the various growth factors, and the role of growth factors in health and disease and their possible clinical application. Some of the topics covered include: structure of the IGFs and their variants; isoforms of PDGF receptor types; tyrosine kinase activation; structure of G-proteins in biological membranes; possible therapeutic application of NGF in the treatment of Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases; PDGF's possible role in the development of several fibroproliferative diseases and its therapeutic application in wound healing; and the possible use of angiogenic inhibitors in tumor treatment.

  4. Heparin-Binding Epidermal Growth Factor-like Growth Factor/Diphtheria Toxin Receptor in Normal and Neoplastic Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Vinante, Fabrizio; Rigo, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) belongs to the EGF family of growth factors. It is biologically active either as a molecule anchored to the membrane or as a soluble form released by proteolytic cleavage of the extracellular domain. HB-EGF is involved in relevant physiological and pathological processes spanning from proliferation and apoptosis to morphogenesis. We outline here the main activities of HB-EGF in connection with normal or neoplastic differentiative or proliferative events taking place primitively in the hematopoietic microenvironment. PMID:23888518

  5. Myogenic expression of an injectable protease-resistant growth hormone-releasing hormone augments long-term growth in pigs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Draghia-Akli, R.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Hill, L. A.; Malone, P. B.; Deaver, D. R.; Schwartz, R. J.

    1999-01-01

    Ectopic expression of a new serum protease-resistant porcine growth hormone-releasing hormone, directed by an injectable muscle-specific synthetic promoter plasmid vector (pSP-HV-GHRH), elicits growth in pigs. A single 10 mg intramuscular injection of pSP-HV-GHRH DNA followed by electroporation in three-week-old piglets elevated serum GHRH levels by twofold to fourfold, enhanced growth hormone secretion, and increased serum insulin-like growth factor-I by threefold to sixfold over control pigs. After 65 days the average body weight of the pigs injected with pSP-HV-GHRH was approximately 37% greater than the placebo-injected controls and resulted in a significant reduction in serum urea concentration, indicating a decrease in amino acid catabolism. Evaluation of body composition indicated a uniform increase in mass, with no organomegaly or associated pathology.

  6. Growth factors for the treatment of ischemic brain injury (growth factor treatment).

    PubMed

    Larpthaveesarp, Amara; Ferriero, Donna M; Gonzalez, Fernando F

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, growth factor therapy has emerged as a potential treatment for ischemic brain injury. The efficacy of therapies that either directly introduce or stimulate local production of growth factors and their receptors in damaged brain tissue has been tested in a multitude of models for different Central Nervous System (CNS) diseases. These growth factors include erythropoietin (EPO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), among others. Despite the promise shown in animal models, the particular growth factors that should be used to maximize both brain protection and repair, and the therapeutic critical period, are not well defined. We will review current pre-clinical and clinical evidence for growth factor therapies in treating different causes of brain injury, as well as issues to be addressed prior to application in humans. PMID:25942688

  7. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, H. H.

    1987-01-01

    Muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow skeletal myofibers which differentiate into more adult-like myofibers. Mechanical simulation studies of these muscle cells in a newly developed mechanical cell simulator can now be performed to study growth processes in skeletal muscle. Conditions in the mechanical cell simulator were defined where mechanical activity can either prevent muscle wasting or stimulate muscle growth. The role of endogenous and exogenous growth factors in tension-induced muscle growth is being investigated under the defined conditions of tissue culture.

  8. Environmental factors influencing growth and pubertal development.

    PubMed Central

    Delemarre-van de Waal, H A

    1993-01-01

    Postnatal growth is based on hereditary signals and environmental factors in a complex regulatory network. Each factor must be in an optimal state for normal growth of the child. Fetal conditions may also have consequences on postnatal height. Intrauterine growth retardation can be recovered postnatally, although postnatal growth remains depressed in about one-third of cases. After birth, the environment may exert either a positive or negative effect on growth. In underdeveloped countries, malnutrition plays a major role in inhibiting the growth process. Children from families of higher socioeconomic classes are taller than their coevals in the lower socioeconomic groups. Urbanization also has a positive effect on growth. Better child care is supported by sufficient food supply, appropriate health and sanitation services, and a higher level of education. Over the last century, these factors have induced a taller stature and a more rapid maturity in Europe, North America, and Australia; a phenomenon which has been referred to as "the secular trend" in growth. Recently, a secular trend has also been reported in some developing countries. Although urbanization in general appears to be associated with better conditions of living, this is not the case in the slums of South America or in Africa where rural children are better off than children living in the poor cities. This paper describes in more detail the different hereditary and environmental factors that act during the fetal period and postnatally, and which play a role in human growth and pubertal development. PMID:8243404

  9. Vascular growth factors in neuropsychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Samuel S.; Fournier, Neil M.; Duman, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in understanding the cellular and molecular basis of psychiatric illnesses have shed light on the important role played by trophic factors in modulating functional parameters associated with disease causality and drug action. Disease mechanisms are now thought to involve multiple cell types, including neurons and endothelial cells. These functionally distinct but interactively coupled cell types engage in cellular cross talk via shared and common signaling molecules. Dysregulation in their cellular signaling pathways influences brain function and alters behavioral performance. Multifunctional trophic factors such as VEGF and EPO that possess both neurotrophic and angiogenic actions are of particular interest due to their ability to rescue structural and plasticity deficits in neurons and vasculature. Obtaining insight into the behavioral, cellular and molecular actions of multi-functional trophic factors has the potential to open new and transformative therapeutic approaches. PMID:23475069

  10. Interactions of growth hormone secretagogues and growth hormone-releasing hormone/somatostatin.

    PubMed

    Tannenbaum, G S; Bowers, C Y

    2001-02-01

    The class of novel synthetic compounds termed growth hormone secretagogues (GHSs) act in the hypothalamus through, as yet, unknown pathways. We performed physiologic and histochemical studies to further understand how the GHS system interacts with the well-established somatostatin (SRIF)/growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neuroendocrine system for regulating pulsatile GH secretion. Comparison of the GH-releasing activities of the hexapeptide growth hormone-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6) and GHRH administered intravenously to conscious adult male rats showed that the pattern of GH responsiveness to GHRP-6 was markedly time-dependent, similar to that observed with GHRH. Immunoneutralization of endogenous SRIF reversed the blunted GH response to GHRP-6 at trough times, suggesting that GHRP-6 neither disrupts nor inhibits the cyclical release of endogenous hypothalamic SRIF. By striking contrast, passive immunization with anti-GHRH serum virtually obliterated the GH responses to GHRP-6, irrespective of the time of administration. These findings suggest that the GHSs do not act by altering SRIF release but, rather, stimulate GH release via GHRH-dependent pathways. Our dual chromogenic and autoradiographic in situ hybridization experiments revealed that a subpopulation of GHRH mRNA-containing neurons in the arcuate (Arc) nucleus and ventromedial nucleus (VMN) of the hypothalamus expressed the GHS receptor (GHS-R) gene. These results provide strong anatomic evidence that GHSs may directly stimulate GHRH release into hypophyseal portal blood, and thereby influence GH secretion, through interaction with the GHS-R on GHRH- containing neurons. Altogether, these findings support the notion that an additional neuroendocrine pathway may exist to regulate pulsatile GH secretion, possibly through the influence of the newly discovered GHS natural peptide, ghrelin. PMID:11322498

  11. New Clue Found to Growth Factor Action.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Michelle

    1991-01-01

    Discussed is the discovery which may help to explain epidermal growth factor effects on the cell skeleton. The role of a protein called profilin in the regulation of the microfilament system is described. (CW)

  12. Expression of growth factors in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Asgari, S; Arun, S; Slade, M B; Marshall, J; Williams, K L; Wheldrake, J F

    2001-07-01

    Growth factors and their binding proteins are important proteins regulating mammalian cell proliferation and differentiation so there is considerable interest in producing them as recombinant proteins, especially in hosts that do not already produce a complex mixture of growth factors. Many growth factors require post-translational modifications making them unsuitable for production in Escherichia coli or other prokaryotes. Since several expression vector systems have been recently developed for foreign protein production in the cellular slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum, we attempted to use two of these systems to express human insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 (hIGFBP6) and bovine beta-cellulin (bBTC) as secreted proteins. Although both proteins were successfully produced in stably transformed amoebae, no secretion was detected in spite of several attempts to facilitate this occurring. PMID:11361083

  13. [T-LYMPHOCYTES AND TISSUE GROWTH FACTORS].

    PubMed

    Tishevskaya, N V; Gevorkyan, N M; Kozlova, N I

    2015-08-01

    Lympnoici regulation, in aciaition to ensuring tne protection of tne antigen, is aimecl at maintaining a qualitative, quantitative, structural and functional integrity of the body. T-lymphocytes and growth factors are involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and tissue and organ regeneration. Lymphocyte's, sensitivity to homeostasis changes and their morphogenetic function are connected with a large number of receptors to bioactive substances and with their ability to syn- thesize and secrete hormones and tissue growth factors. At the same time tissue growth factors are involved in the development of thymocytes, in the differentiation of T helper and cytotoxic lymphocytes. Growth factors modulate the functions of Thl, Th2, Treg, Thl7, Th9. The important aspects of the interaction of T cells and EGF, TGF-P, FGF, VEGF, PlGF, HGF/SF in normal and pathological conditions are shown in this review. PMID:26591583

  14. Extracellular matrix-inspired growth factor delivery systems for bone regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Martino, Mikaël M.; Briquez, Priscilla S.; Maruyama, Kenta; Hubbell, Jeffrey A.

    2015-04-17

    Growth factors are very promising molecules to enhance bone regeneration. However, their translation to clinical use has been seriously limited, facing issues related to safety and cost-effectiveness. These problems derive from the vastly supra-physiological doses of growth factor used without optimized delivery systems. Therefore, these issues have motivated the development of new delivery systems allowing better control of the spatio-temporal release and signaling of growth factors. Because the extracellular matrix (ECM) naturally plays a fundamental role in coordinating growth factor activity in vivo, a number of novel delivery systems have been inspired by the growth factor regulatory function of the ECM. After introducing the role of growth factors during the bone regeneration process, this review exposes different issues that growth factor-based therapies have encountered in the clinic and highlights recent delivery approaches based on the natural interaction between growth factor and the ECM.

  15. Priming Dental Pulp Stem Cells With Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Increases Angiogenesis of Implanted Tissue-Engineered Constructs Through Hepatocyte Growth Factor and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Secretion.

    PubMed

    Gorin, Caroline; Rochefort, Gael Y; Bascetin, Rumeyza; Ying, Hanru; Lesieur, Julie; Sadoine, Jérémy; Beckouche, Nathan; Berndt, Sarah; Novais, Anita; Lesage, Matthieu; Hosten, Benoit; Vercellino, Laetitia; Merlet, Pascal; Le-Denmat, Dominique; Marchiol, Carmen; Letourneur, Didier; Nicoletti, Antonino; Vital, Sibylle Opsahl; Poliard, Anne; Salmon, Benjamin; Muller, Laurent; Chaussain, Catherine; Germain, Stéphane

    2016-03-01

    Tissue engineering strategies based on implanting cellularized biomaterials are promising therapeutic approaches for the reconstruction of large tissue defects. A major hurdle for the reliable establishment of such therapeutic approaches is the lack of rapid blood perfusion of the tissue construct to provide oxygen and nutrients. Numerous sources of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) displaying angiogenic potential have been characterized in the past years, including the adult dental pulp. Establishment of efficient strategies for improving angiogenesis in tissue constructs is nevertheless still an important challenge. Hypoxia was proposed as a priming treatment owing to its capacity to enhance the angiogenic potential of stem cells through vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release. The present study aimed to characterize additional key factors regulating the angiogenic capacity of such MSCs, namely, dental pulp stem cells derived from deciduous teeth (SHED). We identified fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) as a potent inducer of the release of VEGF and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) by SHED. We found that FGF-2 limited hypoxia-induced downregulation of HGF release. Using three-dimensional culture models of angiogenesis, we demonstrated that VEGF and HGF were both responsible for the high angiogenic potential of SHED through direct targeting of endothelial cells. In addition, FGF-2 treatment increased the fraction of Stro-1+/CD146+ progenitor cells. We then applied in vitro FGF-2 priming to SHED before encapsulation in hydrogels and in vivo subcutaneous implantation. Our results showed that FGF-2 priming is more efficient than hypoxia at increasing SHED-induced vascularization compared with nonprimed controls. Altogether, these data demonstrate that FGF-2 priming enhances the angiogenic potential of SHED through the secretion of both HGF and VEGF. PMID:26798059

  16. Beta hairpin peptide hydrogels as an injectable solid vehicle for neurotrophic growth factor delivery

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Piatt, Joseph H.; Worthington, Peter; Sönmez, Cem; Satheye, Sameer; Schneider, Joel P.; Pochan, Darrin J.; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    There is intense interest in developing novel methods for the sustained delivery of low levels of clinical therapeutics. MAX8 is a peptide-based beta-hairpin hydrogel that has unique shear thinning properties that allow for immediate rehealing after the removal of shear forces, making MAX8 an excellent candidate for injectable drug delivery at a localized injury site. The current studies examined the feasibility of using MAX8 as a delivery system for Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), two neurotrophic growth factors currently used in experimental treatments of spinal cord injuries. Experiments determined that encapsulation of NGF and BDNF within MAX8 did not negatively impact gel formation or rehealing and that shear thinning did not result in immediate growth factor release. We found that increased NGF/BDNF dosages increased the amount and rate of growth factor release and that NGF/BDNF release was inversely related to the concentration of MAX8, indicating that growth factor release can be tuned by adjusting MAX8 concentrations. Encapsulation within MAX8 protected NGF and BDNF from in vitro degradation for up to 28 days. Released NGF resulted in the formation of neurite-like extensions in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, demonstrating that NGF remains biologically active after release from encapsulation. Direct physical contact of PC12 cells with NGF-containing hydrogel did not inhibit neurite-like extension formation. On a molecular level, encapsulated growth factors activated the NGF/BDNF signaling pathways. Taken together, our data show MAX8 acts as a time-release gel, continually releasing low levels of growth factor over 21 days. MAX8 allows for greater dosage control and sustained therapeutic growth factor delivery, potentially alleviating side effects and improving the efficacy of current therapies. PMID:26225909

  17. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) antagonizes transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1-induced collagen lattice contraction by human skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Park, J S; Kim, J Y; Cho, J Y; Kang, J S; Yu, Y H

    2000-12-01

    Wound contraction plays an important role in healing, but in extreme conditions, it may lead to excessive scar formation and pathological wound contracture. To date, the key regulator of excessive contracture is known to be transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta1). In this study, we have evaluated epidermal growth factor (EGF) antagonism in fibroblast-populated collagen lattice (FPCL) gel contraction, which has been generally used as an in vitro model thought to mimic wound contraction in vivo. As expected, TGF-beta1 treatment enhanced normal fibroblast-induced collagen gel contraction in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, EGF did not affect normal gel formation, but significantly antagonized TGF-beta1-induced gel formation (p<0.05 at 100 ng/ml), whereas the other growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), did not altered either normal or TGF-beta1-induced gel contractions. Similarly, EGF treatment, but not PDGF, also significantly suppressed TGF-beta1 release that was autologously elicited by TGF-beta1 treatment (p<0.01 at 100 ng/ml). Therefore, the results suggest that EGF may negatively regulate the role of TGF-beta1 through attenuating autologous release of TGF-beta1. PMID:11145189

  18. Predictive factors for intrauterine growth restriction

    PubMed Central

    Albu, AR; Anca, AF; Horhoianu, VV; Horhoianu, IA

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reduced fetal growth is seen in about 10% of the pregnancies but only a minority has a pathological background and is known as intrauterine growth restriction or fetal growth restriction (IUGR / FGR). Increased fetal and neonatal mortality and morbidity as well as adult pathologic conditions are often associated to IUGR. Risk factors for IUGR are easy to assess but have poor predictive value. For the diagnostic purpose, biochemical serum markers, ultrasound and Doppler study of uterine and spiral arteries, placental volume and vascularization, first trimester growth pattern are object of assessment today. Modern evaluations propose combined algorithms using these strategies, all with the goal of a better prediction of risk pregnancies. Abbreviations: SGA = small for gestational age; IUGR = intrauterine growth restriction; FGR = fetal growth restriction; IUFD = intrauterine fetal demise; HIV = human immunodeficiency virus; PAPP-A = pregnancy associated plasmatic protein A; β-hCG = beta human chorionic gonadotropin; MoM = multiple of median; ADAM-12 = A-disintegrin and metalloprotease 12; PP-13 = placental protein 13; VEGF = vascular endothelial growth factor; PlGF = placental growth factor; sFlt-1 = soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1; UAD = uterine arteries Doppler ultrasound; RI = resistence index; PI = pulsatility index; VOCAL = Virtual Organ Computer–Aided Analysis software; VI = vascularization index; FI = flow index; VFI = vascularization flow index; PQ = placental quotient PMID:25408721

  19. Organic growth factor requirements of some yeasts.

    PubMed

    Madan, M; Gulati, N

    1980-01-01

    Some sporogenous yeasts (Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Debaryomyces hansenii, Hansenula ciferrii, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia polymorpha, Saccharomycopsis guttulata, and Saccharomyces chevalieri), isolated from various fruits have been examined for their organic growth factor requisites. H. ciferrii was completely deficient in thiamine, biotin, inositol, riboflavin, niacin, and partially deficient in pantothenic acid. It required an external supply of 0.1-1.0 ppm thiamine, 0.01-0.1 ppm biotin, 10.0 ppm inositol, 0.10 ppm niacin and riboflavin for its optimum growth. H. polymorpha showed partial deficiency only in xanthine. P. polymorpha gave indications of partial deficiencies in thiamine and biotin. S. guttulata was completely deficient in biotin, and partially deficient in adenine sulphate. It required 0.01 ppm biotin for optimum growth. S chevalieri was completely deficient in pyridoxine and partially deficient in thiamine. It required 0.1 ppm pyridoxine for maximum growth. D. hansenii and B bruxellensis were auxoautotrophic for the various growth factors studied. PMID:7242379

  20. Lipoprotein Release by Bacteria: Potential Factor in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Niesel, David W.; Peterson, Johnny W.; Klimpel, Gary R.

    1998-01-01

    Lipoprotein (LP) is a major component of the outer membrane of bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae. LP induces proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and lethal shock in LPS-responsive and -nonresponsive mice. In this study, the release of LP from growing bacteria was investigated by immuno-dot blot analysis. An immuno-dot blot assay that could detect LP at levels as low as 100 ng/ml was developed. By using this assay, significant levels of LP were detected in culture supernatants of growing Escherichia coli cells. During mid-logarithmic growth, approximately 1 to 1.5 μg of LP per ml was detected in culture supernatants from E. coli. In contrast, these culture supernatants contained 5 to 6 μg/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LP release was not unique to E. coli. Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica, and two pathogenic E. coli strains also released LP during in vitro growth. Treatment of bacteria with the antibiotic ceftazidime significantly enhanced LP release. Culture supernatants from 5-h cultures of E. coli were shown to induce in vitro production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by macrophages obtained from LPS-nonresponsive C3H/HeJ mice. In contrast, culture supernatants from an E. coli LP-deletion mutant were significantly less efficient at inducing IL-6 production in C3H/HeJ macrophages. These results suggest, for the first time, that LP is released from growing bacteria and that this released LP may play an important role in the induction of cytokine production and pathologic changes associated with gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:9784522

  1. Kinetics of Stop Codon Recognition by Release Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Byron; Lee, Kristin; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of stop codons by class I release factors is a fundamental step in the termination phase of protein synthesis. Since premature termination is costly to the cell, release factors have to efficiently discriminate between stop and sense codons. In order to understand the mechanism of discrimination between stop and sense codons, we developed a new, pre-steady state kinetic assay to monitor the interaction of RF1 with the ribosome. Our results show that RF1 associates with similar association rate constants to ribosomes programmed with a stop or sense codons. However, dissociation of RF1 from sense codons is as much as three orders of magnitude faster than from stop codons. Interestingly, the affinity of RF1 for ribosomes programmed with different sense codons does not correlate with the defects in peptide release. Thus, discrimination against sense codons is achieved, both, by increasing the dissociation rates and by decreasing the rate of peptide release. These results suggest that sense codons inhibit conformational changes necessary for RF1 to stably bind to the ribosome and catalyze peptide release. PMID:19874047

  2. Placenta Growth Factor in Diabetic Wound Healing

    PubMed Central

    Cianfarani, Francesca; Zambruno, Giovanna; Brogelli, Laura; Sera, Francesco; Lacal, Pedro Miguel; Pesce, Maurizio; Capogrossi, Maurizio C.; Failla, Cristina Maria; Napolitano, Monica; Odorisio, Teresa

    2006-01-01

    Reduced microcirculation and diminished expression of growth factors contribute to wound healing impairment in diabetes. Placenta growth factor (PlGF), an angiogenic mediator promoting pathophysiological neovascularization, is expressed during cutaneous wound healing and improves wound closure by enhancing angiogenesis. By using streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice, we here demonstrate that PlGF induction is strongly reduced in diabetic wounds. Diabetic transgenic mice overexpressing PlGF in the skin displayed accelerated wound closure compared with diabetic wild-type littermates. Moreover, diabetic wound treatment with an adenovirus vector expressing the human PlGF gene (AdCMV.PlGF) significantly accelerated the healing process compared with wounds treated with a control vector. The analysis of treated wounds showed that PlGF gene transfer improved granulation tissue formation, maturation, and vascularization, as well as monocytes/macrophages local recruitment. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor-2, and vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels were increased in AdCMV.PlGF-treated wounds, possibly enhancing PlGF-mediated effects. Finally, PlGF treatment stimulated cultured dermal fibroblast migration, pointing to a direct role of PlGF in accelerating granulation tissue maturation. In conclusion, our data indicate that reduced PlGF expression contributes to impaired wound healing in diabetes and that PlGF gene transfer to diabetic wounds exerts therapeutic activity by promoting different aspects of the repair process. PMID:17003476

  3. Control of angiogenesis by galectins involves the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24788652

  4. Control of Angiogenesis by Galectins Involves the Release of Platelet-Derived Proangiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24788652

  5. Heparin Binding Epidermal Growth Factor Like Growth Factor Heals Chronic Tympanic Membrane Perforations With Advantage Over Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 and Epidermal Growth Factor in an Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Santa Maria, Peter Luke; Weierich, Kendall; Kim, Sungwoo; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hypothesis That heparin binding epidermal growth factor like growth factor (HB-EGF) heals chronic tympanic membrane (TM) perforations at higher rates than fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in an animal model. Background A non-surgical treatment for chronic TM perforation would benefit those unable to access surgery or those unable to have surgery, as well as reducing the cost of tympanoplasty. Growth factor (GF) treatments have been reported in the literature with variable success with the lack of a suitable animal providing a major obstacle. Methods The GFs were tested in a validated mouse model of chronic TM perforation. A bio absorbable hydrogel polymer was used to deliver the GF at a steady concentration as it dissolved over four weeks. A control (polymer only, n=18) was compared to polymer loaded with HB-EGF (5ug/ml, n=18), FGF2 (100ug/ml, n=19) and EGF (250ug/ml, n=19). Perforations were inspected at four weeks. Results The healing rates, as defined as one hundred percent perforation closure, were control (5/18, 27.8%), HB-EGF (15/18, 83.3%), FGF2 (6/19, 31.6%) and EGF (3/19, 15.8%). There were no differences between FGF2 (p=0.80) and EGF (p=0.31) with control healing rates. HB-EGF (p= 0.000001) showed a significant difference for healing. The HB-EGF healed TMs showed layers similar to a normal TM, whilst the other groups showed a lack of epithelial migration. Conclusion This study confirms the advantage of HB-EGF over two other commonly used growth factors and is a promising non-surgical treatment of chronic TM perforations. PMID:26075672

  6. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT). PMID:10704074

  7. Growth factor delivery methods in the management of sports injuries: the state of play.

    PubMed

    Creaney, L; Hamilton, B

    2008-05-01

    In recent years there have been rapid developments in the use of growth factors for accelerated healing of injury. Growth factors have been used in maxillo-facial and plastic surgery with success and the technology is now being developed for orthopaedics and sports medicine applications. Growth factors mediate the biological processes necessary for repair of soft tissues such as muscle, tendon and ligament following acute traumatic or overuse injury, and animal studies have demonstrated clear benefits in terms of accelerated healing. There are various ways of delivering higher doses of growth factors to injured tissue, but each has in common a reliance on release of growth factors from blood platelets. Platelets contain growth factors in their alpha-granules (insulin-like growth factor-1, basic fibroblast growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor-beta(1)) and these are released upon injection at the site of an injury. Three commonly utilised techniques are known as platelet-rich plasma, autologous blood injections and autologous conditioned serum. Each of these techniques has been studied clinically in humans to a very limited degree so far, but results are promising in terms of earlier return to play following muscle and particularly tendon injury. The use of growth factors in sports medicine is restricted under the terms of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) anti-doping code, particularly because of concerns regarding the insulin-like growth factor-1 content of such preparations, and the potential for abuse as performance-enhancing agents. The basic science and clinical trials related to the technology are reviewed, and the use of such agents in relation to the WADA code is discussed. PMID:17984193

  8. Carbachol stimulates a different phospholipid metabolism than nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pessin, M S; Altin, J G; Jarpe, M; Tansley, F; Bradshaw, R A; Raben, D M

    1991-01-01

    We have examined 1,2-diglycerides (DGs) generated in PC12 cells in response to the muscarinic agonist carbachol and compared them with those generated in response to the differentiation factors nerve growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor. Whereas carbachol stimulates a greater release of inositol phosphates, all three agonists generate similar levels of DGs. In this report, we have analyzed the molecular species of PC12 DGs generated in response to these three agonists. Additionally, we have analyzed the molecular species of PC12 phospholipids. The data indicate that 1) after 1 min of either nerve growth factor or basic fibroblast growth factor stimulation, DGs arise primarily from phosphoinositide hydrolysis; 2) in contrast, after 1 min of carbachol stimulation, DG are generated equally by both phosphoinositide and phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis; and 3) after 15 min of stimulation by any of these agonists, DGs are generated largely by phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, with a smaller component arising from the phosphoinositides. These results suggest that at least part of the mechanism by which PC12 cells distinguish between different agonists is via alterations in phospholipid sources and kinetics of DG generation. PMID:1892912

  9. Placental Growth Factor Administration Abolishes Placental Ischemia-Induced Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Spradley, Frank T; Tan, Adelene Y; Joo, Woo S; Daniels, Garrett; Kussie, Paul; Karumanchi, S Ananth; Granger, Joey P

    2016-04-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-specific disorder of new-onset hypertension. Unfortunately, the most effective treatment is early delivery of the fetus and placenta. Placental ischemia appears central to the pathogenesis of preeclampsia because placental ischemia/hypoxia induced in animals by reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) or in humans stimulates release of hypertensive placental factors into the maternal circulation. The anti-angiogenic factor soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt-1), which antagonizes and reduces bioavailable vascular endothelial growth factor and placental growth factor (PlGF), is elevated in RUPP rats and preeclampsia. Although PlGF and vascular endothelial growth factor are both natural ligands for sFlt-1, vascular endothelial growth factor also has high affinity to VEGFR2 (Flk-1) causing side effects like edema. PlGF is specific for sFlt-1. We tested the hypothesis that PlGF treatment reduces placental ischemia-induced hypertension by antagonizing sFlt-1 without adverse consequences to the mother or fetus. On gestational day 14, rats were randomized to 4 groups: normal pregnant or RUPP±infusion of recombinant human PlGF (180 μg/kg per day; AG31, a purified, recombinant human form of PlGF) for 5 days via intraperitoneal osmotic minipumps. On day 19, mean arterial blood pressure and plasma sFlt-1 were higher and glomerular filtration rate lower in RUPP than normal pregnant rats. Infusion of recombinant human PlGF abolished these changes seen with RUPP along with reducing oxidative stress. These data indicate that the increased sFlt-1 and reduced PlGF resulting from placental ischemia contribute to maternal hypertension. Our novel finding that recombinant human PlGF abolishes placental ischemia-induced hypertension, without major adverse consequences, suggests a strong therapeutic potential for this growth factor in preeclampsia. PMID:26831193

  10. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng; Fang, Rejun

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  11. Epidermal Growth Factor and Intestinal Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hu; Yang, Shufen; Li, Zuohua; Zhong, Jinfeng

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) is a 53-amino acid peptide that plays an important role in regulating cell growth, survival, migration, apoptosis, proliferation, and differentiation. In addition, EGF has been established to be an effective intestinal regulator helping to protect intestinal barrier integrity, which was essential for the absorption of nutrients and health in humans and animals. Several researches have demonstrated that EGF via binding to the EGF receptor and subsequent activation of Ras/MAPK, PI3K/AKT, PLC-γ/PKC, and STATS signal pathways regulates intestinal barrier function. In this review, the relationship between epidermal growth factor and intestinal development and intestinal barrier is described, to provide a better understanding of the effects of EGF on intestine development and health. PMID:27524860

  12. Nerve Growth Factor and Diabetic Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Vinik, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    Neuropathy is one of the most debilitating complications of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, with estimates of prevalence between 50–90% depending on the means of detection. Diabetic neuropathies are heterogeneous and there is variable involvement of large myelinated fibers and small, thinly myelinated fibers. Many of the neuronal abnormalities in diabetes can be duplicated by experimental depletion of specific neurotrophic factors, their receptors or their binding proteins. In experimental models of diabetes there is a reduction in the availability of these growth factors, which may be a consequence of metabolic abnormalities, or may be independent of glycemic control. These neurotrophic factors are required for the maintenance of the neurons, the ability to resist apoptosis and regenerative capacity. The best studied of the neurotrophic factors is nerve growth factor (NGF) and the related members of the neurotrophin family of peptides. There is increasing evidence that there is a deficiency of NGF in diabetes, as well as the dependent neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) that may also contribute to the clinical symptoms resulting from small fiber dysfunction. Similarly, NT3 appears to be important for large fiber and IGFs for autonomic neuropathy. Whether the observed growth factor deficiencies are due to decreased synthesis, or functional, e.g. an inability to bind to their receptor, and/or abnormalities in nerve transport and processing, remains to be established. Although early studies in humans on the role of neurotrophic factors as a therapy for diabetic neuropathy have been unsuccessful, newer agents and the possibilities uncovered by further studies should fuel clinical trials for several generations. It seems reasonable to anticipate that neurotrophic factor therapy, specifically targeted at different nerve fiber populations, might enter the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:14668049

  13. Transforming growth factor alpha and epidermal growth factor levels in bladder cancer and their relationship to epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, J. K.; Cook, S.; Chambers, P.; Neal, D. E.

    1996-01-01

    We have examined levels of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha) in neoplastic and non-neoplastic bladder tissue using a standard radioimmunoassay technique. Tumour samples had much higher TGF-alpha levels compared with EGF and TGF-alpha levels in malignant tissue were significantly higher than in benign bladder samples. There was, in addition, a difference in mean EGF levels from 'normal' bladder samples from non-tumour bearing areas of bladder in patients with bladder cancer compared with 'normal' bladder tissue obtained at the time of organ retrieval surgery. Levels of EGF and TGF-alpha did not correlate with levels of EGF receptor (EGFR) as determined by a radioligand binding method but levels of TGF-alpha > 10 ng gm-1 of tumour tissue did correlate with EGFR positivity defined using immunohistochemistry. These data suggest that TGF-alpha is the likely ligand for EGFR in bladder tumours. PMID:8605103

  14. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Gastrointestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Pigrau, Marc; Lobo, Beatriz; Vicario, María; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the intestinal lumen and the mucosa is the location where the majority of ingested immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the vast gastrointestinal immune system. Upon regular physiological conditions, the intestinal micro-flora and the epithelial barrier are well prepared to process daily a huge amount of food-derived antigens and non-immunogenic particles. Similarly, they are ready to prevent environmental toxins and microbial antigens to penetrate further and interact with the mucosal-associated immune system. These functions promote the development of proper immune responses and oral tolerance and prevent disease and inflammation. Brain-gut axis structures participate in the processing and execution of response signals to external and internal stimuli. The brain-gut axis integrates local and distant regulatory networks and super-systems that serve key housekeeping physiological functions including the balanced functioning of the intestinal barrier. Disturbance of the brain-gut axis may induce intestinal barrier dysfunction, increasing the risk of uncontrolled immunological reactions, which may indeed trigger transient mucosal inflammation and gut disease. There is a large body of evidence indicating that stress, through the brain-gut axis, may cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, mainly via the systemic and peripheral release of corticotropin-releasing factor. In this review, we describe the role of stress and corticotropin-releasing factor in the regulation of gastrointestinal permeability, and discuss the link to both health and pathological conditions. PMID:25537677

  15. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-01-01

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  16. Chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor microspheres repair facial nerve defects.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huawei; Wen, Weisheng; Hu, Min; Bi, Wenting; Chen, Lijie; Liu, Sanxia; Chen, Peng; Tan, Xinying

    2013-11-25

    Microspheres containing nerve growth factor for sustained release were prepared by a compound method, and implanted into chitosan conduits to repair 10-mm defects on the right buccal branches of the facial nerve in rabbits. In addition, chitosan conduits combined with nerve growth factor or normal saline, as well as autologous nerve, were used as controls. At 90 days post-surgery, the muscular atrophy on the right upper lip was more evident in the nerve growth factor and normal sa-line groups than in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups. physiological analysis revealed that the nerve conduction velocity and amplitude were significantly higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. Moreover, histological observation illustrated that the di-ameter, number, alignment and myelin sheath thickness of myelinated nerves derived from rabbits were higher in the nerve growth factor-microspheres and autologous nerve groups than in the nerve growth factor and normal saline groups. These findings indicate that chitosan nerve conduits bined with microspheres for sustained release of nerve growth factor can significantly improve facial nerve defect repair in rabbits. PMID:25206635

  17. Material-mediated proangiogenic factor release pattern modulates quality of regenerated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Baek, Kwanghyun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Millet, Larry J; Bashir, Rashid; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-12-28

    Hydrogels designed to sustainably release bioactive molecules are extensively used to enhance tissue repair and regenerative therapies. Along this line, numerous efforts are made to control the molecular release rate and amount. In contrast, few efforts are made to control the molecular release pattern, and, subsequently, modulate the spatial organization of newly forming tissues, including blood vessels. Therefore, using a hydrogel printed to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into a pre-defined pattern, this study demonstrates that spatial distribution of VEGF is important in guiding growth direction of new blood vessels, and also in retaining the structural integrity of pre-existing vasculature. Guided by a computational model, we fabricated a patch composed of micro-sized VEGF-releasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel cylinders using an ink-jet printer. Interestingly, hydrogel printed with computationally optimized spacing created anisotropically aligned vasculature exclusively when the printed gel pattern was placed parallel to pre-existing blood vessels. In contrast, vascular sprouting from placing the printed gel pattern perpendicular to pre-existing vessels resulted in deformation and structural disintegration of the original vasculature. We envision that this study will be useful to better understand angiogenesis-modulated neovascularization and further improve the treatment quality for various wounds and tissue defects. PMID:25450405

  18. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-. alpha. in human milk

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Masaki; Wakai, Kae; Shizume, Kazuo ); Iwashita, Mitsutoshi ); Ohmura, Eiji; Kamiya, Yoshinobu; Murakami, Hitomi; Onoda, Noritaka; Tsushima, Toshio

    1991-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-{alpha} and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were measured in human milk by means of homologous radioimmunoassay. As previously reported, EGF concentration in the colostrum was approximately 200 ng/ml and decreased to 50 ng/ml by day 7 postpartum. The value of immunoreactive (IR)-TGF-{alpha} was 2.2-7.2 ng/ml, much lower than that of EGF. In contrast to EGF, the concentration of IR-TGF-{alpha} was fairly stable during the 7 postpartum days. There was no relationship between the concentrations of IR-TGF-{alpha} and IR-EGF, suggesting that the regulatory mechanism in the release of the two growth factors is different. On gel-chromatography using a Sephadex G-50 column, IR-EGF appeared in the fraction corresponding to that of authentic human EGF, while 70%-80% of the IR-TGF-{alpha} was eluted as a species with a molecular weight greater than that of authentic human TGF-{alpha}. Although the physiological role of TGF-{alpha} in milk is not known, it is possible that it is involved in the development of the mammary gland and/or the growth of newborn infants.

  19. Discovery of growth hormone-releasing hormones and receptors in nonmammalian vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Leo T. O.; Siu, Francis K. Y.; Tam, Janice K. V.; Lau, Ivy T. Y.; Wong, Anderson O. L.; Lin, Marie C. M.; Vaudry, Hubert; Chow, Billy K. C.

    2007-01-01

    In mammals, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) is the most important neuroendocrine factor that stimulates the release of growth hormone (GH) from the anterior pituitary. In nonmammalian vertebrates, however, the previously named GHRH-like peptides were unable to demonstrate robust GH-releasing activities. In this article, we provide evidence that these GHRH-like peptides are homologues of mammalian PACAP-related peptides (PRP). Instead, GHRH peptides encoded in cDNAs isolated from goldfish, zebrafish, and African clawed frog were identified. Moreover, receptors specific for these GHRHs were characterized from goldfish and zebrafish. These GHRHs and GHRH receptors (GHRH-Rs) are phylogenetically and structurally more similar to their mammalian counterparts than the previously named GHRH-like peptides and GHRH-like receptors. Information regarding their chromosomal locations and organization of neighboring genes confirmed that they share the same origins as the mammalian genes. Functionally, the goldfish GHRH dose-dependently activates cAMP production in receptor-transfected CHO cells as well as GH release from goldfish pituitary cells. Tissue distribution studies showed that the goldfish GHRH is expressed almost exclusively in the brain, whereas the goldfish GHRH-R is actively expressed in brain and pituitary. Taken together, these results provide evidence for a previously uncharacterized GHRH-GHRH-R axis in nonmammalian vertebrates. Based on these data, a comprehensive evolutionary scheme for GHRH, PRP-PACAP, and PHI-VIP genes in relation to three rounds of genome duplication early on in vertebrate evolution is proposed. These GHRHs, also found in flounder, Fugu, medaka, stickleback, Tetraodon, and rainbow trout, provide research directions regarding the neuroendocrine control of growth in vertebrates. PMID:17283332

  20. Delivery of Alginate Scaffold Releasing Two Trophic Factors for Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grulova, I.; Slovinska, L.; Blaško, J.; Devaux, S.; Wisztorski, M.; Salzet, M.; Fournier, I.; Kryukov, O.; Cohen, S.; Cizkova, D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been implicated in neural cell loss and consequently functional motor and sensory impairment. In this study, we propose an alginate -based neurobridge enriched with/without trophic growth factors (GFs) that can be utilized as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. The bioavailability of key GFs, such as Epidermal Growth factor (EGF) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) released from injected alginate biomaterial to the central lesion site significantly enhanced the sparing of spinal cord tissue and increased the number of surviving neurons (choline acetyltransferase positive motoneurons) and sensory fibres. In addition, we document enhanced outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons and presence of blood vessels at the central lesion. Tissue proteomics was performed at 3, 7 and 10 days after SCI in rats indicated the presence of anti-inflammatory factors in segments above the central lesion site, whereas in segments below, neurite outgrowth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of the lectican protein family were overexpressed. Collectively, based on our data, we confirm that functional recovery was significantly improved in SCI groups receiving alginate scaffold with affinity-bound growth factors (ALG +GFs), compared to SCI animals without biomaterial treatment. PMID:26348665

  1. Growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor system and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Boguszewski, Cesar Luiz; Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva; Kopchick, John J

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (GH) and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system plays an important role in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and angiogenesis. In terms of cell cycle regulation, the GH-IGF system induces signalling pathways for cell growth that compete with other signalling systems that result in cell death; thus the final effect of these opposed forces is critical for normal and abnormal cell growth. The association of the GH-IGF system with carcinogenesis has long been hypothesised, mainly based on in vitro studies and the use of a variety of animal models of human cancer, and also on epidemiological and clinical evidence in humans. While ample experimental evidence supports a role of the GH-IGF system in tumour promotion and progression, with several of its components being currently tested as central targets for cancer therapy, the strength of evidence from patients with acromegaly, GH deficiency, or treated with GH is much weaker. In this review, we will attempt to consolidate this data. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 414-426). PMID:27387246

  2. The scope and sequence of growth factor delivery for vascularized bone tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bayer, E A; Gottardi, R; Fedorchak, M V; Little, S R

    2015-12-10

    Bone regeneration is a complex process, that in vivo, requires the highly coordinated presentation of biochemical cues to promote the various stages of angiogenesis and osteogenesis. Taking inspiration from the natural healing process, a wide variety of growth factors are currently being released within next generation tissue engineered scaffolds (in a variety of ways) in order to heal non-union fractures and bone defects. This review will focus on the delivery of multiple growth factors to the bone regeneration niche, specifically 1) dual growth factor delivery signaling and crosstalk, 2) the importance of growth factor timing and temporal separation, and 3) the engineering of delivery systems that allow for temporal control over presentation of soluble growth factors. Alternative methods for growth factor presentation, including the use of gene therapy and platelet-rich plasma scaffolds, are also discussed. PMID:26264834

  3. Growth hormone-insulinlike growth factor I and immune function.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C

    1993-04-01

    Growth hormone (GH) and insulinlike growth factor I (IGF-I) may be part of a neuroendocrine immune axis that stimulates cellular proliferation of primary lymphoid organs (bone marrow, thymus) as well as stimulates activation of peripheral lymphocytes and macrophages to enhance specific immune responses. GH can also stimulate production of thymic hormones and cytokines, and in this way impact on immune function. It is not clear whether GH and IGF-I act independently or whether the action of GH is mediated by local production of IGF-I by lymphocytes. Both GH and IGF-I and their receptors are present in lymphocytes. Thus, cells of the immune system may be important targets of the GH-IGF-I axis. PMID:18407143

  4. Interactions of release factor RF3 with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial release factor RF3 is a GTPase that has been implicated in multiple, incompletely understood steps of protein synthesis. This study explores the genetic interaction of RF3 with other components of the translation machinery. RF3 contributes to translation termination by recycling the class I release factors RF1 and RF2 off post-termination ribosomes. RF3 has also been implicated in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs from elongating ribosomes and in a post-peptidyltransferase quality control (post-PT QC) mechanism that selectively terminates ribosomes carrying erroneous peptides. A majority of the in vivo studies on RF3 have been carried out in K-12 strains of Escherichia coli which carry a partially defective RF2 protein with an Ala to Thr substitution at position 246. Here, the contribution of the K-12 specific RF2 variant to RF3 activities has been investigated. Strain reconstruction experiments in both E. coli and Salmonella enterica demonstrate that defects in termination and post-PT QC that are associated with RF3 loss, as well as phenotypes uncovered by phenotypic profiling, are all substantially ameliorated when the incompletely active K-12-specific RF2 protein is replaced by a fully active Ala246 RF2. These results indicate that RF3 loss is well tolerated in bacteria with fully active class I release factors, but that many of the previously reported phenotypes for RF3 deletion strains have been compromised by the presence of a partially defective RF2. PMID:25636454

  5. An expandable, inducible hemangioblast state regulated by fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed

    Vereide, David T; Vickerman, Vernella; Swanson, Scott A; Chu, Li-Fang; McIntosh, Brian E; Thomson, James A

    2014-12-01

    During development, the hematopoietic and vascular lineages are thought to descend from common mesodermal progenitors called hemangioblasts. Here we identify six transcription factors, Gata2, Lmo2, Mycn, Pitx2, Sox17, and Tal1, that "trap" murine cells in a proliferative state and endow them with a hemangioblast potential. These "expandable" hemangioblasts (eHBs) are capable, once released from the control of the ectopic factors, to give rise to functional endothelial cells, multilineage hematopoietic cells, and smooth muscle cells. The eHBs can be derived from embryonic stem cells, from fetal liver cells, or poorly from fibroblasts. The eHBs reveal a central role for fibroblast growth factor, which not only promotes their expansion, but also facilitates their ability to give rise to endothelial cells and leukocytes, but not erythrocytes. This study serves as a demonstration that ephemeral progenitor states can be harnessed in vitro, enabling the creation of tractable progenitor cell lines. PMID:25458896

  6. Effects of plasmid-mediated growth hormone-releasing hormone in severely debilitated dogs with cancer.

    PubMed

    Draghia-Akli, Ruxandra; Hahn, Kevin A; King, Glen K; Cummings, Kathleen K; Carpenter, Robert H

    2002-12-01

    Cachexia is a common manifestation of late stage malignancy and is characterized by anemia, anorexia, muscle wasting, loss of adipose tissue, and fatigue. Although cachexia is disabling and can diminish the life expectancy of cancer patients, there are still no effective therapies for this condition. We have examined the feasibility of using a myogenic plasmid to express growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) in severely debilitated companion dogs with naturally occurring tumors. At a median of 16 days after intramuscular delivery of the plasmid, serum concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), a measure of GHRH activity, were increased in 12 of 16 dogs (P < 0.01). These increases ranged from 21 to 120% (median, 49%) of the pretreatment values and were generally sustained or higher on the final evaluation. Anemia resolved posttreatment, as indicated by significant increases in mean red blood cell count, hematocrit, and hemoglobin concentrations, and there was also a significant rise in the percentage of circulating lymphocytes. Treated dogs maintained their weights over the 56-day study and did not show any adverse effects from the GHRH gene transfer. We conclude that intramuscular injection of a GHRH-expressing plasmid is both safe and capable of stimulating the release of growth hormone and IGF-I in large animals. The observed anabolic responses to a single dose of this therapy might be beneficial in patients with cancer-associated anemia and cachexia. PMID:12498779

  7. Divergent effects of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factors on a human endometrial carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Korc, M; Haussler, C A; Trookman, N S

    1987-09-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), at concentrations ranging from 0.83 to 4.98 nM, markedly inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at low plating densities (4.7 X 10(3) cells/cm2). Under the same incubation conditions, 16.6 pM EGF enhanced cell proliferation. At high plating densities (2.5 X 10(4) cells/cm2) 0.83 nM EGF also stimulated cell proliferation. Both the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of EGF were mimicked by transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). However, the inhibitory action of TGF-alpha was always greater that of EGF. Binding studies with 125I-labeled TGF-alpha indicated that maximal cell surface binding of TGF-alpha occurred at 15 min, whereas maximal internalization occurred at 45 min. Both cell surface and internalized radioactivity declined sharply thereafter. Analysis of radioactivity released into the incubation medium during pulse-chase experiments indicated that RL95-2 cells extensively degraded both TGF-alpha and EGF. The lysosomotropic compound methylamine arrested the generation of low-molecular-weight degradation products of EGF, but not of TGF-alpha. In contrast to EGF and TGF-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at either low or high plating densities. Further, transforming growth factor-beta induced the appearance of large cuboidal cells that were readily distinguished from cells treated with either EGF or TGF-alpha. These findings point to complex regulatory actions of growth factors on the proliferation of RL95-2 cells and suggest that the processing of TGF-alpha following EGF receptor activation is distinct from the processing of EGF. PMID:3497713

  8. Growth Hormone and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1.

    PubMed

    Nicholls, Adam R; Holt, Richard I G

    2016-01-01

    Human growth hormone (GH) was first isolated from the human pituitary gland in 1945 and found to promote the growth of children with hypopituitarism. Since the formation of the World Anti-Doping Association, human GH has appeared on the list of forbidden substances. There is a significant amount of anecdotal evidence that human GH is misused by athletes to enhance performance, and there have been a number of high-profile cases of GH use in professional sport. GH secretagogues (GH-Ss), which increase GH secretion, and insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1), which mediates many of the effects of GH, are also misused, although there is less evidence for this. The effectiveness of GH, IGF-1, and GH-Ss as performance-enhancing drugs remains unclear. Evidence from studies of GH use in people with hypopituitarism show several desirable outcomes, including increased lean body mass, increased strength, and increased exercise capacity. These anabolic and metabolic properties, coupled with the difficulty in detecting them, make them attractive as agents of misuse. Studies in healthy young adults have also demonstrated a performance benefit with GH and IGF-1. PMID:27347885

  9. Layer-by-layer assembly of epidermal growth factors on polyurethane films for wound closure.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Abhilash; Diehl-Jones, William; Ghanbar, Sadegh; Liu, Song

    2014-02-13

    To facilitate the healing of chronic wounds, growth factors such as epidermal growth factor need to be safely encapsulated for their sustained and effective delivery to the wound bed. Using a layer-by-layer assembly technique, epidermal growth factor is successfully encapsulated on the surface of poly(acrylic acid)-modified polyurethane film. The amount of encapsulated epidermal growth factor is controlled by adjusting the number of chitosan/epidermal growth factor bilayers. A controlled release of epidermal growth factor from the surface of polyurethane film for a period of five days is achieved with well-retained bioactivity (over 90%) as evidenced by a cell proliferation assay. In an in vitro cellular wounding assay, the cell gap covered with the epidermal growth factor-loaded polyurethane film closes at a rate more than twice as fast as that covered with a control polyurethane film. Fluorescent staining of F-actin reveals that the released epidermal growth factor induces differences in cytoskeletal organization, suggesting that stimulated cell migration also contributes to the close of the cell gap. PMID:24525716

  10. Waste management - cytokines, growth factors and cachexia.

    PubMed

    Saini, Amarjit; Al-Shanti, Nasser; Nasser, Al-Shanti; Stewart, Claire E H

    2006-12-01

    Muscle damage with a lack of regeneration, manifests itself in several life-threatening diseases, including cancer cachexia, congestive heart failure, AIDS and sepsis. Often misdiagnosed as a condition simply of weight loss, cachexia is actually a highly complex metabolic disorder involving features of anorexia, anaemia, lipolysis and insulin resistance. A significant loss of lean body mass arises from such conditions, resulting in wasting of skeletal muscle. Unlike starvation, the weight loss seen in chronic illnesses arises equally from loss of muscle and of fat. The cachectic state is particularly problematic in cancer, typifying poor prognosis and often lowering responses to chemotherapy and radiation treatment. More than half of cancer patients suffer from cachexia, and strikingly, nearly one-third of cancer deaths are related to cachexia rather than the tumour burden. In considering this disorder, we are faced with a conundrum; how is it possible for uncontrolled growth to prevail in the tumour, in the face of unrestrained tissue loss in our muscles? Consistently, the catabolic state has been associated with a shift in the homeostatic balance between muscle synthesis and degradation mediated by the actions of growth factors and cytokines. Indeed, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels are raised in several animal models of cachectic muscle wasting, whereas the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system acts potently to regulate muscle development, hypertrophy and maintenance. This concept of skeletal muscle homeostasis, often viewed as the net balance between two separate processes of protein synthesis and degradation has however changed. More recently, the view is that these two biochemical processes are not occurring independently of each other but in fact are finely co-ordinated by a web of intricate signalling networks. This review, therefore, aims to discuss data currently available regarding the mechanisms of degeneration and regeneration with

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-II: possible local growth factor in pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C; Vassalotti, J

    1990-11-01

    Pheochromocytomas, neural crest tumors, express an abundance of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II). To assess further the potential for IGF-II to play an autocrine role for these tumors, we measured 1) IGF-II content by RRA in 7 pheochromocytomas and peripheral blood in these patients, 2) IGF-II receptors by Western analysis, and 3) characterized the tumor binding proteins by ligand blot studies. IGF-II levels in the tumors varied from 2.8-41 micrograms/g. Chromatography revealed that 60% of the peptide eluted as a large mol wt form of IGF-II (8.7-10 kDa); the remainder coeluted with mature peptide (7.5 kDa). This was in contrast to IGF-II levels in normal adrenal tissue (0.225 +/- 0.005 micrograms/g) or another neural crest-derived tumor, medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (0.63 +/- 0.02 micrograms/g). Serum IGF-II levels in the 7 patients with pheochromocytoma (720 +/- 71 ng/mL) were similar to those in 35 normal controls (762 +/- 69 ng/mL). Radiolabeled IGF-II (9 +/- 1%) and IGF-I (20 +/- 2%) bound specifically to pheochromocytoma membranes. Western analysis of these membranes using a specific antiserum directed against the type II receptor demonstrated a band at 210 kDa. Affinity cross-linking studies with [125I]IGF-I demonstrated a specific band at 140 kDa. Ligand blot analysis was performed on the void volume pools from the Sephadex G-75 column and demonstrated bands at about 30 and 25 kDa. In conclusion, these data 1) confirm that pheochromocytomas have increased levels of IGF-II; 2) demonstrate that despite high IGF-II concentrations in the tumors, peripheral levels are not elevated, suggesting that very little tumoral IGF-II is released into the circulation, unlike catecholamines; 3) demonstrate the presence of IGF-II and IGF-I receptors; 4) describe binding protein species similar to those present in other tissues. Thus, the presence of high levels of IGF-II and both type I and type II receptors suggests that IGF II may act through both receptors to

  12. A Review of Bioactive Release from Nerve Conduits as a Neurotherapeutic Strategy for Neuronal Growth in Peripheral Nerve Injury

    PubMed Central

    Choonara, Yahya E.; Bijukumar, Divya; du Toit, Lisa C.

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral nerve regeneration strategies employ the use of polymeric engineered nerve conduits encompassed with components of a delivery system. This allows for the controlled and sustained release of neurotrophic growth factors for the enhancement of the innate regenerative capacity of the injured nerves. This review article focuses on the delivery of neurotrophic factors (NTFs) and the importance of the parameters that control release kinetics in the delivery of optimal quantities of NTFs for improved therapeutic effect and prevention of dose dumping. Studies utilizing various controlled-release strategies, in attempt to obtain ideal release kinetics, have been reviewed in this paper. Release strategies discussed include affinity-based models, crosslinking techniques, and layer-by-layer technologies. Currently available synthetic hollow nerve conduits, an alternative to the nerve autografts, have proven to be successful in the bridging and regeneration of primarily the short transected nerve gaps in several patient cases. However, current research emphasizes on the development of more advanced nerve conduits able to simulate the effectiveness of the autograft which includes, in particular, the ability to deliver growth factors. PMID:25143934

  13. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D.

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plantmore » height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.« less

  14. Decorin: A Growth Factor Antagonist for Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Järvinen, Tero A. H.; Prince, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Decorin (DCN) is the best characterized member of the extracellular small leucine-rich proteoglycan family present in connective tissues, typically in association with or “decorating” collagen fibrils. It has substantial interest to clinical medicine owing to its antifibrotic, anti-inflammatory, and anticancer effects. Studies on DCN knockout mice have established that a lack of DCN is permissive for tumor development and it is regarded as a tumor suppressor gene. A reduced expression or a total disappearance of DCN has been reported to take place in various forms of human cancers during tumor progression. Furthermore, when used as a therapeutic molecule, DCN has been shown to inhibit tumor progression and metastases in experimental cancer models. DCN affects the biology of various types of cancer by targeting a number of crucial signaling molecules involved in cell growth, survival, metastasis, and angiogenesis. The active sites for the neutralization of different growth factors all reside in different parts of the DCN molecule. An emerging concept that multiple proteases, especially those produced by inflammatory cells, are capable of cleaving DCN suggests that native DCN could be inactivated in a number of pathological inflammatory conditions. In this paper, we review the role of DCN in cancer. PMID:26697491

  15. ATP differentially upregulates fibroblast growth factor 2 and transforming growth factor α in neonatal and adult mice: effect on neuroproliferation.

    PubMed

    Jia, C; Cussen, A R; Hegg, C C

    2011-03-17

    Multiple neurotrophic factors play a role in proliferation, differentiation and survival in the olfactory epithelium (OE); however, the signaling cascade has not been fully elucidated. We tested the hypotheses that ATP induces the synthesis and secretion of two neurotrophic factors, fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα), and that these neurotrophic factors have a role in inducing proliferation. Protein levels of FGF2 and TGFα were increased 20 h post-intranasal instillation of ATP compared to vehicle control in adult Swiss Webster mice. Pre-intranasal treatment with purinergic receptor antagonist pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-20,40-disulfonic acid (PPADS) significantly blocked this ATP-induced increase, indicating that upregulation of FGF2 and TGFα expression is mediated by purinergic receptor activation. However, in neonatal mouse, intranasal instillation of ATP significantly increased the protein levels of FGF2, but not TGFα. Likewise, ATP evoked the secretion of FGF2, but not TGFα, from neonatal mouse olfactory epithelial slices and PPADS significantly blocked ATP-evoked FGF2 release. To determine the role of FGF2 and TGFα in inducing proliferation, 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation was examined in adult olfactory epithelium. Intranasal treatment with FGF receptor inhibitor PD173074 or epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor AG1478 following ATP instillation significantly blocked ATP-induced BrdU incorporation. Collectively, these data demonstrate that ATP induces proliferation in adult mouse olfactory epithelium by promoting FGF2 and TGFα synthesis and activation of their receptors. These data suggest that different mechanisms regulate neurogenesis in neonatal and adult OE, and FGF2 and TGFα may have different roles throughout development. PMID:21187124

  16. Keratinocyte growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are heparin-binding growth factors for alveolar type II cells in fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    PubMed Central

    Panos, R J; Rubin, J S; Csaky, K G; Aaronson, S A; Mason, R J

    1993-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mediate aspects of normal lung growth and development and are important in the restoration of normal alveolar architecture after lung injury. To determine if fibroblasts are a source of soluble growth factors for alveolar type II cells, we investigated the effect of fibroblast-conditioned medium (CM) on alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. Serum-free CM from confluent adult human lung fibroblasts was concentrated fivefold by lyophilization. Type II cells were isolated from adult rats by elastase dissociation and incubated with [3H]thymidine and varying dilutions of concentrated CM and serum from day 1 to 3 of culture. Stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by fibroblast-CM was maximal after 48 h of conditioning and required the presence of serum. The activity of the CM was eliminated by boiling and by treatment with trypsin, pepsin, or dithiothreitol and was additive with saturating concentrations of acidic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and insulin. The growth factor activity bound to heparin-Sepharose and was eluted with 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl. Neutralizing antibody studies demonstrated that the primary mitogens isolated in the 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl fractions were keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor 7) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), respectively. HGF/SF was demonstrated in the crude CM and KGF was detected in the 0.6 M NaCl eluent by immunoblotting. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the lung fibroblasts expressed both KGF and HGF/SF transcripts. Human recombinant KGF and HGF/SF induced a concentration- and serum-dependent increase in rat alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. We conclude that adult human lung fibroblasts produce at least two soluble heparin-binding growth factors, KGF and HGF/SF, which promote DNA synthesis and proliferation of rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. KGF and HGF/SF may be important stimuli for alveolar type II cell

  17. Skeletal Myogenic Differentiation of Urine-Derived Stem Cells and Angiogenesis Using Microbeads Loaded with Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guihua; Pareta, Rajesh A; Wu, Rongpei; Shi, Yingai; Zhou, Xiaobo; Liu, Hong; Deng, Chunhua; Sun, Xiangzhou; Atala, Anthony; Opara, Emmanuel C; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2012-01-01

    To provide site-specific delivery and targeted release of growth factors to implanted urine-derived stem cells (USCs), we prepared microbeads of alginate containing growth factors. The growth factors included VEGF, IGF-1, FGF-1, PDGF, HGF and NGF. Radiolabeled growth factors were loaded separately and used to access the in vitro release from the microbeads with a gamma counter over 4 weeks. In vitro endothelial differentiation of USCs by the released VEGF from the microbeads in a separate experiment confirmed that the released growth factors from the microbeads were bioactive. USCs and microbeads were mixed with the collagen gel type 1 (2 mg/ml) and used for in vivo studies through subcutaneous injection into nude mice. Four weeks after subcutaneous injection, we found that grafted cell survival was improved and more cells expressed myogenic and endothelial cell transcripts and markers compared to controls. More vessel formation and innervations were observed in USCs combined with six growth factors cocktail incorporated in microbeads compared to controls. In conclusion, a combination of growth factors released locally from the alginate microbeads induced USCs to differentiate into a myogenic lineage, enhanced revascularization and innervation, and stimulated resident cell growth in vivo. This approach could potentially be used for cell therapy in the treatment of stress urinary incontinence. PMID:23137393

  18. Comprehensive Analysis of Stop Codon Usage in Bacteria and Its Correlation with Release Factor Abundance*

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Gürkan; Holm, Mikael; Wiens, Tobias; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of stop codon usage in bacteria by analyzing over eight million coding sequences of 4684 bacterial sequences. Using a newly developed program called “stop codon counter,” the frequencies of the three classical stop codons TAA, TAG, and TGA were analyzed, and a publicly available stop codon database was built. Our analysis shows that with increasing genomic GC content the frequency of the TAA codon decreases and that of the TGA codon increases in a reciprocal manner. Interestingly, the release factor 1-specific codon TAG maintains a more or less uniform frequency (∼20%) irrespective of the GC content. The low abundance of TAG is also valid with respect to expression level of the genes ending with different stop codons. In contrast, the highly expressed genes predominantly end with TAA, ensuring termination with either of the two release factors. Using three model bacteria with different stop codon usage (Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Bacillus subtilis), we show that the frequency of TAG and TGA codons correlates well with the relative steady state amount of mRNA and protein for release factors RF1 and RF2 during exponential growth. Furthermore, using available microarray data for gene expression, we show that in both fast growing and contrasting biofilm formation conditions, the relative level of RF1 is nicely correlated with the expression level of the genes ending with TAG. PMID:25217634

  19. Characterization of insulin-like growth factor I and epidermal growth factor receptors in meningioma

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, M.; Tokunaga, Y.; Tsutsumi, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Shigematsu, K.; Niwa, M.; Mori, K. )

    1989-10-01

    Receptors for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) were localized and characterized in eight samples of human meningioma (four fibrous, two meningothelial, and two angioblastic types), using quantitative autoradiographic techniques. Effects of both growth factors on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in the cultured meningioma cells were examined. High numbers of specific binding sites for both IGF-I and EGF were homogeneously present in tissue sections derived from fibrous and meningothelial types of meningiomas, whereas binding sites for these growth factors were not detectable in adjacent leptomeninges. While relatively large numbers of IGF-I binding sites were located in the wall of the intratumoral vasculature, the number of binding sites in the stromal component was lower in angioblastic-type meningiomas, including a low number of EGF binding sites detected only in the stromal portion. Scatchard analysis revealed the presence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites for both IGF-I and EGF in the meningiomas examined (dissociation constant (Kd) = 0.6 to 2.9 nM, and the maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) = 16 to 80 fmol/mg for IGF-I; and Kd = 0.6 to 4.0 nM, Bmax = 3 to 39 fmol/mg for EGF). Both growth factors increased the synthesis of DNA, in a dose-dependent manner, as measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The combination of IGF-I and EGF synergistically stimulated the synthesis of DNA, and the effects seen with 10% fetal bovine serum could be reproduced at a concentration of 10(-10) M. These observations can be interpreted to mean that both IGF-I and EGF may be involved in the growth modulation of meningiomas, possibly through paracrine or autocrine mechanisms.

  20. The Roles of Growth Factors in Keratinocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Seeger, Mark A.; Paller, Amy S.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The re-epithelialization of wounded skin requires the rapid and coordinated migration of keratinocytes (KC) into the wound bed. Almost immediately after wounding, cells present at or attracted to the wound site begin to secrete a complex milieu of growth factors. These growth factors exert mitogenic and motogenic effects on KCs, inducing the rapid proliferation and migration of KCs at the wound edge. Recent Advances: New roles for growth factors in KC biology are currently being discovered and investigated. This review will highlight the growth factors, particularly transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α), heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF), insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), fibroblast growth factor 7 (FGF-7), FGF-10, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), which have conclusively been shown to be the most motogenic for KCs. Critical Issues: The cellular and molecular heterogeneity of wounded tissue makes establishing direct relationships between specific growth factors and KC migration difficult in situ. The absence of this complexity in simplified in vitro experimental models of migration makes the clinical relevance of the results obtained from these in vitro studies ambiguous. Future Directions: Deciphering the relationship between growth factors and KC migration is critical for understanding the process of wound healing in normal and disease states. Insights into the basic science of the effects of growth factors on KC migration will hopefully lead to the development of new therapies to treat acute and chronic wounds. PMID:25945284

  1. Factors controlling phosphorus release from sediments in coastal archipelago areas.

    PubMed

    Puttonen, Irma; Kohonen, Tuula; Mattila, Johanna

    2016-07-15

    In coastal archipelago areas of the northern Baltic Sea, significantly higher phosphate concentrations (6.0±4.5μmol/l, mean±SD) were measured in water samples close to the sediment surface compared with those from 1m above the seafloor (1.6±2.0μmol/l). The results indicated notable phosphate release from sediments under the bottom water oxygen concentrations of up to 250μmol/l, especially in areas that had experienced recent temporal fluctuation between oxic and hypoxic/anoxic conditions. No single factor alone was found to control the elevated PO4-P concentrations in the near-bottom water. In addition to the oxygen in the water, the contents of potentially mobile phosphorus fractions, grain-size, the organic content at the sediment surface, and the water depth were all important factors controlling the internal loading of phosphorus. The complexity of this process needs to be accounted for in assessments of the internal loading of phosphorus and in potential mitigation plans. PMID:27184132

  2. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF): immunocytochemical localization and radioimmunoassay (RIA). [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vigh, S.; Merchenthaler, I.; Torres-Aleman, I.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Coy, D.; Carter, W.H.; Petrusz, P.; Schally, A.V.

    1982-11-29

    Two fragments of the amino acid sequence corresponding to ovine corticotropin releasing factor (CRF 37-41 and CRF 22-41), as well as the full sequence of 41 residues (CRF 1-41), synthesized in our laboratories by solid-phase methods, were coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glutaraldehyde. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with the emulsified mixtures of peptide-BSA conjugates and Freund's adjuvant as immunogens. The specificity of the generated antibodies was studied by agar-gel diffusion, absorption tests in the immunohistochemical system, and with the aid of displacement curves in RIA. /sup 125/I-Tyr(35)-CRF 36-41 and /sup 125/I-Tyr(0)-CRF 1-41 were used as radioligands in the RIA. The minimum detectable dose was 20 pg. The linearity observed in RIA for immunoreactive CRF in extracts of rat hypothalami, together with the immunocytochemical findings in the rat brain, indicate the presence of substance(s) immunologically indistinguishable from CRF. Immunohistochemistry with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique detected the following CRF-immunoreactive structures in vibratome sections of hypothalami of colchicine-treated rats: CRF-containing cell bodies were observed mainly in smaller neurons of the paraventricular nucleus. CRF-positive nerve fibers and/or terminals were present in the external zone of the median eminence, with some immunoreactive CRF also present in the internal zone. The CRF-positive terminals were localized in the central regions of the median eminence. Data reinforce the view that this polypeptide plays a physiological role in the control of ACTH release.

  3. Fibroblast growth factor 23 and bone mineralisation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yu-Chen; Yuan, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a hormone that is mainly secreted by osteocytes and osteoblasts in bone. The critical role of FGF23 in mineral ion homeostasis was first identified in human genetic and acquired rachitic diseases and has been further characterised in animal models. Recent studies have revealed that the levels of FGF23 increase significantly at the very early stages of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and may play a critical role in mineral ion disorders and bone metabolism in these patients. Our recent publications have also shown that FGF23 and its cofactor, Klotho, may play an independent role in directly regulating bone mineralisation instead of producing a systematic effect. In this review, we will discuss the new role of FGF23 in bone mineralisation and the pathophysiology of CKD-related bone disorders. PMID:25655009

  4. Neuropeptides as lung cancer growth factors.

    PubMed

    Moody, Terry W; Moreno, Paola; Jensen, Robert T

    2015-10-01

    This manuscript is written in honor of the Festschrift for Abba Kastin. I met Abba at a Society for Neuroscience meeting and learned that he was Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Peptides. I submitted manuscripts to the journal on "Neuropeptides as Growth Factors in Cancer" and subsequently was named to the Editorial Advisory Board. Over the past 30 years I have published dozens of manuscripts in Peptides and reviewed hundreds of submitted manuscripts. It was always rewarding to interact with Abba, a consummate professional. When I attended meetings in New Orleans I would sometimes go out to dinner with him at the restaurant "Commanders Palace". When I chaired the Summer Neuropeptide Conference we were honored to have him receive the Fleur Strand Award one year in Israel. I think that his biggest editorial contribution has been the "Handbook of Biologically Active Peptides." I served as a Section Editor on "Cancer/Anticancer Peptides" and again found that it was a pleasure working with him. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which bombesin-like peptides, neurotensin and vasoactive intestinal peptide regulate the growth of lung cancer. PMID:25836991

  5. The Fibroblast Growth Factor signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ornitz, David M; Itoh, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The signaling component of the mammalian Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) family is comprised of eighteen secreted proteins that interact with four signaling tyrosine kinase FGF receptors (FGFRs). Interaction of FGF ligands with their signaling receptors is regulated by protein or proteoglycan cofactors and by extracellular binding proteins. Activated FGFRs phosphorylate specific tyrosine residues that mediate interaction with cytosolic adaptor proteins and the RAS-MAPK, PI3K-AKT, PLCγ, and STAT intracellular signaling pathways. Four structurally related intracellular non-signaling FGFs interact with and regulate the family of voltage gated sodium channels. Members of the FGF family function in the earliest stages of embryonic development and during organogenesis to maintain progenitor cells and mediate their growth, differentiation, survival, and patterning. FGFs also have roles in adult tissues where they mediate metabolic functions, tissue repair, and regeneration, often by reactivating developmental signaling pathways. Consistent with the presence of FGFs in almost all tissues and organs, aberrant activity of the pathway is associated with developmental defects that disrupt organogenesis, impair the response to injury, and result in metabolic disorders, and cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25772309

  6. Epidermal growth factor signaling in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB) family play a critical role in normal cell growth and development. However, many ErbB family members, especially EGFR, are aberrantly expressed or deregulated in tumors and are thought to play crucial roles in cancer development and metastatic progression. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key mechanisms contributing to aberrant EGFR/ErbB signaling in transformed cells which results in many phenotypic changes associated with the earliest stages of tumor formation, including several hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These changes often occur through interaction with other major signaling pathways important to tumor progression resulting in a multitude of transcriptional changes that ultimately impact cell morphology, proliferation and adhesion, all of which are crucial for tumor progression. The resulting mesh of signaling networks will need to be taken into account as new regimens are designed for targeting EGFR for therapeutic intervention. As new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cross-talk of EGFR signaling with other signaling pathways and their role in therapeutic resistance to anti-EGFR therapies are gained a continual reassessment of clinical therapeutic regimes and strategies will be required. Understanding the consequences and complexity of EGF signaling and how it relates to tumor progression is critical for the development of clinical compounds and establishing clinical protocols for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25619714

  7. Differential involvement of signaling pathways in the regulation of growth hormone release by somatostatin and growth hormone-releasing hormone in orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides).

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Qin, Chaobin; Zhang, Cong; Jia, Jirong; Sun, Caiyun; Li, Wensheng

    2014-02-15

    Somatostatin is the most effective inhibitor of GH release, and GHRH was recently identified as one of the primary GH-releasing factors in teleosts. In this study, we analyzed the possible intracellular transduction pathways that are involved in the mechanisms induced by SRIF and GHRH to regulate GH release. Using a pharmacological approach, the blockade of the PLC/IP/PKC pathway reversed the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release but did not affect the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH release. Furthermore, SRIF reduced the GH release induced by two PKC activators. Inhibitors of the AC/cAMP/PKA pathway reversed both the SRIF- and GHRH-induced effects on GH release. Moreover, the GH release evoked by forskolin and 8-Br-cAMP were completely abolished by SRIF. The blockade of the NOS/NO pathway attenuated the GHRH-induced GH release but had minimal effects on the inhibitory actions of SRIF. In addition, inhibitors of the sGC/cGMP pathway did not modify the SRIF- or GHRH-induced regulation of GH release. Taken together, these findings indicate that the SRIF-induced inhibition of GH release is mediated by both the PLC/IP/PKC and the AC/cAMP/PKA pathways and not by the NOS/NO/sGC/cGMP pathway. In contrast, the GHRH-induced stimulation of GH secretion is mediated by both the AC/cAMP/PKA and the NOS/NO pathways and is independent of the sGC/cGMP pathway and the PLC/IP/PKC system. PMID:24183819

  8. Energy-release rate associated with diffusional crack growth

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, T.

    1982-12-01

    A general expression for the energy release rates (G) that arise during steady state crack propagation by diffusion is derived from the standpoint of irreversible thermodynamics. Three contributing components of G are identified: (1) the Griffith energy (G/sub Gr/); (2) heat generated in the process of surface diffusion; and (3) grain-boundary diffusion. Further, the total G is shown to be directly related to the well-known J-integral if formulated in the framework of finite deformation elasticity. This expression for G is valid in general even if the response of the material is not linear and the mass transport kinetics does not follow Fick's law. Quantitative evaluations of each component are made for the linear case where field solutions are available. The results show that component (2) is approximately equal to G/sub Gr/ and is independent of the crack velocity (nu) whereas component (3) is a monotonically increasing function with G starting from 0.85 G/sub Gr/ when nu is at threshold value; and that strain energy contributions can be neglected leading to G = J = (1-..nu../sup 2/)K/sup 2//E. This means that G is not primarily associated with the release of the strain energy; rather, it stems mostly from the negative work done by the normal stresses on the thickening of the grain boundary due to nonuniform deposition of matter along it.

  9. Design of Growth Factor Sequestering Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Belair, David G.; Le, Ngoc Nhi; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Growth factors (GFs) are major regulatory proteins that can govern cell fate, migration, and organization. Numerous aspects of the cell milieu can modulate cell responses to GFs, and GF regulation is often achieved by the native extracellular matrix (ECM). For example, the ECM can sequester GFs and thereby control GF bioavailability. In addition, GFs can exert distinct effects depending on whether they are sequestered in solution, at two-dimensional interfaces, or within three-dimensional matrices. Understanding how the context of GF sequestering impacts cell function in the native ECM can instruct the design of soluble or insoluble GF sequestering moieties, which can then be used in a variety of bioengineering applications. This Feature Article provides an overview of the natural mechanisms of GF sequestering in the cell milieu, and reviews the recent bioengineering approaches that have sequestered GFs to modulate cell function. Results to date demonstrate that the cell response to GF sequestering depends on the affinity of the sequestering interaction, the spatial proximity of sequestering in relation to cells, the source of the GF (supplemented or endogenous), and the phase of the sequestering moiety (soluble or insoluble). We highlight the importance of context for the future design of biomaterials that can leverage endogenous molecules in the cell milieu and mitigate the need for supplemented factors. PMID:25182455

  10. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Hauger, R.L.; Catt, K.J.; Aguilera, G.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution and properties of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) were analyzed in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. Binding of (/sup 125/I)tyrosine-labeled ovine CRF to frontal cortex and amygdala membrane-rich fractions was saturable, specific, and time- and temperature-dependent, reaching equilibrium in 30 min at 23/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated one class of high-affinity sites with a K/sub d/ of 1 nM and a concentration of 125 fmol/mg. As in the rat pituitary and brain, CRF receptors in monkey cerebral cortex and amygdala were coupled to adenylate cyclase. Autoradiographic analysis of specific CRF binding in brain sections revealed that the receptors were widely distributed in the cerebral cortex and limbic system. Receptor density was highest in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary and throughout the cerebral cortex, specifically in the prefrontal, frontal, orbital, cingulate, insular, and temporal areas, and in the cerebellar cortex. A low binding density was present in the superior colliculus, locus coeruleus, substantia gelatinosa, preoptic area, septal area, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These data demonstrate that receptors for CRF are present within the primate brain at areas related to the central control of visceral function and behavior, suggesting that brain CRF may serve as a neurotransmitter in the coordination of endocrine and neural mechanisms involved in the response to stress.

  11. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  12. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  13. Endorsement of Growth Factors in Experiential Training Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiweewa, John; Gilbride, Dennis; Luke, Melissa; Seward, Derek

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify student growth factors during a semester long Master's level group counseling class. Results indicated that 12 growth factors accounted for 86% of the total number of critical incidents that participants reported as influencing their personal growth and awareness during the group experience. Two other…

  14. Gene Expression of Growth Factors and Growth Factor Receptors for Potential Targeted Therapy of Canine Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    IIDA, Gentoku; ASANO, Kazushi; SEKI, Mamiko; SAKAI, Manabu; KUTARA, Kenji; ISHIGAKI, Kumiko; KAGAWA, Yumiko; YOSHIDA, Orie; TESHIMA, Kenji; EDAMURA, Kazuya; WATARI, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to evaluate the gene expression of growth factors and growth factor receptors of primary hepatic masses, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and nodular hyperplasia (NH), in dogs. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to measure the expression of 18 genes in 18 HCCs, 10 NHs, 11 surrounding non-cancerous liver tissues and 4 healthy control liver tissues. Platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B), transforming growth factor-α, epidermal growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor were found to be differentially expressed in HCC compared with NH and the surrounding non-cancerous and healthy control liver tissues. PDGF-B is suggested to have the potential to become a valuable ancillary target for the treatment of canine HCC. PMID:24189579

  15. Release of extracellular ATP by bacteria during growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is used as an intracellular energy source by all living organisms. It plays a central role in the respiration and metabolism, and is the most important energy supplier in many enzymatic reactions. Its critical role as the energy storage molecule makes it extremely valuable to all cells. Results We report here the detection of extracellular ATP in the cultures of a variety of bacterial species. The levels of the extracellular ATP in bacterial cultures peaked around the end of the log phase and decreased in the stationary phase of growth. Extracellular ATP levels were dependent on the cellular respiration as bacterial mutants lacking cytochrome bo oxidase displayed lower extracellular ATP levels. We have also shown that Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Salmonella actively depleted extracellular ATP and an ATP supplement in culture media enhanced the stationary survival of E. coli and Salmonella. In addition to E. coli and Salmonella the presence of the extracellular ATP was observed in a variety of bacterial species that contain human pathogens such as Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Klebsiella and Staphylococcus. Conclusion Our results indicate that extracellular ATP is produced by many bacterial species during growth and extracellular ATP may serve a role in the bacterial physiology. PMID:24364860

  16. Growth factor involvement in tension-induced skeletal muscle growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman W.

    1987-01-01

    New muscle tissue culture techniques were developed to grow embryonic skeletal myofibers which are able to differentiate into more adultlike myofibers. Studies on mechanical simulation of cultured muscle cell growth will now be more directly applicable to mechanically-induced growth in adult muscle, and lead to better models for understanding muscle tissue atrophy caused by disuse in the microgravity of space.

  17. Biochemical characterization of the Drosophila dpp protein, a member of the transforming growth factor beta family of growth factors.

    PubMed Central

    Panganiban, G E; Rashka, K E; Neitzel, M D; Hoffmann, F M

    1990-01-01

    The decapentaplegic (dpp) gene of Drosophila melanogaster is required for pattern formation in the embryo and for viability of the epithelial cells in the imaginal disks. The dpp protein product predicted from the DNA sequence is similar to members of a family of growth factors that includes transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta). We have produced polyclonal antibodies to a recombinant dpp protein made in bacteria and used a metallothionein promoter to express a dpp cDNA in Drosophila S2 cells. Similar to other proteins in the TGF-beta family, the dpp protein produced by the Drosophila cells was proteolytically cleaved, and both portions of the protein were secreted from the cells. The amino-terminal 47-kilodalton (kDa) peptide was found in the medium and in the proteins adhering to the plastic petri dish. The carboxy-terminal peptide, the region with sequence similarity to the active ligand portion of TGF-beta, was found extracellularly as a 30-kDa homodimer. Most of the 30-kDa homodimer was in the S2 cell protein adsorbed onto the surface of the plastic dish. The dpp protein could be released into solution by increased salt concentration and nonionic detergent. Under these conditions, the amino-terminal and carboxy-terminal portions of dpp were not associated in a stable complex. Images PMID:1692958

  18. Design and characteristics of cytotoxic fibroblast growth factor 1 conjugate for fibroblast growth factor receptor-targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Szlachcic, Anna; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Lobocki, Michal; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Otlewski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are attractive candidate cancer therapy targets as they are overexpressed in multiple types of tumors, such as breast, prostate, bladder, and lung cancer. In this study, a natural ligand of FGFR, an engineered variant of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1V), was conjugated to a potent cytotoxic drug, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), and used as a targeting agent for cancer cells overexpressing FGFRs, similar to antibodies in antibody–drug conjugates. The FGF1V–valine–citrulline–MMAE conjugate showed a favorable stability profile, bound FGFRs on the cell surface specifically, and efficiently released the drug (MMAE) upon cleavage by the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Importantly, the conjugate showed a prominent cytotoxic effect toward cell lines expressing FGFR. FGF1V–vcMMAE was highly cytotoxic at concentrations even an order of magnitude lower than those found for free MMAE. This effect was FGFR-specific as cells lacking FGFR did not show any increased mortality. PMID:27563235

  19. Design and characteristics of cytotoxic fibroblast growth factor 1 conjugate for fibroblast growth factor receptor-targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Szlachcic, Anna; Zakrzewska, Malgorzata; Lobocki, Michal; Jakimowicz, Piotr; Otlewski, Jacek

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) are attractive candidate cancer therapy targets as they are overexpressed in multiple types of tumors, such as breast, prostate, bladder, and lung cancer. In this study, a natural ligand of FGFR, an engineered variant of fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1V), was conjugated to a potent cytotoxic drug, monomethyl auristatin E (MMAE), and used as a targeting agent for cancer cells overexpressing FGFRs, similar to antibodies in antibody-drug conjugates. The FGF1V-valine-citrulline-MMAE conjugate showed a favorable stability profile, bound FGFRs on the cell surface specifically, and efficiently released the drug (MMAE) upon cleavage by the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Importantly, the conjugate showed a prominent cytotoxic effect toward cell lines expressing FGFR. FGF1V-vcMMAE was highly cytotoxic at concentrations even an order of magnitude lower than those found for free MMAE. This effect was FGFR-specific as cells lacking FGFR did not show any increased mortality. PMID:27563235

  20. Isolated placental vessel response to vascular endothelial growth factor and placenta growth factor in normal and growth-restricted pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Watroba, Mateusz; Kurowska, Ewa; Maslinski, Slawomir

    2005-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and placenta growth factor (PlGF) cause vasodilation. We examined the vasomotor response of isolated placental vessels to VEGF and PlGF in normal (group I) and intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR)-complicated pregnancy (group II). Rings of vessels were prepared in vitro and mounted on the vessel myograph plunged in tissue bath. The magnitude of dilation to increased doses of VEGF and PlGF has been studied. VEGF is a more potent vasodilator than PlGF. Both, VEGF- and PlGF-induced vasorelaxation was diminished in the IUGR (group II) nearly by half, compared to control (group I). Relative placental nitric oxide deficiency, or decreased sensitivity to VEGF and PlGF may contribute to the development of high impedance fetoplacental circulation. PMID:15591804

  1. Stress-Derived Corticotropin Releasing Factor Breaches Epithelial Endotoxin Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Loss of the endotoxin tolerance of intestinal epithelium contributes to a number of intestinal diseases. The etiology is not clear. Psychological stress is proposed to compromise the intestinal barrier function. The present study aims to elucidate the role of the stress-derived corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in breaching the established intestinal epithelial endotoxin tolerance. Methods Epithelial cells of HT-29, T84 and MDCK were exposed to lipopolysaccharide to induce the endotoxin tolerance; the cells were then stimulated with CRF. The epithelial barrier function was determined using as indicators of the endotoxin tolerant status. A water-avoid stress mouse model was employed to test the role of CRF in breaching the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestine. Results The established endotoxin tolerance in the epithelial cell monolayers was broken down by a sequent exposure to CRF and LPS manifesting a marked drop of the transepithelial resistance (TER) and an increase in the permeability to a macromolecular tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The exposure to CRF also increased the expression of Cldn2 in the epithelial cells, which could be mimicked by over expression of TLR4 in epithelial cells. Over expression of Cldn2 resulted in low TER in epithelial monolayers and high permeability to HRP. After treating mice with the 10-day chronic stress, the intestinal epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised, which could be prevented by blocking either CRF, or TLR4, or Cldn2. Conclusions Psychological stress-derived CRF can breach the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23840363

  2. PEGylation of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GRF) analogues.

    PubMed

    Esposito, P; Barbero, L; Caccia, P; Caliceti, P; D'Antonio, M; Piquet, G; Veronese, F M

    2003-09-26

    Synthetically produced GRF1-29 (Sermorelin) has an amino acid composition identical to the N-terminal 29 amino acids sequence of the natural hypothalamic GHRH1-44 (Figure 1). It maintains bioactivity in vitro and is almost equally effective in eliciting secretion of endogenous growth hormone in vivo. The main drawbacks associated with the pharmaceutical use of hGRF1-29 relate to its short half-life in plasma, about 10-20 min in humans, which is caused mostly by renal ultrafiltration and enzymatic degradation at the N terminus. PEGylation has been considered as one valid approach to obtain more stable forms of the peptide, with a longer in vivo half-life and ultimately with increased pharmacodynamic response along the somatotropic axis (endogenous GH, IGF-1 levels). Different PEGylated GRF conjugates were obtained and their bioactivity was tested in vitro and in vivo by monitoring endogenous growth hormone (GH) serum levels after intravenous (i.v.) injection in rats, and intravenous and subcutaneous (s.c.) injection in pigs. It was found that GRF-PEG conjugates are able to bind and activate the human GRF receptor, although with different potency. The effect of PEG molecular weight, number of PEG chains bound and position of PEGylation site on GRF activity were investigated. Mono-PEGylated isomers with a PEG5000 polymer chain linked to Lys 12 or Lys 21 residues, showed high biological activity in vitro, which is similar to that of hGRF1-29, and a higher pharmacodynamic response as compared to unmodified GRF molecule. PMID:14499707

  3. Direct binding of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor to CD44v6

    PubMed Central

    Volz, Yvonne; Koschut, David; Matzke-Ogi, Alexandra; Dietz, Marina S.; Karathanasis, Christos; Richert, Ludovic; Wagner, Moritz G.; Mély, Yves; Heilemann, Mike; Niemann, Hartmut H.; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    CD44v6, a member of the CD44 family of transmembrane glycoproteins is a co-receptor for two receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), Met and VEGFR-2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2). CD44v6 is not only required for the activation of these RTKs but also for signalling. In order to understand the role of CD44v6 in Met and VEGFR-2 activation and signalling we tested whether CD44v6 binds to their ligands, HGF (hepatocyte growth factor) and VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), respectively. FACS analysis and cellular ELISA showed binding of HGF and VEGF only to cells expressing CD44v6. Direct binding of CD44v6 to HGF and VEGF was demonstrated in pull-down assays and the binding affinities were determined using MicroScale Thermophoresis, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy. The binding affinity of CD44v6 to HGF is in the micromolar range in contrast with the high-affinity binding measured in the case of VEGF and CD44v6, which is in the nanomolar range. These data reveal a heparan sulfate-independent direct binding of CD44v6 to the ligands of Met and VEGFR-2 and suggest different roles of CD44v6 for these RTKs. PMID:26181364

  4. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Eye Disease

    PubMed Central

    Penn, J.S.; Madan, A.; Caldwell, R.B.; Bartoli, M.; Caldwell, R.W.; Hartnett, M.E.

    2012-01-01

    Collectively, angiogenic ocular conditions represent the leading cause of irreversible vision loss in developed countries. In the U.S., for example, retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration are the principal causes of blindness in the infant, working age and elderly populations, respectively. Evidence suggests that vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a 40 kDa dimeric glycoprotein, promotes angiogenesis in each of these conditions, making it a highly significant therapeutic target. However, VEGF is pleiotropic, affecting a broad spectrum of endothelial, neuronal and glial behaviors, and confounding the validity of anti-VEGF strategies, particularly under chronic disease conditions. In fact, among other functions VEGF can influence cell proliferation, cell migration, proteolysis, cell survival and vessel permeability in a wide variety of biological contexts. This article will describe the roles played by VEGF in the pathogenesis of retinopathy of prematurity, diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. The potential disadvantages of inhibiting VEGF will be discussed, as will the rationales for targeting other VEGF-related modulators of angiogenesis. PMID:18653375

  5. [Epidermal growth factor, innovation and safety].

    PubMed

    Esquirol Caussa, Jordi; Herrero Vila, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Bioidentical recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF) is available in concentrations and purity suitable for therapeutic use in long time stable formulations. Beneficial effects in several skin pathologies and lesions have been reported (traumatic and surgical wound healing, laser induced wounds, abnormal scars, keloids, radiation or chemotherapy induced dermatitis, post inflammatory hyperpigmentation or for skin aging damage repairing) and also may be considered for the treatment of several oropharingeal and high gastroesophageal tract mucosa diseases (mouth sores, pharyngeal fistulas, ulcers), and several corneal or conjunctive mucosa lesions. rhEGF has not shown any important side or collateral effects in humans or in laboratory experimentation animals, showing optimal tolerability and safety with continuous use for months. Compounding gives advantages of versatility, individualization, personalization, molecular stability, safety and effectiveness in ideal conditions, showing good tissue penetration, both on intact skin and skin lesions that expose the lower planes to the surface. rhEGF compounds can be considered for prevention or as a treatment of diverse skin and mucosa diseases and conditions through compounding preparations. PMID:25433777

  6. Connective tissue growth factor in tumor pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Key roles for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) are demonstrated in the wound repair process where it promotes myofibroblast differentiation and angiogenesis. Similar mechanisms are active in tumor-reactive stroma where CTGF is expressed. Other potential roles include prevention of hypoxia-induced apoptosis and promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transistion (EMT). CTGF expression in tumors has been associated to both tumor suppression and progression. For example, CTGF expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, breast, pancreas and gastric cancer correlates to worse prognosis whereas the opposite is true for colorectal, lung and ovarian cancer. This discrepancy is not yet understood. High expression of CTGF is a hallmark of ileal carcinoids, which are well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas with serotonin production originating from the small intestine and proximal colon. These tumors maintain a high grade of differentiation and low proliferation. Despite this, they are malignant and most patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. These tumors demonstrate several phenotypes potentially related to CTGF function namely: cell migration, absent tumor cell apoptosis, as well as, reactive and well vascularised myofibroblast rich stroma and fibrosis development locally and in distal organs. The presence of CTGF in other endocrine tumors indicates a role in the progression of well-differentiated tumors. PMID:23259759

  7. Evaluation of emulsion electrospun polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor nanofibrous scaffolds for wound healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenbei; Qian, Yuna; Li, Linhao; Pan, Lianhong; Njunge, Lucy W; Dong, Lili; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Wound healing scaffolds provide cells with structural integrity and can also deliver biological agents to establish a skin tissue-specific microenvironment to regulate cell functions and to accelerate the healing process. In this study, we fabricated biodegradable nanofibrous scaffolds with an emulsion electrospinning technique. The scaffolds were composed of polycaprolactone, hyaluronan and encapsulating epidermal growth factor. The morphology and core-sheath structure of the nanofibers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The scaffolds were also characterized for chemical composition and hydrophilicity with a Fourier-transform infrared analysis, energy dispersive spectroscopy and the water contact angle. An in vitro model protein bovine serum albumin and epidermal growth factor release study was conducted to evaluate the sustained release potential of the core-sheath structured nanofibers with and without the hyaluronan component. Additionally, an in vitro cultivation of human skin keratinocytes (HaCaT) and fibroblasts on polycaprolactone/hyaluronan and polycaprolactone/hyaluronan-epidermal growth factor scaffolds showed a significant synergistic effect of hyaluronan and epidermal growth factor on cell proliferation and infiltration. Furthermore, there was an up-regulation of the wound-healing-related genes collagen I, collagen III and TGF-β in polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor scaffolds compared with control groups. In the full-thickness wound model, the enhanced regeneration of fully functional skin was facilitated by epidermal regeneration in the polycaprolactone/hyaluronan/epidermal growth factor treatment group. Our findings suggest that bioactivity and hemostasis of the hyaluronan-based nanofibrous scaffolds have the capability to encapsulate and control the release of growth factors that can serve as skin tissue engineering scaffolds for wound healing. PMID:26012354

  8. Regulation of renin release by local and systemic factors.

    PubMed

    Schweda, F; Kurtz, A

    2011-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is critically involved in the regulation of the salt and volume status of the body and blood pressure. The activity of the RAS is controlled by the protease renin, which is released from the renal juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells into the circulation. Renin release is regulated in negative feedback-loops by blood pressure, salt intake, and angiotensin II. Moreover, sympathetic nerves and renal autacoids such as prostaglandins and nitric oxide stimulate renin secretion. Despite numerous studies there remained substantial gaps in the understanding of the control of renin release at the organ or cellular level. Some of these gaps have been closed in the last years by means of gene-targeted mice and advanced imaging and electrophysiological methods. In our review, we discuss these recent advances together with the relevant previous literature on the regulation of renin release. PMID:22128405

  9. Fibroblast Growth Factors and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Promote Cardiac Reprogramming under Defined Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakawa, Hiroyuki; Muraoka, Naoto; Miyamoto, Kazutaka; Sadahiro, Taketaro; Isomi, Mari; Haginiwa, Sho; Kojima, Hidenori; Umei, Tomohiko; Akiyama, Mizuha; Kuishi, Yuki; Kurokawa, Junko; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Fukuda, Keiichi; Ieda, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fibroblasts can be directly reprogrammed into cardiomyocyte-like cells (iCMs) by overexpression of cardiac transcription factors, including Gata4, Mef2c, and Tbx5; however, this process is inefficient under serum-based culture conditions, in which conversion of partially reprogrammed cells into fully reprogrammed functional iCMs has been a major hurdle. Here, we report that a combination of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 2, FGF10, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), termed FFV, promoted cardiac reprogramming under defined serum-free conditions, increasing spontaneously beating iCMs by 100-fold compared with those under conventional serum-based conditions. Mechanistically, FFV activated multiple cardiac transcriptional regulators and converted partially reprogrammed cells into functional iCMs through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways. Moreover, FFV enabled cardiac reprogramming with only Mef2c and Tbx5 through the induction of cardiac reprogramming factors, including Gata4. Thus, defined culture conditions promoted the quality of cardiac reprogramming, and this finding provides new insight into the mechanism of cardiac reprogramming. PMID:26626177

  10. Growth hormone responses to growth hormone-releasing hormone in Hand-Schüller-Christian Disease.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C; Loriaux, D L; Merriam, G R

    1989-09-01

    Bolus doses of GH-releasing hormone (GHRH), 1 microgram/kg i.v., were given to two groups of adult patients with growth hormone deficiency (GHD): 9 with Hand-Schüller-Christian disease (HSCD, presumed hypothalamic GHD) and 9 with idiopathic GHD (IGHD, etiology unknown). Six patients in each group were then given further GHRH doses daily for 5 days, and the GH responses to GHRH were measured over 3 h on day 1 and day 5. Plasma levels of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) were measured twice daily on days 1 and 5 during GHRH treatment. All patients with HSCD had measurable GH responses to the first dose of GHRH, with a mean peak response of 6.4 +/- 2.1 ng/ml (mean +/- SE). Only 5 of 9 patients with IGHD had GH responses above the detection limits of the assay; their mean peak response, 1.3 +/- 0.2 ng/ml, was significantly lower than the GH responses of the HSCD patients (p less than 0.05). Responses in both groups of patients were lower than those previously observed in normal adult men (35 +/- 8 ng/ml; p less than 0.01). Five days of daily stimulation with GHRH significantly (p less than 0.01) increased the GH response in both groups of patients. The rise was greater in patients with HSCD than with IGHD (HSCD, 5.1 +/- 2.5 ng/ml on day 1, vs. 12.0 +/- 6.8 ng/ml on day 5; IGHD, 1.4 +/- 0.3 ng/ml vs. 2.9 +/- 0.6 ng/ml).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2507952

  11. Impact of human amniotic membrane preparation on release of angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Wolbank, S; Hildner, F; Redl, H; van Griensven, M; Gabriel, C; Hennerbichler, S

    2009-12-01

    Preserved amniotic membrane (AM) has been used in the field of ophthalmology and wound care due to its bacteriostatic, antiphlogistic, protease-inhibiting, re-epithelialization, wound-protecting and scar formation-reducing properties. Typically, AM is applied after banking in a glycerol-preserved or freeze-dried state. Cell viabilities in different forms of preparation vary substantially, which in consequence may also be reflected in the amount and type of growth factors released from the preserved material. Therefore, we characterized the angiogenic factor (AF) profile released from different AM preparations. For this, medium was conditioned with non-preserved, glycerol- and cryo-preserved AM for 48 h, which was screened for AFs using a protein array system. In parallel, the preparations were tested for cell viability. Non-preserved as well as cryo-preserved AM maintained viabilities at 106.5 +/- 23.9% and 21.9 +/- 23.3%, respectively, whereas glycerol-preserved AM was found to be non-viable. Of the 20 investigated factors, high levels of angiogenin, GRO, IL-6/8, TIMP-1/2 and MCP-1 and low levels of EGF, IFNgamma, IGF-1, leptin, RANTES, TGFbeta1 and thrombopoietin were identified to be secreted from non-preserved AM. Cryo-preserved AM secreted high levels of IL-8, intermediate levels of GRO and TIMP-1/2 but only low levels of angiogenin, IFNgamma, IL-6 and MCP-1 and no detectable EGF, IGF-1, leptin, RANTES, TGFbeta1 and thrombopoietin. After banking in glycerol, AM releases only minute amounts of TIMP-1/2. Along with viability, the AF profile of amniotic membrane largely depends on the preparation method applied for banking. This should be considered for selection of an AM product for a specific clinical application. PMID:19701933

  12. Fibroblast Growth Factor Signaling in Metabolic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nies, Vera J. M.; Sancar, Gencer; Liu, Weilin; van Zutphen, Tim; Struik, Dicky; Yu, Ruth T.; Atkins, Annette R.; Evans, Ronald M.; Jonker, Johan W.; Downes, Michael Robert

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity is a growing health problem. Obesity is strongly associated with several comorbidities, such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, certain cancers, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes, which all reduce life expectancy and life quality. Several drugs have been put forward in order to treat these diseases, but many of them have detrimental side effects. The unexpected role of the family of fibroblast growth factors in the regulation of energy metabolism provides new approaches to the treatment of metabolic diseases and offers a valuable tool to gain more insight into metabolic regulation. The known beneficial effects of FGF19 and FGF21 on metabolism, together with recently discovered similar effects of FGF1 suggest that FGFs and their derivatives carry great potential as novel therapeutics to treat metabolic conditions. To facilitate the development of new therapies with improved targeting and minimal side effects, a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of action of FGFs is needed. In this review, we will discuss what is currently known about the physiological roles of FGF signaling in tissues important for metabolic homeostasis. In addition, we will discuss current concepts regarding their pharmacological properties and effector tissues in the context of metabolic disease. Also, the recent progress in the development of FGF variants will be reviewed. Our goal is to provide a comprehensive overview of the current concepts and consensuses regarding FGF signaling in metabolic health and disease and to provide starting points for the development of FGF-based therapies against metabolic conditions. PMID:26834701

  13. Novel Drosophila receptor that binds multiple growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Rosner, M.R.; Thompson, K.L.; Garcia, V.; Decker, S.J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have recently reported the identification of a novel growth factor receptor from Drosophila cell cultures that has dual binding specificity for both insulin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). This 100 kDa protein is also antigenically related to the cytoplasmic region of the mammalian EGF receptor-tyrosine kinase. They now report that this protein binds to mammalian nerve growth factor and human transforming growth factor alpha as well as insulin and EGF with apparent dissociation constants ranging from 10/sup -6/ to 10/sup -8/ M. The 100 kDa protein can be affinity-labeled with these /sup 125/I-labeled growth factors after immunoprecipitation with anti-EGF receptor antiserum. These four growth factors appear to share a common binding site, as evidenced by their ability to block affinity labelling by /sup 125/I-insulin. No significant binding to the 100 kDa protein was observed with platelet-derived growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, or glucagon. The 100 kDa Drosophila protein has a unique ligand-binding spectrum with no direct counterpart in mammalian cells and may represent an evolutionary precursor of the mammalian receptors for these growth factors.

  14. Growth factor array fabrication using a color ink jet printer.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kohei; Miyazaki, Takeshi; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2003-04-01

    We have developed a novel method for growth factor analysis using a commercial color ink jet printer to fabricate substrata patterned with growth factors. We prepared substrata with insulin printed in a simple pattern or containing multiple areas of varying quantities of printed insulin. When we cultured the mouse myoblast cell line, C2C12, on the insulin-patterned substrata, the cells were grown in the same pattern with the insulin-printed pattern. Cell culture with the latter substrata demonstrated that quantity control of insulin deposition by a color ink jet printer is possible. For further applications, we developed substrata with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) spotted in 16 different areas in varying combinations and concentrations (growth factor array). With this growth factor array, C2C12 cells were cultured, and the onset of muscle cell differentiation was monitored for the expression of the myogenic regulator myogenin. The ratio of cells expressing myogenin varied with the doses of IGF-I and bFGF in the sections, demonstrating a feasibility of growth factor array fabrication by a color ink jet printer. Since a printer manipulates several colors, this method can be easily applied to multivariate analyses of growth factors and attachment factors affecting cell growth and differentiation. This method may provide a powerful tool for cell biology and tissue engineering, especially for stem cell research in investigating unknown conditions for differentiation. PMID:12719645

  15. Insulin/IGF signaling in Drosophila and other insects: factors that regulate production, release and post-release action of the insulin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nässel, Dick R; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs) are important regulators of metabolism, growth, reproduction and lifespan, and mechanisms of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) have been well conserved over evolution. In insects, between one and 38 ILPs have been identified in each species. Relatively few insect species have been investigated in depth with respect to ILP functions, and therefore we focus mainly on the well-studied fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In Drosophila eight ILPs (DILP1-8), but only two receptors (dInR and Lgr3) are known. DILP2, 3 and 5 are produced by a set of neurosecretory cells (IPCs) in the brain and their biosynthesis and release are controlled by a number of mechanisms differing between larvae and adults. Adult IPCs display cell-autonomous sensing of circulating glucose, coupled to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for DILP release. The glucose-mediated DILP secretion is modulated by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, as well as by factors released from the intestine and adipocytes. Larval IPCs, however, are indirectly regulated by glucose-sensing endocrine cells producing adipokinetic hormone, or by circulating factors from the intestine and fat body. Furthermore, IIS is situated within a complex physiological regulatory network that also encompasses the lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. After release from IPCs, the ILP action can be modulated by circulating proteins that act either as protective carriers (binding proteins), or competitive inhibitors. Some of these proteins appear to have additional functions that are independent of ILPs. Taken together, the signaling with multiple ILPs is under complex control, ensuring tightly regulated IIS in the organism. PMID:26472340

  16. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  17. Ethanol Alters Production and Secretion of Estrogen-Regulated Growth Factors That Control Prolactin-Secreting Tumors in the Pituitary

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Dipak K.; Boyadjieva, Nadka I.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic administration of ethanol increases plasma prolactin levels and enhances estradiol’s mitogenic action on the lactotropes of the pituitary gland. The present study was conducted to determine whether ethanol’s lactotropic cell-proliferating action, like estradiol’s, is associated with alteration in the production of 3 peptides that regulate cell growth: transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1), TGF-β3 and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Methods Using ovariectomized Fischer-344 female rats, we determined ethanol’s and estradiol’s actions on lactotropic cell proliferation and growth-regulatory peptide production and release in the pituitary gland during tumorigenesis. Results Ethanol increased basal and estradiol-enhanced mitosis of lactotropes in the pituitary glands of ovariectomized rats. The level of growth-inhibitory TGF-β1 was reduced in the pituitary following ethanol and/or estradiol treatment for 2 and 4 weeks. In contrast, ethanol and estradiol alone as well as together increased levels of growth-stimulatory TGF-β3 and bFGF in the pituitary at 2 and 4 weeks. In primary cultures of pituitary cells, both ethanol and estradiol reduced TGF-β1 release and increased TGF-β3 and bFGF release at 24 hours. Ethanol’s effect on growth factor levels in the pituitary or growth factor release from the pituitary cells was less than that of estradiol. When ethanol and estradiol were applied together, their individual effects on these growth factors were amplified. Conclusions These results confirm estradiol’s modulation of pituitary growth factor production and release, and provide evidence that ethanol, like estradiol, alters the production and secretion of growth-regulatory peptides controlling lactotropic cell proliferation. PMID:18034699

  18. Action of fibroblast growth factor-2 on the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; An, Howard S; Ellman, Michael; Phillips, Frank; Thonar, Eugene J; Park, Daniel K; Udayakumar, Ranjith K; Im, Hee-Jeong

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is a growth factor that is immediately released after cartilage injury and plays a pivotal role in cartilage homeostasis. In human adult articular cartilage, FGF2 mediates anti-anabolic and potentially catabolic effects via the suppression of proteoglycan (PG) production along with the upregulation of matrix-degrading enzyme activity. The aim of the present study was to determine the biological effects of FGF2 in spine disc cells and to elucidate the complex biochemical pathways utilized by FGF2 in bovine intervertebral disc (IVD) cells in an attempt to further understand the pathophysiologic processes involved in disc degeneration. Methods We studied the effect of FGF2 on IVD tissue homeostasis by assessing MMP-13 expression (potent matrix-degrading enzyme), PG accumulation, and PG synthesis in the bovine spine IVD, as well as evaluating whether FGF2 counteracts known anabolic factors such as BMP7. To understand the molecular mechanisms by which FGF2 antagonizes BMP7 activity, we also investigated the signaling pathways utilized by FGF2 in bovine disc tissue. Results The primary receptor expressed in bovine nucleus pulposus cartilage is FGFR1, and this receptor is upregulated in degenerative human IVD tissue compared with normal IVD tissue. Stimulation of bovine nucleus pulposus cells cultured in monolayer with FGF2 augmented the production of MMP-13 at the transcriptional and translational level in a dose-dependent manner. Stimulation of bovine nucleus pulposus cells cultured in alginate beads for 21 days with FGF2 resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in PG accumulation, due at least in part to the inhibition of PG synthesis. Further studies demonstrate that FGF2 (10 ng/ml) antagonizes BMP7-mediated acceleration of PG production in bovine nucleus pulposus cells via the upregulation of noggin, an inhibitor of the transforming growth factor beta/bone morphogenetic protein signaling pathway. Chemical inhibitor studies

  19. Evaluation of growth hormone release and human growth hormone treatment in children with cranial irradiation-associated short stature

    SciTech Connect

    Romshe, C.A.; Zipf, W.B.; Miser, A.; Miser, J.; Sotos, J.F.; Newton, W.A.

    1984-02-01

    We studied nine children who had received cranial irradiation for various malignancies and subsequently experienced decreased growth velocity. Their response to standard growth hormone stimulation and release tests were compared with that in seven children with classic GH deficiency and in 24 short normal control subjects. With arginine and L-dopa stimulation, six of nine patients who received radiation had a normal GH response (greater than 7 ng/ml), whereas by design none of the GH deficient and all of the normal children had a positive response. Only two of nine patients had a normal response to insulin hypoglycemia, with no significant differences in the mean maximal response of the radiation and the GH-deficient groups. Pulsatile secretion was not significantly different in the radiation and GH-deficient groups, but was different in the radiation and normal groups. All subjects in the GH-deficient and radiation groups were given human growth hormone for 1 year. Growth velocity increased in all, with no significant difference in the response of the two groups when comparing the z scores for growth velocity of each subject's bone age. We recommend a 6-month trial of hGH in children who have had cranial radiation and are in prolonged remission with a decreased growth velocity, as there is no completely reliable combination of GH stimulation or release tests to determine their response.

  20. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  1. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  2. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  3. Acoustic droplet–hydrogel composites for spatial and temporal control of growth factor delivery and scaffold stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Fabiilli, Mario L.; Wilson, Christopher G.; Padilla, Frédéric; Martín-Saavedra, Francisco M.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Franceschi, Renny T.

    2013-01-01

    Wound healing is regulated by temporally and spatially restricted patterns of growth factor signaling, but there are few delivery vehicles capable of the “on-demand” release necessary for recapitulating these patterns. Recently we described a perfluorocarbon double emulsion that selectively releases a protein payload upon exposure to ultrasound through a process known as acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV). In this study, we describe a delivery system composed of fibrin hydrogels doped with growth factor-loaded double emulsion for applications in tissue regeneration. Release of immunoreactive basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) from the composites increased up to 5-fold following ADV and delayed release was achieved by delaying exposure to ultrasound. Releasates of ultrasound-treated materials significantly increased the proliferation of endothelial cells compared to sham controls, indicating that the released bFGF was bioactive. ADV also triggered changes in the ultrastructure and mechanical properties of the fibrin as bubble formation and consolidation of the fibrin in ultrasound-treated composites were accompanied by up to a 22-fold increase in shear stiffness. ADV did not reduce the viability of cells suspended in composite scaffolds. These results demonstrate that an acoustic droplet–hydrogel composite could have broad utility in promoting wound healing through on-demand control of growth factor release and/or scaffold architecture. PMID:23535233

  4. An Exploratory Study of Factors Differentiating Freshmen Educational Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenning, Oscar T.

    The present study was an exploratory investigation of factors that differentiate students who exhibit "negative educational growth" from a group of equally able students who exhibit marked "positive educational growth." Educational growth was operationally defined as estimated true test-retest change on American College Tests (ACT) composite…

  5. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J.; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration. PMID:25136093

  6. Agonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone reduces pneumolysin-induced pulmonary permeability edema

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Rudolf; Sridhar, Supriya; Rick, Ferenc G.; Gorshkov, Boris; Umapathy, Nagavedi S.; Yang, Guang; Oseghale, Aluya; Verin, Alexander D.; Chakraborty, Trinad; Matthay, Michael A.; Zemskov, Evgeny A.; White, Richard; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    Aggressive treatment with antibiotics in patients infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae induces release of the bacterial virulence factor pneumolysin (PLY). Days after lungs are sterile, this pore-forming toxin can still induce pulmonary permeability edema in patients, characterized by alveolar/capillary barrier dysfunction and impaired alveolar liquid clearance (ALC). ALC is mainly regulated through Na+ transport by the apically expressed epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and the basolaterally expressed Na+/K+-ATPase in type II alveolar epithelial cells. Because no standard treatment is currently available to treat permeability edema, the search for novel therapeutic candidates is of high priority. We detected mRNA expression for the active receptor splice variant SV1 of the hypothalamic polypeptide growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH), as well as for GHRH itself, in human lung microvascular endothelial cells (HL-MVEC). Therefore, we have evaluated the effect of the GHRH agonist JI-34 on PLY-induced barrier and ALC dysfunction. JI-34 blunts PLY-mediated endothelial hyperpermeability in monolayers of HL-MVEC, in a cAMP-dependent manner, by means of reducing the phosphorylation of myosin light chain and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin. In human airway epithelial H441 cells, PLY significantly impairs Na+ uptake, but JI-34 restores it to basal levels by means of increasing cAMP levels. Intratracheal instillation of PLY into C57BL6 mice causes pulmonary alveolar epithelial and endothelial hyperpermeability as well as edema formation, all of which are blunted by JI-34. These findings point toward a protective role of the GHRH signaling pathway in PLY-induced permeability edema. PMID:22308467

  7. Growth factor effects on costal chondrocytes for tissue engineering fibrocartilage.

    PubMed

    Johns, D E; Athanasiou, K A

    2008-09-01

    Tissue-engineered fibrocartilage could become a feasible option for replacing tissues such as the knee meniscus or temporomandibular joint disc. This study employed five growth factors (insulin-like growth factor-I, transforming growth factor-beta1, epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, and basic fibroblast growth factor) in a scaffoldless approach with costal chondrocytes, attempting to improve biochemical and mechanical properties of engineered constructs. Samples were quantitatively assessed for total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, collagen type I, collagen type II, cells, compressive properties, and tensile properties at two time points. Most treated constructs had lower biomechanical and biochemical properties than the controls with no growth factors, suggesting a detrimental effect, but the treatment with insulin-like growth factor-I tended to improve the constructs. Additionally, the 6-week time point was consistently better than that at 3 weeks, with total collagen, glycosaminoglycans, and aggregate modulus doubling during this time. Further optimization of the time in culture and exogenous stimuli will be important in making a more functional replacement tissue. PMID:18597118

  8. Connective tissue growth factor is a substrate of ADAM28

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Satsuki; Tanaka, Rena; Shimoda, Masayuki; Onuma, Junko; Fujii, Yutaka; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyper-variable region in the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM28 binds to C-terminal domain of CTGF. {yields} ADAM28 cleaves CTGF alone and CTGF in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. {yields} CTGF digestion by ADAM28 releases biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. {yields} ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF{sub 165} are commonly co-expressed by carcinoma cells in human breast carcinoma tissues. {yields} These suggest that ADAM28 promotes VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by selective CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. -- Abstract: ADAM28, a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) gene family, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and the expression correlates with carcinoma cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. However, information about substrates of ADAM28 is limited. We screened interacting molecules of ADAM28 in human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system and identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Binding of CTGF to proADAM28 was demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein binding assay. ADAM28 cleaved CTGF in dose- and time-dependent manners at the Ala{sup 181}-Tyr{sup 182} and Asp{sup 191}-Pro{sup 192} bonds in the hinge region of the molecule. ADAM28 selectively digested CTGF in the complex of CTGF and vascular endothelial growth factor{sub 165} (VEGF{sub 165}), releasing biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF are commonly co-expressed in the breast carcinoma tissues. These data provide the first evidence that CTGF is a novel substrate of ADAM28 and suggest that ADAM28 may promote VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by the CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex.

  9. [Effects of slow/controlled release fertilizers on the growth and nutrient use efficiency of pepper].

    PubMed

    Tang, Shuan-Hu; Zhang, Fa-Bao; Huang, Xu; Chen, Jian-Sheng; Xu, Pei-Zhi

    2008-05-01

    Pot trails were conducted from 2003 to 2005 to study the effects of slow/controlled release fertilizers on the growth and nutrient use efficiency of pepper. The results indicated that in comparison with conventional splitting fertilization (T1), basal application of polymer-coated controlled release fertilizer (T2) enhanced the single fruit mass and vitamin C concentration, improved the root activity, and increased the fruit yield by 8.4%, but no significant effect was observed on the dissoluble sugar concentration in fruit. NH4MgPO4-coated controlled release fertilizer (T3) increased the dissoluble sugar concentration by 5.67%, but had less effect on single fruit mass and vitamin C concentration. Under the application of T3, the root system had a vigorous growth at early stages but became infirm at later stages, resulting in a lower yield. Comparing with T1, the application of 3 slow release fertilizers increased the dissoluble sugar concentration in fruit, enhanced the root activity, but had less effect on the yield. All test slow/controlled release fertilizers increased the use efficiency of N, P, and K significantly, with an exception for T2 which increased the use efficiency of N and K but decreased that of P. It was demonstrated that an appropriate application of slow/controlled release fertilizers could enhance pepper' s root activity and improve nutrient use efficiency. PMID:18655582

  10. Targeting the opioid growth factor: opioid growth factor receptor axis for treatment of human ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagon, Ian S; Donahue, Renee; McLaughlin, Patricia J

    2013-05-01

    The opioid growth factor (OGF) - opioid growth factor receptor (OGFr) axis is a biological pathway that is present in human ovarian cancer cells and tissues. OGF, chemically termed [Met(5)]-enkephalin, is an endogenous opioid peptide that interfaces with OGFr to delay cells moving through the cell cycle by upregulation of cyclin-dependent inhibitory kinase pathways. OGF inhibitory activity is dose dependent, receptor mediated, reversible, protein and RNA dependent, but not related to apoptosis or necrosis. The OGF-OGFr axis can be targeted for treatment of human ovarian cancer by (i) administration of exogenous OGF, (ii) genetic manipulation to over-express OGFr and (iii) use of low dosages of naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, which stimulates production of OGF and OGFr for subsequent interaction following blockade of the receptor. The OGF-OGFr axis may be a feasible target for treatment of cancer of the ovary (i) in a prophylactic fashion, (ii) following cytoreduction or (iii) in conjunction with standard chemotherapy for additive effectiveness. In summary, preclinical data support the transition of these novel therapies for treatment of human ovarian cancer from the bench to bedside to provide additional targets for treatment of this devastating disease. PMID:23856908

  11. Application of photoremovable protecting group for controlled release of plant growth regulators by sunlight.

    PubMed

    Atta, Sanghamitra; Ikbal, Mohammed; Kumar, Ashutosh; Pradeep Singh, N D

    2012-06-01

    We report a novel technique for controlled release of plant growth regulators (PGRs) by sunlight using photoremovable protecting group (PRPG) as a delivery device. In the present work, carboxyl-containing PGRs of the auxin group [indoleacetic acid (IAA) and naphthoxyacetic acid (NOAA)] were chemically caged using PRPGs of coumarin derivatives. Photophysical studies showed that caged PGRs exhibited good fluorescence properties. Irradiation of caged PGRs by sunlight in both aqueous ethanol and soil media resulted in controlled release of PGRs. The results of the bioactivity experiments indicated that caged PGRs showed better enhancement in the root and shoot length growth of Cicer arietinum compared to PGRs after 10days of sunlight exposure. Our results indicated that use of PRPG as a delivery device for controlled release of PGRs by sunlight in soil holds great interest for field application since it can overcome the rapid loss of PGRs in environmental conditions. PMID:22513094

  12. Extracellular matrix and growth factors in branching morphogenesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardman, P.; Spooner, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    The unifying hypothesis of the NSCORT in gravitational biology postulates that the ECM and growth factors are key interrelated components of a macromolecular regulatory system. The ECM is known to be important in growth and branching morphogenesis of embryonic organs. Growth factors have been detected in the developing embryo, and often the pattern of localization is associated with areas undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal interactions. Causal relationships between these components may be of fundamental importance in control of branching morphogenesis.

  13. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor is a Secreted Angiogenic Mitogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, David W.; Cachianes, George; Kuang, Wun-Jing; Goeddel, David V.; Ferrara, Napoleone

    1989-12-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was purified from media conditioned by bovine pituitary folliculostellate cells (FC). VEGF is a heparin-binding growth factor specific for vascular endothelial cells that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo. Complementary DNA clones for bovine and human VEGF were isolated from cDNA libraries prepared from FC and HL60 leukemia cells, respectively. These cDNAs encode hydrophilic proteins with sequences related to those of the A and B chains of platelet-derived growth factor. DNA sequencing suggests the existence of several molecular species of VEGF. VEGFs are secreted proteins, in contrast to other endothelial cell mitogens such as acidic or basic fibroblast growth factors and platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor. Human 293 cells transfected with an expression vector containing a bovine or human VEGF cDNA insert secrete an endothelial cell mitogen that behaves like native VEGF.

  14. Effects of epidermal growth factor on neural crest cells in tissue culture

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, C.A.; Turley, E.A.

    1987-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulates the release of hyaluronic acid (HA) and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) from quail trunk neural crest cultures in a dose-dependent fashion. It also promotes the expression of cell-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG) as detected by immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation of the /sup 3/H-labeled proteoglycan. Furthermore, EGF stimulates (/sup 3/H)thymidine incorporation into total cell DNA. These results raise the possibility that EGF or an analogous growth factor is involved in regulation of neural crest cell morphogenesis.

  15. The Interplay between Stem Cells, Microenvironment Mechanics, and Growth Factor activation

    PubMed Central

    Tenney, Rebeca M.; Discher, Dennis E.

    2009-01-01

    Physicochemical features of a cell’s microenvironment can exert important effects on cell behavior and include the effects of matrix elasticity on cell differentiation processes, but molecular mechanisms are largely mysterious. Here we highlight recent reports of a mechanical dependence to growth factor activation, with a particular focus on release of TGFβ (Transforming Growth Factor β) from its large latent complex via forced unfolding. We discuss these processes and pathways in the contexts of matrix adhesion and fluid shearing as they might relate to stem cell differentiation and other mechanisms in development, disease, and repair. PMID:19615877

  16. Material factors influencing metallic whisker growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodekohr, Chad L.

    Whiskering refers to the formation of slender, long, metallic filaments, much thinner than a human hair, that grow on a metallic thin film surface. They are readily observed for pure and alloyed zinc (Zn), silver (Ag), cadmium (Cd), indium (In), and tin (Sn) surfaces. The longest reported whisker length is 4.5 mm long but most high-aspect ratio whiskers range from 1-500 mum. The focus of this research is upon Sn whiskers. Sn whiskers pose serious reliability problems for the electronics industry and are known to be the source of failure in a wide range of electronic devices, such as nuclear power facilities, heart pacemakers, commercial satellites, aviation radar, telecommunication equipment, and desktop computers. The problem with whiskering has been recently exacerbated by the worldwide shift to lead (Pb) free electronics and the continuing reduction in electrical contact pitches. A thorough understanding of the growth mechanism of Sn whiskers is urgently needed. Currently, there is no universally accepted model that explains the broad range of observations on whiskering. The goals of this research are: (1) to develop a more detailed understanding of the physical mechanisms leading to the initiation and growth of Sn whiskers and (2) to outline reasonable mitigation strategies that could be followed to reduce or eliminate the problem of Sn whiskers. The major contributions of this work are: (1) A reliable method for growing Sn whiskers with predictable incubation times has been developed and tested. (2) A surface oxide is not necessary for whisker growth. (3) Intermetallic compounds (IMC) are not necessary for whisker growth. (4) Smoother, not rougher, substrate surfaces promote whisker growth. (5) Whiskers grow under both compressive and tensile thin film stress states. (6) Whisker growth increases with externally applied compression and tension forces. (7) Sn whiskers are composed of pure Sn except for the expected thin, native Sn oxide on their surface. (8) For

  17. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) polymorphisms associated with carcass traits of meat in Korean cattle

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, Hyun Sub; Yoon, Du-Hak; Kim, Lyoung Hyo; Park, Byung Lae; Choi, Yoo Hyun; Chung, Eui Ryong; Cho, Yong Min; Park, Eng Woo; Cheong, Il-Cheong; Oh, Sung-Jong; Yi, Sung-Gon; Park, Taesung; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2006-01-01

    Background Cold carcass weight (CW) and longissimus muscle area (EMA) are the major quantitative traits in beef cattle. In this study, we found several polymorphisms of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) gene and examined the association of polymorphisms with carcass traits (CW and EMA) in Korean native cattle (Hanwoo). Results By direct DNA sequencing in 24 unrelated Korean cattle, we identified 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms within the 9 kb full gene region, including the 1.5 kb promoter region. Among them, six polymorphic sites were selected for genotyping in our beef cattle (n = 428) and five marker haplotypes (frequency > 0.1) were identified. Statistical analysis revealed that -4241A>T showed significant associations with CW and EMA. Conclusion Our findings suggest that polymorphisms in GHRH might be one of the important genetic factors that influence carcass yield in beef cattle. Sequence variation/haplotype information identified in this study would provide valuable information for the production of a commercial line of beef cattle. PMID:16749938

  18. Heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres enhance large-wound healing by delivering growth factors in platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    La, Wan-Geun; Yang, Hee Seok

    2015-04-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) contains many growth factors that are involved in tissue regeneration processes. For successful tissue regeneration, protein growth factors require a delivery vehicle for long-term and sustained release to a defect site in order to maintain their bioactivity. Previously, we showed that heparin-conjugated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanospheres (HCPNs) can provide long-term delivery of growth factors with affinity for heparin. In this study, we hypothesize that treatment of a skin wound with a mixture of PRP and HCPNs would provide long-term delivery of several growth factors contained in PRP to promote the skin wound healing process with preservation of bioactivity. The release of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), contained in PRP, from HCPN with fibrin gel (FG) showed a prolonged release period versus a PRP mixture with FG alone (FG-PRP). Also, growth factors released from PRP with HCPN and FG showed sustained human dermal fibroblast growth for 12 days. Full-thickness skin wound treatment in mice with FG-HCPN-PRP resulted in much faster wound closure as well as dermal and epidermal regeneration at day 9 compared with treatment with FG-HCPN or FG-PRP. The enhanced wound healing using FG-HCPN-PRP may be due to the prolonged release not only of PDGF-BB but also of other growth factors in the PRP. The delivered growth factors accelerated angiogenesis at the wound site. PMID:25284020

  19. TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF)

    EPA Science Inventory

    TITLE:
    TERATOGENIC RESPONSES ARE MODULATED IN MICE LACKING EXPRESSION OF EPIDERMAL GROWTH FACTOR (EGF) AND TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR-ALPHA (TGF). AUTHORS (ALL): Abbott, Barbara D.1; Best, Deborah S.1; Narotsky, Michael G.1. SPONSOR NAME: None INSTITUTIONS (ALL): 1. Repro Tox ...

  20. EDUCATION AS A FACTOR IN ECONOMIC GROWTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MACKERTICH, ALEX

    THE VALUE OF AN EDUCATION IN THE ECONOMIC GROWTH OF AN UNDERDEVELOPED COUNTRY (INDIA) WAS INVESTIGATED USING THE CASE STUDY APPROACH. DATA WERE GATHERED AT BOTH THE CENTRAL GOVERNMENT AND VILLAGE LEVELS THROUGH INTERVIEWS WITH INDIAN GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND FROM OFFICIAL GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS CONCERNING THE NATION'S EDUCATIONAL EFFORTS, AS…

  1. Strain-energy release rate analysis of cyclic delamination growth in compressively loaded laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates was studied analytically and experimentally. The configuration used was a laminate with an across-the-width delamination. An approximate super-position stress analysis was developed to quantify the effects of various geometric, material, and load parameters on mode 1 and mode 2 strain energy release rates G sub 1 and G sub 2, respectively. Calculated values of G sub 1 and G sub 2 were then compared with measured cyclic delamination growth rates to determine the relative importance of G sub 1 and G sub 2. High growth rates were observed only when G sub 1 was large. However, slow growth was observed even when G sub 1 was negligibly small. This growth was apparently due to a large value of G sub 2.

  2. Strain energy release rate analysis of cyclic delamination growth in compressively loaded laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitcomb, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Delamination growth in compressively loaded composite laminates was studied analytically and experimentally. The configuration used was a laminate with an across-the-width delamination. An approximate super-position stress analysis was developed to quantify the effects of various geometric, material, and load parameters on mode 2 and mode 2 strain energy release rates G sub/1 and G sub 2, respectively. Calculated values of G sub 1 and G sub 2 were then compared with measured cyclic delamination growth rates to determine the relative importance of G sub 1 and G sub 2. High growth rates were observed only when G sub 1 was large. However, slow growth was observed even when G sub 1 was negligibly small. This growth apparently was due to a large value of G sub 2.

  3. Reduced growth factor requirement of keloid-derived fibroblasts may account for tumor growth

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, S.B.; Trupin, K.M.; Rodriguez-Eaton, S.; Russell, J.D.; Trupin, J.S.

    1988-01-01

    Keloids are benign dermal tumors that form during an abnormal wound-healing process is genetically susceptible individuals. Although growth of normal and keloid cells did not differ in medium containing 10% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid culture grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum, keloid cultures grew to significantly higher densities than normal cells in medium containing 5% (vol/vol) plasma or 1% fetal bovine serum. Conditioned medium from keloid cultures did not stimulate growth of normal cells in plasma nor did it contain detectable platelet-derived growth factor or epidermal growth factor. Keloid fibroblasts responded differently than normal adult fibroblasts to transforming growth factor ..beta... Whereas transforming growth factor ..beta.. reduced growth stimulation by epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from normal adult skin or scars, it enhanced the activity of epidermal growth factor in cells from keloids. Normal and keloid fibroblasts also responded differently to hydrocortisone: growth was stimulated in normal adult cells and unaffected or inhibited in keloid cells. Fetal fibroblasts resembled keloid cells in their ability to grow in plasma and in their response to hydrocortisone. The ability of keloid fibroblasts to grow to higher cell densities in low-serum medium than cells from normal adult skin or from normal early or mature scars suggests that a reduced dependence on serum growth factors may account for their prolonged growth in vivo. Similarities between keloid and fetal cells suggest that keloids may result from the untimely expression of growth-control mechanism that is developmentally regulated.

  4. Platelets promote osteosarcoma cell growth through activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-Akt signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Takemoto, Ai; Takami, Miho; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of tumor cells with platelets contribute to the progression of tumor malignancy, and the expression levels of platelet aggregation-inducing factors positively correlate with the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells. However, it is unclear how tumor-platelet interaction contributes to the proliferation of osteosarcomas. We report here that osteosarcoma-platelet interactions induce the release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets, which promotes the proliferation of osteosarcomas. Co-culture of platelets with MG63 or HOS osteosarcoma cells, which could induce platelet aggregation, enhanced the proliferation of each cell line in vitro. Analysis of phospho-antibody arrays revealed that co-culture of MG63 cells with platelets induced the phosphorylation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and Akt. The addition of supernatants of osteosarcoma-platelet reactants also increased the growth of MG63 and HOS cells as well as the level of phosphorylated-PDGFR and -Akt. Sunitinib or LY294002, but not erlotinib, significantly inhibited the platelet-induced proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, indicating that PDGF released from platelets plays an important role in the proliferation of osteosarcomas by activating the PDGFR and then Akt. Our results suggest that inhibitors that specifically target osteosarcoma-platelet interactions may eradicate osteosarcomas. PMID:24974736

  5. The effects of growth factors on skeletal muscle lesions

    PubMed Central

    GIGANTE, ANTONIO; CIANFORLINI, MARCO; MANZOTTI, SANDRA; ULISSE, SERENA

    2013-01-01

    Skeletal muscle injuries are common causes of severe long-term pain and physical disability, accounting for up to 55% of all sports injuries. The phases of the healing process after direct or indirect muscle injury are complex but clearly defined processes comprising well-coordinated steps: degeneration, inflammation, regeneration, and fibrosis. Despite this frequent occurrence and the presence of a body of data on the pathophysiology of muscle injuries, none of the treatment strategies adopted to date have been shown to be really effective in strictly controlled trials. Most current muscle injury treatments are based on limited experimental and clinical data and/or were only empirically tested. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is a promising alternative approach based on the ability of autologous growth factors (GFs) to accelerate tissue healing, improve muscular regeneration, increase neovascularization and reduce fibrosis, allowing rapid recovery after muscle lesions. Thus, further experimental studies that include the quantification of specific GFs released by PRP, as well as additional data on angiogenesis, myogenesis and functional recovery are needed to ultimately validate the hypothesis of PRP efficacy in the treatment of muscle lesions and open the way for its wide clinical application. PMID:25606531

  6. Comparative survival and growth of Atlantic salmon from egg stocking and fry releases

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.

    2004-01-01

    First summer survival and subsequent growth of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar planted as eggs and fry in a tributary of Cayuga Lake, New York, were examined for 3 years. Atlantic salmon were planted in December 1999-2001 in 20 Whitlock-Vibert (W-V) egg incubators, each containing 300 eyed eggs. The following May, 500 fin-clipped Atlantic salmon fry were released in the same stream section. In autumn, a backpack electroshocker was used to capture fry to assess survival and growth. Mean survival was significantly greater for fry (27.9%) than eggs (0.8%). In autumn, mean length was significantly greater for Atlantic salmon released as fry (90.1 mm) than those planted as eggs (76.2 mm), probably owing to accelerated growth in the hatchery caused by warmer water temperatures (i.e., hatchery, 9.4A?C; stream, 5.1A?C). Releasing Atlantic salmon fry in May was nearly 11 times more costly in terms of hatchery effort than was releasing eggs in December. Although the survival of Atlantic salmon eggs in W-V incubators was low, when considering production costs, the use of egg plantings may warrant consideration under certain restoration or enhancement situations.

  7. High-growth-factor implosions (HEP4)

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O.L.; Keane, C.J.; Hammel, B.A.

    1996-06-01

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), the kinetic energy of an ablating, inward-driven, solid spherical shell is used to compressionally heat the low-density fuel inside. For a given drive, the maximum achievable compressed fuel density and temperature - and hence the maximum neutron production rate depend on the degree of shell isentropy and integrity maintained during the compression. Shell integrity will be degraded by hydrodynamic instability growth of areal density imperfections in the capsule. Surface imperfections on the shell grow as a result of the Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities when the shell is accelerated by the ablating lower-density plasma. Perturbations at the outer capsule surface are transferred hydrodynamically to the inner surface, where deceleration of the shell by the lower-density fuel gives rise to further RT growth at the pusher-fuel interface.

  8. Growth Factors Regulate Expression of Mineral Associated Genes in Cementoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Saygin, N. Esra; Tokiyasu, Yoshihiko; Giannobile, William V.; Somerman, Martha J.

    2008-01-01

    Background Knowledge of the responsiveness of cells within the periodontal region to specific bioactive agents is important for improving regenerative therapies. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of specific growth factors, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on cementoblasts in vitro and ex vivo. Methods Osteocalcin (OC) promoter driven SV40 transgenic mice were used to obtain immortalized cementoblasts. Growth factor effects on DNA synthesis were assayed by [3H]-thymidine incorporation. Northern analysis was used to determine the effects of growth factors on gene expression profile. Effects of growth factors on cementoblast induced biomineralization were determined in vitro (von Kossa stain) and ex vivo (re-implantation of cells in immunodeficient (SCID) mice). Results All growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis compared to control. Twenty-four hour exposure of cells to PDGF-BB or TGF-β resulted in a decrease in bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteocalcin (OCN) mRNAs while PDGF-BB also increased osteopontin (OPN) mRNA. Cells exposed to IGF-I for 24 hours exhibited decreased transcripts for OCN and OPN with an upregulation of BSP mRNA noted at 72 hours. In vitro mineralization was inhibited by continuous application of PDGF-BB or TGF-β, while cells exposed to these factors prior to implantation into SCID mice still promoted biomineralization. Conclusions These data indicate IGF-I, PDGF-BB, and TGF-β influence mitogenesis, phenotypic gene expression profile, and biomineralization potential of cementoblasts suggesting that such factors alone or in combination with other agents may provide trigger factors required for regenerating periodontal tissues. PMID:11063392

  9. Phosphorus released from sediment of Dianchi Lake and its effect on growth of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junzhuo; Luo, Xiongxin; Zhang, Naiming; Wu, Yonghong

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus stored in lake sediments is an inner nutrient source and can be released into overlying water to exacerbate algal blooms. A simulated microcosm of Dianchi Lake was built to investigate phosphorus release from sediments to overlying water and its effect on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. The sediments of Dianchi Lake had a total phosphorus (TP) content of 1.7-1.8 mg g(-1) with Ca bound phosphorus (Ca-P, 50-54 %) and organic phosphorus (Org-P, 28-32 %) as the main fractions. The sediments released 8 % of TP into the overlying water with Fe/Al bound phosphorus (Fe/Al-P, 26 %) and Org-P (65 %) being the main fractions released. The phosphorus concentration of the overlying water increased from 0.14-0.16 to 0.28-0.33 mg L(-1). The biomass density of M. aeruginosa was positively correlated (R (2) = 0.825) with the concentration of orthophosphate, which was the predominant bioavailable phosphorus fraction for algal growth. Org-P can be partly utilized by M. aeruginosa but will not cause a bloom. A good understanding of the geochemical cycles of phosphorus is needed for regulating phosphorus release from sediments and thereby reducing the risk of cyanobacterial blooms. PMID:27155834

  10. Evaluation of Three Growth Factors for TMJ Disc Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Detamore, Michael S.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2015-01-01

    Arguably one of the most complex joints in the body, the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) presents one of the most difficult problems in modern medicine. Tissue engineering, for the TMJ disc in particular, has been proposed as a potential breakthrough treatment strategy for TMJ disorders. Central to tissue engineering is understanding growth factor effects on TMJ disc cells, and to the best of our knowledge, this is the first 3D growth factor study for these cells. The purpose was to examine the effects of high and low concentrations of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β) on porcine TMJ disc cells. Cells were seeded onto non-woven PGA scaffolds (95% porosity) in spinner flasks, then cultured with a growth factor for 6 weeks. Constructs were analyzed for mechanical and structural integrity, cell number, and matrix biosynthesis. All growth factors improved mechanical and structural integrity compared to the control. IGF and TGF-β were most effective at promoting collagen synthesis, although there were no significant differences in glycosaminoglycan synthesis or cell number between any groups. After considering the economic advantage of IGF over TGF-β, the conclusion of this study is to use IGF in future TMJ disc tissue engineering experiments. PMID:15868729

  11. Growth factors in critical illness: regulation and therapeutic aspects.

    PubMed

    Frost, R A; Lang, C H

    1998-03-01

    The erosion of lean body mass observed during catabolic illness is still a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The known anabolic actions of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I have stimulated interest in the use of these agents to mitigate the loss of muscle protein after injury. This review summarizes advances in our understanding of how nutrition, hormones and proinflammatory cytokines regulate the somatotropic axis in health and disease, and recent studies involving the use of growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I in the treatment of critically ill patients. PMID:10565348

  12. Sequence comparison of new prokaryotic and mitochondrial members of the polypeptide chain release factor family predicts a five-domain model for release factor structure.

    PubMed Central

    Pel, H J; Rep, M; Grivell, L A

    1992-01-01

    We have recently reported the cloning and sequencing of the gene for the mitochondrial release factor mRF-1. mRF-1 displays high sequence similarity to the bacterial release factors RF-1 and RF-2. A database search for proteins resembling these three factors revealed high similarities to two amino acid sequences deduced from unassigned genomic reading frames in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The amino acid sequence derived from the Bacillus reading frame is 47% identical to E.coli and Salmonella typhimurium RF-2, strongly suggesting that it represents B.subtilis RF-2. Our comparison suggests that the expression of the B.subtilis gene is, like that of the E.coli and S. typhimurium RF-2 genes, autoregulated by a stop codon dependent +1 frameshift. A comparison of prokaryotic and mitochondrial release factor sequences, including the putative B.subtilis RF-2, leads us to propose a five-domain model for release factor structure. Possible functions of the various domains are discussed. PMID:1408743

  13. Myeloid Growth Factors Promote Resistance to Mycobacterial Infection by Curtailing Granuloma Necrosis through Macrophage Replenishment.

    PubMed

    Pagán, Antonio J; Yang, Chao-Tsung; Cameron, James; Swaim, Laura E; Ellett, Felix; Lieschke, Graham J; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2015-07-01

    The mycobacterial ESX-1 virulence locus accelerates macrophage recruitment to the forming tuberculous granuloma. Newly recruited macrophages phagocytose previously infected apoptotic macrophages to become new bacterial growth niches. Granuloma macrophages can then necrose, releasing mycobacteria into the extracellular milieu, which potentiates their growth even further. Using zebrafish with genetic or pharmacologically induced macrophage deficiencies, we find that global macrophage deficits increase susceptibility to mycobacterial infection by accelerating granuloma necrosis. This is because reduction in the macrophage supply below a critical threshold decreases granuloma macrophage replenishment to the point where apoptotic infected macrophages, failing to get engulfed, necrose. Reducing macrophage demand by removing bacterial ESX-1 offsets the susceptibility of macrophage deficits. Conversely, increasing macrophage supply in wild-type fish by overexpressing myeloid growth factors induces resistance by curtailing necrosis. These findings may explain the susceptibility of humans with mononuclear cytopenias to mycobacterial infections and highlight the therapeutic potential of myeloid growth factors in tuberculosis. PMID:26159717

  14. Engineering a growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix niche to promote vascularization for functional cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Kumaraswamy, Priyadharshini; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Sethuraman, Swaminathan

    2016-08-01

    The major loss of tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) after myocardial ischemia is a serious burden that gradually leads to heart failure. Due to lack of available treatment methods to restore the cardiac function, various research strategies have come up to treat the ischemic myocardium. However these have met with limited success due to the complexity of the cardiac tissue, which exhibits a nanofibrous collagenous matrix with spatio-temporal localization of a combination of growth factors. To mimic the topographical and chemical cues of the natural cardiac tissue, we have fabricated a growth factor embedded nanofibrous scaffold through electrospinning. In our previous work, we have reported a nanofibrous matrix made of PLCL and PEOz with an average diameter of 500 nm. The scaffold properties were specifically characterized in vitro for cardio-compatibility. In the present study, we have loaded dual growth factors VEGF and bFGF in the nanofiber matrix and investigated its suitability for cardiac tissue engineering. The encapsulation and release of dual growth factors from the matrix were studied using XPS and ELISA. Bioactivity of the loaded growth factors towards proliferation and migration of endothelial cells (HUVECs) was evaluated through MTS and Boyden chamber assays respectively. The efficiency of growth factors on the nanofibrous matrix to activate signaling molecules was studied in HUVECs through gene expression analysis. Preclinical evaluation of the growth factor embedded nanofibrous patch in a rabbit acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model was studied and cardiac function assessment was made through ECG and echocardiography. The evidence for angiogenesis in the patch secured regions was analyzed through histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Our results confirm the effectiveness of growth factor embedded nanofiber matrix in restoration of cardiac function after ischemia when compared to conventional patch material thereby exhibiting promise as a

  15. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2012-04-24

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  16. Dual chain synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOEpatents

    Zamora, Paul O.; Pena, Louis A.; Lin, Xinhua

    2009-10-06

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having two peptide chains each branched from a branch moiety, such as trifunctional amino acid residues, the branch moieties separated by a first linker of from 3 to about 20 backbone atoms, which peptide chains bind a heparin-binding growth factor receptor and are covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain, preferably by a second linker, which may be a hydrophobic second linker. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as pharmaceutical agents, soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  17. Intestinal hormones and growth factors: Effects on the small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2009-01-01

    There are various hormones and growth factors which may modify the intestinal absorption of nutrients, and which might thereby be useful in a therapeutic setting, such as in persons with short bowel syndrome. In partI, we focus first on insulin-like growth factors, epidermal and transferring growth factors, thyroid hormones and glucocorticosteroids. Part II will detail the effects of glucagon-like peptide (GLP)-2 on intestinal absorption and adaptation, and the potential for an additive effect of GLP2 plus steroids. PMID:19152442

  18. Motogenic substrata and chemokinetic growth factors for human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jennifer; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling and accurate spatio-temporal coordination of growth factor expression are two factors that are believed to regulate mitoses and cell migration in developing and regenerating tissues. The present quantitative videomicroscopical study examined the influence of some of the principal components of extracellular matrix and several growth factors that are known to be expressed in dermal wounds on three important facets of human skin cell behaviour in culture. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts (and myofibroblast controls) exhibited varying degrees of substrate adhesion, division and migration depending on the composition of the culture substrate. Substrates that are recognized components of transitional matrices generally accentuated cell adhesion and proliferation, and were motogenic, when compared with serum-treated control surfaces, whereas components of more stable structures such as basement membrane had less influence. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and α fibroblastic growth factor (αFGF) all promoted cell proliferation and were chemokinetic to dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). PDGF, EGF and KGF, but not TGFβ or αFGF, all enhanced proliferation of dermal keratinocytes. The same growth factors, and in addition KGF, all stimulated motility in keratinocytes, but TGFβ and αFGF again had no effect. Developing a better understanding of the interdependency of factors that control crucial cell behaviour may assist those who are interested in the regulation of histogenesis and also inform the development of rational therapeutic strategies for the management of chronic and poorly healed wounds. PMID:16011545

  19. Effects of retinoic acid on growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor, growth hormone secretagogue receptor gene expression and growth hormone secretion in rat anterior pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Maliza, Rita; Fujiwara, Ken; Tsukada, Takehiro; Azuma, Morio; Kikuchi, Motoshi; Yashiro, Takashi

    2016-06-30

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule in embryonic development and adult tissue. The actions of RA are mediated by the nuclear receptors retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR), which regulate gene expression. RAR and RXR are widely expressed in the anterior pituitary gland. RA was reported to stimulate growth hormone (GH) gene expression in the anterior pituitary cells. However, current evidence is unclear on the role of RA in gene expression of growth hormone-releasing hormone receptor (Ghrh-r), growth hormone secretagogue receptor (Ghs-r) and somatostatin receptors (Sst-rs). Using isolated anterior pituitary cells of rats, we examined the effects of RA on gene expression of these receptors and GH release. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10(-6) M) for 24 h increased gene expression levels of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r; however, expressions of Sst-r2 and Sst-r5 were unchanged. Combination treatment with the RAR-agonist Am80 and RXR-agonist PA024 mimicked the effects of ATRA on Ghrh-r and Ghs-r gene expressions. Exposure of isolated pituitary cells to ATRA had no effect on basal GH release. In contrast, ATRA increased growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH)- and ghrelin-stimulated GH release from cultured anterior pituitary cells. Our results suggest that expressions of Ghrh-r and Ghs-r are regulated by RA through the RAR-RXR receptor complex and that RA enhances the effects of GHRH and ghrelin on GH release from the anterior pituitary gland. PMID:27052215

  20. Targeting insulin-like growth factor pathways

    PubMed Central

    Yee, D

    2006-01-01

    Some cancer cells depend on the function of specific molecules for their growth, survival, and metastatic potential. Targeting of these critical molecules has arguably been the best therapy for cancer as demonstrated by the success of tamoxifen and trastuzumab in breast cancer. This review will evaluate the type I IGF receptor (IGF-IR) as a potential target for cancer therapy. As new drugs come forward targeting this receptor system, several issues will need to be addressed in the early clinical trials using these agents. PMID:16450000

  1. Regulation of Transforming Growth Factor β1, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor, and Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor by Silicone Gel Sheeting in Early-Stage Scarring

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jaehoon; Lee, Eun Hee; Park, Sang Woo

    2015-01-01

    Background Hypertrophic scars and keloids are associated with abnormal levels of growth factors. Silicone gel sheets are effective in treating and preventing hypertrophic scars and keloids. There has been no report on the change in growth factors in the scar tissue following the use of silicone gel sheeting for scar prevention. A prospective controlled trial was performed to evaluate whether growth factors are altered by the application of a silicone gel sheet on a fresh surgical scar. Methods Four of seven enrolled patients completed the study. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) were investigated immunohistochemically in biopsies taken from five scars at 4 months following surgery. Results In both the epidermis and the dermis, the expression of TGF-β1 (P=0.042 and P=0.042) and PDGF (P=0.043 and P=0.042) was significantly lower in the case of silicone gel sheet-treated scars than in the case of untreated scars. The expression of bFGF in the dermis was significantly higher in the case of silicone gel sheet-treated scars than in the case of untreated scars (P=0.042), but in the epidermis, the expression of bFGF showed no significant difference between the groups (P=0.655). Conclusions The levels of TGF-β1, PDGF, and bFGF are altered by the silicone gel sheet treatment, which might be one of the mechanisms of action in scar prevention. PMID:25606485

  2. FACTORS RELATING TO THE RELEASE OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM SPORES FROM CONTAMINATED SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes preliminary results of a research project to determine the factors that control the release of S. chartarum spores from a contaminated source and test ways to reduce spore release and thus exposure. As anticipated, S. chartarum spore emissions from gypsum boar...

  3. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor/Placental Growth Factor Heterodimer Levels in Preterm Infants with Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Procianoy, Renato S; Hentges, Cláudia R; Silveira, Rita C

    2016-04-01

    Background Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is associated with changes in pulmonary angiogenesis. However, the role of the vascular endothelial growth factor/placental growth factor (VEGF/PlGF) heterodimer, an antiangiogenic factor, remains unknown in this disease. Objective To compare VEGF/PlGF levels in preterm infants with and without BPD. Methods This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. Preterm neonates with birth weight <2,000 g and gestational age ≤34 weeks were included. Exclusion criteria were: neonates transferred from other institutions after 72 hours of life; death before blood collection; presence of major congenital malformations, inborn errors of metabolism, and early sepsis; and mothers with multiple pregnancies, TORCH infections, HIV infection, or autoimmune diseases. BPD was defined as the need for oxygen therapy for a period equal to or greater than 28 days, accompanied by radiographic changes compatible with the disease. Blood was collected from neonates in the first 72 hours of life. VEGF/PlGF levels were measured using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The chi-square test, t-test, Mann-Whitney test, analysis of variance, and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for statistical analysis. Variables found to be significant in the univariate analysis were included in the multivariate analysis. Results Seventy-three patients were included (19 with BPD, 43 without BPD, and 11 neonates who died in the first 28 days of life), with a mean (SD) gestational age of 30.32 (2.88) weeks and birth weight of 1,288 (462) g. Median VEGF/PlGF levels were higher in the groups with BPD and death in the first 28 days of life than in the group without BPD (16.46 [IQR, 12.19-44.57] and 20.64 [IQR, 13.39-50.22], respectively, vs. 9.14 [IQR, 0.02-20.64] pg/mL], p < 0.001). Higher VEGF/P1GF levels remained associated with BPD and death in the first 28 days of life in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion Higher plasma VEGF

  4. Relationship between nitric oxide- and calcium-dependent signal transduction pathways in growth hormone release from dispersed goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, John P; Sawisky, Grant R; Davis, Philip J; Pemberton, Joshua G; Rieger, Aja M; Barreda, Daniel R

    2014-09-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) and Ca(2+) are two of the many intracellular signal transduction pathways mediating the control of growth hormone (GH) secretion from somatotropes by neuroendocrine factors. We have previously shown that the NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) elicits Ca(2+) signals in identified goldfish somatotropes. In this study, we examined the relationships between NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent signal transduction mechanisms in GH secretion from primary cultures of dispersed goldfish pituitary cells. Morphologically identified goldfish somatotropes stained positively for an NO-sensitive dye indicating they may be a source of NO production. In 2h static incubation experiments, GH release responses to the NO donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-d,l-penicillamine (SNAP) were attenuated by CoCl2, nifedipine, verapamil, TMB-8, BHQ, and KN62. In column perifusion experiments, the ability of SNP to induce GH release was impaired in the presence of TMB-8, BHQ, caffeine, and thapsigargin, but not ryanodine. Caffeine-elicited GH secretion was not affected by the NO scavenger PTIO. These results suggest that NO-stimulated GH release is dependent on extracellular Ca(2+) availability and voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, as well as intracellular Ca(2+) store(s) that possess BHQ- and/or thapsigargin-inhibited sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPases, as well as TMB-8- and/or caffeine-sensitive, but not ryanodine-sensitive, Ca(2+)-release channels. Calmodulin kinase-II also likely participates in NO-elicited GH secretion but caffeine-induced GH release is not upstream of NO production. These findings provide insights into how NO actions many integrate with Ca(2+)-dependent signalling mechanisms in goldfish somatotropes and how such interactions may participate in the GH-releasing actions of regulators that utilize both NO- and Ca(2+)-dependent transduction pathways. PMID:25038498

  5. Protective Factors for Violence among Released Prisoners--Effects over Time and Interactions with Static Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is a substantial body of research on risk factors for violent behavior in adulthood but little empirical study of protective factors and desistance. Method: This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of factors hypothesized to reduce violent reoffending among a sample of 800 male prisoners following release into the…

  6. Chimeric Aptamer-Gelatin Hydrogels as an Extracellular Matrix Mimic for Loading Cells and Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Battig, Mark R.; Chen, Niancao; Gaddes, Erin R.; Duncan, Katelyn L.; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    It is important to synthesize materials to recapitulate critical functions of biological systems for a variety of applications such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The purpose of this study was to synthesize a chimeric hydrogel as a promising extracellular matrix (ECM) mimic using gelatin, a nucleic acid aptamer and polyethylene glycol (PEG). This hydrogel had a macroporous structure that was highly permeable for fast molecular transport. Despite its high permeability, it could strongly sequester and sustainably release growth factors with high bioactivity. Notably, growth factors retained in the hydrogel could maintain ~50% bioactivity during a 14-day release test. It also provided cells with effective binding sites, which led to high efficiency of cell loading into the macroporous hydrogel matrix. When cells and growth factors were co-loaded into the chimeric hydrogel, living cells could still be observed by day 14 in a static serum-reduced culture condition. Thus, this chimeric aptamer-gelatin hydrogel constitutes a promising biomolecular ECM mimic for loading cells and growth factors. PMID:26791559

  7. Visualization of growth factor receptor sites in rat forebrain

    SciTech Connect

    Quirion, R.; Araujo, D.; Nair, N.P.; Chabot, J.G.

    1988-01-01

    It is now known that various growth factors may also act in the central nervous system. Among them, it has recently been shown that epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) may possess trophic effects in the mammalian brain. We report here on the respective autoradiographic distribution of (/sup 125/I)EGF and (/sup 125/I)IGF-I receptor binding sites in the rat brain, both during ontogeny and in adulthood. It appears that (/sup 125/I)EGF sites are mostly found in the rat forebrain during brain development. On the other hand, (/sup 125/I)IGF-I sites are more widely distributed both during ontogeny and in adulthood. These results reveal the plasticity of the expression of EGF and IGF-I receptor sites in the mammalian brain. This could be relevant for the respective role of these two growth factors in the development and maintenance of neuronal function.

  8. CRITICAL FACTORS CONTROLLING VEGETATION GROWTH ON COMPLETED SANITARY LANDFILLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study identifies some of the critical factors that affect tree and shrub growth on reclaimed sanitary landfill sites and determines which woody species are adaptable to the adverse growth conditions of such sites. Trees planted at the Edgeboro Landfill, East Brunswick, New J...

  9. Alcohol Alters Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1-Induced Transforming Growth Factor-ß1 Synthesis in the Medial Basal Hypothalamus of the Prepubertal Female Rat

    PubMed Central

    Hiney, Jill K.; Srivastava, Vinod K.; Volz, Claire E.; Dees, William L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and transforming growth factor ß1 (TGFß1) are produced in hypothalamic astrocytes and facilitate luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion. IGF-1 stimulates release by acting directly on the LHRH nerve terminals and both peptides act indirectly through specific plastic changes on glial/tanycyte processes that further support LHRH secretion. Because the relationship between these growth factors in the hypothalamus is not known, we assessed the ability of IGF-1 to induce TGFβ1 synthesis and release and the actions of alcohol (ALC) on this mechanism prior to the onset of puberty. Methods Hypothalamic astrocytes were exposed to medium only, medium plus IGF-1 (200 ng/ml) or medium plus IGF-1 with 50 mM ALC. After 18 hours, media were collected and assayed for TGFß1. For the in vivo experiment, prepubertal female rats were administered either ALC (3g/kg) or water via gastric gavage at 0730 h and at 1130h. At 0900 h, saline or IGF-1 was administered into the third ventricle. Rats were killed at 1500 hrs and the medial basal hypothalamus (MBH) was collected for assessment of TGFß1, IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) and Akt. Results IGF-1 induced TGFß1 release (p<0.01) from hypothalamic astrocytes in culture, an action blocked by ALC. In vivo, IGF-1 administration caused an increase in TGFβ1 protein compared to controls (p<0.05), an action blocked by ALC as well as a PI3K/Akt inhibitor. IGF-1 stimulation also increased both total (p<0.01) and phosphorylated (p<0.05) IGF-1R protein levels, and phosphorylated Akt levels (p<0.01), which were also blocked by ALC. Conclusions This study shows that ALC blocks IGF-1 actions to stimulate synthesis and release of hypothalamic TGFß1, total and phosphorylated IGF-1R and phosphorylated Akt levels further demonstrating the inhibitory actions of ALC on puberty-related events associated with hypothalamic LHRH release. PMID:25335926

  10. [Effects of applying controlled-release compound fertilizer on Platycodon grandiflorum growth].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-xiang; Wang, Jian-hua

    2010-09-01

    A pot experiment was conducted in 2008 to study the effects of applying controlled-release compound fertilizer (N:P2O5:K2O = 14:14:14) on the growth of Platycodon grandiflorum in the medicinal herbal farm of Shandong Agricultural University. Comparing with the application of common compound fertilizer (N:P2O5: K2O=15: 15: 15), applying equivalent amount of the controlled-release fertilizer increased the leaf chlorophyll content, root volume, root activity, and root diameter of P. grandiflorum at the late growth stage, but decreased the root length. When the N application rate was 0.24 and 0.32 g x kg(-1) soil, applying the controlled-release compound fertilizer increased the root yield by 26.78% and 22.50%, and the root soluble sugar, protein, and total saponin contents by 9.77% and 6.99%, 11.38% and 2.20%, and 8.85% and 5.47%, respectively, compared with applying the common compound fertilizer. More nitrogen application made the root soluble sugar content decreased but the total saponin content increased. Under our experimental condition, applying the controlled-release compound fertilizer with an application rate of 0.24 g N x kg(-1) soil could obtain the best effect for P. grandiflorum. PMID:21265152

  11. Injectable, rapid gelling and highly flexible hydrogel composites as growth factor and cell carriers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Zhenqing; Khan, Mahmood; Tamama, Kenichi; Kuppusamy, Periannan; Wagner, William R; Sen, Chandan K; Guan, Jianjun

    2010-06-01

    A family of injectable, rapid gelling and highly flexible hydrogel composites capable of releasing insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1) and delivering mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) were developed. Hydrogel composites were fabricated from Type I collagen, chondroitin sulfate (CS) and a thermosensitive and degradable hydrogel copolymer based on N-isopropylacrylamide, acrylic acid, N-acryloxysuccinimide and a macromer poly(trimethylene carbonate)-hydroxyethyl methacrylate. The hydrogel copolymer was gellable at body temperature before degradation and soluble at body temperature after degradation. Hydrogel composites exhibited LCSTs around room temperature. They could easily be injected through a 26-gauge needle at 4 degrees C, and were capable of gelling within 6s at 37 degrees C to form highly flexible gels with moduli matching those of the rat and human myocardium. The hydrogel composites showed good oxygen permeability; the oxygen pressure within the hydrogel composites was similar to that in the air. The effects of collagen and CS contents on LCST, gelation time, injectability, mechanical properties and degradation properties were investigated. IGF-1 was loaded into the hydrogel composites for enhanced cell survival/growth. The released IGF-1 remained bioactive during a 2-week release period. Small fraction of CS in the hydrogel composites significantly decreased IGF-1 release rate. The release kinetics appeared to be controlled mainly by hydrogel composite water content, degradation and interaction with IGF-1. Human MSC adhesion on the hydrogel composites was comparable to that on the tissue culture plate. MSCs were encapsulated in the hydrogel composites and were found to grow inside during a 7-day culture period. IGF-1 loading significantly accelerated MSC growth. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that MSCs maintained their multipotent differentiation potential in hydrogel composites with and without IGF-1. These injectable and rapid gelling hydrogel composites

  12. Regulation of wound healing by growth factors and cytokines.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sabine; Grose, Richard

    2003-07-01

    Cutaneous wound healing is a complex process involving blood clotting, inflammation, new tissue formation, and finally tissue remodeling. It is well described at the histological level, but the genes that regulate skin repair have only partially been identified. Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated varied, but in most cases beneficial, effects of exogenous growth factors on the healing process. However, the roles played by endogenous growth factors have remained largely unclear. Initial approaches at addressing this question focused on the expression analysis of various growth factors, cytokines, and their receptors in different wound models, with first functional data being obtained by applying neutralizing antibodies to wounds. During the past few years, the availability of genetically modified mice has allowed elucidation of the function of various genes in the healing process, and these studies have shed light onto the role of growth factors, cytokines, and their downstream effectors in wound repair. This review summarizes the results of expression studies that have been performed in rodents, pigs, and humans to localize growth factors and their receptors in skin wounds. Most importantly, we also report on genetic studies addressing the functions of endogenous growth factors in the wound repair process. PMID:12843410

  13. Effect of sericin on diabetic hippocampal growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhihong; Yang, Songhe; He, Yaqiang; Song, Chengjun; Liu, Yongping

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that sericin extracted from silk cocoon significantly reduces blood glucose levels and protects the nervous system against diabetes mellitus. In this study, a rat type 2 diabetes mellitus model was established by intraperitoneal injection of 25 mg/kg streptozotocin for 3 successive days, following which the rats were treated with sericin for 35 days. After treatment, the blood glucose levels of the diabetic rats decreased significantly, the growth hormone level in serum and its expression in the hippocampus decreased significantly, while the insulin-like growth factor-1 level in serum and insulin-like growth factor-1 and growth hormone receptor expression in the hippocampus increased significantly. The experimental findings indicate that sericin improves disorders of the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 axis to alleviate hippocampal damage in diabetic rats. PMID:25206472

  14. Efficacy and Safety of Sustained-Release Recombinant Human Growth Hormone in Korean Adults with Growth Hormone Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngsook; Hong, Jae Won; Chung, Yoon-Sok; Kim, Sung-Woon; Cho, Yong-Wook; Kim, Jin Hwa; Kim, Byung-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The administration of recombinant human growth hormone in adults with growth hormone deficiency has been known to improve metabolic impairment and quality of life. Patients, however, have to tolerate daily injections of growth hormone. The efficacy, safety, and compliance of weekly administered sustained-release recombinant human growth hormone (SR-rhGH, Declage™) supplement in patients with growth hormone deficiency were evaluated. Materials and Methods This trial is 12-week prospective, single-arm, open-label trial. Men and women aged ≥20 years with diagnosed growth hormone deficiency (caused by pituitary tumor, trauma and other pituitary diseases) were eligible for this study. Each subject was given 2 mg (6 IU) of SR-rhGH once a week, subcutaneously for 12 weeks. Efficacy and safety at baseline and within 30 days after the 12th injection were assessed and compared. Score of Assessment of Growth Hormone Deficiency in Adults (AGHDA score) for quality of life and serum IGF-1 level. Results The IGF-1 level of 108.67±74.03 ng/mL was increased to 129.01±68.37 ng/mL (p=0.0111) and the AGHDA QoL score was decreased from 9.80±6.51 to 7.55±5.76 (p<0.0001) at week 12 compared with those at baseline. Adverse events included pain, swelling, erythema, and warmth sensation at the administration site, but many adverse events gradually disappeared during the investigation. Conclusion Weekly administered SR-rhGH for 12 weeks effectively increased IGF-1 level and improved the quality of life in patients with GH deficiency without serious adverse events. PMID:24954335

  15. The neglected role of insulin-like growth factors in the maternal circulation regulating fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Sferruzzi-Perri, A N; Owens, J A; Pringle, K G; Roberts, C T

    2011-01-01

    Maternal insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play a pivotal role in modulating fetal growth via their actions on both the mother and the placenta. Circulating IGFs influence maternal tissue growth and metabolism, thereby regulating nutrient availability for the growth of the conceptus. Maternal IGFs also regulate placental morphogenesis, substrate transport and hormone secretion, all of which influence fetal growth either via indirect effects on maternal substrate availability, or through direct effects on the placenta and its capacity to supply nutrients to the fetus. The extent to which IGFs influence the mother and/or placenta are dependent on the species and maternal factors, including age and nutrition. As altered fetal growth is associated with increased perinatal morbidity and mortality and a greater risk of developing degenerative diseases in adult life, understanding the role of maternal IGFs during pregnancy is essential in order to identify mechanisms underlying altered fetal growth and offspring programming. PMID:20921199

  16. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport

    PubMed Central

    Le, Michelle H.; Weissmiller, April M.; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C.; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD. PMID:26790099

  17. Biodegradable polymeric microspheres with "open/closed" pores for sustained release of human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong Kee; Chung, Hyun Jung; Park, Tae Gwan

    2006-05-15

    A new approach for attaining sustained release of protein is introduced, involving a pore-closing process of preformed porous PLGA microspheres. Highly porous biodegradable poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres were fabricated by a single water-in-oil emulsion solvent evaporation technique using Pluronic F127 as an extractable porogen. Recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) was incorporated into porous microspheres by a simple solution dipping method. For their controlled release, porous microspheres containing hGH were treated with water-miscible solvents in aqueous phase for production of pore-closed microspheres. These microspheres showed sustained release patterns over an extended period; however, the drug loading efficiency was extremely low. To overcome the drug loading problem, the pore-closing process was performed in an ethanol vapor phase using a fluidized bed reactor. The resultant pore-closed microspheres exhibited high protein loading amount as well as sustained rhGH release profiles. Also, the released rhGH exhibited structural integrity after the treatment. PMID:16542746

  18. Distribution of insulin-like growth factors in condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Götz, Werner; Lehmann, Tim Sebastian; Appel, Thorsten Robin; Rath-Deschner, Birgit; Dettmeyer, Reinhard; Luder, Hans-Ulrich; Reich, Rudolf H; Jäger, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Condylar hyperplasia (CH) is a local overgrowth of the condylar process of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) of unknown etiology. Probably, growth factors like the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are involved in its pathogenesis. Specimens from 12 patients were investigated histologically and immunohistochemically to obtain the distribution of the IGFs-I and -II and the IGF1 receptor. The results revealed juvenile and adult subtypes. While generally IGF-II could only be detected weakly, in the juvenile cases strong immunostaining for IGF-I in cartilage and bone supposes an influence on pathological growth processes. PMID:17695990

  19. Nerve growth factor binding domain of the nerve growth factor receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Welcher, A.A.; Bitler, C.M.; Radeke, M.J.; Shooter, E.M. )

    1991-01-01

    A structural analysis of the rat low-affinity nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor was undertaken to define the NGF binding domain. Mutant NGF receptor DNA constructs were expressed in mouse fibroblasts or COS cells, and the ability of the mutant receptors to bind NGF was assayed. In the first mutant, all but 16 amino acid residues of the intracellular domain of the receptor were removed. This receptor bound NGF with a K{sub d} comparable to that of the wild-type receptor. A second mutant contained only the four cysteine-rich sequences from the extracellular portion of the protein. This mutant was expressed in COS cells and the resultant protein was a secreted soluble form of the receptor that was able to bind NGF. Two N-terminal deletions, in which either the first cystein-rich sequence or the first and part of the second cystein-rich sequences were removed, bound NGF. However, a mutant lacking all four cysteine-rich sequences was unable to bind NGF. These results show that the four cysteine-rich sequences of the NGF receptor contain the NGF binding domain.

  20. Seasonal growth and mortality of juveniles of Lampsilis fasciola (Bivalvia: Unionidae) released to a fish hatchery raceway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hanlon, S.D.; Neves, R.J.

    2006-01-01

    Recent efforts to restore remnant or extirpated populations of freshwater mussels have focused on artificial propagation as an effective and practical conservation strategy. Although artificially cultured juveniles have been produced and released to the wild at various times of the year, no study has investigated the best time of year to release these juveniles. Newly metamorphosed juveniles of the wavyrayed lampmussel (Lampsilis fasciola) were released into a stream-fed fish hatchery raceway during March, June, and September. Growth and survival rates were measured 32, 52, 72, and 92 days post-metamorphosis. Juveniles released in June experienced the greatest growth and survival rates. Juveniles released in September and March experienced high mortality within the first month of release and exhibited poor growth in the cool water conditions typical of those seasons. Overwinter survival exhibited a size-dependent relationship.

  1. Extracellular Matrix and Growth Factors Improve the Efficacy of Intramuscular Islet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Haruyuki; Sakata, Naoaki; Yoshimatsu, Gumpei; Fukase, Masahiko; Aoki, Takeshi; Ishida, Masaharu; Katayose, Yu; Egawa, Shinichi; Unno, Michiaki

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of intramuscular islet transplantation is poor despite being technically simple, safe, and associated with reduced rates of severe complications. We evaluated the efficacy of combined treatment with extracellular matrix (ECM) and growth factors in intramuscular islet transplantation. Methods Male BALB/C mice were used for the in vitro and transplantation studies. The following three groups were evaluated: islets without treatment (islets-only group), islets embedded in ECM with growth factors (Matrigel group), and islets embedded in ECM without growth factors [growth factor-reduced (GFR) Matrigel group]. The viability and insulin-releasing function of islets cultured for 96 h were significantly improved in Matrigel and GFR Matrigel groups compared with the islets-only group. Results Blood glucose and serum insulin levels immediately following transplantation were significantly improved in the Matrigel and GFR Matrigel groups and remained significantly improved in the Matrigel group at postoperative day (POD) 28. On histological examination, significantly decreased numbers of TdT-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling-positive islet cells and significantly increased numbers of Ki67-positive cells were observed in the Matrigel and GFR Matrigel groups at POD 3. Peri-islet revascularization was most prominent in the Matrigel group at POD 14. Conclusions The efficacy of intramuscular islet transplantation was improved by combination treatment with ECM and growth factors through the inhibition of apoptosis, increased proliferation of islet cells, and promotion of revascularization. PMID:26473955

  2. Mediation of wound-related Rous sarcoma virus tumorigenesis by TFG (transforming growth factor)-. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sieweke, M.H.; Bissell, M.J. ); Thompson, N.L.; Sporn, M.B. )

    1990-06-29

    In Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-infected chickens, wounding leads to tumor formation with nearly 100% frequency in tissues that would otherwise remain tumor-free. Identifying molecular mediators of this phenomenon should yield important clues to the mechanisms involved in RSV tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TGF-{beta} is present locally shortly after wounding, but not in unwounded controls. In addition, subcutaneous administration of recombinant transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) could substitute completely for wounding in tumor induction. A treatment protocol of four doses of 800 nanograms of TGF-{beta} resulted in v-src-expressing tumors with 100% frequency; four doses of only 10 nanograms still led to tumor formation in 80% of the animals. This effect was specific, as other growth factors with suggested roles in would healing did not elicit the same response. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) or TGF-{alpha} had no effect, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) yielded only occasional tumors after longer latency. TGF-{beta} release during the would-healing response may thus be a critical event that creates a conducive environment for RSV tumorigenesis and may act as a cofactor for transformation in this system. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. [Novel role of growth factors in ovary function].

    PubMed

    Amsterdam, Abraham

    2010-12-01

    The development of the DNA microarray technique facilitated systematic studies of the modulation of gene function. Considerable attention has been focused on members of the growth factor family to elucidate the main regulators of oocyte maturation and ovarian follicle rupture. Among these growth factors, it was found, both in rodents and in humans, that amphiregulin (Ar) and epiregulin (Ep) of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) family were dramatically up-regulated by gonadotrophins in the intact ovary and in primary granulosa cells, respectively. Their role in cumulus expansion and oocyte maturation was established in rodents, and their synthesis under LH stimulation in granulosa cells was demonstrated in humans. To be activated, Ar and Ep must be cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs) family. However, the precise processing of Ar and Ep by the cumulus cells is still obscure. Future investigations using DNA microarray technique may reveal the repertoire of genes activated in Ar- and Ep-stimulated cumulus cells and may help elucidate the molecular basis of ovulation. EFG-like factors are also involved in triggering ovarian cancer The author hypothesized that the normal ovary maintains cyclicity in the formation of these growth factors preventing the ovary from developing ovarian cancer In ovarian cancer these growth factors are continuously formed in an autocrine manner, leading to transformation and subsequently to ovarian cancer. These growth factors are essential for both normal and neoplastic transformation of the ovary. Taking into consideration these growth factors in the treatment of ovarian malfunction may be one way of curing ovarian cancer. PMID:21916103

  4. Intraspecific genetic analysis, gamete release performance, and growth of Sargassum muticum (Fucales, Phaeophyta) from China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Feng; Pang, Shaojun; Gao, Suqin; Shan, Tifeng

    2013-11-01

    Sargassum muticum is one of the most abundant and conspicuous native macroalgae species on the northern coasts of China. It often forms large-scale seaweed beds in subtidal zones. This investigation was designed to understand the intraspecific genetic relationships of this alga based on samples collected from four northern coastal sites of China, and to evaluate gamete release and growth capacity in laboratory conditions. The nuclear internal transcribed spacer 2 (ITS2) sequences of 16 samples from four locations were identical. Based on cox3 gene and partial rbcLS operon sequences, intraspecific genetic variability was detected with three and two ribotypes, respectively. Temperature, not irradiance, was shown to significantly affect gamete release and fertilization. Elevated temperature and irradiance enhanced the growth of germlings and vegetative branchlets. Maximum growth rate of germlings was detected at 18-24°C and an irradiance of 60-100 μmol photons/(m2·s). Under ambient conditions (12-25°C and 60-125 μmol photons/(m2·s)), relative growth rate of young branchlets could reach 7.5%/d.

  5. Mechanical perturbation-induced ethylene releases apical dominance in Pharbitis nil by restricting shoot growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, T. K.; Cline, M. G.

    1985-01-01

    Mechanical perturbation (MP, rubbing) or internodes of Pharbitis nil shoots initiates release of lateral buds (LB) from apical dominance within 48 h. Evidence is presented which suggests that MP promotion of LB outgrowth is mediated by ethylene-induced restriction of main shoot growth. Ethylene production in the internodes is stimulated by MP within 2 h. Effects of MP are mimicked by treatments with 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) and are negated by the inhibitors of ethylene production or action, aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) and AgNO3. The fact that effects of MP, ACC, and ethylene inhibitors are observed to occur on main shoot growth at least 24 h before they are observed to occur on LB growth suggests a possible cause and effect relationship. MP also causes an increase in internode diameter. MP stimulation of ethylene production appears to be mediated by ACC synthase. The results of this study and our previous studies suggest that apical dominance may be released by any mechanism which induces ethylene restriction of main shoot growth.

  6. An opioid growth factor regulates the replication of microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Zagon, I S; McLaughlin, P J

    1992-01-01

    An opioid growth factor (OGF), [Met5]-enkephalin, interacts with the zeta (zeta) opioid receptor to modulate development of eukaryotes. We have found that [Met5]-enkephalin, an endogenous opioid peptide serves to inhibit the growth of S. aureus. This effect on growth involves cell proliferative events and is under tonic control, since potent opioid antagonists accelerate cell replication. Both the OGF and zeta opioid receptor were associated with these microorganisms. Other opioid receptors (mu, delta and kappa) were not detected. OGF also controlled the growth of other bacteria: P. aeruginosa and S. marcesans. These results indicate that OGF and its receptor, known to be important in the regulation of mammalian development, also function in the growth of simple unicellular organisms. We suggest that the endogenous opioid system related to growth originated billions of years ago. PMID:1313136

  7. Effects of platelet-derived growth factor and other polypeptide mitogens on DNA synthesis and growth of cultured rat liver fat-storing cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pinzani, M; Gesualdo, L; Sabbah, G M; Abboud, H E

    1989-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies suggest that liver fat-storing cells (FSC) may play an important role in the development of liver fibrosis. We explored the effects of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha and TGF-beta, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) on DNA synthesis and growth of rat liver FSC. PDGF, EGF, TGF-alpha, and bFGF induced a dose-dependent increase in DNA synthesis with a peak effect at 24 h. PDGF produced the most striking effect with a maximum 18-fold increase over control. EGF, TGF-alpha, and bFGF elicited a maximum three- to fourfold increase in DNA synthesis. Analysis of growth curves revealed a similar pattern of potency of the growth factors. TGF-beta did not affect DNA synthesis of FSC; however, TGF-beta markedly potentiated the stimulatory effects of both EGF and PDGF. FSC showed high specific binding of 125I-PDGF and Scatchard analysis revealed high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 2.3 x 10(-10) M. Our data suggest that PDGF is a key mitogen for FSC and that the coordinate release of other growth factors together with PDGF by inflammatory cells represents a potent potential stimulus for FSC proliferation in conditions of chronic self-perpetuating liver inflammation. Images PMID:2592560

  8. Growth factors in the management of adult acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, S H

    1993-02-01

    This review has explored the various ways that growth factors may be used in the management of adult acute leukemia. Growth factors have the potential to reduce the morbidity and mortality of both induction and postremission therapy by enhancing hematopoietic recovery or, when used as an adjunct to standard antimicrobial therapy, reducing the infectious complications of chemotherapy. In addition, they may have favorable effects on the biology of leukemia either by recruitment of leukemic progenitors into cycle, rendering them more sensitive to the cytotoxic effects of chemotherapy, or by inducing the terminal differentiation of the leukemic clone. Finally, disruption of aberrant growth factor networks, thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of leukemia, may be a therapeutic strategy now that soluble receptors and receptor antagonists to such growth factors as IL-1 are available. Whether growth factors used in such ways will have beneficial, or in fact adverse, effects on the treatment outcome for acute leukemia is not yet known. As such, the use of growth factors in the management of adults with acute leukemia is still experimental and needs to be studied in the context of clinical trials. Perhaps the ultimate benefit to be derived from the study of these growth factors will be a deeper understanding of the genetic perturbations that define the leukemic state. The development of molecular therapeutic techniques, such as gene transfer technology and the use of antisense oligonucleotides, has paralleled our increasing knowledge of cytokines. The hope is that as we come to understand leukemia at the molecular level, we will be able to develop the new therapeutic tools necessary to increase the numbers of patients cured. PMID:8449861

  9. Cutaneous adverse reactions specific to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lupu, I; Voiculescu, VM; Bacalbasa, N; Prie, BE; Cojocaru, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2015-01-01

    Classical antineoplastic therapy is encumbered by extensively studied adverse reactions, most often of systemic nature. The emergence of new generations of anticancer treatments, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors, besides improving the response to treatment and the survival rate, is accompanied by the occurrence of new specific side effects, incompletely studied. These side effects are most often cutaneous (hand foot syndrome, acneiform reactions), and in some cases are extremely severe, requiring dose reduction or drug discontinuation. The prevention of the cutaneous adverse effects and their treatment require a close collaboration between the oncologist and the dermatologist. The occurrence of some of these skin adverse effects may be a favorable prognostic factor for the response to the cancer treatment and the overall survival. Abbreviations: EGFR = epidermal growth factor receptors; EGFRI = epidermal growth factor receptors inhibitors PMID:26361513

  10. Polymethylmethacrylate-induced release of bone-resorbing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.H.; Sowder, W.G.; Anderson, D.; Appel, A.M.; Hopson, C.N. )

    1989-12-01

    A pseudomembranous structure that has the histological characteristics of a foreign-body-like reaction invariably develops at the bone-cement interface in the proximity of resorption of bone around aseptically loosened cemented prostheses. This study was an attempt to implicate polymethylmethacrylate in this resorptive process. Unfractionated peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (consisting of lymphocytes and monocytes) and surface-adherent cells (monocyte-enriched) were prepared from control subjects who did and did not have clinical evidence of osteoarthrosis and from patients who had osteoarthrosis and were having a revision for failure of a cemented hip or knee implant. Cells were cultured for varying periods in the presence and absence of nonpolymerized methacrylate (one to two-micrometer spherules), pulverized polymerized material, or culture chambers that were pre-coated with polymerized cement. Conditioned media that were derived from both methacrylate-stimulated cell populations were shown to contain specific bone-resorbing mediators (interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, or prostaglandin E2) and to directly affect bone resorption in 45Ca-labeled murine limb-bone assays.

  11. Controlled Release Strategies for Bone, Cartilage, and Osteochondral Engineering—Part II: Challenges on the Evolution from Single to Multiple Bioactive Factor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Santo, Vítor E.; Mano, João F.; Reis, Rui L.

    2013-01-01

    The development of controlled release systems for the regeneration of bone, cartilage, and osteochondral interface is one of the hot topics in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, the majority of the developed systems consider only the release of a single growth factor, which is a limiting step for the success of the therapy. More recent studies have been focused on the design and tailoring of appropriate combinations of bioactive factors to match the desired goals regarding tissue regeneration. In fact, considering the complexity of extracellular matrix and the diversity of growth factors and cytokines involved in each biological response, it is expected that an appropriate combination of bioactive factors could lead to more successful outcomes in tissue regeneration. In this review, the evolution on the development of dual and multiple bioactive factor release systems for bone, cartilage, and osteochondral interface is overviewed, specifically the relevance of parameters such as dosage and spatiotemporal distribution of bioactive factors. A comprehensive collection of studies focused on the delivery of bioactive factors is also presented while highlighting the increasing impact of platelet-rich plasma as an autologous source of multiple growth factors. PMID:23249320

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor activator and arginine in a rat fulminant colitis model

    PubMed Central

    Zwintscher, Nathan P.; Shah, Puja M.; Salgar, Shashikumar K.; Newton, Christopher R.; Maykel, Justin A.; Samy, Ahmed; Jabir, Murad; Steele, Scott R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) is commonly used to induce a murine fulminant colitis model. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) has been shown to decrease the symptoms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but the effect of its activator, HGFA, is not well characterized. Arginine reduces effects of oxidative stress but its effect on IBD is not well known. The primary aim is to determine whether HGF and HGFA, or arginine will decrease IBD symptoms such as pain and diarrhea in a DSS-induced fulminant colitis murine model. Methods A severe colitis was induced in young, male Fischer 344 rats with 4% (w/v) DSS oral solution for seven days; rats were sacrificed on day 10. Rats were divided into five groups of 8 animals: control, HGF (700 mcg/kg/dose), HGF and HGFA (10 mcg/dose), HGF and arginine, and high dose HGF (2800 mcg/kg/dose). Main clinical outcomes were pain, diarrhea and weight loss. Blinded pathologists scored the terminal ileum and distal colon. Results DSS reliably induced severe active colitis in 90% of animals (n = 36/40). There were no differences in injury scores between control and treatment animals. HGF led to 1.38 fewer days in pain (p = 0.036), while arginine led to 1.88 fewer days of diarrhea (P = 0.017) compared to controls. 88% of HGFA-treated rats started regaining weight (P < 0.001). Discussion/Conclusion Although treatment was unable to reverse fulminant disease, HGF and arginine were associated with decreased days of pain and diarrhea. These clinical interventions may reduce associated symptoms for severe IBD patients, even when urgent surgical intervention remains the only viable option. PMID:27144006

  13. Studies of the nature of the interaction between vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing factor on adrenocorticotropin release in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C; Rivier, J; Mormede, P; Vale, W

    1984-09-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) acts on vasoconstriction and diuresis through two different types of receptors (V1 and V2, respectively). Since AVP also modifies ACTH release, we have attempted to determine which class of receptors mediates the capacity of AVP to increase ACTH secretion and to potentiate the effect of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on the pituitary using two AVP antagonists: [1-deaminopenicillamine-2-(O-methyl)tyrosine]arginine-vasopressin [dPTyr(Me)-AVP], which blocks V1 receptors, and [1-beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopentamethylene propionic acid)2-D-leucine-4-valine]arginine vasopressin [d(CH2)5DLeuValAVP], which interferes with V2 receptors. dPTyr(Me)AVP, but not d(CH2)5DLeuValAVP, inhibited the ACTH-releasing as well as the CRF-potentiating effects of both AVP and its antidiuretic analog [1-deamino-8-D-arginine]vasopressin (dDAVP). These results suggest that the actions of AVP and dDAVP on the corticotrophs is primarily mediated through V1 (pressor-like) receptors. PMID:6086290

  14. Effective Delivery of Doxycycline and Epidermal Growth Factor for Expedited Healing of Chronic Wounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Abhilash

    The problems and high medical costs associated with chronic wounds necessitate an economical bioactive wound dressing. A new strategy was investigated to inhibit MMP-9 proteases and to release epidermal growth factor (EGF) to enhance healing. Doxycycline (DOX) and EGF were encapsulated on polyacrylic acid modified polyurethane film (PAA-PU) using Layer-by-Layer (LbL) assembly. The number of bilayers tuned the concentration of DOX and EGF released over time with over 94% bioactivity of EGF retained over 4 days. A simple wound model in which MMP-9 proteases were added to cell culture containing fibroblast cells demonstrated that DOX inhibited the proteases providing a protective environment for the released EGF to stimulate cell migration and proliferation at a faster healing rate. In the presence of DOX, only small amounts of the highly bioactive EGF are sufficient to close the wound. Results show that this is new and promising bioactive dressing for effective wound management.

  15. Psycho-Social Factors as Predictors of Success in a Work-Release Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahen, Leonard S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the significance of social and environmental factors as predictors of the rehabilitative potential of an inmate. Work history must be used as a whole. The more recent a good history, the more successful an inmate's jail record. Work factors may aid in selecting narcotics-addicted inmates for work-release programs. (Author/BEF)

  16. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing naproxen suppresses colon cancer cell growth and inhibits NF-κB signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kodela, Ravinder; Nath, Niharika; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Nesbitt, Diandra E; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of death due to cancer and the third most common cancer in men and women in the USA. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) is known to be activated in CRC and is strongly implicated in its development and progression. Therefore, activated NF-κB constitutes a bona fide target for drug development in this type of malignancy. Many epidemiological and interventional studies have established nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) as a viable chemopreventive strategy against CRC. Our previous studies have shown that several novel hydrogen sulfide-releasing NSAIDs are promising anticancer agents and are safer derivatives of NSAIDs. In this study, we examined the growth inhibitory effect of a novel H2S-releasing naproxen (HS-NAP), which has a repertoire as a cardiovascular-safe NSAID, for its effects on cell proliferation, cell cycle phase transitions, and apoptosis using HT-29 human colon cancer cells. We also investigated its effect as a chemo-preventive agent in a xenograft mouse model. HS-NAP suppressed the growth of HT-29 cells by induction of G0/G1 arrest and apoptosis and downregulated NF-κB. Tumor xenografts in mice were significantly reduced in volume. The decrease in tumor mass was associated with a reduction of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and decreases in NF-κB levels in vivo. Therefore, HS-NAP demonstrates strong anticancer potential in CRC. PMID:26346117

  17. Beclin 1 regulates growth factor receptor signaling in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Rohatgi, R A; Janusis, J; Leonard, D; Bellvé, K D; Fogarty, K E; Baehrecke, E H; Corvera, S; Shaw, L M

    2015-10-16

    Beclin 1 is a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor that is decreased in many human tumors. The function of beclin 1 in cancer has been attributed primarily to its role in the degradative process of macroautophagy. However, beclin 1 is a core component of the vacuolar protein sorting 34 (Vps34)/class III phosphatidylinositoI-3 kinase (PI3KC3) and Vps15/p150 complex that regulates multiple membrane-trafficking events. In the current study, we describe an alternative mechanism of action for beclin 1 in breast cancer involving its control of growth factor receptor signaling. We identify a specific stage of early endosome maturation that is regulated by beclin 1, the transition of APPL1-containing phosphatidyIinositol 3-phosphate-negative (PI3P(-)) endosomes to PI3P(+) endosomes. Beclin 1 regulates PI3P production in response to growth factor stimulation to control the residency time of growth factor receptors in the PI3P(-)/APPL(+)-signaling-competent compartment. As a result, suppression of BECN1 sustains growth factor-stimulated AKT and ERK activation resulting in increased breast carcinoma cell invasion. In human breast tumors, beclin 1 expression is inversely correlated with AKT and ERK phosphorylation. Our data identify a novel role for beclin 1 in regulating growth factor signaling and reveal a mechanism by which loss of beclin 1 expression would enhance breast cancer progression. PMID:25639875

  18. Cytokine and Growth Factor Responses After Radiotherapy for Localized Ependymoma

    SciTech Connect

    Merchant, Thomas E. Li Chenghong; Xiong Xiaoping; Gaber, M. Waleed

    2009-05-01

    Purpose: To determine the time course and clinical significance of cytokines and peptide growth factors in pediatric patients with ependymoma treated with postoperative radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: We measured 15 cytokines and growth factors (fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF], interleukin [IL]-1{beta}, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-{gamma}, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and macrophage inflammatory protein-{alpha}) from 30 patients before RT and 2 and 24 h, weekly for 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after the initiation of RT. Two longitudinal models for the trend of log-transformed measurements were fitted, one during treatment and one through 12 months. Results: During RT, log IL-8 declined at a rate of -0.10389/wk (p = 0.0068). The rate of decline was greater (p = 0.028) for patients with an infratentorial tumor location. The decline in IL-8 after RT was significant when stratified by infratentorial tumor location (p = 0.0345) and more than one surgical procedure (p = 0.0272). During RT, the decline in log VEGF was significant when stratified by the presence of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. After RT, the log VEGF declined significantly at a rate of -0.06207/mo. The decline was significant for males (p = 0.0222), supratentorial tumors (p = 0.0158), one surgical procedure (p = 0.0222), no ventriculoperitoneal shunt (p = 0.0005), and the absence of treatment failure (p = 0.0028). Conclusion: The pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-8 declined significantly during RT and the decline differed according to tumor location. The angiogenesis factor VEGF declined significantly during the 12 months after RT. The decline was greater in males, those without a ventriculoperitoneal shunt, and in those with favorable disease factors, including one surgical procedure, supratentorial tumor location, and

  19. Atrial distension of isolated rabbit hearts and release of atrial natriuretic factor

    SciTech Connect

    Synhorst, D.P.; Gutkowska, J. Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec )

    1988-08-01

    Interventions that increase atrial pressures in humans or laboratory animals release atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) into the circulation. The authors studied the relation between distension of the right or left atrium and release of ANF in retrograde-perfused isolated rabbit hearts. A fluid-filled balloon within the right or left atrium was inflated to a mean pressure of 5, 10, 15, or 20 mmHg, and ANF in the cardiac effluent was measured by radioimmunoassay. The slope of the regression line relating ANF release to atrial distending pressure was steeper for the left than right atrium, indicating that, at comparable increases in mean pressures, the left atrium releases more ANF than does the right atrium. Left atrial tissue concentration ANF was greater than right atrial. In contrast to previous studies showing right atrial dominance in rats, the left atria of isolated, perfused rabbit hearts contain more ANF and release more in response to atrial distension.

  20. Strategies for Controlled Delivery of Growth Factors and Cells for Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Tiffany N.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2012-01-01

    The controlled delivery of growth factors and cells within biomaterial carriers can enhance and accelerate functional bone formation. The carrier system can be designed with preprogrammed release kinetics to deliver bioactive molecules in a localized, spatiotemporal manner most similar to the natural wound healing process. The carrier can also act as an extracellular matrix-mimicking substrate for promoting osteoprogenitor cellular infiltration and proliferation for integrative tissue repair. This review discusses the role of various regenerative factors involved in bone healing and their appropriate combinations with different delivery systems for augmenting bone regeneration. The general requirements of protein, cell and gene therapy are described, with elaboration on how the selection of materials, configurations and processing affects growth factor and cell delivery and regenerative efficacy in both in vitro and in vivo applications for bone tissue engineering. PMID:22342771

  1. Growth factors in porcine full and partial thickness burn repair. Differing targets and effects of keratinocyte growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, epidermal growth factor, and neu differentiation factor.

    PubMed Central

    Danilenko, D. M.; Ring, B. D.; Tarpley, J. E.; Morris, B.; Van, G. Y.; Morawiecki, A.; Callahan, W.; Goldenberg, M.; Hershenson, S.; Pierce, G. F.

    1995-01-01

    The topical application of recombinant growth factors such as epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor-BB homodimer (rPDGF-BB), keratinocyte growth factor (rKGF), and neu differentiation factor has resulted in significant acceleration of healing in several animal models of wound repair. In this study, we established highly reproducible and quantifiable full and deep partial thickness porcine burn models in which burns were escharectomized 4 or 5 days postburn and covered with an occlusive dressing to replicate the standard treatment in human burn patients. We then applied these growth factors to assess their efficacy on several parameters of wound repair: extracellular matrix and granulation tissue production, percent reepithelialization, and new epithelial area. In full thickness burns, only rPDGF-BB and the combination of rPDGF-BB and rKGF induced significant changes in burn repair. rPDGF-BB induced marked extracellular matrix and granulation tissue production (P = 0.013) such that the burn defect was filled within several days of escharectomy, but had no effect on new epithelial area or reepithelialization. The combination of rPDGF-BB and rKGF in full thickness burns resulted in a highly significant increase in extracellular matrix and granulation tissue area (P = 0.0009) and a significant increase in new epithelial area (P = 0.007), but had no effect on reepithelialization. In deep partial thickness burns, rKGF induced the most consistent changes. Daily application of rKGF induced a highly significant increase in new epithelial area (P < 0.0001) but induced only a modest increase in reepithelialization (83.7% rKGF-treated versus 70.2% control; P = 0.016) 12 days postburn. rKGF also doubled the number of fully reepithelialized burns (P = 0.02) at 13 days postburn, at least partially because of marked stimulation of both epidermal and follicular proliferation as assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression. In situ hybridization for

  2. The biology of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, S; Penuel, E; Sliwkowski, M X

    1999-09-01

    Our understanding of the normal signaling mechanisms and functions of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and other members of the HER family, namely epidermal growth factor receptor, HER3, and HER4, is growing rapidly. Activation of these receptors results in a diverse array of signals through the formation of homodimeric and heterodimeric receptor complexes; HER2 is the preferred dimerization partner for the other HERs. These oligomeric receptor complexes activate distinct signaling pathways, such as the Ras-MAPK and PI3-kinase pathways. These, in turn, affect various cellular processes. Recent gene deletion experiments in mice point to an important role for HER2 in cardiac and neural development, and evidence from other studies indicates that HER2 is involved in normal breast growth and development. Thus, HER2 is a key component of a complex signaling network that plays a critical role in the regulation of tissue development, growth, and differentiation. PMID:11122793

  3. Cellular Actions of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ferry, R. J.; Katz, L. E. L.; Grimberg, Adda; Cohen, P.; Weinzimer, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs), and the IGFBP proteases are involved in the regulation of somatic growth and cellular proliferation both in vivo and in vitro. IGFs are potent mitogenic agents whose actions are determined by the availability of free IGFs to interact with the IGF receptors. IGFBPs comprise a family of proteins that bind IGFs with high affinity and specificity and thereby regulate IGF-dependent actions. IGFBPs have recently emerged as IGF-independent regulators of cell growth. Various IGFBP association proteins as well as cleavage of IGFBPs by specific proteases modulate levels of free IGFs and IGFBPs. The ubiquity and complexity of the IGF axis promise exciting discoveries and applications for the future. PMID:10226802

  4. Hammerhead Ribozyme-Mediated Knockdown of mRNA for Fibrotic Growth Factors: Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paulette M.; Blalock, Timothy D.; Yuan, Rong; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive scarring (fibrosis) is a major cause of pathologies in multiple tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, heart, cornea, and skin. The transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) system has been shown to play a key role in regulating the formation of scar tissue throughout the body. Furthermore, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been shown to mediate most of the fibrotic actions of TGF- β, including stimulation of synthesis of extracellular matrix and differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Currently, no approved drugs selectively and specifically regulate scar formation. Thus, there is a need for a drug that selectively targets the TGF- β cascade at the molecular level and has minimal off-target side effects. This chapter focuses on the design of hammerhead ribozymes, measurement of kinetic activity, and assessment of knockdown mRNAs of TGF- β and CTGF in cell cultures. PMID:22131029

  5. Autocrine ligands of the epithelial growth factor receptor mediate inflammatory responses to diesel exhaust particles

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diesel exhaust is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory mortality and morbidity. Acute exposure leads to increased IL-8 expression and airway neutrophilia, however the mechanism of this response is unknown. Objectives: As cigarette smoke-induced IL-8 expression by epithelial cells involves transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), we studied the effects of diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on IL-8 release and the role of the EGFR. Methods Primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBEC) were exposed to DEPs or carbon black. IL-8 and EGFR ligand expression (transforming growth factor alpha (TGFα), heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor, and amphiregulin (AR)) were assessed by quantitative RT-PCR and ELISA. Results DEP, but not carbon black, caused a dose-dependent increase in mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation and IL-8 expression, however above 50 μg/ml there was an increase in cytotoxicity. At 50 μg/ml, DEPs stimulated transcription and release of IL-8 and EGFR ligands. IL-8 release was blocked by EGFR neutralizing antibodies, an EGFR-selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor and by the metalloprotease inhibitor, GM6001, which blocks EGFR ligand shedding. Neutralizing antibodies to AR, TGFα and heparin-binding (HB)-EGF reduced DEP-induced IL-8 by >50%. Conclusion Expression of IL-8 in response to DEPs is dependent on EGFR activation and that autocrine production of EGFR ligands makes a substantial contribution to this response. Capsule Summary: This study identifies a mechanism whereby diesel particles stimulates IL-8 release from bronchial epithelial cells. This mechanism may help to explain the recruitment of neutrophils into the airways of people exposed to particulate air pollution. PMID:24555532

  6. Gelatin microspheres crosslinked with genipin for local delivery of growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Solorio, Luis; Zwolinski, Christopher; Lund, Amanda W.; Farrell, Megan J.; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2010-01-01

    A main challenge in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine is achieving local and efficient growth factor release to guide cell function. Gelatin is a denatured form of collagen that cells can bind to and degrade through enzymatic action. In this study, gelatin microspheres were used to release bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2). Spherical microparticles with diameters in the range of 2–6 µm were created by an emulsification process and were stabilized by crosslinking with the small molecule genipin. The degree of crosslinking was varied by controlling the incubation time in genipin solution. Loading rate studies, using soy bean trypsin inhibitor as a model protein, showed rapid protein uptake over the first 24 h, followed by a levelling off and then a further increase after approximately 3 days, as the microspheres swelled. Growth factor release studies using microspheres crosslinked to 20%, 50% and 80% of saturation and then loaded with BMP2 showed that higher degrees of crosslinking resulted in higher loading efficiency and slower protein release. After 24 h, the concentration profiles produced by all microsphere formulations were steady and approximately equal. Microspheres incubated with adult human mesenchymal stem cells accumulated preferentially on the cell surface, and degraded over time in culture. BMP2-loaded microspheres caused a three- to eight-fold increase in expression of the bone sialoprotein gene after 14 days in culture, with more crosslinked beads producing a greater effect. These results demonstrate that genipin-crosslinked gelatin microspheres can be used to deliver growth factors locally to cells in order to direct their function. PMID:20872738

  7. Stimulatory effect of luteinizing hormone, insulin-like growth factor-1, and epidermal growth factor on vascular endothelial growth factor production in cultured bubaline luteal cells.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, V S; Dangi, S S; Babitha, V; Verma, M R; Bag, S; Singh, G; Sarkar, M

    2015-10-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the temporal (24, 48, and 72 hours) and dose-dependent (0, 5, 10, and 100 ng/mL of LH, insulin-like growth factor 1 [IGF-1], and EGF) in vitro expression and secretion patterns of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in luteal cell culture during different stages of estrous cycle in water buffaloes. Corpus luteum samples from ovaries of early luteal phase (ELP; Days 1-4), midluteal phase (Days 5-10), and late luteal phase (Days 11-16) were collected from a local slaughterhouse. The samples were then processed and cultured in (serum containing) appropriate cell culture medium and incubated separately with three factors (LH, IGF-1, or EGF) at the previously mentioned three dose-duration combinations. At the end of the respective incubation periods, VEGF was assayed in the spent culture medium by ELISA, whereas the cultured cells were used for VEGF mRNA expression by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results of the present study disclosed dose- and time-dependent stimulatory effects of LH, IGF-1, and EGF on VEGF production in bubaline luteal cells. The VEGF expression and secretion from the cultured luteal cells were highest during the ELP, intermediate in the midluteal phase, and lowest in the late luteal phase of the estrous cycle for all the three tested factors. Comparison of the results of the three treatments depicted EGF as the most potent stimulating factor followed by IGF-1 and LH. Immunocytochemistry findings in luteal cell culture of ELP agreed with the VEGF expression and secretion. In conclusion, mRNA expression, protein secretion, and immunolocalization of VEGF data clearly indicated for the first time that LH, IGF-1, and EGF play an important role in stimulating luteal angiogenesis in buffalo CL. The highest expression and secretion of VEGF in the ELP might be associated with the development of blood vessels in early growth of CL, which in turn gets augmented by the aforementioned

  8. Release and consumption of D-amino acids during growth of marine prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Azúa, Iñigo; Goiriena, Itziar; Baña, Zuriñe; Iriberri, Juan; Unanue, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of the composition of the marine-dissolved organic matter has highlighted the importance of D-amino acids, whose origin is attributed mainly to the remains of bacterial peptidoglycan released as a result of grazing or viral lysis. However, very few studies have focused on the active release of D-amino acids by bacteria. With this purpose, we measured the concentration of dissolved amino acids in both enantiomeric forms with two levels of complexity: axenic cultures of Vibrio furnissii and Vibrio alginolyticus and microcosms created from marine microbial assemblages (Biscay Bay, Cantabrian Sea) with and without heterotrophic nanoflagellates (HNFs). Axenic cultures showed that only D-Ala was significantly released and accumulated in the medium up to a concentration of 120 nM, probably as a consequence of the rearrangement of peptidoglycan. The marine microbial assemblages showed that only two D-amino acids significantly accumulated in the environment, D-Ala and D-aspartic acid (Asp), in both the absence and presence of HNFs. The D/L ratio increased during the incubation and reached maximum values of 3.0 to 4.3 for Ala and 0.4 to 10.6 for Asp and correlated with prokaryotic and HNF abundance as well as the rate of prokaryotic thymidine and leucine incorporation. Prokaryotes preferentially consumed L-amino acids, but the relative uptake rates of D-Ala significantly increased in the growth phase. These results demonstrate that bacteria can release and consume D-amino acids at high rates during growth, even in the absence of viruses and grazers, highlighting the importance of bacteria as producers of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the sea. PMID:24057323

  9. Sustained-release genistein from nanostructured lipid carrier suppresses human lens epithelial cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin-Lu; Zhang, Wen-Ji; Li, Xue-Dong; Yang, Na; Pan, Wei-San; Kong, Jun; Zhang, Jin-Song

    2016-01-01

    AIM To design and investigate the efficacy of a modified nanostructured lipid carrier loaded with genistein (Gen-NLC) to inhibit human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) proliferation. METHODS Gen-NLC was made by melt emulsification method. The morphology, particle size (PS), zeta potentials (ZP), encapsulation efficiency (EE) and in vitro release were characterized. The inhibition effect of nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), genistein (Gen) and Gen-NLC on HLECs proliferation was evaluated by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay, gene and protein expression of the proliferation marker Ki67 were evaluated with real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunofluorescence analyses. RESULTS The mean PS of Gen-NLC was 80.12±1.55 nm with a mean polydispersity index of 0.11±0.02. The mean ZP was -7.14±0.38 mV and the EE of Gen in the nanoparticles was 92.3%±0.73%. Transmission electron microscopy showed that Gen-NLC displayed spherical-shaped particles covered by an outer-layer structure. In vitro release experiments demonstrated a prolonged drug release for 72h. The CCK-8 assay results showed the NLC had no inhibitory effect on HLECs and Gen-NLC displayed a much more prominent inhibitory effect on cellular growth compared to Gen of the same concentration. The mRNA and protein expression of Ki67 in LECs decreased significantly in Gen-NLC group. CONCLUSION Sustained drug release by Gen-NLCs may impede HLEC growth. PMID:27275415

  10. Epidermal growth factor, from gene organization to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fenghua; Harris, Raymond C.

    2014-01-01

    In 1962, epidermal growth factor (EGF) was discovered by Dr. Stanley Cohen while studying nerve growth factor (NGF). It was soon recognized that EGF is the prototypical member of a family of peptide growth factors that activate the EGF receptors, and that the EGF/EGF receptor signaling pathway plays important roles in proliferation, differentiation and migration of a variety of cell types, especially in epithelial cells. After the basic characterization of EGF function in the first decade or so after its discovery, the studies related to EGF and its signaling pathway have extended to a broad range of investigations concerning its biological and pathophysiological roles in development and in human diseases. In this review, we briefly describe the gene organization and tissue distribution of EGF, with emphasis on its biological and pathological roles in human diseases. PMID:24513230

  11. Multiple Transcription Factor Families Regulate Axon Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Darcie L.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding axon regenerative failure remains a major goal in neuroscience, and reversing this failure remains a major goal for clinical neurology. While an inhibitory CNS environment clearly plays a role, focus on molecular pathways within neurons has begun to yield fruitful insights. Initial steps forward investigated the receptors and signaling pathways immediately downstream of environmental cues, but recent work has also shed light on transcriptional control mechanisms that regulate intrinsic axon growth ability, presumably through whole cassettes of gene target regulation. Here we will discuss transcription factors that regulate neurite growth in vitro and in vivo, including p53, SnoN, E47, CREB, STAT3, NFAT, c-Jun, ATF3, Sox11, NFκB, and Kruppel-like factors (KLFs). Revealing the similarities and differences among the functions of these transcription factors may further our understanding of the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in axon growth and regeneration. PMID:21674813

  12. Insulin-like growth factor-1: roles in androgenetic alopecia.

    PubMed

    Panchaprateep, Ratchathorn; Asawanonda, Pravit

    2014-03-01

    Of all the cytokines or growth factors that have been postulated to play a role in hair follicle, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) is known to be regulated by androgens. However, how IGF-1 is altered in the balding scalp has not yet been investigated. In this study, expressions of IGF-1 and its binding proteins by dermal papilla (DP) cells obtained from balding versus non-balding hair follicles were quantified using growth factor array. DP cells from balding scalp follicles were found to secrete significantly less IGF-1, IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-4 (P < 0.05) than their non-balding counterparts. Our data confirmed that the downregulation of IGF-1 may be one of the important mechanisms contributing to male pattern baldness. PMID:24499417

  13. Growth factors with heparin binding affinity in human synovial fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Hamerman, D.; Taylor, S.; Kirschenbaum, I.; Klagsbrun, M.; Raines, E.W.; Ross, R.; Thomas, K.A.

    1987-12-01

    Synovial effusions were obtained from the knees of 15 subjects with joint trauma, menisceal or ligamentous injury, or osteoarthritis. Heparin-Sepharose affinity chromatography of these synovial fluids revealed, in general, three major peaks of mitogenic activity as measured by incorporation of /sup 3/H-thymidine into 3T3 cells. Gradient elution patterns showed activities at 0.5M NaCl, which is characteristic of platelet derived growth factor, and at 1.1 M NaCl and 1.6M NaCl, indicative of acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors, respectively. The identities of these mitogenic fractions were confirmed by specific immunologic and receptor-binding assays. The presence of platelet derived, acidic and basic fibroblast growth factors in the synovial fluid may contribute to wound healing in the arthritic joint.

  14. Cultured human foreskin fibroblasts produce a factor that stimulates their growth with properties similar to basic fibroblast growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Story, M.T. )

    1989-05-01

    To determine if fibroblasts could be a source of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) in tissue, cells were initiated in culture from newborn human foreskin. Fibroblast cell lysates promoted radiolabeled thymidine uptake by cultured quiescent fibroblasts. Seventy-nine percent of the growth-promoting activity of lysates was recovered from heparin-Sepharose. The heparin-binding growth factor reacted on immunoblots with antiserum to human placenta-derived basic FGF and competed with iodinated basic FGF for binding to antiserum to (1-24)bFGF synthetic peptide. To confirm that fibroblasts were the source of the growth factor, cell lysates were prepared from cells incubated with radiolabeled methionine. Heparin affinity purified material was immunoprecipitated with basic FGF antiserum and electrophoresed. Radiolabeled material was detected on gel autoradiographs in the same molecular weight region as authentic iodinated basic FGF. The findings are consistant with the notion that cultured fibroblasts express basic FGF. As these cells also respond to the mitogen, it is possible that the regulation of their growth is under autocrine control. Fibroblasts may be an important source of the growth factor in tissue.

  15. Expression and localization of epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor-α and epidermal growth factor receptor in the canine testis

    PubMed Central

    TAMADA, Hiromichi; TAKEMOTO, Kohei; TOMINAGA, Masato; KAWATE, Noritoshi; TAKAHASHI, Masahiro; HATOYA, Shingo; MATSUYAMA, Satoshi; INABA, Toshio; SAWADA, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression of epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and EGF receptor (EGF-R) and the localization of the corresponding proteins in the canine testis were studied. Levels of mRNA expressions were determined by semiquantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in the testes of the peripubertal (4–6 months), young adult (3–4 years), advanced adult (7–8 years) and senescent (11–16 years) groups. The EGF-R mRNA level in the testes of the peripubertal group was significantly higher than those in the other groups, whereas there was no difference in EGF and TGF-α mRNA levels among groups. Immunohistochemical stainings for EGF, TGF-α and EGF-R in the testis revealed that immunoreactivity in the seminiferous epithelium and Sertoli cell was weak and nonspecific for the stage of spermatogenesis, and distinct staining was found in Leydig cells. These results suggest that the EGF family of growth factors may be involved in testicular maturation and function in the dog. PMID:26498203

  16. Nerve growth factor levels and localisation in human asthmatic bronchi.

    PubMed

    Olgart Höglund, C; de Blay, F; Oster, J P; Duvernelle, C; Kassel, O; Pauli, G; Frossard, N

    2002-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) has recently been suggested to be an important mediator of inflammation. In support of this, serum levels of NGF have been shown to be enhanced in asthmatics. However, it has not yet been shown whether the levels of NGF are also altered locally in asthmatic airways, when compared with healthy subjects, and the localisation of potential sources of NGF in the human bronchus have not yet been described. The aim of the present study was to assess NGF levels in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from asthmatics and to compare them to those of control subjects. Furthermore, the authors wanted to localise potential sources of NGF in bronchial tissue, and to number NGF-immunopositive infiltrating cells in the bronchial submucosa. BALF and bronchial biopsies were obtained from seven control subjects and seven asthmatic patients by fibreoptic bronchoscopy. NGF protein levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in BALF. NGF localisation was examined by immunohistochemistry on bronchial biopsy sections. The asthmatics exhibited significantly enhanced NGF levels in BALF. Intense NGF-immunoreactivity was observed in bronchial epithelium, smooth muscle cells and infiltrating inflammatory cells in the submucosa, and to a lesser extent in the connective tissue. The asthmatics exhibited a higher number of NGF-immunoreactive infiltrating cells in the bronchial submucosa than control subjects. This study provides evidence that nerve growth factor is locally produced in the airways, and shows that this production is enhanced in asthmatics. These findings suggest that nerve growth factor is produced by both structural cells and infiltrating inflammatory cells in human bronchus in vivo, and the authors suggest that the increase in nerve growth factor protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid observed in asthmatic patients may originate both from structural cells, producing increased nerve growth factor levels in inflammatory conditons, and from

  17. Effects of growth factors on temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Detamore, Michael S; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2004-07-01

    The effects of growth factors on cartilaginous tissues are well documented. An exception is the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc, where data for growth factor effects on proliferation and biosynthesis are very limited. The purpose of this study was to quantify proliferation of and synthesis by TMJ disc cells cultured in monolayer with either platelet derived growth factor-AB (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), at either a low (10 ng/ml) or high (100 ng/ml) concentration. Proliferation was assessed with a DNA quantitation technique, collagen synthesis was measured via a hydroxyproline assay, and GAG synthesis was determined with a dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay at 14 days. Overall, the most beneficial growth factor was bFGF, which was most potent in increasing proliferation and GAG synthesis, and also effective in promoting collagen synthesis. At the high concentration, bFGF resulted in 96% more cells than the control and 30 to 45% more cells than PDGF and IGF. PDGF and bFGF were the most potent upregulators of GAG synthesis, producing 2-3 times more GAG than the control. IGF had no significant effect on GAG production, although at its higher concentration it increased collagen production by 4.5 times over the control. Collagen synthesis was promoted by bFGF at its lower concentration, with levels 4.2 times higher than the control, whereas PDGF had no significant effect on collagen production. In general, higher concentrations increased proliferation, whereas lower concentrations favoured biosynthesis. PMID:15126139

  18. Small Is Beautiful: Insulin-Like Growth Factors and Their Role in Growth, Development, and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maki, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors were discovered more than 50 years ago as mediators of growth hormone that effect growth and differentiation of bone and skeletal muscle. Interest of the role of insulin-like growth factors in cancer reached a peak in the 1990s, and then waned until the availability in the past 5 years of monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that block the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. In this article, we review the history of insulin-like growth factors and their role in growth, development, organism survival, and in cancer, both epithelial cancers and sarcomas. Recent developments regarding phase I to II clinical trials of such agents are discussed, as well as potential studies to consider in the future, given the lack of efficacy of one such monoclonal antibody in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy in a first-line study in metastatic non–small-cell lung adenocarcinoma. Greater success with these agents clinically is expected when combining the agents with inhibitors of other cell signaling pathways in which cross-resistance has been observed. PMID:20975071

  19. Small is beautiful: insulin-like growth factors and their role in growth, development, and cancer.

    PubMed

    Maki, Robert G

    2010-11-20

    Insulin-like growth factors were discovered more than 50 years ago as mediators of growth hormone that effect growth and differentiation of bone and skeletal muscle. Interest of the role of insulin-like growth factors in cancer reached a peak in the 1990s, and then waned until the availability in the past 5 years of monoclonal antibodies and small molecules that block the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. In this article, we review the history of insulin-like growth factors and their role in growth, development, organism survival, and in cancer, both epithelial cancers and sarcomas. Recent developments regarding phase I to II clinical trials of such agents are discussed, as well as potential studies to consider in the future, given the lack of efficacy of one such monoclonal antibody in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy in a first-line study in metastatic non-small-cell lung adenocarcinoma. Greater success with these agents clinically is expected when combining the agents with inhibitors of other cell signaling pathways in which cross-resistance has been observed. PMID:20975071

  20. Vascular growth factors play critical roles in kidney glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Gnudi, Luigi; Benedetti, Sara; Woolf, Adrian S; Long, David A

    2015-12-01

    Kidney glomeruli ultrafilter blood to generate urine and they are dysfunctional in a variety of kidney diseases. There are two key vascular growth factor families implicated in glomerular biology and function, namely the vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs) and the angiopoietins (Angpt). We present examples showing not only how these molecules help generate and maintain healthy glomeruli but also how they drive disease when their expression is dysregulated. Finally, we review how manipulating VEGF and Angpt signalling may be used to treat glomerular disease. PMID:26561594

  1. Design and Fabrication of a Biodegradable, Covalently Crosslinked Shape-Memory Alginate Scaffold for Cell and Growth Factor Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Shansky, Janet; Borselli, Cristina; Mooney, David

    2012-01-01

    The successful use of transplanted cells and/or growth factors for tissue repair is limited by a significant cell loss and/or rapid growth factor diffusion soon after implantation. Highly porous alginate scaffolds formed with covalent crosslinking have been used to improve cell survival and growth factor release kinetics, but require open-wound surgical procedures for insertion and have not previously been designed to readily degrade in vivo. In this study, a biodegradable, partially crosslinked alginate scaffold with shape-memory properties was fabricated for minimally invasive surgical applications. A mixture of high and low molecular weight partially oxidized alginate modified with RGD peptides was covalently crosslinked using carbodiimide chemistry. The scaffold was compressible 11-fold and returned to its original shape when rehydrated. Scaffold degradation properties in vitro indicated ∼85% mass loss by 28 days. The greater than 90% porous scaffolds released the recombinant growth factor insulin-like growth factor-1 over several days in vitro and allowed skeletal muscle cell survival, proliferation, and migration from the scaffold over a 28-day period. The compressible scaffold thus has the potential to be delivered by a minimally invasive technique, and when rehydrated in vivo with cells and/or growth factors, could serve as a temporary delivery vehicle for tissue repair. PMID:22646518

  2. Assessment of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor in Fresh versus Frozen Platelet Rich Plasma.

    PubMed

    Hosny, Nada; Goubran, Fikry; BadrEldin Hasan, Basma; Kamel, Noha

    2015-01-01

    Platelet rich plasma (PRP) is hemoconcentration with platelets concentration above baseline values and high concentration of many growth factors. The aim of this study was to assess freezing effect on vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release from PRP using two different activation methods to simplify its use in different clinical applications. PRP was prepared using two-centrifugation steps method from 12 qualified blood donors. VEGF concentrations were measured in fresh PRP and after freezing/thawing for one and three weeks with two methods of activation using (i) calcium gluconate and (ii) calcium gluconate and thrombin. Platelets count was significantly increased compared to baseline whole blood values in all fresh and frozen PRP samples (p value was <0.05). No significant difference was found between VEGF concentrations after activating fresh and frozen-thawed PRP samples for one and three weeks by calcium alone or calcium with thrombin, and also no significant difference was found when freezing period was extended from one to three weeks. Our results showed that platelets count does not correlate with variable levels of VEGF. PRP could be prepared once and preserved frozen for at least three weeks for the next treatment sessions and activation with thrombin addition to calcium will not augment the growth factor release. PMID:26301115

  3. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  4. Increased activity of antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone substituted at positions 8, 9, and 10

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Horvath, Judit E.; Kovacs, Magdolna; Halmos, Gabor; Groot, Kate; Toller, Gabor L.; Rekasi, Zoltan; Zarandi, Marta

    2004-01-01

    Antagonists of human growth hormone-releasing hormone (hGHRH) with increased potency and improved enzymatic and chemical stability are needed for potential clinical applications. We synthesized 21 antagonistic analogs of hGHRH(1-29)NH2, substituted at positions 8, 9, and 10 of the common core sequence {phenylacetyl-Tyr1, d-Arg2,28, para-chloro-phenylalanine 6, Arg9/homoarginine 9, Tyr10/O-methyltyrosine 10, α-aminobutyric acid 15, norleucine 27, Har29} hGHRH(1-29)NH2. Inhibitory effects on hGHRH-induced GH release were evaluated in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system, as well as in vivo after i.v. injection into rats. The binding affinities of the peptides to pituitary GHRH receptors were also determined. Introduction of para-amidinophenylalanine 10 yielded antagonists JV-1-62 and -63 with the highest activities in vitro and lowest receptor dissociation constants (Ki = 0.057-0.062 nM). Antagonists JV-1-62 and -63 also exhibited the strongest effect in vivo, significantly (P < 0.05-0.001) inhibiting hGHRH-induced GH release for at least 1 h. Para-aminophenylalanine 10 and O-ethyltyrosine 10 substitutions yielded antagonists potent in vitro, but His10, 3,3′-diphenylalanine 10, 2-naphthylalanine 10, and cyclohexylalanine 10 modifications were detrimental. Antagonists containing citrulline 9 (in MZ-J-7-72), amidinophenylalanine 9 (in JV-1-65), His9, d-Arg9, citrulline 8, Ala8, d-Ala8, or α-aminobutyric acid 8 substituents also had high activity and receptor affinity in vitro. However, in vitro potencies of analogs with substitution in position 9 correlated poorly with acute endocrine effects in vivo, as exemplified by the weak and/or short inhibitory actions of antagonists JV-1-65 and MZ-J-7-72 on GH release in vivo. Nevertheless, antagonist JV-1-65 was more potent than JV-1-63 in tests on inhibition of the growth of human prostatic and lung cancer lines xenografted into nude mice. This indicates that oncological activity may be based on several mechanisms

  5. YAP Drives Growth by Controlling Transcriptional Pause Release from Dynamic Enhancers.

    PubMed

    Galli, Giorgio G; Carrara, Matteo; Yuan, Wei-Chien; Valdes-Quezada, Christian; Gurung, Basanta; Pepe-Mooney, Brian; Zhang, Tinghu; Geeven, Geert; Gray, Nathanael S; de Laat, Wouter; Calogero, Raffaele A; Camargo, Fernando D

    2015-10-15

    The Hippo/YAP signaling pathway is a crucial regulator of tissue growth, stem cell activity, and tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism by which YAP controls transcription remains to be fully elucidated. Here, we utilize global chromatin occupancy analyses to demonstrate that robust YAP binding is restricted to a relatively small number of distal regulatory elements in the genome. YAP occupancy defines a subset of enhancers and superenhancers with the highest transcriptional outputs. YAP modulates transcription from these elements predominantly by regulating promoter-proximal polymerase II (Pol II) pause release. Mechanistically, YAP interacts and recruits the Mediator complex to enhancers, allowing the recruitment of the CDK9 elongating kinase. Genetic and chemical perturbation experiments demonstrate the requirement for Mediator and CDK9 in YAP-driven phenotypes of overgrowth and tumorigenesis. Our results here uncover the molecular mechanisms employed by YAP to exert its growth and oncogenic functions, and suggest strategies for intervention. PMID:26439301

  6. Vascular endothelial growth factors: A comparison between invertebrates and vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kipryushina, Yulia O; Yakovlev, Konstantin V; Odintsova, Nelly A

    2015-12-01

    This review aims to summarize recent data concerning the structure and role of the members of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) families in the context of early development, organogenesis and regeneration, with a particular emphasis on the role of these factors in the development of invertebrates. Homologs of VEGF and/or VEGFR have been found in all Eumetazoa, in both Radiata and Bilateria, where they are expressed in the descendants of different germ layers and play a pivotal role in the development of animals with and without a vascular system. VEGF is a well-known angiogenesis regulator, but this factor also control cell migration during neurogenesis and the development of branching organs (the trachea) in invertebrate and vertebrate species. A possible explanation for the origin of Vegf/Vegfr in the animal kingdom and a pathway of Vegf/Vegfr evolution are discussed. PMID:26066416

  7. Growth factors in the treatment of early osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Civinini, Roberto; Nistri, Lorenzo; Martini, Caterina; Redl, Birgit; Ristori, Gabriele; Innocenti, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Regenerative medicine is the science that studies the regeneration of biological tissues obtained through use of cells, with the aid of support structures and with biomolecules such as growth factors. As regards the growth factors the PRP, or the platelet-rich plasma, obtained from a withdrawal of autologous blood, concentrating the platelets, represents a safe, economical, easy to prepare and easy to apply source of growth factors. Numerous growth factors are in fact within the platelets and in particular a large number of them have a specific activity on neo-proliferation, on cartilage regeneration and in particular also an antiapoptotic effect on chondroblasts: - The PDGF which regulates the secretion and synthesis of collagen;- The EGF that causes cellular proliferation, endothelial chemotaxis and angiogenesis;- The VEGF that increases angiogenesis and vascular permeability;- The TGF-beta that stimulates the proliferation of undifferentiated MSC, stimulates chemotaxis of endothelial cells and angiogenesis;- The bFGF that promotes the growth and differentiation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts stimulates mitogenesis of mesenchymal cells, chondrocytes and osteoblasts. These properties have led to the development of studies that evaluated the efficacy of treatment of infiltrations in the knee and hip with platelet-derived growth factors. Regarding the knee it was demonstrated that in patients with moderate degree of gonarthrosis, the PRP is able to significantly reduce the pain and improve joint function, both on placebo and towards infiltrations with hyaluronic acid. The success of the treatment was proportional to the age of and inversely proportional to the severity of osteoarthritis according to Kellgren and Lawrence classification. The possibility of infiltrations guided with ultrasound into the hip led us to extend the indications also to hip arthrosis, as already showed by Sanchez. Even in coxarthrosis preliminary results at 6 and 12 months show that

  8. The ROP vesicle release factor is required in adult Drosophila glia for normal circadian behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that endocytosis and/or vesicle recycling mechanisms are essential in adult Drosophila glial cells for the neuronal control of circadian locomotor activity. In this study, our goal was to identify specific glial vesicle trafficking, recycling, or release factors that are required for rhythmic behavior. From a glia-specific, RNAi-based genetic screen, we identified eight glial factors that are required for normally robust circadian rhythms in either a light-dark cycle or in constant dark conditions. In particular, we show that conditional knockdown of the ROP vesicle release factor in adult glial cells results in arrhythmic behavior. Immunostaining for ROP reveals reduced protein in glial cell processes and an accumulation of the Par Domain Protein 1ε (PDP1ε) clock output protein in the small lateral clock neurons. These results suggest that glia modulate rhythmic circadian behavior by secretion of factors that act on clock neurons to regulate a clock output factor. PMID:26190976

  9. Inhibition by somatostatin (growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone, GH-RIH) of gastric acid and pepsin and G-cell release of gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Barros D'sa, A A; Bloom, S R; Baron, J H

    1978-01-01

    Somatostatin (cyclic growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone--GH-RIH) was infused into dogs with gastric fistulae. Somatostatin inhibited gastric acid response to four gastric stimulants--insulin, food, histamine, and pentagastrin. Histamine- and pentagastrin-stimulated pepsins were inhibited similarly to inhibition of acid. Somatostatin inhibited the gastrin response to insulin and food. PMID:348581

  10. A novel sustained-release formulation of recombinant human growth hormone and its pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety profiles.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yi; Wang, Yuxia; Kang, Aijun; Wang, Wei; Ho, Sa V; Gao, Junfeng; Ma, Guanghui; Su, Zhiguo

    2012-07-01

    An effective and safe formulation of sustained-release rhGH for two months using poly(monomethoxypolyethylene glycol-co-D,L-lactide) (mPEG-PLA, PELA) microspheres was developed to reduce the frequency of medication. The rhGH-loaded PELA microspheres with a narrow size distribution were successfully prepared by a double emulsion method combined with a premix membrane emulsification technique without any exogenous stabilizing excipients. The narrow size distribution of the microspheres would guarantee repeatable productivity and release behavior. Moreover, the amphiphilic PELA improved the bioactivity retention of protein drugs since it prevented protein contact with the oil/water interface and the hydrophobic network, and modulated diffusion of acidic degradation products from the carrier system. These PELA microspheres were compared in vivo with commercial rhGH solution, conventional poly(D,L-lactic acid) (PLA) and poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres. Administration of rhGH-PELA could extend the duration of rhGH release (for up to 56 days) and increase area under the curve (AUC) compared to rhGH solution, PLA or PLGA microspheres in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. In addition, rhGH-PELA microspheres induced a greater response in total insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) than other rhGH formulations. With a hypophysectomized SD rat model, the pharmacological efficacy of rhGH-PELA microspheres was shown to be better than that from daily administration of rhGH solutions over 6 days based on body weight gain and width of the tibial growth plate. Histological examination of the injection sites indicated a significantly milder inflammatory response than that observed after injection of PLA and PLGA microspheres. Neither anti-rhGH antibodies nor the toxic effects on heart, liver and kidney were detectable after administration of rhGH-PELA microspheres in SD rats. These results suggest that rh

  11. Insulin-Like Growth Factor I (IGF-1) Ec/Mechano Growth Factor – A Splice Variant of IGF-1 within the Growth Plate

    PubMed Central

    Schlegel, Werner; Raimann, Adalbert; Halbauer, Daniel; Scharmer, Daniela; Sagmeister, Susanne; Wessner, Barbara; Helmreich, Magdalena; Haeusler, Gabriele; Egerbacher, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor 1 Ec (IGF-1Ec), also called mechano growth factor (MGF), is a splice variant of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), which has been shown in vitro as well as in vivo to induce growth and hypertrophy in mechanically stimulated or damaged muscle. Growth, hypertrophy and responses to mechanical stimulation are important reactions of cartilaginous tissues, especially those in growth plates. Therefore, we wanted to ascertain if MGF is expressed in growth plate cartilage and if it influences proliferation of chondrocytes, as it does in musculoskeletal tissues. MGF expression was analyzed in growth plate and control tissue samples from piglets aged 3 to 6 weeks. Furthermore, growth plate chondrocyte cell culture was used to evaluate the effects of the MGF peptide on proliferation. We showed that MGF is expressed in considerable amounts in the tissues evaluated. We found the MGF peptide to be primarily located in the cytoplasm, and in some instances, it was also found in the nucleus of the cells. Addition of MGF peptides was not associated with growth plate chondrocyte proliferation. PMID:24146828

  12. Role of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor-1, matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9, and heparin binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor in estradiol-17β-stimulated bovine satellite cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Kamanga-Sollo, E; Thornton, K J; White, M E; Dayton, W R

    2014-10-01

    In feedlot steers, estradiol-17β (E2) and combined E2 and trenbolone acetate (a testosterone analog) implants enhance rate and efficiency of muscle growth; and, consequently, these compounds are widely used as growth promoters. Although the positive effects of E2 on rate and efficiency of bovine muscle growth are well established, the mechanisms involved in these effects are not well understood. Combined E2 and trenbolone acetate implants result in significantly increased muscle satellite cell number in feedlot steers. Additionally, E2 treatment stimulates proliferation of cultured bovine satellite cells (BSC). Studies in nonmuscle cells have shown that binding of E2 to G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER)-1 results in activation of matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 (MMP2/9) resulting in proteolytic release of heparin binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (hbEGF) from the cell surface. Released hbEGF binds to and activates the epidermal growth factor receptor resulting in increased proliferation. To assess if GPER-1, MMP2/9, and/or hbEGF are involved in the mechanism of E2-stimulated BSC proliferation, we have examined the effects of G36 (a specific inhibitor of GPER-1), CRM197 (a specific inhibitor of hbEGF), and MMP-2/MMP-9 Inhibitor II (an inhibitor of MMP2/9 activity) on E2-stimulated BSC proliferation. Inhibition of GPER-1, MMP2/9, or hbEGF suppresses E2-stimulated BSC proliferation (P < 0.001) suggesting that all these are required in order for E2 to stimulate BSC proliferation. These results strongly suggest that E2 may stimulate BSC proliferation by binding to GPER-1 resulting in MMP2/9-catalyzed release of cell membrane-bound hbEGF and subsequent activation of epidermal growth factor receptor by binding of released hbEGF. PMID:25010024

  13. Androgen-dependent somatotroph function in a hypogonadal adolescent male: evidence for control of exogenous androgens on growth hormone release

    SciTech Connect

    Mauras, N.; Blizzard, R.M.; Rogol, A.D.

    1989-03-01

    A 14(10/12)-year-old white male with primary gonadal failure following testicular irradiation for acute lymphocytic leukemia was evaluated for poor growth. He had received 2400 rad of prophylactic cranial irradiation. The growth velocity had decelerated from 7 to 3.2 cm/yr over 3 years. His bone age was 12(0/12) years (by TW2-RUS), and his peak growth hormone (GH) response to provocative stimuli was 1.4 ng/mL. The 24-hour GH secretion was studied by drawing blood every 20 minutes for 24 hours. The resulting GH profile was analyzed by a computerized pulse detection algorithm, CLUSTER. Timed serum GH samples were also obtained after a 1 microgram/kg IV bolus injection of the GH releasing factor (GRH). The studies showed a flat 24-hour profile and a peak GH response to GRH of 3.9 ng/ml. Testosterone enanthate treatment was started, 100 mg IM every 4 weeks. Ten months after the initiation of therapy the calculated growth rate was 8.6 cm/yr. The 24-hour GH study and GRH responses were repeated at the time, showing a remarkably normal 24-hour GH secretory pattern and a peak GH response to GRH of 14.4 ng/mL. Testosterone therapy was discontinued, and 4 months later similar studies were repeated. A marked decrease in the mean 24-hour GH secretion and mean peak height occurred, but with maintenance of the GH pulse frequency. The GH response to GRH was intermediate, with a peak of 8 ng/mL. There was no further growth during those 4 months despite open epiphyses.

  14. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists inhibit the proliferation of androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Markus; Schally, Andrew V; Busto, Rebeca; Bajo, Ana M; Varga, Jozsef L

    2003-02-01

    The antiproliferative effects of an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) JV-1-38 were evaluated in nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b human androgen-sensitive and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancers. In the androgen-sensitive models, JV-1-38 greatly potentiated the antitumor effect of androgen deprivation induced by surgical castration, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, in castrated animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b cancers, the administration of JV-1-38 for 35 days virtually arrested tumor growth (94% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 75% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). The growth of LNCaP tumors was also powerfully suppressed by JV-1-38 combined with castration (83% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 68% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). However, in androgen-independent DU-145 cancers, JV-1-38 alone could inhibit tumor growth by 57% (P < 0.05) after 45 days. In animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b and LNCaP tumors, the reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen levels, after therapy with JV-1-38, paralleled the decrease in tumor volume. Inhibition of MDA-PCa-2b and DU-145 cancers was associated with the reduction in the expression of mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. The mRNA expression for GHRH receptor splice variants was found in all these models of prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists inhibit androgen-independent prostate cancers and, after combination with androgen deprivation, also androgen-sensitive tumors. Thus, the therapy with GHRH antagonist could be considered for the management of both androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancers. PMID:12538852

  15. Growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) antagonists inhibit the proliferation of androgen-dependent and -independent prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Letsch, Markus; Schally, Andrew V.; Busto, Rebeca; Bajo, Ana M.; Varga, Jozsef L.

    2003-01-01

    The antiproliferative effects of an antagonist of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) JV-1-38 were evaluated in nude mice bearing s.c. xenografts of LNCaP and MDA-PCa-2b human androgen-sensitive and DU-145 androgen-independent prostate cancers. In the androgen-sensitive models, JV-1-38 greatly potentiated the antitumor effect of androgen deprivation induced by surgical castration, but was ineffective when given alone. Thus, in castrated animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b cancers, the administration of JV-1-38 for 35 days virtually arrested tumor growth (94% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 75% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). The growth of LNCaP tumors was also powerfully suppressed by JV-1-38 combined with castration (83% inhibition vs. intact control, P < 0.01; and 68% vs. castrated control, P < 0.05). However, in androgen-independent DU-145 cancers, JV-1-38 alone could inhibit tumor growth by 57% (P < 0.05) after 45 days. In animals bearing MDA-PCa-2b and LNCaP tumors, the reduction in serum prostate-specific antigen levels, after therapy with JV-1-38, paralleled the decrease in tumor volume. Inhibition of MDA-PCa-2b and DU-145 cancers was associated with the reduction in the expression of mRNA and protein levels of vascular endothelial growth factor. The mRNA expression for GHRH receptor splice variants was found in all these models of prostate cancer. Our results demonstrate that GHRH antagonists inhibit androgen-independent prostate cancers and, after combination with androgen deprivation, also androgen-sensitive tumors. Thus, the therapy with GHRH antagonist could be considered for the management of both androgen-dependent or -independent prostate cancers. PMID:12538852

  16. Assessing the Factors of Regional Growth Decline of Sugar Maple

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, D. A.; Beier, C. M.; Pederson, N.; Lawrence, G. B.; Stella, J. C.; Sullivan, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh) is among the most ecologically, economically and culturally important trees in North America, but has experienced a decline disease across much of its range. We investigated the climatic and edaphic factors associated with A. saccharum growth in the Adirondack Mountains (USA) using a well-replicated tree-ring network incorporating a range of soil fertility (base cation availability). We found that nearly 3 in 4 A. saccharum trees exhibited declining growth rates during the last several decades, regardless of tree age or size. Although diameter growth was consistently higher on base-rich soils, the negative trends in growth were largely consistent across the soil chemistry gradient. Sensitivity of sugar maple growth to climatic variability was overall weaker than expected, but were also non-stationary during the 20th century. We observed increasingly positive responses to late-winter precipitation, increasingly negative responses to growing season temperatures, and strong positive responses to moisture availability during the 1960s drought that became much weaker during the recent pluvial. Further study is needed of these factors and their interactions as potential mechanisms for sugar maple growth decline.

  17. Deconstructing the Iboga Alkaloid Skeleton: Potentiation of FGF2-induced Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Release by a Novel Compound.

    PubMed

    Gassaway, Madalee M; Jacques, Teresa L; Kruegel, Andrew C; Karpowicz, Richard J; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Shu; Myer, Yves; Sames, Dalibor

    2016-01-15

    Modulation of growth factor signaling pathways in the brain represents a new experimental approach to treating neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety, and addiction. Neurotrophins and growth factors exert synaptic, neuronal, and circuit level effects on a wide temporal range, which suggests a possibility of rapid and lasting therapeutic effects. Consequently, identification of small molecules that can either enhance the release of growth factors or potentiate their respective pathways will provide a drug-like alternative to direct neurotrophin administration or viral gene delivery and thus represents an important frontier in chemical biology and drug design. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), in particular, has been implicated in marked reduction of alcohol consumption in rodent addiction models, and the natural product ibogaine, a substance used traditionally in ritualistic ceremonies, has been suggested to increase the synthesis and release of GDNF in the dopaminergic system in rats. In this report, we describe a novel iboga analog, XL-008, created by unraveling the medium size ring of the ibogamine skeleton, and its ability to induce release of GDNF in C6 glioma cells. Additionally, XL-008 potentiates the release of GDNF induced by fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), another neurotrophin implicated in major depressive disorder, increasing potency more than 2-fold (from 7.85 ± 2.59 ng/mL to 3.31 ± 0.98 ng/mL) and efficacy more than 3-fold. The GDNF release by both XL-008 and the FGF2/XL-008 mixture was found to be mediated through the MEK and PI3K signaling pathways but not through PLCγ in C6 glioma cells. PMID:26517751

  18. Pulsatile growth hormone release in Turner's syndrome and short normal children.

    PubMed

    Ghizzoni, L; Lamborghini, A; Ziveri, M; Volta, C; Panza, C; Balestrazzi, P; Bernasconi, S

    1990-09-01

    To determine whether the quantitative and qualitative aspects of GH secretion in girls with Turner's syndrome are similar to those of short-normal children we studied the 24-h GH secretion of 10 patients with Turner's syndrome and 9 short-normal children with comparable auxological features. GH profiles, obtained by 30-min sampling, were analysed by the Pulsar programme. The pulsatile GH release over the 24 h in Turner's syndrome was similar to that in normal children. However, when the GH release over the 12 day and night hours were separately analysed, only normal children showed a night-time increase in the sum of peak amplitudes. Moreover, patients with Turner's syndrome had significantly decreased number and frequency of peaks in the night-time compared with short children. In short-normal children but not in Turner's syndrome, height velocity was related to the 24-h integrated concentration of GH, area under the curve over zero-line and over baseline, sum of peak areas, and amplitudes. Night-time GH area over zero-line and over baseline, mean peak amplitude, height area, sum of peak area and amplitudes were positively correlated with height velocity in short children, whereas in Turner's syndrome height velocity was related to daytime parameters only. In conclusion, girls with Turner's syndrome have a discrete pattern of pulsatile GH release. However, the relation of GH secretion to growth in these patients, is uncertain. PMID:2239077

  19. Analysis of release cutting effects on increment and growth in Oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stand.

    PubMed

    Yücesan, Zafer; Ozçelik, Sevilay; Oktan, Ercan

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, the effects of release cuttings on stand structures and increment and growth relations were investigated in afforested oriental beech (Fagus orientalis Lipsky) stands. To maximize spatial variation in dataset, stratified random sampling was used to layout transects. 24 sampling plots were determined which reflects average characteristics of actual stand structure. 8 sampling plots were selected from unthinned stands, 8 sampling plots were selected from lightly thinned (19% of the total basal area removed) stand and 8 sampling plots were selected from heavily thinned (40% of the total basal area removed) stand. Light thinning was done in the year 2008 and heavy thinning in 2009. Stem analyses were carried out and pre- and post-treatment height, diameter, basal area and volume increments were examined according to thinning intensities. Obtained results showed that removal of 40% of the basal area does not contribute to stand increment and growth more positively than those in stands treated by removal of 19% of the basal area. Expected increase in height and diameter increment did not occurr post-treatment in 2008 and 2009. However, in only lightly thinned stands mean basal area increment increased after treatment. Release cuttings in beech stand needs to be practiced at least twice every 5 to 6 years, provided that peculiar characteristics of every habitat are considered. PMID:26521547

  20. Influences of the environment on the endocrine and paracrine fish growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I system.

    PubMed

    Reinecke, M

    2010-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is a key component of the complex system that regulates differentiation, development, growth and reproduction of fishes. The IGF-I gene is mainly expressed in the liver that represents the principal source of endocrine IGF-I but also in numerous other organs where the hormone most probably acts in an autocrine-paracrine manner. The primary stimulus for synthesis and release of IGF-I is growth hormone (GH) from the anterior pituitary. Thus, in analogy to mammals, it is usual to speak of a fish 'GH-IGF-I axis'. The GH-IGF-I system is affected by changes in the environment and probably represents a target of endocrine disrupting compounds (EDC) that impair many physiological processes in fishes. Thus, the review deals with the influences of changes in different environmental factors, such as food availability, temperature, photoperiod, season, salinity and EDCs, on GH gene expression in pituitary, IGF-I gene expression in liver and extrahepatic sites and the physiological effects resulting from the evoked alterations in endocrine and local IGF-I. Environmental influences certainly interact with each other but for convenience of the reader they will be dealt with in separate sections. Current trends in GH-IGF-I research are analysed and future focuses are suggested at the end of the sections. PMID:20537012

  1. The role of hematopoietic growth factors in transfusion medicine.

    PubMed

    Whitsett, C F

    1995-02-01

    Hematopoietic growth factors have already had an enormous impact on transfusion practice by eliminating or reducing the need for red blood cell transfusions in a variety of anemic states characterized by an absolute or relative decrease in erythropoietin. In addition, GM-CSF and G-CSF have stimulated the production of autologous neutrophils in febrile neutropenic patients in whom granulocyte transfusions had been considered ineffective. With the discovery of c-Mpl ligand and the promising results obtained with IL-11 and IL-3, a combination of growth factors that successfully stimulate platelet production may soon be identified. This first era in the clinical application of hematopoietic growth factors has been characterized largely by treatment of the patient to stimulate production of autologous cells or to enhance the ability of transplanted hematopoietic progenitor cells to repopulate the patient. The use of G-CSF to increase the yield of granulocytes harvested by apheresis procedures and to mobilize peripheral blood stem cells in allogeneic donors has initiated a new era in which the cell donor is treated to enhance cell production and enhance the repopulating ability of hematopoietic progenitor cells. As our understanding of hematopoiesis grows, scientists will be able to identify growth factors to overcome or correct deficient hematopoiesis. Increasingly, component transfusions will be reserved for life-threatening situations in which endogenous cell production cannot be stimulated or cell production will be too slow to prevent life-threatening events. PMID:7737944

  2. NEUROBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF COLCHICINE: MODULATION BY NERVE GROWTH FACTOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    To study the effects of exogenously applied nerve growth factor (NGF) on colchicine-induced neurodegeneration in the dentate gyrus of the rat hippocampal formation, male Fischer 344 rats (n=75) weighing 275-325 grams received colchicine [COLCH; 2.5 ug/site in 0.5 ul of artificial...

  3. Role of fibroblast growth factors in organ regeneration and repair.

    PubMed

    El Agha, Elie; Kosanovic, Djuro; Schermuly, Ralph T; Bellusci, Saverio

    2016-05-01

    In its broad sense, regeneration refers to the renewal of lost cells, tissues or organs as part of the normal life cycle (skin, hair, endometrium etc.) or as part of an adaptive mechanism that organisms have developed throughout evolution. For example, worms, starfish and amphibians have developed remarkable regenerative capabilities allowing them to voluntarily shed body parts, in a process called autotomy, only to replace the lost parts afterwards. The bizarre myth of the fireproof homicidal salamander that can survive fire and poison apple trees has persisted until the 20th century. Salamanders possess one of the most robust regenerative machineries in vertebrates and attempting to draw lessons from limb regeneration in these animals and extrapolate the knowledge to mammals is a never-ending endeavor. Fibroblast growth factors are potent morphogens and mitogens that are highly conserved among the animal kingdom. These growth factors play key roles in organogenesis during embryonic development as well as homeostatic balance during postnatal life. In this review, we provide a summary about the current knowledge regarding the involvement of fibroblast growth factor signaling in organ regeneration and repair. We also shed light on the use of these growth factors in previous and current clinical trials in a wide array of human diseases. PMID:26459973

  4. Total Chemical Synthesis of Biologically Active Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2011-09-15

    The 204-residue covalent-dimer vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, see picture) with full mitogenic activity was prepared from three unprotected peptide segments by one-pot native chemical ligations. The covalent structure of the synthetic VEGF was confirmed by precise mass measurement, and the three-dimensional structure of the synthetic protein was determined by high-resolution X-ray crystallography.

  5. Regulation of liver regeneration by growth factors and cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Friederike; Köhler, Ulrike A; Speicher, Tobias; Werner, Sabine

    2010-01-01

    The capability of the liver to fully regenerate after injury is a unique phenomenon essential for the maintenance of its important functions in the control of metabolism and xenobiotic detoxification. The regeneration process is histologically well described, but the genes that orchestrate liver regeneration have been only partially characterized. Of particular interest are cytokines and growth factors, which control different phases of liver regeneration. Historically, their potential functions in this process were addressed by analyzing their expression in the regenerating liver of rodents. Some of the predicted roles were confirmed using functional studies, including systemic delivery of recombinant growth factors, neutralizing antibodies or siRNAs prior to liver injury or during liver regeneration. In particular, the availability of genetically modified mice and their use in liver regeneration studies has unraveled novel and often unexpected functions of growth factors, cytokines and their downstream signalling targets in liver regeneration. This review summarizes the results obtained by functional studies that have addressed the roles and mechanisms of action of growth factors and cytokines in liver regeneration after acute injury to this organ. PMID:20652897

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor-2 Alters the Nature of Extinction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Bronwyn M.; Richardson, Rick

    2011-01-01

    These experiments examined the effects of the NMDA-receptor (NMDAr) antagonist MK801 on reacquisition and re-extinction of a conditioned fear that had been previously extinguished before injection of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) or vehicle. Recent findings have shown that relearning and re-extinction, unlike initial learning and extinction,…

  7. Characterization and estrogen regulation of uterine growth factor activity

    SciTech Connect

    Beck, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    Acid extracts of rat, bovine and rabbit uterus stimulated glucose transport, measured by phosphorylation of 2-deoxyglucose and DNA synthesis, measured by {sup 3}H-thymidne incorporation, in uterine tumor cells and in primary cultures of rat uterine cells. The stimulation of glucose transport was of the same magnitude and followed the same time course as estradiol stimulation in vivo. Uteri from estradiol-treated rat uteri contained 4 times more glucose transport-stimulating activity as control uteri. DNA synthetic activity in rat uterine homogenates was elevated 3-fold within 18-24 h after estradiol injection. Gel filtration showed molecular weight heterogeneity with activity eluting between 10-30 kDA. Both activities were acid and heat stable, were reduced by trypsin but not by dextran-coated charcoal. The effect of purified growth factors on DNA synthesis in primary cultures of rat uterine cells was examined. Epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblasts growth factor (bFGF), and transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF{beta}) had no effect on {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation.

  8. Mapping growth-factor-modulated Akt signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-05-15

    Growth factors alter cellular behavior through shared signaling cascades, raising the question of how specificity is achieved. Here, we have determined how growth factor actions are encoded into Akt signaling dynamics by real-time tracking of a fluorescent sensor. In individual cells, Akt activity was encoded in an analog pattern, with similar latencies (∼2 min) and half-maximal peak response times (range of 5-8 min). Yet, different growth factors promoted dose-dependent and heterogeneous changes in signaling dynamics. Insulin treatment caused sustained Akt activity, whereas EGF or PDGF-AA promoted transient signaling; PDGF-BB produced sustained responses at higher concentrations, but short-term effects at low doses, actions that were independent of the PDGF-α receptor. Transient responses to EGF were caused by negative feedback at the receptor level, as a second treatment yielded minimal responses, whereas parallel exposure to IGF-I caused full Akt activation. Small-molecule inhibitors reduced PDGF-BB signaling to transient responses, but only decreased the magnitude of IGF-I actions. Our observations reveal distinctions among growth factors that use shared components, and allow us to capture the consequences of receptor-specific regulatory mechanisms on Akt signaling. PMID:27044757

  9. [Expression of tissue factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in colorectal carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Altomare, D F; Rotelli, M T; Memeo, V; Martinelli, E; Guglielmi, A; DeFazio, M; D'Elia, G; Pentimone, A; Colucci, M; Semeraro, N

    2003-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) play an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. We analyzed their expression in the carcinoma and normal mucosa of 53 colorectal cancer patients. VEGF levels were significantly higher in the tumor and correlated with TF expression. No correlation was found with tumor stage. TF may influence tumor growth and metastasis by modulating VEGF expression and neoangiogenesis. PMID:12903530

  10. Stimulation and inhibition of corticotrophin releasing factor secretion by beta endorphin.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, J C

    1986-01-01

    The influence of beta-endorphin on the secretion of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) by isolated rat hypothalami in vitro was studied. beta-Endorphin (10(-11)-10(-10) M) caused dose-related increases in the CRF contents of the hypothalami and of the medium in which they were incubated. Its effects were antagonized by naloxone (10(-8)-10(-7) M). In contrast, in higher concentrations (10(-7) - 10(-5) M), it reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, both the spontaneous release of CRF from the hypothalami and the release which normally occurred in response to acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, morphine, met-enkephalin and leu-enkephalin. The inhibition of CRF release was associated with a rise in the tissue content of the hormone and was not blocked readily by naloxone. The results support the concept that opioid substances may be involved in the control of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical function. PMID:2936971

  11. Platelet-activating factor induces eosinophil peroxidase release from purified human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Chanez, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1988-01-01

    The degranulation response of purified human eosinophils to platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been studied. PAF induced release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-glucuronidase from highly purified human eosinophils with an EC50 of 0.9 nM. The order of release was comparable with that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The new specific PAF antagonist 3-[4-(2-chlorophenyl)-9-methyl-H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3a][1,4]-diazepin-2-yl](4-morpholinyl)- 1-propane-one (WEB 2086) inhibited the PAF-induced enzyme release by human eosinophils in a dose-dependent manner. The viability of eosinophils were unaffected both by PAF and WEB 2086. The results suggest that PAF may amplify allergic and inflammatory reactions by release of preformed proteins from eosinophil granules. PMID:3410498

  12. Lipopeptide antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with improved antitumor activities.

    PubMed

    Zarandi, Marta; Varga, Jozsef L; Schally, Andrew V; Horvath, Judit E; Toller, Gabor L; Kovacs, Magdolna; Letsch, Markus; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Halmos, Gabor

    2006-03-21

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesized previously inhibit proliferation of various human cancers, but derivatisation with fatty acids could enhance their clinical efficacy. We synthesized a series of antagonists of GHRH(1-29)NH(2) acylated at the N terminus with monocarboxylic or alpha,omega-dicarboxylic acids containing six to sixteen carbon atoms. These peptides are analogs of prior potent antagonists JV-1-36, JV-1-38, and JV-1-65 with phenylacetyl group at their N terminus. Several new analogs, including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-30, more effectively inhibited GHRH-induced GH release in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system than their parent compound JV-1-36 and had increased binding affinities to rat pituitary GHRH receptors, but they showed weaker inhibition of GH release in vivo than JV-1-36. All antagonists acylated with fatty acids containing 8-14 carbon atoms inhibited the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro better than JV-1-36 or JV-1-65. GHRH antagonist MZ-J-7-114 (5 mug/day) significantly suppressed the growth of PC-3 human androgen-independent prostate cancers xenografted into nude mice and reduced serum IGF-I levels, whereas antagonist JV-1-38 had no effect at the dose of 10 mug/day. GHRH antagonists including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-114 acylated with octanoic acid and MZ-J-7-30 and MZ-J-7-110 acylated with 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acid represent relevant improvements over earlier antagonists. These and previous results suggest that this class of GHRH antagonists might be effective in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:16537407

  13. Lipopeptide antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone with improved antitumor activities

    PubMed Central

    Zarandi, Marta; Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Horvath, Judit E.; Toller, Gabor L.; Kovacs, Magdolna; Letsch, Markus; Groot, Kate; Armatis, Patricia; Halmos, Gabor

    2006-01-01

    Antagonists of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) synthesized previously inhibit proliferation of various human cancers, but derivatisation with fatty acids could enhance their clinical efficacy. We synthesized a series of antagonists of GHRH(1-29)NH2 acylated at the N terminus with monocarboxylic or α,ω-dicarboxylic acids containing six to sixteen carbon atoms. These peptides are analogs of prior potent antagonists JV-1-36, JV-1-38, and JV-1-65 with phenylacetyl group at their N terminus. Several new analogs, including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-30, more effectively inhibited GHRH-induced GH release in vitro in a superfused rat pituitary system than their parent compound JV-1-36 and had increased binding affinities to rat pituitary GHRH receptors, but they showed weaker inhibition of GH release in vivo than JV-1-36. All antagonists acylated with fatty acids containing 8–14 carbon atoms inhibited the proliferation of MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro better than JV-1-36 or JV-1-65. GHRH antagonist MZ-J-7-114 (5 μg/day) significantly suppressed the growth of PC-3 human androgen-independent prostate cancers xenografted into nude mice and reduced serum IGF-I levels, whereas antagonist JV-1-38 had no effect at the dose of 10 μg/day. GHRH antagonists including MZ-J-7-46 and MZ-J-7-114 acylated with octanoic acid and MZ-J-7-30 and MZ-J-7-110 acylated with 1,12-dodecanedicarboxylic acid represent relevant improvements over earlier antagonists. These and previous results suggest that this class of GHRH antagonists might be effective in the treatment of various cancers. PMID:16537407

  14. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-dependent tumor growth inhibition by a vascular endothelial growth factor-superantigen conjugate

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Qingwen; Jiang, Songmin; Han, Baohui; Sun, Tongwen; Li, Zhengnan; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Qiang; Sun, Jialin

    2012-11-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We construct and purify a fusion protein VEGF-SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around tumor cells bearing VEGFR by mice image model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester CTLs into the tumor site. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The induced CTLs could release the cytokines, perforins and granzyme B to kill the tumor cells. -- Abstract: T cells are major lymphocytes in the blood and passengers across the tumor vasculature. If these T cells are retained in the tumor site, a therapeutic potential will be gained by turning them into tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). A fusion protein composed of human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) with a D227A mutation strongly repressed the growth of murine solid sarcoma 180 (S180) tumors (control versus VEGF-SEA treated with 15 {mu}g, mean tumor weight: 1.128 g versus 0.252 g, difference = 0.876 g). CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} T cells driven by VEGF-SEA were accumulated around VEGFR expressing tumor cells and the induced CTLs could release the tumoricidal cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). Meanwhile, intratumoral CTLs secreted cytolytic pore-forming perforin and granzyme B proteins around tumor cells, leading to the death of tumor cells. The labeled fusion proteins were gradually targeted to the tumor site in an imaging mice model. These results show that VEGF-SEA can serve as a tumor targeting agent and sequester active infiltrating CTLs into the tumor site to kill tumor cells, and could therefore be a potential therapeutical drug for a variety of cancers.

  15. Role of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling in the neuroendocrine control of human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Miraoui, Hichem; Dwyer, Andrew; Pitteloud, Nelly

    2011-10-22

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling is critical for a broad range of developmental processes. In 2003, Fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) was discovered as a novel locus causing both forms of isolate GnRH Deficiency, Kallmann syndrome [KS with anosmia] and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism [nIHH] eventually accounting for approximately 10% of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency cases. Such cases are characterized by a broad spectrum of reproductive phenotypes from severe congenital forms of GnRH deficiency to reversal of HH. Additionally, the variable expressivity of both reproductive and non-reproductive phenotypes among patients and family members harboring the identical FGFR1 mutations has pointed to a more complex, oligogenic model for GnRH deficiency. Further, reversal of HH in patients carrying FGFR1 mutations suggests potential gene-environment interactions in human GnRH deficiency disorders. PMID:21664428

  16. Role of growth hormone, insulin-like growth factor-I, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in the catabolic response to injury and infection.

    PubMed

    Lang, Charles H; Frost, Robert A

    2002-05-01

    The erosion of lean body mass resulting from protracted critical illness remains a significant risk factor for increased morbidity and mortality in this patient population. Previous studies have documented the well known impairment in nitrogen balance results from both an increase in muscle protein degradation as well as a decreased rate of both myofibrillar and sacroplasmic protein synthesis. This protein imbalance may be caused by an increased presence or activity of various catabolic agents, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1 beta, interleukin-6 or glucocorticoids, or may be mediated via a decreased concentration or responsiveness to various anabolic hormones, such as growth hormone or insulin-like growth factor-I. This review focuses on recent developments pertaining to the importance of alterations in the growth hormone-insulin-like growth factor-I axis as a mechanism for the observed defects in muscle protein balance. PMID:11953652

  17. Transplacental transfer of a growth hormone-releasing hormone peptide from mother to fetus in the rat.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous studies showed that when growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) was administered to either pregnant rats or pigs as a plasmid-mediated therapy, pituitary weight, somatotroph and lactotroph numbers, and postnatal growth rate of the offspring increased. To determine if these responses result...

  18. Stimulation of body weight increase and epiphyseal cartilage growth by insulin like growth factor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) to induce growth in hypophysectomized immature rats was tested by continuous infusion of the partially purified factor at daily doses of 6, 21, and 46 mU for an 8-day period. A dose-dependent growth of the proximal epiphyseal cartilage of the tibia and an associated stimulation of the primary spongiosa were produced by these amounts of IGF. The two highest doses of IGF also resulted in dose-dependent increases of body weight. Gel permeation of the sera at neutrality showed that the large-molecular-weight IGF binding protein was not induced by the infusion of IGF, whereas it ws generated in the sera of hypophysectomized rats that were infused with daily doses of 86 mU of human growth hormone.

  19. Biomaterials with persistent growth factor gradients in vivo accelerate vascularized tissue formation.

    PubMed

    Akar, Banu; Jiang, Bin; Somo, Sami I; Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Tichauer, Kenneth M; Brey, Eric M

    2015-12-01

    Gradients of soluble factors play an important role in many biological processes, including blood vessel assembly. Gradients can be studied in detail in vitro, but methods that enable the study of spatially distributed soluble factors and multi-cellular processes in vivo are limited. Here, we report on a method for the generation of persistent in vivo gradients of growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) biomaterial system. Fibrin loaded porous poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) scaffolds were generated using a particulate leaching method. Platelet derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) was encapsulated into poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres which were placed distal to the tissue-material interface. PLGA provides sustained release of PDGF-BB and its diffusion through the porous structure results in gradient formation. Gradients within the scaffold were confirmed in vivo using near-infrared fluorescence imaging and gradients were present for more than 3 weeks. The diffusion of PDGF-BB was modeled and verified with in vivo imaging findings. The depth of tissue invasion and density of blood vessels formed in response to the biomaterial increased with magnitude of the gradient. This biomaterial system allows for generation of sustained growth factor gradients for the study of tissue response to gradients in vivo. PMID:26344364

  20. Role of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factors in lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morfoisse, Florent; Renaud, Edith; Hantelys, Fransky; Prats, Anne-Catherine; Garmy-Susini, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxia is known to be a major factor in the induction of angiogenesis during tumor development but its role in lymphangiogenesis remains unclear. Blood and lymphatic vasculatures are stimulated by the vascular endothelial family of growth factors – the VEGFs. In this review, we investigate the role of hypoxia in the molecular regulation of synthesis of the lymphangiogenic growth factors VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D. Gene expression can be regulated by hypoxia at either transcriptional or translational levels. In contrast to strong induction of DNA transcription by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), the majority of cellular stresses such as hypoxia lead to inhibition of cap-dependent translation of mRNA and downregulation of protein synthesis. Here, we describe how initiation of translation of VEGF mRNA is induced by hypoxia through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent mechanism. Considering the implications of the lymphatic vasculature for metastatic dissemination, it is crucial to understand the molecular regulation of lymphangiogenic growth factors by hypoxia to obtain new insights into cancer therapy. PMID:27308316

  1. Reconstructing jaw defects with MSCs and PLGA-encapsulated growth factors.

    PubMed

    Tee, Boon Ching; Desai, Kashappa Goud H; Kennedy, Kelly S; Sonnichsen, Brittany; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Fields, Henry W; Mallery, Susan R; Schwendeman, Steven P; Sun, Zongyang

    2016-01-01

    Cell and growth factor-based tissue engineering has shown great potentials for skeletal regeneration. This study tested its feasibility in reconstructing large mandibular defects and compared the efficacy of varied construction materials and sealing methods. Bilateral mandibular critical-size (5-cm(3)) defects were created on six 4-month-old domestic pigs, and grafted with β-tricalcium phosphate (βTCP) only (Group-A), βTCP with autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) (Group-B), and βTCP with BM-MSCs and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (Group-C). The buccal sides of Groups-B/-C were either sealed by fibrin sealant or by a biodegradable PLGA barrier membrane before soft-tissue closure. Computed tomography (CT), microCT and histology analyses were performed 12 weeks postoperatively. In vitro data demonstrated that BM-MSCs, with MSC properties confirmed, remained vital after integration with βTCP; and PLGA microspheres exhibited an initial burst followed by slow and continuous release of growth factors over a period of 28 days. In vivo data demonstrated that Group-B/-C sites had significantly greater gap obliteration, higher tissue mineral densities and more residual βTCP granules (p<0.05, Kruskal-Wallis tests). Qualitatively, Group-B/-C defect sites had started remodeling while Group-A sites were mainly forming new bone to bridge the gaps. Furthermore, βTCP degradation was not mediated by macrophages or osteoclasts, and was significantly slowed down by sealing the defects with barrier membrane. Combined, these data present a promising formulation composed of βTCP granules, autologous MSCs, controlled-release growth factors and biodegradable PLGA barrier membrane for the reconstruction of critical-size mandibular defects. PMID:27398152

  2. Reconstructing jaw defects with MSCs and PLGA-encapsulated growth factors

    PubMed Central

    Tee, Boon Ching; Desai, Kashappa Goud H; Kennedy, Kelly S; Sonnichsen, Brittany; Kim, Do-Gyoon; Fields, Henry W; Mallery, Susan R; Schwendeman, Steven P; Sun, Zongyang

    2016-01-01

    Cell and growth factor-based tissue engineering has shown great potentials for skeletal regeneration. This study tested its feasibility in reconstructing large mandibular defects and compared the efficacy of varied construction materials and sealing methods. Bilateral mandibular critical-size (5-cm3) defects were created on six 4-month-old domestic pigs, and grafted with β-tricalcium phosphate (βTCP) only (Group-A), βTCP with autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) (Group-B), and βTCP with BM-MSCs and biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres containing bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (Group-C). The buccal sides of Groups-B/-C were either sealed by fibrin sealant or by a biodegradable PLGA barrier membrane before soft-tissue closure. Computed tomography (CT), microCT and histology analyses were performed 12 weeks postoperatively. In vitro data demonstrated that BM-MSCs, with MSC properties confirmed, remained vital after integration with βTCP; and PLGA microspheres exhibited an initial burst followed by slow and continuous release of growth factors over a period of 28 days. In vivo data demonstrated that Group-B/-C sites had significantly greater gap obliteration, higher tissue mineral densities and more residual βTCP granules (p<0.05, Kruskal-Wallis tests). Qualitatively, Group-B/-C defect sites had started remodeling while Group-A sites were mainly forming new bone to bridge the gaps. Furthermore, βTCP degradation was not mediated by macrophages or osteoclasts, and was significantly slowed down by sealing the defects with barrier membrane. Combined, these data present a promising formulation composed of βTCP granules, autologous MSCs, controlled-release growth factors and biodegradable PLGA barrier membrane for the reconstruction of critical-size mandibular defects. PMID:27398152

  3. Vascular Endothelial growth factor signaling in hypoxia and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Anand, Vidhu; Roy, Sabita

    2014-01-01

    Infection, cancer and cardiovascular diseases are the major causes for morbidity and mortality in the United States according to the Center for Disease Control. The underlying etiology that contributes to the severity of these diseases is either hypoxia induced inflammation or inflammation resulting in hypoxia. Therefore, molecular mechanisms that regulate hypoxia-induced adaptive responses in cells are important areas of investigation. Oxygen availability is sensed by molecular switches which regulate synthesis and secretion of growth factors and inflammatory mediators. As a consequence, tissue microenvironment is altered by reprogramming metabolic pathways, angiogenesis, vascular permeability, pH homeostasis to facilitate tissue remodeling. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF) is the central mediator of hypoxic response. HIF regulates several hundred genes and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is one of the primary target genes. Understanding the regulation of HIF and its influence on inflammatory response offers unique opportunities for drug development to modulate inflammation and ischemia in pathological conditions. PMID:24610033

  4. Induction of nerve growth factor receptors on cultured human melanocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Peacocke, M.; Yaar, M.; Mansur, C.P.; Chao, M.V.; Gilchrest, B.A. )

    1988-07-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human melanocytes involve a complex series of interactions during which both genetic and environmental factors play roles. At present, the regulation of these processes is poorly understood. The authors have induced the expression of nerve growth factor (NGF) receptors on cultured human melanocytes with phorbol 12-tetradecanoate 13-acetate and have correlated this event with the appearance of a more differentiated, dendritic morphology. Criteria for NGF receptor expression included protein accumulation and cell-surface immunofluorescent staining with a monoclonal antibody directed against the human receptor and induction of the messenger RNA species as determined by blot-hybridization studies. The presence of the receptor could also be induced by UV irradiation or growth factor deprivation. The NGF receptor is inducible in cultured human melanocytes, and they suggest that NGF may modulate the behavior of this neural crest-derived cell in the skin.

  5. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... regulations in 21 CFR 522.1083 are amended to reflect the approval. In accordance with the freedom of... CFR part 522 continues to read as follows: Authority: 21 U.S.C. 360b. 0 2. In Sec. 522.1083, revise paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(3) to read as follows: Sec. 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor...

  6. TGF-β2 treatment enhances cytoprotective factors released from embryonic stem cells and inhibits apoptosis in infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Singla, Dinender K; Singla, Reetu D; Lamm, Stephanie; Glass, Carley

    2011-04-01

    We investigated whether factors released from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells primed with and without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 inhibit iodoacetic acid (IAA)- and H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in the cell culture system as well as after transplantation in the infarcted heart. We generated conditioned media (CMs) from ES cells primed with and without TGF-β2 and determined their effects on IAA- and H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. We also transplanted both ES-CMs in the infarcted heart to determine the effects on apoptosis and cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) at day (D)1 and D14. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, apoptotic ELISA, and cell viability data demonstrated significantly (P < 0.05) reduced apoptosis with ES-CM compared with controls in both cell culture models. Moreover, TGF-β2-primed ES-CM (T-ES-CM) demonstrated enhanced beneficial effects, with further reduced (P < 0.05) apoptosis compared with ES-CM, suggesting the a presence of additional cytoprotective released factors after TGF-β2 treatment. Next, our in vivo apoptosis data suggested significant decrease in apoptosis with both ES-CMs compared with MI alone at D1 and D14. Notably, T-ES-CM demonstrated significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of apoptosis and fibrosis with improved cardiac function compared with ES-CM at D14, whereas no such effects were observed at D1. Next, we confirmed that apoptosis is mediated through a prosurvival Akt pathway. Moreover, we determined that after TGF-β2 treatment there was a two- to fivefold increase in cytoprotective released factors (interleukin-10, stem cell factor, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and VEGF) with T-ES-CM compared with ES-CM. In conclusion, we suggest that factors released from ES cells with and without TGF-β2 treatment contain antiapoptotic factors that inhibit apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. We also suggest that T-ES-CM demonstrates additional

  7. Extrinsic Factors Influencing Fetal Deformations and Intrauterine Growth Restriction

    PubMed Central

    Moh, Wendy; Graham, John M.; Wadhawan, Isha; Sanchez-Lara, Pedro A.

    2012-01-01

    The causes of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) are multifactorial with both intrinsic and extrinsic influences. While many studies focus on the intrinsic pathological causes, the possible long-term consequences resulting from extrinsic intrauterine physiological constraints merit additional consideration and further investigation. Infants with IUGR can exhibit early symmetric or late asymmetric growth abnormality patterns depending on the fetal stage of development, of which the latter is most common occurring in 70–80% of growth-restricted infants. Deformation is the consequence of extrinsic biomechanical factors interfering with normal growth, functioning, or positioning of the fetus in utero, typically arising during late gestation. Biomechanical forces play a critical role in the normal morphogenesis of most tissues. The magnitude and direction of force impact the form of the developing fetus, with a specific tissue response depending on its pliability and stage of development. Major uterine constraining factors include primigravida, small maternal size, uterine malformation, uterine fibromata, early pelvic engagement of the fetal head, aberrant fetal position, oligohydramnios, and multifetal gestation. Corrective mechanical forces similar to those that gave rise to the deformation to reshape the deformed structures are often used and should take advantage of the rapid postnatal growth to correct form. PMID:22888434

  8. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Acts Primarily via Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor α to Promote Proliferative Vitreoretinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pennock, Steven; Haddock, Luis J.; Mukai, Shizuo; Kazlauskas, Andrius

    2015-01-01

    Proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR) is a nonneovascular blinding disease and the leading cause for failure in surgical repair of rhegmatogenous retinal detachments. Once formed, PVR is difficult to treat. Hence, there is an acute interest in developing approaches to prevent PVR. Of the many growth factors and cytokines that accumulate in vitreous as PVR develops, neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) A has recently been found to prevent PVR in at least one animal model. The goal of this study was to test if Food and Drug Administration–approved agents could protect the eye from PVR in multiple animal models and to further investigate the underlying mechanisms. Neutralizing VEGF with aflibercept (VEGF Trap-Eye) safely and effectively protected rabbits from PVR in multiple models of disease. Furthermore, aflibercept reduced the bioactivity of both experimental and clinical PVR vitreous. Finally, although VEGF could promote some PVR-associated cellular responses via VEGF receptors expressed on the retinal pigment epithelial cells that drive this disease, VEGF's major contribution to vitreal bioactivity occurred via platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. Thus, VEGF promotes PVR by a noncanonical ability to engage platelet-derived growth factor receptor α. These findings indicate that VEGF contributes to nonangiogenic diseases and that anti–VEGF-based therapies may be effective on a wider spectrum of diseases than previously appreciated. PMID:25261788

  9. Transforming growth factor-beta and transforming growth factor beta-receptor expression in human meningioma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. D.; Federspiel, C. F.; Gold, L. I.; Moses, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) family in mammals includes three closely related peptides that influence proliferation and numerous physiologic processes in most mesenchymal cells. In this study, Northern blots, immunohistochemistry, TGF beta radioreceptor assays, TGF beta receptor affinity labeling and [3H] thymidine incorporation were used to evaluate whether primary cell cultures of human meningiomas synthesize the three TGF beta isoforms, bear TGF beta receptors, and respond to TGF beta. Transcripts for TGF beta 1 and 2 were detected in the three cases analyzed. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 immunoreactivity was detected in three of six cases, and TGF beta 2 and 3 immunoreactivity were detected in each case analyzed. Media conditioned by cells cultured from six meningiomas also contained latent TGF beta-like activity. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor cross-linking studies identified TGF beta binding sites corresponding to the type 1, type 2, and type 3 receptors on meningioma cells. Treatment with active TGF beta 1 produced a statistically significant reduction in [3H] thymidine incorporation after stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum and epidermal growth factor in all six cases studied. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1325741

  10. FGF19 functions as autocrine growth factor for hepatoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Elzi, David J.; Song, Meihua; Blackman, Barron; Weintraub, Susan T.; López-Terrada, Dolores; Chen, Yidong; Tomlinson, Gail E.; Shiio, Yuzuru

    2016-01-01

    Hepatoblastoma is the most common liver cancer in children, accounting for over 65% of all childhood liver malignancies. Hepatoblastoma is distinct from adult liver cancer in that it is not associated with hepatitis virus infection, cirrhosis, or other underlying liver pathology. The paucity of appropriate cell and animal models has been hampering the mechanistic understanding of hepatoblastoma pathogenesis. Consequently, there is no molecularly targeted therapy for hepatoblastoma. To gain insight into cytokine signaling in hepatoblastoma, we employed mass spectrometry to analyze the proteins secreted from Hep293TT hepatoblastoma cell line we established and identified the specific secretion of fibroblast growth factor 19 (FGF19), a growth factor for liver cells. We determined that silencing FGF19 by shRNAs or neutralizing secreted FGF19 by anti-FGF19 antibody inhibits the proliferation of hepatoblastoma cells. Furthermore, blocking FGF19 signaling by an FGF receptor kinase inhibitor suppressed hepatoblastoma growth. RNA expression analysis in hepatoblastoma tumors revealed that the high expression of FGF19 signaling pathway components as well as the low expression of FGF19 signaling repression targets correlates with the aggressiveness of the tumors. These results suggest the role of FGF19 as autocrine growth factor for hepatoblastoma. PMID:27382436

  11. Vascular growth factors and receptors in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hatva, E.; Böhling, T.; Jääskeläinen, J.; Persico, M. G.; Haltia, M.; Alitalo, K.

    1996-01-01

    Capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas are highly vascular central nervous system tumors of controversial origin. Of interest in their pathogenesis are mechanisms regulating endothelial cell growth. The endothelial cell mitogen vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) stimulates angiogenesis, and together with its two receptor tyrosine kinases VEGFR-1(FLT1) and VEGFR-2(KDR), is up-regulated during the malignant progression of gliomas. We have analyzed the expression of VEGF and its receptors, the related placental growth factor (PlGF) and the endothelial receptors FLT4 and Tie by in situ hybridization in capillary hemangioblastomas and hemangiopericytomas. VEGF mRNA was up-regulated in all of the hemangiopericytomas studied and highly expressed in the stromal cells of hemangioblastomas. In addition, some hemangioblastoma tumor cells expressed high levels of PlGF. Significantly elevated levels of Tie mRNA, Tie protein, VEGFR-1, and VEGFR-2 but not FLT4 mRNAs were observed in the endothelia of both tumor types. In hemangioblastomas, however, the receptors were also highly expressed by a subpopulation of stromal cells. Consistent results were obtained for a human hemangioblastoma cell line in culture. Up-regulation of the endothelial growth factors and receptors may result in autocrine or paracrine stimulation of endothelial cells and their precursors involved in the genesis of these two vascular tumors. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8774132

  12. Lifetime growth in wild meerkats: incorporating life history and environmental factors into a standard growth model.

    PubMed

    English, Sinéad; Bateman, Andrew W; Clutton-Brock, Tim H

    2012-05-01

    Lifetime records of changes in individual size or mass in wild animals are scarce and, as such, few studies have attempted to model variation in these traits across the lifespan or to assess the factors that affect them. However, quantifying lifetime growth is essential for understanding trade-offs between growth and other life history parameters, such as reproductive performance or survival. Here, we used model selection based on information theory to measure changes in body mass over the lifespan of wild meerkats, and compared the relative fits of several standard growth models (monomolecular, von Bertalanffy, Gompertz, logistic and Richards). We found that meerkats exhibit monomolecular growth, with the best model incorporating separate growth rates before and after nutritional independence, as well as effects of season and total rainfall in the previous nine months. Our study demonstrates how simple growth curves may be improved by considering life history and environmental factors, which may be particularly relevant when quantifying growth patterns in wild populations. PMID:22108854

  13. Tissue Integration of Growth Factor-Eluting Layer-by-Layer Polyelectrolyte Multilayer Coated Implants

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Mara L.; Samuel, Raymond E.; Shah, Nisarg J.; Padera, Robert; Beben, Yvette M.; Hammond, Paula T.

    2011-01-01

    Drug eluting coatings that can direct the host tissue response to implanted medical devices have the potential to ameliorate both the medical and financial burden of complications from implantation. However, because many drugs useful in this arena are biologic in nature, a paucity of delivery strategies for biologics, including growth factors, currently limits the control that can be exerted on the implantation environment. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) polyelectrolyte multilayer films are highly attractive as ultrathin biologic reservoirs, due to conformal coating of difficult geometries, aqueous processing likely to preserve fragile protein function, and tenability of incorporation and release profiles. Herein, we describe the first LbL films capable of microgram-scale release of the biologic Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP-2), which is capable of directing the host tissue response to create bone from native progenitor cells. Ten micrograms of BMP-2 are released over a period of two weeks in vitro; less than 1% is released in the first 3 hours (compared with commercial collagen matrices which can release up to 60% of BMP-2, too quickly to induce differentiation). BMP-2 released from LbL films retains its ability to induce bone differentiation in MC3T3 E1S4 preosteoblasts, as measured by induction of alkaline phosphatase and stains for calcium (via Alizarin Red) and calcium matrix (via Von Kossa). In vivo, BMP-2 film coated scaffolds were compared with film coated scaffolds lacking BMP-2. BMP-2 coatings implanted intramuscularly were able to initiate host progenitor cells to differentiate into bone, which matured and expanded from four to nine weeks as measured by MicroCT and histology. Such LbL films represent new steps towards controlling and tuning host response to implanted medical devices, which may ultimately increase the success of implanted devices, provide alternative new approaches toward bone wound healing, and lay the foundation for development of a multi

  14. Human microvascular endothelial cells express receptors for platelet-derived growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Beitz, J.G.; Kim, Insoon; Calabresi, P.; Frackelton, A.R. Jr. )

    1991-03-01

    Endothelial cells have been widely thought to be unresponsive to platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, a major growth factor released from stimulated platelets at the sites of vascular insults) and devoid of PDGF receptors. Nevertheless, in examining the growth-factor responses of microvascular endothelial cells isolated from human omental adipose tissue, the authors were surprised to detect PDGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of a 180-kDa glycoprotein, subsequently identified as the cellular receptor for PDGF by specific immunoprecipitation. Scatchard analysis of {sup 125}I-labeled PDGF binding to human microvascular endothelial cells revealed 30,000 PDGF receptors per cell with a K{sub d} of 0.14 nM. Normal cellular consequences of receptor activation were also observed, including tyrosine phosphorylation of a 42-kDa protein and serine phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6. Furthermore, PDGF was mitogenic for these cells. Microvascular endothelial cells play a central role in neovascularization required for wound healing and solid tumor growth. Thus, the discovery of functional PFDG receptors on human microvascular endothelial cells suggests a direct role for PDGF in this process.

  15. Comparison of humoral insulin-like growth factor-1, platelet-derived growth factor-BB, transforming growth factor-β1, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist concentrations among equine autologous blood-derived preparations.

    PubMed

    Ionita, Christiane R; Troillet, Antonia R; Vahlenkamp, Thomas W; Winter, Karsten; Brehm, Walter; Ionita, Jean-Claude

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare humoral insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) concentrations in plasma and 3 types of equine autologous blood-derived preparations (ABPs). SAMPLE Blood and ABP samples from 12 horses. PROCEDURES Blood samples from each horse were processed by use of commercial systems to obtain plasma, platelet concentrate, conditioned serum, and aqueous platelet lysate. Half of the platelet concentrate samples were additionally treated with a detergent to release intracellular mediators. Humoral IGF-1, PDGF-BB, TGF-β1, and IL-1Ra concentrations were measured with ELISAs and compared statistically. RESULTS Median IGF-1 concentration was highest in conditioned serum and detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by platelet concentrate and plasma; IGF-1 was not detected in platelet lysate. Mean PDGF-BB concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by detergent-treated platelet concentrate and conditioned serum; PDGF-BB was not detected in plasma and platelet concentrate. Median TGF-β1 concentration was highest in detergent-treated platelet concentrate, followed by conditioned serum, platelet lysate, and platelet concentrate; TGF-β1 was not detected in most plasma samples. Median IL-1Ra concentration was highest in platelet lysate, followed by conditioned serum; IL-1Ra was not detected in almost all plasma, detergent-treated platelet concentrate, and platelet concentrate samples. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Each ABP had its own cytokine profile, which was determined by the specific processing method. Coagulation and cellular lysis strongly increased humoral concentrations of cell-derived cytokines. No ABP had the highest concentrations for all cytokines. Further studies are needed to assess clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:27463555

  16. UVB Generates Microvesicle Particle Release in Part Due to Platelet-activating Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Rapp, Christine M; Chen, Yanfang; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The lipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by ultraviolet B (UVB) have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated processes, from acute inflammation to delayed systemic immunosuppression. Recent studies have provided evidence that microvesicle particles (MVPs) are released from cells in response to various signals including stressors. Importantly, these small membrane fragments can interact with various cell types by delivering bioactive molecules. The present studies were designed to test if UVB radiation can generate MVP release from epithelial cells, and the potential role of PAF receptor (PAF-R) signaling in this process. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation of the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT resulted in the release of MVPs. Similarly, treatment of HaCaT cells with the PAF-R agonist carbamoyl PAF also generated equivalent amounts of MVP release. Of note, pretreatment of HaCaT cells with antioxidants blocked MVP release from UVB but not PAF-R agonist N-methyl carbamyl PAF (CPAF). Importantly, UVB irradiation of the PAF-R-negative human epithelial cell line KB and KB transduced with functional PAF-Rs resulted in MVP release only in PAF-R-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that UVB can generate MVPs in vitro and that PAF-R signaling appears important in this process. PMID:26876152

  17. [Mechanism of production and release of tumor necrosis factor implicated in inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hide, Izumi

    2003-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine involved in many pathophysiological conditions including rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Despite recent evidence regarding signal transduction via TNF receptor and its biological actions, the mechanism of TNF release remains poorly understood. To clarify how production and release of TNF are regulated, we focused on mast cells and microglia which are involved in allergic inflammation and brain damage or recovery, respectively. In RBL-2H3 mast cells, anti-allergic drugs including azelastine inhibited the release of TNF more potently than degranulation in response to antigen or ionomycin. It was also demonstrated that TNF releasing steps are regulated via the PKC alpha-dependent pathway. Furthermore, Rho GTPases, possibly Rac, were shown to be involved in antigen-induced TNF transcription through activating PKC beta I. In cultured rat brain microglia, we found that extracellular ATP triggers the release of TNF via the P2X7 receptor. ERK and JNK are also involved in ATP-induced TNF transcription, while p38 regulates the transport of TNF mRNA from the nucleus to the cytosol. Additionally, JNK and p38, but not ERK, are activated via the P2X7 receptor. A better understanding of the specific pathways that regulate TNF release for each effector cell may offer further possible therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases. PMID:12673950

  18. Neutrophil chemotactic factor release and neutrophil alveolitis in asbestos-exposed individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.A.; Rose, A.H.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W.

    1988-09-01

    Alveolar neutrophil accumulation occurs in asbestosis. To evaluate a possible role for release of neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) in the pathogenesis of asbestosis, spontaneous NCF release from alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in eight individuals with asbestosis, 13 asbestos-exposed individuals without asbestosis, and five control subjects has been studied. Alveolar macrophages were incubated in medium (four hours; 37 degrees C), and neutrophil responses to the supernatants were assayed in a microchemotaxis chamber. Alveolar macrophages from subjects with asbestosis released more NCF (97 +/- 19 neutrophils per high-power field (N/HPF)) than controls (3 +/- 1 N/HPF; p less than 0.01). Alveolar macrophages from individuals with asbestos exposure and increased BAL neutrophil proportions (n = 7) released more NCF (93 +/- 24 N/HPF) than individuals with asbestos exposure and normal BAL neutrophil proportions (n = 6; 11 +/- 6 N/HPF; p less than 0.02). The results show that spontaneous NCF release occurs in asbestosis and that NCF release is associated with neutrophil alveolitis in asbestos-exposed individuals without asbestosis, suggesting a pathogenic role for NCF in mediating this neutrophil alveolitis. The results of the study also suggest that the presence of crackles is a better predictor of the presence of neutrophil alveolitis than is an abnormal chest x-ray film.

  19. The influence of site factors on eucalypt growth in Karnataka

    SciTech Connect

    Dury, S.J.; Manjunath, B.E.

    1992-12-31

    The effect of site factors on the growth of E. tereticornis hybrid plantations in Karnataka, southern India, is investigated. Sites have been characterized and classified on the basis of the physical and chemical conditions of the soil, topography and climate. Growth data have been collected from two sources: permanent sample plots, to relate growth to site conditions and to detect site change over time, and fertilizer trials, to investigate which nutrients or combination of nutrients enhance growth rates. Site indices calculated from the permanent sample plots are used as the basis for relating growth rates to soil type. The lower than expected mean annual increments of the plantations, which vary between 0.2 and 7 m{sup 3} ha{sup {minus}1} yr{sup {minus}1} at six years of age, are considered to be primarily the result of water stress. Three of the areas studied have similar soil characteristics, as confirmed by discriminant analysis, but have quite different average site indices. This is shown to be related to differences in average rainfall. Practices for reducing moisture stress are therefore recommended to improve productivity. The fertilizer trials show no clear growth response to nitrogen or phosphorus; possible reasons for this are outlined. Evidence of potassium deficiency is presented. The need for a combined fertilizer/irrigation trial is discussed.

  20. Role of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factors in lymphangiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Morfoisse, Florent; Renaud, Edith; Hantelys, Fransky; Prats, Anne-Catherine; Garmy-Susini, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major condition for the induction of angiogenesis during tumor development but its role in lymphangiogenesis remains unclear. Blood and lymphatic vasculatures are stimulated by growth factors from the vascular endothelial family: the VEGFs. In this review, we investigate the role of hypoxia in the molecular regulation of synthesis of lymphangiogenic growth factors VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D. Gene expression can be regulated at transcriptional and translational levels by hypoxia. Despite strong regulation of DNA transcription induced by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), the majority of cellular stresses such as hypoxia lead to inhibition of cap-dependent translation of the mRNA, resulting in downregulation of protein synthesis. Here, we describe how translation initiation of VEGF mRNAs is induced by hypoxia through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent mechanism. Considering the implication of the lymphatic vasculature in metastatic dissemination, it seems crucial to understand the hypoxia-induced molecular regulation of lymphangiogenic growth factors to obtain new insights for cancer therapy. PMID:27308508

  1. Key roles of necroptotic factors in promoting tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinjian; Zhou, Min; Mei, Ling; Ruan, Jiaying; Hu, Qian; Peng, Jing; Su, Hang; Liao, Hong; Liu, Shanling; Liu, WeiPing; Wang, He; Huang, Qian; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-04-19

    Necroptotic factors are generally assumed to play a positive role in tumor therapy by eliminating damaged tumor cells. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, necroptotic factors RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL promote tumor growth. We demonstrate that genetic knockout of necroptotic genes RIPK1, RIPK3, or MLKL in cancer cells significantly attenuated their abilities to grow in an anchorage-independent manner. In addition, they exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity. The knockout cells also showed greatly reduced ability to form tumors in mice. Moreover, necrosulfonamide (NSA), a previously identified chemical inhibitor of necroptosis, could significantly delay tumor growth in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, we show that necroptoic factors play a significant role in maintaining the activity of NF-κB. Finally, we found that high levels of phosphorylated MLKL in human esophageal and colon cancers are associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, we conclude that pro-necroptic factors such as RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL may play a role in supporting tumor growth, and MLKL may be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26959742

  2. Key roles of necroptotic factors in promoting tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinjian; Zhou, Min; Mei, Ling; Ruan, Jiaying; Hu, Qian; Peng, Jing; Su, Hang; Liao, Hong; Liu, Shanling; Liu, WeiPing; Wang, He; Huang, Qian; Li, Fang; Li, Chuan-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Necroptotic factors are generally assumed to play a positive role in tumor therapy by eliminating damaged tumor cells. Here we show that, contrary to expectation, necroptotic factors RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL promote tumor growth. We demonstrate that genetic knockout of necroptotic genes RIPK1, RIPK3, or MLKL in cancer cells significantly attenuated their abilities to grow in an anchorage-independent manner. In addition, they exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity. The knockout cells also showed greatly reduced ability to form tumors in mice. Moreover, necrosulfonamide (NSA), a previously identified chemical inhibitor of necroptosis, could significantly delay tumor growth in a xenograft model. Mechanistically, we show that necroptoic factors play a significant role in maintaining the activity of NF-κB. Finally, we found that high levels of phosphorylated MLKL in human esophageal and colon cancers are associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, we conclude that pro-necroptic factors such as RIPK1, RIPK3, and MLKL may play a role in supporting tumor growth, and MLKL may be a promising target for cancer treatment. PMID:26959742

  3. Growth factor choice is critical for successful functionalization of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Pinkernelle, Josephine; Raffa, Vittoria; Calatayud, Maria P.; Goya, Gerado F.; Riggio, Cristina; Keilhoff, Gerburg

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) show new characteristics compared to the corresponding bulk material. These nanoscale properties make them interesting for various applications in biomedicine and life sciences. One field of application is the use of magnetic NPs to support regeneration in the nervous system. Drug delivery requires a functionalization of NPs with bio-functional molecules. In our study, we functionalized self-made PEI-coated iron oxide NPs with nerve growth factor (NGF) and glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Next, we tested the bio-functionality of NGF in a rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12) and the bio-functionality of GDNF in an organotypic spinal cord culture. Covalent binding of NGF to PEI-NPs impaired bio-functionality of NGF, but non-covalent approach differentiated PC12 cells reliably. Non-covalent binding of GDNF showed a satisfying bio-functionality of GDNF:PEI-NPs, but turned out to be unstable in conjugation to the PEI-NPs. Taken together, our study showed the importance of assessing bio-functionality and binding stability of functionalized growth factors using proper biological models. It also shows that successful functionalization of magnetic NPs with growth factors is dependent on the used binding chemistry and that it is hardly predictable. For use as therapeutics, functionalization strategies have to be reproducible and future studies are needed. PMID:26388717

  4. Role of hypoxia and vascular endothelial growth factors in lymphangiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Morfoisse, Florent; Renaud, Edith; Hantelys, Fransky; Prats, Anne-Catherine; Garmy-Susini, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is a major condition for the induction of angiogenesis during tumor development but its role in lymphangiogenesis remains unclear. Blood and lymphatic vasculatures are stimulated by growth factors from the vascular endothelial family: the VEGFs. In this review, we investigate the role of hypoxia in the molecular regulation of synthesis of lymphangiogenic growth factors VEGF-A, VEGF-C, and VEGF-D. Gene expression can be regulated at transcriptional and translational levels by hypoxia. Despite strong regulation of DNA transcription induced by hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), the majority of cellular stresses such as hypoxia lead to inhibition of cap-dependent translation of the mRNA, resulting in downregulation of protein synthesis. Here, we describe how translation initiation of VEGF mRNAs is induced by hypoxia through an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent mechanism. Considering the implication of the lymphatic vasculature in metastatic dissemination, it seems crucial to understand the hypoxia-induced molecular regulation of lymphangiogenic growth factors to obtain new insights for cancer therapy. PMID:27308508

  5. Blocking Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor Signaling Inhibits Tumor Growth, Lymphangiogenesis, and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu-Lahargue, Frédéric; Welm, Alana L.; Bouchecareilh, Marion; Alitalo, Kari; Li, Dean Y.; Bikfalvi, Andreas; Auguste, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fibroblast Growth Factor receptor (FGFR) activity plays crucial roles in tumor growth and patient survival. However, FGF (Fibroblast Growth Factor) signaling as a target for cancer therapy has been under-investigated compared to other receptor tyrosine kinases. Here, we studied the effect of FGFR signaling inhibition on tumor growth, metastasis and lymphangiogenesis by expressing a dominant negative FGFR (FGFR-2DN) in an orthotopic mouse mammary 66c14 carcinoma model. We show that FGFR-2DN-expressing 66c14 cells proliferate in vitro slower than controls. 66c14 tumor outgrowth and lung metastatic foci are reduced in mice implanted with FGFR-2DN-expressing cells, which also exhibited better overall survival. We found 66c14 cells in the lumen of tumor lymphatic vessels and in lymph nodes. FGFR-2DN-expressing tumors exhibited a decrease in VEGFR-3 (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-3) or podoplanin-positive lymphatic vessels, an increase in isolated intratumoral lymphatic endothelial cells and a reduction in VEGF-C (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-C) mRNA expression. FGFs may act in an autocrine manner as the inhibition of FGFR signaling in tumor cells suppresses VEGF-C expression in a COX-2 (cyclooxygenase-2) or HIF1-α (hypoxia-inducible factor-1 α) independent manner. FGFs may also act in a paracrine manner on tumor lymphatics by inducing expression of pro-lymphangiogenic molecules such as VEGFR-3, integrin α9, prox1 and netrin-1. Finally, in vitro lymphangiogenesis is impeded in the presence of FGFR-2DN 66c14 cells. These data confirm that both FGF and VEGF signaling are necessary for the maintenance of vascular morphogenesis and provide evidence that targeting FGFR signaling may be an interesting approach to inhibit tumor lymphangiogenesis and metastatic spread. PMID:22761819

  6. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Borges, Antonio Carlos; Santana, Ana Carolina; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7) in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization. PMID:26633538

  7. Dual Delivery of Hepatocyte and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factors via a Protease-Degradable Hydrogel Improves Cardiac Function in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Boopathy, Archana V.; Che, Pao-lin; Brown, Milton; García, Andrés J.; Davis, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (MI) caused by ischemia and reperfusion (IR) is the most common cause of cardiac dysfunction due to local cell death and a temporally regulated inflammatory response. Current therapeutics are limited by delivery vehicles that do not address spatial and temporal aspects of healing. The aim of this study was to engineer biotherapeutic delivery materials to harness endogenous cell repair to enhance myocardial repair and function. We have previously engineered poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels to present cell adhesive motifs and deliver VEGF to promote vascularization in vivo. In the current study, bioactive hydrogels with a protease-degradable crosslinker were loaded with hepatocyte and vascular endothelial growth factors (HGF and VEGF, respectively) and delivered to the infarcted myocardium of rats. Release of both growth factors was accelerated in the presence of collagenase due to hydrogel degradation. When delivered to the border zones following ischemia-reperfusion injury, there was no acute effect on cardiac function as measured by echocardiography. Over time there was a significant increase in angiogenesis, stem cell recruitment, and a decrease in fibrosis in the dual growth factor delivery group that was significant compared with single growth factor therapy. This led to an improvement in chronic function as measured by both invasive hemodynamics and echocardiography. These data demonstrate that dual growth factor release of HGF and VEGF from a bioactive hydrogel has the capacity to significantly improve cardiac remodeling and function following IR injury. PMID:23226440

  8. Preparation and features of polycaprolactone vascular grafts with the incorporated vascular endothelial growth factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevostyanova, V. V.; Khodyrevskaya, Y. I.; Glushkova, T. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-01

    The development of tissue-engineered small-diameter vascular grafts is an urgent issue in cardiovascular surgery. In this study, we assessed how the incorporation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects morphological and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) vascular grafts along with its release kinetics. Vascular grafts were prepared using two-phase electrospinning. In pursuing our aims, we performed scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated the preservation of a highly porous structure and improvement of PCL/VEGF scaffold mechanical properties as compared to PCL grafts. A prolonged VEGF release testifies the use of this construct as a scaffold for tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  9. Preparation and features of polycaprolactone vascular grafts with the incorporated vascular endothelial growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Sevostyanova, V. V. Khodyrevskaya, Y. I.; Glushkova, T. V.; Antonova, L. V.; Kudryavtseva, Y. A.; Barbarash, O. L.; Barbarash, L. S.

    2015-10-27

    The development of tissue-engineered small-diameter vascular grafts is an urgent issue in cardiovascular surgery. In this study, we assessed how the incorporation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) affects morphological and mechanical properties of polycaprolactone (PCL) vascular grafts along with its release kinetics. Vascular grafts were prepared using two-phase electrospinning. In pursuing our aims, we performed scanning electron microscopy, mechanical testing, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Our results demonstrated the preservation of a highly porous structure and improvement of PCL/VEGF scaffold mechanical properties as compared to PCL grafts. A prolonged VEGF release testifies the use of this construct as a scaffold for tissue-engineered vascular grafts.

  10. Layer-by-layer polysaccharide-coated liposomes for sustained delivery of epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Gabriel A T; Sierakowski, Maria Rita; Pontarolo, Roberto; Santos, Larissa Antoniacomi Dos; de Freitas, Rilton Alves

    2016-04-20

    A three-dimensional layer-by-layer (LbL) structure composed by xanthan and galactomannan biopolymers over dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) liposome template was proposed and characterized for protein drug delivery. The polymers and the surfactant interaction were sufficiently strong to create a LbL structure up to 8 layers, evaluated using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and zeta potential analysis. The polymer-liposome binding enthalpy was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The bilayer of biopolymer-coated liposomes with diameters of 165 (±15)nm, measured by dynamic light scattering (DLS), and ζ-potential of -4 (±13)mV. These bilayer-coated nanoparticles increased up to 5 times the sustained release of epidermal growth factor (EGF) at a first order rate of 0.005min(-1). This system could be useful for improving the release profile of low-stability drugs like EGF. PMID:26876836

  11. Antitumor effect of hepatocyte growth factor on hepatoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Tsunoda, Y; Shibusawa, M; Tsunoda, A; Gomi, A; Yatsuzuka, M; Okamatsu, T

    1998-01-01

    A six month-old girl presented with an abdominal mass, and high serum level of alpha-fetoprotein. She was diagnosed as having a well-differentiated hepatoblastoma by open biopsy. The biopsy specimen was transplanted on a nude mouse, and a xenograft was successfully established. Because the xenograft maintained the characteristics of the original tumor, the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on hepatoblastoma xenograft was investigated. Recently HGF was reported to be involved in growth, invasion, and metastasis of tumor cells. Contrary to our expectations, the treatment of hepatoblastoma xenograft with recombinant 20 ng/ml HGF produced a marked inhibition of cell growth and a suppression of producing alpha-fetoprotein. PMID:9891489

  12. A study of substrate factor on carbon nanotube forest growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, Carlos; Call, Robert; Shen, T. C.

    2010-10-01

    Carbon Nanotube Forests (CNFs) are vertically grown carbon nanotubes. They can be as tall as millimeters with radii from less than one nm (single-walled) to more than a hundred nm (multi-walled). Their high surface to volume ratio provides a unique material system for EM radiation absorption, dry adhesive and biosensor applications. There have been numerous, but not all consistent reports on successful CNF growth. We find that the optimal growth conditions depend critically on the substrate, at least by the spray pyrolysis method we have adopted. To determine the substrate factor, we have investigated two grades of copper, stainless steel, silicon and quartz as substrates on which the catalytic particles and carbon source are delivered simultaneously by a ferrocine-xylene solution. We find that the interplay of lateral and in-diffusion of the iron atoms and interactions with existing gas molecules such as H2, O2, H2O on the substrates dictate the CNF growth.

  13. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  14. Modulation of epidermal growth factor receptors by human alpha interferon.

    PubMed

    Zoon, K C; Karasaki, Y; zur Nedden, D L; Hu, R Q; Arnheiter, H

    1986-11-01

    Treatment of Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK) cells with human interferon (IFN)-alpha 2 at 37 degrees C results in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth and a reduction of the subsequent binding of 125I-labeled epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 4 degrees C. Human IFN-beta and -gamma, which exhibit little antiviral and antiproliferative activities on MDBK cells, have little effect on cell growth or the binding of 125I-labeled EGF to these cells. The binding of EGF is decreased after exposure to IFN-alpha for greater than 8 hr. Scatchard analyses of the EGF binding data indicate that a 20-hr exposure period results in a decrease in the apparent number of cell-surface EGF receptors and a reduction in the affinity of EGF for its receptor. The rate of internalization of EGF by MDBK cells does not appear to be affected by IFN treatment. PMID:3095830

  15. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors.

    PubMed

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Langenecker, Tobias; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Barneche, Fredy; Weigel, Detlef; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Becker, Claude

    2015-11-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  16. Plants Release Precursors of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors to Suppress Growth of Competitors[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Venturelli, Sascha; Belz, Regina G.; Kämper, Andreas; Berger, Alexander; von Horn, Kyra; Wegner, André; Böcker, Alexander; Zabulon, Gérald; Barneche, Fredy; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Bitzer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To secure their access to water, light, and nutrients, many plant species have developed allelopathic strategies to suppress competitors. To this end, they release into the rhizosphere phytotoxic substances that inhibit the germination and growth of neighbors. Despite the importance of allelopathy in shaping natural plant communities and for agricultural production, the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we report that allelochemicals derived from the common class of cyclic hydroxamic acid root exudates directly affect the chromatin-modifying machinery in Arabidopsis thaliana. These allelochemicals inhibit histone deacetylases both in vitro and in vivo and exert their activity through locus-specific alterations of histone acetylation and associated gene expression. Our multilevel analysis collectively shows how plant-plant interactions interfere with a fundamental cellular process, histone acetylation, by targeting an evolutionarily highly conserved class of enzymes. PMID:26530086

  17. Insulin-like growth factor- I and factors affecting it in thalassemia major

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Ashraf T.; Sanctis, Vincenzo De; Elalaily, Rania; Yassin, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Despite improvement of blood transfusion regimens and iron chelation therapy growth and maturational delay, cardiomyopathy, endocrinopathies and osteoporosis still occur in good number of thalassemic patients. Decreased IGF-1 secretion occurs in the majority of the thalassemic patients particularly those with growth and pubertal delay. Many factors contribute to this decreased synthesis of IGF-I including disturbed growth hormone (GH) - insulin-like growth factor - I (IGF-I) axis. The possible factors contributing to low IGF-I synthesis in thalassemia and the possible interaction between low IGF-I secretion and the occurrence of these complications is discussed in this mini-review. Improvement of IGF-I secretion in thalassemic patients should be intended to improve linear growth and bone mineral accretion in thalassemic patients. This can be attained through adequate correction of anemia and proper chelation, nutritional supplementation (increasing caloric intake), correction of vitamin D and zinc deficiencies, induction of puberty and correction of hypogonadism at the proper time and treating GH deficiency. This review paper provides a summary of the current state of knowledge regarding IGF-I and factors affecting it in patients with thalassaemia major (TM). Search on PubMed and reference lists of articles with the term ‘IGF-I, GH, growth, thalassemia, thyroxine, anemia, vitamin D, and zinc’ was carried out. A hundred and forty-eight articles were found and used in the write up and the data analyzed was included in this report. PMID:25729686

  18. Effects of medium flow on axon growth with or without nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Kumamoto, Junichi; Kitahata, Hiroyuki; Goto, Makiko; Nagayama, Masaharu; Denda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-09-11

    Axon growth is a crucial process in regeneration of damaged nerves. On the other hand, elongation of nerve fibers in the epidermis has been observed in skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Thus, regulation of nerve fiber extension might be an effective strategy to accelerate nerve regeneration and/or to reduce itching in pruritus dermatosis. We previously demonstrated that neurons and epidermal keratinocytes similarly contain multiple receptors that are activated by various environmental factors, and in particular, keratinocytes are influenced by shear stress. Thus, in the present study, we evaluated the effects of micro-flow of the medium on axon growth in the presence or absence of nerve growth factor (NGF), using cultured dorsal-root-ganglion (DRG) cells. The apparatus, AXIS™, consists of two chambers connected by a set of microgrooves, through which signaling molecules and axons, but not living cells, can pass. When DRG cells were present in chamber 1, NGF was present in chamber 2, and micro-flow was directed from chamber 1 to chamber 2, axon growth was significantly increased compared with other conditions. Acceleration of axon growth in the direction of the micro-flow was also observed in the absence of NGF. These results suggest that local micro-flow might significantly influence axon growth. PMID:26212442

  19. The hypothalamic-pituitary response in SLE. Regulation of prolactin, growth hormone and cortisol release.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Blazícková, S; Rauová, L; Jezová, D; Koska, J; Lukác, J; Vigas, M

    1998-01-01

    It has been suggested that neuroendocrine regulation plays an important role in the pathogenesis and activation of autoimmune diseases. The aim of this investigation was to clarify the hypothalamic-pituitary response to a well-defined stimulus under standardised conditions in patients with SLE. Plasma concentrations of prolactin (PRL), growth hormone (GH) and cortisol were determined in venous blood drawn through an indwelling cannula during insulin-induced hypoglycaemia (0.1 U/kg b.w., i.v.) in ten patients and in 12 age-, gender- and weight-matched healthy subjects. Basal PRL concentrations were higher in patients vs healthy controls (12 vs 6 ng/ml, P < 0.01), though still within the physiological range. Insulin-induced plasma PRL and GH were significantly increased both in patients and healthy subjects; however, the increments or areas under the curves were not different in the two groups. Plasma cortisol response showed moderate attenuation in patients. Sensitivity of pituitary lactotrothrops to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) administration (200 microg, i.v.) was the same in patients and control subjects. In SLE patients with low activity of the disease the sensitivity of pituitary PRL release to TRH administration remained unchanged. The hypothalamic response to stress stimulus (hypoglycaemia) was comparable in patients and healthy subjects. PMID:9736325

  20. Thyroid Hormone and Estrogen Regulate Exercise-Induced Growth Hormone Release

    PubMed Central

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S. Silvestre, Diego H.; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  1. Thyroid hormone and estrogen regulate exercise-induced growth hormone release.

    PubMed

    Ignacio, Daniele Leão; da S Silvestre, Diego H; Cavalcanti-de-Albuquerque, João Paulo Albuquerque; Louzada, Ruy Andrade; Carvalho, Denise P; Werneck-de-Castro, João Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) regulates whole body metabolism, and physical exercise is the most potent stimulus to induce its secretion in humans. The mechanisms underlying GH secretion after exercise remain to be defined. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of estrogen and pituitary type 1 deiodinase (D1) activation on exercise-induced GH secretion. Ten days after bilateral ovariectomy, animals were submitted to 20 min of treadmill exercise at 75% of maximum aerobic capacity and tissues were harvested immediately or 30 min after exercise. Non-exercised animals were used as controls. A significant increase in D1 activity occurred immediately after exercise (~60%) in sham-operated animals and GH was higher (~6-fold) 30 min after exercise. Estrogen deficient rats exhibited basal levels of GH and D1 activity comparable to those found in control rats. However, after exercise both D1 activity and serum GH levels were blunted compared to sedentary rats. To understand the potential cause-effect of D1 activation in exercise-induced GH release, we pharmacologically blocked D1 activity by propylthiouracil (PTU) injection into intact rats and submitted them to the acute exercise session. D1 inhibition blocked exercise-induced GH secretion, although basal levels were unaltered. In conclusion, estrogen deficiency impairs the induction of thyroid hormone activating enzyme D1 in the pituitary, and GH release by acute exercise. Also, acute D1 activation is essential for exercise-induced GH response. PMID:25874614

  2. Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 in Long-Duration Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bokhari, R.; Zwart, S. R.; Fields, E.; Heer, M.; Sibonga, J.; Smith, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many nutritional factors influence bone, from the basics of calcium and vitamin D, to factors which influence bone through acid/base balance, including protein, sodium, and more. Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a recently identified factor, secreted from osteocytes, which is involved in classic (albeit complex) feedback loops controlling phosphorus homeostasis through both vitamin D and parathyroid hormone (PTH) (1, 2). As osteocytes are gravity sensing cells, it is important to determine if there are changes in FGF23 during spaceflight. In extreme cases, such as chronic kidney disease, FGF23 levels are highly elevated. FGF23 imbalances, secondary to dietary influences, may contribute to skeletal demineralization and kidney stone risk during spaceflight.

  3. Effects of epidermal growth factor-loaded mucoadhesive films on wounded oral tissue rafts.

    PubMed

    Ramineni, Sandeep K; Fowler, Craig B; Fisher, Paul D; Cunningham, Larry L; Puleo, David A

    2015-02-01

    Current treatments for traumatic oral mucosal wounds include the gold standard of autologous tissue and alternative tissue-engineered grafts. While use of autografts has disadvantages of minimal availability of oral keratinized tissue, second surgery, and donor site discomfort, tissue-engineered grafts are limited by their unavailability as off-the-shelf products owing to their fabrication time of 4-8 weeks. Hence, the current work aimed to develop a potentially cost-effective, readily available device capable of enhancing native mucosal regeneration. Considering the key role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in promoting mucosal wound regeneration and the advantages of mucoadhesive delivery systems, mucoadhesive films composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone and carboxymethylcellulose were developed to provide sustained release of EGF for a minimum of 6 h. Bioactivity of released EGF supernatants was then confirmed by its ability to promote proliferation of BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Efficacy of the developed system was then investigated in vitro using buccal tissues (ORL 300-FT) as a potential replacement for small animal studies. Although the mucoadhesive films achieved their desired role of delivering bioactive EGF in a sustained manner, treatment with EGF, irrespective of its release from the films or solubilized in medium, caused a hyperparakeratotic response from in vitro tissues with distinguishable histological features including thickening of the spinous layer, intra- and intercellular edema, and pyknotic nuclei. These significant morphological changes were associated with no improvements in wound closure. These observations raise questions about the potential of using in vitro tissues as a wound healing model and substitute for small animal studies. The mucoadhesive delivery system developed, however, with its potential for sustained release of bioactive growth factors and small molecules, may be loaded with other desired compounds, with or without EGF, to accelerate

  4. Effects of Epidermal Growth Factor-Loaded Mucoadhesive Films on Wounded Oral Tissue Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ramineni, Sandeep K.; Fowler, Craig B.; Fisher, Paul D.; Cunningham, Larry L.; Puleo, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Current treatments for traumatic oral mucosal wounds include the gold standard of autologous tissue and alternative tissue engineered grafts. While use of autografts has disadvantages of minimal availability of oral keratinized tissue, second surgery, and donor site discomfort, tissue engineered grafts are limited by their unavailability as off-the-shelf products owing to their fabrication time of 4–8 weeks. Hence, the current work aimed to develop a potentially cost-effective, readily available device capable of enhancing native mucosal regeneration. Considering the key role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in promoting mucosal wound regeneration and the advantages of mucoadhesive delivery systems, mucoadhesive films composed of polyvinylpyrrolidone and carboxymethylcellulose were developed to provide sustained release of EGF for minimum of 6 hours. Bioactivity of released EGF supernatants was then confirmed by its ability to promote proliferation of BALB/3T3 fibroblasts. Efficacy of the developed system was then investigated in vitro using buccal tissues (ORL 300-FT) as a potential replacement for small animal studies. Although the mucoadhesive films achieved their desired role of delivering bioactive EGF in a sustained manner, treatment with EGF, irrespective of its release from the films or solubilized in medium, caused a hyperparakeratotic response from in vitro tissues with distinguishable histological features including thickening of the spinous layer, intra- and intercellular edema, and pyknotic nuclei. These significant morphological changes were associated with no improvements in wound closure. These observations raise questions about the potential of using in vitro tissues as a wound healing model and substitute for small animal studies. The mucoadhesive delivery system developed, however, with its potential for sustained release of bioactive growth factors and small molecules, may be loaded with other desired compounds, with or without EGF, to

  5. Adipocytokines, gut hormones and growth factors in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Kowalska, Irina; Karczewska-Kupczewska, Monika; Strączkowski, Marek

    2011-09-18

    Anorexia nervosa is a complex eating disorder of unknown etiology which affects adolescent girls and young women and leads to chronic malnutrition. Clinical manifestations of prolonged semistarvation include a variety of physical features and psychiatric disorders. The study of different biological factors involved in the pathophysiology of anorexia nervosa is an area of active interest. In this review we have described the role of adipocytokines, neurotrophins, peptides of the gastrointestinal system and growth factors in appetite regulation, energy balance and insulin sensitivity in anorexia nervosa patients. PMID:21699889

  6. Nerve Growth Factor: A Focus on Neuroscience and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Omar Balzamino, Bijorn; Micera, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is the firstly discovered and best characterized neurotrophic factor, known to play a critical protective role in the development and survival of sympathetic, sensory and forebrain cholinergic neurons. NGF promotes neuritis outgrowth both in vivo and in vitro and nerve cell recovery after ischemic, surgical or chemical injuries. Recently, the therapeutic property of NGF has been demonstrated on human cutaneous and corneal ulcers, pressure ulcer, glaucoma, maculopathy and retinitis pigmentosa. NGF eye drops administration is well tolerated, with no detectable clinical evidence of systemic or local adverse effects. The aim of this review is to summarize these biological properties and the potential clinical development of NGF. PMID:26411962

  7. EGF: new tricks for an old growth factor.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G

    1993-04-01

    During the past year, the biology of epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been investigated in lower organisms (Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila and bacteria). These experiments have produced some surprising results: the identification of defects produced by mutation of EGF-like genes; the role of EGF receptors in bacterial invasion; and the role of EGF-like precursors as receptors for a bacteria toxin. PMID:8507498

  8. Harnessing endogenous growth factor activity modulates stem cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hudalla, Gregory A.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Koepsel, Justin T.; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of specific serum-borne biomolecules (e.g. heparin) on growth factor-dependent cell behavior is often difficult to elucidate in traditional cell culture due to the random, non-specific nature of biomolecule adsorption from serum. We hypothesized that chemically well-defined cell culture substrates could be used to study the influence of sequestered heparin on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) behavior. Specifically, we used bio-inert self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) chemically modified with a bioinspired heparin-binding peptide (termed “HEPpep”) and an integrin-binding peptide (RGDSP) as stem cell culture substrates. Our results demonstrate that purified heparin binds to HEPpep SAMs in a dose-dependent manner, and serum-borne heparin binds specifically and in a dose-dependent manner to HEPpep SAMs. These heparin-sequestering SAMs enhance hMSC proliferation by amplifying endogenous fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and enhance hMSC osteogenic differentiation by amplifying endogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. The effects of heparin-sequestering are similar to the effects of supraphysiologic concentrations of recombinant FGF-2. hMSC phenotype is maintained over multiple population doublings on heparin-sequestering substrates in growth medium, while hMSC osteogenic differentiation is enhanced in a bone morphogenetic protein-dependent manner on the same substrates during culture in osteogenic induction medium. Together, these observations demonstrate that the influence of the substrate on stem cell phenotype is sensitive to the culture medium formulation. Our results also demonstrate that enhanced hMSC proliferation can be spatially localized by patterning the location of HEPpep on the substrate. Importantly, the use of chemically well-defined SAMs in this study eliminated the confounding factor of random, non-specific biomolecule adsorption, and identified serum-borne heparin as a key mediator of hMSC response to endogenous

  9. Cytokines and growth factors cross-link heparan sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Migliorini, Elisa; Thakar, Dhruv; Kühnle, Jens; Sadir, Rabia; Dyer, Douglas P.; Li, Yong; Sun, Changye; Volkman, Brian F.; Handel, Tracy M.; Coche-Guerente, Liliane; Fernig, David G.; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Richter, Ralf P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycosaminoglycan heparan sulfate (HS), present at the surface of most cells and ubiquitous in extracellular matrix, binds many soluble extracellular signalling molecules such as chemokines and growth factors, and regulates their transport and effector functions. It is, however, unknown whether upon binding HS these proteins can affect the long-range structure of HS. To test this idea, we interrogated a supramolecular model system, in which HS chains grafted to streptavidin-functionalized oligoethylene glycol monolayers or supported lipid bilayers mimic the HS-rich pericellular or extracellular matrix, with the biophysical techniques quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). We were able to control and characterize the supramolecular presentation of HS chains—their local density, orientation, conformation and lateral mobility—and their interaction with proteins. The chemokine CXCL12α (or SDF-1α) rigidified the HS film, and this effect was due to protein-mediated cross-linking of HS chains. Complementary measurements with CXCL12α mutants and the CXCL12γ isoform provided insight into the molecular mechanism underlying cross-linking. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2), which has three HS binding sites, was also found to cross-link HS, but FGF-9, which has just one binding site, did not. Based on these data, we propose that the ability to cross-link HS is a generic feature of many cytokines and growth factors, which depends on the architecture of their HS binding sites. The ability to change matrix organization and physico-chemical properties (e.g. permeability and rigidification) implies that the functions of cytokines and growth factors may not simply be confined to the activation of cognate cellular receptors. PMID:26269427

  10. Fibrochondrogenesis of hESCs: growth factor combinations and cocultures.

    PubMed

    Hoben, Gwendolyn M; Willard, Vincent P; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2009-03-01

    The successful differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to fibrochondrocyte-like cells and characterization of these differentiated cells is a critical step toward tissue engineering of musculoskeletal fibrocartilages (e.g., knee meniscus, temporomandibular joint disc, and intervertebral disc). In this study, growth factors and primary cell cocultures were applied to hESC embryoid bodies (EBs) for 3 weeks and evaluated for their effect on the synthesis of critical fibrocartilage matrix components: glycosaminoglycans (GAG) and collagens (types I, II, and VI). Changes in surface markers (CD105, CD44, SSEA, PDGFR alpha) after the differentiation treatments were also analyzed. The study was conducted in three phases: (1) examination of growth factors (TGF-beta 3, BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-6, PDGF-BB, sonic hedgehog protein); (2) comparison of two cocultures (primary chondrocytes or fibrochondrocytes); and (3) the combination of the most effective growth factor and coculture regimen. TGF-beta 3 with BMP-4 yielded EBs positive for collagens I, II, and VI, with up to 6.7- and 4.8-fold increases in GAG and collagen, respectively. Analysis of cell surface markers showed a significant increase in CD44 with the TGF-beta 3 + BMP-4 treatment compared to the controls. Coculture with fibrochondrocytes resulted in up to a 9.8-fold increase in collagen II production. The combination of the growth factors BMP-4 + TGF-beta 3 with the fibrochondrocyte coculture led to an increase in cell proliferation and GAG production compared to either treatment alone. This study determined two powerful treatments for inducing fibrocartilaginous differentiation of hESCs and provides a foundation for using flow cytometry to purify these differentiated cells. PMID:18454697

  11. An evaluation of carrier agents for desferoxamine, an up-regulator of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Hertzberg, Brian P; Holt, Joshua B; Graff, Ronald D; Gilbert, Shawn R; Dahners, Laurence E

    2013-05-01

    Avascularity and hypoxia result in avascular necrosis and play a negative role in fracture healing. The FDA-approved iron chelating agent, desferoxamine (DFO) in a liquid form, has been shown to induce angiogenesis and improve fracture healing through upregulation of the vascular endothelial growth factor. We were concerned that local injection of DFO would either fail to adequately deliver sufficient drug to the desired site or lead to undesired delivery to adjacent sites. Therefore, a sustained release delivery system was desirable to direct DFO to the intended site. Calcium sulfate pellets, collagen sponges, and demineralized cortical bone matrix were all evaluated as potentially controlled release systems for DFO using a fetal mouse metatarsal angiogenesis assay. Angiogenesis was analyzed using a vascularity grading scale, by measuring the mean vessel length of the 5 longest vessels, and by counting the mean number of vessels per metatarsal. Although there was some evidence of angiogenesis with all three carriers, DFO loaded CaSO4 pellets increased vascularity grading, the mean length of the five longest vessels, and the mean number of vessels, all by statistically significant margins versus the control. These results suggest that CaSO4 pellets could be used as a viable, nontoxic, controlled release system for DFO in clinical situations where increased angiogenesis and bone growth are desirable. PMID:22262572

  12. Skeletal effects of growth hormone and insulin-like growth factor-I therapy.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Richard C; Mohan, Subburaman

    2016-09-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (GH/IGF) axis is critically important for the regulation of bone formation, and deficiencies in this system have been shown to contribute to the development of osteoporosis and other diseases of low bone mass. The GH/IGF axis is regulated by a complex set of hormonal and local factors which can act to regulate this system at the level of the ligands, receptors, IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs), or IGFBP proteases. A combination of in vitro studies, transgenic animal models, and clinical human investigations has provided ample evidence of the importance of the endocrine and local actions of both GH and IGF-I, the two major components of the GH/IGF axis, in skeletal growth and maintenance. GH- and IGF-based therapies provide a useful avenue of approach for the prevention and treatment of diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:26408965

  13. Nerve growth factor-induced migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Jean-Pierre; Rezvan, Amir; Allen, Fred D; Lazarovici, Philip; Lelkes, Peter I

    2005-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a well known neurotropic and neurotrophic agonist in the nervous system, which recently was shown to also induce angiogenic effects in endothelial cells (ECs). To measure NGF effects on the migration of cultured ECs, an important step in neoangiogenesis, we optimized an omnidirectional migration assay using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and validated the assay with human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) and human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF). The potencies of nerve growth factor purified from various species (viper, mouse, and recombinant human) to stimulate HAEC migration was similar to that of VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) (EC50 of approximately 0.5 ng/ml). Recombinant human bFGF was significantly more efficacious than either viper NGF or rhVEGF, both of which stimulated HAEC migration by approximately 30% over basal spontaneous migration. NGF-mediated stimulation of HAEC migration was completely blocked by the NGF/TrkA receptor antagonist K252a [(8R*,9S*,11S*)-(/)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-2,3,9,10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy-1H,-8H,11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo(a,g)cycloocta(c,d,e)trindene-1-one] (30 nM) but not by the VEGF/Flk receptor antagonist SU-5416 [3-[(2,4-dimethylpyrrol-5-yl) methylidenyl]-indolin-2-one] (250 nM), indicating a direct effect of NGF via TrkA receptor activation on HAEC migration. Viper NGF stimulation of HAEC migration was additively increased by either rhVEGF or rhbFGF, suggesting a potentiating interaction between their tyrosine kinase receptor signaling pathways. Viper NGF represents a novel pharmacological tool to investigate possible TrkA receptor subtypes in endothelial cells. The ability of NGF to stimulate migration of HAEC cells in vitro implies that this factor may play an important role in the cardiovascular system besides its well known effects in the nervous system. PMID:16123305

  14. Bilirubin release induced by tumor necrosis factor in combination with galactosamine is toxic to mice.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, W; Libert, C

    2003-08-01

    Application of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in combination with galactosamine (GalN) in mice causes severe apoptosis of hepatocytes, resulting in complete destruction of the liver. Administration of high levels of unconjugated bilirubin and abnormally high production of unconjugated bilirubin have been reported to cause liver damage and are associated with several human pathologies. Serum alanine aminotransferase as well as total and direct bilirubin levels in mice were determined. Bilirubin levels are shown to significantly increase after a challenge with TNF/GalN in mice. Pretreatment with a heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor significantly prevents this release in bilirubin and offers significant protection against TNF/GalN-induced lethality. A correlation between the release of unconjugated bilirubin and the toxicity accompanied with this release is provided. PMID:12906872

  15. Angiogenesis and antifibrotic action by hepatocyte growth factor in cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, Yoshiaki; Morishita, Ryuichi; Aoki, Motokuni; Hiraoka, Kazuya; Yamasaki, Keita; Hashiya, Naotaka; Matsumoto, Kunio; Nakamura, Toshikazu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Ogihara, Toshio

    2002-07-01

    Impairment of cardiac function in cardiomyopathy has been postulated to be related to decreased blood blow and increased collagen synthesis. Therefore, a therapeutic approach to alter the blood flow or fibrosis directly by means of growth factors may open a new therapeutic concept in dilated cardiomyopathy. From this viewpoint, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a unique growth factor with antifibrosis and angiogenesis effects. Using the hereditary cardiomy