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Sample records for growth factor-induced cell

  1. Nerve growth factor-induced migration of endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Dollé, Jean-Pierre; Rezvan, Amir; Allen, Fred D; Lazarovici, Philip; Lelkes, Peter I

    2005-12-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a well known neurotropic and neurotrophic agonist in the nervous system, which recently was shown to also induce angiogenic effects in endothelial cells (ECs). To measure NGF effects on the migration of cultured ECs, an important step in neoangiogenesis, we optimized an omnidirectional migration assay using human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) and validated the assay with human recombinant basic fibroblast growth factor (rhbFGF) and human recombinant vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF). The potencies of nerve growth factor purified from various species (viper, mouse, and recombinant human) to stimulate HAEC migration was similar to that of VEGF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) (EC50 of approximately 0.5 ng/ml). Recombinant human bFGF was significantly more efficacious than either viper NGF or rhVEGF, both of which stimulated HAEC migration by approximately 30% over basal spontaneous migration. NGF-mediated stimulation of HAEC migration was completely blocked by the NGF/TrkA receptor antagonist K252a [(8R*,9S*,11S*)-(/)-9-hydroxy-9-methoxycarbonyl-8-methyl-2,3,9,10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy-1H,-8H,11H-2,7b,11a-triazadibenzo(a,g)cycloocta(c,d,e)trindene-1-one] (30 nM) but not by the VEGF/Flk receptor antagonist SU-5416 [3-[(2,4-dimethylpyrrol-5-yl) methylidenyl]-indolin-2-one] (250 nM), indicating a direct effect of NGF via TrkA receptor activation on HAEC migration. Viper NGF stimulation of HAEC migration was additively increased by either rhVEGF or rhbFGF, suggesting a potentiating interaction between their tyrosine kinase receptor signaling pathways. Viper NGF represents a novel pharmacological tool to investigate possible TrkA receptor subtypes in endothelial cells. The ability of NGF to stimulate migration of HAEC cells in vitro implies that this factor may play an important role in the cardiovascular system besides its well known effects in the nervous system. PMID:16123305

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 strongly potentiates growth factor-induced proliferation of mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Montesano, Roberto Sarkoezi, Rita; Schramek, Herbert

    2008-09-12

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are multifunctional cytokines that elicit pleiotropic effects on biological processes such as cell proliferation, cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. With respect to cell proliferation, BMPs can exert either mitogenic or anti-mitogenic activities, depending on the target cells and their context. Here, we report that in low-density cultures of immortalized mammary epithelial cells, BMP-4 did not stimulate cell proliferation by itself. However, when added in combination with suboptimal concentrations of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, FGF-7, FGF-10, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), BMP-4 potently enhanced growth factor-induced cell proliferation. These results reveal a hitherto unsuspected interplay between BMP-4 and growth factors in the regulation of mammary epithelial cell proliferation. We suggest that the ability of BMP-4 to potentiate the mitogenic activity of multiple growth factors may contribute to mammary gland ductal morphogenesis as well as to breast cancer progression.

  3. Quercetin 3-O-glucoside suppresses epidermal growth factor-induced migration by inhibiting EGFR signaling in pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungwhoi; Han, Song-I; Yun, Jeong-Hun; Kim, Jae Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most dangerous cancers and is associated with a grave prognosis. Despite increased knowledge of the complex signaling networks responsible for progression of pancreatic cancer, many challenging therapies have fallen short of expectations. In this study, we examined the anti-migratory effect of quercetin 3-O-glucoside in epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration by inhibiting EGF receptor (EGFR) signaling in several human pancreatic cancer cell lines. Treatment with quercetin, quercetin 3-O-glucoside, and quercetin 7-O-glucoside differentially suppressed epidermal growth factor-induced migration activity of human pancreatic cancer cells. In particular, quercetin 3-O-glucoside strongly inhibited the infiltration activity of pancreatic cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, quercetin 3-O-glucoside exerted the anti-migratory effect even at a relatively low dose compared with other forms of quercetin. The anti-tumor effects of quercetin 3-O-glucoside were mediated by selectively inhibiting the EGFR-mediated FAK, AKT, MEK1/2, and ERK1/2 signaling pathway. Combinatorial treatment with quercetin 3-O-glucoside plus gemcitabine showed the synergistic anti-migratory effect on epidermal growth factor-induced cell migration in human pancreatic cancer cell lines. These results suggest that quercetin 3-O-glucoside has potential for anti-metastatic therapy in human pancreatic cancer. PMID:26109002

  4. Growth factor induced proliferation, migration, and lumen formation of rat endometrial epithelial cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Rashedul; Yamagami, Kazuki; Yoshii, Yuka; Yamauchi, Nobuhiko

    2016-06-17

    Endometrial modulation is essential for the preservation of normal uterine physiology, and this modulation is driven by a number of growth factors. The present study investigated the mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on rat endometrial epithelial (REE) cells. The REE cells were isolated and cultured and then characterized based on their morphology and their expression of epithelial cell markers. The MTT assay revealed that EGF and HGF induce proliferation of REE cells. Consistent with increased proliferation, we found that the cell cycle regulatory factor Cyclin D1 was also upregulated upon EGF and HGF addition. REE cell migration was prompted by EGF, as observed with the Oris Cell Migration Assay. The morphogenic impact of growth factors on REE cells was studied in a three-dimensional BD Matrigel cell culture system, wherein these growth factors also increased the frequency of lumen formation. In summary, we show that EGF and HGF have a stimulatory effect on REE cells, promoting proliferation, cell migration, and lumen formation. Our findings provide important insights that further the understanding of endometrial regeneration and its regulation. PMID:26946922

  5. Growth factor induced proliferation, migration, and lumen formation of rat endometrial epithelial cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    ISLAM, Md. Rashedul; YAMAGAMI, Kazuki; YOSHII, Yuka; YAMAUCHI, Nobuhiko

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial modulation is essential for the preservation of normal uterine physiology, and this modulation is driven by a number of growth factors. The present study investigated the mitogenic, motogenic, and morphogenic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) on rat endometrial epithelial (REE) cells. The REE cells were isolated and cultured and then characterized based on their morphology and their expression of epithelial cell markers. The MTT assay revealed that EGF and HGF induce proliferation of REE cells. Consistent with increased proliferation, we found that the cell cycle regulatory factor Cyclin D1 was also upregulated upon EGF and HGF addition. REE cell migration was prompted by EGF, as observed with the Oris Cell Migration Assay. The morphogenic impact of growth factors on REE cells was studied in a three-dimensional BD Matrigel cell culture system, wherein these growth factors also increased the frequency of lumen formation. In summary, we show that EGF and HGF have a stimulatory effect on REE cells, promoting proliferation, cell migration, and lumen formation. Our findings provide important insights that further the understanding of endometrial regeneration and its regulation. PMID:26946922

  6. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  7. Keratinocyte growth factor induces proliferation of hepatocytes and epithelial cells throughout the rat gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed Central

    Housley, R M; Morris, C F; Boyle, W; Ring, B; Biltz, R; Tarpley, J E; Aukerman, S L; Devine, P L; Whitehead, R H; Pierce, G F

    1994-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, was identified as a specific keratinocyte mitogen after isolation from a lung fibroblast line. Recently, recombinant (r)KGF was found to influence proliferation and differentiation patterns of multiple epithelial cell lineages within skin, lung, and the reproductive tract. In the present study, we designed experiments to identify additional target tissues, and focused on the rat gastrointestinal (GI) system, since a putative receptor, K-sam, was originally identified in a gastric carcinoma. Expression of KGF receptor and KGF mRNA was detected within the entire GI tract, suggesting the gut both synthesized and responded to KGF. Therefore, rKGF was administered to adult rats and was found to induce markedly increased proliferation of epithelial cells from the foregut to the colon, and of hepatocytes, one day after systemic treatment. Daily treatment resulted in the marked selective induction of mucin-producing cell lineages throughout the GI tract in a dose-dependent fashion. Other cell lineages were either unaffected (e.g., Paneth cells), or relatively decreased (e.g., parietal cells, enterocytes) in rKGF-treated rats. The direct effect of rKGF was confirmed by demonstrating markedly increased carcinoembryonic antigen production in a human colon carcinoma cell line, LIM1899. Serum levels of albumin were specifically and significantly elevated after daily treatment. These results demonstrate rKGF can induce epithelial cell activation throughout the GI tract and liver. Further, endogenous KGF may be a normal paracrine mediator of growth within the gut. Images PMID:7962522

  8. Live cell imaging shows hepatocyte growth factor-induced Met dimerization.

    PubMed

    Koschut, David; Richert, Ludovic; Pace, Giuseppina; Niemann, Hartmut H; Mély, Yves; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique

    2016-07-01

    The canonical model of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation assumes that ligand-induced dimerization of inactive receptor monomers is a prerequisite for autophosphorylation. For several RTK families, recent results of fluorescence microscopy provided evidence for preformed receptor dimers that may or may not require ligand binding for kinase activity. Here we report, for the first time, the application of advanced quantitative fluorescence microscopy techniques to study changes in the oligomerization state of the RTK Met in response to stimulation by its endogenous ligand hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). We used inducible C-terminal fusions between Met and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or red fluorescent protein (RFP) in combination with fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based fluorescence-lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). A small fraction of HGF-independent Met dimers appeared to be present in cells even at low receptor density. At high receptor density, both the fraction of Met dimers and the level of Met autophosphorylation increased in the absence of HGF. Stimulation with HGF at low receptor density significantly increased the fraction of Met dimers on live cells. We found no indications of Met oligomers larger than dimers. Our findings thus confirm a model of Met activation through HGF-induced dimerization and at the same time they support previous reports of Met dimers in unstimulated cells. The tools established in this work will be useful to further characterize the mechanism of Met activation and to define the contribution of co-receptors. PMID:27094128

  9. Knockdown of stromal interaction molecule 1 attenuates hepatocyte growth factor-induced endothelial progenitor cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yankun; Song, Mingbao; Guo, Ruiwei; Wang, Hong; Gao, Pan; Shi, Weibin; Huang, Lan

    2010-03-01

    Increased Ca(2+) entry through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCCs) plays an essential role in the regulation of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced cell proliferation. Stromal interaction molecule 1 (STIM1) is thought to transmit endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca(2+) store depletion signals to the plasma membrane (PM), causing the opening of SOCCs in the PM. However, the relationship between HGF and STIM1 in endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) proliferation remains uncharacterized. The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential involvement of STIM1 in HGF-induced EPC proliferation. For this purpose, we used cultured rat bone marrow-derived EPCs and found that HGF-induced EPC proliferation at low concentrations. Store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) was elevated in HGF-treated EPCs, and the SOCC inhibitors 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) and BTP-2 inhibited the HGF-induced proliferation response. Moreover, STIM1 mRNA and protein expression levels were increased in response to HGF stimulation and knockdown of STMI1 decreased SOCE and prevented HGF-induced EPC proliferation. In conclusion, our data suggest that HGF-induced EPC proliferation is mediated partly via activation of STIM1. PMID:20404049

  10. Hepatic nerve growth factor induced by iron overload triggers defenestration in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Addo, Lynda; Tanaka, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Masayo; Toki, Yasumichi; Ito, Satoshi; Ikuta, Katsuya; Sasaki, Katsunori; Ohtake, Takaaki; Torimoto, Yoshihiro; Fujiya, Mikihiro; Kohgo, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The fenestrations of liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) play important roles in the exchange of macromolecules, solutes, and fluid between blood and surrounding liver tissues in response to hepatotoxic drugs, toxins, and oxidative stress. As excess iron is a hepatotoxin, LSECs may be affected by excess iron. In this study, we found a novel link between LSEC defenestration and hepatic nerve growth factor (NGF) in iron-overloaded mice. By Western blotting, NGF was highly expressed, whereas VEGF and HGF were not, and hepatic NGF mRNA levels were increased according to digital PCR. Immunohistochemically, NGF staining was localized in hepatocytes, while TrkA, an NGF receptor, was localized in LSECs. Scanning electron microscopy revealed LSEC defenestration in mice overloaded with iron as well as mice treated with recombinant NGF. Treatment with conditioned medium from iron-overloaded primary hepatocytes reduced primary LSEC fenestrations, while treatment with an anti-NGF neutralizing antibody or TrkA inhibitor, K252a, reversed this effect. However, iron-loaded medium itself did not reduce fenestration. In conclusion, iron accumulation induces NGF expression in hepatocytes, which in turn leads to LSEC defenestration via TrkA. This novel link between iron and NGF may aid our understanding of the development of chronic liver disease. PMID:25460199

  11. MET inhibitor PHA-665752 suppresses the hepatocyte growth factor-induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Tongxin; Li, Qi; Sun, Quanquan; Zhang, Yuqin; Yang, Hua; Wang, Rong; Chen, Longhua; Wang, Wei

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • We demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation. • The aberrant MET signal mediated by HGF induced proliferation and radioresistance of NPC cells. • MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. • PHA-665752 suppressed the three downstream pathway of HGF/MET signal in a dose-dependent manner. - Abstract: Although ionizing radiation (IR) has provided considerable improvements in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), in subsets of patients, radioresistance is still a major problem in the treatment. In this study, we demonstrated that irradiation induced MET overexpression and activation, and the aberrant MET signal mediated by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) induced radioresistance. We also found that MET inhibitor PHA-665752 effectively suppressed HGF induced cell proliferation and radioresistance in NPC cells. Further investigation indicated that PHA-665752 suppressed the phosphorylation of the Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3 proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Our data indicated that the combination of IR with a MET inhibitor, such as PHA-665752, might be a promising therapeutic strategy for NPC.

  12. Keratinocyte Growth Factor Induces Gene Expression Signature Associated with Suppression of Malignant Phenotype of Cutaneous Squamous Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toriseva, Mervi; Ala-aho, Risto; Peltonen, Sirkku; Peltonen, Juha; Grénman, Reidar; Kähäri, Veli-Matti

    2012-01-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor-7) is a fibroblast-derived mitogen, which stimulates proliferation of epithelial cells. The expression of KGF by dermal fibroblasts is induced following injury and it promotes wound repair. However, the role of KGF in cutaneous carcinogenesis and cancer progression is not known. We have examined the role of KGF in progression of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. The expression of KGF receptor (KGFR) mRNA was lower in cutaneous SCCs (n = 6) than in normal skin samples (n = 6). Expression of KGFR mRNA was detected in 6 out of 8 cutaneous SCC cell lines and the levels were downregulated by 24-h treatment with KGF. KGF did not stimulate SCC cell proliferation, but it reduced invasion of SCC cells through collagen. Gene expression profiling of three cutaneous SCC cell lines treated with KGF for 24 h revealed a specific gene expression signature characterized by upregulation of a set of genes specifically downregulated in SCC cells compared to normal epidermal keratinocytes, including genes with tumor suppressing properties (SPRY4, DUSP4, DUSP6, LRIG1, PHLDA1). KGF also induced downregulation of a set of genes specifically upregulated in SCC cells compared to normal keratinocytes, including genes associated with tumor progression (MMP13, MATN2, CXCL10, and IGFBP3). Downregulation of MMP-13 and KGFR expression in SCC cells and HaCaT cells was mediated via ERK1/2. Activation of ERK1/2 in HaCaT cells and tumorigenic Ha-ras-transformed HaCaT cells resulted in downregulation of MMP-13 and KGFR expression. These results provide evidence, that KGF does not promote progression of cutaneous SCC, but rather suppresses the malignant phenotype of cutaneous SCC cells by regulating the expression of several genes differentially expressed in SCC cells, as compared to normal keratinocytes. PMID:22427941

  13. Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Tumor Cell Invasion and Metastasis Initiated by Dephosphorylation and Downregulation of Focal Adhesion Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhimin; Jiang, Guoqiang; Blume-Jensen, Peter; Hunter, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Upregulated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) expression and EGFR-induced signaling have been correlated with progression to invasion and metastasis in a wide variety of carcinomas, but the mechanism behind this is not well understood. We show here that, in various human carcinoma cells that overexpress EGFR, EGF treatment induced rapid tyrosine dephosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) associated with downregulation of its kinase activity. The downregulation of FAK activity was both required and sufficient for EGF-induced refractile morphological changes, detachment of cells from the extracellular matrix, and increased tumor cell motility, invasion, and metastasis. Tumor cells with downregulated FAK activity became less adherent to the extracellular matrix. However, once cells started reattaching, FAK activity was restored by activated integrin signaling. Moreover, this process of readhesion and spreading could not be abrogated by further EGF stimulation. Interruption of transforming growth factor alpha-EGFR autocrine regulation with an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor led to a substantial increase in FAK tyrosine phosphorylation and inhibition of tumor cell invasion in vitro. Consistent with this, FAK tyrosine phosphorylation was reduced in cells from tumors growing in transplanted, athymic, nude mice, which have an intact autocrine regulation of the EGFR. We suggest that the dynamic regulation of FAK activity, initiated by EGF-induced downregulation of FAK leading to cell detachment and increased motility and invasion, followed by integrin-dependent reactivation during readhesion, plays a role in EGF-associated tumor invasion and metastasis. PMID:11359909

  14. Involvement of PI3K and ERK1/2 pathways in hepatocyte growth factor-induced cholangiocarcinoma cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Menakongka, Apaporn; Suthiphongchai, Tuangporn

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cell invasiveness and the mechanisms underlying such cellular responses. METHODS: Effects of HGF on cell invasion and motility were investigated in two human CCA cell lines, HuCCA-1 and KKU-M213, using Transwell in vitro assay. Levels of proteins of interest and their phosphorylated forms were determined by Western blotting. Localization of E-cadherin was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining and visualized under confocal microscope. Activities of matrix degrading enzymes were determined by zymography. RESULTS: Both CCA cell lines expressed higher Met levels than the H69 immortalized cholangiocyte cell line. HGF induced invasion and motility of the cell lines and altered E-cadherin from membrane to cytoplasm localization, but did not affect the levels of secreted matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9 and urokinase plasminogen activator, key matrix degrading enzymes involved in cell invasion. Concomitantly, HGF stimulated Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation but with slightly different kinetic profiles in the two cell lines. Inhibition of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway by the PI3K inhibitor, LY294002, markedly suppressed HGF-stimulated invasion of both CCA cell lines, and inhibition of the ERK pathway by U0126 suppressed HGF-induced invasion of the KKU-M213 cell line but had a moderate effect on HuCCA-1 cells. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that HGF promotes CCA cell invasiveness through dys-localization of E-cadherin and induction of cell motility by distinct signaling pathways depending on cell line type. PMID:20135719

  15. Epidermal growth factor-induced cyclooxygenase-2 enhances head and neck squamous cell carcinoma metastasis through fibronectin up-regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jinn-Yuan; Chang, Kwang-Yu; Chen, Shang-Hung; Lee, Chung-Ta; Chang, Sheng-Tsung; Cheng, Hung-Chi; Chang, Wen-Chang; Chen, Ben-Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is a major cause of metastasis in many cancers, such as head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, whether the induction of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mediates EGF-enhanced HNSCC metastasis remains unclear. Interestingly, we found that EGF induced COX-2 expression mainly in HNSCC. The tumor cell transformation induced by EGF was repressed by COX-2 knockdown, and this repression was reversed by simultaneously treating the cells with EGF and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). The down-regulation of COX-2 expression or inhibition of COX-2 activity significantly blocked EGF enhancement of cell migration and invasion, but the addition of PGE2 compensated for this inhibitory effect in COX-2-knockdown cells. COX-2 depletion inhibited EGF-induced matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and fibronectin expression and Rac1/cdc42 activation. The inhibitory effect of COX-2 depletion on MMPs and the fibronectin/Rac1/cdc42 axis were reversed by co-treatment with PGE2. Furthermore, depletion of fibronectin impeded the COX-2-enhanced binding of HNSCC cells to endothelial cells and tumor cells metastatic seeding of the lungs. These results demonstrate that EGF-induced COX-2 expression enhances HNSCC metastasis via activation of the fibronectin signaling pathway. The inhibition of COX-2 expression and activation may be a potential strategy for the treatment of EGFR-mediated HNSCC metastasis. PMID:25595899

  16. Selective translocation of protein kinase C-delta in PC12 cells during nerve growth factor-induced neuritogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    O'Driscoll, K R; Teng, K K; Fabbro, D; Greene, L A; Weinstein, I B

    1995-01-01

    The specific intracellular signals initiated by nerve growth factor (NGF) that lead to neurite formation in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells are as of yet unclear. Protein kinase C-delta (PKC delta) is translocated from the soluble to the particulate subcellular fraction during NGF-induced-neuritogenesis; however, this does not occur after treatment with the epidermal growth factor, which is mitogenic but does not induce neurite formation. PC12 cells also contain both Ca(2+)-sensitive and Ca(2+)-independent PKC enzymatic activities, and express mRNA and immunoreactive proteins corresponding to the PKC isoforms alpha, beta, delta, epsilon, and zeta. There are transient decreases in the levels of immunoreactive PKCs alpha, beta, and epsilon after 1-3 days of NGF treatment, and after 7 days there is a 2.5-fold increase in the level of PKC alpha, and a 1.8-fold increase in total cellular PKC activity. NGF-induced PC12 cell neuritogenesis is enhanced by 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in a TPA dose- and time-dependent manner, and this differentiation coincides with abrogation of the down-regulation of PKC delta and other PKC isoforms, when the cells are treated with TPA. Thus a selective activation of PKC delta may play a role in neuritogenic signals in PC12 cells. Images PMID:7626808

  17. Inhibitory effects of tetrandrine on epidermal growth factor-induced invasion and migration in HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Yang, Jai-Sing; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Lee, Chiu-Fang; Chiang, Ni-Na; Chen, Fu-An

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine has been shown to reduce cancer cell proliferation and to inhibit metastatic effects in multiple cancer models in vitro and in vivo. However, the effects of tetrandrine on the underlying mechanism of HT29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell metastasis remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was focused on tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells following epidermal growth factor (EGF) treatment, and Transwell, gelatin zymography, gene expression and immunoblotting assays were performed to investigate metastatic effects in vitro. Tetrandrine was observed to dose‑dependently inhibit EGF‑induced HT29 cell invasion and migration, however, no effect on cell viability occurred following exposure to tetradrine between 0.5 and 2 µM. Tetrandrine treatment inhibited the enzymatic activity of matrix metalloprotease (MMP)‑2 and MMP‑9 in a concentration‑dependent manner. The present study also found a reduction in the mRNA expression levels of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9 in the tetrandrine‑treated HT29 cells. Tetrandrine also suppressed the phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGFR) and its downstream pathway, including phosphoinositide‑dependent kinase 1, phosphatidylinositol 3‑kinase and phosphorylated AKT, suppressing the gene expression of MMP‑2 and MMP‑9. Furthermore, tetrandrine triggered mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling through the suppressing the activation of phosphorylated extracellular signal‑regulated protein kinase. These data suggested that targeting EGFR signaling and its downstream molecules contributed to the inhibition of EGF‑induced HT29 cell metastasis caused by tetrandrine, eventually leading to a reduction in the mRNA and gelatinase activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, respectively. PMID:26648313

  18. Nerve growth factor-induced differentiation of PC12 cells is accompanied by elevated adenylyl cyclase activity.

    PubMed

    Yung, H S; Lai, K H; Chow, K B S; Ip, N Y; Tsim, K W K; Wong, Y H; Wu, Z; Wise, H

    2010-01-01

    Rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells characteristically undergo differentiation when cultured with nerve growth factor (NGF). Here we show that NGF dramatically increased the adenylyl cyclase-activating property of forskolin in PC12 cells. This effect of NGF was well maintained even when NGF was removed after 4 days, even though the morphological features of neuronal differentiation were rapidly lost on removal of NGF. The enhanced cAMP production in response to forskolin could be due to a synergistic interaction between forskolin and endogenously released agonists acting on G(s)-coupled receptors. However, responses to forskolin were not attenuated by antagonists of adenosine A2 receptors or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) receptors, suggesting that adenosine and PACAP were not involved. Adenylyl cyclases 3, 6 and 9 were the predominant isoforms expressed in PC12 cells, but we found no evidence for NGF-induced changes in expression levels of any of the 9 adenylyl cyclase isoforms, nor in the expression of Gα(s). These findings highlight that NGF has a subtle influence on adenylyl cyclase activity in PC12 cells which may influence more than the neurite extension process classically associated with neuronal differentiation. PMID:20389133

  19. Mechano-growth factor induces migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells by altering its mechanical properties and activating ERK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Jiamin; Wu, Kewen; Lin, Feng; Luo, Qing; Yang, Li; Shi, Yisong; Song, Guanbin; Sung, Kuo-Li Paul

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •MGF induced the migration of rat MSC in a concentration-dependent manner. •MGF enhanced the mechanical properties of rMSC in inducing its migration. •MGF activated the ERK 1/2 signaling pathway of rMSC in inducing its migration. •rMSC mechanics may synergy with ERK 1/2 pathway in MGF-induced rMSC migration. -- Abstract: Mechano-growth factor (MGF) generated by cells in response to mechanical stimulation has been identified as a mechano effector molecule, playing a key role in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) function, including proliferation and migration. However, the mechanism(s) underlying how MGF-induced MSC migration occurs is still unclear. In the present study, MGF motivated migration of rat MSCs (rMSCs) in a concentration-dependent manner and optimal concentration of MGF at 50 ng/mL (defined as MGF treatment in this paper) was demonstrated. Notably, enhancement of mechanical properties that is pertinent to cell migration, such as cell traction force and cell stiffness were found to respond to MGF treatment. Furthermore, MGF increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), ERK inhibitor (i.e., PD98059) suppressed ERK phosphorylation, and abolished MGF-induced rMSC migration were found, demonstrating that ERK is involved molecule for MGF-induced rMSC migration. These in vitro evidences of MGF-induced rMSC migration and its direct link to altering rMSC mechanics and activating the ERK pathway, uncover the underlying biomechanical and biological mechanisms of MGF-induced rMSC migration, which may help find MGF-based application of MSC in clinical therapeutics.

  20. The transcription of the human fructose-bisphosphate aldolase C gene is activated by nerve-growth-factor-induced B factor in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Buono, P; Conciliis, L D; Izzo, P; Salvatore, F

    1997-01-01

    A DNA region located at around -200 bp in the 5' flanking region (region D) of the human brain-type fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (aldolase C) gene has been analysed. We show by transient transfection assay and electrophoretic-mobility-shift assay (EMSA) that the binding of transcriptional activators to region D is much more efficient (80% versus 30%) in human neuroblastoma cells (SKNBE) than in the non-neuronal cell line A1251, which contains low levels of aldolase C mRNA. The sequence of region D, CAAGGTCA, is very similar to the AAAGGTCA motif present in the mouse steroid 21-hydroxylase gene; the latter motif binds nerve-growth-factor-induced B factor (NGFI-B), which is a member of the thyroid/steroid/retinoid nuclear receptor gene family. Competition experiments in EMSA and antibody-directed supershift experiments showed that NGFI-B is involved in the binding to region D of the human aldolase C gene. Furthermore, the regulation of the aldolase C gene (which is the second known target of NGFI-B) expression during development parallels that of NGFI-B. PMID:9173889

  1. MicroRNA-145 regulates platelet-derived growth factor-induced human aortic vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration by targeting CD40

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yumei; Huang, Jiangnan; Jiang, Zhiyuan; Zhong, Yuanli; Xia, Mingjie; Wang, Hui; Jiao, Yang

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the expression of microRNA (miR)-145 in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the effect of miR-145 in the biological behavior and expression of CD40 in VSMCs. Cells were treated with either miR-145 or miR-145 inhibitor. Cell proliferation was analyzed by a colony formation assay and a methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. Cell migration and invasion were assessed using a transwell assay, an invasion assay, and a wound healing assay. A luciferase reporter assay was used to detect the interaction between miR-145 and CD40. Expression of α-SMA, calponin, osteopontin (OPN), epiregulin, activator protein-1 (AP-1) and CD40 was measured using real-time RT-PCR for mRNA levels and Western blotting for protein levels. Overexpression of miR-145 significantly inhibited VSMC proliferation, invasion and migration. Furthermore, OPN, epiregulin, AP-1 and CD40 expression at the mRNA and protein levels was down-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. However, α-SMA and calponin expression at the mRNA and protein levels was up-regulated by overexpression of miR-145. In addition, the luciferase reporter assay showed that CD40 may be a direct target gene of miR-145 in VSMC initiation and development. Moreover, these data demonstrate that the up-regulation of CD40 is critical for miR-145-mediated inhibitory effects on platelet-derived growth factor-induced cell proliferation and migration in human VSMCs. In summary, CD40, a direct target of miR-145, reverses the inhibitory effects of miR-145. These results suggest that the specific modulation of miR-145 in human VSMCs may be an attractive approach for the treatment of proliferative vascular diseases. PMID:27186305

  2. The heat shock protein 90-binding geldanamycin inhibits cancer cell proliferation, down-regulates oncoproteins, and inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced invasion in thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Yeh, Michael W; Wong, Mariwil G; Lobo, Margaret; Hyun, William C; Duh, Quan-Yang; Clark, Orlo H

    2003-07-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) serves as a chaperone protein and plays a critical role in tumor cell growth and/or survival. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of HSP90, is cytotoxic to several human cancer cell lines, but its effect in thyroid cancer is unknown. We, therefore, investigated the effect of geldanamycin on cell proliferation, oncoprotein expression, and invasion in human thyroid cancer cell lines. We used six thyroid cancer cell lines: TPC-1 (papillary), FTC-133, FTC-236, FTC-238 (follicular), XTC-1 (Hürthle cell), and ARO (anaplastic). We used the dimethyl-thiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, a clonogenic assay, an apoptotic assay, and a Matrigel invasion assay. We evaluated oncoprotein expression using Western blots and flow cytometry. After 6 d of treatment with 50 nM geldanamycin, the percent inhibition of growth was 29.4% in TPC-1, 97.5% in FTC-133, 96.7% in FTC-236, 10.8% in FTC-238, 70.9% in XTC-1, and 45.5% in ARO cell lines. In the FTC-133 cell line, geldanamycin treatment decreased clonogenicity by 21% at a concentration of 50 nM; geldanamycin induced apoptosis and down-regulated c-Raf-1, mutant p53, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor expression; geldanamycin inhibited EGF-stimulated invasion. In conclusion, geldanamycin inhibited cancer cell proliferation, down-regulated oncoproteins, and inhibited EGF-induced invasion in thyroid cancer cell lines. PMID:12843186

  3. BAG-1 enhances cell-cell adhesion, reduces proliferation and induces chaperone-independent suppression of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epidermal keratinocyte migration

    SciTech Connect

    Hinitt, C.A.M.; Wood, J.; Lee, S.S.; Williams, A.C.; Howarth, J.L.; Glover, C.P.; Uney, J.B.; Hague, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cell motility is important in maintaining tissue homeostasis, facilitating epithelial wound repair and in tumour formation and progression. The aim of this study was to determine whether BAG-1 isoforms regulate epidermal cell migration in in vitro models of wound healing. In the human epidermal cell line HaCaT, endogenous BAG-1 is primarily nuclear and increases with confluence. Both transient and stable p36-Bag-1 overexpression resulted in increased cellular cohesion. Stable transfection of either of the three human BAG-1 isoforms p36-Bag-1 (BAG-1S), p46-Bag-1 (BAG-1M) and p50-Bag-1 (BAG-1L) inhibited growth and wound closure in serum-containing medium. However, in response to hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in serum-free medium, BAG-1S/M reduced communal motility and colony scattering, but BAG-1L did not. In the presence of HGF, p36-Bag-1 transfectants retained proliferative response to HGF with no change in ERK1/2 activation. However, the cells retained E-cadherin localisation at cell-cell junctions and exhibited pronounced cortical actin. Point mutations in the BAG domain showed that BAG-1 inhibition of motility is independent of its function as a chaperone regulator. These findings are the first to suggest that BAG-1 plays a role in regulating cell-cell adhesion and suggest an important function in epidermal cohesion.

  4. Hepatocyte growth factor-induced differentiation of bone mesenchymal stem cells toward hepatocyte-like cells occurs through nuclear factor-kappa B signaling in vitro.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tongxi; Wang, Yi; Jiang, Shasha; Liu, Xiaoping; Yu, Zhongjie

    2016-09-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is multifaceted cytokine that regulates proliferation, differentiation, morphology, and motility within numerous stem cells. More recently, HGF has been reported to induce the differentiation of bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into mature hepatocytes, but the underlying biochemical and molecular signaling is largely unknown. We isolated BMSC from the bone marrow of rats, which were then cultured and exposed to HGF for 15 days. We subsequently assayed these cells for liver functionality and markers, and blocked NF-кB signaling at various stages of the pathway. The present results demonstrate that HGF induces the differentiation of BMSCs toward hepatocyte-like cells through the NF-кB signaling. More specifically, HGF upregulated the translocation of NF-кB to the nucleus. PMID:27249785

  5. Long-Term Expansion in Platelet Lysate Increases Growth of Peripheral Blood-Derived Endothelial-Colony Forming Cells and Their Growth Factor-Induced Sprouting Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Tasev, Dimitar; van Wijhe, Michiel H.; Weijers, Ester M.; van Hinsbergh, Victor W. M.; Koolwijk, Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Efficient implementation of peripheral blood-derived endothelial-colony cells (PB-ECFCs) as a therapeutical tool requires isolation and generation of a sufficient number of cells in ex vivo conditions devoid of animal-derived products. At present, little is known how the isolation and expansion procedure in xenogeneic-free conditions affects the therapeutical capacity of PB-ECFCs. Results The findings presented in this study indicate that human platelet lysate (PL) as a serum substitute yields twice more colonies per mL blood compared to the conventional isolation with fetal bovine serum (FBS). Isolated ECFCs displayed a higher proliferative ability in PL supplemented medium than cells in FBS medium during 30 days expansion. The cells at 18 cumulative population doubling levels (CPDL) retained their proliferative capacity, showed higher sprouting ability in fibrin matrices upon stimulation with FGF-2 and VEGF-A than the cells at 6 CPDL, and displayed low β-galactosidase activity. The increased sprouting of PB-ECFCs at 18 CPDL was accompanied by an intrinsic activation of the uPA/uPAR fibrinolytic system. Induced deficiency of uPA (urokinase-type plasminogen activator) or uPAR (uPA receptor) by siRNA technology completely abolished the angiogenic ability of PB-ECFCs in fibrin matrices. During the serial expansion, the gene induction of the markers associated with inflammatory activation such as VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 did not occur or only to limited extent. While further propagation up to 31 CPDL proceeded at a comparable rate, a marked upregulation of inflammatory markers occurred in all donors accompanied by a further increase of uPA/uPAR gene induction. The observed induction of inflammatory genes at later stages of long-term propagation of PB-ECFCs underpins the necessity to determine the right time-point for harvesting of sufficient number of cells with preserved therapeutical potential. Conclusion The presented isolation method and subsequent cell

  6. Hepatocyte growth factor-induced up-regulation of Twist drives epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a canine mammary tumour cell line.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kota; Choisunirachon, Nan; Saito, Tomochika; Matsumoto, Kaori; Saeki, Kohei; Mochizuki, Manabu; Nishimura, Ryohei; Sasaki, Nobuo; Nakagawa, Takayuki

    2014-12-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a crucial step in tumour progression. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying EMT in canine tumours remain to be elucidated. In this study, the similarity or difference in the molecular mechanism of EMT in canine cells was evaluated and compared with that reported in human and mouse cells. We used eight cell lines derived from canine mammary cancers. Stimulation with hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) increased cell motility and changed EMT-related markers towards mesenchyme in CHMm cell line. These changes were accompanied by an increase in Twist expression and did not occur in CHMm transfected with Twist siRNA, indicating that Twist plays a key role in this phenomenon in CHMm. However, the down-regulation of E-cadherin was not observed by HGF stimulation. Further studies are required to elucidate the difference between human and canine Twist. PMID:25278141

  7. 8-Prenylnaringenin inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced MCF-7 breast cancer cell proliferation by targeting phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Brunelli, Elisa; Pinton, Giulia; Chianale, Federica; Graziani, Andrea; Appendino, Giovanni; Moro, Laura

    2009-02-01

    8-Prenylnaringenin (8PN), one of the strongest plant-derived oestrogen receptors (ERs) ligand, has been suggested to have potential cancer chemo-preventive activities and anti-angiogenic properties. Because published data suggest that ERs serve as nodal point that allows interactions between hormones and growth factors mediated pathways, we decided to investigate the effects exerted by 8PN on Epidermal growth factor (EGF)-elicited pathways in breast cancer cells. Here we show that in ER positive MCF-7 cells, 8PN interferes with EGF induced cell proliferation by strongly inhibiting activation of PI(3)K/Akt pathway, without affecting EGFR expression or tyrosine phosphorylation, and exerting a synergistic activation of Erk1/2 phosphorylation. Moreover, we demonstrate that 8PN is a direct inhibitor of PI(3)K activity as it is shown by in vitro experiments with the purified enzyme and by its inability to impair serine phosphorylation of a constitutive active form of Akt. These findings suggest that inhibition of PI(3)K is a novel mechanism which contributes to 8PN activity to inhibit cancer cell survival and EGF induced proliferation. PMID:19103290

  8. Involvement of cysteine-rich protein 61 in the epidermal growth factor-induced migration of human anaplastic thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chin, Li-Han; Hsu, Sung-Po; Zhong, Wen-Bin; Liang, Yu-Chih

    2016-05-01

    Anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) is among the most aggressive types of malignant cancer. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of ATC, and patients with thyroid carcinoma typically exhibit increased cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61). In this study, we found that EGF treatment induced cell migration, stress fiber formation, Cyr61 mRNA and protein expressions, and Cyr61 protein secretion in ATC cells. The recombinant Cyr61 protein significantly induced cell migration; however, inhibition of Cyr61 activity by a Cyr61-specific antibody abrogated EGF-induced cell migration. EGF treatment also affected epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related marker protein expression, as evidenced by an increase in vimentin and a decrease in E-cadherin expression. Inhibition of Cyr61 expression by Cyr61 siRNA decreased cell migration and reversed the EMT-related marker protein expression. EGF treatment increased the phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), and finally activated Cyr61 promoter plasmid activity. Our results suggest that Cyr61 is induced by EGF through the ERK/CREB signal pathway and that it plays a crucial role in the migration and invasion of ATC cells; moreover, Cyr61 might be a therapeutic target for metastatic ATC. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25773758

  9. Eicosopentaneoic Acid and Other Free Fatty Acid Receptor Agonists Inhibit Lysophosphatidic Acid- and Epidermal Growth Factor-Induced Proliferation of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Mandi M.; Zhang, Zhihong; Liu, Ze; Meier, Kathryn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many key actions of ω-3 (n-3) fatty acids have recently been shown to be mediated by two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in the free fatty acid receptor (FFAR) family, FFA1 (GPR40) and FFA4 (GPR120). n-3 Fatty acids inhibit proliferation of human breast cancer cells in culture and in animals. In the current study, the roles of FFA1 and FFA4 were investigated. In addition, the role of cross-talk between GPCRs activated by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), and the tyrosine kinase receptor activated by epidermal growth factor (EGF), was examined. In MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell lines, both LPA and EGF stimulated proliferation, Erk activation, Akt activation, and CCN1 induction. LPA antagonists blocked effects of LPA and EGF on proliferation in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, and on cell migration in MCF-7. The n-3 fatty acid eicosopentaneoic acid inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation in both cell lines. Two synthetic FFAR agonists, GW9508 and TUG-891, likewise inhibited LPA- and EGF-induced proliferation. The data suggest a major role for FFA1, which was expressed by both cell lines. The results indicate that n-3 fatty acids inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation via FFARs, and suggest a mechanism involving negative cross-talk between FFARS, LPA receptors, and EGF receptor. PMID:26821052

  10. Assessment of gene expression of intracellular calcium channels, pumps and exchangers with epidermal growth factor-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in a breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process implicated in cancer metastasis that involves the conversion of epithelial cells to a more mesenchymal and invasive cell phenotype. In breast cancer cells EMT is associated with altered store-operated calcium influx and changes in calcium signalling mediated by activation of cell surface purinergic receptors. In this study, we investigated whether MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells induced to undergo EMT exhibit changes in mRNA levels of calcium channels, pumps and exchangers located on intracellular calcium storing organelles, including the Golgi, mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Methods Epidermal growth factor (EGF) was used to induce EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. Serum-deprived cells were treated with EGF (50 ng/mL) for 12 h and gene expression was assessed using quantitative RT-PCR. Results and conclusions These data reveal no significant alterations in mRNA levels of the Golgi calcium pump secretory pathway calcium ATPases (SPCA1 and SPCA2), or the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) or Na+/Ca2+ exchanger (NCLX). However, EGF-induced EMT was associated with significant alterations in mRNA levels of specific ER calcium channels and pumps, including (sarco)-endoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPases (SERCAs), and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) and ryanodine receptor (RYR) calcium channel isoforms. The most prominent change in gene expression between the epithelial and mesenchymal-like states was RYR2, which was enriched 45-fold in EGF-treated MDA-MB-468 cells. These findings indicate that EGF-induced EMT in breast cancer cells may be associated with major alterations in ER calcium homeostasis. PMID:23890218

  11. Inhibition of aldose reductase prevents growth factor-induced G1-S phase transition through the AKT/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/E2F-1 pathway in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ramana, Kota V; Tammali, Ravinder; Srivastava, Satish K

    2010-04-01

    Colon cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in both men and women worldwide. The deregulated cell cycle control or decreased apoptosis of normal epithelial cells leading to uncontrolled proliferation is one of the major features of tumor progression. We have previously shown that aldose reductase (AR), a NADPH-dependent aldo-keto reductase, has been shown to be involved in growth factor-induced proliferation of colon cancer cells. Herein, we report that inhibition of AR prevents epidermal growth factor (EGF)- and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced HT29 cell proliferation by accumulating cells at G(1) phase of cell cycle. Similar results were observed in SW480 and HCT-116 colon cancer cells. Treatment of HT29 cells with AR inhibitor, sorbinil or zopolrestat, prevented the EGF- and bFGF-induced DNA binding activity of E2F-1 and phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein. Inhibition of AR also prevented EGF- and bFGF-induced phosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk)-2 and expression of G(1)-S transition regulatory proteins such as cyclin D1, cdk4, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin E, and c-myc. More importantly, inhibition of AR prevented the EGF- and bFGF-induced activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT and reactive oxygen species generation in colon cancer cells. Further, inhibition of AR also prevented the tumor growth of human colon cancer cells in nude mouse xenografts. Collectively, these results show that AR mediates EGF- and bFGF-induced colon cancer cell proliferation by activating or expressing G(1)-S phase proteins such as E2F-1, cdks, and cyclins through the reactive oxygen species/phosphoinositide 3-kinase/AKT pathway, indicating the use of AR inhibitors in the prevention of colon carcinogenesis. Mol Cancer Ther; 9(4); 813-24. (c)2010 AACR. PMID:20354121

  12. The role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{beta}/{delta} in epidermal growth factor-induced HaCaT cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Pengfei; Jiang Bimei; Yang Xinghua; Xiao Xianzhong Huang Xu; Long Jianhong; Zhang Pihong; Zhang Minghua; Xiao Muzhang; Xie Tinghong; Huang Xiaoyuan

    2008-10-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) has been shown to be a potent mitogen for epidermal cells both in vitro and in vivo, thus contributing to the development of an organism. It has recently become clear that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{beta}/{delta} (PPAR{beta}/{delta}) expression and activation is involved in the cell proliferation. However, little is known about the role of PPAR{beta}/{delta} in EGF-induced proliferation of HaCaT keratinocytes. In this study, HaCaT cells were cultured in the presence and absence of EGF and we identified that EGF induced an increase of PPAR{beta}/{delta} mRNA and protein level expression in time-dependent and dose-dependent manner, and AG1487, an EGF receptor (EGFR) special inhibitor, caused attenuation of PPAR{beta}/{delta} protein expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) revealed that EGF significantly increased PPAR{beta}/{delta} binding activity in HaCaT keratinocytes. Antisense phosphorothioate oligonucleotides (asODNs) against PPAR{beta}/{delta} caused selectively inhibition of PPAR{beta}/{delta} protein content induced by EGF and significantly attenuated EGF-mediated cell proliferation. Treatment of the cells with L165041, a specific synthetic ligand for PPAR{beta}/{delta}, significantly enhanced EGF-mediated cell proliferation. Finally, c-Jun ablation inhibited PPAR{beta}/{delta} up-regulation induced by EGF, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) showed that c-Jun bound to the PPAR{beta}/{delta} promoter and the binding increased in EGF-stimulated cells. These results demonstrate that EGF induces PPAR{beta}/{delta} expression in a c-Jun-dependent manner and PPAR{beta}/{delta} plays a vital role in EGF-stimulated proliferation of HaCaT cells.

  13. Hypoxia- and Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Stromal Cell-Derived Factor-1α/CXCR4 Expression in Glioblastomas

    PubMed Central

    Zagzag, David; Esencay, Mine; Mendez, Olga; Yee, Herman; Smirnova, Iva; Huang, Yuanyuan; Chiriboga, Luis; Lukyanov, Eugene; Liu, Mengling; Newcomb, Elizabeth W.

    2008-01-01

    The morphological patterns of glioma cell invasion are known as the secondary structures of Scherer. In this report, we propose a biologically based mechanism for the nonrandom formation of Scherer’s secondary structures based on the differential expression of stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α and CXCR4 at the invading edge of glioblastomas. The chemokine SDF-1α was highly expressed in neurons, blood vessels, subpial regions, and white matter tracts that form the basis of Scherer’s secondary structures. In contrast, the SDF-1α receptor, CXCR4, was highly expressed in invading glioma cells organized around neurons and blood vessels, in subpial regions, and along white matter tracts. Neuronal and endothelial cells exposed to vascular endothelial growth factor up-regulated the expression of SDF-1α. CXCR4-positive tumor cells migrated toward a SDF-1α gradient in vitro, whereas inhibition of CXCR4 expression decreased their migration. Similarly, inhibition of CXCR4 decreased levels of SDF-1α-induced phosphorylation of FAK, AKT, and ERK1/2, suggesting CXCR4 involvement in glioma invasion signaling. These studies offer one plausible molecular basis and explanation of the formation of Scherer’s structures in glioma patients. PMID:18599607

  14. Ephedrae herba stimulates hepatocyte growth factor-induced MET endocytosis and downregulation via early/late endocytic pathways in gefitinib-resistant human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Yukio; Hyuga, Sumiko; Takiguchi, Soichi; Hyuga, Masashi; Itoh, Kazuyuki; Hanawa, Toshihiko

    2016-05-01

    The MET tyrosine kinase receptor and its ligand, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), are known to be overexpressed in a variety of malignant tumor cells, and are implicated in the development of gefitinib-resistance in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Ephedrae herba was previously reported to prevent HGF-induced cancer cell motility by directly suppressing HGF/MET signaling through the inhibition of MET tyrosine kinase, and treatment with its extract also considerably reduced MET protein levels. To further investigate the mechanism underlying the Ephedrae herba-induced inhibition of MET phosphorylation as well as its degradation and subsequent disappearance, we examined the effect of Ephedrae herba on HGF-stimulated MET endocytosis and downregulation via early/late endocytic pathways in an NSCLC cell line. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, we found that pretreatment of cells with Ephedrae herba extract dramatically changed the intracellular distribution of plasma membrane-associated MET, and that the resultant MET staining was distributed throughout the cytoplasm. Pretreatment of the cells with Ephedrae herba extract also led to the rapid loss of MET and phosphorylated (p)-MET in HGF-stimulated cells. In contrast, inefficient endocytic delivery of MET and p-MET from early to late endosomes was observed in the absence of Ephedrae herba extract, since considerable amounts of the internalized MET accumulated in the early endosomes and were not delivered to lysosomes up to 1 h after HGF-stimulation. Furthermore, large amounts of MET and p-MET that had accumulated in late endosomes of Ephedrae herba-pretreated cells after HGF stimulation were observed along with bafilomycin A1. Therefore, we inferred that degradation of MET occurred in the late endosome/lysosome pathway. Moreover, western blot analysis revealed the accelerated degradation of MET and p-MET proceeds in cells pretreated with Ephedrae herba extract. Collectively, our results suggest that

  15. Intracellular sphingosine kinase 2-derived sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced ezrin-radixin-moesin phosphorylation and cancer cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Adada, Mohamad M; Canals, Daniel; Jeong, Nara; Kelkar, Ashwin D; Hernandez-Corbacho, Maria; Pulkoski-Gross, Michael J; Donaldson, Jane C; Hannun, Yusuf A; Obeid, Lina M

    2015-11-01

    The bioactive sphingolipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) mediates cellular proliferation, mitogenesis, inflammation, and angiogenesis. These biologies are mediated through S1P binding to specific GPCRs [sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor (S1PR)1-5] and some other less well-characterized intracellular targets. Ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins, a family of adaptor molecules linking the cortical actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane, are emerging as critical regulators of cancer invasion via regulation of cell morphology and motility. Recently, we identified S1P as an acute ERM activator (via phosphorylation) through its action on S1PR2. In this work, we dissect the mechanism of S1P generation downstream of epidermal growth factor (EGF) leading to ERM phosphorylation and cancer invasion. Using pharmacologic inhibitors, small interfering RNA technologies, and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that sphingosine kinase (SK)2, and not SK1, is essential and sufficient in EGF-mediated ERM phosphorylation in HeLa cells. In fact, knocking down SK2 decreased ERM activation 2.5-fold. Furthermore, we provide evidence that SK2 is necessary to mediate EGF-induced invasion. In addition, overexpressing SK2 causes a 2-fold increase in HeLa cell invasion. Surprisingly, and for the first time, we find that this event, although dependent on S1PR2 activation, does not generate and does not require extracellular S1P secretion, therefore introducing a potential novel model of autocrine/intracrine action of S1P that still involves its GPCRs. These results define new mechanistic insights for EGF-mediated invasion and novel actions of SK2, therefore setting the stage for novel targets in the treatment of growth factor-driven malignancies. PMID:26209696

  16. UAP56 is an important mediator of Angiotensin II/platelet derived growth factor induced vascular smooth muscle cell DNA synthesis and proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Sahni, Abha; Wang, Nadan; Alexis, Jeffrey

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Angiotensin II/PDGF induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. ► UAP56 is a positive regulator of E2F transcriptional activation. ► UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low flow carotid arteries. -- Abstract: Angiotensin (Ang) II and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) are important mediators of pathologic vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation. Identifying downstream mediators of Ang II and PDGF signaling may provide insights for therapies to improve vascular proliferative diseases. We have previously demonstrated that breakpoint cluster region (Bcr) is an important mediator of Ang II/PDGF signaling in VSMC. We have recently reported that the DExD/H box protein UAP56 is an interacting partner of Bcr in regulating VSMC DNA synthesis. We hypothesized that UAP56 itself is an important regulator of VSMC proliferation. In this report we demonstrate that knockdown of UAP56 inhibits Ang II/PDGF induced VSMC DNA synthesis and proliferation, and inhibits E2F transcriptional activity. In addition, we demonstrate that UAP56 is present in the vessel wall of low-flow carotid arteries. These findings suggest that UAP56 is a regulator of VSMC proliferation and identify UAP56 as a target for preventing vascular proliferative disease.

  17. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)−1 and (−)−1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)−1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (−)−1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)−1 and (−)−1. PMID:26585042

  18. Distinctive effect on nerve growth factor-induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth by two unique neolignan enantiomers from Illicium merrillianum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xinhui; Yue, Rongcai; Zeng, Huawu; Li, Honglin; Shan, Lei; He, Weiwei; Shen, Yunheng; Zhang, Weidong

    2015-11-01

    Merrillianoid (1), a racemic neolignan possessing the characteristic benzo-2,7-dioxabicyclo[3.2.1]octane moiety, was isolated from the branches and leaves of Illicium merrillianum. Chiral separation of 1 gave two enantiomers (+)-1 and (-)-1. The structure of 1 was established by comprehensive spectroscopic analysis and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The absolute configurations of enantiomers were determined by quantum mechanical calculation. Compound (+)-1 exhibited a better neurotrophic activity than racemate 1 by promoting nerve growth factor (NGF) induced PC12 cell neurite outgrowth, while (-)-1 showed a distinctive inhibitory effect. Furthermore, a mechanism study indicated that the two enantiomers influenced NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells possibly by interacting with the trkA receptor, and extracellular signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MEK) in Ras/ERK signal cascade. But the phosphorylation level of serine/threonine kinase Akt1 and Akt2 in PI3K/Akt signal pathway showed no significant difference between (+)-1 and (-)-1.

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species, Ki-Ras, and Mitochondrial Superoxide Dismutase Cooperate in Nerve Growth Factor-induced Differentiation of PC12 Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Silvana; Agnese, Savina; D'Amato, Valentina; Papale, Massimo; Garbi, Corrado; Castagnola, Patrizio; Ruocco, Maria Rosaria; Castellano, Immacolata; De Vendittis, Emmanuele; Santillo, Mariarosaria; Amente, Stefano; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico Vittorio

    2010-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) induces terminal differentiation in PC12, a pheochromocytoma-derived cell line. NGF binds a specific receptor on the membrane and triggers the ERK1/2 cascade, which stimulates the transcription of neural genes. We report that NGF significantly affects mitochondrial metabolism by reducing mitochondrial-produced reactive oxygen species and stabilizing the electrochemical gradient. This is accomplished by stimulation of mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) both transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally via Ki-Ras and ERK1/2. Activation of MnSOD is essential for completion of neuronal differentiation because 1) expression of MnSOD induces the transcription of a neuronal specific promoter and neurite outgrowth, 2) silencing of endogenous MnSOD by small interfering RNA significantly reduces transcription induced by NGF, and 3) a Ki-Ras mutant in the polylysine stretch at the COOH terminus, unable to stimulate MnSOD, fails to induce complete differentiation. Overexpression of MnSOD restores differentiation in cells expressing this mutant. ERK1/2 is also downstream of MnSOD, as a SOD mimetic drug stimulates ERK1/2 with the same kinetics of NGF and silencing of MnSOD reduces NGF-induced late ERK1/2. Long term activation of ERK1/2 by NGF requires SOD activation, low levels of hydrogen peroxide, and the integrity of the microtubular cytoskeleton. Confocal immunofluorescence shows that NGF stimulates the formation of a complex containing membrane-bound Ki-Ras, microtubules, and mitochondria. We propose that active NGF receptor induces association of mitochondria with plasma membrane. Local activation of ERK1/2 by Ki-Ras stimulates mitochondrial SOD, which reduces reactive oxygen species and produces H2O2. Low and spatially restricted levels of H2O2 induce and maintain long term ERK1/2 activity and ultimately differentiation of PC12 cells. PMID:20495008

  20. p70 S6 kinase activation is not required for insulin-like growth factor-induced differentiation of rat, mouse, or human skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Canicio, J; Gallardo, E; Illa, I; Testar, X; Palacín, M; Zorzano, A; Kaliman, P

    1998-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) are potent stimulators of muscle differentiation, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) is an essential second messenger in this process. Little is known about the downstream effectors of the IGF/PI 3-kinase myogenic cascade, and contradictory observations have been reported concerning the involvement of p70 S6 kinase. In an attempt to clarify the role of p70 S6 kinase in myogenesis, here we have studied the effect of rapamycin on rat, mouse, and human skeletal muscle cell differentiation. Both insulin and IGF-II activated p70 S6 kinase in rat L6E9 and mouse Sol8 myoblasts, which was markedly inhibited at 1 ng/ml rapamycin concentrations. Consistent with previous observations in a variety of cell lines, rapamycin exerted a potent inhibitory effect on L6E9 and Sol8 serum-induced myoblast proliferation. In contrast, even at high concentrations (20 ng/ml), rapamycin had no effect on IGF-II-induced proliferation or differentiation. Indeed, neither the morphological differentiation, as assessed by myotube formation, nor the expression of muscle-specific markers such as myogenin, myosin heavy chain, or GLUT4 (glucose transporter-4) glucose carriers was altered by rapamycin. Moreover, here we extended our studies on IGF-II-induced myogenesis to human myoblasts derived from skeletal muscle biopsies. We show that, as observed for rat and mouse muscle cells, human myoblasts can be induced to form multinucleated myotubes in the presence of exogenous IGF-II. Moreover, IGF-II-induced human myotube formation was totally blocked by LY294002, a specific PI 3-kinase inhibitor, but remained unaffected in the presence of rapamycin. PMID:9832443

  1. In vitro growth factor-induced bio engineering of mature articular cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Ilyas M.; Francis, Lewis; Theobald, Peter S.; Perni, Stefano; Young, Robert D.; Prokopovich, Polina; Conlan, R. Steven; Archer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    Articular cartilage maturation is the postnatal development process that adapts joint surfaces to their site-specific biomechanical demands. Maturation involves gross morphological changes that occur through a process of synchronised growth and resorption of cartilage and generally ends at sexual maturity. The inability to induce maturation in biomaterial constructs designed for cartilage repair has been cited as a major cause for their failure in producing persistent cell-based repair of joint lesions. The combination of growth factors FGF2 and TGFβ1 induces accelerated articular cartilage maturation in vitro such that many molecular and morphological characteristics of tissue maturation are observable. We hypothesised that experimental growth factor-induced maturation of immature cartilage would result in a biophysical and biochemical composition consistent with a mature phenotype. Using native immature and mature cartilage as reference, we observed that growth factor-treated immature cartilages displayed increased nano-compressive stiffness, decreased surface adhesion, decreased water content, increased collagen content and smoother surfaces, correlating with a convergence to the mature cartilage phenotype. Furthermore, increased gene expression of surface structural protein collagen type I in growth factor-treated explants compared to reference cartilages demonstrates that they are still in the dynamic phase of the postnatal developmental transition. These data provide a basis for understanding the regulation of postnatal maturation of articular cartilage and the application of growth factor-induced maturation in vitro and in vivo in order to repair and regenerate cartilage defects. PMID:23182922

  2. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor induces post-lesion transcommissural growth of olivary axons that develop normal climbing fibers on mature Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Kirsty J; Sherrard, Rachel M

    2006-11-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system, reinnervation and recovery from trauma is limited. During development, however, post-lesion plasticity may generate alternate paths providing models to investigate factors that promote reinnervation to appropriate targets. Following unilateral transection of the neonatal rat olivocerebellar pathway, axons from the remaining inferior olive reinnervate the denervated hemicerebellum and develop climbing fiber arbors on Purkinje cells. However, the capacity to recreate this accurate target reinnervation in a mature system remains unknown. In rats lesioned on day 15 (P15) or 30 and treated with intracerebellar injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) or vehicle 24 h later, the morphology and organisation of transcommissural olivocerebellar reinnervation was examined using neuronal tracing and immunohistochemistry. In all animals BDNF, but not vehicle, induced transcommissural olivocerebellar axonal growth into the denervated hemicerebellum. The distribution of reinnervating climbing fibers was not confined to the injection sites but extended throughout the denervated hemivermis and, less densely, up to 3.5 mm into the hemisphere. Transcommissural olivocerebellar axons were organised into parasagittal microzones that were almost symmetrical to those in the right hemicerebellum. Reinnervating climbing fiber arbors were predominantly normal, but in the P30-lesioned group 10% were either branched within the molecular layer forming a smaller secondary arbor or were less branched, and in the P15 lesion group the reinnervating arbors extended their terminals almost to the pial surface and were larger than control arbors (P < 0.02). These results show that BDNF can induce transcommissural olivocerebellar reinnervation, which resembles developmental neuroplasticity to promote appropriate target reinnervation in a mature environment. PMID:16790241

  3. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on platelet-derived growth factor-induced vascular smooth muscle cell migration through up-regulating PGC-1{alpha} expression

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Wei; Guo, Ting; Zhang, Yan; Jiang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Yongxian; Zen, Ke; Yu, Bo; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2011-05-01

    Dexamethasone has been shown to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration, which is required for preventing restenosis. However, the mechanism underlying effect of dexamethasone remains unknown. We have previously demonstrated that peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1{alpha}) can inhibit VSMC migration and proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of PGC-1{alpha} in dexamethasone-reduced VSMC migration and explored the possible mechanism. We first examined PGC-1{alpha} expression in cultured rat aortic VSMCs. The results revealed that incubation of VSMCs with dexamethasone could significantly elevate PGC-1{alpha} mRNA expression. In contrast, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) decreased PGC-1{alpha} expression while stimulating VSMC migration. Mechanistic study showed that suppression of PGC-1{alpha} by small interfering RNA strongly abrogated the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VSMC migration, whereas overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} had the opposite effect. Furthermore, an analysis of MAPK signal pathways showed that dexamethasone inhibited ERK and p38 MAPK phosphorylation in VSMCs. Overexpression of PGC-1{alpha} decreased both basal and PDGF-induced p38 MAPK phosphorylation, but it had no effect on ERK phosphorylation. Finally, inhibition of PPAR{gamma} activation by a PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 abolished the suppressive effects of PGC-1{alpha} on p38 MAPK phosphorylation and VSMC migration. These effects of PGC-1{alpha} were enhanced by a PPAR{gamma} agonist troglitazone. Collectively, our data indicated for the first time that one of the anti-migrated mechanisms of dexamethasone is due to the induction of PGC-1{alpha} expression. PGC-1{alpha} suppresses PDGF-induced VSMC migration through PPAR{gamma} coactivation and, consequently, p38 MAPK inhibition.

  4. Dactylone inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced transformation and phenotype expression of human cancer cells and induces G1-S arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Fedorov, Sergey N; Shubina, Larisa K; Bode, Ann M; Stonik, Valentin A; Dong, Zigang

    2007-06-15

    The marine natural chamigrane-type sesquiterpenoid, dactylone, is closely related to secondary metabolites of some edible species of red algae. In the present study, the effect of dactylone was tested on the mouse skin epidermal JB6 P+ Cl41 cell line and its stable transfectants as well as on several human tumor cell lines, including lung (H460), colon (HCT-116), and skin melanomas (SK-MEL-5 and SK-MEL-28). This natural product was effective at nontoxic doses as a cancer-preventive agent, which exerted its actions, at least in part, through the inhibition of cyclin D3 and Cdk4 expression and retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (Rb) phosphorylation. The inhibition of these cell cycle components was followed by cell cycle arrest at the G1-S transition with subsequent p53-independent apoptosis. Therefore, these data showed that application of dactylone and related compounds may lead to decreased malignant cell transformation and/or decreased tumor cell proliferation. PMID:17575161

  5. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  6. Epidermal Growth Factor-induced Vacuolar (H+)-ATPase Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yanqing; Parmar, Amanda; Roux, Emmanuelle; Balbis, Alejandro; Dumas, Victor; Chevalier, Stephanie; Posner, Barry I.

    2012-01-01

    Using proteomics and immunofluorescence, we demonstrated epidermal growth factor (EGF) induced recruitment of extrinsic V1 subunits of the vacuolar (H+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) to rat liver endosomes. This was accompanied by reduced vacuolar pH. Bafilomycin, an inhibitor of V-ATPase, inhibited EGF-stimulated DNA synthesis and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) activation as indicated by a decrease in eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding 1 (4E-BP1) phosphorylation and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (p70S6K) phosphorylation and kinase activity. There was no corresponding inhibition of EGF-induced Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (Erk) activation. Chloroquine, a neutralizer of vacuolar pH, mimicked bafilomycin effects. Bafilomycin did not inhibit the association of mTORC1 with Raptor nor did it affect AMP-activated protein kinase activity. Rather, the intracellular concentrations of essential but not non-essential amino acids were decreased by bafilomycin in EGF-treated primary rat hepatocytes. Cycloheximide, a translation elongation inhibitor known to augment intracellular amino acid levels, prevented the effect of bafilomycin on amino acids levels and completely reversed its inhibition of EGF-induced mTORC1 activation. In vivo administration of EGF stimulated the recruitment of Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) but not mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) to endosomes and lysosomes. This was inhibited by chloroquine treatment. Our results suggest a role for vacuolar acidification in EGF signaling to mTORC1. PMID:22689575

  7. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor-2 Contributes to the Basic Fibroblast Growth Factor-Induced Neuronal Differentiation in Canine Bone Marrow Stromal Cells via Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase/Akt Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Rei; Edamura, Kazuya; Nakayama, Tomohiro; Narita, Takanori; Okabayashi, Ken; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are considered as candidates for regenerative therapy and a useful model for studying neuronal differentiation. The role of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in neuronal differentiation has been previously studied; however, the signaling pathway involved in this process remains poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway in the bFGF-induced neuronal differentiation of canine BMSCs. bFGF induced the mRNA expression of the neuron marker, microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP2) and the neuron-like morphological change in canine BMSCs. In the presence of inhibitors of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt, i.e., SU5402, LY294002, and MK2206, respectively, bFGF failed to induce the MAP2 mRNA expression and the neuron-like morphological change. bFGF induced Akt phosphorylation, but it was attenuated by the FGFR inhibitor SU5402 and the PI3K inhibitor LY294002. In canine BMSCs, expression of FGFR-1 and FGFR-2 was confirmed, but only FGFR-2 activation was detected by cross-linking and immunoprecipitation analysis. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of FGFR-2 in canine BMSCs resulted in the attenuation of bFGF-induced Akt phosphorylation. These results suggest that the FGFR-2/PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in the bFGF-induced neuronal differentiation of canine BMSCs. PMID:26523832

  8. Mo polyoxometalate nanoparticles inhibit tumor growth and vascular endothelial growth factor induced angiogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wenjing; Yang, Licong; Liu, Ying; Qin, Xiuying; Zhou, Yanhui; Zhou, Yunshan; Liu, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Tumor growth depends on angiogenesis, which can furnish the oxygen and nutrients that proliferate tumor cells. Thus, blocking angiogenesis can be an effective strategy to inhibit tumor growth. In this work, three typical nanoparticles based on polyoxometalates (POMs) have been prepared; we investigated their capability as antitumor and anti-angiogenesis agents. We found that Mo POM nanoparticles, especially complex 3, inhibited the growth of human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cells (HepG2) through cellular reactive oxygen species levels’ elevation and mitochondrial membrane potential damage. Complex 3 also suppressed the proliferation, migration, and tube formation of endothelial cells in vitro and chicken chorioallantoic membrane development ex vivo. Furthermore, western blot analysis of cell signaling molecules indicated that Mo POMs blocked the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2-mediated ERK1/2 and AKT signaling pathways in endothelial cells. Using transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrated their cellular uptake and localization within the cytoplasm of HepG2 cells. These results indicate that, owing to the extraordinary physical and chemical properties, Mo POM nanoparticles can significantly inhibit tumor growth and angiogenesis, which makes them potential drug candidates in anticancer and anti-angiogenesis therapies.

  9. 15d-prostaglandin J2 enhancement of nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth is blocked by the chemoattractant receptor- homologous molecule expressed on T-helper type 2 cells (CRTH2) antagonist CAY10471 in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Michiyoshi; Shibata, Norihiro; Shintani, Norihito; Haba, Ryota; Hayata, Atsuko; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Baba, Akemichi

    2010-01-01

    The chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on T-helper type 2 cells (CRTH2) is the most recently identified prostaglandin (PG) receptor for both PGD(2) and 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-PGJ(2) (15d-PGJ(2)). We examined the mechanism by which 15d-PGJ(2) enhances nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. CAY10471 (CRTH2 antagonist) inhibited both the neurite-promotion and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphorylation induced by 15d-PGJ(2). In contrast, 13,14-dihydro-15-keto-PGD(2 )(DK-PGD(2)) (selective CRTH2 agonist) stimulated its phosphorylation but failed to produce neurite-promoting effects. These suggest, for the first time, the action of 15d-PGJ(2) is mediated by CRTH2, although the CRTH2 activation alone is insufficient for the underlying action. PMID:20424389

  10. 7,3',4'-Trihydroxyisoflavone inhibits epidermal growth factor-induced proliferation and transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells by suppressing cyclin-dependent kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Eun; Lee, Ki Won; Song, Nu Ry; Seo, Sang Kwon; Heo, Yong-Seok; Kang, Nam Joo; Bode, Ann M; Lee, Hyong Joo; Dong, Zigang

    2010-07-01

    Numerous in vitro and in vivo studies have shown that isoflavones exhibit anti-proliferative activity against epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor-positive malignancies of the breast, colon, skin, and prostate. 7,3',4'-Trihydroxyisoflavone (7,3',4'-THIF) is one of the metabolites of daidzein, a well known soy isoflavone, but its chemopreventive activity and the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. In this study, 7,3',4'-THIF prevented EGF-induced neoplastic transformation and proliferation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells. It significantly blocked cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G(1) phase. As shown by Western blot, 7,3',4'-THIF suppressed the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma protein at Ser-795 and Ser-807/Ser-811, which are the specific sites of phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4. It also inhibited the expression of G(1) phase-regulatory proteins, including cyclin D1, CDK4, cyclin E, and CDK2. In addition to regulating the expression of cell cycle-regulatory proteins, 7,3',4'-THIF bound to CDK4 and CDK2 and strongly inhibited their kinase activities. It also bound to phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), strongly inhibiting its kinase activity and thereby suppressing the Akt/GSK-3beta/AP-1 pathway and subsequently attenuating the expression of cyclin D1. Collectively, these results suggest that CDKs and PI3K are the primary molecular targets of 7,3',4'-THIF in the suppression of EGF-induced cell proliferation. These insights into the biological actions of 7,3',4'-THIF provide a molecular basis for the possible development of new chemoprotective agents. PMID:20444693

  11. Vascular endothelial growth factor induces anti‑Müllerian hormone receptor 2 overexpression in ovarian granulosa cells of in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection patients.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yanqiu; Lu, Xiaodan; Liu, Lei; Lin, Xiuying; Sun, Munan; Fu, Jianhua; Xu, Shufen; Tan, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Misregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF‑A) has been implicated in numerous types of ovarian disease, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome, ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, endometriosis and ovarian cancer. VEGF regulates blood vessel permeability and angiogenesis. In our previous study, VEGF‑regulated gene expression was profiled in the uterus of a transgenic mouse model with repressed VEGF expression, which indicated that VEGF is an important regulator in controlling gene expression in the uterus. The anti‑Müllerian hormone (AMH) is expressed by ovarian granulosa cells (GCs) and acts through its type 2 receptor, AMH receptor 2 (AMHR2). Serum AMH levels are used to predict ovarian reserves and the small antral follicles contribute markedly to the serum AMH level. AMH recruits primordial follicles and inhibits excessive follicular development by follicular stimulating hormone (FSH). However, AMH may be influenced by suppression of gonadotrophin secretion and VEGF inhibition. In the current study, human primary ovarian GCs were isolated from ovarian follicle fluid of in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles (IVF/ICSI). It was identified that the FSH receptor was consistently expressed in the isolated cells. VEGF‑A treatment stimulated AMHR2 overexpression at the gene and protein levels. In addition, VEGF induced AMHR2 expression on the surface of the isolated GCs from mature follicles. The VEGF treatment was also performed in an ovarian granulosa‑like cell line, KGN. AMH and AMHR2 are co‑expressed in normal GCs; however, as a result of VEGF misregulation, AMHR2 overexpression increases AMH binding, which may attenuate follicular or oocyte maturation. However, the associated function and underlying mechanism requires further investigation. PMID:27109000

  12. Expression and function of fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 in human corneal myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ebihara, Nobuyuki; Nakayama, Masafumi; Tokura, Tomoko; Ushio, Hiroko; Murakami, Akira

    2009-08-01

    The interaction of fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) and, its ligand tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is known to be important in wound healing of tissues. However, to our knowledge, expression and function of Fn14 in corneal myofibroblasts, which have a crucial role in wound healing of corneal stroma, has not been investigated. In this study, we investigated the expression and function of Fn14 in corneal myofibroblasts. Expression of Fn14 protein was assessed by flow cytometry. Corneal myofibroblasts showed strong expression of Fn14 protein, while keratocytes did not. TGF-beta(1) promoted the differentiation of keratocytes into corneal myofibroblasts, and induced Fn14 expression. These data reveal that keratocytes phenotype determines the level of Fn14 expression. ELISA was used to detect chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases in the supernatant of corneal myofibroblasts cultured with or without stimulation by TWEAK and/or TGF-beta(1). TWEAK increased the production of IL-8, MCP-1, and RANTES by corneal myofibroblasts via Fn14. TGF-beta(1) augmented the TWEAK-induced production of these chemokines. TWEAK also increased the production of MMP-1 and -3 by corneal myofibroblasts via Fn14, while TGF-beta(1) inhibited this effect of TWEAK on MMP production. TWEAK-induced phosphorylation of NF-kappaB and MAP kinase in corneal myofibroblasts. Furthermore, TWEAK partially inhibited the differentiation of keratocytes into corneal myofibroblasts promoted by TGF-beta(1). These data suggest that the Fn14/TWEAK system may have several roles in wound healing by corneal myofibroblasts. In the future, modulation of the TWEAK/Fn14 system may become a novel approach for control corneal wound healing. PMID:19344712

  13. SOXC Transcription Factors Induce Cartilage Growth Plate Formation in Mouse Embryos by Promoting Noncanonical WNT Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kato, Kenji; Bhattaram, Pallavi; Penzo-Méndez, Alfredo; Gadi, Abhilash; Lefebvre, Véronique

    2015-09-01

    Growth plates are specialized cartilage structures that ensure the elongation of most skeletal primordia during vertebrate development. They are made by chondrocytes that proliferate in longitudinal columns and then progress in a staggered manner towards prehypertrophic, hypertrophic and terminal maturation. Complex molecular networks control the formation and activity of growth plates, but remain incompletely understood. We investigated here the importance of the SoxC genes, which encode the SOX4, SOX11 and SOX12 transcription factors, in growth plates. We show that the three genes are expressed robustly in perichondrocytes and weakly in growth plate chondrocytes. SoxC(Prx1Cre) mice, which deleted SoxC genes in limb bud skeletogenic mesenchyme, were born with tiny appendicular cartilage primordia because of failure to form growth plates. In contrast, SoxC(Col2Cre) and SoxC(ATC) mice, which deleted SoxC genes primarily in chondrocytes, were born with mild dwarfism and fair growth plates. Chondrocytes in the latter mutants matured normally, but formed irregular columns, proliferated slowly and died ectopically. Asymmetric distribution of VANGL2 was defective in both SoxC(Prx1Cre) and SoxC(ATC) chondrocytes, indicating impairment of planar cell polarity, a noncanonical WNT signaling pathway that controls growth plate chondrocyte alignment, proliferation and survival. Accordingly, SoxC genes were necessary in perichondrocytes for expression of Wnt5a, which encodes a noncanonical WNT ligand required for growth plate formation, and in chondrocytes and perichondrocytes for expression of Fzd3 and Csnk1e, which encode a WNT receptor and casein kinase-1 subunit mediating planar cell polarity, respectively. Reflecting the differential strengths of the SOXC protein transactivation domains, SOX11 was more powerful than SOX4, and SOX12 interfered with the activity of SOX4 and SOX11. Altogether, these findings provide novel insights into the molecular regulation of skeletal

  14. ENDOGLIN is dispensable for vasculogenesis, but required for vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Lebrin, Franck; Maring, Janita A; van den Driesche, Sander; van der Brink, Stieneke; van Dinther, Maarten; Thorikay, Midory; Martin, Sabrina; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Hawinkels, Lukas J A C; van Meeteren, Laurens A; Pardali, Evangelia; Korving, Jeroen; Letarte, Michelle; Arthur, Helen M; Theuer, Charles; Goumans, Marie-José; Mummery, Christine; ten Dijke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ENDOGLIN (ENG) is a co-receptor for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members that is highly expressed in endothelial cells and has a critical function in the development of the vascular system. Mutations in Eng are associated with the vascular disease known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type l. Using mouse embryonic stem cells we observed that angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), induce vasculogenesis in embryoid bodies even when Eng deficient cells or cells depleted of Eng using shRNA are used. However, ENG is required for the stem cell-derived endothelial cells to organize effectively into tubular structures. Consistent with this finding, fetal metatarsals isolated from E17.5 Eng heterozygous mouse embryos showed reduced VEGF-induced vascular network formation. Moreover, shRNA-mediated depletion and pharmacological inhibition of ENG in human umbilical vein cells mitigated VEGF-induced angiogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that ENG is required for efficient VEGF-induced angiogenesis. PMID:24489709

  15. ENDOGLIN Is Dispensable for Vasculogenesis, but Required for Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    van der Brink, Stieneke; van Dinther, Maarten; Thorikay, Midory; Martin, Sabrina; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Hawinkels, Lukas J. A. C.; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Pardali, Evangelia; Korving, Jeroen; Letarte, Michelle; Arthur, Helen M.; Theuer, Charles; Goumans, Marie-José; Mummery, Christine; ten Dijke, Peter

    2014-01-01

    ENDOGLIN (ENG) is a co-receptor for transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family members that is highly expressed in endothelial cells and has a critical function in the development of the vascular system. Mutations in Eng are associated with the vascular disease known as hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia type l. Using mouse embryonic stem cells we observed that angiogenic factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), induce vasculogenesis in embryoid bodies even when Eng deficient cells or cells depleted of Eng using shRNA are used. However, ENG is required for the stem cell-derived endothelial cells to organize effectively into tubular structures. Consistent with this finding, fetal metatarsals isolated from E17.5 Eng heterozygous mouse embryos showed reduced VEGF-induced vascular network formation. Moreover, shRNA-mediated depletion and pharmacological inhibition of ENG in human umbilical vein cells mitigated VEGF-induced angiogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that ENG is required for efficient VEGF-induced angiogenesis. PMID:24489709

  16. Expression of cyr61, a growth factor-inducible immediate-early gene.

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, T P; Yang, G P; Sanders, L; Lau, L F

    1990-01-01

    A set of immediate-early genes that are rapidly activated by serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor in mouse 3T3 fibroblasts has been previously identified. Among these genes, several are related to known or putative transcription factors and growth factors, supporting the notion that some of these genes encode regulatory molecules important to cell growth. We show here that a member of this set of genes, cyr61 (originally identified by its cDNA 3CH61), encodes a 379-amino-acid polypeptide rich in cysteine residues. cyr61 can be induced through protein kinase C-dependent and -independent pathways. Unlike many immediate-early genes that are transiently expressed, the cyr61 mRNA is accumulated from the G0/G1 transition through mid-G1. This expression pattern is due to persistent transcription, while the mRNA is rapidly turned over during the G0/G1 transition and in mid-G1 at the same rate. In logarithmically growing cells, the cyr61 mRNA level is constant throughout the cell cycle. Cyr61 contains an N-terminal secretory signal sequence; however, it is not detected in the culture medium by immunoprecipitation. Cyr61 is synthesized maximally at 1 to 2 h after serum stimulation and has a short half-life within the cell. Images PMID:2355916

  17. Nuclear localization of Src-family tyrosine kinases is required for growth factor-induced euchromatinization

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akinori; Obata, Yuuki; Fukumoto, Yasunori; Nakayama, Yuji; Kasahara, Kousuke; Kuga, Takahisa; Higashiyama, Yukihiro; Saito, Takashi; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2009-04-15

    Src-family kinases (SFKs), which participate in various signaling events, are found at not only the plasma membrane but also several subcellular compartments, including the nucleus. Nuclear structural changes are frequently observed during transcription, cell differentiation, senescence, tumorigenesis, and cell cycle. However, little is known about signal transduction in the alteration of chromatin texture. Here, we develop a pixel imaging method for quantitatively evaluating chromatin structural changes. Growth factor stimulation increases euchromatic hypocondensation and concomitant heterochromatic hypercondensation in G{sub 1} phase, and the levels reach a plateau by 30 min, sustain for at least 5 h and return to the basal levels after 24 h. Serum-activated SFKs in the nucleus were more frequently detected in the euchromatin areas than the heterochromatin areas. Nuclear expression of kinase-active SFKs, but not unrelated Syk kinase, drastically increases both euchromatinization and heterochromatinization in a manner dependent on the levels of nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation. However, growth factor stimulation does not induce chromatin structural changes in SYF cells lacking SFKs, and reintroduction of one SFK member into SYF cells can, albeit insufficiently, induce chromatin structural changes. These results suggest that nuclear tyrosine phosphorylation by SFKs plays an important role in chromatin structural changes upon growth factor stimulation.

  18. Involvement of hepatocyte growth factor-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in human adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Khaleque Newaz; Kitajima, Michio; Hiraki, Koichi; Fujishita, Akira; Nakashima, Masahiro; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-02-01

    Adenomyosis is commonly believed to arise from the basalis endometrium. As an estromedin growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) exhibits multiple functions in endometriosis, a disease commonly believed to arise from the functionalis endometrium. Here, we investigated the role of HGF in the occurrence of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in adenomyosis. Full-thickness-biopsy specimens from endometrium to myometrium were collected after hysterectomy from women with and without adenomyosis. The relationship between HGF and E-cadherin (epithelial cell marker) and N-cadherin (mesenchymal cell markers) was examined at the gene and protein levels using endometrial epithelial cells (EECs) in culture and tissues by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. The gene and protein expressions of two transcriptional repressors of E-cadherin, SLUG and SNAIL, were examined using Ishikawa cells and in response to HGF and estrogen (E2). HGF down-regulated E-cadherin and up-regulated N-cadherin mRNA expression in EECs, and an inverse relationship in protein expression between HGF and E-cadherin was observed in basalis endometria derived from women with diffuse and focal adenomyosis. HGF induced morphological changes of EECs from a cobblestone-like appearance to spindle-shaped cells and promoted migration of EECs. Ishikawa cells exhibited up-regulation of SLUG/SNAIL gene expression in response to both HGF and E2 with an additive effect between them. HGF- and E2-promoted SLUG/SNAIL gene expression was significantly abrogated after pretreatment of cells with anti-HGF antibody or ICI 182720, an estrogen receptor antagonist. HGF may be involved in gland invagination deep into the myometrium by inducing EMT at the endo-myometrial junction in women with adenomyosis. PMID:25505196

  19. Occludin S490 Phosphorylation Regulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Retinal Neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuwen; Dreffs, Alyssa; Díaz-Coránguez, Monica; Runkle, E Aaron; Gardner, Thomas W; Chiodo, Vince A; Hauswirth, William W; Antonetti, David A

    2016-09-01

    Occludin is a transmembrane tight junction protein that contributes to diverse cellular functions, including control of barrier properties, cell migration, and proliferation. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces phosphorylation of occludin at S490, which is required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Herein, we demonstrate that occludin S490 phosphorylation also regulates VEGF-induced retinal endothelial cell proliferation and neovascularization. Using a specific antibody, phospho-occludin was located in centrosomes in endothelial cell cultures, animal models, and human surgical samples of retinal neovessels. Occludin S490 phosphorylation was found to increase with endothelial tube formation in vitro and in vivo during retinal neovascularization after induction of VEGF expression. More important, expression of occludin mutated at S490 to Ala, completely inhibited angiogenesis in cell culture models and in vivo. Collectively, these data suggest a novel role for occludin in regulation of endothelial proliferation and angiogenesis in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. These findings may lead to methods of regulating pathological neovascularization by specifically targeting endothelial cell proliferation. PMID:27423695

  20. Exogenous vascular endothelial growth factor induces malformed and hyperfused vessels during embryonic neovascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Drake, C J; Little, C D

    1995-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent and specific endothelial mitogen that is able to induce angiogenesis in vivo [Leung, D. W., Cachianes, G., Kuang, W.-J., Goeddel, D. V. & Ferrara, N. (1989) Science 246 1306-1309]. To determine if VEGF also influences the behavior of primordial endothelial cells, we used an in vivo vascular assay based on the de novo formation of vessels. Japanese quail embryos injected with nanomolar quantities of the 165-residue form of VEGF at the onset of vasculogenesis exhibited profoundly altered vessel development. In fact, the overall patterning of the vascular network was abnormal in all VEGF-injected embryos. The malformations were attributable to two specific endothelial cell activities: (i) inappropriate neovascularization in normally avascular areas and (ii) the unregulated, excessive fusion of vessels. In the first instance, supernumerary vessels directly linked the inflow channel of the heart to the aortic outflow channel. The second aberrant activity led to the formation of vessels with abnormally large lumens. Ultimately, unregulated vessel fusion generated massive vascular sacs that obliterated the identity of individual vessels. These observations show that exogenous VEGF has an impact on the behavior of primordial endothelial cells engaged in vasculogenesis, and they strongly suggest that endogenous VEGF is important in vascular patterning and regulation of vessel size (lumen formation). Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7543999

  1. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments. PMID:27026484

  2. A growth factor-induced, spatially organizing cytoskeletal module enables rapid and persistent fibroblast migration

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Katrin; Vilela, Marco; Jeon, Noo Li; Danuser, Gaudenz; Pertz, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Summary Directional migration requires robust front/back polarity. We find that fibroblasts treated with platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and pre-polarized by plating on a fibronectin line substrate, exhibit persistent migration for hours. This does not occur in the absence of PDGF, or on uniformly-coated fibronectin substrates. Persistent migration arises from establishment of two functional modules at cell front and back. At the front, formation of a zone containing podosome-like structures (PLS), dynamically correlates with low RhoA and myosin activity, and absence of a contractile lamella. At the back, myosin contractility specifically controls tail retraction with minimal crosstalk to the front module. The PLS zone is maintained in a dynamic steady state that preserves size and position relative to the cell front, allowing for long term coordination of front and back modules. We propose that front/back uncoupling achieved by the PLS zone is crucial for persistent migration in absence of directional cues. PMID:25268172

  3. Flavonoids from the leaves of Carya cathayensis Sarg. inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Sha-Sha; Jiang, Fu-Sheng; Zhang, Kun; Zhu, Xue-Xin; Jin, Bo; Lu, Jin-Jian; Ding, Zhi-Shan

    2014-01-01

    The total flavonoids (TFs) were isolated from the leaves of Carya cathayensis Sarg. (LCC), a well-known Chinese medicinal herb commercially cultivated in Tianmu Mountain district, a cross area of Zhejiang and Anhui provinces in China. Five flavonoids, i.e. cardamonin, pinostrobin chalcone (PC), wogonin, chrysin, and pinocembrin were the main components of the TFs. The TFs and these pure compounds suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced angiogenesis as detected in the mouse aortic ring assay, and cardamonin showed the best effect among them. To further elucidate the mechanisms for suppressing angiogenesis of these flavonoids, assays of VEGF-induced proliferation and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were performed. The TFs, cardamonin, pinocembrin, and chrysin obviously suppressed both VEGF-induced HUVEC proliferation and migration. However, PC and wogonin not only slightly inhibited VEGF-induced proliferation but also remarkably suppressed those of migration in HUVECs. Our further study showed that cardamonin decreased the phosphorylation of ERK and AKT induced by VEGF with a dose-dependent manner in HUVECs. Our findings indicate that the TFs and these pure flavonoids may become potential preventive and/or therapeutic agents against angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24096161

  4. Stem cell factor induces HIF-1{alpha} at normoxia in hematopoietic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, Malin; Loefstedt, Tobias; Sun Jianmin; Holmquist-Mengelbier, Linda; Pahlman, Sven; Roennstrand, Lars

    2008-12-05

    Signaling by the receptor for stem cell factor (SCF), c-Kit, is of major importance for hematopoiesis, melanogenesis and reproduction, and the biological responses are commonly proliferation and cell survival. Thus, constitutive activation due to c-Kit mutations is involved in the pathogenesis of several forms of cancer, e.g. leukemias, gastrointestinal stromal tumors and testicular tumors. Tumor survival requires oxygen supply through induced neovascularization, a process largely mediated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a prominent target of the transcription factors hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) and HIF-2. Using Affymetrix microarrays we have identified genes that are upregulated following SCF stimulation. Interestingly, many of the genes induced were found to be related to a hypoxic response. These findings were corroborated by our observation that SCF stimulation of the hematopoietic cell lines M-07e induces HIF-1{alpha} and HIF-2{alpha} protein accumulation at normoxia. In addition, SCF-induced HIF-1{alpha} was transcriptionally active, and transcribed HIF-1 target genes such as VEGF, BNIP3, GLUT1 and DEC1, an effect that could be reversed by siRNA against HIF-1{alpha}. We also show that SCF-induced accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} is dependent on both the PI-3-kinase and Ras/MEK/Erk pathways. Our data suggest a novel mechanism of SCF/c-Kit signaling in angiogenesis and tumor progression.

  5. Regulation by intracellular Ca sup 2+ and cyclic AMP of the growth factor-induced ruffling membrane formation and stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Miyata, Yoshihiko Tokyo Metropolitan Inst. of Medical Science ); Nishida, Eisuke; Sakai, Hikoichi ); Koyasu, Shigeo; Yahara, Ichiro )

    1989-04-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and epidermal growth factor (EGF) induce formation of ruffling membranes and stimulate the fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis in human epidermoid carcinoma KB cells. An increase in intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration by treatment with A23187, a calcium ionophore, or an increase in intracellular cAMP level by treatment with dibutyryl cAMP or forskolin almost completely inhibited the insulin-, IGF-I-, or EGF-induced formation of ruffling membranes. Increases in Ca{sup 2+} or cAMP concentration also inhibited almost completely the stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis elicited by these growth factors. These results suggest that the growth factor-induced ruffling membrane formation and the stimulation of fluid-phase endocytosis and exocytosis have a common regulatory mechanism involving intracellular concentrations of Ca{sup 2+} and cAMP. {sup 125}I-EGF binding assays and immunoprecipitation experiments with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody revealed that treatment of KB cells with A23187, dibutyryl cAMP, or forskolin did not inhibit the EGF binding to the cells nor subsequent tyrosine autophosphorylation of its receptors. These results indicate that Ca{sup 2+}- and/or cAMP-sensitive intracellular reactions exist downstream from the receptor kinase activation in the process of these early cellular responses.

  6. NOVEL ATYPICAL PKC INHIBITORS PREVENT VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Titchenell, Paul M.; Lin, Cheng-Mao; Keil, Jason M.; Sundstrom, Jeffrey M.; Smith, Charles D.; Antonetti, David A.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) contribute to the loss of the blood-retinal barrier (BRB) and subsequent macular edema in various retinal pathologies. VEGF signaling requires conventional PKC (PKCβ) activity; however, PKCβ inhibition only partially prevents VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and does not affect pro-inflammatory cytokine-induced permeability suggesting the involvement of alternative signaling pathways. Here, we provide evidence for the involvement of atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) signaling in VEGF-induced endothelial permeability and identify a novel class of inhibitors of aPKC that prevent BRB breakdown in vivo. Genetic and pharmacological manipulations of aPKC isoforms were used to assess their contribution to endothelial permeability in culture. A chemical library was screened using an in vitro kinase assay to identify novel small molecule inhibitors and further medicinal chemistry was performed to delineate a novel pharmacophore. We demonstrate that aPKC isoforms are both sufficient and required for VEGF-induced endothelial permeability. Furthermore, these specific, potent, non-competitive, small molecule inhibitors prevented VEGF-induced tight junction internalization and retinal endothelial permeability in response to VEGF in both primary culture and in rodent retina. These data suggest that aPKC inhibition with 2-amino-4-phenyl-thiophene derivatives may be developed to preserve the BRB in retinal diseases such as diabetic retinopathy or uveitis and the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of brain tumors. PMID:22721706

  7. Effects of angiopoietin-1 on vascular endothelial growth factor-induced angiogenesis in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Shwe, Y; Du, R; Chen, Y; Shen, F X; Young, W L; Yang, G Y

    2006-01-01

    A better understanding of angiogenic factors and their effects on angiogenesis in brain is necessary to treat cerebral vascular disorders such as ischemic brain injury. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) induces angiogenesis and increases blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability in adult mouse brain. The effect of angiopoietin-1 on BBB leakage during the angiogenesis process is unclear. We sought to identify the effects of combining VEGF with angiopoietin-1 on cerebral angiogenesis and BBB. Adult male CD-1 mice underwent AdFc (adenoviral vector control), AdAng-1, VEGF protein, VEGF protein plus AdAng-1, or saline (negative control) injection. Brain microvessels were counted using lectin staining on tissue sections after 2 weeks of adenoviral gene transfer. The presence of zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1) was determined by Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Microvessel count and augmented capillary diameter increased in mice treated with either VEGF protein or AdAng-1 plus VEGF protein compared to saline, AdFc, or AdAng-1 alone (p < 0.05). Double-labeled immunostaining demonstrated that ZO-1-positive staining was more complete on the microvessel wall in the AdAng-1 and AdAng-1 plus VEGF protein treated group compared to VEGF protein group. The results of ZO-1 expression from Western blot analysis paralleled that from immunohistochemistry (p < 0.05). We conclude that focal VEGF and angiopoietin-1 hyperstimulation in mouse brain increases microvessel density while maintaining ZO-1 protein expression, suggesting that angiopoietin-1 plays a role in synergistically inducing angiogenesis and BBB integrity. PMID:16671501

  8. Nerve growth factor induces sensitization of nociceptors without evidence for increased intraepidermal nerve fiber density.

    PubMed

    Hirth, Michael; Rukwied, Roman; Gromann, Alois; Turnquist, Brian; Weinkauf, Benjamin; Francke, Klaus; Albrecht, Philip; Rice, Frank; Hägglöf, Björn; Ringkamp, Matthias; Engelhardt, Maren; Schultz, Christian; Schmelz, Martin; Obreja, Otilia

    2013-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is involved in the long-term sensitization of nociceptive processing linked to chronic pain. Functional and structural ("sprouting") changes can contribute. Thus, humans report long-lasting hyperalgesia to mechanical and electrical stimulation after intradermal NGF injection and NGF-induced sprouting has been reported to underlie cancer bone pain and visceral pain. Using a human-like animal model we investigated the relationship between the structure and function of unmyelinated porcine nociceptors 3 weeks after intradermal NGF treatment. Axonal and sensory characteristics were studied by in vivo single-fiber electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry. C fibers recorded extracellularly were classified based on mechanical response and activity-dependent slowing (ADS) of conduction velocity. Intraepidermal nerve fiber (IENF) densities were assessed by immunohistochemistry in pigs and in human volunteers using the same NGF model. NGF increased conduction velocity and reduced ADS and propagation failure in mechano-insensitive nociceptors. The proportion of mechano-sensitive C nociceptors within NGF-treated skin areas increased from 45.1% (control) to 71% and their median mechanical thresholds decreased from 40 to 20 mN. After NGF application, the mechanical receptive fields of nociceptors increased from 25 to 43 mm(2). At the structural level, however, IENF density was not increased by NGF. In conclusion, intradermal NGF induces long-lasting axonal and mechanical sensitization in porcine C nociceptors that corresponds to hyperalgesia observed in humans. Sensitization is not accompanied by increased IENF density, suggesting that NGF-induced hyperalgesia might not depend on changes in nerve fiber density but could be linked to the recruitment of previously silent nociceptors. PMID:23891896

  9. Fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) is expressed in the lower genital tract and may play a role in amplifying inflammation during infection.

    PubMed

    Han, Eugene S; Mekasha, Samrawit; Ingalls, Robin R

    2010-01-01

    TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) cytokine superfamily which regulates a number of cellular responses, including inflammation and proliferation. TWEAK is primarily secreted by phagocytic cells and its receptor, fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14), is expressed on non-lymphoid cells, including epithelial, endothelial and mesenchymal cells. The TWEAK/Fn14 pathway is highly conserved from an evolutionary standpoint, and has been shown to play a role in tissue regeneration and inflammation in the liver, kidney, lung and skeletal muscle. We hypothesized that TWEAK/Fn14 might have a physiological role in regulating infection-induced inflammation in the lower female genital tract. To test this hypothesis, we examined expression of the receptor Fn14 in relevant cells and tissue. Receptor function was tested by treating cells with recombinant TWEAK, with and without other known proinflammatory stimuli. Flow cytometric analysis of vaginal and cervical epithelial cells revealed that Fn14 was highly expressed at the cell surface. We also detected both Fn14 and TWEAK in whole cervical tissue by RT-PCR. Treatment of vaginal and cervical epithelial cells with recombinant TWEAK led to a weak induction of the chemokine IL-8. However, TWEAK potentiated the effects of IL-1ss, the TLR2 ligand Pam(3)CysSK(4), and live Neisseria gonorrhoeae in a synergistic manner. These data reveal a novel pathway for regulation of microbial-induced inflammation in the female reproductive tract and suggest that interference with the TWEAK/Fn14 pathway might be an approach to abrogate excessive infection-induced inflammation caused by sexually transmitted pathogens. PMID:19963275

  10. Inhibitory Activity of Yokukansankachimpihange against Nerve Growth Factor-Induced Neurite Growth in Cultured Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Chiaki; Watanabe, Shimpei; Nakamura, Motokazu; Norimoto, Hisayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Chronic pruritus is a major and distressing symptom of many cutaneous diseases, however, the treatment remains a challenge in the clinic. The traditional Chinese-Japanese medicine (Kampo medicine) is a conservative and increasingly popular approach to treat chronic pruritus for both patients and medical providers. Yokukansankachimpihange (YKH), a Kampo formula has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of itching of atopic dermatitis in Japan although its pharmacological mechanism is unknown clearly. In an attempt to clarify its pharmacological actions, in this study, we focused on the inhibitory activity of YKH against neurite growth induced with nerve growth factor (NGF) in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons because epidermal hyperinnervation is deeply related to itch sensitization. YKH showed approximately 200-fold inhibitory activity against NGF-induced neurite growth than that of neurotropin (positive control), a drug used clinically for treatment of chronic pruritus. Moreover, it also found that Uncaria hook, Bupleurum root and their chemical constituents rhynchophylline, hirsutine, and saikosaponin a, d showed inhibitory activities against NGF-induced neurite growth, suggesting they should mainly contribute to the inhibitory activity of YKH. Further study on the effects of YKH against epidermal nerve density in "itch-scratch" animal models is under investigation. PMID:26287150

  11. Epidermal growth factor-induced stimulation of proliferation and gene expression changes in the hypotrichous ciliate, Stylonychia lemnae.

    PubMed

    Mu, Weijie; Wang, Qi; Bourland, William A; Jiang, Chuanqi; Yuan, Dongxia; Pan, Xuming; Miao, Wei; Chen, Ying; Xiong, Jie

    2016-10-30

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) induces proliferation of epidermal and epithelial tissues in mammals. However, the effect of EGF on the single-celled eukaryotes is not well characterized, especially in the protists. Ciliates, an important group of protists, are well characterized as both pollution indicators and model organisms for research. Stylonychia lemnae, is one of the most common free-living ciliates, widely distributed in ponds, rivers and marshes. Here, we report the role of EGF on cell proliferation stimulation in S. lemnae. The growth curve of S. lemnae was established, and the stimulation effect of EGF on the proliferation of S. lemnae was investigated. Based on the results, potential EGF receptors were identified in S. lemnae according to the conserved domains and gene expression. Differential gene expression revealed that EGF-induced genes in other organisms (e.g. antioxidant) also up-regulated in S. lemnae cells at propagation stages. In addition, our results showed that EGF could up-regulate the signal transduction-related processes in the decline stage of S. lemnae cells, indicating its potential function in apoptosis inhibition. In summary, this study reports findings of the first investigation of EGF effects in hypotrich ciliates, and establishes an additional system for the study of the molecular mechanisms of EGF actions in eukaryotic cell division and proliferation. PMID:27506312

  12. Liver growth factor induces testicular regeneration in EDS-treated rats and increases protein levels of class B scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Lobo, M V T; Arenas, M I; Huerta, L; Sacristán, S; Pérez-Crespo, M; Gutiérrez-Adán, A; Díaz-Gil, J J; Lasunción, M A; Martín-Hidalgo, A

    2015-01-15

    The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of liver growth factor (LGF) on the regeneration process of rat testes after chemical castration induced by ethane dimethanesulfonate (EDS) by analyzing some of the most relevant proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism, such as hormone sensitive lipase (HSL), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), scavenger receptor SR-BI, and other components of the SR family that could contribute to the recovery of steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis. Sixty male rats were randomized to nontreated (controls) and LGF-treated, EDS-treated, and EDS + LGF-treated groups. Testes were obtained on days 10 (T1), 21 (T2), and 35 (T3) after EDS treatment, embedded in paraffin, and analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. LGF improved the recovery of the seminiferous epithelia, the appearance of the mature pattern of Leydig cell interstitial distribution, and the expression of mature SR-BI. Moreover, LGF treatment resulted in partial recovery of HSL expression in Leydig cells and spermatogonia. No changes in serum testosterone were observed in control or LGF-treated rats, but in EDS-castrated animals LGF treatment induced a progressive increase in serum testosterone levels and 3β-HSD expression. Based on the pivotal role of SR-BI in the uptake of cholesteryl esters from HDL, it is suggested that the observed effects of LGF would facilitate the provision of cholesterol for sperm cell growth and Leydig cell recovery. PMID:25389365

  13. Enhancement of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell injury by cycloheximide

    SciTech Connect

    Nolop, K.B.; Ryan, U.S. )

    1990-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a potent polypeptide mediator released by activated monocytes and macrophages, has a number of proinflammatory effects on endothelial cells. TNF is cytotoxic to tumor cells in vivo and in vitro, but TNF-induced toxicity to endothelial cells is less well established. We now report that cycloheximide (CHX), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, renders endothelial cells highly susceptible to TNF-induced lysis. TNF alone did not change the overall rate of protein synthesis by endothelial cells, whereas the addition of CHX completely abolished protein synthesis. Endothelial cells incubated in TNF alone in high concentrations (up to 1,000 U/ml) showed minimal rounding up and release of 51Cr. Likewise, CHX alone (5 micrograms/ml) had no significant effect on endothelial cell morphology and release of 51Cr. However, incubation of endothelial cells in both CHX and TNF caused injury in a dose-dependent manner. Morphological evidence of cell retraction, rounding, and detachment began within 2 h, but specific 51Cr release did not begin to rise until after 4 h. These changes were not observed when endothelial cells were incubated with TNF/CHX at 4 degrees C. The combination of TNF/CHX was lethal to all endothelial cells tested (bovine pulmonary artery, human umbilical vein, and human aorta), with human aortic cells showing the most pronounced changes. We conclude that healthy endothelial cells are resistant to TNF-induced lysis, but inhibition of their ability to make protein renders them highly susceptible.

  14. Structural Basis and Targeting of the Interaction between Fibroblast Growth Factor-inducible 14 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-like Weak Inducer of Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Dhruv, Harshil; Loftus, Joseph C.; Narang, Pooja; Petit, Joachim L.; Fameree, Maureen; Burton, Julien; Tchegho, Giresse; Chow, Donald; Yin, Holly; Al-Abed, Yousef; Berens, Michael E.; Tran, Nhan L.; Meurice, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Deregulation of the TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK)-fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) signaling pathway is observed in many diseases, including inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and cancer. Activation of Fn14 signaling by TWEAK binding triggers cell invasion and survival and therefore represents an attractive pathway for therapeutic intervention. Based on structural studies of the TWEAK-binding cysteine-rich domain of Fn14, several homology models of TWEAK were built to investigate plausible modes of TWEAK-Fn14 interaction. Two promising models, centered on different anchoring residues of TWEAK (tyrosine 176 and tryptophan 231), were prioritized using a data-driven strategy. Site-directed mutagenesis of TWEAK at Tyr176, but not Trp231, resulted in the loss of TWEAK binding to Fn14 substantiating Tyr176 as the anchoring residue. Importantly, mutation of TWEAK at Tyr176 did not disrupt TWEAK trimerization but failed to induce Fn14-mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cell (NF-κB) signaling. The validated structural models were utilized in a virtual screen to design a targeted library of small molecules predicted to disrupt the TWEAK-Fn14 interaction. 129 small molecules were screened iteratively, with identification of molecules producing up to 37% inhibition of TWEAK-Fn14 binding. In summary, we present a data-driven in silico study revealing key structural elements of the TWEAK-Fn14 interaction, followed by experimental validation, serving as a guide for the design of small molecule inhibitors of the TWEAK-Fn14 ligand-receptor interaction. Our results validate the TWEAK-Fn14 interaction as a chemically tractable target and provide the foundation for further exploration utilizing chemical biology approaches focusing on validating this system as a therapeutic target in invasive cancers. PMID:24056367

  15. Prolactin, growth hormone, erythropoietin and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor induce MGF-Stat5 DNA binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Gouilleux, F; Pallard, C; Dusanter-Fourt, I; Wakao, H; Haldosen, L A; Norstedt, G; Levy, D; Groner, B

    1995-01-01

    The molecular components which mediate cytokine signaling from the cell membrane to the nucleus were studied. Upon the interaction of cytokines with their receptors, members of the janus kinase (Jak) family of cytoplasmic protein tyrosine kinases and of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stat) family of transcription factors are activated through tyrosine phosphorylation. It has been suggested that the Stat proteins are substrates of the Jak protein tyrosine kinases. MGF-Stat5 is a member of the Stat family which has been found to confer the prolactin response. MGF-Stat5 can be phosphorylated and activated in its DNA binding activity by Jak2. The activation of MGF-Stat5 is not restricted to prolactin. Erythropoietin (EPO) and growth hormone (GH) stimulate the DNA binding activity of MGF-Stat5 in COS cells transfected with vectors encoding EPO receptor and MGF-Stat5 or vectors encoding GH receptor and MGF-Stat5. The activation of DNA binding by prolactin, EPO and GH requires the phosphorylation of tyrosine residue 694 of MGF-Stat5. The transcriptional induction of a beta-casein promoter luciferase construct in transiently transfected COS cells is specific for the prolactin activation of MGF-Stat5; it is not observed in EPO- and GH-treated cells. In the UT7 human hematopoietic cell line, EPO and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor activate the DNA binding activity of a factor closely related to MGF-Stat5 with respect to its immunological reactivity, DNA binding specificity and molecular weight. These results suggest that MGF-Stat5 regulates physiological processes in mammary epithelial cells, as well as in hematopoietic cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images PMID:7744007

  16. Tumor necrosis factor-induced contraction of cultured rat mesangial cells: interaction with angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Medina, J; Baud, L; Garcia Escribano, C; Gila, J A; Rodriguez Puyol, D; Rodriguez Puyol, M

    1993-08-01

    The role of tumor necrosis factor alpha in the regulation of renal function, particularly glomerular filtration rate, has not been completely defined. This study was designed to assess the intrinsic role of this cytokine on glomerular filtration rate by analyzing its short-term effect on the degree of contraction in cultured rat mesangial cells, not only directly but also in the presence of angiotensin II. Contraction was evaluated both morphologically--by measuring planar cell surface area of cultured rat mesangial cells and glomerular cross-sectional area of isolated rat glomeruli--and biochemically--by analyzing myosin light-chain phosphorylation in cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha significantly decreased planar cell surface area in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner, an effect completely abolished by preincubation of the cells with platelet-activating factor receptor antagonists BN 52021 and alprazolam. This effect was also observed in the presence of angiotensin II, whether tumor necrosis factor alpha was added before or after angiotensin II, increasing the reduction in planar cell surface area induced by angiotensin II in both cases. Changes in planar cell surface area were evident not only when the absolute values of this parameter were considered but also when the percentage of contracted cells (cells with a planar cell surface area reduction > 10%) was analyzed. Tumor necrosis factor alpha also induced a significant reduction of glomerular cross-sectional area in isolated rat glomeruli. The results of the morphologic studies were supported by myosin light-chain phosphorylation experiments.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8340701

  17. Generation and gene expression profiling of 48 transcription-factor-inducible mouse embryonic stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yamamizu, Kohei; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Yu, Hong; Nishiyama, Akira; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2016-01-01

    Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) can differentiate into a wide range – and possibly all cell types in vitro, and thus provide an ideal platform to study systematically the action of transcription factors (TFs) in cell differentiation. Previously, we have generated and analyzed 137 TF-inducible mouse ESC lines. As an extension of this “NIA Mouse ESC Bank,” we generated and characterized 48 additional mouse ESC lines, in which single TFs in each line could be induced in a doxycycline-controllable manner. Together, with the previous ESC lines, the bank now comprises 185 TF-manipulable ESC lines (>10% of all mouse TFs). Global gene expression (transcriptome) profiling revealed that the induction of individual TFs in mouse ESCs for 48 hours shifts their transcriptomes toward specific differentiation fates (e.g., neural lineages by Myt1 Isl1, and St18; mesodermal lineages by Pitx1, Pitx2, Barhl2, and Lmx1a; white blood cells by Myb, Etv2, and Tbx6, and ovary by Pitx1, Pitx2, and Dmrtc2). These data also provide and lists of inferred target genes of each TF and possible functions of these TFs. The results demonstrate the utility of mouse ESC lines and their transcriptome data for understanding the mechanism of cell differentiation and the function of TFs. PMID:27150017

  18. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes has a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by upregulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression; therefore, we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF, and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 upregulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  19. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by up regulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression, so we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 up-regulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  20. Proangiogenic role of ephrinB1/EphB1 in basic fibroblast growth factor-induced corneal angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Takashi; Chang, Jin-Hong; Azar, Dimitri T

    2007-02-01

    Corneal neovascularization is a vision-threatening condition caused by various ocular pathological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the function of the ephrin ligands and Eph receptors in vitro and in vivo in corneal angiogenesis in a mouse model. The Eph tyrosine kinase receptors and their ligands, ephrins, are expressed on the cell surface. The functions of Eph and ephrins have been shown to regulate axonal guidance, segmentation, cell migration, and angiogenesis. Understanding the roles of Eph and ephrin in corneal angiogenesis may provide a therapeutic intervention for the treatment of angiogenesis-related disorders. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated that ephrinB1 and EphB1 were expressed in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF)-induced vascularized corneas. EphB1 was specifically colocalized with vascular endothelial marker CD31 surrounded by type IV collagen. EphrinB1 was expressed in corneal-resident keratocytes and neutrophils. Recombinant ephrinB1-Fc, which induces EphB receptor activation, enhanced bFGF-induced tube formation in an in vitro aortic ring assay and promoted bFGF-induced corneal angiogenesis in vivo in a corneal pocket assay. Synergistically enhanced and sustained activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase was noted in vascular endothelial cell lines after stimulation with ephrin B1 and bFGF combinations. These results suggest that ephrinB1 plays a synergistic role in corneal neovascularization. PMID:17255342

  1. Platelet-released growth factors induce the antimicrobial peptide human beta-defensin-2 in primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Andreas; Lammel, Justus; Rademacher, Franziska; Groß, Justus; Siggelkow, Markus; Lippross, Sebastian; Klüter, Tim; Varoga, Deike; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Pufe, Thomas; Cremer, Jochen; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF) and its related clinically used formulations [e.g. Vivostat platelet-rich fibrin (PRF(®) )] are thrombocyte concentrate lysates that support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal and infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide expressed in human keratinocytes exhibiting potent antimicrobial activity against wound-related bacteria. In this study, we analysed the influence of PRGF on hBD-2 expression in human primary keratinocytes and the influence of Vivostat PRF(®) on hBD-2 expression in experimentally generated skin wounds in vivo. Treatment of primary keratinocytes with PRGF caused a significant increase in hBD-2 gene and protein expressions in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The use of blocking antibodies revealed that the PRGF-mediated hBD-2 induction was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Luciferase gene reporter assays indicated that the hBD-2 induction through PRGF required activation of the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1), but not of NF-kappaB. In concordance with these cell culture data, Vivostat PRF(®) induced hBD-2 expression when applied to experimentally generated skin wounds. Together, our results indicate that the induction of hBD-2 by thrombocyte concentrate lysates can contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of chronic and infected wounds. PMID:26843467

  2. Vascular endothelial growth factor-induced elimination of the type 1 interferon receptor is required for efficient angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hui; Qian, Juan; Carbone, Christopher J; Leu, N Adrian; Baker, Darren P; Fuchs, Serge Y

    2011-10-01

    Angiogenesis is stimulated by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and antagonized by type 1 interferons, including IFN-α/β. On engaging their respective receptors (VEGFR2 and IFNAR), both stimuli activate protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and type 1 IFNs require PKD2 activation and recruitment to IFNAR1 to promote the phosphorylation-dependent ubiquitination, down-regulation, and degradation of the cognate receptor chain, IFNAR1. Data reveal that PKD2 activity is dispensable for VEGF-stimulated down-regulation of VEGFR2. Remarkably, VEGF treatment promotes the recruitment of PKD2 to IFNAR1 as well as ensuing phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and degradation of IFNAR1. In cells exposed to VEGF, phosphorylation-dependent degradation of IFNAR1 leads to an inhibition of type 1 IFN signaling and is required for efficient VEGF-stimulated angiogenesis. Importance of this mechanism for proangiogenic or antiangiogenic responses in cells exposed to counteracting stimuli and the potential medical significance of this regulation are discussed. PMID:21832278

  3. Nerve growth factor induces facial heat hyperalgesia and plays a role in trigeminal neuropathic pain in rats.

    PubMed

    Dos Reis, Renata C; Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Nones, Carina F M; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2016-09-01

    There is preclinical evidence that nerve growth factor (NGF) contributes toward inflammatory hyperalgesia in the orofacial region, but the mechanisms underlying its hyperalgesic effect as well as its role in trigeminal neuropathic pain require further investigation. This study investigated the ability of NGF to induce facial heat hyperalgesia and the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptor A, transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, and mast cells in NGF pronociceptive effects. In addition, the role of NGF in heat hyperalgesia in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain was evaluated. NGF injection into the upper lip of naive rats induced long-lasting heat hyperalgesia. Pretreatment with an antibody anti-NGF, antagonists of tyrosine kinase receptor A, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 receptors or compound 48/80, to induce mast-cell degranulation, all attenuated NGF-induced hyperalgesia. In a rat model of trigeminal neuropathic pain, local treatment with anti-NGF significantly reduced heat hyperalgesia. In addition, increased NGF levels were detected in the ipsilateral infraorbital nerve branch at the time point that represents the peak of heat hyperalgesia. The results suggest that NGF is a prominent hyperalgesic mediator in the trigeminal system and it may represent a potential therapeutic target for the management of painful orofacial conditions, including trigeminal neuropathic pain. PMID:27392124

  4. Loss of serum response factor induces microRNA-mediated apoptosis in intestinal smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, C; Lee, M Y; Slivano, O J; Park, P J; Ha, S; Berent, R M; Fuchs, R; Collins, N C; Yu, T J; Syn, H; Park, J K; Horiguchi, K; Miano, J M; Sanders, K M; Ro, S

    2015-01-01

    Serum response factor (SRF) is a transcription factor known to mediate phenotypic plasticity in smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Despite the critical role of this protein in mediating intestinal injury response, little is known about the mechanism through which SRF alters SMC behavior. Here, we provide compelling evidence for the involvement of SRF-dependent microRNAs (miRNAs) in the regulation of SMC apoptosis. We generated SMC-restricted Srf inducible knockout (KO) mice and observed both severe degeneration of SMCs and a significant decrease in the expression of apoptosis-associated miRNAs. The absence of these miRNAs was associated with overexpression of apoptotic proteins, and we observed a high level of SMC death and myopathy in the intestinal muscle layers. These data provide a compelling new model that implicates SMC degeneration via anti-apoptotic miRNA deficiency caused by lack of SRF in gastrointestinal motility disorders. PMID:26633717

  5. Attenuation of tumor necrosis factor-induced endothelial cell cytotoxicity and neutrophil chemiluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, H.; Crowley, J.J.; Chan, J.C.; Hoffmann, H.; Hatherill, J.R.; Ishizaka, A.; Raffin, T.A. )

    1990-11-01

    Our laboratory has previously shown that the administration of tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a cytokine produced by activated mononuclear cells, to guinea pigs produces a syndrome similar to gram-negative sepsis or ARDS. Pentoxifylline (PTX), a methylxanthine, protects against TNF-induced and sepsis-induced acute lung injury in vivo. We now report on in vitro cellular studies of PMN-mediated cellular injury and its attenuation. We studied TNF-induced bovine pulmonary artery endothelial cell (EC) cytotoxicity both with and without PMN. A 51Cr release assay was used to measure EC damage. Further, we investigated PMN function in response to TNF by measuring chemiluminescence. Agents that attenuate EC damage and PMN activation were evaluated in the above assays. Results revealed that TNF causes EC injury (p less than 0.05) and PMN increase TNF-induced EC injury. Furthermore, PTX, aminophylline (AMPH), caffeine, and forskolin attenuate TNF-induced EC cytotoxicity only in the presence of PMN (p less than 0.05). Of interest, dibutyryl cAMP (DBcAMP) protects EC from TNF-induced injury both with and without PMN. Agents that may increase cAMP levels in PMN (PTX, DBcAMP, forskolin, isobutyl methylxanthine, and terbutaline) significantly attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence (p less than 0.05). We conclude that TNF causes EC damage and PMN increase this damage. Furthermore, PTX, AMPH, caffeine, and forskolin can attenuate TNF-induced EC injury in the presence of PMN, whereas DBcAMP attenuates TNF-induced EC injury with and without PMN. In addition, agents that may increase intracellular cAMP levels in PMN can attenuate TNF-induced PMN chemiluminescence. Thus, these agents likely attenuate TNF-induced PMN-mediated EC injury through their inhibitory effects on PMN.

  6. Platelet-activating factor induces collagenase expression in corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, H E; Tao, Y; Bazan, N G

    1993-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator involved in inflammatory and immune responses, accumulates rapidly in response to injury in a variety of tissues, including the corneal epithelium. However, the precise role of this compound in the cascade of events following insult has not been defined. Here we examined the effect of PAF on gene expression in the epithelial cells of rabbit corneas in organ culture. We found that incubation with 100 nM methylcarbamoyl PAF, a nonhydrolyzable analog of PAF, produced rapid transient 2.8- and 3.5-fold increases in the expression of c-fos and c-jun, respectively, at 1 hr, followed by increased expression of the collagenase type I gene beginning at 3 hr and peaking at 14-fold by 8 hr. Addition of the protein-synthesis-inhibitor cycloheximide superinduced c-fos and c-jun, strongly potentiating the PAF effect, but inhibited the induction of collagenase type I expression, suggesting the existence of a transcriptional factor linking the two events. BN-50730, a selective antagonist of intracellular PAF-binding sites, blocked the expression of the immediate-early genes as well as the increase in collagenase type I mRNA. Our results suggest that one of the functions of PAF may be to enhance the breakdown of the extracellular matrix as a part of the remodeling process during corneal wound healing after injury. Pathologically, a PAF-induced overproduction of collagenase may be a factor in the development of corneal ulcers, as well as other pathophysiological conditions such as cartilage destruction in arthritis. If so, inhibitors of this signal-transduction pathway may be useful as tools for further investigation and, eventually, as therapeutic agents to treat such disorders. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8378347

  7. Bcl-2–Modifying Factor Induces Renal Proximal Tubular Cell Apoptosis in Diabetic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Garnet J.; Godin, Nicolas; Maachi, Hasna; Lo, Chao-Sheng; Wu, Shyh-Jong; Zhu, Jian-Xin; Brezniceanu, Marie-Luise; Chénier, Isabelle; Fragasso-Marquis, Joelle; Lattouf, Jean-Baptiste; Ethier, Jean; Filep, Janos G.; Ingelfinger, Julie R.; Nair, Viji; Kretzler, Matthias; Cohen, Clemens D.; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S.D.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the mechanisms underlying tubular apoptosis in diabetes by identifying proapoptotic genes that are differentially upregulated by reactive oxygen species in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs) in models of diabetes. Total RNAs isolated from renal proximal tubules (RPTs) of 20-week-old heterozygous db/m+, db/db, and db/db catalase (CAT)-transgenic (Tg) mice were used for DNA chip microarray analysis. Real-time quantitative PCR assays, immunohistochemistry, and mice rendered diabetic with streptozotocin were used to validate the proapoptotic gene expression in RPTs. Cultured rat RPTCs were used to confirm the apoptotic activity and regulation of proapoptotic gene expression. Additionally, studies in kidney tissues from patients with and without diabetes were used to confirm enhanced proapoptotic gene expression in RPTs. Bcl-2–modifying factor (Bmf) was differentially upregulated (P < 0.01) in RPTs of db/db mice compared with db/m+ and db/db CAT-Tg mice and in RPTs of streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice in which insulin reversed this finding. In vitro, Bmf cDNA overexpression in rat RPTCs coimmunoprecipated with Bcl-2, enhanced caspase-3 activity, and promoted apoptosis. High glucose (25 mmol/L) induced Bmf mRNA expression in RPTCs, whereas rotenone, catalase, diphenylene iodinium, and apocynin decreased it. Knockdown of Bmf with small interfering RNA reduced high glucose–induced apoptosis in RPTCs. More important, enhanced Bmf expression was detected in RPTs of kidneys from patients with diabetes. These data demonstrate differential upregulation of Bmf in diabetic RPTs and suggest a potential role for Bmf in regulating RPTC apoptosis and tubular atrophy in diabetes. PMID:22210314

  8. Essential Role of Transglutaminase 2 in Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Vascular Leakage in the Retina of Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeon-Ju; Jung, Se-Hui; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Sungeun; Hwang, JongYun; Kim, Soo-Youl; Kim, Young-Myeong; Ha, Kwon-Soo

    2016-08-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is predominantly caused by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced vascular leakage; however, the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we designed an in vivo transglutaminase (TGase) activity assay in mouse retina and demonstrated that hyperglycemia induced vascular leakage by activating TGase2 in diabetic retina. VEGF elevated TGase2 activity through sequential elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations in endothelial cells. The TGase inhibitors cystamine and monodansylcadaverin or TGase2 small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented VEGF-induced stress fiber formation and vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin disruption, which play a critical role in modulating endothelial permeability. Intravitreal injection of two TGase inhibitors or TGase2 siRNA successfully inhibited hyperglycemia-induced TGase activation and microvascular leakage in the retinas of diabetic mice. C-peptide or ROS scavengers also inhibited TGase activation in diabetic mouse retinas. The role of TGase2 in VEGF-induced vascular leakage was further supported using diabetic TGase2(-/-) mice. Thus, our findings suggest that ROS-mediated activation of TGase2 plays a key role in VEGF-induced vascular leakage by stimulating stress fiber formation and VE-cadherin disruption. PMID:27207524

  9. Scatter factor induces blood vessel formation in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, D S; Kleinman, H K; Goldberg, I D; Bhargava, M M; Nickoloff, B J; Kinsella, J L; Polverini, P; Rosen, E M

    1993-01-01

    Scatter factor (also known as hepatocyte growth factor) is a glycoprotein secreted by stromal cells that stimulates cell motility and proliferation. In vitro, scatter factor stimulates vascular endothelial cell migration, proliferation, and organization into capillary-like tubes. Using two different in vivo assays, we showed that physiologic quantities of purified native mouse scatter factor and recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor induce angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). The angiogenic activity was blocked by specific anti-scatter factor antibodies. Scatter factor induced cultured microvascular endothelial cells to accumulate and secrete significantly increased quantities of urokinase, an enzyme associated with development of an invasive endothelial phenotype during angiogenesis. We further showed that immunoreactive scatter factor is present surrounding sites of blood vessel formation in psoriatic skin. These findings suggest that scatter factor may act as a paracrine mediator in pathologic angiogenesis associated with human inflammatory disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:7680481

  10. Monitoring cell growth.

    PubMed

    Strober, W

    2001-05-01

    This appendix provides two protocols for monitoring cell growth. Counting cells using a hemacytometer is tedious but it allows one to effectively distinguish live cells from dead cells (using Trypan Blue exclusion). In addition, this procedure is less subject to errors due to cell clumping or heterogeneity of cell size. The use of an electronic cell counter is quicker and easier than counting cells using a hemacytometer. However, an electronic cell counter as currently constructed does not distinguish live from dead cells in a reliable fashion and is subject to error due to the presence of cell clumps. Overall, the electronic cell counter is best reserved for repetitive and rapid counting of fresh peripheral blood cells and should be used with caution when counting cell populations derived from tissues. PMID:18432653

  11. Platelet-activating factor induces cell cycle arrest and disrupts the DNA damage response in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Puebla-Osorio, N; Damiani, E; Bover, L; Ullrich, S E

    2015-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid modulator of inflammation that has diverse physiological and pathological functions. Previously, we demonstrated that PAF has an essential role in ultraviolet (UV)-induced immunosuppression and reduces the repair of damaged DNA, suggesting that UV-induced PAF is contributing to skin cancer initiation by inducing immune suppression and also affecting a proper DNA damage response. The exact role of PAF in modulating cell proliferation, differentiation or transformation is unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) by which PAF affects the cell cycle and impairs early DNA damage response. PAF arrests proliferation in transformed and nontransformed human mast cells by reducing the expression of cyclin-B1 and promoting the expression of p21. PAF-treated cells show a dose-dependent cell cycle arrest mainly at G2–M, and a decrease in the DNA damage response elements MCPH1/BRIT-1 and ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (ATR). In addition, PAF disrupts the localization of p-ataxia telangiectasia mutated (p-ATM), and phosphorylated-ataxia telangiectasia and rad related (p-ATR) at the site of DNA damage. Whereas the potent effect on cell cycle arrest may imply a tumor suppressor activity for PAF, the impairment of proper DNA damage response might implicate PAF as a tumor promoter. The outcome of these diverse effects may be dependent on specific cues in the microenvironment. PMID:25950475

  12. Tissue factor induces VEGF expression via activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in ARPE-19 cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Sang, Aimin; Zhu, Manhui; Zhang, Guowei; Guan, Huaijin; Ji, Min

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of the present study was to investigate the potential signal mechanism of tissue factor (TF) in the regulation of the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. Methods An in vitro RPE cell chemical hypoxia model was established by adding cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in the culture medium. The irritative concentration of CoCl2 was determined with a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay kit. VEGF production in ARPE-19 cells was measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting. The Wnt signaling pathway–associated molecules, including phospho-glycogen synthase kinase 3β (p-GSK3β), GSK3β, p-β-catenin and β-catenin, were detected with western blotting. pEGFP-N3-hTF was constructed and verified with digestion of the restriction enzyme and sequencing analysis. Human TF overexpression and silencing plasmids were transfected into the ARPE-19 cells to clarify the causal relationship between TF and VEGF expression. The Transwell coculture system of ARPE-19 cells and RF/6A rhesus macaque choroid–retinal endothelial cells was performed to evaluate cell invasion and tube formation ability. Results Our anoxic model of ARPE-19 cells showed that TF expression was upregulated in accordance with variations in hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HIF-1α) and VEGF levels. Silencing and overexpression of TF decreased and increased VEGF expression, respectively. The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway played an important role in this effect. Results from the ARPE-19 cell and RF/6A cell coculture system showed that the enhancement of TF expression in the ARPE-19 cells led to significantly faster invasion and stronger tube-forming ability of the RF/6A cells, while siRNA-mediated TF silencing caused the opposite effects. Pharmacological disruption of Wnt signaling IWR-1-endo inhibited the effects compared to the TF-overexpressing group

  13. Novel Piperazine-based Compounds Inhibit Microtubule Dynamics and Sensitize Colon Cancer Cells to Tumor Necrosis Factor-induced Apoptosis*

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Avijeet; Anderson, Amy; Giardina, Charles

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a series of mitotically acting piperazine-based compounds that potently increase the sensitivity of colon cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. Here we describe a structure-activity relationship study on this compound class and identify a highly active derivative ((4-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazin-1-yl)(2-ethoxyphenyl)methanone), referred to as AK301, the activity of which is governed by the positioning of functional groups on the phenyl and benzoyl rings. AK301 induced mitotic arrest in HT29 human colon cancer cells with an ED50 of ≈115 nm. Although AK301 inhibited growth of normal lung fibroblast cells, mitotic arrest was more pronounced in the colon cancer cells (50% versus 10%). Cells arrested by AK301 showed the formation of multiple microtubule organizing centers with Aurora kinase A and γ-tubulin. Employing in vitro and in vivo assays, tubulin polymerization was found to be slowed (but not abolished) by AK301. In silico molecular docking suggests that AK301 binds to the colchicine-binding domain on β-tubulin, but in a novel orientation. Cells arrested by AK301 expressed elevated levels of TNFR1 on their surface and more readily activated caspases-8, -9, and -3 in the presence of TNF. Relative to other microtubule destabilizers, AK301 was the most active TNF-sensitizing agent and also stimulated Fas- and TRAIL-induced apoptosis. In summary, we report a new class of mitosis-targeting agents that effectively sensitizes cancer cells to apoptotic ligands. These compounds should help illuminate the role of microtubules in regulating apoptotic ligand sensitivity and may ultimately be useful for developing agents that augment the anti-cancer activities of the immune response. PMID:24338023

  14. Mechanics of Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Morrison, Barclay; Holmes, Jeffrey W.; Hung, Clark T.

    2012-01-01

    Cell growth describes an essential feature of biological tissues. This growth process may be modeled by using a set of relatively simple governing equations based on the axioms of mass and momentum balance, and using a continuum framework that describes cells and tissues as mixtures of a solid matrix, a solvent and multiple solutes. In this model the mechanics of cell growth is driven by osmotic effects, regulated by the cells’ active uptake of solutes and passive uptake of solvent. By accounting for the anisotropy of the cells’ cytoskeletal structures or extracellular matrix, as well as external constraints, a wide variety of growing shapes may be produced as illustrated in various examples. PMID:22904576

  15. Tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 are expressed in urticarial vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengmeng; Chen, Tao; Guo, Zaipei; Li, Jingyi; Cao, Na

    2013-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), a member of the TNF family, has been implicated as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in many types of autoimmune and infectious diseases. However, information about TWEAK in dermatological diseases is limited. To date, no studies have investigated the roles of TWEAK in patients with urticarial vasculitis (UV). This study aimed to assess serum TWEAK levels, together with TWEAK and fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) expressions of skin lesions in patients with UV. Serum TWEAK levels in patients with UV, together with patients with cutaneous leukocytoclastic angiitis (CLA) and healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay; TWEAK and Fn14 expressions of skin lesions were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Results showed that TWEAK and Fn14 were abundantly expressed in the dermal vessel wall of lesional skin in patients with UV but not healthy controls. Serum TWEAK levels in the acute stage in patients with UV were significantly higher than those in the convalescent stage and healthy controls. Serum TWEAK levels were elevated significantly in patients with CLA compared with those in healthy controls. Our previous study indicated that TWEAK may be an important mediator for the development of vascular inflammation in skin. In addition, we also found that TWEAK blockade substantially reduced vascular damage and perivascular leukocyte infiltrates in lipopolysaccharide-induced cutaneous vasculitis. Our study shows that TWEAK may be associated with the pathogenesis of UV; it is therefore suggested that TWEAK may be a potential therapeutic target for UV and other types of cutaneous vasculitis. PMID:23968277

  16. Cell Growth Enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Exogene Corporation uses advanced technologies to enhance production of bio-processed substances like proteins, antibiotics and amino acids. Among them are genetic modification and a genetic switch. They originated in research for Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Extensive experiments in cell growth through production of hemoglobin to improve oxygen supply to cells were performed. By improving efficiency of oxygen use by cells, major operational expenses can be reduced. Greater product yields result in decreased raw material costs and more efficient use of equipment. A broad range of applications is cited.

  17. Expression of tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis and fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 in patients with polymyositis and dermatomyositis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) and its receptor fibroblast growth factor-inducible 14 (Fn14) in patients with polymyositis (PM) and dermatomyositis (DM), and their relation to clinical manifestations. Methods Serum levels of TWEAK were detected in 98 PM/DM patients and 37 healthy controls by using the ELISA method. Total RNA isolated from fresh-frozen muscle tissue samples of 36 PM/DM patients and 10 healthy controls were used for analyzing the mRNA levels of TWEAK and Fn14 by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Immunofluorescence staining of TWEAK and Fn14 was conducted on muscle biopsy specimens from 23 PM/DM patients and seven healthy controls. Results Serum levels of TWEAK were significantly decreased in the PM/DM patients compared to those in the healthy controls (P < 0.001), and serum TWEAK levels negatively correlated with serum CD163 levels in PM/DM patients (r = -0.49, P < 0.001). The expression of Fn14 mRNA was significantly increased in the muscle tissue of PM/DM patients than in the muscle tissue of healthy controls (P < 0.01), whereas the expression of TWEAK mRNA in PM/DM patients was not statistically different from that of the healthy controls (P > 0.05). Fn14 mRNA levels in muscle tissue positively correlated with muscle disease activity (r = 0.512, P < 0.01). Patients with oropharyngeal dysphagia had significantly higher Fn14 mRNA levels than patients without oropharyngeal dysphagia (P < 0.05). The results of immunofluorescence staining showed that 19 out of 23 PM/DM patients were TWEAK-positive, and 20 out of 23 PM/DM patients were Fn14-positive. No detectable expressions of TWEAK or Fn14 were observed in the healthy controls. Conclusions TWEAK-Fn14 axis may be involved in the pathogenesis of PM/DM. Further understanding of TWEAK-Fn14 function in PM/DM may help to define

  18. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  19. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α and macrophage migration-inhibitory factor induce metastatic behavior in CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shin, Han-Na; Moon, Hyun-Hye; Ku, Ja-Lok

    2012-12-01

    Metastasis of cancer cells is a major cause of death in cancer patients. The process of cancer metastasis includes the proliferation of primary cancer cells, local invasion, intravasation and cancer cell survival in blood flow, extravasation and attachment to secondary organs and metastatic growth in a new environment. In these mechanisms of cancer metastasis, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4) and its ligand play an important role. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α, also known as CXCL12) is well known as a ligand of CXCR4, and macrophage migration-inhibitory factor (MIF) has recently become known as a ligand of CXCR4. In many types of cancers including breast, pancreatic and colorectal cancer (CRC), CXCR4/SDF-1α has been investigated in metastasis-related cancer behavior, which include cell proliferation, adhesion, migration and invasion. However, CXCR4/MIF has rarely been investigated in the metastatic behavior of colon cancer cells. In this report, the effect of SDF-1α or MIF was studied on cell cycle, cell proliferation, adhesion and migration of the CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cell line SW480. SDF-1α or MIF caused a decrease in the number of cells in G0/G1 phase and an increase in the numbers of cells in S and G2/M phases. In addition, SDF-1α or MIF caused an increase in cell proliferation, cell adhesion to fibronectin and migration. AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist, attenuated these effects, which included increased cell proliferation, adhesion and migration due to treatment of CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells with SDF-1α or MIF. In conclusion, SDF-1α or MIF affects the metastasis-related behaviors of CXCR4-expressing colon cancer cells. PMID:23023114

  20. TGF-β1, in association with the increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, induce the hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum through the p38 MAPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan-Lin; Duan, Yang; Zhu, Li-Xin; Zhan, Ye-Nan; Min, Shao-Xiong; Jin, An-Min

    2016-08-01

    Hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum (LF) is one of the key pathomechanisms of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is abundantly expressed in hypertrophied degenerative LF tissues from LSS. However, the molecular mechanisms underling the association between TGF-β1 and LF hypertrophy have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the important role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in the pathogenesis of LSS by analyzing the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen I and collagen III) in TGF-β1-treated LF cells. Cell growth assay revealed that TGF-β1, in association with CTGF, enhanced the the proliferation of LF cells, and we found that TGF-β1 also elevated CTGF expression and subsequently enhanced the mRNA expression of collagen I and collagen III. The increased mRNA expression levels of CTGF, collagen I and collagen III were abolished by p38 inhibitors. Both immunofluorescence imaging and western blot analysis of p38 and p-p38 revealed the increased expression and phosphorylation of p38. Silencing the expression of p38 by siRNA in LF cells decreased the protein expression of p38, p-p38 and CTGF, as well as the mRNA expression of CTGF, collagen I and collagen III. Taken together, our findings indicate that TGF-β1, in association with the increased expression of CTGF, contribute to the homeostasis of the ECM and to the hypertrophy of LF through the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:27279555

  1. TGF-β1, in association with the increased expression of connective tissue growth factor, induce the hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum through the p38 MAPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yan-Lin; Duan, Yang; Zhu, Li-Xin; Zhan, Ye-Nan; Min, Shao-Xiong; Jin, An-Min

    2016-01-01

    Hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum (LF) is one of the key pathomechanisms of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 is abundantly expressed in hypertrophied degenerative LF tissues from LSS. However, the molecular mechanisms underling the association between TGF-β1 and LF hypertrophy have not yet been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the important role of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway in the pathogenesis of LSS by analyzing the expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and extracellular matrix (ECM) components (collagen I and collagen III) in TGF-β1-treated LF cells. Cell growth assay revealed that TGF-β1, in association with CTGF, enhanced the the proliferation of LF cells, and we found that TGF-β1 also elevated CTGF expression and subsequently enhanced the mRNA expression of collagen I and collagen III. The increased mRNA expression levels of CTGF, collagen I and collagen III were abolished by p38 inhibitors. Both immunofluorescence imaging and western blot analysis of p38 and p-p38 revealed the increased expression and phosphorylation of p38. Silencing the expression of p38 by siRNA in LF cells decreased the protein expression of p38, p-p38 and CTGF, as well as the mRNA expression of CTGF, collagen I and collagen III. Taken together, our findings indicate that TGF-β1, in association with the increased expression of CTGF, contribute to the homeostasis of the ECM and to the hypertrophy of LF through the p38 MAPK pathway. PMID:27279555

  2. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants do not prevent tumour necrosis factor-induced necrosis of L929 cells.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Reagan M; Göttert, Jana; Murphy, Michael P; Ledgerwood, Elizabeth C

    2007-09-01

    Mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is widely reported as a central effector during TNF-induced necrosis. The effect of a family of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants on TNF-induced necrosis of L929 cells was studied. While the commonly used lipid-soluble antioxidant BHA effectively protected cells from TNF-induced necrosis, the mitochondria-targeted antioxidants MitoQ(3), MitoQ(5), MitoQ(10) and MitoPBN had no effect on TNF-induced necrosis. Since BHA also acts as an uncoupler of mitochondrial membrane potential, two additional uncouplers were tested. FCCP and CCCP both provided dose-dependent inhibition of TNF-induced necrosis. In conclusion, the generation of mitochondrial ROS may not be necessary for TNF-induced necrosis. Instead, these results suggest alternative mitochondrial functions, such as a respiration-dependent process, are critical for necrotic death. PMID:17729122

  3. Overexpression of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor induces pulmonary granulation tissue formation and fibrosis by induction of transforming growth factor-beta 1 and myofibroblast accumulation.

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Z.; Tremblay, G. M.; Sime, P. J.; Gauldie, J.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously reported that transfer to rat lung of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) gene leads to high expression of GM-CSF between days 1 and 4 and granulation tissue formation followed by an irreversible fibrotic response starting from day 12 onward. In the current study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms. We found that GM-CSF overexpression did not enhance production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in a significant manner at any time after GM-CSF gene transfer. However, the content of transforming growth factor-beta 1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was markedly induced at day 4 and appeared to be maximal around day 7 and remained high at day 12. Macrophages purified from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid 7 days after GM-CSF gene transfer spontaneously released significant quantities of transforming growth factor-beta 1 protein in vitro. After peak transforming growth factor-beta 1 production was the emergence of alpha-smooth muscle actin-rich myofibroblasts. Accumulation of these cells was most prominent at day 12 within the granulation tissues and they were still present in fibrotic areas between days 12 and 24 and diminished markedly afterward. Thus, we provide the first in vivo evidence that tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be dissociated from participation in a fibrotic process in the lung and GM-CSF may play a more direct role in pulmonary fibrogenesis at least in part through its capability to induce transforming growth factor-beta 1 in macrophages and the subsequent emergence of myofibroblast phenotypes. This GM-CSF transgene lung model is useful for a stepwise dissection of both cellular and molecular events involved in pulmonary fibrosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9006322

  4. PTK787/ZK 222584, a novel and potent inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, impairs vascular endothelial growth factor-induced responses and tumor growth after oral administration.

    PubMed

    Wood, J M; Bold, G; Buchdunger, E; Cozens, R; Ferrari, S; Frei, J; Hofmann, F; Mestan, J; Mett, H; O'Reilly, T; Persohn, E; Rösel, J; Schnell, C; Stover, D; Theuer, A; Towbin, H; Wenger, F; Woods-Cook, K; Menrad, A; Siemeister, G; Schirner, M; Thierauch, K H; Schneider, M R; Drevs, J; Martiny-Baron, G; Totzke, F

    2000-04-15

    PTK787/ZK 222584 (1-[4-chloroanilino]-4-[4-pyridylmethyl] phthalazine succinate) is a potent inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinases, active in the submicromolar range. It also inhibits other class III kinases, such as the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor beta tyrosine kinase, c-Kit, and c-Fms, but at higher concentrations. It is not active against kinases from other receptor families, such as epidermal growth factor receptor, fibroblast growth factor receptor-1, c-Met, and Tie-2, or intracellular kinases such as c-Src, c-Abl, and protein kinase C-alpha. PTK787/ZK 222584 inhibits VEGF-induced autophosphorylation of kinase insert domain-containing receptor (KDR), endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and survival in the nanomolar range in cell-based assays. In concentrations up to 1 microM, PTK787/ZK 222584 does not have any cytotoxic or antiproliferative effect on cells that do not express VEGF receptors. After oral dosing (50 mg/kg) to mice, plasma concentrations of PTK787/ZK 222584 remain above 1 microM for more than 8 h. PTK787/ZK 222584 induces dose-dependent inhibition of VEGF and PDGF-induced angiogenesis in a growth factor implant model, as well as a tumor cell-driven angiogenesis model after once-daily oral dosing (25-100 mg/kg). In the same dose range, it also inhibits the growth of several human carcinomas, grown s.c. in nude mice, as well as a murine renal carcinoma and its metastases in a syngeneic, orthotopic model. Histological examination of tumors revealed inhibition of microvessel formation in the interior of the tumor. PTK787/ZK 222584 is very well tolerated and does not impair wound healing. It also does not have any significant effects on circulating blood cells or bone marrow leukocytes as a single agent or impair hematopoetic recovery after concomitant cytotoxic anti-cancer agent challenge. This novel compound has therapeutic potential for the treatment of solid tumors and other

  5. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells.

    PubMed

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean-rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27271618

  6. Regulation of Small RNAs and Corresponding Targets in Nod Factor-Induced Phaseolus vulgaris Root Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Formey, Damien; Martín-Rodríguez, José Ángel; Leija, Alfonso; Santana, Olivia; Quinto, Carmen; Cárdenas, Luis; Hernández, Georgina

    2016-01-01

    A genome-wide analysis identified the set of small RNAs (sRNAs) from the agronomical important legume Phaseolus vulgaris (common bean), including novel P. vulgaris-specific microRNAs (miRNAs) potentially important for the regulation of the rhizobia-symbiotic process. Generally, novel miRNAs are difficult to identify and study because they are very lowly expressed in a tissue- or cell-specific manner. In this work, we aimed to analyze sRNAs from common bean root hairs (RH), a single-cell model, induced with pure Rhizobium etli nodulation factors (NF), a unique type of signal molecule. The sequence analysis of samples from NF-induced and control libraries led to the identity of 132 mature miRNAs, including 63 novel miRNAs and 1984 phasiRNAs. From these, six miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed during NF induction, including one novel miRNA: miR-RH82. A parallel degradome analysis of the same samples revealed 29 targets potentially cleaved by novel miRNAs specifically in NF-induced RH samples; however, these novel miRNAs were not differentially accumulated in this tissue. This study reveals Phaseolus vulgaris-specific novel miRNA candidates and their corresponding targets that meet all criteria to be involved in the regulation of the early nodulation events, thus setting the basis for exploring miRNA-mediated improvement of the common bean–rhizobia symbiosis. PMID:27271618

  7. Factor-induced Reprogramming and Zinc Finger Nuclease-aided Gene Targeting Cause Different Genome Instability in β-Thalassemia Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs)*

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ning; Shan, Yongli; Liao, Baojian; Kong, Guanyi; Wang, Cheng; Huang, Ke; Zhang, Hui; Cai, Xiujuan; Chen, Shubin; Pei, Duanqing; Chen, Nansheng; Pan, Guangjin

    2015-01-01

    The generation of personalized induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) followed by targeted genome editing provides an opportunity for developing customized effective cellular therapies for genetic disorders. However, it is critical to ascertain whether edited iPSCs harbor unfavorable genomic variations before their clinical application. To examine the mutation status of the edited iPSC genome and trace the origin of possible mutations at different steps, we have generated virus-free iPSCs from amniotic cells carrying homozygous point mutations in β-hemoglobin gene (HBB) that cause severe β-thalassemia (β-Thal), corrected the mutations in both HBB alleles by zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting, and obtained the final HBB gene-corrected iPSCs by excising the exogenous drug resistance gene with Cre recombinase. Through comparative genomic hybridization and whole-exome sequencing, we uncovered seven copy number variations, five small insertions/deletions, and 64 single nucleotide variations (SNVs) in β-Thal iPSCs before the gene targeting step and found a single small copy number variation, 19 insertions/deletions, and 340 single nucleotide variations in the final gene-corrected β-Thal iPSCs. Our data revealed that substantial but different genomic variations occurred at factor-induced somatic cell reprogramming and zinc finger nuclease-aided gene targeting steps, suggesting that stringent genomic monitoring and selection are needed both at the time of iPSC derivation and after gene targeting. PMID:25795783

  8. Growth factor-induced activation of a kinase activity which causes regulatory phosphorylation of p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    L'Allemain, G; Her, J H; Wu, J; Sturgill, T W; Weber, M J

    1992-01-01

    p42/microtubule-associated protein kinase (p42mapk) is activated by tyrosine and threonine phosphorylation, and its regulatory phosphorylation is likely to be important in signalling pathways involved in growth control, secretion, and differentiation. Here we show that treatment of quiescent 3T3 cells with diverse agonists results in the appearance of an activity capable of causing the in vitro phosphorylation of p42mapk on the regulatory tyrosine and to a lesser extent on the regulatory threonine, resulting in enzymatic activation of the p42mapk. This p42mapk-activating activity is capable of phosphorylating a kinase-defective p42mapk mutant, thus confirming its activity as a kinase. Images PMID:1314951

  9. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase mediates epidermal growth factor-induced activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Logan, S K; Falasca, M; Hu, P; Schlessinger, J

    1997-01-01

    The signaling events which mediate activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) are not yet well characterized. To broaden our understanding of upstream mediators which link extracellular signals to the JNK pathway, we investigated the role of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase in epidermal growth factor (EGF)-mediated JNK activation. In this report we demonstrate that a dominant negative form of PI 3-kinase as well as the inhibitor wortmannin blocks EGF-induced JNK activation dramatically. However, wortmannin does not have an effect on JNK activation induced by UV irradiation or osmotic shock. In addition, a membrane-targeted, constitutively active PI 3-kinase (p110beta) was shown to produce in vivo products and to activate JNK, while a kinase-mutated form of this protein showed no activation. On the basis of these experiments, we propose that PI 3-kinase activity plays a role in EGF-induced JNK activation in these cells. PMID:9315636

  10. Overexpression of mitochondrial Hsp75 protects neural stem cells against microglia-derived soluble factor-induced neurotoxicity by regulating mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Lin, Jizong; Chen, Qing-Zhuang; Zhu, Ning; Jiang, De-Qi; Li, Ming-Xing; Wang, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Microglia (MG)-induced neurotoxicity, a major determinant of Alzheimer's disease, is closely related to the survival of neural stem cells (NSCs). Heat shock protein 75 (Hsp75) has been reported to exert protective effects against environmental stresses; however, whether or not it protects NSCs against MG-derived soluble factor-induced neurotoxicity remains unclear. In the present study, we constructed NSCs that overexpressed human Hsp75 protein and established a co-culture system in order to elucidate the role of Hsp75 in NSC-MG interactions. The results obtained indicated that Hsp75 expression increased after 12 h of soluble factor induction and continued to increase for up to 36 h of treatment. The overexpression of Hsp75 decreased NSC apoptosis and preserved mitochondrial membrane potential. Further experiments revealed that the overexpression of Hsp75 inhibited the formation of cyclophilin D (CypD)-dependent mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) involvement in neurotoxicity-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and suppressed the activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade, as demonstrated by the inhibition of the release of cytochrome c (Cytc) and the activation of caspase-3. The findings of this study demonstrate that Hsp75 overexpression prevents the impairment of NSCs induced by MG-derived soluble factors by regulating the opening of mPTP. Thus, Hsp75 warrants further investigation as a potential candidate for protection against neurotoxicity. PMID:26500047

  11. Nicotine contributes to the neural stem cells fate against toxicity of microglial-derived factors induced by Aβ via the Wnt/β-catenin pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, De-Qi; Wei, Mei-Dan; Wang, Ke-Wan; Lan, Yan-Xian; Zhu, Ning; Wang, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the molecules secreted from microglias play important roles in the cell fate determination of neural stem cells (NSCs), and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist treatment could reduce neuroinflammation in some neurodegenerative disease models, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it is not clear how nicotine plays a neuroprotective role in inflammation-mediated central nervous diseases, and its possible mechanisms in the process remain largely elusive. The aim of this study is to improve the survival microenvironment of NSCs co-cultured with microglias in vitro by weakening inflammation that mediated by accumulation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). The viability, proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis of NSCs and underlying mechanisms associated with Wnt signaling pathway were investigated. The results showed that Aβ could directly damage NSCs. Furthermore, concomitant to elevated levels of TNF-α, IL-1β derived from microglias, the NSCs had been damaged more severely with the upregulation of Axin 2, p-β-catenin and the downregulation of β-catenin, p-GSK-3β, microtubule-associated protein-2, choline acetyltransferase. However, addition of 10 μmol/L nicotine before microglias treated with Aβ was beneficial to protect the NSCs against neurotoxicity of microglial-derived factors induced by Aβ, which partially rescued proliferation, differentiation and inhibited apoptosis of NSCs via activation of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Taken together, these data imply that low concentration nicotine attenuates NSCs injury induced by microglial-derived factors via Wnt signaling pathway. Thus, treatment with nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonist provides a promising research field for neural stem cell fate and therapeutic intervention in neuroinflammation diseases. PMID:26001208

  12. The regulatory effect of SC-236 (4-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1-pyrazol-1-l] benzenesulfonamide) on stem cell factor induced migration of mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Su-Jin; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Park, Rae-Kil; Lee, Kang-Min; Kim, Hyung-Min; Um, Jae-Young; Hong, Seung-Heon . E-mail: jooklim@wonkwang.ac.kr

    2007-04-15

    SC-236 (4-[5-(4-chlorophenyl)-3-(trifluoromethyl)-1-pyrazol-1-]benzenesulfonamide; C{sub 16}H{sub 11}ClF{sub 3}N{sub 3}O{sub 2}S), is a highly selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor. Recently, there have been reports that SC-236 protects against cartilage damage in addition to reducing inflammation and pain in osteoarthritis. However, the mechanism involved in the inflammatory allergic reaction has not been examined. Mast cells accumulation can be related to inflammatory conditions, including allergic rhinitis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. The aim of the present study is to investigate the effects of SC-236 on stem cell factor (SCF)-induced migration, morphological alteration, and cytokine production of rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). We observed that SCF significantly induced the migration and morphological alteration. The ability of SCF to enhance migration and morphological alteration was abolished by treatment with SC-236. In addition, production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}, interleukin (IL)-1{beta}, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production induced by SCF was significantly inhibited by treatment with SC-236. Previous work has demonstrated that SCF-induced migration and cytokine production of mast cells require p38 MAPK activation. We also showed that SC-236 suppresses the SCF-induced p38 MAPK activation in RPMCs. These data suggest that SC-236 inhibits migration and cytokine production through suppression of p38 MAPK activation. These results provided new insight into the pharmacological actions of SC-236 and its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of inflammatory allergic diseases.

  13. Epidermal growth factor induces Ca(2+) sensitization through Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Tomoya; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Ohkura, Natsumi; Kobe, Asami; Yayama, Katsutoshi

    2015-09-01

    We previously found that the protein tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor orthovanadate evoked a vasoconstrictor effect in rat aortas via Rho-kinase-dependent inactivation of myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) downstream of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor signaling. To determine whether the direct activation of EGF receptor by EGF also induces Rho-kinase-dependent vasoconstriction, isometric tension changes were measured in rat aortic rings without endothelium. Although EGF did not produce a contractile effect, the Ca(2+)-induced force in Ca(2+)-depleted rings significantly increased after treatment with 100nM EGF, suggesting that EGF induces Ca(2+) sensitization by MLCP inactivation. In addition, EGF induced the activation of Rho-kinase and phosphorylation of myosin phosphatase target subunit 1 (MYPT1) in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). The effects of EGF on Ca(2+) sensitivity in aortas and MYPT1 phosphorylation in VSMCs were blocked by inhibitors of EGF receptor (AG1478), Rho-kinase (Y27632), extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (Erk1/2; FR180204), and mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK; PD98059), but not by inhibitors of p38 kinase (SB203580) and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (AS601245). EGF-induced Erk1/2 phosphorylation was not abrogated by the Rho-kinase inhibitor, suggesting that Rho-kinase-dependent phosphorylation of MYPT1 is downstream of EGF receptor/MEK/Erk1/2 signaling. These results suggest that EGF induces Ca(2+) sensitization in vascular smooth muscle by Rho-kinase-dependent inactivation of MLCP mediated by the EGF receptor/MEK/Erk1/2 pathway. PMID:26004531

  14. Nodal Promotes Glioblastoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    De Silva, Tanya; Ye, Gang; Liang, Yao-Yun; Fu, Guodong; Xu, Guoxiong; Peng, Chun

    2012-01-01

    Nodal is a member of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily that plays critical roles during embryogenesis. Recent studies in ovarian, breast, prostate, and skin cancer cells suggest that Nodal also regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis, and invasion in cancer cells. However, it appears to exert both tumor-suppressing and tumor-promoting effects, depending on the cell type. To further understand the role of Nodal in tumorigenesis, we examined the effect of Nodal in glioblastoma cell growth and spheroid formation using U87 cell line. Treatment of U87 with recombinant Nodal significantly increased U87 cell growth. In U87 cells stably transfected with the plasmid encoding Nodal, Smad2 phosphorylation was strongly induced and cell growth was significantly enhanced. Overexpression of Nodal also resulted in tight spheroid formation. On the other hand, the cells stably transfected with Nodal siRNA formed loose spheroids. Nodal is known to signal through activin receptor-like kinase 4 (ALK4) and ALK7 and the Smad2/3 pathway. To determine which receptor and Smad mediate the growth promoting effect of Nodal, we transfected siRNAs targeting ALK4, ALK7, Smad2, or Smad3 into Nodal-overexpressing cells and observed that cell growth was significantly inhibited by ALK4, ALK7, and Smad3 siRNAs. Taken together, these findings suggest that Nodal may have tumor-promoting effects on glioblastoma cells and these effects are mediated by ALK4, ALK7, and Smad3. PMID:22645523

  15. Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor Induces Genes Associated with Inflammation and Gliosis in the Retina: A Gene Profiling Study of Flow-Sorted, Müller Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, V. Joseph; Brooks, Matthew; Swaroop, Anand; Sarthy, Vijay P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), a member of the interleukin-6 cytokine family, has been implicated in the development, differentiation and survival of retinal neurons. The mechanisms of CNTF action as well as its cellular targets in the retina are poorly understood. It has been postulated that some of the biological effects of CNTF are mediated through its action via retinal glial cells; however, molecular changes in retinal glia induced by CNTF have not been elucidated. We have, therefore, examined gene expression dynamics of purified Müller (glial) cells exposed to CNTF in vivo. Methodology/Principal Findings Müller cells were flow-sorted from mgfap-egfp transgenic mice one or three days after intravitreal injection of CNTF. Microarray analysis using RNA from purified Müller cells showed differential expression of almost 1,000 transcripts with two- to seventeen-fold change in response to CNTF. A comparison of transcriptional profiles from Müller cells at one or three days after CNTF treatment showed an increase in the number of transcribed genes as well as a change in the expression pattern. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed that the differentially regulated genes belong to distinct functional types such as cytokines, growth factors, G-protein coupled receptors, transporters and ion channels. Interestingly, many genes induced by CNTF were also highly expressed in reactive Müller cells from mice with inherited or experimentally induced retinal degeneration. Further analysis of gene profiles revealed 20–30% overlap in the transcription pattern among Müller cells, astrocytes and the RPE. Conclusions/Significance Our studies provide novel molecular insights into biological functions of Müller glial cells in mediating cytokine response. We suggest that CNTF remodels the gene expression profile of Müller cells leading to induction of networks associated with transcription, cell cycle regulation and inflammatory response. CNTF also appears to

  16. The Small GTPase ROP10 of Medicago truncatula Is Required for Both Tip Growth of Root Hairs and Nod Factor-Induced Root Hair Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ming-Juan; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Aimin; Luo, Li; Xie, Yajun; Li, Guan; Luo, Da; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Wen, Jiangqi; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian; Wang, Yan-Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Rhizobia preferentially enter legume root hairs via infection threads, after which root hairs undergo tip swelling, branching, and curling. However, the mechanisms underlying such root hair deformation are poorly understood. Here, we showed that a type II small GTPase, ROP10, of Medicago truncatula is localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of root hair tips to regulate root hair tip growth. Overexpression of ROP10 and a constitutively active mutant (ROP10CA) generated depolarized growth of root hairs, whereas a dominant negative mutant (ROP10DN) inhibited root hair elongation. Inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti, the depolarized swollen and ballooning root hairs exhibited extensive root hair deformation and aberrant infection symptoms. Upon treatment with rhizobia-secreted nodulation factors (NFs), ROP10 was transiently upregulated in root hairs, and ROP10 fused to green fluorescent protein was ectopically localized at the PM of NF-induced outgrowths and curls around rhizobia. ROP10 interacted with the kinase domain of the NF receptor NFP in a GTP-dependent manner. Moreover, NF-induced expression of the early nodulin gene ENOD11 was enhanced by the overexpression of ROP10 and ROP10CA. These data suggest that NFs spatiotemporally regulate ROP10 localization and activity at the PM of root hair tips and that interactions between ROP10 and NF receptors are required for root hair deformation and continuous curling during rhizobial infection. PMID:25794934

  17. The small GTPase ROP10 of Medicago truncatula is required for both tip growth of root hairs and nod factor-induced root hair deformation.

    PubMed

    Lei, Ming-Juan; Wang, Qi; Li, Xiaolin; Chen, Aimin; Luo, Li; Xie, Yajun; Li, Guan; Luo, Da; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Wen, Jiangqi; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Staehelin, Christian; Wang, Yan-Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Rhizobia preferentially enter legume root hairs via infection threads, after which root hairs undergo tip swelling, branching, and curling. However, the mechanisms underlying such root hair deformation are poorly understood. Here, we showed that a type II small GTPase, ROP10, of Medicago truncatula is localized at the plasma membrane (PM) of root hair tips to regulate root hair tip growth. Overexpression of ROP10 and a constitutively active mutant (ROP10CA) generated depolarized growth of root hairs, whereas a dominant negative mutant (ROP10DN) inhibited root hair elongation. Inoculated with Sinorhizobium meliloti, the depolarized swollen and ballooning root hairs exhibited extensive root hair deformation and aberrant infection symptoms. Upon treatment with rhizobia-secreted nodulation factors (NFs), ROP10 was transiently upregulated in root hairs, and ROP10 fused to green fluorescent protein was ectopically localized at the PM of NF-induced outgrowths and curls around rhizobia. ROP10 interacted with the kinase domain of the NF receptor NFP in a GTP-dependent manner. Moreover, NF-induced expression of the early nodulin gene ENOD11 was enhanced by the overexpression of ROP10 and ROP10CA. These data suggest that NFs spatiotemporally regulate ROP10 localization and activity at the PM of root hair tips and that interactions between ROP10 and NF receptors are required for root hair deformation and continuous curling during rhizobial infection. PMID:25794934

  18. Surface expression of CD74 by type II alveolar epithelial cells: a potential mechanism for macrophage migration inhibitory factor-induced epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Leigh M; Cakarova, Lidija; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna; von Wulffen, Werner; Herold, Susanne; Seeger, Werner; Lohmeyer, Juergen

    2009-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a pleiotropic proinflammatory cytokine involved in acute lung injury and other processes such as wound repair and tumor growth. MIF exerts pro-proliferative effects on a variety of cell types including monocytes/macrophages, B cells, and gastric epithelial cell lines through binding to the major histocompatibility complex type II-associated invariant chain, CD74. In acute lung injury, inflammatory damage of the alveolar epithelium leads to loss of type I alveolar epithelial cells (AEC-I), which are replaced by proliferation and differentiation of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AEC-II). In this study we have investigated the potential of MIF to contribute to alveolar repair by stimulating alveolar epithelial cell proliferation. We show that murine AEC-II, but not AEC-I, express high surface levels of CD74 in vivo. Culture of AEC-II in vitro resulted in decreased mRNA levels for CD74 and loss of surface CD74 expression, which correlated with a transition of AEC-II to an AEC-I-like phenotype. MIF stimulation of AEC-II induced rapid and prolonged phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt, increased expression of cyclins D1 and E, as well as AEC-II proliferation. Corresponding MIF signaling and enhanced thymidine incorporation was observed after MIF stimulation of MLE-12 cells transfected to overexpress CD74. In contrast, MIF did not induce MAPK activation, gene transcription, or increased proliferation in differentiated AEC-I-like cells that lack CD74. These data suggest a previously unidentified role of MIF-CD74 interaction by inducing proliferation of AEC-II, which may contribute to alveolar repair. PMID:19136583

  19. Studies of binding of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK) to fibroblast growth factor inducible 14 (Fn14).

    PubMed

    Fick, Andrea; Lang, Isabell; Schäfer, Viktoria; Seher, Axel; Trebing, Johannes; Weisenberger, Daniela; Wajant, Harald

    2012-01-01

    To perform highly sensitive cellular binding studies with TNF-like weak inducer of apoptosis (TWEAK), we developed a bioluminescent variant of soluble TWEAK (GpL-FLAG-TNC-TWEAK) by fusing it genetically to the C terminus of the luciferase of Gaussia princeps (GpL). Equilibrium binding studies on human (HT1080 and HT29) and murine (Renca and B16) cell lines at 37 °C revealed high affinities of human TWEAK from 53 to 112 pm. The dissociation rate constant of the TWEAK-Fn14 interaction was between 0.48×10(-3) s(-1) (HT29) and 0.58×10(-3) s(-1) (HT1080) for the human molecules, and the association rate constant obtained was 3.3×10(6) m(-1) s(-1) for both cell lines. It has been shown previously that oligomerization of soluble TWEAK trimers results in enhanced Fn14-mediated activation of the classical NFκB pathway. Binding studies with GpL-FLAG-TNC-TWEAK trimers oligomerized by help of a FLAG tag-specific antibody gave no evidence for a major increase in Fn14 occupancy by oligomerized ligand despite strongly enhanced induction of the NFκB target IL8. Thus, aggregated complexes of soluble TWEAK and Fn14 have a higher intrinsic activity to stimulate the classical NFκB pathway and qualitatively differ from isolated trimeric TWEAK-Fn14 complexes. Furthermore, determination of IL8 induction as a function of occupied activated receptors revealed that the intrinsic capability of TNFR1 to stimulate the classical NFκB pathway and IL8 production was ∼100-fold higher than Fn14. Thus, although ∼25 activated TNFR1 trimers were sufficient to trigger half-maximal IL8 production, more than 2500 cell-bound oligomerized TWEAK trimers were required to elicit a similar response. PMID:22081603

  20. Pre-B cell colony enhancing factor induces Nampt-dependent translocation of the insulin receptor out of lipid microdomains in A549 lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qianyi; Jia, Song Hui; Parodo, Jean; Ai, Yuhang; Marshall, John C

    2015-02-15

    Pre-B cell colony-enhancing factor (PBEF) is a highly conserved pleiotropic protein reported to be an alternate ligand for the insulin receptor (IR). We sought to clarify the relationship between PBEF and insulin signaling by evaluating the effects of PBEF on the localization of the IRβ chain to lipid rafts in A549 epithelial cells. We isolated lipid rafts from A549 cells and detected the IR by immunoprecipitation from raft fractions or whole cell lysates. Cells were treated with rPBEF, its enzymatic product nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), or the Nampt inhibitor daporinad to study the effect of PBEF on IRβ movement. We used coimmunoprecipitation studies in cells transfected with PBEF and IRβ constructs to detect interactions between PBEF, the IRβ, and caveolin-1 (Cav-1). PBEF was present in both lipid raft and nonraft fractions, whereas the IR was found only in lipid raft fractions of resting A549 cells. The IR-, PBEF-, and Cav-1-coimmunoprecipitated rPBEF treatment resulted in the movement of IRβ- and tyrosine-phosphorylated Cav-1 from lipid rafts to nonrafts, an effect that could be blocked by daporinad, suggesting that this effect was facilitated by the Nampt activity of PBEF. The addition of PBEF to insulin-treated cells resulted in reduced Akt phosphorylation of both Ser⁴⁷³ and Thr³⁰⁸. We conclude that PBEF can inhibit insulin signaling through the IR by Nampt-dependent promotion of IR translocation into the nonraft domains of A549 epithelial cells. PBEF-induced alterations in the spatial geometry of the IR provide a mechanistic explanation for insulin resistance in inflammatory states associated with upregulation of PBEF. PMID:25516545

  1. Leptin Enhances Cholangiocarcinoma Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Giammarco; Alpini, Gianfranco; Rychlicki, Chiara; Saccomanno, Stefania; DeMorrow, Sharon; Trozzi, Luciano; Candelaresi, Cinzia; Venter, Julie; Di Sario, Antonio; Marzioni, Marco; Bearzi, Italo; Glaser, Shannon; Alvaro, Domenico; Marucci, Luca; Francis, Heather; Svegliati-Baroni, Gianluca; Benedetti, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma is a strongly aggressive malignancy with a very poor prognosis. Effective therapeutic strategies are lacking because molecular mechanisms regulating cholangiocarcinoma cell growth are unknown. Furthermore, experimental in vivo animal models useful to study the pathophysiologic mechanisms of malignant cholangiocytes are lacking. Leptin, the hormone regulating caloric homeostasis, which is increased in obese patients, stimulates the growth of several cancers, such as hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to define if leptin stimulates cholangiocarcinoma growth. We determined the expression of leptin receptors in normal and malignant human cholangiocytes. Effects on intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (HuH-28) cell proliferation, migration, and apoptosis of the in vitro exposure to leptin, together with the intracellular pathways, were then studied. Moreover, cholangiocarcinoma was experimentally induced in obese fa/fa Zucker rats, a genetically established animal species with faulty leptin receptors, and in their littermates by chronic feeding with thioacetamide, a potent carcinogen. After 24 weeks, the effect of leptin on cholangiocarcinoma development and growth was assessed. Normal and malignant human cholangiocytes express leptin receptors. Leptin increased the proliferation and the metastatic potential of cholangiocarcinoma cells in vitro through a signal transducers and activators of transcription 3–dependent activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Leptin increased the growth and migration, and was antiapoptotic for cholangiocarcinoma cells. Moreover, the loss of leptin function reduced the development and the growth of cholangiocarcinoma. The experimental carcinogenesis model induced by thioacetamide administration is a valid and reproducible method to study cholangiocarcinoma pathobiology. Modulation of the leptin-mediated signal could be considered a valid tool for the prevention and treatment of

  2. Mechanical forces and their second messengers in stimulating cell growth in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1992-01-01

    Mechanical forces play an important role in modulating the growth of a number of different tissues including skeletal muscle, smooth muscle, cardiac muscle, bone, endothelium, epithelium, and lung. As interest increases in the molecular mechanisms by which mechanical forces are transduced into growth alterations, model systems are being developed to study these processes in tissue culture. This paper reviews the current methods available for mechanically stimulating tissue cultured cells. It then outlines some of the putative 'mechanogenic' second messengers involved in altering cell growth. Not surprisingly, many mechanogenic second messengers are the same as those involved in growth factor-induced cell growth. It is hypothesized that from an evolutionary standpoint, some second messenger systems may have initially evolved for unicellular organisms to respond to physical forces such as gravity and mechanical perturbation in their environment. As multicellular organisms came into existence, they appropriated these mechanogenic second messenger cascades for cellular regulation by growth factors.

  3. Single-cell growth analysis in a mixed cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Jun; Bato, Mary Grace P.; Daria, Vincent Ricardo

    2008-06-01

    We perform single cell analysis of cell growth in a mixed cell culture. Two species of yeast cells: Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans, are optically trapped using focused continuous-wave near infrared laser. Cell growth for both cells is inhibited only when the two species of cells are in contact with each other. This indicates cell-cell interaction mediated cell growth inhibition mechanism. Single cell level analysis of cell growth studied here contributes to the further understanding of yeast growth arrest in a mixed yeast culture.

  4. Stimulation of nuclear receptor REV-ERBs regulates tumor necrosis factor-induced expression of proinflammatory molecules in C6 astroglial cells.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Tomori, Mizuki; Zhang, Fang Fang; Saeki, Munenori; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, astrocytes maintain homeostasis in the CNS. Following inflammation and injury to the CNS, however, activated astrocytes produce neurotoxic molecules such as cytokines and chemokines, amplifying the initial molecular-cellular events evoked by inflammation and injury. Nuclear receptors REV-ERBα and REV-ERBβ (REV-ERBs) are crucial in the regulation of inflammation- and metabolism-related gene transcription. The current study sought to elucidate a role of REV-ERBs in rat C6 astroglial cells on the expression of inflammatory molecules following stimulation with the neuroinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF). Stimulation of C6 cells with TNF (10 ng/ml) significantly increased the mRNA expression of CCL2, interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9, but not fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and MMP-2. Treatment with either REV-ERB agonists GSK4112 or SR9009 significantly blocked TNF-induced upregulation of CCL2 mRNA and MMP-9 mRNA, but not IL-6 mRNA and iNOS mRNA expression. Furthermore, treatment with RGFP966, a selective histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) inhibitor, potently reversed the inhibitory effects of GSK4112 on TNF-induced expression of MMP-9 mRNA, but not CCL2 mRNA. Expression of Rev-erbs mRNA in C6 astroglial cells, primary cultured rat cortical and spinal astrocytes was confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Together, the findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory effect, downregulating of MMP-9 and CCL2 transcription, of astroglial REV-ERBs activation through HDAC3-dependent and HDAC3-independent mechanisms. PMID:26616049

  5. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved.

    PubMed

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  6. Organotypic Cultures of Intervertebral Disc Cells: Responses to Growth Factors and Signaling Pathways Involved

    PubMed Central

    Pratsinis, Harris; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is strongly associated with low back pain, a major cause of disability worldwide. An in-depth understanding of IVD cell physiology is required for the design of novel regenerative therapies. Accordingly, aim of this work was the study of IVD cell responses to mitogenic growth factors in a three-dimensional (3D) organotypic milieu, comprising characteristic molecules of IVD's extracellular matrix. In particular, annulus fibrosus (AF) cells were cultured inside collagen type-I gels, while nucleus pulposus (NP) cells in chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) supplemented collagen gels, and the effects of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF), basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF), and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I (IGF-I) were assessed. All three growth factors stimulated DNA synthesis in both AF and NP 3D cell cultures, with potencies similar to those observed previously in monolayers. CSA supplementation inhibited basal DNA synthesis rates, without affecting the response to growth factors. ERK and Akt were found to be phosphorylated following growth factor stimulation. Blockade of these two signaling pathways using pharmacologic inhibitors significantly, though not completely, inhibited growth factor-induced DNA synthesis. The proposed culture systems may prove useful for further in vitro studies aiming at future interventions for IVD regeneration. PMID:26583105

  7. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor induces phosphorylation of Mdm2 mediated by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt kinase: Role of this pathway in decidual cell survival.

    PubMed

    Costa, Adriana Fraga; Gomes, Sara Zago; Lorenzon-Ojea, Aline R; Martucci, Mariane; Faria, Miriam Rubio; Pinto, Décio Dos Santos; Oliveira, Sergio F; Ietta, Francesca; Paulesu, Luana; Bevilacqua, Estela

    2016-05-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway has an anti-apoptotic effect through several downstream targets, which includes activation of the transformed mouse 3T3 cell double-minute 2 (Mdm2) protein, its translocation to the nucleus and degradation of the tumor suppressor p53. We show that Mif, the Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor, an important cytokine at the maternal fetal interface in several species, triggers phosphorylation of Mdm2 protein in a PI3K/Akt-dependent manner, thereby preventing apoptosis in cultured mouse decidual cells. Inhibition of Akt and PI3K suppresses the pathway. Mif treatment also changes the nuclear translocation of p53 and interferes with the apoptotic fate of these cells when challenged with reactive oxygen species. In conclusion, an important mechanism has been found underlying decidual cell survival through Akt signaling pathway activated by Mif, suggesting a role for this cytokine in decidual homeostasis and in the integrity of the maternal-fetal barrier that is essential for successful gestation. PMID:27208405

  8. Circulating factors induce coronary endothelial cell activation following exposure to inhaled diesel exhaust and nitrogen dioxide in humans: evidence from a novel translational in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Channell, Meghan M; Paffett, Michael L; Devlin, Robert B; Madden, Michael C; Campen, Matthew J

    2012-05-01

    The vascular toxicity of inhaled agents may be caused by soluble factors that are released into the systemic circulation. To confirm this in a straightforward manner, we obtained plasma from healthy human volunteers before and after exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)). Plasma samples were obtained from human volunteers exposed to 100 μg/m(3) DE or filtered air for 2 h. A second cohort was exposed to 500 ppb NO(2) or filtered air in an identical protocol. Primary human coronary artery endothelial cells (hCAECs) were grown to confluence and treated for 24 h with a 10 or 30% (in media) mixture of plasma obtained before, immediately post or 24 h postexposure to pollutant exposures. Messenger RNA (mRNA) was isolated from hCAECs following the incubation and probed for intracellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1) expression. ICAM-1 mRNA expression was increased by plasma obtained at both timepoints following the NO(2) exposures. VCAM-1 was significantly elevated in cells treated with plasma obtained 24 h following diesel exposure and at both timepoints following NO(2) exposure. Interleukin-8 protein was elevated in the hCAEC supernatant when cells were incubated with plasma from NO(2) exposures. These data indicate that proinflammatory circulating factors are elevated acutely following exposure to both DE and a primary component thereof, NO(2). These functional translational assays offer novel approaches to assessing the cardiovascular risk associated with air pollution exposure. PMID:22331494

  9. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor-induced mice liver defatting: A novel strategy to enable transplantation of steatotic livers.

    PubMed

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Kailar, Roshni; Rahman, Khalidur; Nezami, Behtash Ghazi; Mwangi, Simon Musyoka; Anania, Frank A; Srinivasan, Shanthi

    2016-04-01

    Moderate macrovesicular steatosis (>30%), which is present in almost 50% of livers considered for transplantation, increases the risk of primary graft dysfunction. Our previously published data showed that glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is protective against high-fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis in mice. Hence, we hypothesized that perfusion of steatotic livers with GDNF may reduce liver fat content before transplantation. Livers from 8 weeks of regular diet (RD) and of HFD-fed mice were perfused ex vivo for 4 hours with either vehicle, GDNF, or a previously described defatting cocktail. The liver's residual fat was quantified colorimetrically using a triglyceride (TG) assay kit and by Oil Red O (ORO) and Nile red/Hoechst staining. Liver tissue injury was assessed by using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay. In vitro induction of lipolysis in HepG2 cells was assessed by measuring glycerol and free fatty acid release. ORO staining showed significantly more steatosis in livers from HFD-fed mice compared with RD-fed mice (P < 0.001). HFD livers perfused with GDNF had significantly less steatosis than those not perfused (P = 0.001) or perfused with vehicle (P < 0.05). GDNF is equally effective in steatotic liver defatting compared to the defatting cocktail; however, GDNF induces less liver damage than the defatting cocktail. These observations were consistent with data obtained from assessment of liver TG content. Assessment of liver injury revealed significant hepatocyte injury in livers perfused with the control defatting cocktail but no evidence of injury in livers perfused with either GDNF or vehicle. In vitro, GDNF reduced TG accumulation in HepG2 cells and stimulated increased TG lipolysis. In conclusion, GDNF can decrease mice liver fat content to an acceptable range and could be a potential defatting agent before liver transplantation. Liver Transplantation 22 459-467 2016 AASLD. PMID:26714616

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibits stem cell factor-induced proliferation of human bone marrow progenitor cells in vitro. Role of p55 and p75 tumor necrosis factor receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Rusten, L S; Smeland, E B; Jacobsen, F W; Lien, E; Lesslauer, W; Loetscher, H; Dubois, C M; Jacobsen, S E

    1994-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF), a key regulator of hematopoiesis, potently synergizes with a number of hematopoietic growth factors. However, little is known about growth factors capable of inhibiting the actions of SCF. TNF-alpha has been shown to act as a bidirectional regulator of myeloid cell proliferation and differentiation. This study was designed to examine interactions between TNF-alpha and SCF. Here, we demonstrate that TNF-alpha potently and directly inhibits SCF-stimulated proliferation of CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells. Furthermore, TNF-alpha blocked all colony formation stimulated by SCF in combination with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (CSF) or CSF-1. The synergistic effect of SCF observed in combination with GM-CSF or IL-3 was also inhibited by TNF-alpha, resulting in colony numbers similar to those obtained in the absence of SCF. These effects of TNF-alpha were mediated through the p55 TNF receptor, whereas little or no inhibition was signaled through the p75 TNF receptor. Finally, TNF-alpha downregulated c-kit cell-surface expression on CD34+ bone marrow cells, and this was predominantly a p55 TNF receptor-mediated event as well. Images PMID:7518828

  11. A phyletic perspective on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J

    2015-05-01

    Commonalities, as well as lineage-specific differences among bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals, are reviewed in the context of (1) the coordination of cell growth, (2) the flow of mass and energy affecting the physiological status of cells, (3) cytoskeletal dynamics during cell division, and (4) the coordination of cell size in multicellular organs and organisms. A comparative approach reveals that similar mechanisms are used to gauge and regulate cell size and proliferation, and shows that these mechanisms share similar modules to measure cell size, cycle status, competence, and number, as well as ploidy levels, nutrient availability, and other variables affecting cell growth. However, this approach also reveals that these modules often use nonhomologous subsystems when viewed at modular or genomic levels; that is, different lineages have evolved functionally analogous, but not genomically homologous, ways of either sensing or regulating cell size and growth, in much the same way that multicellularity has evolved in different lineages using analogous developmental modules. PMID:25934012

  12. Exposure to Nerve Growth Factor Worsens Nephrotoxic Effect Induced by Cyclosporine A in HK-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lofaro, Danilo; Toteda, Giuseppina; Lupinacci, Simona; Leone, Francesca; Gigliotti, Paolo; Papalia, Teresa; Bonofiglio, Renzo

    2013-01-01

    Nerve growth factor is a neurotrophin that promotes cell growth, differentiation, survival and death through two different receptors: TrkANTR and p75NTR. Nerve growth factor serum concentrations increase during many inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, glomerulonephritis, chronic kidney disease, end-stage renal disease and, particularly, in renal transplant. Considering that nerve growth factor exerts beneficial effects in the treatment of major central and peripheral neurodegenerative diseases, skin and corneal ulcers, we asked whether nerve growth factor could also exert a role in Cyclosporine A-induced graft nephrotoxicity. Our hypothesis was raised from basic evidence indicating that Cyclosporine A-inhibition of calcineurin-NFAT pathway increases nerve growth factor expression levels. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of nerve growth factor and its receptors in the damage exerted by Cyclosporine A in tubular renal cells, HK-2. Our results showed that in HK-2 cells combined treatment with Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor induced a significant reduction in cell vitality concomitant with a down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and up-regulation of p21 levels respect to cells treated with Cyclosporine A alone. Moreover functional experiments showed that the co-treatment significantly up-regulated human p21promoter activity by involvement of the Sp1 transcription factor, whose nuclear content was negatively regulated by activated NFATc1. In addition we observed that the combined exposure to Cyclosporine A + nerve growth factor promoted an up-regulation of p75 NTR and its target genes, p53 and BAD leading to the activation of intrinsic apoptosis. Finally, the chemical inhibition of p75NTR down-regulated the intrinsic apoptotic signal. We describe two new mechanisms by which nerve growth factor promotes growth arrest and apoptosis in tubular renal cells exposed to Cyclosporine A. PMID:24244623

  13. Unraveling Growth Factor Signaling and Cell Cycle Progression in Individual Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Gross, Sean M; Rotwein, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Cultured cells require the actions of growth factors to enter the cell cycle, but how individual members of a population respond to the same stimulus remains unknown. Here we have employed continuous monitoring by live cell imaging in a dual-reporter cell model to investigate the regulation of short-term growth factor signaling (protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activity) and longer-term progression through the cell cycle (cyclin-dependent kinase 2 activity). In the total population, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I)-enhanced cell cycle entry by >5-fold compared with serum-free medium (from 13.5 to 78%), but at the single cell level we observed a broad distribution in the timing of G1 exit (4-24 h, mean ∼12 h) that did not vary with either the amount or duration of IGF-I treatment. Cells that failed to re-enter the cell cycle exhibited similar responses to IGF-I in terms of integrated Akt activity and migration distance compared with those that did. We made similar observations with EGF, PDGF-AA, and PDGF-BB. As potential thresholds of growth factor-mediated cell cycle progression appeared to be heterogeneous within the population, the longer-term proliferative outcomes of individual cells to growth factor stimulation could not be predicted based solely on acute Akt signaling responses, no matter how robust these might be. Thus, although we could define a relationship at the population level between growth factor-induced Akt signaling dynamics and cell cycle progression, we could not predict the fate of individual cells. PMID:27226630

  14. Environmental Factors Inducing Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, N

    2012-01-01

    Background An explosion of research has been done in discovering how human health is affected by environmental factors. I will discuss the impacts of environmental cancer causing factors and how they continue to cause multiple disruptions in cellular networking. Some risk factors may not cause cancer. Other factors initiate consecutive genetic mutations that would eventually alter the normal pathway of cellular proliferations and differentiation. Genetic mutations in four groups of genes; (Oncogenes, Tumor suppressor genes, Apoptosis genes and DNA repairing genes) play a vital role in altering the normal cell division. In recent years, molecular genetics have greatly increased our understanding of the basic mechanisms in cancer development and utilizing these molecular techniques for cancer screening, diagnosis, prognosis and therapies. Inhibition of carcinogenic exposures wherever possible should be the goal of cancer prevention programs to reduce exposures from all environmental carcinogens. PMID:23304670

  15. Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show that portable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences incorporated into host cells make them produce hemoglobins - oxygen-binding proteins essential to function of red blood cells. Method useful in several biotechnological applications. One, enhancement of growth of cells at higher densities. Another, production of hemoglobin to enhance supplies of oxygen in cells, for use in chemical reactions requiring oxygen, as additive to serum to increase transport of oxygen, and for binding and separating oxygen from mixtures of gases.

  16. Stromal influences on breast cancer cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    van Roozendaal, C. E.; van Ooijen, B.; Klijn, J. G.; Claassen, C.; Eggermont, A. M.; Henzen-Logmans, S. C.; Foekens, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Paracrine influences from fibroblasts derived from different sources of breast tissue on epithelial breast cancer cell growth in vitro were investigated. Medium conditioned (CM) by fibroblasts derived from tumours, adjacent normal breast tissue, and normal breast tissue obtained from reduction mammoplasty or from skin tissue significantly stimulated the growth of the steroid-receptor positive cell lines MCF-7 and ZR 75.1. The proliferation index (PI) on MCF-7 cells with CM from fibroblasts derived from breast tumour tissue was significantly higher than that obtained with fibroblasts derived from adjacent normal breast tissue (2p less than 0.05, n = 8). The PI obtained with CM from normal fibroblast cultures from reduction mammoplasty tissue, like normal tissue adjacent to the tumour, fell in the lower range of values. Skin fibroblast, like tumour tissue derived fibroblast, CM caused a high range PI. MDA-MB-231 and Evsa-T, two steroid-receptor negative cell lines, showed only a minor growth stimulatory responses with some of the fibroblast CM's. Evsa-T was occasionally inhibited by CM's. In conclusion, stromal factors play a role in the growth regulation of human breast cancer cells. The effects on cancer cell growth are, however, varying depending on the source of the stroma and the characteristics of the epithelial tumour cells. PMID:1733444

  17. Role of bentonite clays on cell growth.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Ramírez-Apan, María Teresa; Kaufhold, Stephan; Ufer, Kristian; Palacios, Eduardo; Montoya, Ascención

    2016-04-01

    Bentonites, naturally occurring clays, are produced industrially because of their adsorbent capacity but little is known about their effects on human health. This manuscript reports on the effect of bentonites on cell growth behaviour. Bentonites collected from India (Bent-India), Hungary (Bent-Hungary), Argentina (Bent-Argentina), and Indonesia (Bent-Indonesia) were studied. All four bentonites were screened in-vitro against two human cancer cell lines [U251 (central nervous system, glioblastoma) and SKLU-1 (lung adenocarcinoma)] supplied by the National Cancer Institute (USA). Bentonites induced growth inhibition in the presence of U251 cells, and growth increment in the presence of SKLU-1 cells, showing that interactions between bentonite and cell surfaces were highly specific. The proliferation response for U251 cells was explained because clay surfaces controlled the levels of metabolic growth components, thereby inhibiting the development of high-grade gliomas, particularly primary glioblastomas. On the other hand, the proliferation response for SKLU-1 was explained by an exacerbated growth favoured by swelling, and concomitant accumulation of solutes, and their hydration and transformation via clay-surface mediated reactions. PMID:26849195

  18. The pituitary growth hormone cell in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, Wesley C.; Grindeland, R.

    1989-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH), produced and secreted from specialized cells in the pituitary gland, controls the metabolism of protein, fat, and carbohydrate. It is also probably involved in the regulation of proper function of bone, muscle and immune systems. The behavior of the GH cell system was studied by flying either isolated pituitary cells or live rats. In the latter case, pituitary GH cells are prepared on return to earth and then either transplanted into hypophysectomized rats or placed into cell culture so that function of GH cells in-vivo vs. in-vitro can be compared. The results from three flights to date (STS-8, 1983; SL-3, 1985; Cosmos 1887, 1987) established that the ability of GH cells to release hormone, on return to earth, is compromised. The mechanism(s) responsible for this attenuation response is unknown. However, the data are sufficiently positive to indicate that the nature of the secretory defect resides directly within the GH cells.

  19. β2-Glycoprotein I Inhibits Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor-Induced Angiogenesis by Suppressing the Phosphorylation of Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase 1/2, Akt, and Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Wen-Chin; Chiou, Tzeon-Jye; Chung, Meng-Ju; Chiang, An-Na

    2016-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the process of new blood vessel formation, and it plays a key role in various physiological and pathological conditions. The β2-glycoprotein I (β2-GPI) is a plasma glycoprotein with multiple biological functions, some of which remain to be elucidated. This study aimed to identify the contribution of 2-GPI on the angiogenesis induced by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a pro-angiogenic factor that may regulate endothelial remodeling, and its underlying mechanism. Our results revealed that β2-GPI dose-dependently decreased the VEGF-induced increase in endothelial cell proliferation, using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) and the bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays. Furthermore, incubation with both β2-GPI and deglycosylated β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced tube formation. Our results suggest that the carbohydrate residues of β2-GPI do not participate in the function of anti-angiogenesis. Using in vivo Matrigel plug and angioreactor assays, we show that β2-GPI remarkably inhibited the VEGF-induced angiogenesis at a physiological concentration. Moreover, β2-GPI inhibited the VEGF-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), Akt, and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). In summary, our in vitro and in vivo data reveal for the first time that β2-GPI inhibits the VEGF-induced angiogenesis and highlights the potential for β2-GPI in anti-angiogenic therapy. PMID:27579889

  20. Growth of gold nanoparticles in human cells.

    PubMed

    Anshup, Anshup; Venkataraman, J Sai; Subramaniam, Chandramouli; Kumar, R Rajeev; Priya, Suma; Kumar, T R Santhosh; Omkumar, R V; John, Annie; Pradeep, T

    2005-12-01

    Gold nanoparticles of 20-100 nm diameter were synthesized within HEK-293 (human embryonic kidney), HeLa (human cervical cancer), SiHa (human cervical cancer), and SKNSH (human neuroblastoma) cells. Incubation of 1 mM tetrachloroaurate solution, prepared in phosphate buffered saline (PBS), pH 7.4, with human cells grown to approximately 80% confluency yielded systematic growth of nanoparticles over a period of 96 h. The cells, stained due to nanoparticle growth, were adherent to the bottom of the wells of the tissue culture plates, with their morphology preserved, indicating that the cell membrane was intact. Transmission electron microscopy of ultrathin sections showed the presence of nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, the latter being much smaller in dimension. Scanning near field microscopic images confirmed the growth of large particles within the cytoplasm. Normal cells gave UV-visible signatures of higher intensity than the cancer cells. Differences in the cellular metabolism of cancer and noncancer cells were manifested, presumably in their ability to carry out the reduction process. PMID:16316080

  1. Tumor growth and angiogenesis are dependent on the presence of immature dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Fainaru, Ofer; Almog, Nava; Yung, Chong Wing; Nakai, Kei; Montoya-Zavala, Martin; Abdollahi, Amir; D'Amato, Robert; Ingber, Donald E.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs)—immunomodulatory cells that initiate adaptive immune responses—have recently been shown to exert proangiogenic effects when infiltrating the tumor microenvironment. As tumors that escape immune surveillance inhibit DC maturation, we explored whether maturation status determines their ability to promote angiogenesis and whether angiogenesis depends on the presence of DCs. Using mouse xenograft models of human tumors, we show that fast-growing “angiogenic” tumors are infiltrated by a more immature DC population than respective dormant avascular tumors. Accordingly, supplementation of immature DCs, but not mature DCs, enhanced tumor growth. When DCs were mixed with Matrigel and injected subcutaneously into mice, only immature DCs promoted the ingrowth of patent blood vessels. Notably, depletion of DCs in a transgenic mouse model that allows for their conditional ablation completely abrogated basic fibroblast growth factor-induced angiogenesis in Matrigel plugs, and significantly inhibited tumor growth in these mice. Because immature DCs actively promote angiogenesis and tumor growth, whereas DC maturation or ablation suppresses this response, we conclude that angiogenesis is dependent on the presence of immature DCs. Thus, cancer immunotherapies that promote DC maturation may act by both augmenting the host immune response to the tumor and by suppressing tumor angiogenesis.—Fainaru, O., Almog, N., Yung, C. W., Nakai, K., Montoya-Zavala, M., Abollahi, A., D’Amato, R., Ingber, D. E. Tumor growth and angiogenesis are dependent on the presence of immature dendritic cells. PMID:20008545

  2. The cell biology of bone growth.

    PubMed

    Price, J S; Oyajobi, B O; Russell, R G

    1994-02-01

    The field of bone cell biology is clearly of relevance to the problem of stunting in children, as in the final analysis the cells of the growing long bone are the ultimate 'regulators'. It is the alterations in the functions of these cells that manifests as a reduction in height. Normal longitudinal growth is achieved by the coordinated recruitment, proliferation, differentiation, maturation and eventual death of the cells of growth plate and bone. Cellular activity is closely regulated by endocrine factors acting directly or indirectly, with factors produced locally and stored within the bone and cartilage microenvironment having a critical role in intercellular communication. Disruption of any of these processes can lead to growth disturbances, since it only requires a defect in a single gene to have profound effects. Studies in recent years have shed light on the biochemical and molecular effects of cytokines and growth factors and have shown that these regulatory molecules may mediate the effects of certain hormones important in controlling growth. However, the complex interrelationship of these molecules is still not clear. Notwithstanding, understanding of the mechanisms involved in bone remodelling is increasing, as this area attracts much research because of the high incidence of metabolic bone disease in Western society. Although studies of adult bone remodelling are of relevance, there is a requirement for increased research directed specifically at the mechanisms of endochondral ossification and its regulation. Longitudinal bone growth is a challenge to the cell biologist, since it is an accelerated cycle of cellular division and differentiation, within which it is not easy to separate events temporally and spatially. In addition, different regulatory mechanisms are probably important at different stages of growth. Another difficulty impeding progress in this field is the lack of appropriate animal models for research. Much information has come from

  3. Bacterial cell curvature through mechanical control of cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Cabeen, Matthew T; Charbon, Godefroid; Vollmer, Waldemar; Born, Petra; Ausmees, Nora; Weibel, Douglas B; Jacobs-Wagner, Christine

    2009-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a key regulator of cell morphogenesis. Crescentin, a bacterial intermediate filament-like protein, is required for the curved shape of Caulobacter crescentus and localizes to the inner cell curvature. Here, we show that crescentin forms a single filamentous structure that collapses into a helix when detached from the cell membrane, suggesting that it is normally maintained in a stretched configuration. Crescentin causes an elongation rate gradient around the circumference of the sidewall, creating a longitudinal cell length differential and hence curvature. Such curvature can be produced by physical force alone when cells are grown in circular microchambers. Production of crescentin in Escherichia coli is sufficient to generate cell curvature. Our data argue for a model in which physical strain borne by the crescentin structure anisotropically alters the kinetics of cell wall insertion to produce curved growth. Our study suggests that bacteria may use the cytoskeleton for mechanical control of growth to alter morphology. PMID:19279668

  4. Direct inhibition of Retinoblastoma phosphorylation by Nimbolide causes cell cycle arrest and suppresses glioblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jane; Liu, Xiaona; Henry, Heather; Gasilina, Anjelika; Nassar, Nicholas; Ghosh, Jayeeta; Clark, Jason P; Kumar, Ashish; Pauletti, Giovanni M.; Ghosh, Pradip K; Dasgupta, Biplab

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Classical pharmacology allows the use and development of conventional phytomedicine faster and more economically than conventional drugs. This approach should be tested for their efficacy in terms of complementarity and disease control. The purpose of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms by which nimbolide, a triterpenoid found in the well-known medicinal plant Azadirachta indica controls glioblastoma (GBM) growth. Experimental Design Using in vitro signaling, anchorage-independent growth, kinase assays, and xenograft models, we investigated the mechanisms of its growth inhibition in glioblastoma. Results We show that nimbolide or an ethanol soluble fraction of A. indica leaves (Azt) that contains nimbolide as the principal cytotoxic agent is highly cytotoxic against GBM in vitro and in vivo. Azt caused cell cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1-S stage in GBM cells expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogene present in about 20-25% of GBMs. Azt/nimbolide directly inhibited CDK4/CDK6 kinase activity leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein, cell cycle arrest at G1-S and cell death. Independent of RB hypophosphorylation, Azt also significantly reduced proliferative and survival advantage of GBM cells in vitro and in tumor xenografts by downregulating Bcl2 and blocking growth factor induced phosphorylation of Akt, Erk1/2 and STAT3. These effects were specific since Azt did not affect mTOR or other cell cycle regulators. In vivo, Azt completely prevented initiation and inhibited progression of GBM growth. Conclusions Our preclinical findings demonstrate Nimbolide as a potent anti-glioma agent that blocks cell cycle and inhibits glioma growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24170547

  5. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  6. Nucleoside transporters and liver cell growth.

    PubMed

    Pastor-Anglada, M; Felipe, A; Casado, F J; del Santo, B; Mata, J F; Valdés, R

    1998-01-01

    Liver parenchymal cells show a wide variety of plasma membrane transporters that are tightly regulated by endocrine and nutritional factors. This review summarizes work performed in our laboratory on these transport systems, particularly nucleoside transporters, which are up-regulated in physiological situations associated with liver cell growth. Rat hepatocytes show a Na+-dependent nucleoside transport activity that is stimulated by pancreatic hormones. Indeed, this biological activity appears to be the result of the co-expression of at least two isoforms of nucleoside carriers, CNT1 and CNT2 (also called SPNT). These two transporters are up-regulated during the early phase of liver growth after partial hepatectomy, although to different extents, suggesting differential regulation of the two isoforms. The recent generation of isoform-specific antibodies allowed us to demonstrate that carrier expression may also have complex post-transcriptional regulation on the basis of the lack of correspondence between mRNA and protein levels. The analysis of nucleoside transport systems in hepatoma cells and the comparison with those in hepatocytes has also provided evidence that the differentiation status of liver parenchymal cells may determine the pattern of nucleoside transporters expressed. PMID:10353710

  7. Thiazolidinediones inhibit the growth of PC12 cells both in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Wan; Choi, Ok Kyung; Chang, Mee Soo; Shin, Chan Soo; Park, Kyong Soo; Kim, Seong Yeon

    2008-06-27

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) have recently been proposed as a therapy for PPAR{gamma}-expressing tumors. Pheochromocytoma (PHEO) is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to excess catecholamine production, and few effective drug therapies currently exist. We investigated the effects of TZDs on PHEO both in vitro and in vivo. PPAR{gamma} protein was expressed in human adrenal PHEO tissues as well as in rat PHEO cells, PC12. TZDs, including rosiglitazone (RGZ) and pioglitazone (PGZ), inhibited proliferation of PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner and increased casapse-3 expression of PC12 cells. TZDs also reduced expression of cyclin E and cyclin-dependent kinase2. RGZ inhibited nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth and reduced expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes. Finally, rat PHEO growth generated by subcutaneous injection of PC12 cells was slowed in an RGZ-treated mouse. These data suggest that TZDs may be a promising therapeutic approach for medical treatment for PHEO.

  8. Epidermal growth factor signaling in transformed cells

    PubMed Central

    Lindsey, Stephan; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ErbB) family play a critical role in normal cell growth and development. However, many ErbB family members, especially EGFR, are aberrantly expressed or deregulated in tumors and are thought to play crucial roles in cancer development and metastatic progression. In this chapter, we provide an overview of key mechanisms contributing to aberrant EGFR/ErbB signaling in transformed cells which results in many phenotypic changes associated with the earliest stages of tumor formation, including several hallmarks of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). These changes often occur through interaction with other major signaling pathways important to tumor progression resulting in a multitude of transcriptional changes that ultimately impact cell morphology, proliferation and adhesion, all of which are crucial for tumor progression. The resulting mesh of signaling networks will need to be taken into account as new regimens are designed for targeting EGFR for therapeutic intervention. As new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cross-talk of EGFR signaling with other signaling pathways and their role in therapeutic resistance to anti-EGFR therapies are gained a continual reassessment of clinical therapeutic regimes and strategies will be required. Understanding the consequences and complexity of EGF signaling and how it relates to tumor progression is critical for the development of clinical compounds and establishing clinical protocols for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25619714

  9. Direct observation of mammalian cell growth and size regulation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sungmin; Tzur, Amit; Weng, Yaochung; Jorgensen, Paul; Kim, Jisoo; Kirschner, Marc W.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a microfluidic system for simultaneously measuring single cell mass and cell cycle progression over multiple generations. We use this system to obtain over 1,000 hours of growth data from mouse lymphoblast and pro-B-cell lymphoid cell lines. Cell lineage analysis revealed a decrease in the growth rate variability at the G1/S phase transition, which suggests the presence of a growth rate threshold for maintaining size homeostasis. PMID:22863882

  10. Sphingosine-1-phosphate in cell growth and cell death.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, S; Cuvillier, O; Edsall, L C; Kohama, T; Menzeleev, R; Olah, Z; Olivera, A; Pirianov, G; Thomas, D M; Tu, Z; Van Brocklyn, J R; Wang, F

    1998-06-19

    Recent evidence suggests that branching pathways of sphingolipid metabolism may mediate either apoptotic or mitogenic responses depending on the cell type and the nature of the stimulus. While ceramide has been shown to be an important regulatory component of apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor alpha and Fas ligand, sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP), a further metabolite of ceramide, has been implicated as a second messenger in cellular proliferation and survival induced by platelet-derived growth factor, nerve growth factor, and serum. SPP protects cells from apoptosis resulting from elevations of ceramide. Inflammatory cytokines stimulate sphingomyelinase, but not ceramidase, leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also leading to accumulation of ceramide, whereas growth signals also stimulate ceramidase and sphingosine kinase leading to increased SPP levels. We propose that the dynamic balance between levels of sphingolipid metabolites, ceramide, and SPP, and consequent regulation of different family members of mitogen-activated protein kinases (JNK versus ERK), is an important factor that determines whether a cell survives or dies. PMID:9668339

  11. Human neuroblastoma cells express alpha and beta platelet-derived growth factor receptors coupling with neurotrophic and chemotactic signaling.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, T; Sano, K; Tsukamoto, T; Ito, M; Takaishi, T; Nakata, H; Nakamura, H; Chihara, K

    1993-01-01

    Both platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) A- and B-chains are expressed in mammalian neurons, but their precise roles still remain to be clarified. In the present studies, we examined the expression of two PDGF receptor genes in human tumor cell lines derived from neural crest. The expression of alpha and/or beta PDGF receptors was detected in a wide variety of neural crest-derived human tumor cell lines such as neuroblastoma, primitive neuroectodermal tumor, and Ewing's sarcoma by RNA blot analysis, and confirmed by immunoblot analysis. We have also demonstrated that PDGF receptors on the human neuroblastoma cell lines were biologically functional. Accordingly, chemotactic and mitogenic activities were induced by either PDGF-AA or PDGF-BB in serum-free medium. PDGF isoforms as well as nerve growth factor induced morphological changes showing neuronal cell maturation. Moreover, PDGF coordinately increased the levels of the transcript of the midsize neurofilament gene. The neuroblastoma cell lines also expressed the transcripts of PDGF A- and B-chains. These findings suggest that PDGF isoforms are involved not only in the promotion of the neuroblastoma cell growth, but also in neuronal cell migration, growth, and differentiation in human brain development. Images PMID:8376577

  12. Milk stimulates growth of prostate cancer cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Tate, Patricia L; Bibb, Robert; Larcom, Lyndon L

    2011-11-01

    Concern has been expressed about the fact that cows' milk contains estrogens and could stimulate the growth of hormone-sensitive tumors. In this study, organic cows' milk and two commercial substitutes were digested in vitro and tested for their effects on the growth of cultures of prostate and breast cancer cells. Cows' milk stimulated the growth of LNCaP prostate cancer cells in each of 14 separate experiments, producing an average increase in growth rate of over 30%. In contrast, almond milk suppressed the growth of these cells by over 30%. Neither cows' milk nor almond milk affected the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells or AsPC-1 pancreatic cancer cells significantly. Soy milk increased the growth rate of the breast cancer cells. These data indicate that prostate and breast cancer patients should be cautioned about the possible promotional effects of commercial dairy products and their substitutes. PMID:22043817

  13. Alterations in cellular differentiation, mitogenesis, cytoskeleton and growth characteristics during Syrian hamster embryo cell multistep in vitro transformation.

    PubMed

    Isfort, R J; Cody, D B; Doersen, C J; Kerckaert, G A; Leboeuf, R A

    1994-10-01

    In vitro Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation is a neoplastic process that proceeds through several identifiable consecutive stages including in vitro morphological transformation (mt), acquisition of immortality (I+), acquisition of tumorigenicity (T+) and tumor-derived cells (I'TD). Eight transformed lineages consisting of cells at the mt, I+, T+ and I'TD stages were assayed for alterations in general markers of cell differentiation, mitogenic signaling pathways, cytoskeleton and cellular growth in 3D matrix. Alterations in cellular differentiation markers included a decrease in H19 gene expression and placental alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity at the mt stage in all lineages examined with a complete absence of H19 gene expression and placental alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity by the I'TD stage in a majority of transformed lineages. Changes in mitogenic signaling pathways included the production of autocrine growth factors and alterations in growth factor-induced immediate early gene expression by the I'TD stage of transformation in the majority of transformed lineages investigated. By the I'TD stage of transformation in most lineages, changes in both the cytoskeleton (including a decrease in tropomyosin-I gene expression) and the Matrigel growth characteristics of SHE cells were observed. PMID:7927892

  14. CELL-BASE URBAN GROWTH MODEL TO 2020

    EPA Science Inventory

    SLEUTH (formerly known as the Urban Growth Model) uses a cellular automata simulation approach to illustrate future urbanization based on historic patterns of land transition. Its scale is dependent on cell size, and it applies growth rules to geographic data on a cell-by-cell b...

  15. Single-cell dynamics reveals sustained growth during diauxic shifts.

    PubMed

    Boulineau, Sarah; Tostevin, Filipe; Kiviet, Daniel J; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Nghe, Philippe; Tans, Sander J

    2013-01-01

    Stochasticity in gene regulation has been characterized extensively, but how it affects cellular growth and fitness is less clear. We study the growth of E. coli cells as they shift from glucose to lactose metabolism, which is characterized by an obligatory growth arrest in bulk experiments that is termed the lag phase. Here, we follow the growth dynamics of individual cells at minute-resolution using a single-cell assay in a microfluidic device during this shift, while also monitoring lac expression. Mirroring the bulk results, the majority of cells displays a growth arrest upon glucose exhaustion, and resume when triggered by stochastic lac expression events. However, a significant fraction of cells maintains a high rate of elongation and displays no detectable growth lag during the shift. This ability to suppress the growth lag should provide important selective advantages when nutrients are scarce. Trajectories of individual cells display a highly non-linear relation between lac expression and growth, with only a fraction of fully induced levels being sufficient for achieving near maximal growth. A stochastic molecular model together with measured dependencies between nutrient concentration, lac expression level, and growth accurately reproduces the observed switching distributions. The results show that a growth arrest is not obligatory in the classic diauxic shift, and underscore that regulatory stochasticity ought to be considered in terms of its impact on growth and survival. PMID:23637881

  16. Effect of freezing on lens epithelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Y; Hara, T; Hara, T; Iwata, S

    1988-05-01

    The effect of freezing on the growth of rat lens epithelial cells was studied in vitro. We found that 80% of the lens epithelial cells died after freezing at -45 degrees C for two hours and that the surviving cells could grow with the addition of growth factors or when placed on a sheet of type 4 collagen, but not when placed on a plain plastic culture dish. These results suggest that the surviving cells are at the Go phase of the cell cycle and that type 4 collagen or growth factors can initiate cell division. PMID:3294380

  17. Novel cell culture device enabling three-dimensional cell growth and improved cell function.

    PubMed

    Bokhari, Maria; Carnachan, Ross J; Cameron, Neil R; Przyborski, Stefan A

    2007-03-23

    A better understanding of cell biology and cell-cell interactions requires three-dimensional (3-D) culture systems that more closely represent the natural structure and function of tissues in vivo. Here, we present a novel device that provides an environment for routine 3-D cell growth in vitro. We have developed a thin membrane of polystyrene scaffold with a well defined and uniform porous architecture and have adapted this material for cell culture applications. We have exemplified the application of this technology by growing HepG2 liver cells on 2- and 3-D substrates. The performance of HepG2 cells grown on scaffolds was significantly enhanced compared to functional activity of cells grown on 2-D plastic. The incorporation of thin membranes of porous polystyrene to create a novel device has been successfully demonstrated as a new 3-D cell growth technology for routine use in cell culture. PMID:17276400

  18. Fibroblast growth factor 8 increases breast cancer cell growth by promoting cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, Emeli M.; Brokken, Leon J.S.; Haerkoenen, Pirkko L.

    2010-03-10

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF-8) is expressed in a large proportion of breast cancers, whereas its level in normal mammary gland epithelium is low. Previous studies have shown that FGF-8b stimulates breast cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo. To explore the mechanisms by which FGF-8b promotes growth, we studied its effects on cell cycle regulatory proteins and signalling pathways in mouse S115 and human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. We also studied the effect of FGF-8b on cell survival. FGF-8b induced cell cycle progression and up-regulated particularly cyclin D1 mRNA and protein in S115 cells. Silencing cyclin D1 with siRNA inhibited most but not all FGF-8b-induced proliferation. Inhibition of the FGF-8b-activated ERK/MAPK pathway decreased FGF-8b-stimulated proliferation. Blocking the constitutively active PI3K/Akt and p38 MAPK pathways also lowered FGF-8b-induced cyclin D1 expression and proliferation. Corresponding results were obtained in MCF-7 cells. In S115 and MCF-7 mouse tumours, FGF-8b increased cyclin D1 and Ki67 levels. Moreover, FGF-8b opposed staurosporine-induced S115 cell death which effect was blocked by inhibiting the PI3K/Akt pathway but not the ERK/MAPK pathway. In conclusion, our results suggest that FGF-8b increases breast cancer cell growth both by stimulating cell cycle progression and by protecting against cell death.

  19. Cell growth characterization using multi-electrode bioimpedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi-Yu; Huang, Ji-Jer; Huang, Yu-Jie; Cheng, Kuo-Sheng

    2013-03-01

    Cell growth characterization during culturing is an important issue in a variety of biomedical applications. In this study an electrical bioimpedance spectroscopy-based multi-electrode culture monitoring system was developed to characterize cell growth. A PC12 cell line was cultured for the cell growth study. The bioimpedance variations for PC12 cell growth within the initial 12 h were measured over a range between 1 kHz and 4 MHz at three different medium concentrations. Within this frequency range, the largest bioimpedance value was 1.9 times the smallest bioimpedance value. The phase angle decreased over the range from 1 to 10 kHz when cells were growing. Then, the phase angle approached a constant over the frequency range between 10 kHz and 2 MHz. Thereafter, the phase angle increased rapidly from 20 to 52 degrees during cell culturing between 8 and 12 h at 4 MHz. The maximum cell number after culturing for 12 h increased by 25.8% for the control sites with poly-D-lysine (PDL) pastes. For the normal growth factor, the cell number increased up to 4.78 times from 8 to 12 h, but only 0.96 and 1.60 times for the other two medium growth factors. The correlation coefficients between impedance and cell number were 0.868 (coating with PDL), and 0.836 (without PDL) for the normal concentration medium. Thus, impedance may be used as an index for cell growth characterization.

  20. Cell Wall Nonlinear Elasticity and Growth Dynamics: How Do Bacterial Cells Regulate Pressure and Growth?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yi

    In my thesis, I study intact and bulging Escherichia coli cells using atomic force microscopy to separate the contributions of the cell wall and turgor pressure to the overall cell stiffness. I find strong evidence of power--law stress--stiffening in the E. coli cell wall, with an exponent of 1.22±0.12, such that the wall is significantly stiffer in intact cells (E = 23±8 MPa and 49±20 MPa in the axial and circumferential directions) than in unpressurized sacculi. These measurements also indicate that the turgor pressure in living cells E. coli is 29±3 kPa. The nonlinearity in cell elasticity serves as a plausible mechanism to balance the mechanical protection and tension measurement sensitivity of the cell envelope. I also study the growth dynamics of the Bacillus subtilis cell wall to help understand the mechanism of the spatiotemporal order of inserting new cell wall material. High density fluorescent markers are used to label the entire cell surface to capture the morphological changes of the cell surface at sub-cellular to diffraction-limited spatial resolution and sub-minute temporal resolution. This approach reveals that rod-shaped chaining B. subtilis cells grow and twist in a highly heterogeneous fashion both spatially and temporally. Regions of high growth and twisting activity have a typical length scale of 5 μm, and last for 10-40 minutes. Motivated by the quantification of the cell wall growth dynamics, two microscopy and image analysis techniques are developed and applied to broader applications beyond resolving bacterial growth. To resolve densely distributed quantum dots, we present a fast and efficient image analysis algorithm, namely Spatial Covariance Reconstruction (SCORE) microscopy that takes into account the blinking statistics of the fluorescence emitters. We achieve sub-diffraction lateral resolution of 100 nm from 5 to 7 seconds of imaging, which is at least an order of magnitude faster than single-particle localization based methods

  1. ULTRASOUND INCREASES THE RATE OF BACTERIAL CELL GROWTH

    PubMed Central

    Pitt, William G.; Ross, S. Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Ultrasound was employed to increase the growth rate of bacterial cells attached to surfaces. Staphylococcus epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli cells adhered to and grew on a polyethylene surface in the presence of ultrasound. It was found that low frequency ultrasound (70 kHz) of low acoustic intensity (<2 W/cm2) increased the growth rate of the cells compared to growth without ultrasound. However, at high intensity levels, cells were partially removed from the surface. Ultrasound also enhanced planktonic growth of S. epidermidis and other planktonic bacteria. It is hypothesized that ultrasound increases the rate of transport of oxygen and nutrients to the cells and increases the rate of transport of waste products away from the cells, thus enhancing their growth. PMID:12790676

  2. Growth of Facultatively Heterofermentative Lactobacilli on Starter Cell Suspensions

    PubMed Central

    Rapposch, S.; Eliskases-Lechner, F.; Ginzinger, W.

    1999-01-01

    The growth of facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli (FHL) on cell suspensions of the homofermentative Lactobacillus helveticus was investigated. Osmotic lysis of L. helveticus led to a significant increase of ribose. It decreased steadily in parallel with the growth of FHL, strongly suggesting that the bacteria used ribose as a growth substrate. PMID:10584024

  3. Ozone selectively inhibits growth of human cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sweet, F.; Kao, M.S.; Lee, S.C.; Hagar, W.L.; Sweet, W.E.

    1980-08-01

    The growth of human cancer cells from lung, breast, and uterine tumors was selectively inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by ozone at 0.3 to 0.8 part per million of ozone in ambient air during 8 days of culture. Human lung diploid fibroblasts served as noncancerous control cells. The presence of ozone at 0.3 to 0.5 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth 40 and 60 percent, respectively. The noncancerous lung cells were unaffected at these levels. Exposure to ozone at 0.8 part per million inhibited cancer cell growth more than 90 percent and control cell growth less than 50 percent. Evidently, the mechanisms for defense against ozone damage are impaired in human cancer cells.

  4. Reaction of plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels in non-small cell lung cancer patients treated with EGFR-TKIs.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hidenori; Kimura, Tatsuo; Kudoh, Shinzoh; Mitsuoka, Shigeki; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Suzumura, Tomohiro; Tachibana, Keisei; Noguchi, Masayuki; Yano, Seiji; Hirata, Kazuto

    2011-09-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor induces resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors. It has been hypothesized that epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors administration may influence the levels of plasma hepatocyte growth factor. Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and relapsed after chemotherapies were eligible. Plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels were analyzed on pretreatment and post-treatment day 15 and 30. We also investigated the correlation between plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels and sensitivity to epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, tissue immunoreactivity for hepatocyte growth factor and MET gene status. Thirty-one patients were enrolled. Plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels on post-treatment day 15 (630.1 ± 366.9 pg/ml) were significantly higher (p = 0.029) than the pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels (485.9 ± 230.2 pg/ml). Plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels on the post-treatment day 30 (581.5 ± 298.1 pg/ml) tend to be higher than those before treatment (p = 0.057). Pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels in patients with progressive disease (724.1 ± 216.4 pg/ml) were significantly higher than those in patients with stable disease (396.5 ± 148.3 pg/ml; p = 0.0008) and partial response (381.7 ± 179.0 pg/ml; p = 0.0039). The optimal pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor cut-off value for diagnosis of responder was 553.5 pg/ml, and its sensitivity and specificity were 90% and 65%, respectively. Pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels had no correlation with tissue immunoreactivities for hepatocyte growth factor, MET gene status and active EGFR mutations. Administration of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors significantly increased plasma hepatocyte growth factor levels. High levels of pretreatment plasma hepatocyte growth factor indicated intrinsic resistance to epidermal growth factor

  5. Staphylococcus aureus-derived factors induce IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-17A-expressing FOXP3+CD161+ T-helper cells in a partly monocyte-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Björkander, Sophia; Hell, Lena; Johansson, Maria A.; Forsberg, Manuel Mata; Lasaviciute, Gintare; Roos, Stefan; Holmlund, Ulrika; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a human pathogen as well as a frequent colonizer of skin and mucosa. This bacterium potently activates conventional T-cells through superantigens and it is suggested to induce T-cell cytokine-production as well as to promote a regulatory phenotype in T-cells in order to avoid clearance. This study aimed to investigate how S. aureus impacts the production of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the expression of CD161 and HELIOS by peripheral CD4+FOXP3+ T-cells. Stimulation of PBMC with S. aureus 161:2-cell free supernatant (CFS) induced expression of IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-17A in FOXP3+ cells. Further, CD161 and HELIOS separated the FOXP3+ cells into four distinct populations regarding cytokine-expression. Monocyte-depletion decreased S. aureus 161:2-induced activation of FOXP3+ cells while pre-stimulation of purified monocytes with S. aureus 161:2-CFS and subsequent co-culture with autologous monocyte-depleted PBMC was sufficient to mediate activation of FOXP3+ cells. Together, these data show that S. aureus potently induces FOXP3+ cells and promotes a diverse phenotype with expression of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines connected to increased CD161-expression. This could indicate potent regulation or a contribution of FOXP3+ cells to inflammation and repression of immune-suppression upon encounter with S. aureus. PMID:26917055

  6. Staphylococcus aureus-derived factors induce IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-17A-expressing FOXP3+CD161+ T-helper cells in a partly monocyte-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Björkander, Sophia; Hell, Lena; Johansson, Maria A; Forsberg, Manuel Mata; Lasaviciute, Gintare; Roos, Stefan; Holmlund, Ulrika; Sverremark-Ekström, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a human pathogen as well as a frequent colonizer of skin and mucosa. This bacterium potently activates conventional T-cells through superantigens and it is suggested to induce T-cell cytokine-production as well as to promote a regulatory phenotype in T-cells in order to avoid clearance. This study aimed to investigate how S. aureus impacts the production of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines and the expression of CD161 and HELIOS by peripheral CD4(+)FOXP3(+) T-cells. Stimulation of PBMC with S. aureus 161:2-cell free supernatant (CFS) induced expression of IL-10, IFN-γ and IL-17A in FOXP3(+) cells. Further, CD161 and HELIOS separated the FOXP3(+) cells into four distinct populations regarding cytokine-expression. Monocyte-depletion decreased S. aureus 161:2-induced activation of FOXP3(+) cells while pre-stimulation of purified monocytes with S. aureus 161:2-CFS and subsequent co-culture with autologous monocyte-depleted PBMC was sufficient to mediate activation of FOXP3(+) cells. Together, these data show that S. aureus potently induces FOXP3(+) cells and promotes a diverse phenotype with expression of regulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines connected to increased CD161-expression. This could indicate potent regulation or a contribution of FOXP3(+) cells to inflammation and repression of immune-suppression upon encounter with S. aureus. PMID:26917055

  7. Can Insulin Production Suppress β Cell Growth?

    PubMed

    De Vas, Matias; Ferrer, Jorge

    2016-01-12

    While insulin has mitogenic effects in many cell types, its effects on β cells remain elusive. In this issue of Cell Metabolism, Szabat et al. (2015) genetically block insulin production in adult β cells and show that this leads to a relief of ER stress, AKT activation, and increased β cell proliferation. PMID:26771111

  8. Separating growth from elastic deformation during cell enlargement

    SciTech Connect

    Proseus, T.E.; Boyer, J.S. . Coll. of Marine Studies); Ortega, J.K.E. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1999-02-01

    Plants change size by deforming reversibly (elastically) whenever turgor pressure changes, and by growing. The elastic deformation is independent of growth because it occurs in nongrowing cells. Its occurrence with growth has prevented growth from being observed alone. The authors investigated whether the two processes could be separated in internode cells of Chara corallina Klien ex Willd., em R.D.W. by injecting or removing cell solution with a pressure probe to change turgor while the cell length was continuously measured. Cell size changed immediately when turgor changed, and growth rates appeared to be altered. Low temperature eliminated growth but did not alter the elastic effects. This allowed elastic deformation measured at low temperature to be subtracted from elongation at warm temperature in the same cell. After te subtraction, growth alone could be observed for the first time. Alternations in turgor caused growth to change rapidly to a new, steady rate with no evidence of rapid adjustments in wall properties. This turgor response, together with the marked sensitivity of growth to temperature, suggested that the growth rate was not controlled by inert polymer extension but rather by the biochemical reactions that include a turgor-sensitive step.

  9. On the growth of walled cells: From shells to vesicles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-03-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells inflated by a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  10. Growth of Walled Cells: From Shells to Vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudaoud, Arezki

    2003-07-01

    The growth of isolated walled cells is investigated. Examples of such cells range from bacteria to giant algae, and include cochlear hair, plant root hair, fungi, and yeast cells. They are modeled as elastic shells containing a liquid. Cell growth is driven by fluid pressure and is is similar to a plastic deformation of the wall. The requirement of mechanical equilibrium leads to two new scaling laws for cell size that are in quantitative agreement with the compiled biological data. Given these results, possible shapes for growing cells are computed by analogy with those of vesicle membranes.

  11. Cell Competition Drives the Growth of Intestinal Adenomas in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Suijkerbuijk, Saskia J.E.; Kolahgar, Golnar; Kucinski, Iwo; Piddini, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    Summary Tumor-host interactions play an increasingly recognized role in modulating tumor growth. Thus, understanding the nature and impact of this complex bidirectional communication is key to identifying successful anti-cancer strategies. It has been proposed that tumor cells compete with and kill neighboring host tissue to clear space that they can expand into; however, this has not been demonstrated experimentally. Here we use the adult fly intestine to investigate the existence and characterize the role of competitive tumor-host interactions. We show that APC−/−-driven intestinal adenomas compete with and kill surrounding cells, causing host tissue attrition. Importantly, we demonstrate that preventing cell competition, by expressing apoptosis inhibitors, restores host tissue growth and contains adenoma expansion, indicating that cell competition is essential for tumor growth. We further show that JNK signaling is activated inside the tumor and in nearby tissue and is required for both tumor growth and cell competition. Lastly, we find that APC−/− cells display higher Yorkie (YAP) activity than host cells and that this promotes tumor growth, in part via cell competition. Crucially, we find that relative, rather than absolute, Hippo activity determines adenoma growth. Overall, our data indicate that the intrinsic over-proliferative capacity of APC−/− cells is not uncontrolled and can be constrained by host tissues if cell competition is inhibited, suggesting novel possible therapeutic approaches. PMID:26853366

  12. Control of Francisella tularensis Intracellular Growth by Pulmonary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Savannah; Takeda, Kazuyo; Stark, Felicity; Meierovics, Anda I.; Yabe, Idalia; Cowley, Siobhan C.

    2015-01-01

    The virulence of F. tularensis is often associated with its ability to grow in macrophages, although recent studies show that Francisella proliferates in multiple host cell types, including pulmonary epithelial cells. Thus far little is known about the requirements for killing of F. tularensis in the non-macrophage host cell types that support replication of this organism. Here we sought to address this question through the use of a murine lung epithelial cell line (TC-1 cells). Our data show that combinations of the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A activated murine pulmonary epithelial cells to inhibit the intracellular growth of the F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and the highly virulent F. tularensis Schu S4 strain. Although paired combinations of IFN-γ, TNF, and IL-17A all significantly controlled LVS growth, simultaneous treatment with all three cytokines had the greatest effect on LVS growth inhibition. In contrast, Schu S4 was more resistant to cytokine-induced growth effects, exhibiting significant growth inhibition only in response to all three cytokines. Since one of the main antimicrobial mechanisms of activated macrophages is the release of reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNI) via the activity of iNOS, we investigated the role of RNI and iNOS in Francisella growth control by pulmonary epithelial cells. NOS2 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in infected, cytokine-treated pulmonary epithelial cells in a manner that correlated with LVS and Schu S4 growth control. Treatment of LVS-infected cells with an iNOS inhibitor significantly reversed LVS killing in cytokine-treated cultures. Further, we found that mouse pulmonary epithelial cells produced iNOS during in vivo respiratory LVS infection. Overall, these data demonstrate that lung epithelial cells produce iNOS both in vitro and in vivo, and can inhibit Francisella intracellular growth via reactive nitrogen intermediates. PMID:26379269

  13. Another Brick in the Cell Wall: Biosynthesis Dependent Growth Model

    PubMed Central

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  14. Another brick in the cell wall: biosynthesis dependent growth model.

    PubMed

    Barbacci, Adelin; Lahaye, Marc; Magnenet, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Expansive growth of plant cell is conditioned by the cell wall ability to extend irreversibly. This process is possible if (i) a tensile stress is developed in the cell wall due to the coupling effect between turgor pressure and the modulation of its mechanical properties through enzymatic and physicochemical reactions and if (ii) new cell wall elements can be synthesized and assembled to the existing wall. In other words, expansive growth is the result of coupling effects between mechanical, thermal and chemical energy. To have a better understanding of this process, models must describe the interplay between physical or mechanical variable with biological events. In this paper we propose a general unified and theoretical framework to model growth in function of energy forms and their coupling. This framework is based on irreversible thermodynamics. It is then applied to model growth of the internodal cell of Chara corallina modulated by changes in pressure and temperature. The results describe accurately cell growth in term of length increment but also in term of cell pectate biosynthesis and incorporation to the expanding wall. Moreover, the classical growth model based on Lockhart's equation such as the one proposed by Ortega, appears as a particular and restrictive case of the more general growth equation developed in this paper. PMID:24066142

  15. Mechanoresponsiveness of human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells in in vitro chondrogenesis-A comparative study with growth factor induction.

    PubMed

    Remya, N S; Nair, Prabha D

    2016-10-01

    Fetal-derived mesenchymal stem cells especially human umbilical cord matrix mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), with their ease of availability, pluripotency, and high expansion potential have emerged as an alternative solution for stem cell based cartilage therapies. An attempt to elucidate the effect of dynamic mechanical compression in modulating the chondrogenic differentiation of hUCMSCs is done in this study to add on to the knowledge of optimizing chondrogenic signals necessary for the effective differentiation of these stem cells and subsequent integration to the surrounding tissues. hUCMSCs were seeded in porous poly (vinyl alcohol)-poly (caprolactone) (PVA-PCL) scaffolds and cultured in chondrogenic medium with/without TGF-β3 and were subjected to a dynamic compression of 10% strain, 1 Hz for 1/4 h for 7 days. The results on various analysis shows that the extent of dynamic compression is an important factor affecting cell viability. Mechanical stimulation in the form of dynamic compression stimulates expression of chondrogenic genes even in the absence of chondrogenic growth factors and also augments growth factor induced chondrogenic potential of hUCMSC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2554-2566, 2016. PMID:27227673

  16. Growth rate and cell size: A re-examination of the growth law

    PubMed Central

    Vadia, Stephen; Levin, Petra Anne

    2015-01-01

    Research into the mechanisms regulating bacterial cell size has its origins in a single paper published over 50 years ago. In it Schaechter and colleagues made the observation that the chemical composition and size of a bacterial cell is a function of growth rate, independent of the medium used to achieve that growth rate, a finding that is colloquially referred to as the growth law. Recent findings hint at unforeseen complexity in the growth law, and suggest that nutrients rather than growth rate are the primary arbiter of size. The emerging picture suggests that size is a complex, multifactorial phenomenon mediated through the varied impacts of central carbon metabolism on cell cycle progression and biosynthetic capacity. PMID:25662920

  17. Automated single cell microbioreactor for monitoring intracellular dynamics and cell growth in free solution†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Agrawal, Utsav; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Kuhlman, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    We report an automated microfluidic-based platform for single cell analysis that allows for cell culture in free solution with the ability to control the cell growth environment. Using this approach, cells are confined by the sole action of gentle fluid flow, thereby enabling non-perturbative analysis of cell growth away from solid boundaries. In addition, the single cell microbioreactor allows for precise and time-dependent control over cell culture media, with the combined ability to observe the dynamics of non-adherent cells over long time scales. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we used the platform to observe dynamic cell growth, gene expression, and intracellular diffusion of repressor proteins while precisely tuning the cell growth environment. Overall, this microfluidic approach enables the direct observation of cellular dynamics with exquisite control over environmental conditions, which will be useful for quantifying the behaviour of single cells in well-defined media. PMID:24836754

  18. Targeting Btk with ibrutinib inhibit gastric carcinoma cells growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jin Dao; Chen, Xiao Ying; Ji, Ke Wei; Tao, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Bruton’s tyrosine kinase (Btk) is a member of the Tec-family non-receptor tyrosine kinases family. It has previously been reported to be expressed in B cells and has an important role in B-cell malignancies. While the roles of Btk in the pathogenesis of certain B-cell malignancies are well established, the functions of Btk in gastric carcinoma have never been investigated. Herein, we found that Btk is over-expressed in gastric carcinoma tissues and gastric cancer cells. Knockdown of Btk expression selectively inhibits the growth of gastric cancer cells, but not that of the normal gastric mucosa epithelial cell, which express very little Btk. Inhibition of Btk by its inhibitor ibrutinib has an additive inhibitory effect on gastric cancer cell growth. Treatment of gastric cancer cells, but not immortalized breast epithelial cells with ibrutinib results in effective cell killing, accompanied by the attenuation of Btk signals. Ibrutinib also induces apoptosis in gastric carcinoma cells as well as is a chemo-sensitizer for docetaxel (DTX), a standard of care for gastric carcinoma patients. Finally, ibrutinib markedly reduces tumor growth and increases tumor cell apoptosis in the tumors formed in mice inoculated with the gastric carcinoma cells. Given these promising preclinical results for ibrutinib in gastric carcinoma, a strategy combining Btk inhibitor warrants attention in gastric cancer. PMID:27508020

  19. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A multiphase study was conducted to examine the properties of growth hormone cells. Topics investigated included: (1) to determine if growth hormone (GH) cells contained within the rat pituitary gland can be separated from the other hormone producing cell types by continuous flow electrophoresis (CFE); (2) to determine what role, if any, gravity plays in the electrophoretic separation of GH cells; (3) to compare in vitro GH release from rat pituitary cells previously exposed to microgravity conditions vs release from cells not exposed to microgravity; (4) to determine if the frequency of different hormone producing pituitary cell types contained in cell suspensions can be quantitated by flow cytometry; and (5) to determine if GH contained within the human post mortem pituitary gland can be purified by CFE. Specific experimental procedures and results are included.

  20. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1978-01-01

    The maintainance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro was studied. The primary approach was the testing of agents which may be expected to increase the release of the human growth hormone (hGH). A procedure for tissue procurement is described along with the methodologies used to dissociate human pituitary tissue (obtained either at autopsy or surgery) into single cell suspensions. The validity of the Biogel cell column perfusion system for studying the dynamics of GH release was developed and documented using a rat pituitary cell system.

  1. Ether-linked diglycerides inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell growth via decreased MAPK and PI3K/Akt signaling.

    PubMed

    Houck, Kristy L; Fox, Todd E; Sandirasegarane, Lakshman; Kester, Mark

    2008-10-01

    Diglycerides (DGs) are phospholipid-derived second messengers that regulate PKC-dependent signaling pathways. Distinct species of DGs are generated from inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. Growth factors increase diacyl- but not ether-linked DG species, whereas inflammatory cytokines predominately generate alkyl, acyl- and alkenyl, acyl-linked DG species in rat mesenchymal cells. These DG species have been shown to differentially regulate protein kinase C (PKC) isotypes. Ester-linked diacylglycerols activate PKC-epsilon and cellular proliferation in contrast to ether-linked DGs, which lead to growth arrest through the inactivation of PKC-epsilon. It is now hypothesized that ether-linked DGs inhibit mitogenesis through the inactivation of ERK and/or Akt signaling cascades. We demonstrate that cell-permeable ether-linked DGs reduce vascular smooth muscle cell growth by inhibiting platelet-derived growth factor-stimulated ERK in a PKC-epsilon-dependent manner. This inhibition is specific to the ERK pathway, since ether-linked DGs do not affect growth factor-induced activation of other family members of the MAPKs, including p38 MAPK and c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinases. We also demonstrate that ether-linked DGs reduce prosurvival phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, independent of PKC-epsilon, by diminishing an interaction between the subunits of PI3K and not by affecting protein phosphatase 2A or lipid (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10) phosphatases. Taken together, our studies identify ether-linked DGs as potential adjuvant therapies to limit vascular smooth muscle migration and mitogenesis in atherosclerotic and restenotic models. PMID:18723771

  2. Cell growth on immobilized cell growth factor. 7. Protein-free cell culture by using growth-factor-immobilized polymer membrane.

    PubMed

    Liu, S Q; Ito, Y; Imanishi, Y

    1993-02-01

    A protein-free culture of anchorage-dependent cells, mouse fibroblast cells, STO and 3T3-L1 and fibroic sarcoma cells, Swiss albino HSDM1C1, grown on a cell-growth protein, insulin, and/or a cell-adhesion protein, collagen, which are immobilized or coimmobilized on surface-hydrolyzed poly(methyl methacrylate) membrane, was investigated. By adding metal ions and lipids to the culture medium, a protein-free culture medium was composed, which was potent in promoting cell proliferation similarly to serum-containing culture medium. In particular, with insulin/collagen-coimmobilized membrane, a protein-free culture was established without detachment of growing cells over a long period. These protein-immobilized membranes could be used repeatedly. PMID:7763456

  3. Effects of hepatocyte growth factor on glutathione synthesis, growth, and apoptosis is cell density-dependent

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Heping; Magilnick, Nathaniel; Xia Meng; Lu, Shelly C.

    2008-01-15

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a potent hepatocyte mitogen that exerts opposing effects depending on cell density. Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in mammalian cells that modulates growth and apoptosis. We previously showed that GSH level is inversely related to cell density of hepatocytes and is positively related to growth. Our current work examined whether HGF can modulate GSH synthesis in a cell density-dependent manner and how GSH in turn influence HGF's effects. We found HGF treatment of H4IIE cells increased cell GSH levels only under subconfluent density. The increase in cell GSH under low density was due to increased transcription of GSH synthetic enzymes. This correlated with increased protein levels and nuclear binding activities of c-Jun, c-Fos, p65, p50, Nrf1 and Nrf2 to the promoter region of these genes. HGF acts as a mitogen in H4IIE cells under low cell density and protects against tumor necrosis factor {alpha} (TNF{alpha})-induced apoptosis by limiting JNK activation. However, HGF is pro-apoptotic under high cell density and exacerbates TNF{alpha}-induced apoptosis by potentiating JNK activation. The increase in cell GSH under low cell density allows HGF to exert its full mitogenic effect but is not necessary for its anti-apoptotic effect.

  4. Sulf1A and HGF regulate satellite-cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Gill, Roop; Hitchins, Laura; Fletcher, Fenella; Dhoot, Gurtej K.

    2010-01-01

    The role of Sulf1A, sulfation and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in satellite-cell growth was examined in an in vitro model of dissociated whole skeletal muscle fibres. Pax7-positive quiescent satellite cells express little or no Sulf1A but show rapid re-expression in regenerating myoblasts and myotubes, similar to embryonic muscle and in vitro satellite cells preceding asynchronous MyoD activation. Once activated, Sulf1A and MyoD re-expression persists up to 72 hours in most satellite cells under normal culture conditions and following moderate changes in sulfation, whereas Sulf1A neutralisation by antibodies not only enhances satellite-cell proliferation but also downregulates MyoD and Pax7 expression in a large proportion of the satellite cells. The HGF exposure also induces similar but even more pronounced changes characterised by variable sulfation levels and rapid downregulation of MyoD and Pax7 without myogenin activation in a sub-set of cells. This Pax7-MyoD-myogenin-negative sub-population expresses Sulf1A and Myf5. The transfer of all such satellite-cell progenies onto gelatin-coated-substratum re-activates MyoD and Pax7 gene expression in all cells, thus detecting a distinct sub-population of satellite cells. We conclude that HGF and fine-tuned sulfation levels are major contributory factors controlling satellite-cell growth by regulating the relative activities of actively proliferating and differentiating cells. PMID:20442248

  5. Epitaxial silicon growth for solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daiello, R. V.; Robinson, P. H.; Richman, D.

    1979-01-01

    The epitaxial procedures, solar cell fabrication, and evaluation techniques are described. The development of baseline epitaxial solar cell structures grown on high quality conventional silicon substrates is discussed. Diagnostic layers and solar cells grown on four potentially low cost silicon substrates are considered. The crystallographic properties of such layers and the performance of epitaxially grown solar cells fabricated on these materials are described. An advanced epitaxial reactor, the rotary disc, is described along with the results of growing solar cell structures of the baseline type on low cost substrates. The add on cost for the epitaxial process is assessed and the economic advantages of the epitaxial process as they relate to silicon substrate selection are examined.

  6. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth.

    PubMed

    Wesch, Neil L; Burlock, Laura J; Gooding, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed. PMID:27500377

  7. Critical telomerase activity for uncontrolled cell growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesch, Neil L.; Burlock, Laura J.; Gooding, Robert J.

    2016-08-01

    The lengths of the telomere regions of chromosomes in a population of cells are modelled using a chemical master equation formalism, from which the evolution of the average number of cells of each telomere length is extracted. In particular, the role of the telomere-elongating enzyme telomerase on these dynamics is investigated. We show that for biologically relevant rates of cell birth and death, one finds a critical rate, R crit, of telomerase activity such that the total number of cells diverges. Further, R crit is similar in magnitude to the rates of mitosis and cell death. The possible relationship of this result to replicative immortality and its associated hallmark of cancer is discussed.

  8. Growth and differentiation in cultured human thyroid cells: effects of epidermal growth factor and thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    Errick, J E; Ing, K W; Eggo, M C; Burrow, G N

    1986-01-01

    Human thyroid cells were grown and subcultured in vitro to examine their responses to known hormones and growth factors, and to serum. The cells were obtained from surgical specimens and were either neoplastic or nonneoplastic. The effects of culture conditions on cell growth were measured by changes in cell numbers and by stimulation of [3H]thymidine incorporation. The results showed that serum (0.5%) was essential for cell proliferation, and that a mixture of insulin (10 micrograms/ml), transferrin (5 micrograms/ml), hydrocortisone (10 micrograms/ml), somatostatin (10 ng/ml), and glycyl-histidyl-lysine (10 ng/ml) enhanced the effect of serum. Maximum growth of the cells was obtained when epidermal growth factor was present at 10(-9) M. Differentiation was measured by production of thyroglobulin, which was found to be stimulated by thyrotropin. This system provides a means to study the hormonal control of growth and differentiation in human thyroid cells. PMID:3511027

  9. Prolonged cyclic strain inhibits human endothelial cell growth.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Kelly J; Liu, Xiao-ming; Durante, William

    2016-01-01

    The vascular endothelium is continuously exposed to cyclic mechanical strain due to the periodic change in vessel diameter as a result of pulsatile blood flow. Since emerging evidence indicates the cyclic strain plays an integral role in regulating endothelial cell function, the present study determined whether application of a physiologic regimen of cyclic strain (6% at 1 hertz) influences the proliferation of human arterial endothelial cells. Prolonged exposure of human dermal microvascular or human aortic endothelial cells to cyclic strain for up to 7 days resulted in a marked decrease in cell growth. The strain-mediated anti-proliferative effect was associated with the arrest of endothelial cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, did not involve cell detachment or cytotoxicity, and was due to the induction of p21. Interestingly, the inhibition in endothelial cell growth was independent of the strain regimen since prolonged application of constant or intermittent 6% strain was also able to block endothelial cell proliferation. The ability of chronic physiologic cyclic strain to inhibit endothelial cell growth represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which hemodynamic forces maintain these cells in a quiescent, non-proliferative state. PMID:26709656

  10. Role of growth factors in the growth of normal and transformed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lokeshwar, V.B.

    1989-01-01

    Growth factors play an important role in the growth of normal cells. However, their untimely and/or excess production leads to neoplastic transformation. The role of growth factors in the growth of normal cells was studied by investigating the mechanism of transmodulation of the cell surface EGF receptor number by protamine. Protamine increased the EGF stimulated mitogenic response in Swiss mouse 3T3 cells and A431 cells by increasing the number of functionally active EGF receptors. Protamine also increased EGF receptor number in plasma membranes and solubilized membranes. This was evidenced by an increase in both {sup 125}I-EGF-EGF-receptor complex and EGF stimulated phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. The solubilized EGF receptor was retained on a protamine-agarose gel indicating that protamine might increase EGF receptor number by directly activating cryptic EGF receptors in the plasma membranes. The role of growth factors in neoplastic transformation was studied by investigating the role of the oncogene v-sis in the growth of Simian sarcoma virus (SSV) transformed cells. The product of the oncogene v-sis is 94% homologous to the B chain of PDGF. This study found that (i) v-sis gene product is synthesized as a 32 kDa unglycosylated monomer which is glycosylated, dimerized and proteolytically processed into p36, p72, p68, p58, p44 and p27 mol. wt. species respectively. (ii) p36, p72, p68 and p58 are very likely formed in the endoplasmic reticulum and/or Golgi complex. A fraction of newly synthesized p72, p68 and p58 is degraded intracellularly at a fast rate. (iii) p44 is a secretory product which remains tightly associated with the cell surface. p44 is recaptured by the cells through interaction with cell surface PDGF receptors and degraded into p27. (iv) During long term cultures p44 is extracellularly cleaved into a 27 kDa product.

  11. A study of cell electrophoresis as a means of purifying growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, Lindsay D.; Hymer, W. C.; Kunze, M. Elaine; Marks, Gary M.; Lanham, J. Wayne

    1983-01-01

    Growth hormone secreting cells of the rat anterior pituitary are heavily laden with granules of growth hormone and can be partialy purified on the basis of their resulting high density. Two methods of preparative cell electrophoresis were investigated as methods of enhancing the purification of growth hormone producing cells: density gradient electrophoresis and continuous flow electrophoresis. Both methods provided a two- to four-fold enrichment in growth hormone production per cell relative to that achieved by previous methods. Measurements of electrophoretic mobilities by two analytical methods, microscopic electrophoresis and laser-tracking electrophoresis, revealed very little distinction between unpurified anterior pituitary cell suspensions and somatotroph-enriched cell suspensions. Predictions calculated on the basis of analytical electrophoretic data are consistent with the hypothesis that sedimentation plays a significant role in both types of preparative electrophoresis and the electrophoretic mobility of the growth hormone secreting subpopulation of cells remains unknown.

  12. Cytosolic pH: A conserved regulator of cell growth?

    PubMed Central

    Dechant, Reinhard; Peter, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Although target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase and Ras are central regulators of cell growth in yeast and mammals, the molecular mechanisms underlying their regulation by nutrients are still poorly understood. Interestingly, recent studies identified cytosolic pH as a critical regulatory signal for both pathways, which might have widespread implications for tumor cell biology PMID:27308377

  13. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita; Estevez, José M

    2016-07-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca(2+)) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca(2+) and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. PMID:27208283

  14. Mechanisms of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid inhibition of mammary cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Said, Thenaa K; Moraes, Ricardo CB; Sinha, Raghu; Medina, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid in cell growth inhibition involved induction of pRb-2/p130 interaction and nuclear translocation with E2F-4, followed by significant repression in E2F-1 and PCNA nuclear levels, which led to inhibition in DNA synthesis in mammary epithelial cell lines. PMID:11250759

  15. ROS Regulation of Polar Growth in Plant Cells1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mangano, Silvina; Juárez, Silvina Paola Denita

    2016-01-01

    Root hair cells and pollen tubes, like fungal hyphae, possess a typical tip or polar cell expansion with growth limited to the apical dome. Cell expansion needs to be carefully regulated to produce a correct shape and size. Polar cell growth is sustained by oscillatory feedback loops comprising three main components that together play an important role regulating this process. One of the main components are reactive oxygen species (ROS) that, together with calcium ions (Ca2+) and pH, sustain polar growth over time. Apoplastic ROS homeostasis controlled by NADPH oxidases as well as by secreted type III peroxidases has a great impact on cell wall properties during cell expansion. Polar growth needs to balance a focused secretion of new materials in an extending but still rigid cell wall in order to contain turgor pressure. In this review, we discuss the gaps in our understanding of how ROS impact on the oscillatory Ca2+ and pH signatures that, coordinately, allow root hair cells and pollen tubes to expand in a controlled manner to several hundred times their original size toward specific signals. PMID:27208283

  16. III-V Growth on Silicon Toward a Multijunction Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Geisz, J.; Olson, J.; McMahon, W.; Friedman, D.; Kibbler, A.; Kramer, C.; Young, M.; Duda, A.; Ward, S.; Ptak, A.; Kurtz, S.; Wanlass, M.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H.; Norman, A.; Jones, K.; Romero, M.; Reedy, B.

    2005-11-01

    A III-V on Si multijunction solar cell promises high efficiency at relatively low cost. The challenges to epitaxial growth of high-quality III-Vs on Si, though, are extensive. Lattice-matched (LM) dilute-nitride GaNPAs solar cells have been grown on Si, but their performance is limited by defects related to the nitrogen. Advances in the growth of lattice-mismatched (LMM) materials make more traditional III-Vs, such as GaInP and GaAsP, very attractive for use in multijunction solar cells on silicon.

  17. In vitro melanoma cell growth after preenucleation radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneally, C.Z.; Farber, M.G.; Smith, M.E.; Devineni, R.

    1988-02-01

    The in vitro efficacy of 20 Gy (2000 rad) of external beam irradiation delivered to patients with choroidal melanomas prior to enucleation was investigated in 11 patients whose tumors were grown in cell culture. Phase-contrast microscopy was used to compare growth patterns between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. Cell types were determined by histologic stains, and electron microscopy identified intracytoplasmic melanin. Irradiated melanomas did not grow and did not attach to culture flasks, thus demonstrating that preenucleation irradiation alters the in vitro growth of melanoma cells.

  18. A novel role for a major component of the vitamin D axis: vitamin D binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor induces human breast cancer cell apoptosis through stimulation of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J V; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-07-01

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This allows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects. PMID:23857228

  19. A Novel Role for a Major Component of the Vitamin D Axis: Vitamin D Binding Protein-Derived Macrophage Activating Factor Induces Human Breast Cancer Cell Apoptosis through Stimulation of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Thyer, Lynda; Ward, Emma; Smith, Rodney; Fiore, Maria Giulia; Magherini, Stefano; Branca, Jacopo J. V.; Morucci, Gabriele; Gulisano, Massimo; Ruggiero, Marco; Pacini, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    The role of vitamin D in maintaining health appears greater than originally thought, and the concept of the vitamin D axis underlines the complexity of the biological events controlled by biologically active vitamin D (1,25(OH)(2)D3), its two binding proteins that are the vitamin D receptor (VDR) and the vitamin D-binding protein-derived macrophage activating factor (GcMAF). In this study we demonstrate that GcMAF stimulates macrophages, which in turn attack human breast cancer cells, induce their apoptosis and eventually phagocytize them. These results are consistent with the observation that macrophages infiltrated implanted tumors in mice after GcMAF injections. In addition, we hypothesize that the last 23 hydrophobic amino acids of VDR, located at the inner part of the plasma membrane, interact with the first 23 hydrophobic amino acids of the GcMAF located at the external part of the plasma membrane. This al1ows 1,25(OH)(2)D3 and oleic acid to become sandwiched between the two vitamin D-binding proteins, thus postulating a novel molecular mode of interaction between GcMAF and VDR. Taken together, these results support and reinforce the hypothesis that GcMAF has multiple biological activities that could be responsible for its anti-cancer effects, possibly through molecular interaction with the VDR that in turn is responsible for a multitude of non-genomic as well as genomic effects. PMID:23857228

  20. Modeling Intrinsic Heterogeneity and Growth of Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Greene, James M.; Levy, Doron; Fung, King L.; Silva de Souza, Paloma; Gottesman, Michael M.; Lavi, Orit

    2014-01-01

    Intratumoral heterogeneity has been found to be a major cause of drug resistance. Cell-to-cell variation increases as a result of cancer-related alterations, which are acquired by stochastic events and further induced by environmental signals. However, most cellular mechanisms include natural fluctuations that are closely regulated, and thus lead to asynchronization of the cells, which causes intrinsic heterogeneity in a given population. Here, we derive two novel mathematical models, a stochastic agent-based model and an integro-differential equation model, each of which describes the growth of cancer cells as a dynamic transition between proliferative and quiescent states. These models are designed to predict variations in growth as a function of the intrinsic heterogeneity emerging from the durations of the cell-cycle and apoptosis, and also include cellular density dependencies. By examining the role all parameters play in the evolution of intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, and the sensitivity of the population growth to parameter values, we show that the cell-cycle length has the most significant effect on the growth dynamics. In addition, we demonstrate that the agent-based model can be approximated well by the more computationally efficient integro-differential equations when the number of cells is large. This essential step in cancer growth modeling will allow us to revisit the mechanisms of multi-drug resistance by examining spatiotemporal differences of cell growth while administering a drug among the different sub-populations in a single tumor, as well as the evolution of those mechanisms as a function of the resistance level. PMID:25457229

  1. Motogenic substrata and chemokinetic growth factors for human skin cells

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, Jennifer; Denyer, Morgan; Britland, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling and accurate spatio-temporal coordination of growth factor expression are two factors that are believed to regulate mitoses and cell migration in developing and regenerating tissues. The present quantitative videomicroscopical study examined the influence of some of the principal components of extracellular matrix and several growth factors that are known to be expressed in dermal wounds on three important facets of human skin cell behaviour in culture. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and dermal fibroblasts (and myofibroblast controls) exhibited varying degrees of substrate adhesion, division and migration depending on the composition of the culture substrate. Substrates that are recognized components of transitional matrices generally accentuated cell adhesion and proliferation, and were motogenic, when compared with serum-treated control surfaces, whereas components of more stable structures such as basement membrane had less influence. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and α fibroblastic growth factor (αFGF) all promoted cell proliferation and were chemokinetic to dermal fibroblasts, but not keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) or transforming growth factor β (TGFβ). PDGF, EGF and KGF, but not TGFβ or αFGF, all enhanced proliferation of dermal keratinocytes. The same growth factors, and in addition KGF, all stimulated motility in keratinocytes, but TGFβ and αFGF again had no effect. Developing a better understanding of the interdependency of factors that control crucial cell behaviour may assist those who are interested in the regulation of histogenesis and also inform the development of rational therapeutic strategies for the management of chronic and poorly healed wounds. PMID:16011545

  2. Meloxicam inhibits the growth of colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Goldman, A P; Williams, C S; Sheng, H; Lamps, L W; Williams, V P; Pairet, M; Morrow, J D; DuBois, R N

    1998-12-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 has been reported to play an important role in colorectal carcinogenesis. The effects of meloxicam (a COX-2 inhibitor) on the growth of two colon cancer cell lines that express COX-2 (HCA-7 and Moser-S) and a COX-2 negative cell line (HCT-116) were evaluated. The growth rate of these cells was measured following treatment with meloxicam. HCA-7 and Moser-S colony size were significantly reduced following treatment with meloxicam; however, there was no significant change in HCT-116 colony size with treatment. In vivo studies were performed to evaluate the effect of meloxicam on the growth of HCA-7 cells when xenografted into nude mice. We observed a 51% reduction in tumor size after 4 weeks of treatment. Analysis of COX-1 and COX-2 protein levels in HCA-7 tumor lysates revealed a slight decrease in COX-2 expression levels in tumors taken from mice treated with meloxicam and no detectable COX-1 expression. Here we report that meloxicam significantly inhibited HCA-7 colony and tumor growth but had no effect on the growth of the COX-2 negative HCT-116 cells. PMID:9886578

  3. When Cells Collide: A Model for Cell-Assisted Cell Growth based on Direct Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Ip, Wui; Bae, Albert; Franck, Nathan; Bogart, Elijah; Thi Le, Thanhbinh

    2008-03-01

    Although intercellular communication is frequently viewed as involving the transport of small molecules through an intracellular fluid medium, biologists have proposed chemical signaling with chemical specificity due to chemical recognition through direct contacts. Considering the collective computation behind the decision of a cell to divide when it senses the presence of a sufficient number of like neighbors, we offer a model for the transition from slow to exponential growth in shaken suspension cell culture of the model eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum. Besides exploring an elegantly simple example of multicellular life, this discussion might well prove useful in considering the limits of cell culture on small spatial scales as required for contemporary massively parallel biotechnology.

  4. CD166-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation promotes the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guodong; Wang, Xu; Yan, Ming; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    CD166 has been considered a relatively specific marker of stem cells and cancer stem cells, and the altered expression of CD166 has also been reported as a prognostic marker of several other types of cancer. However, the molecular functions of CD166 in these cancer cells are largely unknown. In this study, we found that CD166 significantly enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation and prolonged epidermal growth factor (EGF)/EGFR signalling activation. In addition, EGF stimulation in CD166-overexpressing oral squamous carcinoma cells led to enhanced colony formation, invasion capacity and cytoskeletal re-organization in vitro and elevated tumourigenesis in vivo. Taken together, the results of our study identify CD166 as an intriguing therapeutic target for patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). PMID:27424177

  5. Total triterpenoids from Ganoderma Lucidum suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Xie, Zi-ping; Huang, Zhan-sen; Li, Hao; Wei, An-yang; Di, Jin-ming; Xiao, Heng-jun; Zhang, Zhi-gang; Cai, Liu-hong; Tao, Xin; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-ling; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    In this study, one immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell line (BPH) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, 22Rv1, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with Ganoderma Lucidum triterpenoids (GLT) at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle were analyzed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR and Western blotting. It was found that GLT dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. GLT-induced apoptosis was due to activation of Caspases-9 and -3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. GLT-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and E2F1 expression at the late time. These findings demonstrate that GLT suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which might suggest that GLT or Ganoderma Lucidum could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:26489631

  6. Decreased ferroportin promotes myeloma cell growth and osteoclast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gu, Zhimin; Wang, He; Xia, Jiliang; Yang, Ye; Jin, Zhendong; Xu, Hongwei; Shi, Jumei; De Domenico, Ivana; Tricot, Guido; Zhan, Fenghuang

    2015-06-01

    Iron homeostasis is disrupted in multiple myeloma, a difficult-to-cure plasma cell malignancy with lytic bone lesions. Here, we systematically analyzed iron gene expression signature and demonstrated that mRNA expression of iron exporter ferroportin (FPN1) is significantly downregulated in myeloma cells and correlates negatively with clinic outcome. Restoring expression of FPN1 reduces intracellular liable iron pool, inhibits STAT3-MCL-1 signaling, and suppresses myeloma cells growth. Furthermore, we demonstrated that mRNA of FPN1 is also downregulated at the initial stages of osteoclast differentiation and suppresses myeloma cell-induced osteoclast differentiation through regulating iron regulator TFRC, NF-κB, and JNK pathways. Altogether, we demonstrated that downregulation of FPN1 plays critical roles in promoting myeloma cell growth and bone resorption in multiple myeloma. PMID:25855377

  7. Numerical Methods for Two-Dimensional Stem Cell Tissue Growth.

    PubMed

    Ovadia, Jeremy; Nie, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Growth of developing and regenerative biological tissues of different cell types is usually driven by stem cells and their local environment. Here, we present a computational framework for continuum tissue growth models consisting of stem cells, cell lineages, and diffusive molecules that regulate proliferation and differentiation through feedback. To deal with the moving boundaries of the models in both open geometries and closed geometries (through polar coordinates) in two dimensions, we transform the dynamic domains and governing equations to fixed domains, followed by solving for the transformation functions to track the interface explicitly. Clustering grid points in local regions for better efficiency and accuracy can be achieved by appropriate choices of the transformation. The equations resulting from the incompressibility of the tissue is approximated by high-order finite difference schemes and is solved using the multigrid algorithms. The numerical tests demonstrate an overall spatiotemporal second-order accuracy of the methods and their capability in capturing large deformations of the tissue boundaries. The methods are applied to two biological systems: stratified epithelia for studying the effects of two different types of stem cell niches and the scaling of a morphogen gradient with the size of the Drosophila imaginal wing disc during growth. Direct simulations of both systems suggest that that the computational framework is robust and accurate, and it can incorporate various biological processes critical to stem cell dynamics and tissue growth. PMID:24415847

  8. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  9. Cell Wall Composition, Biosynthesis and Remodeling during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mollet, Jean-Claude; Leroux, Christelle; Dardelle, Flavien; Lehner, Arnaud

    2013-01-01

    The pollen tube is a fast tip-growing cell carrying the two sperm cells to the ovule allowing the double fertilization process and seed setting. To succeed in this process, the spatial and temporal controls of pollen tube growth within the female organ are critical. It requires a massive cell wall deposition to promote fast pollen tube elongation and a tight control of the cell wall remodeling to modify the mechanical properties. In addition, during its journey, the pollen tube interacts with the pistil, which plays key roles in pollen tube nutrition, guidance and in the rejection of the self-incompatible pollen. This review focuses on our current knowledge in the biochemistry and localization of the main cell wall polymers including pectin, hemicellulose, cellulose and callose from several pollen tube species. Moreover, based on transcriptomic data and functional genomic studies, the possible enzymes involved in the cell wall remodeling during pollen tube growth and their impact on the cell wall mechanics are also described. Finally, mutant analyses have permitted to gain insight in the function of several genes involved in the pollen tube cell wall biosynthesis and their roles in pollen tube growth are further discussed. PMID:27137369

  10. HMGCR positively regulated the growth and migration of glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhihua; Yuan, Wen; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Chenzhi; Liu, Chao; Huang, Yongkai; Han, Deqing; Huang, Qinghui

    2016-01-15

    The metabolic program of cancer cells is significant different from the normal cells, which makes it possible to develop novel strategies targeting cancer cells. Mevalonate pathway and its rate-limiting enzyme HMG-CoA reductase (HMGCR) have shown important roles in the progression of several cancer types. However, their roles in glioblastoma cells remain unknown. In this study, up-regulation of HMGCR in the clinical glioblastoma samples was observed. Forced expression of HMGCR promoted the growth and migration of U251 and U373 cells, while knocking down the expression of HMGCR inhibited the growth, migration and metastasis of glioblastoma cells. Molecular mechanism studies revealed that HMGCR positively regulated the expression of TAZ, an important mediator of Hippo pathway, and the downstream target gene connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), suggesting HMGCR might activate Hippo pathway in glioblastoma cells. Taken together, our study demonstrated the oncogenic roles of HMGCR in glioblastoma cells and HMGCR might be a promising therapeutic target. PMID:26432005

  11. In Scarcity and Abundance: Metabolic Signals Regulating Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Saad, Shady; Peter, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Although nutrient availability is a major driver of cell growth, and continuous adaptation to nutrient supply is critical for the development and survival of all organisms, the molecular mechanisms of nutrient sensing are only beginning to emerge. Here, we highlight recent advances in the field of nutrient sensing and discuss arising principles governing how metabolism might regulate growth-promoting pathways. In addition, we discuss signaling functions of metabolic enzymes not directly related to their metabolic activity. PMID:23997189

  12. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  13. Hydrodynamic effects on cell growth in agitated microcarrier bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherry, Robert S.; Papoutsakis, E. Terry

    1988-01-01

    The net growth rate of bovine embryonic kidney cells in microcarrier bioreactor is the result of a variable death rate imposed on a cell culture trying to grow at a constant intrinsic growth rate. The death rate is a function of the agitation conditions in the system, and increases at higher agitation because of increasingly energetic interactions of the cell covered microcarriers with turbulent eddies in the fluid. At very low agitation rates bead-bead bridging becomes important; the large clumps formed by bridging can interact with larger eddies than single beads, leading to a higher death rate at low agitation. The growth and death rate were correlated with a dimensionless eddy number which compares eddy forces to the buoyant force on the bead.

  14. Nordihydroguaiaretic Acid Inhibits Insulin-Like Growth Factor Signaling, Growth, and Survival in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Gary E.; Chesler, Louis; Liu, Dandan; Gable, Karissa; Maddux, Betty A.; Goldenberg, David D.; Youngren, Jack F.; Goldfine, Ira D.; Weiss, William A.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Rosenthal, Stephen M.

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a common pediatric malignancy that metastasizes to the liver, bone, and other organs. Children with metastatic disease have a less than 50% chance of survival with current treatments. Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) stimulate neuroblastoma growth, survival, and motility, and are expressed by neuroblastoma cells and the tissues they invade. Thus, therapies that disrupt the effects of IGFs on neuroblastoma tumorigenesis may slow disease progression. We show that NVP-AEW541, a specific inhibitor of the IGF-I receptor (IGF-IR), potently inhibits neuroblastoma growth in vitro. Nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a phenolic compound isolated from the creosote bush (Larrea divaricata), has anti-tumor properties against a number of malignancies, has been shown to inhibit the phosphorylation and activation of the IGF-IR in breast cancer cells, and is currently in Phase I trials for prostate cancer. In the present study in neuroblastoma, NDGA inhibits IGF-I-mediated activation of the IGF-IR and disrupts activation of ERK and Akt signaling pathways induced by IGF-I. NDGA inhibits growth of neuroblastoma cells and induces apoptosis at higher doses, causing IGF-I-resistant activation of caspase-3 and a large increase in the fraction of sub-G0 cells. In addition, NDGA inhibits the growth of xenografted human neuroblastoma tumors in nude mice. These results indicate that NDGA may be useful in the treatment of neuroblastoma and may function in part via disruption of IGF-IR signaling. PMID:17486636

  15. The role of stem cells in midgut growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hakim, R S; Baldwin, K M; Loeb, M

    2001-06-01

    The Manduca sexta (L.) [Lepidoptera: Sphingidae] and Heliothis virescens (F.) [Lepidoptera: Noctuidae] midguts consist of a pseudostratified epithelium surrounded by striated muscle and tracheae. This epithelium contains goblet, columnar, and basal stem cells. The stem cells are critically important in that they are capable of massive proliferation and differentiation. This growth results in a fourfold enlargement of the midgut at each larval molt. The stem cells are also responsible for limited cell replacement during repair. While the characteristics of the stem cell population vary over the course of an instar, stem cells collected early in an instar and those collected late can start in vitro cultures. Cultures of larval stem, goblet, and columnar cells survive in vitro for several mo through proliferation and differentiation of the stem cells. One of the two polypeptide differentiation factors which have been identified and characterized from the culture medium has now been shown to be present in midgut in vivo. Thus the ability to examine lepidopteran midgut stem cell growth in vitro and in vivo is proving to be effective in determining the basic features of stem cell action and regulation. PMID:11515964

  16. Purification and cultivation of human pituitary growth hormone secreting cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    Efforts were directed towards maintenance of actively secreting human pituitary growth hormone cells (somatotrophs) in vitro. The production of human growth hormone (hGH) by this means would be of benefit for the treatment of certain human hypopituitary diseases such as dwarfism. One of the primary approaches was the testing of agents which may logically be expected to increase hGH release. The progress towards this goal is summarized. Results from preliminary experiments dealing with electrophoresis of pituitary cell for the purpose of somatotroph separation are described.

  17. Microcrystalline silicon growth for heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iles, P. A.; Leung, D. C.; Fang, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A single source of evaporation with B mixed with highly doped Si is used instead of the coevaporation of separate Si and B sources to reduce possible carbon contamination. The results of both the heterojunction or heteroface structures, however, are similar when evaporation is used. The best Voc of the heterojunction is about 460mV and no improvement in Voc in the heteroface structure is observed. Slight Voc degradation occurred. A study of the p m-Si/p c-Si structure showed a negative Voc in many cases. The interface properties between the two materials are such that instead of repelling minority carriers from the substrate carrier, collection actually occurred. Another study of cells made in the part of substrates not covered by n-Si results in performance lower than the controls. This indicates possible substrate degradation in the process.

  18. Effects of deuterium oxide on cell growth and vesicle speed in RBL-2H3 cells

    PubMed Central

    Triplett, Ashley R.

    2014-01-01

    For the first time we show the effects of deuterium oxide on cell growth and vesicle transport in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells. RBL-2H3 cells cultured with 15 moles/L deuterium showed decreased cell growth which was attributed to cells not doubling their DNA content. Experimental observations also showed an increase in vesicle speed for cells cultured in deuterium oxide. This increase in vesicle speed was not observed in deuterium oxide cultures treated with a microtubule-destabilizing drug, suggesting that deuterium oxide affects microtubule-dependent vesicle transport. PMID:25237603

  19. Growth inhibitory effect of Cucurbitacin E on breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Tian; Wang, Linling; Xu, Qian; Liu, Weiguo; Jin, Hongchuan; Mao, Weimin; Wang, Xian; Wang, Xiaojia

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Due its inhibitory effects on chemical carcinogenesis and inflammation, Cucurbitacins have been proposed as an effective agent for the prevention or treatment of human cancers. In this study, we aimed to explore the effect of Cucurbitacin E (CuE) on human breast cancer cells. Methods: The inhibitory effect of CuE on proliferation of Bcap37 and MDA-MB-231 cells was assessed by MTT assay. The cell cycle distribution and cell apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry (FCM). The expression of pro-caspase 3, cleaved caspase 3, p21, p27 and the phosphorylation of signaling proteins was detected by Western Blotting. Results: CuE inhibited the growth of human breast cancer cells in a dose and time-dependent manner. FCM analysis showed that CuE induced G2/M phase arrest and cell apoptosis. CuE treatment promoted the cleavage of caspase 3 and upregulated p21 and p27. In addition, the phosphorylation of STAT3 but not ERK-1/2 was abrogated upon CuE treatment. Interestingly, losedose CuE significantly enhanced the growth inhibition induced by cisplatin. Conclusions Cucurbitacin E (CuE) could inhibit the growth of human breast cancer cells in vitro. CuE induced both apoptosis and cell cycle arrest probably through the inhibition of STAT3 function. Lose-dose CuE significantly enhanced the growth inhibitory effect of cisplatin on breast cancer cells, further indicating the potential clinical values of CuE for the prevention or treatment of human breast cancer PMID:24040444

  20. Effect of peritoneal cells on tumors cells growth in vitro.

    PubMed

    Salwa, J

    1995-01-01

    The cytotoxic and cytostatic activity of PMA-treated macrophages, obtained from pristane-primed BALB/c mice, was analyzed in vitro. The activated macrophages were cytotoxic and cytostatic for YAC-1 lymphoma, P-388 leukemia and P-815 mastocytoma target cells. However, the RPC-5 plasmacytoma target cells appeared to be resistant to their cytotoxicity. The observed cytotoxic or cytostatic effects of macrophages in vitro were not correlated with their ability to produce the superoxide ion. Cytotoxic activity of NK cells, obtained from pristane-primed mice, was also studied. No differences in cytotoxicity of NK cells obtained from pristane-treated and untreated donors, were found. However, only the effector cells from untreated mice were able to respond to stimulatory effect of polyinosinic acid-polycytidylic acid-poly-L-lysine (poly ICLC). PMID:8744682

  1. Soliton growth-signal transduction in topologically quantized T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsson, Leif

    1993-09-01

    A model for growth-signal transduction of the T cell and its growth factor, interleukin-2, is presented. It is obtained as a generalization of the usual rate equation and is founded on the observation that a definite number of receptor occupations must take place in order to promote transition to the S phase and subsequent DNA replication. The generalized rate equation is identified as the equation of motion of a Lagrangian field theory of Ginzburg-Landau (Goldstone) type. However it is not an ad hoc model but is a microscopic theory of the interaction of interleukin-2 and its receptor. The topological quantum number of the model is related to the observed definite number of receptor occupations required to elicit growth-signal transduction. Individual receptor quanta, up to this limit, are subjected to a type of Bose condensation. This collective excitation constitutes the growth signal in the form of a topological kink soliton which is then launched by the next potential receptor occupation that makes the interaction repulsive. The model provides a possible long-absent explanation of the triggering mechanism for growth-signal transduction by means of the ambivalent interaction, which switches sign after a definite number of receptor occupations. Moreover, it offers an explanation of how Nature screens out fractional signals in the growth-signal-transduction process of T cells. Although the model is derived for assumed point-like cells and certain other restrictions, the obtained dose-response curves are in striking agreement with proliferation data from studies of both the leukemic T cell line MLA-144 from gibbon ape and normal human T cells in, and without, the presence of monoclonal anti-Tac antibodies.

  2. Hybrid models of cell and tissue dynamics in tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yangjin; Othmer, Hans G

    2015-12-01

    Hybrid models of tumor growth, in which some regions are described at the cell level and others at the continuum level, provide a flexible description that allows alterations of cell-level properties and detailed descriptions of the interaction with the tumor environment, yet retain the computational advantages of continuum models where appropriate. We review aspects of the general approach and discuss applications to breast cancer and glioblastoma. PMID:26775860

  3. Metabolic pathways promoting cancer cell survival and growth

    PubMed Central

    Boroughs, Lindsey K.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes and loss of tumour suppressors promote metabolic reprogramming in cancer, resulting in enhanced nutrient uptake to supply energetic and biosynthetic pathways. However, nutrient limitations within solid tumours may require that malignant cells exhibit metabolic flexibility to sustain growth and survival. Here, we highlight these adaptive mechanisms and also discuss emerging approaches to probe tumour metabolism in vivo and their potential to expand the metabolic repertoire of malignant cells even further. PMID:25774832

  4. Neuropeptide Y inhibits cholangiocarcinoma cell growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    DeMorrow, Sharon; Onori, Paolo; Venter, Julie; Invernizzi, Pietro; Frampton, Gabriel; White, Mellanie; Franchitto, Antonio; Kopriva, Shelley; Bernuzzi, Francesca; Francis, Heather; Coufal, Monique; Glaser, Shannon; Fava, Giammarco; Meng, Fanyin; Alvaro, Domenico; Carpino, Guido; Gaudio, Eugenio

    2011-01-01

    No information exists on the role of neuropeptide Y (NPY) in cholangiocarcinoma growth. Therefore, we evaluated the expression and secretion of NPY and its subsequent effects on cholangiocarcinoma growth and invasion. Cholangiocarcinoma cell lines and nonmalignant cholangiocytes were used to assess NPY mRNA expression and protein secretion. NPY expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry in human liver biopsies. Cell proliferation and migration were evaluated in vitro by MTS assays and matrigel invasion chambers, respectively, after treatment with NPY or a neutralizing NPY antibody. The effect of NPY or NPY depletion on tumor growth was assessed in vivo after treatment with NPY or the neutralizing NPY antibody in a xenograft model of cholangiocarcinoma. NPY secretion was upregulated in cholangiocarcinoma compared with normal cholangiocytes. Administration of exogenous NPY decreased proliferation and cell invasion in all cholangiocarcinoma cell lines studied and reduced tumor cell growth in vivo. In vitro, the effects of NPY on proliferation were blocked by specific inhibitors for NPY receptor Y2, but not Y1 or Y5, and were associated with an increase in intracellular d-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and PKCα activation. Blocking of NPY activity using a neutralizing antibody promoted cholangiocarcinoma growth in vitro and in vivo and increased the invasiveness of cholangiocarcinoma in vitro. Increased NPY immunoreactivity in human tumor tissue occurred predominantly in the center of the tumor, with less expression toward the invasion front of the tumor. We demonstrated that NPY expression is upregulated in cholangiocarcinoma, which exerts local control on tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Modulation of NPY secretion may be important for the management of cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:21270292

  5. Targeting the erythropoietin receptor on glioma cells reduces tumour growth

    SciTech Connect

    Peres, Elodie A.; Valable, Samuel; Guillamo, Jean-Sebastien; Marteau, Lena; Bernaudin, Jean-Francois; Roussel, Simon; Lechapt-Zalcman, Emmanuele; Bernaudin, Myriam; Petit, Edwige

    2011-10-01

    Hypoxia has been shown to be one of the major events involved in EPO expression. Accordingly, EPO might be expressed by cerebral neoplastic cells, especially in glioblastoma, known to be highly hypoxic tumours. The expression of EPOR has been described in glioma cells. However, data from the literature remain descriptive and controversial. On the basis of an endogenous source of EPO in the brain, we have focused on a potential role of EPOR in brain tumour growth. In the present study, with complementary approaches to target EPO/EPOR signalling, we demonstrate the presence of a functional EPO/EPOR system on glioma cells leading to the activation of the ERK pathway. This EPO/EPOR system is involved in glioma cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo, we show that the down-regulation of EPOR expression on glioma cells reduces tumour growth and enhances animal survival. Our results support the hypothesis that EPOR signalling in tumour cells is involved in the control of glioma growth.

  6. FH535 inhibited metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meng-Yao; Liang, Rong-Rui; Chen, Kai; Shen, Meng; Tian, Ya-Li; Li, Dao-Ming; Duan, Wei-Ming; Gui, Qi; Gong, Fei-Ran; Lian, Lian; Li, Wei; Tao, Min

    2015-01-01

    FH535 is a small-molecule inhibitor of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, which a substantial body of evidence has proven is activated in various cancers, including pancreatic cancer. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway plays an important role in tumor progression and metastasis. We investigated the inhibitory effect of FH535 on the metastasis and growth of pancreatic cancer cells. Western blotting and luciferase reporter gene assay indicated that FH535 markedly inhibited Wnt/β-catenin pathway viability in pancreatic cancer cells. In vitro wound healing, invasion, and adhesion assays revealed that FH535 significantly inhibited pancreatic cancer cell metastasis. We also observed the inhibitory effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cell growth via the tetrazolium and plate clone formation assays. Microarray analyses suggested that changes in the expression of multiple genes could be involved in the anti-cancer effect of FH535 on pancreatic cancer cells. Our results indicate for the first time that FH535 inhibits pancreatic cancer cell metastasis and growth, providing new insight into therapy of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26185454

  7. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  8. Identifying Francisella tularensis Genes Required for Growth in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, J.; Steele, S.; Miller, C.; Lovullo, E.; Taft-Benz, S.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram-negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cells, including, but not limited to, macrophages and epithelial cells. We developed a luminescence reporter system to facilitate a large-scale transposon mutagenesis screen to identify genes required for growth in macrophage and epithelial cell lines. We screened 7,454 individual mutants, 269 of which exhibited reduced intracellular growth. Transposon insertions in the 269 growth-defective strains mapped to 68 different genes. FTT_0924, a gene of unknown function but highly conserved among Francisella species, was identified in this screen to be defective for intracellular growth within both macrophage and epithelial cell lines. FTT_0924 was required for full Schu S4 virulence in a murine pulmonary infection model. The ΔFTT_0924 mutant bacterial membrane is permeable when replicating in hypotonic solution and within macrophages, resulting in strongly reduced viability. The permeability and reduced viability were rescued when the mutant was grown in a hypertonic solution, indicating that FTT_0924 is required for resisting osmotic stress. The ΔFTT_0924 mutant was also significantly more sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics than Schu S4. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that FTT_0924 is required for maintaining peptidoglycan integrity and virulence. PMID:25987704

  9. Histone acetyltransferase inhibitors block neuroblastoma cell growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gajer, J M; Furdas, S D; Gründer, A; Gothwal, M; Heinicke, U; Keller, K; Colland, F; Fulda, S; Pahl, H L; Fichtner, I; Sippl, W; Jung, M

    2015-01-01

    We have previously described novel histone acetyltransferase (HAT) inhibitors that block neuroblastoma cell growth in vitro. Here we show that two selected pyridoisothiazolone HAT inhibitors, PU139 and PU141, induce cellular histone hypoacetylation and inhibit growth of several neoplastic cell lines originating from different tissues. Broader in vitro selectivity profiling shows that PU139 blocks the HATs Gcn5, p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF), CREB (cAMP response element-binding) protein (CBP) and p300, whereas PU141 is selective toward CBP and p300. The pan-inhibitor PU139 triggers caspase-independent cell death in cell culture. Both inhibitors block growth of SK-N-SH neuroblastoma xenografts in mice and the PU139 was shown to synergize with doxorubicin in vivo. The latter also reduces histone lysine acetylation in vivo at concentrations that block neoplastic xenograft growth. This is one of the very few reports on hypoacetylating agents with in vivo anticancer activity. PMID:25664930

  10. How to Foster an Understanding of Growth and Cell Division

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruger, Dirk; Fleige, Jennifer; Riemeier, Tanja

    2006-01-01

    The study presents the frequencies of students' conceptions of growth and cell division before and after one hour of instruction. The investigation supplements qualitative results by directing attention to those conceptions which might occur most frequently to students: teachers can then concentrate their preparation on practical requirements. A…

  11. Nerve growth factor enhances Clara cell proliferation after lung injury.

    PubMed

    Sonar, S S; Schwinge, D; Kilic, A; Yildirim, A O; Conrad, M L; Seidler, K; Müller, B; Renz, H; Nockher, W A

    2010-07-01

    The lung epithelia facilitate wound closure by secretion of various cytokines and growth factors. Nerve growth factor (NGF) has been well described in airway inflammation; however, its likely role in lung repair has not been examined thus far. To investigate the repair function of NGF, experiments were performed in vitro using cultured alveolar epithelial cells and in vivo using a naphthalene-induced model of Clara epithelial cell injury. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments revealed airway epithelial cell proliferation following injury to be dependent on NGF and the expression of its receptor, tropomyosin-receptor-kinase A. Additionally, NGF also augmented in vitro migration of alveolar type II cells. In vivo, transgenic mice over-expressing NGF in Clara cells (NGFtg) did not reveal any proliferation or alteration in Clara cell phenotype. However, following Clara cell specific injury, proliferation was increased in NGFtg and impaired upon inhibition of NGF. Furthermore, NGF also promoted the expression of collagen I and fibronectin in vitro and in vivo during repair, where significantly higher levels were measured in re-epithelialising NGFtg mice. Our study demonstrates that NGF promotes the proliferation of lung epithelium in vitro and the renewal of Clara cells following lung injury in vivo. PMID:20075049

  12. Toxicology across scales: Cell population growth in vitro predicts reduced fish growth.

    PubMed

    Stadnicka-Michalak, Julita; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2015-08-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is essential but often relies on ethically controversial and expensive methods. We show that tests using cell cultures, combined with modeling of toxicological effects, can replace tests with juvenile fish. Hundreds of thousands of fish at this developmental stage are annually used to assess the influence of chemicals on growth. Juveniles are more sensitive than adult fish, and their growth can affect their chances to survive and reproduce. Thus, to reduce the number of fish used for such tests, we propose a method that can quantitatively predict chemical impact on fish growth based on in vitro data. Our model predicts reduced fish growth in two fish species in excellent agreement with measured in vivo data of two pesticides. This promising step toward alternatives to fish toxicity testing is simple, inexpensive, and fast and only requires in vitro data for model calibration. PMID:26601229

  13. Toxicology across scales: Cell population growth in vitro predicts reduced fish growth

    PubMed Central

    Stadnicka-Michalak, Julita; Schirmer, Kristin; Ashauer, Roman

    2015-01-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is essential but often relies on ethically controversial and expensive methods. We show that tests using cell cultures, combined with modeling of toxicological effects, can replace tests with juvenile fish. Hundreds of thousands of fish at this developmental stage are annually used to assess the influence of chemicals on growth. Juveniles are more sensitive than adult fish, and their growth can affect their chances to survive and reproduce. Thus, to reduce the number of fish used for such tests, we propose a method that can quantitatively predict chemical impact on fish growth based on in vitro data. Our model predicts reduced fish growth in two fish species in excellent agreement with measured in vivo data of two pesticides. This promising step toward alternatives to fish toxicity testing is simple, inexpensive, and fast and only requires in vitro data for model calibration. PMID:26601229

  14. Methoxyacetic acid suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab R; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; Patel, Neil K; Lu, Hua; Zeng, Shelya X; Wang, Guangdi; Zhang, Changde; You, Zongbing

    2014-01-01

    Methoxyacetic acid (MAA) is a primary metabolite of ester phthalates that are used in production of consumer products and pharmaceutical products. MAA causes embryo malformation and spermatocyte death through inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Little is known about MAA’s effects on cancer cells. In this study, two immortalized human normal prostatic epithelial cell lines (RWPE-1 and pRNS-1-1) and four human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, C4-2B, PC-3, and DU-145) were treated with MAA at different doses and for different time periods. Cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis were performed using flow cytometry and chemical assays. Gene expression and binding to DNA were assessed using real-time PCR, Western blot, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses. We found that MAA dose-dependently inhibited prostate cancer cell growth through induction of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at G1 phase. MAA-induced apoptosis was due to down-regulation of the anti-apoptotic gene baculoviral inhibitor of apoptosis protein repeat containing 2 (BIRC2, also named cIAP1), leading to activation of caspases 7 and 3 and turning on the downstream apoptotic events. MAA-induced cell cycle arrest (mainly G1 arrest) was due to up-regulation of p21 expression at the early time and down-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and CDK2 expression at the late time. MAA up-regulated p21 expression through inhibition of HDAC activities, independently of p53/p63/p73. These findings demonstrate that MAA suppresses prostate cancer cell growth by inducing growth arrest and apoptosis, which suggests that MAA could be used as a potential therapeutic drug for prostate cancer. PMID:25606576

  15. Morphology and growth of murine cell lines on model biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Godek, Marisha L; Duchsherer, Nichole L; McElwee, Quinn; Grainger, David W

    2004-01-01

    All biomaterial implants are assaulted by the host "foreign body" immune response. Understanding the complex, dynamic relationship between cells, biomaterials and milieu is an important first step towards controlling this reaction. Material surface chemistry dictates protein adsorption, and thus subsequent cell interactions. The cell-implant is a microenvironment involving 1) proteins that coat the surface and 2) cells that interact with these proteins. Macrophages and fibroblasts are two cell types that interact with proteins on biomaterials surfaces and play different related, but equally important, roles in biomaterials rejection and implant failure. Growth characteristics of four murine cell lines on model biomaterials surfaces were examined. Murine monocyte-macrophages (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1), murine macrophage (IC-21) and murine fibroblast (NIH 3T3) cell lines were tested to determine whether differences exist in adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, spreading, and fusion (macrophage lineages only) on these surfaces. Differences were observed in the ability of cells to adhere to and subsequently proliferate on polymer surfaces. (Monocyte-) macrophages grew well on all surfaces tested and growth rates were measured on three representative polymer biomaterials surfaces: tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS), polystyrene, and Teflon-AF. J774A.1 cultures grown on TCPS and treated with exogenous cytokines IL-4 and GM-CSF were observed to contain multinucleate cells with unusual morphologies. Thus, (monocyte-) macrophage cell lines were found to effectively attach to and interrogate each surface presented, with evidence of extensive spreading on Teflon-AF surfaces, particularly in the IC-21 cultures. The J774A.1 line was able to proliferate and/or differentiate to more specialized cell types (multinucleate/dendritic-like cells) in the presence of soluble chemokine cues. PMID:15133927

  16. Uterine Leiomyoma Stem Cells: Linking Progesterone to Growth.

    PubMed

    Bulun, Serdar E; Moravek, Molly B; Yin, Ping; Ono, Masanori; Coon, John S; Dyson, Matthew T; Navarro, Antonia; Marsh, Erica E; Zhao, Hong; Maruyama, Tetsuo; Chakravarti, Debabrata; Kim, J Julie; Wei, Jian-Jun

    2015-09-01

    Uterine leiomyomas (fibroids) represent the most common class of benign tumors in women. Multiple leiomyomas usually arise from the uterus of a symptomatic woman. These tumors cause a variety of symptoms, including abnormal uterine bleeding, pelvic pain, bladder or bowel dysfunction, and recurrent pregnancy loss, and are responsible for more than 200,000 hysterectomies in the United States annually. Each leiomyoma seems to arise from the clonal expansion of a single myometrial smooth muscle cell transformed by a mutation. Tumor expansion is sustained by cell proliferation together with the production of large amounts of extracellular matrix. Estrogen and progesterone stimulate the growth of leiomyomas. Estrogen, together with its receptor ERα, enables progesterone action via induction of progesterone receptor (PR) expression. Progesterone induces the growth of leiomyoma by regulation of a set of key genes that control proliferation and apoptosis. A distinct cell population with stem-progenitor properties is indispensable for progesterone-dependent growth of leiomyomas. This stem-progenitor cell population is deficient in ERα and PR and dependent on the much higher levels of these steroid receptors in surrounding mature leiomyoma or myometrial cells. Progesterone sends paracrine signals from these mature cells to stem cells. The WNT/β-catenin pathway comprises a key component of this paracrine signaling system. The majority of medical treatments currently available for leiomyoma works by inhibiting estrogen or progesterone production or action, but tumors tend to regrow once treatment is stopped. Targeting stem cells and their paracrine interactions with more differentiated cell populations within leiomyoma may lead to the development of more effective therapeutics. PMID:26251118

  17. Two-dimensional diffusion limited system for cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Hlatky, L.

    1985-11-01

    A new cell system, the ''sandwich'' system, was developed to supplement multicellular spheroids as tumor analogues. Sandwiches allow new experimental approaches to questions of diffusion, cell cycle effects and radiation resistance in tumors. In this thesis the method for setting up sandwiches is described both theoretically and experimentally followed by its use in x-ray irradiation studies. In the sandwich system, cells are grown in a narrow gap between two glass slides. Where nutrients and waste products can move into or out of the local environment of the cells only by diffusing through the narrow gap between the slides. Due to the competition between cells, self-created gradients of nutrients and metabolic products are set up resulting in a layer of cells which resembles a living spheroid cross section. Unlike the cells of the spheroid, however, cells in all regions of the sandwich are visible. Therefore, the relative sizes of the regions and their time-dependent growth can be monitored visually without fixation or sectioning. The oxygen and nutrient gradients can be ''turned off'' at any time without disrupting the spatial arrangement of the cells by removing the top slide of the assembly and subsequently turned back on if desired. Removal of the top slide also provides access to all the cells, including those near the necrotic center, of the sandwich. The cells can then be removed for analysis outside the sandwich system. 61 refs., 17 figs.

  18. Pumpkin seed extract: Cell growth inhibition of hyperplastic and cancer cells, independent of steroid hormone receptors.

    PubMed

    Medjakovic, Svjetlana; Hobiger, Stefanie; Ardjomand-Woelkart, Karin; Bucar, Franz; Jungbauer, Alois

    2016-04-01

    Pumpkin seeds have been known in folk medicine as remedy for kidney, bladder and prostate disorders since centuries. Nevertheless, pumpkin research provides insufficient data to back up traditional beliefs of ethnomedical practice. The bioactivity of a hydro-ethanolic extract of pumpkin seeds from the Styrian pumpkin, Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca, was investigated. As pumpkin seed extracts are standardized to cucurbitin, this compound was also tested. Transactivational activity was evaluated for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor with in vitro yeast assays. Cell viability tests with prostate cancer cells, breast cancer cells, colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and a hyperplastic cell line from benign prostate hyperplasia tissue were performed. As model for non-hyperplastic cells, effects on cell viability were tested with a human dermal fibroblast cell line (HDF-5). No transactivational activity was found for human androgen receptor, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor, for both, extract and cucurbitin. A cell growth inhibition of ~40-50% was observed for all cell lines, with the exception of HDF-5, which showed with ~20% much lower cell growth inhibition. Given the receptor status of some cell lines, a steroid-hormone receptor independent growth inhibiting effect can be assumed. The cell growth inhibition for fast growing cells together with the cell growth inhibition of prostate-, breast- and colon cancer cells corroborates the ethnomedical use of pumpkin seeds for a treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia. Moreover, due to the lack of androgenic activity, pumpkin seed applications can be regarded as safe for the prostate. PMID:26976217

  19. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters.

    PubMed

    Harris, Edouard A; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected. PMID:26871096

  20. LAT1 regulates growth of uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Xia Luo; Coon, John S; Su, Emily; Pearson, Elizabeth Kerry; Ping Yin; Ishikawa, Hiroshi; Bulun, Serdar E

    2010-09-01

    L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and LAT2 were shown to encode system L, which mediates the Na(+)-independent transport of branched-chain and aromatic amino acids. We demonstrated previously that LAT2 is a progesterone receptor target gene involved in leiomyoma growth. The role of LAT1 in the regulation of human uterine leiomyoma growth, however, remains unelucidated. We herein investigated the function of LAT1 and its progesterone-mediated regulation within human uterine leiomyoma smooth muscle (LSM) cells (n = 8) and tissues (n = 29). In vivo, LAT1 expression was higher in leiomyoma than in myometrial tissue. LAT1 knockdown augmented cell proliferation and viability. Treatment of LSM cells with RU486 markedly increased LAT1 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels but decreased proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. L-type amino acid transporter 1 as a downstream target, however, did not entirely account for this antiproliferative effect of RU486 on LSM cells. Taken together, LAT1 may have a critical and complex role in regulating human leiomyoma cell growth. PMID:20601542

  1. Automated inference procedure for the determination of cell growth parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Edouard A.; Koh, Eun Jee; Moffat, Jason; McMillen, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate and carrying capacity of a cell population are key to the characterization of the population's viability and to the quantification of its responses to perturbations such as drug treatments. Accurate estimation of these parameters necessitates careful analysis. Here, we present a rigorous mathematical approach for the robust analysis of cell count data, in which all the experimental stages of the cell counting process are investigated in detail with the machinery of Bayesian probability theory. We advance a flexible theoretical framework that permits accurate estimates of the growth parameters of cell populations and of the logical correlations between them. Moreover, our approach naturally produces an objective metric of avoidable experimental error, which may be tracked over time in a laboratory to detect instrumentation failures or lapses in protocol. We apply our method to the analysis of cell count data in the context of a logistic growth model by means of a user-friendly computer program that automates this analysis, and present some samples of its output. Finally, we note that a traditional least squares fit can provide misleading estimates of parameter values, because it ignores available information with regard to the way in which the data have actually been collected.

  2. Growth behavior of cochlear nucleus neuronal cells on semiconductor substrates.

    PubMed

    Rak, Kristen; Wasielewski, Natalia; Radeloff, Andreas; Scherzed, Agmal; Jablonka, Sibylle; Hagen, Rudolf; Mlynski, Robert

    2011-05-01

    Auditory brainstem implants provide sound information by direct stimulation of the cochlear nucleus to patients with dysfunctional or absent cranial nerve VIII. In contrast to patients with cochlear implants, the use of the auditory brainstem implants is less successful. This cannot be fully explained by the difference location of stimulation but a rather unspecific neuronal stimulation. The aim of this study was to further examine neuronal cells of the cochlear nucleus and to test their interactions with semiconductor substrates as a potential electrode material for improved auditory brainstem implants. The cochlear nuclei of postnatal day 7 rats were microsurgically dissected. The tissue was dissociated enzymatically and plated on coverslips as control and on the semiconductor substrates silicon or silicon nitride. After 4 days in culture the morphology and growth of dissociated cells was determined by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy. Dissociated cells of the cochlear nucleus showed reduced cell growth on semiconductor substrates compared with controls. SEM analysis demonstrated close contact of neurons with supporting cells in culture and good adherence of neuronal growth cones on the used materials. These findings present basic knowledge for the development of neuron-electrode interfaces for future auditory brainstem implants. PMID:21370446

  3. Membrane aging during cell growth ascertained by Laurdan generalized polarization.

    PubMed

    Parasassi, T; Di Stefano, M; Ravagnan, G; Sapora, O; Gratton, E

    1992-10-01

    The sensitivity of the fluorescent probe Laurdan to the phase state of lipids has been utilized to detect modifications in the composition and physical state of cell membranes during cell growth. In phospholipid vesicles, the Laurdan emission spectrum shows a 50-nm red shift by passing from the gel to the liquid-crystalline phase. The Generalized Polarization (GP) value has been used for the data treatment instead of the ratiometric method common in investigations utilizing other fluorescent probes that display spectral sensitivity to medium properties. The GP value can be measured easily and quickly and possesses all the properties of "classical" polarization, including the additivity rule. Once Laurdan limiting GP values have been established for the gel and the liquid-crystalline phase of lipids, the quantitative determination of coexisting phases in natural samples is possible. In the present work the observation of a relevant decrease in the fractional intensity of the liquid-crystalline phase in K562 cell membranes during 5 days of asynchronous growth is reported. A decrease in the "fluidity" of cell membranes in K562 cells kept in culture for several months is also reported. The procedure developed for labeling cell membranes with Laurdan is reported and the influence of cell metabolism on fluorescence parameters is discussed. Also discussed is the influence of cholesterol on Laurdan GP. PMID:1397095

  4. Thermoresponsive copolymer nanofilms for controlling cell adhesion, growth, and detachment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lei; Pan, Fang; Zhao, Xiubo; Yaseen, Mohammed; Padia, Faheem; Coffey, Paul; Freund, Amy; Yang, Luyuan; Liu, Tianqing; Ma, Xuehu; Lu, Jian R

    2010-11-16

    This study reports the development and use of a novel thermoresponsive polymeric nanofilm for controlling cell adhesion and growth at 37 °C, and then cell detachment for cell recovery by subsequent temperature drop to the ambient temperature, without enzymatic cleavage or mechanical scraping. A copolymer, poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-hydroxypropyl methacrylate-co-3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate) (abbreviated PNIPAAm copolymer), was synthesized by free radical polymerization. The thermoresponses of the copolymer in aqueous solution were demonstrated by dynamic light scattering (DLS) through detecting the sensitive changes of copolymer aggregation against temperature. The DLS measurements revealed the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) at approximately 30 °C. The PNIPAAm film stability and robustness was provided through silyl cross-linking within the film and with the hydroxyl groups on the substrate surface. Film thickness, stability, and reversibility with respect to temperature switches were examined by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and contact angle measurements. The results confirmed the high extent of thermosensitivity and structural restoration based on the alterations of film thickness and surface wettability. The effective control of adhesion, growth, and detachment of HeLa and HEK293 cells demonstrated the physical controllability and cellular compatibility of the copolymer nanofilms. These PNIPAAm copolymer nanofilms could open up a convenient interfacial mediation for cell film production and cell expansion by nonenzymatic and nonmechanical cell recovery. PMID:20964301

  5. Harnessing endogenous growth factor activity modulates stem cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Hudalla, Gregory A.; Kouris, Nicholas A.; Koepsel, Justin T.; Ogle, Brenda M.; Murphy, William L.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of specific serum-borne biomolecules (e.g. heparin) on growth factor-dependent cell behavior is often difficult to elucidate in traditional cell culture due to the random, non-specific nature of biomolecule adsorption from serum. We hypothesized that chemically well-defined cell culture substrates could be used to study the influence of sequestered heparin on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) behavior. Specifically, we used bio-inert self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) chemically modified with a bioinspired heparin-binding peptide (termed “HEPpep”) and an integrin-binding peptide (RGDSP) as stem cell culture substrates. Our results demonstrate that purified heparin binds to HEPpep SAMs in a dose-dependent manner, and serum-borne heparin binds specifically and in a dose-dependent manner to HEPpep SAMs. These heparin-sequestering SAMs enhance hMSC proliferation by amplifying endogenous fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling, and enhance hMSC osteogenic differentiation by amplifying endogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling. The effects of heparin-sequestering are similar to the effects of supraphysiologic concentrations of recombinant FGF-2. hMSC phenotype is maintained over multiple population doublings on heparin-sequestering substrates in growth medium, while hMSC osteogenic differentiation is enhanced in a bone morphogenetic protein-dependent manner on the same substrates during culture in osteogenic induction medium. Together, these observations demonstrate that the influence of the substrate on stem cell phenotype is sensitive to the culture medium formulation. Our results also demonstrate that enhanced hMSC proliferation can be spatially localized by patterning the location of HEPpep on the substrate. Importantly, the use of chemically well-defined SAMs in this study eliminated the confounding factor of random, non-specific biomolecule adsorption, and identified serum-borne heparin as a key mediator of hMSC response to endogenous

  6. Regulation of cell surface receptors for different hematopoietic growth factors on myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Lotem, J; Sachs, L

    1986-01-01

    There are clones of myeloid leukemic cells which are different from normal myeloid cells in that they have become independent of hematopoietic growth factor for cell viability and growth. The ability of these clones to bind three types of hematopoietic growth factors (MGI-1GM = GM-CSF, IL-3 = multi-CSF and MGI-1M = M-CSF = CSF-1) was measured using the method of quantitative absorption at 1 degree C and low pH elution of cell-bound biological activity. Results of binding to normal myeloid and lymphoid cells were similar to those obtained by radioreceptor assays. The results indicate that the number of receptors on different clones of these leukemic cells varied from 0 to 1,300 per cell. The receptors have a high binding affinity. Receptors for different growth factors can be independently expressed in different clones. There was no relationship between expression of receptors for these growth factors and the phenotype of the leukemic cells regarding their ability to be induced to differentiate. The number of receptors on the leukemic cells was lower than on normal mature macrophages. Myeloid leukemic cells induced to differentiate by normal myeloid cell differentiation factor MGI-2 (= DF), or by low doses of actinomycin D or cytosine arabinoside, showed an up-regulation of the number of MGI-1GM and IL-3 receptors. Induction of differentiation of leukemic cells by MGI-2 also induced production and secretion of the growth factor MGI-1GM, and this induced MGI-1GM saturated the up-regulated MGI-1GM receptors. It is suggested that up-regulation of these receptors during differentiation is required for the functioning of differentiated cells. PMID:3023059

  7. Hepatoma-derived growth factor stimulates smooth muscle cell growth and is expressed in vascular development

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Allen D.; Lobe, David R.; Matsumura, Martin E.; Nakamura, Hideji; McNamara, Coleen A.

    2000-01-01

    Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is the first member identified of a new family of secreted heparin-binding growth factors highly expressed in the fetal aorta. The biologic role of HDGF in vascular growth is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that HDGF mRNA is expressed in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), most prominently in proliferating SMCs, 8–24 hours after serum stimulation. Exogenous HDGF and endogenous overexpression of HDGF stimulated a significant increase in SMC number and DNA synthesis. Rat aortic SMCs transfected with a hemagglutinin-epitope–tagged rat HDGF cDNA contain HA-HDGF in their nuclei during S-phase. We also detected native HDGF in nuclei of cultured SMCs, of SMCs and endothelial cells from 19-day fetal (but not in the adult) rat aorta, of SMCs proximal to abdominal aortic constriction in adult rats, and of SMCs in the neointima formed after endothelial denudation of the rat common carotid artery. Moreover, HDGF colocalizes with the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in SMCs in human atherosclerotic carotid arteries, suggesting that HDGF helps regulate SMC growth during development and in response to vascular injury. PMID:10712428

  8. Growth differentiation factor 15 stimulates rapamycin-sensitive ovarian cancer cell growth and invasion.

    PubMed

    Griner, Samantha E; Joshi, Jayashree P; Nahta, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Identification of novel molecular markers and therapeutic targets may improve survival rates for patients with ovarian cancer. In the current study, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis of two human ovarian tumor tissue arrays showed high staining for GDF15 in a majority of tissues. Exogenous stimulation of ovarian cancer cell lines with recombinant human GDF15 (rhGDF15) or stable over-expression of a GDF15 expression plasmid promoted anchorage-independent growth, increased invasion, and up-regulation of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). MMP inhibition suppressed GDF15-mediated invasion. In addition, IHC analysis of human ovarian tumor tissue arrays indicated that GDF15 expression correlated significantly with high MMP2 and MMP9 expression. Exogenous and endogenous GDF15 over-expression stimulated phosphorylation of p38, Erk1/2, and Akt. Pharmacologic inhibition of p38, MEK, or PI3K suppressed GDF15-stimulated growth. Further, proliferation, growth, and invasion of GDF15 stable clones were blocked by rapamycin. IHC analysis demonstrated significant correlation between GDF15 expression and phosphorylation of mTOR. Finally, knockdown of endogenous GDF15 or neutralization of secreted GDF15 suppressed invasion and growth of a GDF15-over-expressing ovarian cancer cell line. These data indicate that GDF15 over-expression, which occurred in a majority of human ovarian cancers, promoted rapamycin-sensitive invasion and growth of ovarian cancer cells. Inhibition of mTOR may be an effective therapeutic strategy for ovarian cancers that over-express GDF15. Future studies should examine GDF15 as a novel molecular target for blocking ovarian cancer progression. PMID:23085437

  9. Purification and Cultivation of Human Pituitary Growth Hormones Secreting Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Todd, P.; Grindeland, R.; Lanham, W.; Morrison, D.

    1985-01-01

    The rat and human pituitary gland contains a mixture of hormone producing cell types. The separation of cells which make growth hormone (GH) is attempted for the purpose of understanding how the hormone molecule is made within the pituitary cell; what form(s) it takes within the cell; and what form(s) GH assumes as it leaves the cell. Since GH has a number of biological targets (e.g., muscle, liver, bone), the assessment of the activities of the intracellular/extracellular GH by new and sensitive bioassays. GH cells contained in the mixture was separated by free flow electrophoresis. These experiments show that GH cells have different electrophoretic mobilities. This is relevant to NASA since a lack of GH could be a prime causative factor in muscle atrophy. Further, GH has recently been implicated in the etiology of motion sickness in space. Continous flow electrophoresis experiment on STS-8 showed that GH cells could be partially separated in microgravity. However, definitive cell culture studies could not be done due to insufficient cell recoveries.

  10. Wall relaxation and the driving forces for cell expansive growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosgrove, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    When water uptake by growing cells is prevented, the turgor pressure and the tensile stress in the cell wall are reduced by continued wall loosening. This process, termed in vivo stress relaxation, provides a new way to study the dynamics of wall loosening and to measure the wall yield threshold and the physiological wall extensibility. Stress relaxation experiments indicate that wall stress supplies the mechanical driving force for wall yielding. Cell expansion also requires water absorption. The driving force for water uptake during growth is created by wall relaxation, which lowers the water potential of the expanding cells. New techniques for measuring this driving force show that it is smaller than believed previously; in elongating stems it is only 0.3 to 0.5 bar. This means that the hydraulic resistance of the water transport pathway is small and that rate of cell expansion is controlled primarily by wall loosening and yielding.

  11. miR-526a regulates apoptotic cell growth in human carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoli; Wang, Cui; Xu, Changzhi; Yan, Zhifeng; Wei, Congwen; Guan, Kai; Ma, Shengli; Cao, Ye; Liu, Liping; Zou, Deyong; He, Xiang; Zhang, Buchang; Ma, Qingjun; Zheng, Zirui

    2015-09-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital roles in the regulation of cell cycle, cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. Our previous studies showed that miR-526a positively regulated innate immune response by suppressing CYLD expression, however, the functional relevance of miR-526a expression and cell growth remains to be evaluated. In this study, miR-526a overexpression was found to promote cancer cell proliferation, migration, and anchor-independent colony formation. The molecular mechanism(s) of miR-526a-mediated growth stimulation is associated with rapid cell cycle progression and inhibition of cell apoptosis by targeting CYLD. Taken together, these results provide evidence to show the stimulatory role of miR-526a in tumor migration and invasion through modulation of the canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. PMID:26002288

  12. Effects of growth factors on temporomandibular joint disc cells.

    PubMed

    Detamore, Michael S; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A

    2004-07-01

    The effects of growth factors on cartilaginous tissues are well documented. An exception is the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) disc, where data for growth factor effects on proliferation and biosynthesis are very limited. The purpose of this study was to quantify proliferation of and synthesis by TMJ disc cells cultured in monolayer with either platelet derived growth factor-AB (PDGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) or insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF), at either a low (10 ng/ml) or high (100 ng/ml) concentration. Proliferation was assessed with a DNA quantitation technique, collagen synthesis was measured via a hydroxyproline assay, and GAG synthesis was determined with a dimethylmethylene blue dye binding assay at 14 days. Overall, the most beneficial growth factor was bFGF, which was most potent in increasing proliferation and GAG synthesis, and also effective in promoting collagen synthesis. At the high concentration, bFGF resulted in 96% more cells than the control and 30 to 45% more cells than PDGF and IGF. PDGF and bFGF were the most potent upregulators of GAG synthesis, producing 2-3 times more GAG than the control. IGF had no significant effect on GAG production, although at its higher concentration it increased collagen production by 4.5 times over the control. Collagen synthesis was promoted by bFGF at its lower concentration, with levels 4.2 times higher than the control, whereas PDGF had no significant effect on collagen production. In general, higher concentrations increased proliferation, whereas lower concentrations favoured biosynthesis. PMID:15126139

  13. Autophagy contributes to gefitinib-induced glioma cell growth inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Pan, Pin-Ho; Chen, Wen-Ying; Huang, Hsuan-Yi; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2014-09-10

    Epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors, including gefitinib, have been evaluated in patients with malignant gliomas. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gefitinib-mediated anticancer effects against glioma are incompletely understood. In the present study, the cytostatic potential of gefitinib was demonstrated by the inhibition of glioma cell growth, long-term clonogenic survival, and xenograft tumor growth. The cytostatic consequences were accompanied by autophagy, as evidenced by monodansylcadaverine staining of acidic vesicle formation, conversion of microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain 3-II (LC3-II), degradation of p62, punctate pattern of GFP-LC3, and conversion of GFP-LC3 to cleaved-GFP. Autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenosine and chloroquine and genetic silencing of LC3 or Beclin 1 attenuated gefitinib-induced growth inhibition. Gefitinib-induced autophagy was not accompanied by the disruption of the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. Instead, the activation of liver kinase-B1/AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling correlated well with the induction of autophagy and growth inhibition caused by gefitinib. Silencing of AMPK suppressed gefitinib-induced autophagy and growth inhibition. The crucial role of AMPK activation in inducing glioma autophagy and growth inhibition was further supported by the actions of AMP mimetic AICAR. Gefitinib was shown to be capable of reducing the proliferation of glioma cells, presumably by autophagic mechanisms involving AMPK activation. - Highlights: • Gefitinib causes cytotoxic and cytostatic effect on glioma. • Gefitinib induces autophagy. • Gefitinib causes cytostatic effect through autophagy. • Gefitinib induces autophagy involving AMPK.

  14. 42% 500X Bi-Facial Growth Concentrator Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtczuk, S.; Chiu, P.; Zhang, X.; Pulver, D.; Harris, C.; Siskavich, B.

    2011-12-01

    Data are presented from three-junction concentrator photovoltaic cells using a new cell architecture (1.9 eV InGaP top cell lattice-matched to a 1.42 eV GaAs middle cells on one side of a infrared-transparent GaAs wafer with a lattice-mismatched 0.95 eV InGaAs bottom cell grown isolated on the wafer backside). The cell uses a new epitaxial bifacial growth (BFG) technique. The impetus is to replace the 0.67 eV Ge bottom cell in the standard three junction InGaP/GaAs/Ge tandems with a higher bandgap 0.95 eV InGaAs cell that boosts the bottom cell voltage by about 40% while maintaining a simple high-yield cell process without use of complex large area epitaxial liftoff or wafer bonding steps used to make similar cell stacks. Efficiency was independently-verified by NREL for a 1 cm×1 cm cell (42.3% at 406 suns, with Voc 3.452V, 87.1% FF and 1xJsc of 14.07 mA/cm2, at 25 °C AM1.5D, 100 mW/cm2), which was the world record at the time of the CPV-7 conference. No degradation was seen during concentrated solar operation after a 2000 hr 165C burn-in and PbSn solder tests. Average efficiency of 1 cm2 cells designed for 500 suns at 1018 suns was 40.5% (Spire test, 25 °C, spectrally corrected flash simulator). Measured efficiency temperature coefficient for gen2 cells is -0.06%/°C, similar to InGaP/GaAs/Ge tandems.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of Tumor Cell Growth and Immune System Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.; Safan, Muntaser; Abdeen, Mohamed A.; Abdel-Rahman, Duaa H.

    In this paper, we provide a family of ordinary and delay differential equations to describe the dynamics of tumor-growth and immunotherapy interactions. We explore the effects of adoptive cellular immunotherapy on the model and describe under what circumstances the tumor can be eliminated. The possibility of clearing the tumor, with a strategy, is based on two parameters in the model: the rate of influx of the effector cells, and the rate of influx of IL2. The critical tumor-growth rate, below which endemic tumor does not exist, has been found. One can use the model to make predictions about tumor-dormancy.

  16. Loss of growth homeostasis by genetic decoupling of cell division from biomass growth: implication for size control mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt-Glenewinkel, Hannah; Barkai, Naama

    2014-01-01

    Growing cells adjust their division time with biomass accumulation to maintain growth homeostasis. Size control mechanisms, such as the size checkpoint, provide an inherent coupling of growth and division by gating certain cell cycle transitions based on cell size. We describe genetic manipulations that decouple cell division from cell size, leading to the loss of growth homeostasis, with cells becoming progressively smaller or progressively larger until arresting. This was achieved by modulating glucose influx independently of external glucose. Division rate followed glucose influx, while volume growth was largely defined by external glucose. Therefore, the coordination of size and division observed in wild-type cells reflects tuning of two parallel processes, which is only refined by an inherent feedback-dependent coupling. We present a class of size control models explaining the observed breakdowns of growth homeostasis. PMID:25538138

  17. Plasma membrane growth during the cell cycle: unsolved mysteries and recent progress

    PubMed Central

    McCusker, Derek; Kellogg, Douglas R.

    2012-01-01

    Growth of the plasma membrane is as fundamental to cell reproduction as DNA replication, chromosome segregation and ribosome biogenesis, yet little is known about the underlying mechanisms. Membrane growth during the cell cycle requires mechanisms that control the initiation, location, and extent of membrane growth, as well as mechanisms that coordinate membrane growth with cell cycle progression. Recent experiments have established links between membrane growth and core cell cycle regulators. Further analysis of these links will yield insights into conserved and fundamental mechanisms of cell growth. A better understanding of the post-Golgi pathways by which membrane growth occurs will be essential for future progress. PMID:23141634

  18. Evaluation of effect of triterpenes and limonoids on cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis in human tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Cazal, Cristiane M; Choosang, Kantima; Severino, Vanessa Gisele P; Soares, Marcio S; Sarria, Andre Lucio F; Fernandes, Joao B; Silva, Maria Fatima G F; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Pakkong, Pannee; Almeida, Gabriela M; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Nascimento, Maria S J; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2010-12-01

    Six triterpenes and eight limonoids were evaluated for their capacity to inhibit the growth of three human tumour cell lines, breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) and melanoma (A375-C5). The mechanisms involved in the observed cell growth arrest of the four most potent compounds were carried out by studying their effect in cell cycle profile and programmed cell death. The results showed that one triterpene (odoratol) and two limonoids (gedunin and cedrelone) caused cell cycle arrest while only the limonoids gedunin and cedrelone were found to be very potent inducers of apoptosis. PMID:21269253

  19. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D. Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000–2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  20. Culture at a Higher Temperature Mildly Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth but Enhances Chemotherapeutic Effects by Inhibiting Cell-Cell Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shengming; Wang, Jiangang; Xie, Bingkun; Luo, Zhiguo; Lin, Xiukun; Liao, D Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Acute febrile infections have historically been used to treat cancer. To explore the underlying mechanism, we studied chronic effects of fever on cancer cell growth and chemotherapeutic efficacy in cell culture. We found that culturing cancer cells at 39°C mildly inhibited cell growth by arresting the cells at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. When cells were seeded in culture dishes at a lower density, e.g. about 1000-2000 cells per 35-mm dish, the growth inhibition was much greater, manifested as many fewer cell colonies in the 39°C dishes, compared with the results at a higher density seeding, e.g. 20,000 cells per dish, suggesting that cell-cell collaboration as the Allee effect in cell culture is inhibited at 39°C. Withdrawal of cells from serum enhanced the G1 arrest at 39°C and, for some cell lines such as A549 lung cancer cells, serum replenishment failed to quickly drive the cells from the G1 into the S and G2-M phases. Therapeutic effects of several chemotherapeutic agents, including clove bud extracts, on several cancer cell lines were more potent at 39°C than at 37°C, especially when the cells were seeded at a low density. For some cell lines and some agents, this enhancement is long-lasting, i.e. continuing after the cessation of the treatment. Collectively these results suggest that hyperthermia may inhibit cancer cell growth by G1 arrest and by inhibition of cell-cell collaboration, and may enhance the efficacy of several chemotherapeutic agents, an effect which may persist beyond the termination of chemotherapy. PMID:26495849

  1. Glycan Sulfation Modulates Dendritic Cell Biology and Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    El Ghazal, Roland; Yin, Xin; Johns, Scott C; Swanson, Lee; Macal, Monica; Ghosh, Pradipta; Zuniga, Elina I; Fuster, Mark M

    2016-05-01

    In cancer, proteoglycans have been found to play roles in facilitating the actions of growth factors, and effecting matrix invasion and remodeling. However, little is known regarding the genetic and functional importance of glycan chains displayed by proteoglycans on dendritic cells (DCs) in cancer immunity. In lung carcinoma, among other solid tumors, tumor-associated DCs play largely subversive/suppressive roles, promoting tumor growth and progression. Herein, we show that targeting of DC glycan sulfation through mutation in the heparan sulfate biosynthetic enzyme N-deacetylase/N-sulfotransferase-1 (Ndst1) in mice increased DC maturation and inhibited trafficking of DCs to draining lymph nodes. Lymphatic-driven DC migration and chemokine (CCL21)-dependent activation of a major signaling pathway required for DC migration (as measured by phospho-Akt) were sensitive to Ndst1 mutation in DCs. Lewis lung carcinoma tumors in mice deficient in Ndst1 were reduced in size. Purified CD11c+ cells from the tumors, which contain the tumor-infiltrating DC population, showed a similar phenotype in mutant cells. These features were replicated in mice deficient in syndecan-4, the major heparan sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the DC surface: Tumors were growth-impaired in syndecan-4-deficient mice and were characterized by increased infiltration by mature DCs. Tumors on the mutant background also showed greater infiltration by NK cells and NKT cells. These findings indicate the genetic importance of DC heparan sulfate proteoglycans in tumor growth and may guide therapeutic development of novel strategies to target syndecan-4 and heparan sulfate in cancer. PMID:27237321

  2. RACK1 inhibits colonic cell growth by regulating Src activity at cell cycle checkpoints.

    PubMed

    Mamidipudi, V; Dhillon, N K; Parman, T; Miller, L D; Lee, K C; Cartwright, C A

    2007-05-01

    Previously, we showed that Src tyrosine kinases are activated early in the development of human colon cancer and are suppressed as intestinal cells differentiate. We identified RACK1 as an endogenous substrate, binding partner and inhibitor of Src. Here we show (by overexpressing RACK1, depleting Src or RACK1 and utilizing cell-permeable peptides that perturb RACK1's interaction with Src) that RACK1 regulates growth of colon cells by suppressing Src activity at G(1) and mitotic checkpoints, and consequently delaying cell cycle progression. Activated Src rescues RACK1-inhibited growth of HT-29 cells. Conversely, inhibiting Src abolishes growth promoted by RACK1 depletion in normal cells. Two potential mechanisms whereby RACK1 regulates mitotic exit are identified: suppression of Src-mediated Sam68 phosphorylation and maintenance of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1-cyclin B complex in an active state. Our results reveal novel mechanisms of cell cycle control in G(1) and mitosis of colon cells. The significance of this work lies in the discovery of a mechanism by which the growth of colon cancer cells can be slowed, by RACK1 suppression of an oncogenic kinase at critical cell cycle checkpoints. Small molecules that mimic RACK1 function may provide a powerful new approach to the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:17072338

  3. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  4. Controlled Cell Growth and Cell Migration in Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica/Alginate Nanocomposite Hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Seda Kehr, Nermin; Riehemann, Kristina

    2016-01-21

    Nanocomposite (NC) hydrogels with different periodic mesoporous organosilica (PMO) concentrations and a NC hydrogel bilayer with various PMO concentrations inside the layers of the hydrogel matrix are prepared. The effect of the PMO concentration on cell growth and migration of cells is reported. The cells migrate in the bilayer NC hydrogel towards higher PMO concentrations and from cell culture plates to NC hydrogel scaffolds. PMID:26648333

  5. Identification of Pathways Mediating Growth Differentiation Factor5-Induced Tenogenic Differentiation in Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sik-Loo; Ahmad, Tunku Sara; Ng, Wuey-Min; Azlina, Amir Abbas; Azhar, Mahmood Merican; Selvaratnam, Lakshmi; Kamarul, Tunku

    2015-01-01

    To date, the molecular signalling mechanisms which regulate growth factors-induced MSCs tenogenic differentiation remain largely unknown. Therefore, a study to determine the global gene expression profile of tenogenic differentiation in human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) using growth differentiation factor 5 (GDF5) was conducted. Microarray analyses were conducted on hMSCs cultures supplemented with 100 ng/ml of GDF5 and compared to undifferentiated hMSCs and adult tenocytes. Results of QuantiGene® Plex assay support the use and interpretation of the inferred gene expression profiles and pathways information. From the 27,216 genes assessed, 873 genes (3.21% of the overall human transcriptome) were significantly altered during the tenogenic differentiation process (corrected p<0.05). The genes identified as potentially associated with tenogenic differentiation were ARHGAP29, CCL2, integrin alpha 8 and neurofilament medium polypeptides. These genes, were mainly associated with cytoskeleton reorganization (stress fibers formation) signaling. Pathway analysis demonstrated the potential molecular pathways involved in tenogenic differentiation were: cytoskeleton reorganization related i.e. keratin filament signaling and activin A signaling; cell adhesion related i.e. chemokine and adhesion signaling; and extracellular matrix related i.e. arachidonic acid production signaling. Further investigation using atomic force microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated apparent cytoskeleton reorganization in GDF5-induced hMSCs suggesting that cytoskeleton reorganization signaling is an important event involved in tenogenic differentiation. Besides, a reduced nucleostemin expression observed suggested a lower cell proliferation rate in hMSCs undergoing tenogenic differentiation. Understanding and elucidating the tenogenic differentiation signalling pathways are important for future optimization of tenogenic hMSCs for functional tendon cell-based therapy and

  6. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  7. Somatic growth and lung function in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, Tina; Koumbourlis, Anastassios C

    2014-03-01

    Somatic growth is a key indicator of overall health and well-being with important prognostic implications in the management of chronic disease. Worldwide studies of growth in children and adults with SCD have predominantly shown delayed growth (especially in terms of body weight) that is gradual and progressive in nature. However, more recent studies have shown that a substantial number of patients with SCD have normal weight gain whereas some are even obese. Height in patients with SCD is not universally affected even among those with suboptimal weight gain, whereas some achieve the same or greater height than healthy controls. The relationship between somatic growth and lung function in SCD is not yet clearly defined. As a group, patients with SCD tend to have lower lung volumes compared with healthy controls. These findings are similar across the age spectrum and across ethnic/racial lines regardless of the differences in body weight. Several mechanisms and risk factors have been proposed to explain these findings. These include malnutrition, racial differences and socioeconomic status. In addition, there are structural changes of the thorax (specifically the anterio-posterior chest diameter and anterio-posterior to lateral chest ratio) specific to sickle cell disease, that potentially interfere with normal lung growth. Although, caloric and protein intake have been shown to improve both height and weight, the composition of an optimal diet remains unclear. The following article reviews the current knowledge and controversies regarding somatic growth and its relationship with lung function in sickle cell disease (SCD) as well as the role of specific deficiencies of certain micronutrients. PMID:24268619

  8. Bacterial actin and tubulin homologs in cell growth and division.

    PubMed

    Busiek, Kimberly K; Margolin, William

    2015-03-16

    In contrast to the elaborate cytoskeletal machines harbored by eukaryotic cells, such as mitotic spindles, cytoskeletal structures detectable by typical negative stain electron microscopy are generally absent from bacterial cells. As a result, for decades it was thought that bacteria lacked cytoskeletal machines. Revolutions in genomics and fluorescence microscopy have confirmed the existence not only of smaller-scale cytoskeletal structures in bacteria, but also of widespread functional homologs of eukaryotic cytoskeletal proteins. The presence of actin, tubulin, and intermediate filament homologs in these relatively simple cells suggests that primitive cytoskeletons first arose in bacteria. In bacteria such as Escherichia coli, homologs of tubulin and actin directly interact with each other and are crucial for coordinating cell growth and division. The function and direct interactions between these proteins will be the focus of this review. PMID:25784047

  9. Large-cell Monte Carlo renormalization of irreversible growth processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakanishi, H.; Family, F.

    1985-01-01

    Monte Carlo sampling is applied to a recently formulated direct-cell renormalization method for irreversible, disorderly growth processes. Large-cell Monte Carlo renormalization is carried out for various nonequilibrium problems based on the formulation dealing with relative probabilities. Specifically, the method is demonstrated by application to the 'true' self-avoiding walk and the Eden model of growing animals for d = 2, 3, and 4 and to the invasion percolation problem for d = 2 and 3. The results are asymptotically in agreement with expectations; however, unexpected complications arise, suggesting the possibility of crossovers, and in any case, demonstrating the danger of using small cells alone, because of the very slow convergence as the cell size b is extrapolated to infinity. The difficulty of applying the present method to the diffusion-limited-aggregation model, is commented on.

  10. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth.

    PubMed

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK. PMID:19932089

  11. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  12. Nodal and Lefty signaling regulates the growth of pancreatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, You-Qing; Sterling, Lori; Stotland, Aleksandr; Hua, Hong; Kritzik, Marcie; Sarvetnick, Nora

    2014-01-01

    Nodal and its antagonist, Lefty, are important mediators specifying the laterality of the organs during embryogenesis. Nodal signals through activin receptors in the presence of its co-receptor, Cripto. In the present study, we investigated the possible roles of Nodal and Lefty signaling during islet development and regeneration. We found that both Nodal and Lefty are expressed in the pancreas during embryogenesis and islet regeneration. In vitro studies demonstrated that Nodal inhibits, whereas Lefty enhances, the proliferation of a pancreatic cell line. In addition, we showed that Lefty-1 activates MAPK and Akt phosphorylation in these cells. In vivo blockade of endogenous Lefty using neutralizing Lefty-1 monoclonal antibody results in a significantly decreased proliferation of duct epithelial cells during islet regeneration. This is the first study to decipher the expression and function of Nodal and Lefty in pancreatic growth. Importantly, our results highlight a novel function of Nodal-Lefty signaling in the regulation of expansion of pancreatic cells. PMID:18393305

  13. Growth inhibition by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in mesothelioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Nutt, Joyce E; O'Toole, Kieran; Gonzalez, David; Lunec, John

    2009-06-01

    Clinical outcome following chemotherapy for malignant pleural mesothelioma is poor and improvements are needed. This preclinical study investigates the effect of five tyrosine kinase inhibitors (PTK787, ZD6474, ZD1839, SU6668 and SU11248) on the growth of three mesothelioma cell lines (NCI H226, NCI H28 and MSTO 211H), the presence of growth factor receptors and inhibition of their downstream signalling pathways. GI50 values were determined: ZD6474 and SU11248, mainly VEGFR2 inhibitors, gave the lowest GI50 across all cell lines (3.5-6.9 microM) whereas ZD1839 gave a GI50 in this range only in H28 cells. All cell lines were positive for EGFR, but only H226 cells were positive for VEGFR2 by Western blotting. ZD6474 and ZD1839 inhibited EGF-induced phosphorylation of EGFR, AKT and ERK, whereas VEGF-induced phosphorylation of VEGFR2 was completely inhibited with 0.1 microM SU11248. VEGFR2 was detected in tumour samples by immunohistochemistry. VEGFR2 tyrosine kinase inhibitors warrant further investigation in mesothelioma. PMID:19318229

  14. Disrupting the Oncogenic Synergism between Nucleolin and Ras Results in Cell Growth Inhibition and Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Schokoroy, Sari; Juster, Dolly; Kloog, Yoel; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2013-01-01

    Background The ErbB receptors, Ras proteins and nucleolin are major contributors to malignant transformation. The pleiotropic protein nucleolin can bind to both Ras protein and ErbB receptors. Previously, we have demonstrated a crosstalk between Ras, nucleolin and the ErbB1 receptor. Activated Ras facilitates nucleolin interaction with ErbB1 and stabilizes ErbB1 levels. The three oncogenes synergistically facilitate anchorage independent growth and tumor growth in nude mice. Methodology/Principal Findings In the present study we used several cancer cell lines. The effect of Ras and nucleolin inhibition was determined using cell growth, cell death and cell motility assays. Protein expression was determined by immunohistochemistry. We found that inhibition of Ras and nucleolin reduces tumor cell growth, enhances cell death and inhibits anchorage independent growth. Our results reveal that the combined treatment affects Ras and nucleolin levels and localization. Our study also indicates that Salirasib (FTS, Ras inhibitor) reduces cell motility, which is not affected by the nucleolin inhibitor. Conclusions/Significance These results suggest that targeting both nucleolin and Ras may represent an additional avenue for inhibiting cancers driven by these oncogenes. PMID:24086490

  15. In Vitro plant cell growth in microgravity and on clinostat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurinavicius, R.; Kenstaviciene, P.; Rupainiene, O.; Necitailo, G.

    1994-08-01

    For the study of gravity's role in the processes of plant cell differentiation in vitro, a model ``seed-seedling-callus'' has been used. Experiments were carried out on board the orbital stations Salyut-7 and Mir as well as on clinostat. They lasted from 18 to 72 days. It was determined that the exclusion of a one-sided action of gravity vector by means of clinostat and spaceflight conditions does not impede the formation and growth of callus tissue; however, at cell and subcellular levels structural and functional changes do take place. No significant changes were observed either on clinostat or in space concerning the accumulation of fresh biomass, while the percentage of dry material in space is lower than in control. Both in microgravity (MG) and in control, even after 72 days of growth, cells with a normally developed ultrastructure are present. In space, however, callus tissue more often contains cells in which the cross-section area of a cells, a nuclei and of mitochondria are smaller and the vacuole area - bigger than in controls. In microgravity a considerable decrease in the number of starch-containing cells and a reduction in the mean area of starch grains in amyloplasts is observed. In space the amount of soluble proteins in callus tissue is 1.5 times greater than in control. However, no differences were observed in fractions when separated by the SDS-PAGE method. In microgravity the changes in cell wall material components was noted. In the space-formed callus changes in the concentration of ions K, Na, Mg, Ca and P were observed. However, the direction of these changes depends on the age of callus. Discussed are the possible reasons for modification of morphological and metabolic parameters of callus cells when grown under changed gravity conditions.

  16. Monoterpenes inhibit cell growth, cell cycle progression, and cyclin D1 gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bardon, S; Picard, K; Martel, P

    1998-01-01

    Monoterpenes are found in the essential oils of many commonly consumed fruits and vegetables. These compounds have been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in mammary tumor models and represent a new class of breast cancer therapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated the effects of limonene and limonene-related monoterpenes, perillyl alcohol and perillic acid, on cell growth, cell cycle progression, and expression of cyclin D1 cell cycle-regulatory gene in T-47D, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Our results revealed that limonene-related monoterpenes caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Of the three monoterpenes tested, perillyl alcohol was the most potent and limonene was the least potent inhibitor of cell growth. The enantiomeric composition of limonene and perillyl alcohol did not interfere with their effect on cell growth. Sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to monoterpenes was in the following order: T-47D > MCF-7 > MDA-MB-231. Growth inhibition induced by perillyl alcohol and perillic acid was associated with a fall in the proportion of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Finally, we showed that the effects of limonene-related monoterpenes on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were preceded by a decrease in cyclin D1 mRNA levels. PMID:9824849

  17. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies.

  18. Stochastic modeling of cell growth with symmetric or asymmetric division.

    PubMed

    Marantan, Andrew; Amir, Ariel

    2016-07-01

    We consider a class of biologically motivated stochastic processes in which a unicellular organism divides its resources (volume or damaged proteins, in particular) symmetrically or asymmetrically between its progeny. Assuming the final amount of the resource is controlled by a growth policy and subject to additive and multiplicative noise, we derive the recursive integral equation describing the evolution of the resource distribution over subsequent generations and use it to study the properties of stable resource distributions. We find conditions under which a unique stable resource distribution exists and calculate its moments for the class of affine linear growth policies. Moreover, we apply an asymptotic analysis to elucidate the conditions under which the stable distribution (when it exists) has a power-law tail. Finally, we use the results of this asymptotic analysis along with the moment equations to draw a stability phase diagram for the system that reveals the counterintuitive result that asymmetry serves to increase stability while at the same time widening the stable distribution. We also briefly discuss how cells can divide damaged proteins asymmetrically between their progeny as a form of damage control. In the appendixes, motivated by the asymmetric division of cell volume in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we extend our results to the case wherein mother and daughter cells follow different growth policies. PMID:27575162

  19. Cyclic Stretch Affects Pulmonary Endothelial Cell Control of Pulmonary Smooth Muscle Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Baker, Haven; Hasak, Stephen; Matyal, Robina; Salam, Aleya; Hales, Charles A.; Hancock, William; Quinn, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to mechanical forces in the form of cyclic stretch resulting from blood pulsatility. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) produce factors that stimulate and inhibit pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) growth. We hypothesized that PAECs exposed to cyclic stretch secrete proteins that inhibit PASMC growth. Media from PAECs exposed to cyclic stretch significantly inhibited PASMC growth in a time-dependent manner. Lyophilized material isolated from stretched PAEC-conditioned media significantly inhibited PASMC growth in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition was reversed by trypsin inactivation, which is consistent with the relevant factor being a protein(s). To identify proteins that inhibited cell growth in conditioned media from stretched PAECs, we used proteomic techniques and found that thrombospondin (TSP)-1, a natural antiangiogenic factor, was up-regulated by stretch. In vitro, exogenous TSP-1 inhibited PASMC growth. TSP-1–blocking antibodies reversed conditioned media–induced inhibition of PASMC growth. Cyclic stretched PAECs secrete protein(s) that inhibit PASMC proliferation. TSP-1 may be, at least in part, responsible for this inhibition. The complete identification and understanding of the secreted proteome of stretched PAECs may lead to new insights into the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:18314539

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis Inclusion Disrupts Host Cell Cytokinesis to Enhance Its Growth in Multinuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, He Song; Sin, Alex T-W; Poirier, Mathieu B; Harrison, Rene E

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis, the leading cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections, disrupts cytokinesis and causes significant multinucleation in host cells. Here, we demonstrate that multinuclear cells that result from unsuccessful cell division contain significantly higher Golgi content, an important source of lipids for chlamydiae. Using immunofluorescence and fluorescent live cell imaging, we show that C. trachomatis in multinuclear cells indeed intercept Golgi-derived lipid faster than in mononuclear cells. Moreover, multinuclear cells enhance C. trachomatis inclusion growth and infectious particle formation. Together, these results indicate that C. trachomatis robustly position inclusions to the cell equator to disrupt host cell division in order to acquire host Golgi-derived lipids more quickly in multinucleated progeny cells. PMID:26084267

  1. The role of growth factors in maintenance of stemness in bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Young Woo; Oh, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jong In; Baik, Soon Koo; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Shin, Ha Cheol; Kim, Yong Man; Ahn, Chan Mug; Kong, Jee Hyun; Kim, Hyun Soo; Shim, Kwang Yong

    2014-02-28

    Highlights: • Expression of FGF-2, FGF-4, EGF, and HGF decreased during long-term culture of BMSCs. • Loss of growth factors induced autophagy, senescence and decrease of stemness. • FGF-2 increased proliferation potential via AKT and ERK activation in BMSCs. • FGF-2 suppressed LC3-II expression and down-regulated senescence of BMSCs. • HGF was important in maintenance of the differentiation potential of BMSCs. - Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an active topic of research in regenerative medicine due to their ability to secrete a variety of growth factors and cytokines that promote healing of damaged tissues and organs. In addition, these secreted growth factors and cytokines have been shown to exert an autocrine effect by regulating MSC proliferation and differentiation. We found that expression of EGF, FGF-4 and HGF were down-regulated during serial passage of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). Proliferation and differentiation potentials of BMSCs treated with these growth factors for 2 months were evaluated and compared to BMSCs treated with FGF-2, which increased proliferation of BMSCs. FGF-2 and -4 increased proliferation potentials at high levels, about 76- and 26-fold, respectively, for 2 months, while EGF and HGF increased proliferation of BMSCs by less than 2.8-fold. Interestingly, differentiation potential, especially adipogenesis, was maintained only by HGF treatment. Treatment with FGF-2 rapidly induced activation of AKT and later induced ERK activation. The basal level of phosphorylated ERK increased during serial passage of BMSCs treated with FGF-2. The expression of LC3-II, an autophagy marker, was gradually increased and the population of senescent cells was increased dramatically at passage 7 in non-treated controls. But FGF-2 and FGF-4 suppressed LC3-II expression and down-regulated senescent cells during long-term (i.e. 2 month) cultures. Taken together, depletion of growth factors during serial passage

  2. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  3. Models of lipid droplets growth and fission in adipocyte cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boschi, Federico; Rizzatti, Vanni; Zamboni, Mauro; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2015-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LD) are spherical cellular inclusion devoted to lipids storage. It is well known that excessive accumulation of lipids leads to several human worldwide diseases like obesity, type 2 diabetes, hepatic steatosis and atherosclerosis. LDs' size range from fraction to one hundred of micrometers in adipocytes and is related to the lipid content, but their growth is still a puzzling question. It has been suggested that LDs can grow in size due to the fusion process by which a larger LD is obtained by the merging of two smaller LDs, but these events seems to be rare and difficult to be observed. Many other processes are thought to be involved in the number and growth of LDs, like the de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets. Moreover the number and size of LDs are influenced by the catabolism and the absorption or interaction with other organelles. The comprehension of these processes could help in the confinement of the pathologies related to lipid accumulation. In this study the LDs' size distribution, number and the total volume of immature (n=12), mature (n=12, 10-days differentiated) and lipolytic (n=12) 3T3-L1 adipocytes were considered. More than 11,000 LDs were measured in the 36 cells after Oil Red O staining. In a previous work Monte Carlo simulations were used to mimic the fusion process alone between LDs. We found that, considering the fusion as the only process acting on the LDs, the size distribution in mature adipocytes can be obtained with numerical simulation starting from the size distribution in immature cells provided a very high rate of fusion events. In this paper Monte Carlo simulations were developed to mimic the interaction between LDs taking into account many other processes in addition to fusion (de novo formation and the growth through additional neutral lipid deposition in pre-existing droplets) in order to reproduce the LDs growth and we also simulated the catabolism

  4. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    PubMed

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. PMID:22287482

  5. Cholera Toxin and Cell Growth: Role of Membrane Gangliosides

    PubMed Central

    Hollenberg, Morley D.; Fishman, Peter H.; Bennett, Vann; Cuatrecasas, Pedro

    1974-01-01

    The binding of cholera toxin to three transformed mouse cell lines derived from the same parent strain, and the effects of the toxin on DNA synthesis and adenylate cyclase activity, vary in parallel with the ganglioside composition of the cells. TAL/N cells of early passage, which contain large quantities of gangliosides GM3, GM2, GM1, and GDla, as well as the glycosyltransferases necessary for the synthesis of these gangliosides, bind the most cholera toxin and are the most sensitive to its action. TAL/N cells of later passage, which lack chemically detectable GM1 and GDla and which have no UDP-Gal:GM2 galactosyltransferase activity, are intermediate in binding and response to the toxin. SVS AL/N cells, which lack GM2 in addition to GM1 and GDla and which have little detectable UDP-GalNAc:GM3N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase activity, bind the least amount of toxin. The SVS AL/N cells are the least responsive to inhibition of DNA synthesis and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by cholera toxin. Gangliosides (especially GM1), which appear to be the natural membrane receptors for cholera toxin, may normally have important roles in the regulation of cell growth and cAMP-mediated responses. PMID:4530298

  6. Targeted Proapoptotic Peptides Depleting Adipose Stromal Cells Inhibit Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Tseng, Chieh; Zhang, Yan; Amaya-Manzanares, Felipe; Florez, Fernando; Dadbin, Ali; Zhang, Tao; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Progression of many cancers is associated with tumor infiltration by mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC). Adipose stromal cells (ASC) are MSC that serve as adipocyte progenitors and endothelium-supporting cells in white adipose tissue (WAT). Clinical and animal model studies indicate that ASC mobilized from WAT are recruited by tumors. Direct evidence for ASC function in tumor microenvironment has been lacking due to unavailability of approaches to specifically inactivate these cells. Here, we investigate the effects of a proteolysis-resistant targeted hunter-killer peptide D-WAT composed of a cyclic domain CSWKYWFGEC homing to ASC and of a proapoptotic domain KLAKLAK2. Using mouse bone marrow transplantation models, we show that D-WAT treatment specifically depletes tumor stromal and perivascular cells without directly killing malignant cells or tumor-infiltrating leukocytes. In several mouse carcinoma models, targeted ASC cytoablation reduced tumor vascularity and cell proliferation resulting in hemorrhaging, necrosis, and suppressed tumor growth. We also validated a D-WAT derivative with a proapoptotic domain KFAKFAK2 that was found to have an improved cytoablative activity. Our results for the first time demonstrate that ASC, recruited as a component of tumor microenvironment, support cancer progression. We propose that drugs targeting ASC can be developed as a combination therapy complementing conventional cancer treatments. PMID:26316391

  7. Cell responses to FGFR3 signalling: growth, differentiation and apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    L'Hote, Corine G.M. . E-mail: Corine.LHote@cancer.org.uk; Knowles, Margaret A.

    2005-04-01

    FGFR3 is a receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) of the FGF receptor family, known to have a negative regulatory effect on long bone growth. Fgfr3 knockout mice display longer bones and, accordingly, most germline-activating mutations in man are associated with dwarfism. Somatically, some of the same activating mutations are associated with the human cancers multiple myeloma, cervical carcinoma and carcinoma of the bladder. How signalling through FGFR3 can lead to either chondrocyte apoptosis or cancer cell proliferation is not fully understood. Although FGFR3 can be expressed as two main splice isoforms (IIIb or IIIc), there is no apparent link with specific cell responses, which may rather be associated with the cell type or its differentiation status. Depending on cell type, differential activation of STAT proteins has been observed. STAT1 phosphorylation seems to be involved in inhibition of chondrocyte proliferation while activation of the ERK pathway inhibits chondrocyte differentiation and B-cell proliferation (as in multiple myeloma). The role of FGFR3 in epithelial cancers (bladder and cervix) is not known. Some of the cell specificity may arise via modulation of signalling by crosstalk with other signalling pathways. Recently, inhibition of the ERK pathway in achondroplastic mice has provided hope for an approach to the treatment of dwarfism. Further understanding of the ability of FGFR3 to trigger different responses depending on cell type and cellular context may lead to treatments for both skeletal dysplasias and cancer.

  8. Effects of flavonoids on the growth and cell cycle of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, S U; Ryu, S Y; Yoon, S K; Jung, N P; Park, S H; Kim, K H; Choi, E J; Lee, C O

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the cytotoxicities of flavone (F01), 3-hydroxyflavone (F02), 6- hydroxyflavone (F03), 7-hydroxyflavone (F04), 3,6-dihydroxyflavone (F05), 5,7-dihydroxyflavone (F06) and 5,6,7-trihydroxyflavone (F07) to human cancer cells including P- glycoprotein (Pgp)-expressing HCT15 cells and its multidrug resistant subline, HCT15/CL02 cells. We also examined the effects of those flavonoids on the cell cycle of these cancer cells. HCT15/CL02 cells did not reveal resistance to all the flavonoids tested in comparison with HCT15 cells. In cell cycle analysis, all the flavonoids tested, except F01 and F04, reduced the G0/G1 population of SF295 cells at growth inhibitory concentrations, and increased G2/M (F02, F03 and F06) or S (F05 and F07) populations. In addition, F02 and F03 decreased the G2/M and G0/G1 population, and increased the S and G2/M population in HCT15 cells, respectively. Meanwhile, in HCT15/CL02 cells, F02 and F03 decreased the G0/G1 populations and increased the S population. In conclusion, we deemed that the flavonoids tested had diverse cytotoxic mechanisms, and exerted their cell growth inhibitory or killing activity by distinctive ways in different cells. PMID:10697540

  9. Vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor and angiogenesis in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Byrne, K J; Koukourakis, M I; Giatromanolaki, A; Cox, G; Turley, H; Steward, W P; Gatter, K; Harris, A L

    2000-01-01

    High microvessel density, an indirect measure of angiogenesis, has been shown to correlate with increased tumour size, lymph node involvement and poor prognosis in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumour cell vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and platelet-derived endothelial cell growth factor (PD-ECGF) expression correlate with angiogenesis and a poor outcome in this disease. In a retrospective study VEGF and PD-ECGF expression and microvessel density were evaluated immunohistochemically in surgically resected specimens (T1–3, N0–2) from 223 patients with operable NSCLC using the VG1, P-GF.44C and JC70 monoclonal antibodies respectively. High VEGF immunoreactivity was seen in 104 (46.6%) and PD-ECGF in 72 (32.3%) cases and both were associated with high vascular grade tumours (P = 0.009 and P = 0.05 respectively). Linear regression analysis revealed a weak positive correlation between VEGF and PD-ECGF expression in cancer cells (r = 0.21;P = 0.002). Co-expression of VEGF and PD-ECGF was not associated with a higher microvessel density than VEGF or PD-ECGF only expressing tumours. Furthermore a proportion of high vascular grade tumours expressed neither growth factor. Univariate analysis revealed tumour size, nodal status, microvessel density and VEGF and PD-ECGF expression as significant prognostic factors. Tumour size (P< 0.02) and microvessel density (P< 0.04) remained significant on multivariate analysis. In conclusion, VEGF and PD-ECGF are important angiogenic growth factors and have prognostic significance in NSCLC. Furthermore the study underlines the prognostic significance of microvessel density in operable NSCLC. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10780522

  10. Tomato waste: Carotenoids content, antioxidant and cell growth activities.

    PubMed

    Stajčić, Sladjana; Ćetković, Gordana; Čanadanović-Brunet, Jasna; Djilas, Sonja; Mandić, Anamarija; Četojević-Simin, Dragana

    2015-04-01

    The carotenoid content, antioxidant and cell growth activities of tomato waste extracts, obtained from five different tomato genotypes, was investigated. High performance liquid chromatography was used to identify and quantify the main carotenoids present in tomato waste extracts. The antioxidant activity of tomato waste extracts was tested using spectrophotometric methods, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity and reducing power assay. The highest DPPH scavenging activity (IC50 = 0.057 mg/ml) was obtained for Bačka extract. The Knjaz extract showed the best reducing power (IC50 = 2.12 mg/ml). Cell growth effects were determined in HeLa, MCF7 and MRC-5 cell lines by sulforhodamine B test. Anti-proliferative effects were observed in all cell lines at higher concentrations (⩾ 0.125 mg/ml). The carotenoid contents exhibited a strong correlation with antioxidant and anti-proliferation activity. The results obtained indicated that tomato waste should be regarded as potential nutraceutic resource and may be used as a functional food ingredient. PMID:25442547

  11. Hydroxyurea and Growth in Young Children With Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Houston, Patricia E.; Wang, Winfred C.; Iyer, Rathi V.; Goldsmith, Jonathan; Casella, James F.; Reed, Caroline K.; Rogers, Zora R.; Waclawiw, Myron A.; Thompson, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Growth impairment is a known complication of sickle cell disease. Effects of hydroxyurea (HU) on growth in very young children are not known. METHODS: Height, weight, BMI, and head circumference (HC) were compared with World Health Organization (WHO) standards in BABY HUG, a multicenter, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled 2-year clinical trial of HU in 193 children 9 to 18 months of age. Anthropometric data were closely monitored and converted to z scores by using WHO standardized algorithms for descriptive analyses. The treatment and placebo groups were compared longitudinally by using a mixed model analysis. RESULTS: At entry, the z scores of BABY HUG children were higher than WHO norms. After 2 years of HU or placebo treatment, there were no significant differences between the groups, except for the mean HC z scores at study exit (HU: +0.8 versus placebo: +1.0, P = .05). Baseline z scores were the best predictors of z scores at study exit. The absolute neutrophil count, absolute reticulocyte count, and total white blood cell count had significant negative correlations with growth measures. CONCLUSIONS: Both groups had normal or near normal anthropometric measures during the study. The HC z scores at study entry and exit were slightly greater than WHO norms. Higher baseline white blood cell count, absolute reticulocyte count, and absolute neutrophil count were associated with poorer growth. The significance of the slightly lower HC in the treatment group at study exit is not clear. Trends toward normalization of weight and height and effects on HC will be monitored in ongoing BABY HUG follow-up studies. PMID:25157002

  12. Influence of cell growth conditions and medium composition on EGFP photostability in live cells.

    PubMed

    Mamontova, Anastasia V; Bogdanov, Alexey M; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2015-05-01

    Photostability is a key characteristic of fluorescent proteins. It was recently demonstrated that green fluorescent protein (GFP) photobleaching in live cells can be suppressed by changes in medium composition. Here we show that Ham's F12 medium provides very high enhanced GFP (EGFP) photostability during fluorescence microscopy of live cells. This property of Ham's F12 medium is associated with decreased concentrations of riboflavin and pyridoxine, and increased concentrations of FeSO4, cyanocobalamine, lipoic acid, hypoxanthine, and thymidine compared with DMEM. We also found that the rate of EGFP photobleaching strongly depends on cell growth conditions such as cell density and the concentration of serum. We conclude that both imaging medium composition and the physiological state of the cells can strongly affect the photostability of fluorescent proteins. Thus, accurate comparison of the photostabilities of fluorescent proteins should be performed only in side-by-side analysis in identical cell growth conditions and media. PMID:25967905

  13. Growth and adherence on stainless steel by Enterococcus faecium cells.

    PubMed

    Andrade, N J; Ajao, D B; Zottola, E A

    1998-11-01

    Enterococcus faecium isolated from Brazilian raw milk was used in this study. For growth studies, E. faecium was inoculated into 10% RSM (reconstituted skim milk) and MRS both, incubated at 6.5 and 9 degrees C for 10 days and at 30, 42, and 45 degrees C for 48 h. Cells were enumerated after spread-plating onto MRS agar and incubating at 30 degrees C for 48 h. The ability of E. faecium cells to adhere to stainless-steel chips (6 by 6 by 1 mm, AISI 304, finish #4) was investigated. MRS broth containing stainless steel chips was inoculated to an initial concentration of 10(3) or 10(6) CFU/ml of E. faecium. Adherent cells were stained with acridine orange and enumerated by epifluorescence microscopy. E. faecium grew between 6.5 and 42 degrees C in MRS and between 9 and 40 degrees C in RSM. In MRS broth with 10(6) or 10(3) CFU/ml, the g (generation time) values were 0.62 and 0.42 h and R (growth rate) values were 1.6 and 2.4 h-1. Values of R = 2.3 h-1 and g = 0.43 h were determined for E. faecium growing in RSM with 10(3) CFU/ml. In MRS broth, for samples with a starting concentration of 10(6) cells per ml, adherence to stainless-steel chips was first observed at 2 h. However, adherence was first observed at 4 h in samples with an initial concentration of 10(3) cells per ml. After 10 h of exposure the number of adherent cells was similar for all samples regardless of initial inoculum. These results indicate that E. faecium readily adheres to stainless steel. It also underscores the need to control E. faecium by using appropriate low storage temperatures and adequate sanitizing practices in the dairy industry. PMID:9829184

  14. Entrainability of cell cycle oscillator models with exponential growth of cell mass.

    PubMed

    Nakao, Mitsuyuki; Enkhkhudulmur, Tsog-Erdene; Katayama, Norihiro; Karashima, Akihiro

    2014-01-01

    Among various aspects of cell cycle, understanding synchronization mechanism of cell cycle is important because of the following reasons. (1)Cycles of cell assembly should synchronize to form an organ. (2) Synchronizing cell cycles are required to experimental analysis of regulatory mechanisms of cell cycles. (3) Cell cycle has a distinct phase relationship with the other biological rhythms such as circadian rhythm. However, forced as well as mutual entrainment mechanisms are not clearly known. In this study, we investigated entrainability of cell cycle models of yeast cell under the periodic forcing to both of the cell mass and molecular dynamics. Dynamics of models under study involve the cell mass growing exponentially. In our result, they are shown to allow only a limited frequency range for being entrained by the periodic forcing. In contrast, models with linear growth are shown to be entrained in a wider frequency range. It is concluded that if the cell mass is included in the cell cycle regulation, its entrainability is sensitive to a shape of growth curve assumed in the model. PMID:25571564

  15. Metformin impairs growth of endometrial cancer cells via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective therapies for early endometrial cancer usually involve surgical excision and consequent infertility Therefore, new treatment approaches that preserve fertility should be developed. Metformin, a well-tolerated anti-diabetic drug, can inhibit cancer cell growth. However, the mechanism of metformin action is not well understood. Here we investigate the roles of autophagy and apoptosis in the anti-cancer effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. Methods Ishikawa endometrial cancer cells were treated with metformin. WST-8 assays, colony formation assays, flow cytometry, caspase luminescence measurement, immunofluorescence, and western blots were used to assess the effects of metformin on cell viability, proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and autophagy. Results Metformin-treated cells exhibited significantly lower viability and proliferation and significantly more cell cycle arrest in G1 and G2/M than control cells. These cells also exhibited significantly more apoptosis via both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways. In addition, metformin treatment induced autophagy. Inhibition of autophagy, either by Beclin1 knockdown or by 3-methyladenine-mediated inhibition of caspase-3/7, suppressed the anti-proliferative effects of metformin on endometrial cancer cells. These findings indicate that the anti-proliferative effects and apoptosis caused by metformin are partially or completely dependent on autophagy. Conclusions We showed that metformin suppresses endometrial cancer cell growth via cell cycle arrest and concomitant autophagy and apoptosis. PMID:24966801

  16. Connective tissue progenitor cell growth characteristics on textured substrates.

    PubMed

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George F; Roy, Shuvo

    2007-01-01

    Growth characteristics of human connective tissue progenitor (CTP) cells were investigated on smooth and textured substrates, which were produced using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) fabrication technology. Human bone marrow derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates comprising smooth (non-patterned) surfaces (SMOOTH), 4 different cylindrical post micro-textures (POSTS) that were 7-10 microm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 microm diameter, respectively, and channel micro-textures (CHANNELS) with curved cross-sections that were 11 microm high, 45 microm wide, and separated by 5 microm wide ridges. Standard glass-tissue culture surfaces were used as controls. Micro-textures resulted in the modification of CTP morphology, attachment, migration, and proliferation characteristics. Specifically, cells on POSTS exhibited more contoured morphology with closely packed cytoskeletal actin microfilaments compared to the more random orientation in cells grown on SMOOTH. CTP colonies on 10 gm-diameter POSTS exhibited higher cell number than any other POSTS, and a significant increase in cell number (442%) compared to colonies on SMOOTH (71%). On CHANNELS, colonies tended to be denser (229%) than on POSTS (up to 140% on 10 microm POSTS), and significantly more so compared to those on SMOOTH (104%). PMID:18019838

  17. Differential effects of AMPK agonists on cell growth and metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Emma E.; Coelho, Paula P.; Blagih, Julianna; Griss, Takla; Viollet, Benoit; Jones, Russell G.

    2016-01-01

    As a sensor of cellular energy status, the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is believed to act in opposition to the metabolic phenotypes favored by proliferating tumor cells. Consequently, compounds known to activate AMPK have been proposed as cancer therapeutics. However, the extent to which the anti-neoplastic properties of these agonists are mediated by AMPK is unclear. Here we examined the AMPK-dependence of six commonly used AMPK agonists (metformin, phenformin, AICAR, 2DG, salicylate and A-769662) and their influence on cellular processes often deregulated in tumor cells. We demonstrate that the majority of these agonists display AMPK-independent effects on cell proliferation and metabolism with only the synthetic activator, A-769662, exerting AMPK-dependent effects on these processes. We find that A-769662 promotes an AMPK-dependent increase in mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity (SRC). Finally, contrary to the view of AMPK activity being tumor suppressive, we find A-769662 confers a selective proliferative advantage to tumor cells growing under nutrient deprivation. Our results indicate that many of the anti-growth properties of these agonists cannot be attributed to AMPK activity in cells, and thus any observed effects using these agonists should be confirmed using AMPK-deficient cells. Ultimately, our data urge caution, not only regarding the type of AMPK agonist proposed for cancer treatment, but also the context in which they are used. PMID:25241895

  18. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective.

    PubMed

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as "The Central Dogma in Bacteriology," is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called "nucleoid complexity," is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  19. 1-Dimensional Zinc Oxide Nanomaterial Growth and Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyung Woo

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) has attracted much interest during last decades as a functional material. Furthermore, ZnO is a potential material for transparent conducting oxide material competing with indium tin oxide (ITO), graphene, and carbon nanotube film. It has been known as a conductive material when doped with elements such as indium, gallium and aluminum. The solubility of those dopant elements in ZnO is still debatable; but, it is necessary to find alternative conducting materials when their form is film or nanostructure for display devices. This is a consequence of the ever increasing price of indium. In addition, a new generation solar cell (nanostructured or hybrid photovoltaics) requires compatible materials which are capable of free standing on substrates without seed or buffer layers and have the ability introduce electrons or holes pathway without blocking towards electrodes. The nanostructures for solar cells using inorganic materials such as silicon (Si), titanium oxide (TiO2), and ZnO have been an interesting topic for research in solar cell community in order to overcome the limitation of efficiency for organic solar cells. This dissertation is a study of the rational solution-based synthesis of 1-dimentional ZnO nanomaterial and its solar cell applications. These results have implications in cost effective and uniform nanomanufacturing for the next generation solar cells application by controlling growth condition and by doping transition metal element in solution.

  20. Cytokines and growth factors which regulate bone cell function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seino, Yoshiki

    Everybody knows that growth factors are most important in making bone. Hormones enhance bone formation from a long distance. Growth factors promote bone formation as an autocrine or paracrine factor in nearby bone. BMP-2 through BMP-8 are in the TGF-β family. BMP makes bone by enchondral ossification. In bone, IGF-II is most abundant, second, TGF-β, and third IGF-I. TGF-β enhances bone formation mainly by intramembranous ossification in vivo. TGF-β affects both cell proliferation and differentiation, however, TGF-β mainly enhances bone formation by intramembranous ossification. Interestingly, TGF-β is increased by estrogen(E 2), androgen, vitamin D, TGF-β and FGF. IGF-I and IGF-II also enhance bone formation. At present it remains unclear why IGF-I is more active in bone formation than IGF-II, although IGF-II is more abundant in bone compared to IGF-I. However, if only type I receptor signal transduction promotes bone formation, the strong activity of IGF-I in bone formation is understandable. GH, PTH and E 2 promotes IGF-I production. Recent data suggest that hormones containing vitamin D or E 2 enhance bone formation through growth factors. Therefore, growth factors are the key to clarifying the mechanism of bone formation.

  1. RARalpha is a regulatory factor for Am-80-induced cell growth inhibition of hematologic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Jimi, Shiro; Mashima, Kota; Matsumoto, Taichi; Hara, Shuji; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2007-08-01

    Retinoids are used for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Am-80, Tamibarotene, binds to retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) more specifically than all-trans retinoic acid. We studied the tumor cell suppressive effects of Am-80, with respect to cytotoxicity and growth inhibition using eight myeloid and lymphoid malignant cells in culture (HL-60, HL-60R, K-562, Kasumi-1, MEG01, Raji, U266B1, and U937). The effects of Am-80 were examined during 9 days of incubation with 10(-7)-10(-5) M of Am-80 in culture medium, which was changed every 3 days. HL-60 were the only cells sensitive to Am-80-induced cytotoxicity; the latter reached more than 95% after 9 days of incubation, and death was primarily through apoptosis. The total mass of RARalpha in HL-60 was significantly greater (p<0.006) than in ATRA-resistant HL-60 (HL-60R) as well as all of other cells tested. However, in all cells excluding HL-60, Am-80 induced time- and dose-dependent cell growth inhibition without noticeable cytotoxicity. TGF-beta2 was released into the media containing cells incubated with Am-80 for 3 days. A dose-dependent increment of phosphorylation of Smad-2 was also detected. The relative amount of secreted TGF-beta2 correlated with the growth inhibition rates in all cells tested excluding HL-60, and with the total mass of RARalpha in the cells (p=0.0137). Our results indicate that Am-80-induced cell-type non-specific growth inhibition is mediated by TGF-beta2, where the total mass of RARalpha could be an important regulatory factor in hematologic malignant cells. PMID:17611697

  2. Vitamin K2-induced cell growth inhibition via autophagy formation in cholangiocellular carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, Masanobu; Tsuchida, Akihiko; Miyazawa, Keisuke; Yokoyama, Tomohisa; Kawakita, Hideaki; Tokita, Hiromi; Naito, Munekazu; Itoh, Masahiro; Ohyashiki, Kazuma; Aoki, Tatsuya

    2007-12-01

    Vitamin K2 (MK4) has antitumor effects on various types of cancer cell lines in vitro, and its efficacy has also been reported in clinical applications for patients with leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, details of the mechanism of the antitumor effects of MK4 remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the antitumor effects of MK4 on cholangiocellular carcinoma (CCC) cell lines and its mechanism of action using the HL-60 leukemia cell line that exerts MK4-induced cell growth inhibition via apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest as a control. MK4 exerted dose-dependent antitumor effects on all three types of CCC cell lines. However, apoptosis occurred in a smaller percentage of cells and there was less cell cycle arrest compared with other cancer cell lines studied previously, which suggested slight MK4-induced cell growth inhibition via apoptosis induction and cell cycle arrest. On the contrary, histopathological fidings showed a large number of cells containing vacuoles in their cytoplasm, and electron microscopic findings showed a large number of cytoplasmic autophagosomes and autolysosomes. These findings suggested evidence of autophagy-related cell death. Fluorescence microscopy following acridine orange staining revealed an increase in the number of cytoplasmic acidic vesicular organelles characteristic of autophagy. Moreover, there were few cells forming autophagic vesicles in the control group, while the percentage of cells containing vacuoles in the MK4-treated group increased with the duration of culture. These results suggested that, unlike in leukemia, gastric cancer, HCC, and other cancer cells, the antitumor effects of MK4 on CCC cells are induced via autophagy formation. PMID:17982686

  3. Improved clonal and nonclonal growth of human, rat and bovine adrenocortical cells in culture.

    PubMed

    McAllister, J M; Hornsby, P J

    1987-10-01

    This report describes the development of a culture system for long-term growth and cloning of human fetal adrenocortical cells. Optimal conditions for stimulating clonal growth were determined by testing the efficacy of horse serum (HS), fetal bovine serum (FBS), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), fibronectin, and a combination of growth factors, UltroSer G, in stimulating growth from low density. Optimal conditions for clonal growth were achieved using fibronectin-coated dishes and DME/F12 medium with 10% FBS, 10% HS, 2% UltroSer G, and 100 ng/ml FGF or 100 pM EGF. Conditions for growth at clonal density were found to be optimal for growth of early passage, nonclonal cultures at higher densities. The improved growth conditions used for cloning were shown to allow continued long-term growth of nonclonal human adrenocortical cells without fibroblast overgrowth. All cells in cultures grown in HS, FBS, and UltroSer G had morphologic characteristics of adrenocortical cells, whereas cells grown in FBS only rapidly became overgrown with fibroblasts. Clonal and nonclonal early passage human adrenocortical cells had similar mitogenic responses to FGF and EGF. Whereas FGF, EGF, and UltroSer G showed similar stimulation of DNA synthesis and clonal growth in human adrenocortical cells and human adrenal gland fibroblasts, the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate stimulated growth only in adrenocortical cells and was strongly inhibitory to growth in fibroblasts. In both cell types, forskolin inhibited DNA synthesis. Human adrenocortical cell cultures were functional and synthesized cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone, and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate. The improved growth conditions for clonal growth of human adrenocortical cells also provided optimal conditions for long-term growth of cultured rat adrenocortical cells and increased the cloning efficiency of cultured bovine adrenocortical cells. PMID:3667487

  4. Nuclear PI3K signaling in cell growth and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, William J.; Lehmann, Peter Z.; Li, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is a major driving force in a variety of cellular functions. Dysregulation of this pathway has been implicated in many human diseases including cancer. While the activity of the cytoplasmic PI3K/Akt pathway has been extensively studied, the functions of these molecules and their effector proteins within the nucleus are poorly understood. Harboring key cellular processes such as DNA replication and repair as well as nascent messenger RNA transcription, the nucleus provides a unique compartmental environment for protein–protein and protein–DNA/RNA interactions required for cell survival, growth, and proliferation. Here we summarize recent advances made toward elucidating the nuclear PI3K/Akt signaling cascade and its key components within the nucleus as they pertain to cell growth and tumorigenesis. This review covers the spatial and temporal localization of the major nuclear kinases having PI3K activities and the counteracting phosphatases as well as the role of nuclear PI3K/Akt signaling in mRNA processing and exportation, DNA replication and repair, ribosome biogenesis, cell survival, and tumorigenesis. PMID:25918701

  5. Nonlinear Growth Kinetics of Breast Cancer Stem Cells: Implications for Cancer Stem Cell Targeted Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinfeng; Johnson, Sara; Liu, Shou; Kanojia, Deepak; Yue, Wei; Singn, Udai; Wang, Qian; Wang, Qi; Nie, Qing; Chen, Hexin

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in primary breast cancer tissues and cell lines. The CSC population varies widely among cancerous tissues and cell lines, and is often associated with aggressive breast cancers. Despite of intensive research, how the CSC population is regulated within a tumor is still not well understood so far. In this paper, we present a mathematical model to explore the growth kinetics of CSC population both in vitro and in vivo. Our mathematical models and supporting experiments suggest that there exist non-linear growth kinetics of CSCs and negative feedback mechanisms to control the balance between the population of CSCs and that of non-stem cancer cells. The model predictions can help us explain a few long-standing questions in the field of cancer stem cell research, and can be potentially used to predict the efficicacy of anti-cancer therapy.

  6. Control of cell growth, division and death: information processing in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, John J.; Novak, Bela

    2014-01-01

    By way of surface receptor molecules and internal surveillance mechanisms, the living cell receives information about its external environment and internal state. In light of this information, the cell must determine its most appropriate course of action under the circumstances and initiate the relevant response pathways. Typical responses include growth and division, sexual reproduction, movement, differentiation and programmed cell death. Similar to a digital computer that uses bistable electrical switches to store and process information, the living cell uses bistable biochemical switches to implement its decision-making capabilities. In this review article, we describe some of the lines of thought that led, over the last 50 years, to our current understanding of cellular information processing, particularly related to cell growth, division and death. PMID:24904735

  7. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough.

    PubMed

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  8. Single-Cell Analysis of Growth and Cell Division of the Anaerobe Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough

    PubMed Central

    Fievet, Anouchka; Ducret, Adrien; Mignot, Tâm; Valette, Odile; Robert, Lydia; Pardoux, Romain; Dolla, Alain R.; Aubert, Corinne

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen significant progress in understanding basic bacterial cell cycle properties such as cell growth and cell division. While characterization and regulation of bacterial cell cycle is quite well-documented in the case of fast growing aerobic model organisms, no data has been so far reported for anaerobic bacteria. This lack of information in anaerobic microorganisms can mainly be explained by the absence of molecular and cellular tools such as single cell microscopy and fluorescent probes usable for anaerobes and essential to study cellular events and/or subcellular localization of the actors involved in cell cycle. In this study, single-cell microscopy has been adapted to study for the first time, in real time, the cell cycle of a bacterial anaerobe, Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough (DvH). This single-cell analysis provides mechanistic insights into the cell division cycle of DvH, which seems to be governed by the recently discussed so-called incremental model that generates remarkably homogeneous cell sizes. Furthermore, cell division was reversibly blocked during oxygen exposure. This may constitute a strategy for anaerobic cells to cope with transient exposure to oxygen that they may encounter in their natural environment, thereby contributing to their aerotolerance. This study lays the foundation for the first molecular, single-cell assay that will address factors that cannot otherwise be resolved in bulk assays and that will allow visualization of a wide range of molecular mechanisms within living anaerobic cells. PMID:26696987

  9. Nerve growth factor: role in growth, differentiation and controlling cancer cell development.

    PubMed

    Aloe, Luigi; Rocco, Maria Luisa; Balzamino, Bijorn Omar; Micera, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) research has shown that this factor acts not only outside its classical domain of the peripheral and central nervous system, but also on non-neuronal and cancer cells. This latter observation has led to divergent hypothesis about the role of NGF, its specific distribution pattern within the tissues and its implication in induction as well as progression of carcinogenesis. Moreover, other recent studies have shown that NGF has direct clinical relevance in certain human brain neuron degeneration and a number of human ocular disorders. These studies, by suggesting that NGF is involved in a plethora of physiological function in health and disease, warrant further investigation regarding the true role of NGF in carcinogenesis. Based on our long-lasting experience in the physiopathology of NGF, we aimed to review previous and recent in vivo and in vitro NGF studies on tumor cell induction, progression and arrest. Overall, these studies indicate that the only presence of NGF is unable to generate cell carcinogenesis, both in normal neuronal and non-neuronal cells/tissues. However, it cannot be excluded the possibility that the co-expression of NGF and pro-carcinogenic molecules might open to different consequence. Whether NGF plays a direct or an indirect role in cell proliferation during carcinogenesis remains to demonstrate. PMID:27439311

  10. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    PubMed Central

    Zaritsky, Arieh; Woldringh, Conrad L.

    2015-01-01

    The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the bacterial cell division cycle (BCD), described as “The Central Dogma in Bacteriology,” is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion) is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that the total amount of DNA associated with the replication terminus, so called “nucleoid complexity,” is directly related to cell size and shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation) to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, e.g., stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell’s center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids. PMID:26284044

  11. Cell transfection as a tool to study growth hormone action

    SciTech Connect

    Norstedt, G.; Enberg, B.; Francis, S.

    1994-12-31

    The isolation of growth hormone receptor (GHR) cDNA clones has made possible the transfection of GHRs into cultured cells. Our aim in this minireview is to show how the application of such approaches have benefited GHR research. GH stimulation of cells expressing GHR cDNAs can cause an alteration of cellular function that mimic those of the endogenous GHR. GHR cDNA transfected cells also offer a system where the mechanism of GH action can be studied. Such a system has been used to demonstrate that the GHR itself becomes tyrosine phosphorylated and that further phosphorylation of downstream proteins is important in GH action. The GH signals are transmitted to the nucleus and GH regulated genes have now begun to be characterized. The ability to use cell transfection for mechanistic studies of GH action will be instrumental to define domains within the receptor that are of functional importance and to determined pathways whereby GH signals are conveyed within the cell. 33 refs., 2 tabs.

  12. Microvesicles Derived from Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitate Tubular Epithelial Cell Dedifferentiation and Growth via Hepatocyte Growth Factor Induction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shuai; Zou, Xiang-yu; Zhang, Guang-yuan; Gu, Di; Miao, Shuai; Zhu, Ying-jian; Sun, Jie; Du, Tao

    2015-01-01

    During acute kidney injury (AKI), tubular cell dedifferentiation initiates cell regeneration; hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is involved in modulating cell dedifferentiation. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-derived microvesicles (MVs) deliver RNA into injured tubular cells and alter their gene expression, thus regenerating these cells. We boldly speculated that MVs might induce HGF synthesis via RNA transfer, thereby facilitating tubular cell dedifferentiation and regeneration. In a rat model of unilateral AKI, the administration of MVs promoted kidney recovery. One of the mechanisms of action is the acceleration of tubular cell dedifferentiation and growth. Both in vivo and in vitro, rat HGF expression in damaged rat tubular cells was greatly enhanced by MV treatment. In addition, human HGF mRNA present in MVs was delivered into rat tubular cells and translated into the HGF protein as another mechanism of HGF induction. RNase treatment abrogated all MV effects. In the in vitro experimental setting, the conditioned medium of MV-treated injured tubular cells, which contains a higher concentration of HGF, strongly stimulated cell dedifferentiation and growth, as well as Erk1/2 signaling activation. Intriguingly, these effects were completely abrogated by either c-Met inhibitor or MEK inhibitor, suggesting that HGF induction is a crucial contributor to the acceleration of cell dedifferentiation and growth. All these findings indicate that MV-induced HGF synthesis in damaged tubular cells via RNA transfer facilitates cell dedifferentiation and growth, which are important regenerative mechanisms. PMID:25793303

  13. Reflectin as a Material for Neural Stem Cell Growth.

    PubMed

    Phan, Long; Kautz, Rylan; Arulmoli, Janahan; Kim, Iris H; Le, Dai Trang T; Shenk, Michael A; Pathak, Medha M; Flanagan, Lisa A; Tombola, Francesco; Gorodetsky, Alon A

    2016-01-13

    Cephalopods possess remarkable camouflage capabilities, which are enabled by their complex skin structure and sophisticated nervous system. Such unique characteristics have in turn inspired the design of novel functional materials and devices. Within this context, recent studies have focused on investigating the self-assembly, optical, and electrical properties of reflectin, a protein that plays a key role in cephalopod structural coloration. Herein, we report the discovery that reflectin constitutes an effective material for the growth of human neural stem/progenitor cells. Our findings may hold relevance both for understanding cephalopod embryogenesis and for developing improved protein-based bioelectronic devices. PMID:26703760

  14. DNA Walker-Regulated Cancer Cell Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Li, Feiran; Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-06-16

    We demonstrate a DNAzyme-based walker system as a controlled oligonucleotide drug AS1411 release platform for breast cancer treatment. In this system, AS1411 strands are released from fuel strands as a walker moves along its carbon nanotube track. The release rate and amount of anticancer oligonucleotides are controlled by the walker operation. With a walker system embedded within the collagen extracellular matrix, we show that this drug release system can be used for in situ cancer cell growth inhibition. PMID:27059426

  15. Farnesyltransferase inhibitor R115777 inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Rolland, Delphine; Camara-Clayette, Valérie; Barbarat, Aurélie; Salles, Gilles; Coiffier, Bertrand; Ribrag, Vincent; Thieblemont, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The cytotoxic activity of the farnesyltranseferase inhibitor R115777 was evaluated in cell lines representative of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis were analyzed in four human MCL cell lines (Granta, NCEB, REC, and UPN1) in presence of R115777, alone or in combination with vincristin, doxorubicin, bortezomib, cisplatin and cytarabine. Inhibition of farnesylation was determined by the appearance of prelamin A. The antitumor activity of R115777, administered p.o. at 100, 250 and 500mg/kg, was determined in vivo in nude mice xenografted with UPN1 cells. R115777 inhibited the growth of MCL cell lines in vitro with inhibitory concentrations ranging between 2 and 15nM. A fifty percent decrease of cell viability was observed at concentrations comprised between 0.08 and 17μM. Apoptosis, evaluated by annexin V and activated caspase 3 staining, was induced in all cell lines, in 40 to 71% of the cells depending on the cell lines. In addition, R115777 significantly increased the cytotoxic effect of vincristine, doxorubicin, bortezomib, cisplatin and cytarabine (p=0.001, p=0.016, p=0.006, p=0.014 and p=0.007 respectively). Exposure of MCL cell lines to R115777 during 72 hours resulted in inhibition of protein farnesylation. R115777 administered p.o. twice daily for 8 consecutive days to mice bearing established s.c. UPN1 xenograft displayed cytostatic activity at the 500 mg/kg dosage. We have demonstrated that inhibition of farnesyltransferase by R115777 was associated with growth inhibition and apoptosis of MCL cell lines in vitro and tumor xenograft stability in vivo. PMID:17639395

  16. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  17. Finger Growth in Surfactant Solution in Hele-Shaw Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Yamashita, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yousuke; Hashimoto, Takamasa; Mori, Noriyasu

    2006-05-01

    Viscous fingering in surfactant solutions was experimentally studied. Aqueous solutions of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) with sodium salicylate (NaSal) as a counter ion were used as test fluids. Excess of counter ion was added into a surfactant solution of CTAB to configure network structures of wormlike micelles. The experiments were mainly carried out using a square Hele-Shaw cell. The structure of fingering pattern was dimensionally analyzed to classify the patterns into three types. In addition, growth phenomena distinguishing for the viscous finger in the CTAB/NaSal solutions were observed: surface instabilities with dendrites, and a sudden protrusion from a cuspidate shaped finger tip. The dependence of the sudden protrusion on the shear rate was confirmed by the experiment using a rectangular cell.

  18. Thymoquinone Inhibits Escherichia coli ATP Synthase and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Laughlin, Thomas F.; Kady, Ismail O.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the thymoquinone induced inhibition of purified F1 or membrane bound F1FO E. coli ATP synthase. Both purified F1 and membrane bound F1FO were completely inhibited by thymoquinone with no residual ATPase activity. The process of inhibition was fully reversible and identical in both membrane bound F1Fo and purified F1 preparations. Moreover, thymoquinone induced inhibition of ATP synthase expressing wild-type E. coli cell growth and non-inhibition of ATPase gene deleted null control cells demonstrates that ATP synthase is a molecular target for thymoquinone. This also links the beneficial dietary based antimicrobial and anticancer effects of thymoquinone to its inhibitory action on ATP synthase. PMID:25996607

  19. Chicken stem cell factor enhances primordial germ cell proliferation cooperatively with fibroblast growth factor 2

    PubMed Central

    MIYAHARA, Daichi; OISHI, Isao; MAKINO, Ryuichi; KURUMISAWA, Nozomi; NAKAYA, Ryuma; ONO, Tamao; KAGAMI, Hiroshi; TAGAMI, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    An in vitro culture system of chicken primordial germ cells (PGCs) has been recently developed, but the growth factor involved in the proliferation of PGCs is largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the growth effects of chicken stem cell factor (chSCF) on the in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. We established two feeder cell lines (buffalo rat liver cells; BRL cells) that stably express the putative secreted form of chSCF (chSCF1-BRL) and membrane bound form of chSCF (chSCF2-BRL). Cultured PGC lines were incubated on chSCF1 or chSCF2-BRL feeder cells with fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and growth effects of each chSCF isoform were investigated. The in vitro proliferation rate of the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL at 20 days of culture was more than threefold higher than those cultured on chSCF1-BRL cells and more than fivefold higher than those cultured on normal BRL cells. Thus, use of chSCF2-BRL feeder layer was effective for in vitro proliferation of chicken PGCs. However, the acceleration of PGC proliferation on chSCF2-BRL was not observed without FGF2, suggesting that chSCF2 would act as a proliferation co-factor of FGF2. We transferred the PGCs cultured on chSCF2-BRL cells to recipient embryos, generated germline chimeric chickens and assessed the germline competency of cultured PGCs by progeny test. Donor-derived progenies were obtained, and the frequency of germline transmission was 3.39%. The results of this study demonstrate that chSCF2 induces hyperproliferation of chicken PGCs retaining germline competency in vitro in cooperation with FGF2. PMID:26727404

  20. Close Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neuroblastoma Cell Lines Lead to Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Giovanna; Morandi, Fabio; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Gambini, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted much interest in oncology since they exhibit marked tropism for the tumor microenvironment and support or suppress malignant cell growth depending on the tumor model tested. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MSCs in the control of the growth of neuroblastoma (NB), which is the second most common solid tumor in children. In vivo experiments showed that systemically administered MSCs, under our experimental conditions, did not home to tumor sites and did not affect tumor growth or survival. However, MSCs injected intratumorally in an established subcutaneous NB model reduced tumor growth through inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis of NB cells and prolonged the survival of hMSC-treated mice. The need for contact between MSCs and NB cells was further supported by in vitro experiments. In particular, MSCs were found to be attracted by NB cells, and to affect NB cell proliferation with different results depending on the cell line tested. Moreover, NB cells, after pre-incubation with hMSCs, acquired a more invasive behavior towards CXCL12 and the bone marrow, i.e., the primary site of NB metastases. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that functional cross-talk between MSCs and NB cell lines used in our experiments can occur only within short range interaction. Thus, this report does not support the clinical use of MSCs as vehicles for selective delivery of antitumor drugs at the NB site unless chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy create suitable local conditions for MSCs recruitment. PMID:23119082

  1. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, LaKeisha G.; Winfield, Leyte L.

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • The methyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MDA-MB 231 cells. • The naphthyl-substituted benzimidazole was more effective at inhibiting growth in MCF-7 cells than ICI. • The benzimidazole molecules demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in ERE transcriptional activity. • The benzimidazole molecules had binding mode in ERα and ERβ comparable to that of the co-crystallized ligand. - Abstract: Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulfonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel, while the naphthyl analog did not significantly alter gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules

  2. Tumor necrosis factor induced stimulation of granulopoiesis and radioprotection.

    PubMed

    Urbaschek, R; Männel, D N; Urbaschek, B

    1987-01-01

    Human recombinant tumor necrosis factor, TNF, was used to assess its ability to stimulate granulopoiesis and to protect mice against lethal irradiation, effects known to be inducable with TNF-rich postendotoxin serum from BCG infected mice (BCG/ET serum). Although the endotoxin contamination of this TNF preparation is extremely low its effects were compared in endotoxin low responder C3H/HeJ mice and susceptible NMRI mice. TNF is a potent inducer of serum colony stimulating activity, CSA, in both mouse strains. In peripheral blood a marked granulocytosis with a concomitant decrease in lymphocytes and monocytopenia occurs at 2 hours after injection of TNF. Moreover, TNF induces an increase in the number of splenic myelopoietic committed stem cells (GM-CFC, granulocyte-macrophage colony forming cells) determined five days after injection. The lethality rate, registered over 30 days after exposure to 660 cGy whole body X-irradiation is reduced to 40% in C3H/HeJ mice as compared to 75% in control animals. The reduction in lethality is observed both, when TNF was injected 24 hours before or after irradiation. In vitro, TNF significantly increases the number of colonies in the presence of CSA in bone marrow cultures. TNF per se does not effect colony growth. The studies reported here demonstrate that TNF is a myelopoiesis stimulating factor in mice which may be related to the reduction in lethality following whole body irradiation. PMID:3306175

  3. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  4. ARNT2 Regulates Tumoral Growth in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yasushi; Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Nakashima, Dai; Yamatoji, Masanobu; Minakawa, Yasuyuki; Koike, Kazuyuki; Fushimi, Kazuaki; Higo, Morihiro; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) 2 is a transcriptional factor related to adaptive responses against cellular stress from a xenobiotic substance. Recent evidence indicates ARNT is involved in carcinogenesis and cancer progression; however, little is known about the relevance of ARNT2 in the behavior of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). In the current study, we evaluated the ARNT2 mRNA and protein expression levels in OSCC in vitro and in vivo and the clinical relationship between ARNT2 expression levels in primary OSCCs and their clinicopathologic status by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. Using ARNT2 overexpression models, we performed functional analyses to investigate the critical roles of ARNT2 in OSCC. ARNT2 mRNA and protein were down-regulated significantly (P < 0.05 for both comparisons) in nine OSCC-derived cells and primary OSCC (n=100 patients) compared with normal counterparts. In addition to the data from exogenous experiments that ARNT2-overexpressed cells showed decreased cellular proliferation, ARNT2-positive OSCC cases were correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with tumoral size. Since von Hippel-Lindau tumor suppressor, E3 ubiquitin protein ligase, a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF1)-α, is a downstream molecule of ARNT2, we speculated that HIF1-α and its downstream molecules would have key functions in cellular growth. Consistent with our hypothesis, overexpressed ARNT2 cells showed down-regulation of HIF1-α, which causes hypofunctioning of glucose transporter 1, leading to decreased cellular growth. Our results proposed for the first time that the ARNT2 level is an indicator of cellular proliferation in OSCCs. Therefore, ARNT2 may be a potential therapeutic target against progression of OSCCs. PMID:27076852

  5. Why Cells Grow and Divide? General Growth Mechanism and How it Defines Cells’ Growth, Reproduction and Metabolic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shestopaloff, Yuri K.

    2015-02-01

    We consider a general growth mechanism, which acts at cellular level and above (organs, systems and whole organisms). Using its mathematical representation, the growth equation, we study the growth and division mechanisms of amoeba and fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show how this mechanism, together with biomolecular machinery, governs growth and reproduction of cells, and these organisms in particular. This mechanism provides revealing answers to fundamental questions of biology, like why cells grow and divide, why and when cells’ growth stops. It also sheds light on questions like why and how life originated and developed. Solving the growth equation, we obtain analytical expression for the growth curve of fission yeast as a function of geometrical characteristics and nutrient influxes for RNA and protein synthesis, and compare the computed growth curves with 85 experiments. Statistical evaluation shows that these growth curves correspond to experimental data significantly better than all previous approximations. Also, using the general growth mechanism, we show how metabolic characteristics of cells, their size and evolutionary traits relate, considering fission yeast. In particular, we found that fission yeast S. pombe consumes about 16-18 times more nutrients for maintenance needs than for biomass synthesis.

  6. Biochemistry of growth inhibition by ammonium ions in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ryll, T.; Valley, U.; Wagner, R. . Cell Culture Techniques Dept.)

    1994-06-20

    The intracellular pool of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine has been shown to act as a central target during the inhibitory action of ammonium ions in vitro cultivated mammalian cell cultures. This pool has been demonstrated to be elevated at the end of a batch cultivation and very quickly as a response to exogenously applied ammonium chloride by using four different cell lines (hybridoma, BHK, CHO, and Ltk-929). The amount of enlarged UDP aminohexoses is correlated to the inhibitor concentration and additionally dependent on the cell line. The formation of the UDP sugars is associated with a transient reduction of the UTP pool. Moreover, the quick formation of UDP-GNAC is strictly dependent on the presence of, glucose and ammonium. Both metabolites act as biochemical precursors. Additionally, the formation of UDP-GNAc after ammonium application has been shown to increase with an elevated cultivation pH and to be independent of the inhibition of transcription and translation processes. The intracellular amount of UDP-GNAc correlates with the level of growth inhibition in mammalian cell lines.

  7. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient.

  8. Chinese medicinal herbs inhibit growth of murine renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lau, B H; Ruckle, H C; Botolazzo, T; Lui, P D

    1994-01-01

    Tumors are known to produce factors suppressing immune functions. We previously showed that a murine renal cell carcinoma (Renca) suppressed macrophage function in vitro and that this suppression was abolished by co-incubation with extracts of two Chinese medicinal herbs. We now report that these phytochemicals are capable of inhibiting growth of Renca in vivo. BALB/c mice were transplanted intraperitoneally (IP) with 1-2 x 10(5) Renca cells. One day after tumor transplant, mice were randomized into two groups. One group was treated IP, daily for 10 days, with 100 microliters of phytochemicals containing 500 micrograms each of Astragalus membranaceus and Ligustrum lucidum, while the other group received saline as controls. A cure rate of 57% was obtained with these phytochemicals when the initial tumor load was 2 x 10(5), and 100% when the initial tumor load was 1 x 10(5). Additional experiments were performed to investigate the mechanisms involved in this protection. Splenic macrophages from tumor-bearing mice were shown to have depressed chemiluminescent oxidative burst activity, and this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Splenocytes from mice transplanted with Renca responded less favorably to interleukin-2 (IL-2) in generating lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells; again this depression was restored with phytochemical treatment. Our data suggest that these phytochemicals may have exerted their antitumor effects via augmentation of phagocyte and LAK cell activities. PMID:7812364

  9. Control of cell wall extensibility during pollen tube growth.

    PubMed

    Hepler, Peter K; Rounds, Caleb M; Winship, Lawrence J

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we address the question of how the tip-growing pollen tube achieves its rapid rate of elongation while maintaining an intact cell wall. Although turgor is essential for growth to occur, the local expansion rate is controlled by local changes in the viscosity of the apical wall. We focus on several different structures and underlying processes that are thought to be major participants including exocytosis, the organization and activity of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium and proton physiology, and cellular energetics. We think that the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the apical cortical actin fringe, directs the flow of vesicles to the apical domain, where they fuse with the plasma membrane and contribute their contents to the expanding cell wall. While pH gradients, as generated by a proton-ATPase located on the plasma membrane along the side of the clear zone, may regulate rapid actin turnover and new polymerization in the fringe, the tip-focused calcium gradient biases secretion towards the polar axis. The recent data showing that exocytosis of new wall material precedes and predicts the process of cell elongation provide support for the idea that the intussusception of newly secreted pectin contributes to decreases in apical wall viscosity and to cell expansion. Other prime factors will be the localization and activity of the enzyme pectin methyl-esterase, and the chelation of calcium by pectic acids. Finally, we acknowledge a role for reactive oxygen species in the control of wall viscosity. PMID:23770837

  10. Control of Cell Wall Extensibility during Pollen Tube Growth

    PubMed Central

    Hepler, Peter K.

    2013-01-01

    In this review, we address the question of how the tip-growing pollen tube achieves its rapid rate of elongation while maintaining an intact cell wall. Although turgor is essential for growth to occur, the local expansion rate is controlled by local changes in the viscosity of the apical wall. We focus on several different structures and underlying processes that are thought to be major participants including exocytosis, the organization and activity of the actin cytoskeleton, calcium and proton physiology, and cellular energetics. We think that the actin cytoskeleton, in particular the apical cortical actin fringe, directs the flow of vesicles to the apical domain, where they fuse with the plasma membrane and contribute their contents to the expanding cell wall. While pH gradients, as generated by a proton-ATPase located on the plasma membrane along the side of the clear zone, may regulate rapid actin turnover and new polymerization in the fringe, the tip-focused calcium gradient biases secretion towards the polar axis. The recent data showing that exocytosis of new wall material precedes and predicts the process of cell elongation provide support for the idea that the intussusception of newly secreted pectin contributes to decreases in apical wall viscosity and to cell expansion. Other prime factors will be the localization and activity of the enzyme pectin methyl-esterase, and the chelation of calcium by pectic acids. Finally, we acknowledge a role for reactive oxygen species in the control of wall viscosity. PMID:23770837

  11. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  12. Silencing NOTCH signaling causes growth arrest in both breast cancer stem cells and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Suman, S; Das, T P; Damodaran, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) are characterized by high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) enzyme activity and are refractory to current treatment modalities, show a higher risk for metastasis, and influence the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), leading to a shorter time to recurrence and death. In this study, we focused on examination of the mechanism of action of a small herbal molecule, psoralidin (Pso) that has been shown to effectively suppress the growth of BSCSs and breast cancer cells (BCCs), in breast cancer (BC) models. Methods: ALDH− and ALDH+ BCCs were isolated from MDA-MB-231 cells, and the anticancer effects of Pso were measured using cell viability, apoptosis, colony formation, invasion, migration, mammosphere formation, immunofluorescence, and western blot analysis. Results: Psoralidin significantly downregulated NOTCH1 signaling, and this downregulation resulted in growth inhibition and induction of apoptosis in both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Molecularly, Pso inhibited NOTCH1 signaling, which facilitated inhibition of EMT markers (β-catenin and vimentin) and upregulated E-cadherin expression, resulting in reduced migration and invasion of both ALDH− and ALDH+ cells. Conclusion: Together, our results suggest that inhibition of NOTCH1 by Pso resulted in growth arrest and inhibition of EMT in BCSCs and BCCs. Psoralidin appears to be a novel agent that targets both BCSCs and BCCs. PMID:24129237

  13. Influence of different growth factors on a rat choriocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Verstuyf, A; Goebels, J; Sobis, H; Vandeputte, M

    1993-01-01

    The influence of epidermal growth factor, insulin-like growth factors I and II, insulin, transforming growth factor beta 1 and transferrin on the growth of a postgestational rat choriocarcinoma was examined by the MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] assay. The cell line was cultured in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with fetal calf serum, beta-mercaptoethanol, glucose, sodium pyruvate and antibiotics. The experiments were done in media supplemented with 10% (optimal) or 3% (suboptimal) fetal calf serum. Among the different growth factors tested, only epidermal growth factor and to a certain extent insulin had a growth-promoting effect by themselves. The other growth factors had either an additive effect in the presence of epidermal growth factor or no effect at all. The cytotrophoblast cells expressed both epidermal growth factor and transferrin receptors whereas the more differentiated giant cells expressed only transferrin receptors. PMID:8493450

  14. Transfer of spleen cells expanded by T cell growth factor suppresses arthritis induced in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, H; Tsunematsu, T

    1987-01-01

    The effects of transfer of T cell growth factor (TCGF)-expanded spleen cells after concanavalin A (Con A) stimulation into syngeneic Lewis rats were studied. The recipient rats were immunized with complete Freund's adjuvant for induction of adjuvant arthritis (AA) or chick type II collagen in incomplete Freund's adjuvant for induction of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) on day 0. Each of 5 X 10(7) cultured cells without mitogenic stimulation, 2 X 10(7) Con A-stimulated cells, or 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells cultured for 8 days (4 days X 2 culture cycles) after Con A stimulation was given on days 0 and 7. Both transfers of the cultured cells without stimulation and TCGF-expanded cells markedly diminished the severity of AA and CIA. On the contrary, transfer of Con A-stimulated cells led to no suppressive activity. In addition, transfer to TCGF-expanded cells significantly lowered the titre of anti-type II collagen antibody compared to that of control rats. The transfer of 1 X 10(7) TCGF-expanded cells was optimal for suppressing AA, in terms of cell number. This observation suggests that these cells were much more effective than were the unstimulated cultured cells, for which more than five times the number was required for the same suppressive activity. As far as the phenotypic proportion of helper (W3/13) and suppressor (OX-8) cells is concerned, we found no significant differences between the cultured cell groups and the freshly separated spleen cell group. The precise mechanism of these suppressive effects is the subject of further study. The transfer of TCGF-expanded cells appears to have a potent immunomodulatory effect. PMID:3497743

  15. Polydatin inhibits growth of lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and causing cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yusong; Zhuang, Zhixiang; Meng, Qinghui; Jiao, Yang; Xu, Jiaying; Fan, Saijun

    2014-01-01

    Polydatin (PD), a small natural compound from Polygonum cuspidatum, has a number of biological functions. However, the anticancer activity of PD has been poorly investigated. In the present study, thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide assay was used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of PD on cell growth. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were investigated by flow cytometry. In addition, the expression of several proteins associated with apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by western blot analysis. The results demonstrated that PD significantly inhibits the proliferation of A549 and NCI-H1975 lung cancer cell lines and causes dose-dependent apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PD induces S phase cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis showed that the expression of Bcl-2 decreased as that of Bax increased, and the expression of cyclin D1 was also suppressed. The results suggest that PD has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24348867

  16. Analysis of Vero cell growth behavior on microcarrier by means of environmental scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Manjun; Jiang, Lei; Cong, Wei; Ouyang, Fan

    2002-04-01

    By using environmental scanning electron microscopy, the morphological changes of Vero cells attached to and grown on the microcarrier Cytodex-3 were observed, and their behavior of adhesion, spreading and proliferation was analyzed. The effect of exogenous fibronectin/ laminin on adhesion and spreading of MCC/Vero cell was studied. The images of ESEM showed that expansion of cell growth was directed toward vacancy space. The growth curve and cell concentration change during the whole culture process were obtained from the statistical counting method based on ESEM images and the crystal violet method. The growth rate of Vero cells increases with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation, that is, the specific growth rate increases quickly with increasing the concentration of cell inoculation. When serum concentration in medium #199 ranged from 5% to 10%, experimental results indicated that serum concentration is one of the important factors influencing cell growth, particularly in the cell adhesion and spreading stage. PMID:18763074

  17. Transcriptional modulator ZBED6 affects cell cycle and growth of human colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar Ali, Muhammad; Younis, Shady; Wallerman, Ola; Gupta, Rajesh; Andersson, Leif; Sjöblom, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor ZBED6 (zinc finger, BED-type containing 6) is a repressor of IGF2 whose action impacts development, cell proliferation, and growth in placental mammals. In human colorectal cancers, IGF2 overexpression is mutually exclusive with somatic mutations in PI3K signaling components, providing genetic evidence for a role in the PI3K pathway. To understand the role of ZBED6 in tumorigenesis, we engineered and validated somatic cell ZBED6 knock-outs in the human colorectal cancer cell lines RKO and HCT116. Ablation of ZBED6 affected the cell cycle and led to increased growth rate in RKO cells but reduced growth in HCT116 cells. This striking difference was reflected in the transcriptome analyses, which revealed enrichment of cell-cycle–related processes among differentially expressed genes in both cell lines, but the direction of change often differed between the cell lines. ChIP sequencing analyses displayed enrichment of ZBED6 binding at genes up-regulated in ZBED6-knockout clones, consistent with the view that ZBED6 modulates gene expression primarily by repressing transcription. Ten differentially expressed genes were identified as putative direct gene targets, and their down-regulation by ZBED6 was validated experimentally. Eight of these genes were linked to the Wnt, Hippo, TGF-β, EGF receptor, or PI3K pathways, all involved in colorectal cancer development. The results of this study show that the effect of ZBED6 on tumor development depends on the genetic background and the transcriptional state of its target genes. PMID:26056301

  18. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Darin C; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K K; McElwee, Kevin J; Cheng, Kimberly M

    2015-09-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51×faster), ostrich oil (1.46×faster), and rhea oil (1.64×faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35×slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  19. Ratite oils promote keratinocyte cell growth and inhibit leukocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Darin C.; Leung, Gigi; Wang, Eddy; Ma, Sam; Lo, Blanche K. K.; McElwee, Kevin J.; Cheng, Kimberly M.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, native Australian aborigines have used emu oil for the treatment of inflammation and to accelerate wound healing. Studies on mice suggest that topically applied emu oil may have anti-inflammatory properties and may promote wound healing. We investigated the effects of ratite oils (6 emu, 3 ostrich, 1 rhea) on immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) in vitro by culturing the cells in media with oil concentrations of 0%, 0.5%, and 1.0%. Peking duck, tea tree, and olive oils were used as comparative controls. The same oils at 0.5% concentration were evaluated for their influence on peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) survival over 48 hr and their ability to inhibit IFNγ production in PBMCs activated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA) in ELISpot assays. Compared to no oil control, significantly shorter population doubling time durations were observed for HaCaT cells cultured in emu oil (1.51 × faster), ostrich oil (1.46 × faster), and rhea oil (1.64 × faster). Tea tree oil demonstrated significant antiproliferative activity and olive oil significantly prolonged (1.35 × slower) cell population doubling time. In contrast, almost all oils, particularly tea tree oil, significantly reduced PBMC viability. Different oils had different levels of inhibitory effect on IFNγ production with individual emu, ostrich, rhea, and duck oil samples conferring full inhibition. This preliminary investigation suggests that emu oil might promote wound healing by accelerating the growth rate of keratinocytes. Combined with anti-inflammatory properties, ratite oil may serve as a useful component in bandages and ointments for the treatment of wounds and inflammatory skin conditions. PMID:26217022

  20. A Millifluidic Study of Cell-to-Cell Heterogeneity in Growth-Rate and Cell-Division Capability in Populations of Isogenic Cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Damodaran, Shima P.; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  1. A millifluidic study of cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth-rate and cell-division capability in populations of isogenic cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Damodaran, Shima P; Eberhard, Stephan; Boitard, Laurent; Rodriguez, Jairo Garnica; Wang, Yuxing; Bremond, Nicolas; Baudry, Jean; Bibette, Jérôme; Wollman, Francis-André

    2015-01-01

    To address possible cell-to-cell heterogeneity in growth dynamics of isogenic cell populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, we developed a millifluidic drop-based device that not only allows the analysis of populations grown from single cells over periods of a week, but is also able to sort and collect drops of interest, containing viable and healthy cells, which can be used for further experimentation. In this study, we used isogenic algal cells that were first synchronized in mixotrophic growth conditions. We show that these synchronized cells, when placed in droplets and kept in mixotrophic growth conditions, exhibit mostly homogeneous growth statistics, but with two distinct subpopulations: a major population with a short doubling-time (fast-growers) and a significant subpopulation of slowly dividing cells (slow-growers). These observations suggest that algal cells from an isogenic population may be present in either of two states, a state of restricted division and a state of active division. When isogenic cells were allowed to propagate for about 1000 generations on solid agar plates, they displayed an increased heterogeneity in their growth dynamics. Although we could still identify the original populations of slow- and fast-growers, drops inoculated with a single progenitor cell now displayed a wider diversity of doubling-times. Moreover, populations dividing with the same growth-rate often reached different cell numbers in stationary phase, suggesting that the progenitor cells differed in the number of cell divisions they could undertake. We discuss possible explanations for these cell-to-cell heterogeneities in growth dynamics, such as mutations, differential aging or stochastic variations in metabolites and macromolecules yielding molecular switches, in the light of single-cell heterogeneities that have been reported among isogenic populations of other eu- and prokaryotes. PMID:25760649

  2. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Senno, Laura del; Aguiari, Gianluca

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 μg/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 μg/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new

  3. Quantification of cell lysis during CHO bioprocesses: Impact on cell count, growth kinetics and productivity.

    PubMed

    Klein, Tobias; Heinzel, Nicole; Kroll, Paul; Brunner, Matthias; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2015-08-10

    High cell densities and high viability are critical quality attributes for mammalian bioprocesses. Determination of living and dead cell numbers is nowadays routinely performed by automated image-based cell analyzers or flow cytometry. However, complete lysis of cells is usually neglected by these devices. We present a novel method for robust quantification of lysed cell populations over the course of a CHO bioprocess. The release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and double stranded genomic DNA in culture supernatants were used as markers for cell lysis. We considered the degradation of both markers over cultivation time, which significantly increased the amount of released LDH and DNA. For correct and robust estimation of lysed cell fractions, degradation of both markers over cultivation time was considered, where redundancy of markers allowed data reconciliation. Calculating the number of cells which were subject to complete cell lysis, we could show that this fraction makes up as much as 30% of the total produced biomass and is not described by measurements of image-based analyzers. Finally, we demonstrate that disregarding cell lysis heavily affects the calculation of biomass yields and growth rates and that increasing levels of cell lysis are related to decreased productivity. PMID:25956245

  4. DUSP10 regulates intestinal epithelial cell growth and colorectal tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Png, C W; Weerasooriya, M; Guo, J; James, S J; Poh, H M; Osato, M; Flavell, R A; Dong, C; Yang, H; Zhang, Y

    2016-01-14

    Dual specificity phosphatase 10 (DUSP10), also known as MAP kinase phosphatase 5 (MKP5), negatively regulates the activation of MAP kinases. Genetic polymorphisms and aberrant expression of this gene are associated with colorectal cancer (CRC) in humans. However, the role of DUSP10 in intestinal epithelial tumorigenesis is not clear. Here, we showed that DUSP10 knockout (KO) mice had increased intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) proliferation and migration and developed less severe colitis than wild-type (WT) mice in response to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS) treatment, which is associated with increased ERK1/2 activation and Krüppel-like factor 5 (KLF5) expression in IEC. In line with increased IEC proliferation, DUSP10 KO mice developed more colon tumours with increased severity compared with WT mice in response to administration of DSS and azoxymethane (AOM). Furthermore, survival analysis of CRC patients demonstrated that high DUSP10 expression in tumours was associated with significant improvement in survival probability. Overexpression of DUSP10 in Caco-2 and RCM-1 cells inhibited cell proliferation. Our study showed that DUSP10 negatively regulates IEC growth and acts as a suppressor for CRC. Therefore, it could be targeted for the development of therapies for colitis and CRC. PMID:25772234

  5. Linear increase in cell volume during the growth cycle of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    SciTech Connect

    Kubitschek, H.E.; Clay, K.

    1985-01-01

    Classical observations on the growth of cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe indicate that cell length and volume increase to a maximum value, which is reached about three-quarters of the way through the growth cycle, followed by a constant volume plateau. The authors have reexamined the growth of these cells by phase microscopy. When growth conditions were perturbed by inoculating cells at high density, in the presence of contaminant, or upon agar slips containing the growth medium in 4% agar, all cells grew in the classical pattern. But, at smaller agar concentrations and lower cell densities, many cells grew at a constant rate throughout the entire cell cycle. Also, the frequency of this linear pattern of cell growth increased as growth perturbations were reduced. They interpret these results as evidence for a sensitivity of this microorganism to perturbations of steady-state growth. The constant rate of volume increase throughout the cell cycle in unperturbed cells, when considered along with Mitchison's earlier results for constant dry mass increase, suggests that the buoyant densities of these cells remain constant during the entire cell cycle.

  6. Benzimidazoles diminish ERE transcriptional activity and cell growth in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Payton-Stewart, Florastina; Tilghman, Syreeta L.; Williams, LaKeisha G.; Winfield, Leyte L.

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERα and ERβ) are members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. They regulate the transcription of estrogen-responsive genes and mediate numerous estrogen related diseases (i.e., fertility, osteoporosis, cancer, etc.). As such, ERs are potentially useful targets for developing therapies and diagnostic tools for hormonally responsive human breast cancers. In this work, two benzimidazole-based sulphonamides originally designed to reduce proliferation in prostate cancer, have been evaluated for their ability to modulate growth in estrogen dependent and independent cell lines (MCF-7 and MDA-MB 231) using cell viability assays. The molecules reduced growth in MCF-7 cells, but differed in their impact on the growth of MDA-MB 231 cells. Although both molecules reduced estrogen response element (ERE) transcriptional activity in a dose dependent manner, the contrasting activity in the MDA-MB-231 cells seems to suggest that the molecules may act through alternate ER-mediated pathways. Further, the methyl analog showed modest selectivity for the ERβ receptor in an ER gene expression array panel. However, the napthyl analog diminished gene expression. The molecules were docked in the ligand binding domains of the ERα-antagonist and ERβ-agonist crystal structures to evaluate the potential of the molecules to interact with the receptors. The computational analysis complimented the results obtained in the assay of transcriptional activity and gene expression suggesting that the molecules upregulate ERβ activity while down regulating that of ERα. PMID:24997336

  7. Microencapsulation of human cells: its effects on growth of normal and tumour cells in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Shimi, S. M.; Hopwood, D.; Newman, E. L.; Cuschieri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The growth kinetics of established human colorectal tumour cell lines (HT29, HT115 and COLO 320DM) and human diploid fibroblasts (Flow 2002) were studied in conventional culture and in microcapsules formed from alginate-poly(L-lysine)-alginate membranes. The tumour lines grew rapidly in microcapsules but, in the case of the substrate-adherent lines HT29 and HT115, only after a prolonged lag phase. This phase was reduced by serial passage in microcapsules. The anchorage-independent line COLO 320DM showed no lengthening in lag phase. Microencapsulated fibroblasts underwent negligible growth but remained viable. Some evidence for functional differentiation (microvilli, cell-cell junctions) of the tumour line HT115 within the microcapsules was observed. We conclude that the use of microcapsules provides an alternative system with some advantages for the study of human cancer and its metastases in vitro. Images Figure 4 Figure 6 PMID:2039691

  8. Human Wharton's jelly stem cells, its conditioned medium and cell-free lysate inhibit the growth of human lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hao Daniel; Fong, Chui Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2014-08-01

    Several groups have reported that primitive mesenchymal stem cells from the gelatinous matrix of the Wharton's jelly of the human umbilical cord (hWJSCs) possess tumoricidal properties and inhibit the growth of solid tumours such as human mammary carcinoma, ovarian carcinoma and osteosarcoma. This unique characteristic led to the hypothesis that hWJSCs serve as a natural defence against migrating cancer cells from mother to fetus thus explaining why tumorigenesis in the fetus is rare. However, it is not known whether non-solid malignant hematopoietic cells are also inhibited by hWJSCs and what the exact tumoricidal mechanisms are. We therefore evaluated the influence of hWJSCs and its extracts on Burkitt's lymphoma cells. Cell proliferation (BrdU and Ki67+), viability (MTT) and cell death (Annexin V-Propidium iodide and live/dead) assays showed significant inhibition of lymphoma cell growth after 48 h exposure to hWJSCs or its extracts compared to controls. Increased cell death was observed at sub-G1 and S and decreased proliferation at G2/M phases of the mitotic cycle. Superoxide dismutase and hydrogen peroxide activity were significantly increased and glutathione peroxidase significantly decreased in treated lymphoma cells. Time lapse imaging and confocal z-stack images showed yellow fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) signals of lymphoma cell Y chromosomes within the cytoplasm of female red labelled hWJSCs. We hypothesize that the growth of lymphoma cells is inhibited by the molecules secreted by hWJSCs that use oxidative stress pathways to induce cell death followed by engulfment of the apoptotic remains of the lymphoma cells by the hWJSCs. PMID:24789672

  9. Sonic hedgehog signaling promotes growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells associated with bone destruction.

    PubMed

    Honami, Tatsuki; Shimo, Tsuyoshi; Okui, Tatsuo; Kurio, Naito; Hassan, Nur Mohammad Monsur; Iwamoto, Masahiro; Sasaki, Akira

    2012-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) and its signaling have been identified in several human cancers, and increased levels of its expression appear to correlate with disease progression and metastasis. However, the role of Shh in bone destruction associated with oral squamous cell carcinomas, which frequently invade the maxilla or the mandible, is still unclear. In this study we show that the use of siRNA for Shh to block SHH secreted by SAS oral squamous cell carcinoma cells suppressed the tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of subcutaneous SAS xenografts in vivo. Moreover, blockade of Shh in SAS cells decreased tumor growth and osteoclast number in a tibial metaphysis mouse model. Significantly, we clearly show that SHH stimulated osteoclast formation in a co-culture system consisting of murine bone stromal ST2 cells and murine CD11b(+) bone marrow cells. These findings suggest that Shh signaling is a potential target for the treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma associated with bone destruction. PMID:21945071

  10. Divergent effects of epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factors on a human endometrial carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Korc, M; Haussler, C A; Trookman, N S

    1987-09-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), at concentrations ranging from 0.83 to 4.98 nM, markedly inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at low plating densities (4.7 X 10(3) cells/cm2). Under the same incubation conditions, 16.6 pM EGF enhanced cell proliferation. At high plating densities (2.5 X 10(4) cells/cm2) 0.83 nM EGF also stimulated cell proliferation. Both the inhibitory and stimulatory effects of EGF were mimicked by transforming growth factor-alpha (TGF-alpha). However, the inhibitory action of TGF-alpha was always greater that of EGF. Binding studies with 125I-labeled TGF-alpha indicated that maximal cell surface binding of TGF-alpha occurred at 15 min, whereas maximal internalization occurred at 45 min. Both cell surface and internalized radioactivity declined sharply thereafter. Analysis of radioactivity released into the incubation medium during pulse-chase experiments indicated that RL95-2 cells extensively degraded both TGF-alpha and EGF. The lysosomotropic compound methylamine arrested the generation of low-molecular-weight degradation products of EGF, but not of TGF-alpha. In contrast to EGF and TGF-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) inhibited the proliferation of RL95-2 cells that were seeded at either low or high plating densities. Further, transforming growth factor-beta induced the appearance of large cuboidal cells that were readily distinguished from cells treated with either EGF or TGF-alpha. These findings point to complex regulatory actions of growth factors on the proliferation of RL95-2 cells and suggest that the processing of TGF-alpha following EGF receptor activation is distinct from the processing of EGF. PMID:3497713

  11. IL-6 promotes growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition of CD133+ cells of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Ok; Yang, Xiaodong; Duan, Shanzhou; Tsai, Ying; Strojny, Laura R.; Keng, Peter; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2016-01-01

    We examined IL-6 effects on growth, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process, and metastatic ability of CD133+ and CD133– cell subpopulations isolated from three non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines: A549, H157, and H1299. We developed IL-6 knocked-down and scramble (sc) control cells of A549 and H157 cell lines by lentiviral infection system, isolated CD133+ and CD133– sub-populations, and investigated the IL-6 role in self-renewal/growth of these cells. IL-6 showed either an inhibitory or lack of effect in modulating growth of CD133– cells depending on intracellular IL-6 levels, but there was higher self-renewal ability of IL-6 expressing CD133+ cells than IL-6 knocked down cells, confirming the promoter role of IL-6 in CD133+ cells growth. We then examined tumor growth of xenografts developed from CD133+ cells of A549IL-6si vs. A549sc cell lines. Consistently, there was retarded growth of tumors developed from A549IL-6si, CD133+ cells compared to tumors originating from A549sc, CD133+ cells. The effect of IL-6 in promoting CD133+ self-renewal was due to hedgehog (Hhg) and Erk signaling pathway activation and higher Bcl-2/Bcl-xL expression. We also investigated whether IL-6 regulates the EMT process of CD133− and CD133+ cells differently. Expression of the EMT/metastasis-associated molecules in IL-6 expressing cells was higher than in IL-6 knocked down cells. Together, we demonstrated dual roles of IL-6 in regulating growth of CD133– and CD133+ subpopulations of lung cancer cells and significant regulation of IL-6 on EMT/metastasis increase in CD133+ cells, not in CD133– cells. PMID:26675547

  12. Hepatocyte growth factor/hepatopoietin A is expressed in fat-storing cells from rat liver but not myofibroblast-like cells derived from fat-storing cells.

    PubMed

    Schirmacher, P; Geerts, A; Pietrangelo, A; Dienes, H P; Rogler, C E

    1992-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor/hepatopoietin A is a complete mitogen for parenchymal liver cells, and its expression is increased as an early response to acute liver injury. To identify the liver cell population responsible for hepatocyte growth factor gene expression, we investigated tissue sections and isolated and purified cell fractions from normal rat liver by in situ and Northern blot hybridization. Hepatocyte growth factor transcripts were present in sinusoidal liver cells, which were preferentially located in the periportal parenchyma. Northern hybridization analysis of RNA isolated from purified liver cell fractions demonstrated that HGF messenger RNA is present only in fat-storing cells. No specific hepatocyte growth factor gene expression was detected in parenchymal cells, endothelial cells and Kupffer cells. Myofibroblast-like transition of fat-storing cells, which is linked to fibrogenesis in chronic liver disease, results in the loss of hepatocyte growth factor expression. Hepatocyte growth factor gene expression in the normal liver, a new function of fat-storing cells, suggests that this growth factor may play a role in the physiological balance between cell death and replacement in the liver and that hepatocyte growth factor may also act in a paracrine manner. Furthermore, loss of hepatocyte growth factor expression in myofibroblast-like cells derived from fat-storing cells may be responsible for reduced parenchymal cell regeneration in chronic liver disease. PMID:1530788

  13. Procyanidin B2 3,3″-di-O-gallate inhibits endothelial cells growth and motility by targeting VEGFR2 and integrin signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Deep, Gagan; Wempe, Michael F.; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2015-01-01

    Targeting angiogenesis, one of the hallmarks of carcinogenesis, using non-toxic phytochemicals has emerged as a translational opportunity for angioprevention and to control advanced stages of malignancy. Herein, we investigated the inhibitory effects and associated mechanism/s of action of Procyanidin B2-3,3″-di-O-gallate (B2G2), a major component of grape seed extract, on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and human prostate microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs). Our results showed that B2G2 (10–40 μM) inhibits growth and induces death in both HUVECs and HPMECs. Additional studies revealed that B2G2 causes a G1 arrest in cell cycle progression of HUVECs by down-regulating cyclins (D1 and A), CDKs (Cdk2 and Cdc2) and Cdc25c phosphatase and up-regulating CDK inhibitors (p21 and p27) expression. B2G2 also induced strong apoptotic death in HUVECs through increasing p53, Bax and Smac/Diablo expression while decreasing Bcl-2 and survivin levels. Additionally, B2G2 inhibited the growth factors-induced capillary tube formation in HUVECs and HPMECs. Interestingly, conditioned media (CCM) from prostate cancer (PCA) cells (LNCaP and PC3) grown under normoxic (~21% O2) and hypoxic (1% O2) conditions significantly enhanced the tube formation in HUVECs, which was compromised in presence of conditioned media from B2G2-treated PCA cells. B2G2 also inhibited the motility and invasiveness of both HUVECs and HPMECs. Mechanistic studies showed that B2G2 targets VEGFR2/PI3K/Akt and integrin signaling molecules which are important for endothelial cells survival, proliferation, tube formation and motility. Overall, we report that B2G2 inhibits several attributes of angiogenesis in cell culture; therefore, warrants further investigation for its efficacy for angioprevention and cancer control. PMID:25552257

  14. CTLs regulate tumor growth via cytostatic effects rather than cytotoxicity: a few T cells can influence the growth of many times more tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Matsushita, Hirokazu; Hosoi, Akihiro; Miyai, Manami; Ohara, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a central role in antitumor immunity. We utilized B16 melanoma cells expressing the fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator B16-fucci implanted in host mice and adoptively transferred with pmel-1-TCR transgenic T cells to demonstrate that tumor growth reduction is largely dependent on interferon γ-mediated cell cycle arrest rather than the cytotoxic killing of tumor cells by CTLs. PMID:25949889

  15. Plasticity in sunflower leaf and cell growth under high salinity.

    PubMed

    Céccoli, G; Bustos, D; Ortega, L I; Senn, M E; Vegetti, A; Taleisnik, E

    2015-01-01

    A group of sunflower lines that exhibit a range of leaf Na(+) concentrations under high salinity was used to explore whether the responses to the osmotic and ionic components of salinity can be distinguished in leaf expansion kinetics analysis. It was expected that at the initial stages of the salt treatment, leaf expansion kinetics changes would be dominated by responses to the osmotic component of salinity, and that later on, ion inclusion would impose further kinetics changes. It was also expected that differential leaf Na(+) accumulation would be reflected in specific changes in cell division and expansion rates. Plants of four sunflower lines were gradually treated with a relatively high (130 mm NaCl) salt treatment. Leaf expansion kinetics curves were compared in leaves that were formed before, during and after the initiation of the salt treatment. Leaf areas were smaller in salt-treated plants, but the analysis of growth curves did not reveal differences that could be attributed to differential Na(+) accumulation, since similar changes in leaf expansion kinetics were observed in lines with different magnitudes of salt accumulation. Nevertheless, in a high leaf Na(+) -including line, cell divisions were affected earlier, resulting in leaves with proportionally fewer cells than in a Na(+) -excluding line. A distinct change in leaf epidermal pavement shape caused by salinity is reported for the first time. Mature pavement cells in leaves of control plants exhibited typical lobed, jigsaw-puzzle shape, whereas in treated plants, they tended to retain closer-to-circular shapes and a lower number of lobes. PMID:24942979

  16. Proliferative signals for suppressor T cells. Helper cells stimulated with pokeweed mitogen in vitro produce a suppressor cell growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, E J; Cook, R G; Lewis, D E; Rich, R R

    1986-01-01

    To define molecular signals elaborated by inducer populations supporting growth or differentiation of T8+ cells, we collected supernatants of pokeweed mitogen (PWM)-stimulated cultures depleted of T8+ cells. When added to purified T8+ cells, these supernatants caused significant proliferation. PWM plus interleukin 2 (IL-2) in amounts equivalent to those in the supernatant could not reconstitute the response caused by the supernatant. T8+ cells activated by supernatants obtained from PWM-pulsed T4+ cells suppressed fresh PWM cultures. Although exhibiting little proliferation, T8+ cells cultured for 6 d in PWM plus IL-2 still suppressed a fresh PWM response. The supernatants therefore contain an additional T suppressor cell growth factor (TsGF). Elaboration of TsGF required radiosensitive T4+Leu8+ cells. Molecular weight determination by high performance liquid chromatography gave a single peak of TsGF activity at approximately 8,000. Finally, whereas TsGF in the absence of IL-2 could not support the proliferation of T suppressor cells, it did cause T8+ cells to become strongly IL-2 receptor-positive. PMID:2941453

  17. Macrophage-secreted factors induce adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Permana, Paska A. . E-mail: Paska.Permana@med.va.gov; Menge, Christopher; Reaven, Peter D.

    2006-03-10

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue increases with obesity, a condition associated with low-grade inflammation and insulin resistance. We investigated the direct effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocyte inflammation and insulin resistance. 3T3-L1 adipocytes incubated with media conditioned by RAW264.7 macrophages (RAW-CM) showed dramatically increased transcription of several inflammation-related genes, greater nuclear factor kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activity, and enhanced binding of U937 monocytes. All of these effects were prevented by co-incubation with pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate, an NF-{kappa}B inhibitor. Adipocytes incubated with RAW-CM also released more non-esterified fatty acids and this increased lipolysis was not suppressed by insulin. In addition, RAW-CM treatment decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. Taken together, these results indicate that macrophage-secreted factors induce inflammatory responses and reduce insulin responsiveness in adipocytes. These effects of macrophage-secreted factors on adipocytes may contribute significantly to the systemic inflammation and insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  18. Modulation of cell growth and PPARgamma expression in human colorectal cancer cell lines by ciglitazone.

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Nik Soriani; Darus, Halisa Mohd; Norazmi, Mohd Nor

    2008-09-01

    Studies have shown that ligand activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma) can induce differentiation and inhibit proliferation of several cancer cells. The present study was performed to investigate the effects of the PPARgamma ligand, ciglitazone, and the involvement of PPARgamma in modulating the growth of human colorectal cancer cells. Lactate dehydrogenase release assay showed that ciglitazone potently inhibited HT-29 (well-differentiated) and COLO-205 (poorly differentiated) colorectal adenocarcinoma cell growth. Measurement of apoptosis by flow cytometry using a fluorescein-conjugated monoclonal antibody against cytokeratin 18 revealed a high induction of apoptosis by ciglitazone in a time-dependent fashion. The expression of PPARgamma1 but not PPARgamma2 mRNA was significantly downregulated as measured by real-time quantitative PCR, and the PPARgamma protein levels were decreased as determined by Western blot analysis. We conclude that ciglitazone treatment suppressed colon cancer cell growth via induction of apoptosis. However, the anticancer effects of ciglitazone may not depend solely on PPARgamma activation. PMID:18579355

  19. TP508 accelerates fracture repair by promoting cell growth over cell death

    SciTech Connect

    Li Xinmin; Wang Hali; Touma, Edward; Qi Yuchen; Rousseau, Emma; Quigg, Richard J.; Ryaby, James T.

    2007-12-07

    TP508 is a synthetic 23-amino acid peptide representing a receptor-binding domain of human thrombin. We have previously shown that a single injection of TP508 accelerates fracture healing in a rat femoral fracture model. To understand how TP508 acts at the protein level during fracture healing, we compared the translational profiles between saline-control and fractured femur at six time points after TP508 treatment using the second generation of BD Clontech{sup TM} Antibody Microarray. Here, we demonstrate that TP508 accelerates fracture healing by modulating expression levels of proteins primarily involved in the functional categories of cell cycle, cellular growth and proliferation, and cell death. The majority of those proteins are physically interrelated and functionally overlapped. The action of those proteins is highlighted by a central theme of promoting cell growth via balance of cell survival over cell death signals. This appears to occur through the stimulation of several bone healing pathways including cell cycle-G1/S checkpoint regulation, apoptosis, JAK/STAT, NF-{kappa}B, PDGF, PI3K/AKT, PTEN, and ERK/MAPK.

  20. Sensitivity of human granulosa cell tumor cells to epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Noora; Anttonen, Mikko; Färkkilä, Anniina; Pihlajoki, Marjut; Bützow, Ralf; Unkila-Kallio, Leila; Heikinheimo, Markku

    2014-04-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is implicated in the progression of many human cancers, but its significance in ovarian granulosa cell tumor (GCT) pathobiology remains poorly understood. We assessed the EGFR gene copy number, surveyed the mRNA and protein expression patterns of EGFR in 90 adult GCTs, and assessed the in vitro sensitivity of GCT cells to EGFR inhibition. Low-level amplification of EGFR gene was observed in five GCTs and high-level amplification in one sample. EGFR mRNA was robustly expressed in GCTs. Most tumors expressed both unphosphorylated and phosphorylated EGFR protein, but the protein expression did not correlate with clinical parameters, including the risk of recurrence. Small-molecule EGFR inhibitors reduced the EGF-induced activation of EGFR and its downstream signaling molecules at nanomolar doses, but cell viability was reduced, and caspase-3/7 was activated in GCT cells only at micromolar doses. Based on the present results, EGFR is active and abundantly expressed in the majority of GCTs, but probably has only minor contribution to GCT cell growth. Given the high doses of EGFR inhibitors required to reduce GCT cell viability in vitro, they are not likely to be effective for GCT treatment as single agents; they should rather be tested as part of combination therapies for these malignancies. PMID:24463098

  1. Metformin inhibits cell growth by upregulating microRNA-26a in renal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Qiang; Wang, Ji-Jiao; Yan, Jia-Sheng; Huang, Jian-Hua; Li, Wei; Che, Jian-Ping; Wang, Guang-Chun; Liu, Min; Zheng, Jun-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that metformin, a biguanide class of anti-diabetic drugs, possesses anti-cancer properties and may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis. However, the mechanism by which metformin affects various cancers, including renal cancer still unknown. MiR-26a induces cell growth, cell cycle and cell apoptosis progression via direct targeting of Bcl-2, clyclin D1 and PTEN in cancer cells. In the present study, we used 786-O human renal cancer cell lines to study the effects and mechanisms of metformin. Metformin treatment inhibited RCC cells proliferation by increasing expression of miR-26a in 786-O cells (P < 0.05). As a result, protein abundance of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 was decreased and PTEN was increased in cells exposed to metformin. Also over-expression of miR-26a can inhibited cell proliferation by down-regulating Bcl-2, cyclin D1 and up-regulating PTEN expression. Therefore, these data for the first time provide novel evidence for a mechanism that the anticancer activities of metformin are due to upregulation of miR-26a and affect its downstream target gene. PMID:25419360

  2. Short Laminin Peptide for Improved Neural Stem Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Xiaoyan; Josey, Benjamin; Chou, C. James; Tan, Yu; Zhang, Ning

    2014-01-01

    Human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNSCs) are very difficult to culture and require human or animal source extracellular matrix molecules, such as laminin or collagen type IV, to support attachment and to regulate their survival and proliferation. These extracellular matrix molecules are difficult to purify from human or animal tissues, have high batch-to-batch variability, and may cause an immune response if used in clinical applications. Although several laminin- and collagen IV-derived peptides are commercially available, they do not support long-term hNSC attachment and growth. To solve this problem, we developed a novel peptide sequence with only 12 amino acids based on the Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val, or IKVAV, sequence: Ac-Cys-Cys-Arg-Arg-Ile-Lys-Val-Ala-Val-Trp-Leu-Cys. This short peptide sequence, similar to tissue-derived full laminin molecules, supported hNSCs to attach and proliferate to confluence for continuous passage and subculture. This short peptide also directed hNSCs to differentiate into neurons. When conjugated to poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels, this short peptide benefited hNSC attachment and proliferation on the surface of hydrogels and promoted cell migration inside the hydrogels with maximum enhancement at a peptide density of 10 μM. This novel short peptide shows great promise in artificial niche development for supporting hNSC culture in vitro and in vivo and for promoting hNSC transplantation in future clinical therapy. PMID:24692587

  3. Stem cells, growth factors and scaffolds in craniofacial regenerative medicine

    PubMed Central

    Tollemar, Viktor; Collier, Zach J.; Mohammed, Maryam K.; Lee, Michael J.; Ameer, Guillermo A.; Reid, Russell R.

    2015-01-01

    Current reconstructive approaches to large craniofacial skeletal defects are often complicated and challenging. Critical-sized defects are unable to heal via natural regenerative processes and require surgical intervention, traditionally involving autologous bone (mainly in the form of nonvascularized grafts) or alloplasts. Autologous bone grafts remain the gold standard of care in spite of the associated risk of donor site morbidity. Tissue engineering approaches represent a promising alternative that would serve to facilitate bone regeneration even in large craniofacial skeletal defects. This strategy has been tested in a myriad of iterations by utilizing a variety of osteoconductive scaffold materials, osteoblastic stem cells, as well as osteoinductive growth factors and small molecules. One of the major challenges facing tissue engineers is creating a scaffold fulfilling the properties necessary for controlled bone regeneration. These properties include osteoconduction, osetoinduction, biocompatibility, biodegradability, vascularization, and progenitor cell retention. This review will provide an overview of how optimization of the aforementioned scaffold parameters facilitates bone regenerative capabilities as well as a discussion of common osteoconductive scaffold materials. PMID:27239485

  4. Oridonin inhibits BxPC-3 cell growth through cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bin; Shen, Wen; Liu, Xing; Zhang, Ting; Ren, Jun; Fan, Yongjun; Xu, Jian

    2015-03-01

    Oridonin, an ent-kaurene diterpenoid extracted from the traditional Chinese herb Rabdosia rubescens, has multiple biological and pharmaceutical functions and has been used clinically for many years. While the antitumor function of oridonin has been corroborated by numerous lines of evidence, its anticancer mechanism has not been well documented. In this study, the pancreatic cancer cell line BxPC-3 was used as a model to investigate a possible anticancer mechanism of oridonin through examining its effects on cell viability. The results showed that oridonin affected cell viability in a time- and dose-dependent manner. After exposure to different oridonin concentrations, growth rates and cell cycle arrest of BxPC-3 cells were significantly reduced compared with untreated cells, suggesting its effects on proliferation inhibition. Detailed signaling pathway analysis by western blot analysis revealed that low-dose oridonin treatment inhibited BxPC-3 cell proliferation by up-regulating p53 and down-regulating cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1), which led to cell cycle arrest in the G2/M phase. A high-dose oridonin not only arrested BxPC-3 cells in the G2/M phase but also induced cell accumulation in the S phase, presumably through γH2AX up-regulation and DNA damage. In addition, our results showed that a cell subpopulation was stained with propidium iodide after oridonin treatment. Protein quantification showed that cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) expression was increased after a high-dose oridonin treatment, especially after long-term exposure. Accompanied by the increased level of deactivated PARP in BxPC-3 cells, the apoptosis initiators caspase-3 and caspase-7 expressions were also significantly increased, suggesting that caspase-mediated apoptosis contributed to cell death. PMID:25651847

  5. Chimeric toxins inhibit growth of primary oral squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bachran, Christopher; Heisler, Iring; Bachran, Diana; Dassler, Katrin; Ervens, Jürgen; Melzig, Matthias F; Fuchs, Hendrik

    2008-02-01

    Treatment of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is currently based on surgery and radiotherapy. Prolongation of the survival time of patients with progressing tumors is infrequently achieved. To improve the therapeutic options, targeted therapies are a favorable alternative. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of a chimeric toxin (CT) named SE consisting of the epidermal growth factor and the plant protein toxin saporin from Saponaria officinalis. A second construct (SA2E) additionally contains a peptidic adapter designed to enhance efficacy of the CT in vivo and to reduce side effects. The IC(50) values for an OSCC cell line (BHY) were 0.27 nM and 0.73 nM for SE and SA2E, respectively, while fibroblasts remained unaffected. To investigate primary tumor cells, we developed a technique to analyze freshly prepared OSCC cells of 28 patients in a stem cell assay directly after surgery. Cells were treated for 1 h with the CTs, subsequently seeded into soft agar and colony growth determined after 1-2 weeks In spite of the short time of CT incubation, the amount of colonies was reduced to about 78% by 10 nM and to 69% by 100 nM of either toxin. A combined application of 10 nM SA2E with a saponin from Gypsophila paniculata reduced the amount of surviving cells to 68%. The results demonstrate the impact of the CTs on OSCC cells and depict that the stem cell assay is suitable to determine the potential of anti-tumor drugs before studies in vivo will be initiated. PMID:18059188

  6. Knockdown of asparagine synthetase by RNAi suppresses cell growth in human melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhou, Fusheng; Du, Wenhui; Dou, Jinfa; Xu, Yu; Gao, Wanwan; Chen, Gang; Zuo, Xianbo; Sun, Liangdan; Zhang, Xuejun; Yang, Sen

    2016-05-01

    Melanoma, the most aggressive form of skin cancer, causes more than 40,000 deaths each year worldwide. And epidermoid carcinoma is another major form of skin cancer, which could be studied together with melanoma in several aspects. Asparagine synthetase (ASNS) gene encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the glutamine- and ATP-dependent conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine, and its expression is associated with the chemotherapy resistance and prognosis in several human cancers. The present study aims to explore the potential role of ASNS in melanoma cells A375 and human epidermoid carcinoma cell line A431. We applied a lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) system to study its function in cell growth of both cells. The results revealed that inhibition of ASNS expression by RNAi significantly suppressed the growth of melanoma cells and epidermoid carcinoma cells, and induced a G0/G1 cell cycle arrest in melanoma cells. Knockdown of ASNS in A375 cells remarkably downregulated the expression levels of CDK4, CDK6, and Cyclin D1, and upregulated the expression of p21. Therefore, our study provides evidence that ASNS may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25858017

  7. Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Growth by Antibody-Directed Human LAK Cells in SCID Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakada, Tetsuya; Puisieux, Isabelle

    1993-03-01

    Advanced human colon cancer does not respond to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. In order to direct cytotoxic cells to the tumor, human LAK cells linked with antibodies to a tumor cell surface antigen were tested with established hepatic metastases in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These cells had increased uptake into the tumor and suppression of tumor growth as compared with LAK cells alone, thereby improving the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, tumor growth can be inhibited by targeted LAK cells, and SCID mice can be used to test the antitumor properties of human effector cells.

  8. HIV protease inhibitor nelfinavir inhibits growth of human melanoma cells by induction of cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wei; Mikochik, Peter J; Ra, Jin H; Lei, Hanqin; Flaherty, Keith T; Winkler, Jeffrey D; Spitz, Francis R

    2007-02-01

    HIV protease inhibitors (HIV PI) are a class of antiretroviral drugs that are designed to target the viral protease. Unexpectedly, this class of drugs is also reported to have antitumor activity. In this study, we have evaluated the in vitro activity of nelfinavir, a HIV PI, against human melanoma cells. Nelfinavir inhibits the growth of melanoma cell lines at low micromolar concentrations that are clinically attainable. Nelfinavir promotes apoptosis and arrests cell cycle at G(1) phase. Cell cycle arrest is attributed to inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and concomitant dephosphorylation of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. We further show that nelfinavir inhibits CDK2 through proteasome-dependent degradation of Cdc25A phosphatase. Our results suggest that nelfinavir is a promising candidate chemotherapeutic agent for advanced melanoma, for which novel and effective therapies are urgently needed. PMID:17283158

  9. Heparin Binds Endothelial Cell Growth Factor, the Principal Endothelial Cell Mitogen in Bovine Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciag, Thomas; Mehlman, Tevie; Friesel, Robert; Schreiber, Alain B.

    1984-08-01

    Endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF), an anionic polypeptide mitogen, binds to immobilized heparin. The interaction between the acidic polypeptide and the anionic carbohydrate suggests a mechanism that is independent of ion exchange. Monoclonal antibodies to purified bovine ECGF inhibited the biological activity of ECGF in crude preparations of bovine brain. These data indicate that ECGF is the principal mitogen for endothelial cells from bovine brain, that heparin affinity chromatography may be used to purify and concentrate ECGF, and that the affinity of ECGF for heparin may have structural and perhaps biological significance.

  10. Coupling between the Circadian Clock and Cell Cycle Oscillators: Implication for Healthy Cells and Malignant Growth

    PubMed Central

    Feillet, Celine; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T. J.; Levi, Francis; Rand, David A.; Delaunay, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled cell proliferation is one of the key features leading to cancer. Seminal works in chronobiology have revealed that disruption of the circadian timing system in mice, either by surgical, genetic, or environmental manipulation, increased tumor development. In humans, shift work is a risk factor for cancer. Based on these observations, the link between the circadian clock and cell cycle has become intuitive. But despite identification of molecular connections between the two processes, the influence of the clock on the dynamics of the cell cycle has never been formally observed. Recently, two studies combining single live cell imaging with computational methods have shed light on robust coupling between clock and cell cycle oscillators. We recapitulate here these novel findings and integrate them with earlier results in both healthy and cancerous cells. Moreover, we propose that the cell cycle may be synchronized or slowed down through coupling with the circadian clock, which results in reduced tumor growth. More than ever, systems biology has become instrumental to understand the dynamic interaction between the circadian clock and cell cycle, which is critical in cellular coordination and for diseases such as cancer. PMID:26029155

  11. Inhibitory effect of maple syrup on the cell growth and invasion of human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tetsushi; Uemura, Kentaro; Moriyama, Kaho; Mitamura, Kuniko; Taga, Atsushi

    2015-04-01

    Maple syrup is a natural sweetener consumed by individuals of all ages throughout the world. Maple syrup contains not only carbohydrates such as sucrose but also various components such as organic acids, amino acids, vitamins and phenolic compounds. Recent studies have shown that these phenolic compounds in maple syrup may possess various activities such as decreasing the blood glucose level and an anticancer effect. In this study, we examined the effect of three types of maple syrup, classified by color, on the cell proliferation, migration and invasion of colorectal cancer (CRC) cells in order to investigate whether the maple syrup is suitable as a phytomedicine for cancer treatment. CRC cells that were administered maple syrup showed significantly lower growth rates than cells that were administered sucrose. In addition, administration of maple syrup to CRC cells caused inhibition of cell invasion, while there was no effect on cell migration. Administration of maple syrup clearly inhibited AKT phosphorylation, while there was no effect on ERK phosphorylation. These data suggest that maple syrup might inhibit cell proliferation and invasion through suppression of AKT activation and be suitable as a phytomedicine for CRC treatment, with fewer adverse effects than traditional chemotherapy. PMID:25647359

  12. Influence of Cancer-Associated Endometrial Stromal Cells on Hormone-Driven Endometrial Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Pineda, M. J.; Lu, Z.; Cao, D.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts have been shown to inhibit or stimulate tumor growth depending on stage, grade, and tumor type. It remains unclear, however, the effect of endometrial-cancer-associated fibroblasts on hormone-driven responses in endometrial cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of normal and cancer-associated stromal cells from patients with and without endometrial cancer on endometrial tumor growth in response to estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4). Compared to benign endometrial stromal cells, the low-grade and high-grade cancer-associated stromal cells exhibited a blunted hormone response for proliferation as well as IGFBP1 secretion. Additional analysis of the influence of stromal cells on hormone-driven tumor growth was done by mixing stromal cells from benign, low-grade, or high-grade tumors, with Ishikawa cells for subcutaneous tumor formation. The presence of both benign and high-grade cancer-associated stromal cells increased estradiol-driven xenografted tumor growth compared to Ishikawa cells alone. Low-grade cancer-associated stromal cells did not significantly influence hormone-regulated tumor growth. Addition of P4 attenuated tumor growth in Ishikawa + benign or high-grade stromal cells, but not in Ishikawa cells alone or with low-grade stromal cells. Using an angiogenesis focused real-time array TGFA, TGFB2 and TGFBR1 and VEGFC were identified as potential candidates for hormone-influenced growth regulation of tumors in the presence of benign and high-grade stromal cells. In summary, endometrial-cancer-associated cells responded differently to in vitro hormone treatment compared to benign endometrial stromal cells. Additionally, presence of stromal cells differentially influenced hormone-driven xenograft growth in vivo depending on the disease status of the stromal cells. PMID:25976290

  13. CRACK GROWTH ANALYSIS OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    S. Bandopadhyay; N. Nagabhushana

    2003-10-01

    Defects and Flaws control the structural and functional property of ceramics. In determining the reliability and lifetime of ceramics structures it is very important to quantify the crack growth behavior of the ceramics. In addition, because of the high variability of the strength and the relatively low toughness of ceramics, a statistical design approach is necessary. The statistical nature of the strength of ceramics is currently well recognized, and is usually accounted for by utilizing Weibull or similar statistical distributions. Design tools such as CARES using a combination of strength measurements, stress analysis, and statistics are available and reasonably well developed. These design codes also incorporate material data such as elastic constants as well as flaw distributions and time-dependent properties. The fast fracture reliability for ceramics is often different from their time-dependent reliability. Further confounding the design complexity, the time-dependent reliability varies with the environment/temperature/stress combination. Therefore, it becomes important to be able to accurately determine the behavior of ceramics under simulated application conditions to provide a better prediction of the lifetime and reliability for a given component. In the present study, Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) of 9.6 mol% Yttria composition was procured in the form of tubes of length 100 mm. The composition is of interest as tubular electrolytes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. Rings cut from the tubes were characterized for microstructure, phase stability, mechanical strength (Weibull modulus) and fracture mechanisms. The strength at operating condition of SOFCs (1000 C) decreased to 95 MPa as compared to room temperature strength of 230 MPa. However, the Weibull modulus remains relatively unchanged. Slow crack growth (SCG) parameter, n = 17 evaluated at room temperature in air was representative of well studied brittle materials. Based on the results, further work

  14. Insulin and insulin-like growth factor I exert different effects on plasminogen activator production or cell growth in the ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS.

    PubMed

    Degryse, B; Maisonobe, F; Hovsépian, S; Fayet, G

    1991-11-01

    Insulin and Insulin-like Growth Factor I (IGF-I) are evaluated for their capacity to affect cell proliferation and plasminogen activator (PA) activity production in an ovine thyroid cell line OVNIS. Insulin at physiological and supraphysiological doses induces cell proliferation and increases PA activity. IGF-I, which is also clearly mitogenic for these cells, surprisingly does not modulate PA activity. The results indicate that the growth promoting effect is mediated through the insulin and IGF-I receptors whereas PA activity is solely regulated via the insulin receptors. PMID:1802921

  15. Spatial Patterning of Newly-Inserted Material during Bacterial Cell Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursell, Tristan

    2012-02-01

    In the life cycle of a bacterium, rudimentary microscopy demonstrates that cell growth and elongation are essential characteristics of cellular reproduction. The peptidoglycan cell wall is the main load-bearing structure that determines both cell shape and overall size. However, simple imaging of cellular growth gives no indication of the spatial patterning nor mechanism by which material is being incorporated into the pre-existing cell wall. We employ a combination of high-resolution pulse-chase fluorescence microscopy, 3D computational microscopy, and detailed mechanistic simulations to explore how spatial patterning results in uniform growth and maintenance of cell shape. We show that growth is happening in discrete bursts randomly distributed over the cell surface, with a well-defined mean size and average rate. We further use these techniques to explore the effects of division and cell wall disrupting antibiotics, like cephalexin and A22, respectively, on the patterning of cell wall growth in E. coli. Finally, we explore the spatial correlation between presence of the bacterial actin-like cytoskeletal protein, MreB, and local cell wall growth. Together these techniques form a powerful method for exploring the detailed dynamics and involvement of antibiotics and cell wall-associated proteins in bacterial cell growth.[4pt] In collaboration with Kerwyn Huang, Stanford University.

  16. Myeloid cell leukemia-1 regulates the cell growth and predicts prognosis in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan-Sik; Park, Young-Lan; Kim, Nuri; Oh, Hyung-Hoon; Son, Dong-Jun; Kim, Mi-Young; Oak, Chan-Young; Chung, Cho-Yun; Park, Hyung-Chul; Kim, Jong-Sun; Myung, Dae-Seong; Cho, Sung-Bum; Joo, Young-Eun

    2015-05-01

    The expression of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl‑1), a member of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein family, has been associated with tumor progression and adverse patient outcome. The aims of current study were to evaluate whether Mcl-1 affects the survival or death of gastric cancer cells, and to investigate the prognostic value of its expression in gastric cancer. PcDNA3.1-Mcl-1 expression and Mcl-1 siRNA vectors were used to overexpress and silence Mcl-1 expression in gastric cancer cell lines including SNU638 and TMK1, respectively. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine the expression of Mcl-1 in gastric cancer tissues. Apoptosis was determined by the TUNEL assay, and cell proliferation was determined by immunostaining with a Ki-67 antibody. Mcl-1 knockdown induced apoptosis through the upregulation of caspase-3, and -7, and PARP activity, and the release of Smac/DIABLO and Omi/HtrA2 into the cytoplasm. Additionally, cell cycle arrest occurred due to decrease of cyclin D1, cell division cycle gene 2 (cdc2), and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 and 6. In contrast, overexpression of Mcl-1 inhibited apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Mcl-1 knockdown did not suppress tumor cell proliferation in gastric cancer cells, whereas overexpression of Mcl-1 enhanced tumor cell proliferation. The JAK2 and STAT3 signaling cascades were significantly blocked by Mcl-1 knockdown. The mean Ki-67 labeling index (KI) value of Mcl-1 positive tumors was significantly lower than that of Mcl-1 negative tumors. However, there was no significant difference between Mcl-1 expression and the apoptotic index (AI). Mcl-1 expression was significantly increased in gastric cancer tissues compared to normal gastric mucosa tissues, and was associated with age, tumor size, stage, depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis and poor survival. Our study showed that Mcl-1 regulates the cell growth and might be a potential prognostic marker for gastric cancer. PMID:25672320

  17. Long-Distance Growth and Connectivity of Neural Stem Cells After Severe Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Paul; Wang, Yaozhi; Graham, Lori; McHale, Karla; Gao, Mingyong; Wu, Di; Brock, John; Blesch, Armin; Rosenzweig, Ephron S.; Havton, Leif A.; Zheng, Binhai; Conner, James M.; Marsala, Martin; Tuszynski, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Neural stem cells (NSCs) expressing GFP were embedded into fibrin matrices containing growth factor cocktails and grafted to sites of severe spinal cord injury. Grafted cells differentiated into multiple cellular phenotypes, including neurons, which extended large numbers of axons over remarkable distances. Extending axons formed abundant synapses with host cells. Axonal growth was partially dependent on mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) but not Nogo signaling. Grafted neurons supported formation of electrophysiological relays across sites of complete spinal transection, resulting in functional recovery. Two human stem cell lines (566RSC and HUES7) embedded in growth factor-containing fibrin exhibited similar growth, and 566RSC cells supported functional recovery. Thus, properties intrinsic to early stage neurons can overcome the inhibitory milieu of the injured adult spinal cord to mount remarkable axonal growth resulting in formation of novel relay circuits that significantly improve function. These therapeutic properties extend across stem cell sources and species. PMID:22980985

  18. Growth factors and hormones which affect survival, growth, and differentiation of the MCF-7 stem cells and their descendants

    SciTech Connect

    Resnicoff, M.; Medrano, E.E. )

    1989-03-01

    The human breast tumor cell line was separated by Percoll density gradient centrifugation into six different subpopulations, A to F, of which (E) appears to contain the stem cells on the basis of several criteria. The authors analyzed the response of the isolated subpopulations to insulin, thrombin, PGF{sub 2{alpha}}, estradiol, and 13-cis-retinal. They demonstrate that the first two growth factors stimulate ({sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation in the more differentiated subpopulations (D and F), while PGF{sub 2{alpha}} has mitogenic activity in subpopulations C and D. In the absence of any added growth factor, estradiol has the extreme and transient capacity of allowing the stem cell to detach from the tissue culture dish and to grow in suspension as multicellular aggregates (MCF-7/SE cells). 13-cis-Retinal acts as a negative modulator of differentiation and protects the cells from the inhibitory and differentiation activity in Na-butyrate.

  19. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, Carol Ann Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  20. Houttuynia cordata Thunb extract inhibits cell growth and induces apoptosis in human primary colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lai, Kuang-Chi; Chiu, Yu-Jen; Tang, Yih-Jing; Lin, Kuei-Li; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Jiang, Yi-Lin; Jen, Hsiu-Fang; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Agamaya, Sakae; Chung, Jing-Gung; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2010-09-01

    It is reported that Houttuynia cordata Thunb. (HCT), a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, has many biological properties such as antiviral, antibacterial and antileukemic activities. However, the molecular mechanisms of cytotoxicity and apoptosis in human primary colorectal cancer cells are not clear. In this study, whether HCT induced cytotoxicity in primary colorectal cancer cells obtained from three patients was investigated. The results indicated that HCT inhibited growth of cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. After treatment with HCT (250 μg/ml) for 24 h, cells exhibited chromatin condensation (an apoptotic characteristic). HCT increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ(m)) in examined cells. Mitochondria-dependent apoptotic signaling pathway was shown to be involved as determined by increase in the levels of cytochrome c, Apaf-1, and caspase-3 and -9. The decrease in the level of ΔΨ(m) was associated with an increase in the BAX/BCL-2 ratio which led to activation of caspase-9 and -3. Based on our results, HCT induced apoptotic cell death in human primary colorectal cancer cells through a mitochondria-dependent signaling pathway. PMID:20944136

  1. Targeted disruption of EBNA1 in EBV-infected cells attenuated cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Ka-Won; Park, Jihyun; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV)-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1) plays a pivotal in an EBV episome replication and persistence. Despite considerable attempts, there are no EBV drugs or vaccines. We attempted to eradicate EBV episomes by targeting EBNA1 using the transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) (E1TN). E1TN-mediated transient knockout (KO) of EBNA1 reduced EBNA1 expression, and caused significant loss of EBV genomes and progressive death of EBV-infected cells. Furthermore, when a mixture of EBV-infected Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) cells and EBV-negative BL cells was targeted by E1TN, EBV-negative cells were counter-selected while most EBV-infected cells died, further substantiating that EBNA1 KO caused selective death of EBV-infected cells. TALEN-mediated transient targeting of EBNA1 attenuated the growth of EBV-infected cells, implicating a possible therapeutic application of E1TN for EBV-associated disorders. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(4): 226-231] PMID:26879316

  2. Hyposmotic stress induces cell growth arrest via proteasome activation and cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase degradation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Guo-Zhong; Rott, Lusijah S; Lowe, Anson W; Omary, M Bishr

    2002-05-31

    Ordered cell cycle progression requires the expression and activation of several cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks). Hyperosmotic stress causes growth arrest possibly via proteasome-mediated degradation of cyclin D1. We studied the effect of hyposmotic conditions on three colonic (Caco2, HRT18, HT29) and two pancreatic (AsPC-1 and PaCa-2) cell lines. Hyposmosis caused reversible cell growth arrest of the five cell lines in a cell cycle-independent fashion, although some cell lines accumulated at the G(1)/S interface. Growth arrest was followed by apoptosis or by formation of multinucleated giant cells, which is consistent with cell cycle catastrophe. Hyposmosis dramatically decreased Cdc2, Cdk2, Cdk4, cyclin B1, and cyclin D3 expression in a time-dependent fashion, in association with an overall decrease in cellular protein synthesis. However, some protein levels remained unaltered, including cyclin E and keratin 8. Selective proteasome inhibition prevented Cdk and cyclin degradation and reversed hyposmotic stress-induced growth arrest, whereas calpain and lysosome enzyme inhibitors had no measurable effect on cell cycle protein degradation. Therefore, hyposmotic stress inhibits cell growth and, depending on the cell type, causes cell cycle catastrophe with or without apoptosis. The growth arrest is due to decreased protein synthesis and proteasome activation, with subsequent degradation of several cyclins and Cdks. PMID:11897780

  3. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  4. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  5. Calcium-dependent growth regulation of small cell lung cancer cells by neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Gudermann, Thomas; Roelle, Susanne

    2006-12-01

    Approximately 15-25% of all primary cancers of the lung are classified histologically as small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC), a subtype characterized by rapid growth and a poor prognosis. Neuropeptide hormones like bombesin/gastrin-releasing peptide, bradykinin or galanin are the principal mitogenic stimuli of this tumour entity. The mitogenic signal is transmitted into the cell via heptahelical neuropeptide hormone receptors, which couple to the heterotrimeric G proteins of the Gq/11 familiy. Subsequent activation of phospholipase Cbeta (PLCbeta) entails the activation of protein kinase C and the elevation of the intracellular calcium concentration. There is mounting evidence to support the notion that calcium mobilization is the key event that initiates different mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades. Neuropeptide-dependent proliferation of SCLC cells relies on parallel activation of the Gq/11/PLCbeta/Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase and the c-jun N-terminal kinase pathways, while selective engagement of either signalling cascade alone results in growth arrest and differentiation or apoptotic cell death. Basic experimental research has the potential to identify and validate novel therapeutic targets located at critical points of convergence of different mitogenic signal transduction pathways. In the case of SCLC, targeting the distinct components of the Ca2+ influx pathway as well as critical Ca2+-dependent cellular effectors may be rewarding in this regard. PMID:17158754

  6. Expression of insulin-like growth factor family genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Białożyt, Michał; Plato, Marta; Mazurek, Urszula; Braczkowska, Bogumiła

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite significant progress in the pathology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), diagnostic and predictive factors of major importance have not been discovered. Some hopes are associated with insulin-like growth factors. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of genes for insulin-like growth factor family in tumours and in tissue of kidneys without cancer. Material and methods Fifty-two patients years with clear cell renal cell cancer were qualified to the study group; patients nephrectomised because of hydronephrosis were included in the control group. Expression of genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Expression of IGFR-1 gene in tumour accounts for about 60% of cases. The incidence is higher than in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues and higher (but with no statistical significance) than in kidney without cancer. Expression of IGFR-2 gene in tumours has not been established. The incidence of the expression in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues is small. Expression of this gene has been present in all specimens from kidneys without cancer. Expression of IGFBP-3 gene ascertained in all (except four) cases of ccRCC and in the majority of clippings from adjacent tissue. It was not found in kidneys from the control group. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFR-1 mRNA copy numbers in ccRCC were higher than in the material from the control group PMID:27358591

  7. Ca-alginate hydrogel mechanical transformations--the influence on yeast cell growth dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pajić-Lijaković, Ivana; Plavsić, Milenko; Bugarski, Branko; Nedović, Viktor

    2007-05-01

    A mathematical model was formulated to describe yeast cell growth within the Ca-alginate microbead during air-lift bioreactor cultivation. Model development was based on experimentally obtained data for the intra-bead cell concentration profile, after reached the equilibrium state, as well as, total yeast cell concentration per microbed and microbead volume as function of time. Relatively uniform cell concentration in the carrier matrix indicated that no internal nutrient diffusion limitations, but microenvironmental restriction, affected dominantly the dynamics of cell growth. Also interesting phenomenon of very different rates of cell number growth during cultivation is observed. After some critical time, the growth rate of cell colonies decreased drastically, but than suddenly increased again under all other experimental condition been the same. It is interpreted as disintegration of gel network and opening new free space for growth of cell clusters. These complex phenomena are modeled using the thermodynamical, free energy formalism. The particular form of free energy functional is proposed to describe various kinds of interactions, which affected the dynamics of cell growth and cause pseudo-phase transition of hydrogel. The good agreement of experimentally obtained data and model predictions are obtained. In that way the model provides both, the quantitative tools for further technological optimization of the process and deeper insight into dynamics of cell growth mechanism. PMID:17331608

  8. Serine 220 phosphorylation of the Merkel cell polyomavirus large T antigen crucially supports growth of Merkel cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Schrama, David; Hesbacher, Sonja; Angermeyer, Sabrina; Schlosser, Andreas; Haferkamp, Sebastian; Aue, Annemarie; Adam, Christian; Weber, Alexandra; Schmidt, Marc; Houben, Roland

    2016-03-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is regarded as a major causal factor for Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC). Indeed, tumor cell growth of MCPyV-positive MCC cells is dependent on the expression of a truncated viral Large T antigen (LT) with an intact retinoblastoma protein (RB)-binding site. Here we determined the phosphorylation pattern of a truncated MCPyV-LT characteristically for MCC by mass spectrometry revealing MCPyV-LT as multi-phospho-protein phosphorylated at several serine and threonine residues. Remarkably, disruption of most of these phosphorylation sites did not affect its ability to rescue knockdown of endogenous T antigens in MCC cells indicating that phosphorylation of the respective amino acids is not essential for the growth promoting function of MCPyV-LT. However, alteration of serine 220 to alanine completely abolished the ability of MCPyV-LT to support proliferation of MCC cells. Conversely, mimicking the phosphorylated state by mutation of serine 220 to glutamic acid resulted in a fully functional LT. Moreover, MCPyV-LT(S220A) demonstrated reduced binding to RB in co-immunoprecipitation experiments as well as weaker induction of RB target genes in MCC cells. In conclusion, we provide evidence that phosphorylation of serine 220 is required for efficient RB inactivation in MCC and may therefore be a potential target for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:26383606

  9. Serum and growth factor requirements for proliferation of human adrenocortical cells in culture: comparison with bovine adrenocortical cells.

    PubMed

    Hornsby, P J; Sturek, M; Harris, S E; Simonian, M H

    1983-11-01

    Although bovine adrenocortical cells proliferate readily in cell culture, proliferation of fetal or adult human adrenocortical cells has been observed to be limited and preparation of pure proliferating cultures of human adrenocortical cells has not been reported. The growth requirements of fetal human definitive zone adrenocortical cells in culture were compared to the established requirements of bovine adrenocortical cells. The medium used was 1:1 Ham's F12 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium supplemented with transferrin and insulin. Earlier experiments showed that human cells had a greater proliferative response to horse serum than to fetal bovine serum, whereas the opposite was true for bovine cells. When plated on fibronectin-coated dishes and exposed to varying concentrations of horse serum in the presence of 100 ng/ml fibroblast growth factor (FGF), increasing cell growth was observed up to a serum concentration of 50%. When 50% fetal bovine serum was used instead of horse serum proliferation was less. In contrast, bovine adrenocortical cells showed a maximal proliferative response to either fetal bovine serum or horse serum at 10%. Human adrenocortical cells thus have a very high requirement for serum; 50% is the highest level that may be practically used, but the shape of the dose-response curve suggests that this concentration is still suboptimal. Growth was less in the absence of FGF. Epidermal growth factor can partially substitute for FGF. No response to 100 nM placental lactogen was observed. Less growth was observed when dishes were not coated with fibronectin. The factors present in horse serum that are evidently needed in high amounts by human cells are unknown. Despite this lack of knowledge, use of 50% horse serum enabled long-term growth of human adrenocortical cells that are pure by the criterion of retraction in response to ACTH. Nonadrenocortical cells do not show a retraction response. Such long-term cultures may be useful in studies of

  10. Keratinocyte growth factor and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor are heparin-binding growth factors for alveolar type II cells in fibroblast-conditioned medium.

    PubMed Central

    Panos, R J; Rubin, J S; Csaky, K G; Aaronson, S A; Mason, R J

    1993-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions mediate aspects of normal lung growth and development and are important in the restoration of normal alveolar architecture after lung injury. To determine if fibroblasts are a source of soluble growth factors for alveolar type II cells, we investigated the effect of fibroblast-conditioned medium (CM) on alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. Serum-free CM from confluent adult human lung fibroblasts was concentrated fivefold by lyophilization. Type II cells were isolated from adult rats by elastase dissociation and incubated with [3H]thymidine and varying dilutions of concentrated CM and serum from day 1 to 3 of culture. Stimulation of type II cell DNA synthesis by fibroblast-CM was maximal after 48 h of conditioning and required the presence of serum. The activity of the CM was eliminated by boiling and by treatment with trypsin, pepsin, or dithiothreitol and was additive with saturating concentrations of acidic fibroblast growth factor, epidermal growth factor, and insulin. The growth factor activity bound to heparin-Sepharose and was eluted with 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl. Neutralizing antibody studies demonstrated that the primary mitogens isolated in the 0.6 and 1.0 M NaCl fractions were keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, fibroblast growth factor 7) and hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), respectively. HGF/SF was demonstrated in the crude CM and KGF was detected in the 0.6 M NaCl eluent by immunoblotting. Northern blot analysis confirmed that the lung fibroblasts expressed both KGF and HGF/SF transcripts. Human recombinant KGF and HGF/SF induced a concentration- and serum-dependent increase in rat alveolar type II cell DNA synthesis. We conclude that adult human lung fibroblasts produce at least two soluble heparin-binding growth factors, KGF and HGF/SF, which promote DNA synthesis and proliferation of rat alveolar type II cells in primary culture. KGF and HGF/SF may be important stimuli for alveolar type II cell

  11. GROWTH AND METABOLISM OF INDIVIDUAL BACTERIAL CELLS UTILIZING NANOSIMS

    SciTech Connect

    NEALSON, H. K.

    2007-08-03

    This work involved the use of the Nano-SIMS Instrument at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, in an effort to utilize this unique tool for experiments in Biology. The work consisted primarily of experiments to measure in real time, C and N fixation in cyanobacteria. The work revealed a number of the difficulties in using the nano-SIMS approach with biological material, but with collaboration from a number of individuals at USC and LLNL, major progress was made. The collaborators from LLNL were from the Chemistry Group (Dr. Peter Weber), and the Biology Group (Dr. Jennifer Pett-Ridge). In addition, there were a number of other scientists involved from LLNL. The USC group consisted of Dr. K.H. Nealson, the PI on the grant, Dr. R. Popa, a postdoctoral fellow and research associate at USC, Professor Douglas Capone, and Juliet Finze, a graduate student in biology. Two major experiments were done, both of which yielded new and exciting data. (1) We studied nitrogen and carbon fixation in Anabaena, demonstrating that fixation ofN occurred rapidly in the heterocysts, and that the fixed N was transported rapidly and completely to the vegetative cells. C fixation occurred in the vegetative cells, with labeled C remaining in these cells in support of their growth and metabolism. This work was accepted in the ISME Journal (Nature Publication), and published last month. (2) We studied nitrogen and carbon fixation in Trichodesmium, a non-heterocystous cyanobacterium that also fixes nitrogen. Interestingly, the nitrogen fixation was confined to regions within the filaments that seem to be identical to the so-called cyanophycaen granules. The fixed N is then transported to other parts of the cyanobacterium, as judged by movement of the heavy N throughout the filaments. On the basis of these very exciting results, we have applied for funding from the NSF to continue the collaboration with LLNL. The results of both studies were presented in the summer of 2007 at the Gordon Research

  12. Genetic and Nongenetic Determinants of Cell Growth Variation Assessed by High-Throughput Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ziv, Naomi; Siegal, Mark L.; Gresham, David

    2013-01-01

    In microbial populations, growth initiation and proliferation rates are major components of fitness and therefore likely targets of selection. We used a high-throughput microscopy assay, which enables simultaneous analysis of tens of thousands of microcolonies, to determine the sources and extent of growth rate variation in the budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in different glucose environments. We find that cell growth rates are regulated by the extracellular concentration of glucose as proposed by Monod (1949), but that significant heterogeneity in growth rates is observed among genetically identical individuals within an environment. Yeast strains isolated from different geographic locations and habitats differ in their growth rate responses to different glucose concentrations. Inheritance patterns suggest that the genetic determinants of growth rates in different glucose concentrations are distinct. In addition, we identified genotypes that differ in the extent of variation in growth rate within an environment despite nearly identical mean growth rates, providing evidence that alleles controlling phenotypic variability segregate in yeast populations. We find that the time to reinitiation of growth (lag) is negatively correlated with growth rate, yet this relationship is strain-dependent. Between environments, the respirative activity of individual cells negatively correlates with glucose abundance and growth rate, but within an environment respirative activity and growth rate show a positive correlation, which we propose reflects differences in protein expression capacity. Our study quantifies the sources of genetic and nongenetic variation in cell growth rates in different glucose environments with unprecedented precision, facilitating their molecular genetic dissection. PMID:23938868

  13. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Observation of Colloidal Nanocrystal Growth Mechanisms using Graphene Liquid Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yuk, Jong Min; Park, Jungwon; Ercius, Peter; Kim, Kwanpyo; Hellebusch, Danny J.; Crommie, Michael F.; Lee, Jeong Yong; Zettl, A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2011-12-12

    We introduce a new type of liquid cell for in-situ electron microscopy based upon entrapment of a liquid film between layers of graphene. We employ this cell to achieve high-resolution imaging of colloidal platinum nanocrystal growth. The ability to directly image and resolve critical steps at atomic resolution provides new insights into nanocrystal coalescence and reshaping during growth.

  14. Inhibition of mitogen stimulated growth of human colon cancer cells by interferon.

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, A. W.; Condon, M. E.; O'Donnell, K.

    1988-01-01

    Recombinant human interferon alpha inhibits growth of a human colon cancer cell line, Colo 205. To explore the mechanisms of IFN induced growth inhibition, quiescent Colo 205 cells were stimulated to proliferate in serum-free media by defined growth factors. Addition of insulin, transferrin and selenium (ITS) stimulated DNA synthesis, as measured by 3H-thymidine incorporation, in a dose-dependent manner. IFN-alpha (at concentrations greater than 100 U ml-1) inhibited ITS stimulated DNA synthesis by 63%. Inhibition of cell cycle traverse was confirmed by flow cytometric analysis. Although IFN inhibited growth of ITS-treated cells, steady state levels of c-myc mRNA remained above levels observed in unstimulated cells. IFN inhibited DNA synthesis only when added prior to mitogen stimulation. IFN, added 6 h after exposure of quiescent cells to ITS, failed to inhibit cell growth. Addition of increasing concentrations of ITS failed to overcome the IFN-induced growth inhibition. These results suggest IFN may inhibit cell growth in part by antagonizing the action of growth factors. Images Figure 4 PMID:3166905

  15. A single dividing cell population with imbalanced fate drives oesophageal tumour growth.

    PubMed

    Frede, Julia; Greulich, Philip; Nagy, Tibor; Simons, Benjamin D; Jones, Philip H

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the cellular mechanisms of tumour growth is key for designing rational anticancer treatment. Here we used genetic lineage tracing to quantify cell behaviour during neoplastic transformation in a model of oesophageal carcinogenesis. We found that cell behaviour was convergent across premalignant tumours, which contained a single proliferating cell population. The rate of cell division was not significantly different in the lesions and the surrounding epithelium. However, dividing tumour cells had a uniform, small bias in cell fate so that, on average, slightly more dividing than non-dividing daughter cells were generated at each round of cell division. In invasive cancers induced by Kras(G12D) expression, dividing cell fate became more strongly biased towards producing dividing over non-dividing cells in a subset of clones. These observations argue that agents that restore the balance of cell fate may prove effective in checking tumour growth, whereas those targeting cycling cells may show little selectivity. PMID:27548914

  16. The FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway is critical for chordoma cell growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yunping; Mintz, Akiva; Shah, Sagar R.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Hsu, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the expression of brachyury is necessary for chordoma growth. However, the mechanism associated with brachyury-regulated cell growth is poorly understood. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF), a regulator of brachyury expression in normal tissue, may also play an important role in chordoma pathophysiology. Using a panel of chordoma cell lines, we explored the role of FGF signaling and brachyury in cell growth and survival. Western blots showed that all chordoma cell lines expressed fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2), FGFR3, mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), whereas no cell lines expressed FGFR1 and FGFR4. Results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay indicated that chordoma cells produced FGF2. Neutralization of FGF2 inhibited MEK/ERK phosphorylation, decreased brachyury expression and induced apoptosis while reducing cell growth. Activation of the FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway by FGF2-initiated phosphorylation of FGFR substrate 2 (FRS2)-α (Tyr196) prevented apoptosis while promoting cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Immunofluorescence staining showed that FGF2 promoted the translocation of phosphorylated ERK to the nucleus and increased brachyury expression. The selective inhibition of FGFR, MEK and ERK phosphorylation by PD173074, PD0325901 and PD184352, respectively, decreased brachyury expression, induced apoptosis, and inhibited cell growth and EMT. Moreover, knockdown of brachyury by small hairpin RNA reduced FGF2 secretion, inhibited FGFR/MEK/ERK phosphorylation and blocked the effects of FGF2 on cell growth, apoptosis and EMT. Those findings highlight that FGFR/MEK/ERK/brachyury pathway coordinately regulates chordoma cell growth and survival and may represent a novel chemotherapeutic target for chordoma. PMID:24445144

  17. Stimulation of Mucosal Mast Cell Growth in Normal and Nude Rat Bone Marrow Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haig, David M.; McMenamin, Christine; Gunneberg, Christian; Woodbury, Richard; Jarrett, Ellen E. E.

    1983-07-01

    Mast cells with the morphological and biochemical properties of mucosal mast cells (MMC) appear and proliferate to form the predominant cell type in rat bone marrow cultures stimulated with factors from antigen- or mitogen-activated lymphocytes. Conditioned media causing a selective proliferation of MMC were derived from mesenteric lymph node cells of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis-infected rats restimulated in vitro with specific antigen or from normal or infected rat mesenteric lymph node cells stimulated with concanavalin A. MMC growth factor is not produced by T-cell-depleted mesenteric lymph node cells or by the mesenteric lymph node cells of athymic rats. By contrast, MMC precursors are present in the bone marrow of athymic rats and are normally receptive to the growth factor produced by the lymphocytes of thymus-intact rats. The thymus dependence of MMC hyperplasia is thus based on the requirement of a thymus-independent precursor for a T-cell-derived growth promoter.

  18. Platelets promote osteosarcoma cell growth through activation of the platelet-derived growth factor receptor-Akt signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Takagi, Satoshi; Takemoto, Ai; Takami, Miho; Oh-hara, Tomoko; Fujita, Naoya

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of tumor cells with platelets contribute to the progression of tumor malignancy, and the expression levels of platelet aggregation-inducing factors positively correlate with the metastatic potential of osteosarcoma cells. However, it is unclear how tumor-platelet interaction contributes to the proliferation of osteosarcomas. We report here that osteosarcoma-platelet interactions induce the release of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) from platelets, which promotes the proliferation of osteosarcomas. Co-culture of platelets with MG63 or HOS osteosarcoma cells, which could induce platelet aggregation, enhanced the proliferation of each cell line in vitro. Analysis of phospho-antibody arrays revealed that co-culture of MG63 cells with platelets induced the phosphorylation of platelet derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and Akt. The addition of supernatants of osteosarcoma-platelet reactants also increased the growth of MG63 and HOS cells as well as the level of phosphorylated-PDGFR and -Akt. Sunitinib or LY294002, but not erlotinib, significantly inhibited the platelet-induced proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, indicating that PDGF released from platelets plays an important role in the proliferation of osteosarcomas by activating the PDGFR and then Akt. Our results suggest that inhibitors that specifically target osteosarcoma-platelet interactions may eradicate osteosarcomas. PMID:24974736

  19. Cytokinesis-Based Constraints on Polarized Cell Growth in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Bohnert, K. Adam; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2012-01-01

    The rod-shaped fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which undergoes cycles of monopolar-to-bipolar tip growth, is an attractive organism for studying cell-cycle regulation of polarity establishment. While previous research has described factors mediating this process from interphase cell tips, we found that division site signaling also impacts the re-establishment of bipolar cell growth in the ensuing cell cycle. Complete loss or targeted disruption of the non-essential cytokinesis protein Fic1 at the division site, but not at interphase cell tips, resulted in many cells failing to grow at new ends created by cell division. This appeared due to faulty disassembly and abnormal persistence of the cell division machinery at new ends of fic1Δ cells. Moreover, additional mutants defective in the final stages of cytokinesis exhibited analogous growth polarity defects, supporting that robust completion of cell division contributes to new end-growth competency. To test this model, we genetically manipulated S. pombe cells to undergo new end take-off immediately after cell division. Intriguingly, such cells elongated constitutively at new ends unless cytokinesis was perturbed. Thus, cell division imposes constraints that partially override positive controls on growth. We posit that such constraints facilitate invasive fungal growth, as cytokinesis mutants displaying bipolar growth defects formed numerous pseudohyphae. Collectively, these data highlight a role for previous cell cycles in defining a cell's capacity to polarize at specific sites, and they additionally provide insight into how a unicellular yeast can transition into a quasi-multicellular state. PMID:23093943

  20. Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) isomers influence cell detachment of MG-63 bone cells.

    PubMed

    Sefat, Farshid; Khaghani, Seyed Ali; Nejatian, Touraj; Genedy, Mohammed; Abdeldayem, Ali; Moghaddam, Zoha Salehi; Denyer, Morgan C T; Youseffi, Mansour

    2015-12-01

    Bone repair and wound healing are modulated by different stimuli. There is evidence that Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) super-family of cytokines have significant effects on bone structure by regulating the replication and differentiation of chondrocytes, osteoblasts and osteoclasts. There is also significant evidence that interactions with extracellular matrix molecules influence cell behaviour. In this study cell surface attachment was examined via a trypsinization assay using various TGF-β isomers in which the time taken to trypsinize cells from the surface provided a means of assessing the strength of attachment. Three TGF-β isomers (TGF-β1, 2 and 3), four combined forms (TGF-β(1+2), TGF-β(1+3), TGF-β(2+3) and TGF-β(1+2+3)) along with four different controls (BSA, HCl, BSA/HCl and negative control) were investigated in this study. The results indicated that treatment with TGF-β1, 2, 3 and HCl decreased cell attachment, however, this effect was significantly greater in the case of TGF-β3 (p<0.001) indicating perhaps that TGF-β3 does not act alone in cell detachment, but instead functions synergistically with signalling pathways that are dependent on the availability of hydrogen ions. Widefield Surface Plasmon Resonance (WSPR) microscope was also used to investigate cell surface interactions. PMID:26372305

  1. Heparin Affinity: Purification of a Tumor-Derived Capillary Endothelial Cell Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shing, Y.; Folkman, J.; Sullivan, R.; Butterfield, C.; Murray, J.; Klagsbrun, M.

    1984-03-01

    A tumor-derived growth factor that stimulates the proliferation of capillary endothelial cells has a very strong affinity for heparin. This heparin affinity makes it possible to purify the growth factor to a single-band preparation in a rapid two-step procedure. The purified growth factor is a cationic polypeptide, has a molecular weight of about 18,000, and stimulates capillary endothelial cell proliferation at a concentration of about 1 nanogram per milliliter.

  2. c-myb stimulates cell growth by regulation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) and IGF-binding protein-3 in K562 leukemia cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Min-Sun; Kim, Sun-Young; Arunachalam, Sankarganesh; Hwang, Pyoung-Han; Yi, Ho-Keun; Nam, Sang-Yun; Lee, Dae-Yeol

    2009-07-17

    c-myb plays an important role in the regulation of cell growth and differentiation, and is highly expressed in immature hematopoietic cells. The human chronic myelogenous leukemia cell K562, highly expresses IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and IGF-induced cellular proliferation is mediated by IGF-IR. To characterize the impact of c-myb on the IGF-IGFBP-3 axis in leukemia cells, we overexpressed c-myb using an adenovirus gene transfer system in K562 cells. The overexpression of c-myb induced cell proliferation, compared to control, and c-myb induced cell growth was inhibited by anti-IGF-IR antibodies. c-myb overexpression resulted in a significant increase in the expression of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGF-IR, and a decrease in IGFBP-3 expression. By contrast, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb overexpression resulted in significant reduction of IGF-I, IGF-II, IGF-IR, and elevation of IGFBP-3 expression. In addition, exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibited the proliferation of K562 cells, and c-myb induced cell growth was blocked by IGFBP-3 overexpression in a dose-dependent manner. The growth-promoting effects of c-myb were mediated through two major intracellular signaling pathways, Akt and Erk. Activation of Akt and Erk by c-myb was completely blocked by IGF-IR and IGFBP-3 antibodies. These findings suggest that c-myb stimulates cell growth, in part, by regulating expression of the components of IGF-IGFBP axis in K562 cells. In addition, disruption of c-myb function by DN-myb may provide a useful strategy for treatment of leukemia.

  3. The role of protein breakdown in growth, quiescence, and starvation of vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Libby, P; O'Brien, K V

    1984-03-01

    Protein accumulation in growing cells may be due in part to a reduction in the rate of protein breakdown. Previous studies of the relation of cell proliferation to protein degradation often produced growth arrest by conditions that may involve nutritional deprivation. However, nutrient lack can itself accelerate proteolysis and produce negative protein balance. We therefore reexamined the relation between growth and protein breakdown using a more selective method for limiting cell growth. We produced quiescent cell cultures using a chemically defined, serum-free medium supplemented with hormones and nutrients. Such media can maintain viability and near neutral protein balance in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, in part because of reduced breakdown of cellular protein. We then compared rates of protein degradation in these quiescent but not starving cells, to those of cultures stimulated to grow by addition of mitogenic substances. Platelet-derived growth factor, fibroblast growth factor, or fetuin added to insulin-containing medium stimulated growth of smooth muscle cells, but further reduced protein breakdown only slightly. Contrary to the implications of certain previous studies, our results show that proliferating cells can accumulate protein without an appreciable reduction in the rates of protein breakdown. Thus, while accelerated proteolysis appears to be an important adaptation to adverse nutritional conditions, growth of smooth muscle cells does not require changes in overall protein breakdown, but occurs primarily through an increase in protein synthesis. PMID:6365933

  4. Growth, productivity and protein glycosylation in a CHO EpoFc producer cell line adapted to glutamine-free growth.

    PubMed

    Taschwer, Michael; Hackl, Matthias; Hernández Bort, Juan A; Leitner, Christian; Kumar, Niraj; Puc, Urszula; Grass, Josephine; Papst, Martin; Kunert, Renate; Altmann, Friedrich; Borth, Nicole

    2012-01-20

    A primary objective of cell line development and process optimisation in animal cell culture is the improvement of culture performance as indicated by desirable properties such as high cell concentration, viability, productivity and product quality. The inefficient energy metabolism of mammalian cells in culture is still a major limiting factor for improvements in process performance. It results in high uptake rates of glucose and glutamine and the concomitant accumulation of waste products which in turn limits final cell concentrations and growth. To avoid these negative side effects, a CHO host cell line was established recently which is able to grow in completely glutamine free medium (Hernandez Bort et al., 2010). To determine the influence of this adaptation on productivity and product quality, the same procedure was repeated with a recombinant CHO cell line producing an erythropoietin-Fc fusion protein (CHO-EpoFc) for this publication. After adaptation to higher cell densities and glutamine free medium, culture performance was monitored in batch bioprocesses and revealed comparable growth properties and EpoFc product formation in both cell lines. The level of reactive oxygen species was elevated in the adapted cells, reflecting a higher level of oxidative stress, however, at the same time the level of the oxido-protective glutathione was also higher, so that cells seem adequately protected against cellular damage. Analysis of nucleotides and nucleotide sugars revealed elevated UDP-sugars in cells grown in the absence of glutamine. Furthermore, the antennarity of N-glycans was moderately higher on the Epo part of the protein produced by the adapted cell line compared to the parental cell line. Except for this, the glycosylation, with respect to site occupancy, degree of sialylation and glycoform structure, was highly comparable, both for the Epo and the Fc part of the protein. PMID:22178781

  5. Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waag, Andreas

    , molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) delivers high quality ZnMgO-ZnO quantum well structures. Other thin film techniques such as PLD or MOCVD are also widely used. The main problem at present is to consistently achieve reliable p-type doping. For this topic, see also Chap. 5. In the past years, there have been numerous publications on p-type doping of ZnO, as well as ZnO p-n junctions and light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, a lot of these reports are in one way or the other inconsistent or at least incomplete. It is quite clear from optical data that once a reliable hole injection can be achieved, high brightness ZnO LEDs should be possible. In contrast to that expectation, none of the LEDs reported so far shows efficient light emission, as would be expected from a reasonable quality ZnO-based LED. See also Chap. 13. As a matter of fact, there seems to be no generally accepted and reliable technique for p-type doping available at present. The reason for this is the unfavorable position of the band structure of ZnO relative to the vacuum level, with a very low lying valence band. See also Fig. 5.1. This makes the incorporation of electrically active acceptors difficult. Another difficulty is the huge defect density in ZnO. There are many indications that defects play a major role in transport and doping. In order to solve the doping problem, it is generally accepted that the quality of the ZnO material grown by the various techniques needs to be improved. Therefore, the optimization of ZnO epitaxy is thought to play a key role in the further development of this material system. Besides being used as an active material in optoelectronic devices, ZnO plays a major role as transparent contact material in thin film solar cells. Polycrystalline, heavily n-type doped ZnO is used for this, combining a high electrical conductivity with a good optical transparency. In this case, ZnO thin films are fabricated by large area growth techniques such as sputtering. For this and other

  6. The role of vascular endothelial growth factor in the tissue specific in vivo growth of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Krupski, T; Harding, M A; Herce, M E; Gulding, K M; Stoler, M H; Theodorescu, D

    2001-01-01

    Despite the fact that cancer cells can be found in many vascular beds, continued growth of the metastatic tumor focus exhibits a significant degree of 'organ tropism', with only certain organs exhibiting the ravages of metastatic disease. Since a limiting factor to the growth of metastases beyond 2 mm in diameter, may be a lack of angiogenesis, we sought to determine whether tumor overexpression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a potent angiogenic factor related to prostate cancer metastasis, is causally related to organ specific tumor growth in a prostate cancer xenograft model. LnCaP-C4-2 is a subline of the human prostate cancer cell line LnCaP which unlike its parent, has a predilection for growth in bone, a common site for human prostate cancer metastasis. LnCaP-C4-2, is tumorigenic when injected intrafemorally in mice but requires co-injection of stromal components (Matrigel) to be tumorigenic in the subcutaneous site. Because of this site-specific tumorigenicity profile and relatively low VEGF mRNA and protein expression, this line was transfected with a full length cDNA encoding the 165 isoform of VEGF. Cells either overexpressing or not expressing the transfected gene were selected for study in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of VEGF did not seem to affect in vitro cell growth. Such overexpression did affect tumorigenicity and in vivo tumor growth rates when cells were inoculated in the subcutaneus site. Interestingly, the dependency of subcutaneous tumorigenicity on Matrigel co-inoculation was still observed in cells overexpressing VEGF. In contrast to the impact that VEGF overexpression has on subcutaneous tumorigenicity, no such effect was observed when cells were inoculated in orthotopic/prostate (primary) or intrafemoral (metastatic) sites. In view of the importance of tumor-stromal interactions in growth of xenografts, we sought to determine if the host strain is important to the observed tumorigenicity effects of VEGF overexpression

  7. Polyamines regulate cell growth and cellular methylglyoxal in high-glucose medium independently of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Min-Kyu; Lee, Mun-Hyoung; Park, Seong-Jun; Shin, Sang-Min; Liu, Rui; Kang, Sa-Ouk

    2016-03-01

    Polyamines can presumably inhibit protein glycation, when associated with the methylglyoxal inevitably produced during glycolysis. Herein, we hypothesized a nonenzymatic interaction between putrescine and methylglyoxal in putrescine-deficient or -overexpressing Dictyostelium cells in high-glucose medium, which can control methylglyoxal production. Putrescine was essentially required for growth rescue accompanying methylglyoxal detoxification when cells underwent growth defect and cell cycle G1-arrest when supplemented with high glucose. Furthermore, methylglyoxal regulation by putrescine seemed to be a parallel pathway independent of the changes in cellular glutathione content in high-glucose medium. Consequently, we suggest that Dictyostelium cells need polyamines for normal growth and cellular methylglyoxal regulation. PMID:26898161

  8. Effect of adenosine on the growth of human T-lymphocyte leukemia cell line MOLT-4.

    PubMed

    Streitová, Denisa; Weiterová, Lenka; Hofer, Michal; Holá, Jirina; Horváth, Viktor; Kozubík, Alois; Znojil, Vladimír

    2007-09-01

    Adenosine has been observed to suppress the growth of MOLT-4 human leukemia cells in vitro. Changes in the cell cycle, especially increased percentage of cells in S phase, prolonged generation time, and induction of apoptosis at higher adenosine concentrations have been found to be responsible for the growth suppression. Dipyridamole, a drug inhibiting the cellular uptake of adenosine, reversed partially but significantly the adenosine-induced growth suppression. It follows from these results that the action of adenosine on the MOLT-4 cells comprises its cellular uptake and intracellular operation. These findings present new data on anticancer efficacy of adenosine. PMID:17882653

  9. Growth and by-product profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cells immobilized in foamed alginate.

    PubMed

    Wilkowska, Agnieszka; Kregiel, Dorota; Guneser, Onur; Karagul Yuceer, Yonca

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study how the yeast cell immobilization technique influences the growth and fermentation profiles of Kluyveromyces marxianus cultivated on apple/chokeberry and apple/cranberry pomaces. Encapsulation of the cells was performed by droplet formation from a foamed alginate solution. The growth and metabolic profiles were evaluated for both free and immobilized cells. Culture media with fruit waste produced good growth of free as well as immobilized yeast cells. The fermentation profiles of K. marxianus were different with each waste material. The most varied aroma profiles were noted for immobilized yeast cultivated on apple/chokeberry pomace. PMID:25277269

  10. Prolyl oligopeptidase inhibition-induced growth arrest of human gastric cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Kanayo; Sakaguchi, Minoru; Tanaka, Satoshi; Yoshimoto, Tadashi; Takaoka, Masanori

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •We examined the effects of prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) inhibition on p53 null gastric cancer cell growth. •POP inhibition-induced cell growth suppression was associated with an increase in a quiescent G{sub 0} state. •POP might regulate the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle. -- Abstract: Prolyl oligopeptidase (POP) is a serine endopeptidase that hydrolyzes post-proline peptide bonds in peptides that are <30 amino acids in length. We recently reported that POP inhibition suppressed the growth of human neuroblastoma cells. The growth suppression was associated with pronounced G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle arrest and increased levels of the CDK inhibitor p27{sup kip1} and the tumor suppressor p53. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of POP inhibition-induced cell growth arrest using a human gastric cancer cell line, KATO III cells, which had a p53 gene deletion. POP specific inhibitors, 3-((4-[2-(E)-styrylphenoxy]butanoyl)-L-4-hydroxyprolyl)-thiazolidine (SUAM-14746) and benzyloxycarbonyl-thioprolyl-thioprolinal, or RNAi-mediated POP knockdown inhibited the growth of KATO III cells irrespective of their p53 status. SUAM-14746-induced growth inhibition was associated with G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} cell cycle phase arrest and increased levels of p27{sup kip1} in the nuclei and the pRb2/p130 protein expression. Moreover, SUAM-14746-mediated cell cycle arrest of KATO III cells was associated with an increase in the quiescent G{sub 0} state, defined by low level staining for the proliferation marker, Ki-67. These results indicate that POP may be a positive regulator of cell cycle progression by regulating the exit from and/or reentry into the cell cycle by KATO III cells.

  11. Extracellular vesicle–depleted fetal bovine and human sera have reduced capacity to support cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Eitan, Erez; Zhang, Shi; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal bovine serum (FBS) is the most widely used serum supplement for mammalian cell culture. It supports cell growth by providing nutrients, growth signals, and protection from stress. Attempts to develop serum-free media that support cell expansion to the same extent as serum-supplemented media have not yet succeeded, suggesting that FBS contains one or more as-yet-undefined growth factors. One potential vehicle for the delivery of growth factors from serum to cultured cells is extracellular vesicles (EVs). Methods EV-depleted FBS and human serum were generated by 120,000g centrifugation, and its cell growth–supporting activity was measured. Isolated EVs from FBS were quantified and characterized by nanoparticle tracking analysis, electron microscopy, and protein assay. EV internalization into cells was quantified using fluorescent plate reader analysis and microscopy. Results Most cell types cultured with EV-depleted FBS showed a reduced growth rate but not an increased sensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent etoposide and the endoplasmic reticulum stress–inducing chemical tunicamycin. Supplying cells with isolated FBS-derived EVs enhanced their growth. FBS-derived EVs were internalized by mouse and human cells wherein 65±26% of them interacted with the lysosomes. EV-depleted human serum also exhibited reduced cell growth–promoting activity. Conclusions EVs play a role in the cell growth and survival-promoting effects of FBS and human serum. Thus, it is important to take the effect of EV depletion under consideration when planning EV extraction experiments and while attempting to develop serum-free media that support rapid cell expansion. In addition, these findings suggest roles for circulating EVs in supporting cell growth and survival in vivo. PMID:25819213

  12. Cell growth stimulating effect of Ganoderma lucidum spores and their potential application for Chinese hamster ovary K1 cell cultivation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ding; Zhong, Qi; Liu, Tingting; Wang, Jufang

    2016-06-01

    In this work, water-soluble extracts of Ganoderma lucidum spores (Gls), a Chinese medicinal herb that possesses cell growth stimulating function, were found to be an effective growth factor for Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultivation. The Gls extract was prepared and supplemented to CHO K1 cell culture media with various serum levels. Our results obtained from both the static culture and the spinner-flask suspension culture showed that use of small-amount Gls extract effectively promoted cell growth and suppressed cell apoptosis induced by serum deprivation with normal cell cycle maintained in a low-serum medium. The low-serum medium containing 1 % (v/v) fetal bovine serum (FBS) and 0.01 % (w/v) Gls extract showed a comparable performance on both cell growth and fusion protein productivity with the conventional CHO culture medium containing 10 % (v/v) FBS and a commercial serum-free medium. This is the first study of the potential of Gls extracts for use as an alternative cell growth factor and nutrient for CHO cells. The findings have presented a new approach to economic cultivation of CHO cells for therapeutic protein production. PMID:26921102

  13. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  14. Identifying anti-growth factors for human cancer cell lines through genome-scale metabolic modeling.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Pouyan; Mardinoglu, Adil; Asplund, Anna; Shoaie, Saeed; Kampf, Caroline; Uhlen, Mathias; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Human cancer cell lines are used as important model systems to study molecular mechanisms associated with tumor growth, hereunder how genomic and biological heterogeneity found in primary tumors affect cellular phenotypes. We reconstructed Genome scale metabolic models (GEMs) for eleven cell lines based on RNA-Seq data and validated the functionality of these models with data from metabolite profiling. We used cell line-specific GEMs to analyze the differences in the metabolism of cancer cell lines, and to explore the heterogeneous expression of the metabolic subsystems. Furthermore, we predicted 85 antimetabolites that can inhibit growth of, or even kill, any of the cell lines, while at the same time not being toxic for 83 different healthy human cell types. 60 of these antimetabolites were found to inhibit growth in all cell lines. Finally, we experimentally validated one of the predicted antimetabolites using two cell lines with different phenotypic origins, and found that it is effective in inhibiting the growth of these cell lines. Using immunohistochemistry, we also showed high or moderate expression levels of proteins targeted by the validated antimetabolite. Identified anti-growth factors for inhibition of cell growth may provide leads for the development of efficient cancer treatment strategies. PMID:25640694

  15. Substrate flexibility regulates growth and apoptosis of normal but not transformed cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, H. B.; Dembo, M.; Wang, Y. L.

    2000-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of oncogenic transformation is anchorage-independent growth (27). Here we demonstrate that responses to substrate rigidity play a major role in distinguishing the growth behavior of normal cells from that of transformed cells. We cultured normal or H-ras-transformed NIH 3T3 cells on flexible collagen-coated polyacrylamide substrates with similar chemical properties but different rigidity. Compared with cells cultured on stiff substrates, nontransformed cells on flexible substrates showed a decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis and an increase in the rate of apoptosis. These responses on flexible substrates are coupled to decreases in cell spreading area and traction forces. In contrast, transformed cells maintained their growth and apoptotic characteristics regardless of substrate flexibility. The responses in cell spreading area and traction forces to substrate flexibility were similarly diminished. Our results suggest that normal cells are capable of probing substrate rigidity and that proper mechanical feedback is required for regulating cell shape, cell growth, and survival. The loss of this response can explain the unregulated growth of transformed cells.

  16. Myelosuppression in HCL: role of hairy cells, T cells and haematopoietic growth factors.

    PubMed

    Schwarzmeier, J D; Gasché, C G; Hilgarth, M F; Reinisch, W W; Göbl, S; Berger, R

    1994-05-01

    To elucidate mechanisms which may be responsible for the haematopoietic insufficiency in hairy cell leukaemia (HCL), we investigated in an autologous in vitro system the influence of haematopoietic growth factors (CSFs) and the effects of hairy cells (HCs) as well as T cells on the formation of haematopoietic colonies (CFU). Colony forming assays were performed using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of 6 HCL patients. To remove HCs, PBMCs were subjected to complement-mediated lysis, T cells were removed by E-rosette formation. Assays were done with and without recombinant human (rh) interleukin-3 (IL-3) and rh granulocyte-macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). All 6 patients exhibited a severe reduction of their circulating progenitor cell (CPC) compartment. There was no correlation between the degree of colony reduction and the number of HCs. However, a correlation was found between the numbers of CPCs of HCL patients and healthy donors and the monocyte counts in these groups (r = 0.8573, p < 0.001). The removal of autologous HCs, but also of T cells, resulted in a significant increase in colony formation (BFU-E, CFU-GM, CFU-mix). In none of the experiments, however, did colony numbers come close to the normal range. This was only achieved by supplementation of the culture medium with rh IL-3 and rh GM-CSF. The results suggest that the haematopoietic failure observed in HCL patients is probably due to an inadequate supply of CSFs as well as to an inhibitory activity of HCs and T cells which might exert their effects in a synergistic fashion. There is also evidence that the lack of monocytes plays a role in the development of the haematopoietic insufficiency in HCL. PMID:8020624

  17. Combination of imatinib and clotrimazole enhances cell growth inhibition in T47D breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Motawi, Tarek M K; Sadik, Nermin A H; Fahim, Sally A; Shouman, Samia A

    2015-05-25

    Imatinib mesylate (IM), a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is used as targeted cancer therapy. However, mono-targeting by IM does not always achieve full tumor eradication and thus it is recommended to combine IM with other anticancer agents. Clotrimazole (CLT) is an antifungal azole derivative with promising anticancer effects due to inhibiting the activity of glycolytic enzymes. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of combining CLT with IM on breast cancer cell line in an attempt to establish effective new combination. T47D human breast cancer cell line was treated with different concentrations of IM and/or CLT for 48 h. IM-CLT interaction was determined by isobologram equation and combination index. Cell viability was confirmed by measuring LDH activity. As indicators of glycolysis inhibition, the expression of hexokinase-2 (HK-2) and 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK-1) plus the activity of intracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and pyruvate kinase (PK) were determined. In addition, glucose consumption and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production were measured. Moreover, nitric oxide (NO), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia inducible factor-α (HIF-α) were also determined as they are modulators for glycolysis. This study demonstrated that IM or CLT synergistically inhibited cell growth in T47D as shown by combination and dose reduction indices. The combination of 15 μM IM and 20 μM CLT significantly decreased glucose consumption, activity of both PK and intracellular LDH, while increased leaked LDH, VEGF and NO in the medium compared to each drug alone. Furthermore the combination decreased gene expression of HK-2, PFK-1 and ATP content compared to the control. In conclusion, the synergistic effect of CLT on IM cytotoxicity in T47D cell line maybe mediated through inhibition of glycolysis and increasing both NO and VEGF. Further studies are required to confirm the efficiency and safety of this combination. PMID:25863232

  18. Altered growth, differentiation, and responsiveness to epidermal growth factor of human embryonic mesenchymal cells of palate by persistent rubella virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneda, T.; Urade, M.; Sakuda, M.; Miyazaki, T.

    1986-05-01

    We previously demonstrated that human embryonic mesenchymal cells derived from the palate (HEMP cells) retain alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content and capacity for collagen synthesis after long-term culture, and their growth is markedly stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF). There was a dramatic decrease in ALP content and capacity to synthesize collagen in HEMP cells (HEMP-RV cells) persistently infected with rubella virus (RV). EGF increased ALP activity and decreased collagen synthesis in HEMP cells, whereas EGF showed no effect on these activities in HEMP-RV cells. Growth of HEMP-RV cells was slightly reduced compared with that of HEMP cells. EGF stimulated growth of HEMP cells and to a lesser extent of HEMP-RV cells. Binding of /sup 125/I-EGF to cell-surface receptors in HEMP-RV cells was, to our surprise, twice as much as that in HEMP cells. However, internalization of bound /sup 125/I-EGF in HEMP-RV cells was profoundly diminished. Thus, persistent RV infection causes not only changes in HEMP cell growth and differentiation but a decrease in or loss of HEMP cell responsiveness to EGF. The effects of persistent RV infection on palatal cell differentiation as well as growth may be responsible for the pathogenesis of congenital rubella. Furthermore, since HEMP cells appear to be closely related to osteoblasts, these results suggest a mechanism for RV-induced osseous abnormalities manifested in congenital rubella patients.

  19. A role for SIRT1 in cell growth and chemoresistance in prostate cancer PC3 and DU145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Keitaro; Ohhashi, Riyako; Fujita, Yasunori; Hamada, Nanako; Akao, Yukihiro; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2008-08-29

    SIRT1, which belongs to the family of type III histone deacetylase, is implicated in diverse cellular processes. We have determined the expression levels of SIRT1 in human prostate cancer cell lines and have examined the roles of SIRT1 in cell growth and chemoresistance. SIRT1 expression was markedly up-regulated in androgen-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells compared with androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells and its expression level was correlated with cell growth in PC3 cells. Treatment with a SIRT1 inhibitor, sirtinol, inhibited cell growth and increased sensitivity to camptothecin and cisplatin. Silencing of SIRT1 expression by siRNA also suppressed cell proliferation and reduced camptothecin resistance in PC3 cells, mimicking the chemosensitizing effect caused by sirtinol. Also in DU145 cells, sirtinol treatment enhanced sensitivity to camptothecin and cisplatin. These results suggest that up-regulation of SIRT1 expression may play an important role in promoting cell growth and chemoresistance in androgen-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells.

  20. Cell density modulates growth, extracellular matrix, and protein synthesis of cultured rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Wolthuis, A; Boes, A; Grond, J

    1993-10-01

    Mesangial cell (MC) hyperplasia and accumulation of extracellular matrix are hallmarks of chronic glomerular disease. The present in vitro study examined the effects of cell density on growth, extracellular matrix formation, and protein synthesis of cultured rat MCs. A negative linear relationship was found between initial plating density and DNA synthesis per cell after 24 hours incubation in medium with 10% fetal calf serum (range: 1 x 10(3) to 7 x 10(5) MCs/2cm2, r = 0.996, P < 0.001). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the amount of fibronectin in the conditioned medium after 72 hours showed a negative relationship with increasing cell density. In contrast, the amount of cell-associated fibronectin increased to maximal values in confluent cultures, and no further increase was seen at supraconfluency. The relative collagen synthesis in the conditioned medium and cell layer--assessed by collagenase digestion after 5 hours [3H]proline pulse labeling--showed a similar pattern. Secreted collagen decreased with increasing cell density from 3.4% to 0.2% of total protein synthesis. In contrast, cell-associated collagen increased from 1.1% to 11.8% of newly synthesized protein until confluency followed by a decrease to 4.2% at supraconfluency. Specific immunoprecipitation of collagen types I, III, and IV revealed a significant (twofold) increase in collagen I synthesis per cell at confluency. Collagen III and IV synthesis was not affected by cell density. Specific protein expression in both the medium and cell layer were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (150 to 20 kd, pI 5.0 to 7.0) after 20 hours steady-state metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine. Supraconfluent MCs displayed overexpression of 10, underexpression of four, new expression of five, and changed mobility of three different intracellular proteins. Of interest was the overexpression of two proteins (89 kd, pI 5.31 and 72 kd, pI 5.32) that were identified by immunoblotting as

  1. BST-1, a surface molecule of bone marrow stromal cell lines that facilitates pre-B-cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Kaisho, T; Ishikawa, J; Oritani, K; Inazawa, J; Tomizawa, H; Muraoka, O; Ochi, T; Hirano, T

    1994-01-01

    Bone marrow stromal cells are essential for B-lymphocyte development. However, how stromal cells regulate B lymphopoiesis is not clear. In this paper, we report the molecular cloning of a stromal cell line-derived glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored molecule, BST-1, that facilitates pre-B-cell growth. The deduced amino acid sequence of BST-1 exhibited 33% identity with CD38. BST-1 was expressed in a wide range of tissues and in umbilical vein endothelial cells, whereas it was scarcely expressed in a variety of hematopoietic cell lines. The gene for BST-1 was assigned to chromosome 14q32.3, where immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes are clustered. BST-1 expression was enhanced in rheumatoid arthritis patient-derived bone marrow stromal cell lines that were previously shown to have an enhanced ability to support the growth of a pre-B-cell line as compared with stromal cell lines derived from healthy donors. Images PMID:8202488

  2. Calcium influences sensitivity to growth inhibition induced by a cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Betz, N. A.; Fattaey, H. K.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    While studies concerning mitogenic factors have been an important area of research for many years, much less is understood about the mechanisms of action of cell surface growth inhibitors. We have purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) which can reversibly inhibit the proliferation of diverse cell types. The studies discussed in this article show that three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibit sixty-fold greater sensitivity than other fibroblasts and epithelial-like cells to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. Growth inhibition induced by CeReS-18 treatment is a reversible process, and the three mouse keratinocyte cell lines exhibited either single or multiple cell cycle arrest points, although a predominantly G0/G1 cell cycle arrest point was exhibited in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. The sensitivity of the mouse keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition was not affected by the degree of tumorigenic progression in the cell lines and was not due to differences in CeReS-18 binding affinity or number of cell surface receptors per cell. However, the sensitivity of both murine fibroblasts and keratinocytes could be altered by changing the extracellular calcium concentration, such that increased extracellular calcium concentrations resulted in decreased sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced proliferation inhibition. Thus the increased sensitivity of the murine keratinocyte cell lines to CeReS-18 could be ascribed to the low calcium concentration used in their propagation. Studies are currently under way investigating the role of calcium in CeReS-18-induced growth arrest. The CeReS-18 may serve as a very useful tool to study negative growth control and the signal transduction events associated with cell cycling.

  3. The TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 S-Acyl Transferase Regulates Plant Cell Growth in ArabidopsisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hemsley, Piers A.; Kemp, Alison C.; Grierson, Claire S.

    2005-01-01

    TIP GROWTH DEFECTIVE1 (TIP1) of Arabidopsis thaliana affects cell growth throughout the plant and has a particularly strong effect on root hair growth. We have identified TIP1 by map-based cloning and complementation of the mutant phenotype. TIP1 encodes an ankyrin repeat protein with a DHHC Cys-rich domain that is expressed in roots, leaves, inflorescence stems, and floral tissue. Two homologues of TIP1 in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and human (Homo sapiens) have been shown to have S-acyl transferase (also known as palmitoyl transferase) activity. S-acylation is a reversible hydrophobic protein modification that offers swift, flexible control of protein hydrophobicity and affects protein association with membranes, signal transduction, and vesicle trafficking within cells. We show that TIP1 binds the acyl group palmitate, that it can rescue the morphological, temperature sensitivity, and yeast casein kinase2 localization defects of the yeast S-acyl transferase mutant akr1Δ, and that inhibition of acylation in wild-type Arabidopsis roots reproduces the Tip1− mutant phenotype. Our results demonstrate that S-acylation is essential for normal plant cell growth and identify a plant S-acyl transferase, an essential research tool if we are to understand how this important, reversible lipid modification operates in plant cells. PMID:16100337

  4. Partial pneumonectomy of telomerase null mice carrying shortened telomeres initiates cell growth arrest resulting in a limited compensatory growth response

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Sha-Ron; Lee, Jooeun; Reddy, Raghava; Williams, Genevieve N.; Kikuchi, Alexander; Freiberg, Yael; Warburton, David

    2011-01-01

    Telomerase mutations and significantly shortened chromosomal telomeres have recently been implicated in human lung pathologies. Natural telomere shortening is an inevitable consequence of aging, which is also a risk factor for development of lung disease. However, the impact of shortened telomeres and telomerase dysfunction on the ability of lung cells to respond to significant challenge is still largely unknown. We have previously shown that lungs of late generation, telomerase null B6.Cg-Terctm1Rdp mice feature alveolar simplification and chronic stress signaling at baseline, a phenocopy of aged lung. To determine the role telomerase plays when the lung is challenged, B6.Cg-Terctm1Rdp mice carrying shortened telomeres and wild-type controls were subjected to partial pneumonectomy. We found that telomerase activity was strongly induced in alveolar epithelial type 2 cells (AEC2) of the remaining lung immediately following surgery. Eighty-six percent of wild-type animals survived the procedure and exhibited a burst of early compensatory growth marked by upregulation of proliferation, stress response, and DNA repair pathways in AEC2. In B6.Cg-Terctm1Rdp mice carrying shortened telomeres, response to pneumonectomy was characterized by decreased survival, diminished compensatory lung growth, attenuated distal lung progenitor cell response, persistent DNA damage, and cell growth arrest. Overall, survival correlated strongly with telomere length. We conclude that functional telomerase and properly maintained telomeres play key roles in both long-term survival and the early phase of compensatory lung growth following partial pneumonectomy. PMID:21460122

  5. Transforming growth factor-beta and transforming growth factor beta-receptor expression in human meningioma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, M. D.; Federspiel, C. F.; Gold, L. I.; Moses, H. L.

    1992-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-beta (TGF beta) family in mammals includes three closely related peptides that influence proliferation and numerous physiologic processes in most mesenchymal cells. In this study, Northern blots, immunohistochemistry, TGF beta radioreceptor assays, TGF beta receptor affinity labeling and [3H] thymidine incorporation were used to evaluate whether primary cell cultures of human meningiomas synthesize the three TGF beta isoforms, bear TGF beta receptors, and respond to TGF beta. Transcripts for TGF beta 1 and 2 were detected in the three cases analyzed. Transforming growth factor-beta 1 immunoreactivity was detected in three of six cases, and TGF beta 2 and 3 immunoreactivity were detected in each case analyzed. Media conditioned by cells cultured from six meningiomas also contained latent TGF beta-like activity. Transforming growth factor-beta receptor cross-linking studies identified TGF beta binding sites corresponding to the type 1, type 2, and type 3 receptors on meningioma cells. Treatment with active TGF beta 1 produced a statistically significant reduction in [3H] thymidine incorporation after stimulation with 10% fetal calf serum and epidermal growth factor in all six cases studied. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:1325741

  6. Expression of a hyperactive androgen receptor leads to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chen-Lin; Cai, Changmeng; Giwa, Ahmed; Bivins, Aaronica; Chen, Shao-Yong; Sabry, Dina; Govardhan, Kumara; Shemshedini, Lirim

    2008-07-01

    Cellular changes that affect the androgen receptor (AR) can cause prostate cancer to transition from androgen dependent to androgen independent, which is usually lethal. One common change in prostate tumors is overexpression of the AR, which has been shown to lead to androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. This led us to hypothesize that expression of a hyperactive AR would be sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To test this hypothesis, stable lune cancer prostate (LNCaP) cell lines were generated, which express a virion phosphoprotein (VP)16-AR hybrid protein that contains full-length AR fused to the strong viral transcriptional activation domain VP16. This fusion protein elicited as much as a 20-fold stronger transcriptional activity than the natural AR. Stable expression of VP16-AR in LNCaP cells yielded androgen-independent cell proliferation, while under the same growth conditions the parental LNCaP cells exhibited only androgen-dependent growth. These results show that expression of a hyperactive AR is sufficient for androgen-independent growth of prostate cancer cells. To study the molecular basis of this enhanced growth, we measured the expression of soluble guanylyl cyclase-alpha1 (sGCalpha1), a subunit of the sGC, an androgen-regulated gene that has been shown to be involved in prostate cancer cell growth. Interestingly, the expression of sGCalpha1 is androgen independent in VP16-AR-expressing cells, in contrast to its androgen-induced expression in control LNCaP cells. RNA(I)-dependent inhibition of sGCalpha1 expression resulted in significantly reduced proliferation of VP16-AR cells, implicating an important role for sGCalpha1 in the androgen-independent growth of these cells. PMID:18469090

  7. Bioactive recombinant human lactoferrin, derived from rice, stimulates mammalian cell growth.

    PubMed

    Huang, N; Bethell, D; Card, C; Cornish, J; Marchbank, T; Wyatt, D; Mabery, K; Playford, R

    2008-01-01

    Today there is a concern about the use of animal source proteins and peptides in cell culture applications due to potential contamination by adventitious infectious pathogens. Recombinant production of these proteins using a plant host provides a safe and cost effective alternative. In this paper, we tested the effect of rice-derived recombinant human lactoferrin (rhLF) on mammalian cell growth. The purified rhLF was partially (about 50%) iron-saturated (pis-rhLF). Chemical modification of pis-rhLF generated apo-rhLF (<10% iron saturation) or holo-rhLF (>90% iron saturation). All three forms of rhLF (pis, apo, holo) promoted growth of intestinal cells (HT-29) measured as [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation or viable cell count, but holo-rhLF was most effective. Holo-rhLF was further tested on hybridoma, osteoblast, and human embryonic kidney cells. Results showed that holo-rhLF promoted cell growth and reduced cell doubling time. The concentration of holo-rhLF in media was critical in promoting cell growth and each cell line had different concentration dependence with the most effective range from 5 to 200 mg/L. The effect of rhLF on antibody production was determined using a hybridoma cell line. Significantly, more antibodies were produced by cells grown with holo-rhLF than cells grown without holo-rhLF. We also compared the effect of holo-rhLF to that of human transferrin, a component commonly used in cell culture media as an iron source. Holo-rhLF was as effective as human transferrin in promoting cell growth and antibody production. Considering all the data obtained, we conclude that rhLF from rice is effective in promoting mammalian cell growth and increasing cell productivity. PMID:18802738

  8. The Satellite Cell in Male and Female, Developing and Adult Mouse Muscle: Distinct Stem Cells for Growth and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Neal, Alice; Boldrin, Luisa; Morgan, Jennifer Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Satellite cells are myogenic cells found between the basal lamina and the sarcolemma of the muscle fibre. Satellite cells are the source of new myofibres; as such, satellite cell transplantation holds promise as a treatment for muscular dystrophies. We have investigated age and sex differences between mouse satellite cells in vitro and assessed the importance of these factors as mediators of donor cell engraftment in an in vivo model of satellite cell transplantation. We found that satellite cell numbers are increased in growing compared to adult and in male compared to female adult mice. We saw no difference in the expression of the myogenic regulatory factors between male and female mice, but distinct profiles were observed according to developmental stage. We show that, in contrast to adult mice, the majority of satellite cells from two week old mice are proliferating to facilitate myofibre growth; however a small proportion of these cells are quiescent and not contributing to this growth programme. Despite observed changes in satellite cell populations, there is no difference in engraftment efficiency either between satellite cells derived from adult or pre-weaned donor mice, male or female donor cells, or between male and female host muscle environments. We suggest there exist two distinct satellite cell populations: one for muscle growth and maintenance and one for muscle regeneration. PMID:22662253

  9. Mutant tristetraprolin: a potent inhibitor of malignant glioma cell growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Malignant gliomas rely on the production of certain critical growth factors including VEGF, interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, to fuel rapid tumor growth, angiogenesis, and treatment resistance. Post-transcriptional regulation through adenine and uridine-rich elements of the 3' untranslated region is one ...

  10. The effect of light direction and suspended cell concentrations on algal biofilm growth rates.

    PubMed

    Schnurr, Peter J; Espie, George S; Allen, D Grant

    2014-10-01

    Algae biofilms were grown in a semicontinuous flat plate biofilm photobioreactor to study the effects of light direction and suspended algal cell populations on algal biofilm growth. It was determined that, under the growth conditions and biofilm thicknesses studied, light direction had no effect on long-term algal biofilm growth (26 days); however, light direction did affect the concentration of suspended algal cells by influencing the photon flux density in the growth medium in the photobioreactors. This suspended algal cell population affected short-term (7 days) algae cell recruitment and algal biofilm growth, but additional studies showed that enhanced suspended algal cell populations did not affect biofilm growth rates over the long term (26 days). Studying profiles of light transmittance through biofilms as they grew showed that most of the light became attenuated by the biomass after just a few days of growth (88 % after 3 days). The estimated biofilm thicknesses after these few days of growth were approximately 150 μm. The light attenuation data suggests that, although the biofilms grew to 700-900 μm, under these light intensities, only the first few hundred micrometers of the biofilm is receiving enough light to be photosynthetically active. We postulate that this photosynthetically active layer of the biofilm grows adjacent to the light source, while the rest of the biofilm is in a stationary growth phase. The results of this study have implications for algal biofilm photobioreactor design and operation. PMID:25149444

  11. Irradiated fibroblast-induced bystander effects on invasive growth of squamous cell carcinoma under cancer-stromal cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Kamochi, Noriyuki; Nakashima, Masahiro; Aoki, Shigehisa; Uchihashi, Kazuyoshi; Sugihara, Hajime; Toda, Shuji; Kudo, Sho

    2008-12-01

    The irradiated fibroblast-induced response of non-irradiated neighboring cells is called 'radiation-induced bystander effect', but it is unclear in non-irradiated human squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. The present study shows that irradiated fibroblasts promoted the invasive growth of T3M-1 SCC cells, but not their apoptosis, more greatly than non-irradiated fibroblasts, using collagen gel invasion assay, immunohistochemistry and Western blot. The number of irradiated fibroblasts decreased to about 30% of that of non-irradiated fibroblasts, but irradiated fibroblasts increased the growth marker ki-67 display of SCC cells more greatly than non-irradiated fibroblasts. Irradiated fibroblasts did not affect the apoptosis marker ss-DNA expression of SCC cells. Irradiated fibroblasts enhanced the display of the following growth-, invasion- and motility-related molecules in SCC cells more greatly than non-irradiated fibroblasts: c-Met, Ras, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade (Raf-1, MEK-1 and ERK-1/2), matrix metalloproteinase-1 and -9, laminin 5 and filamin A. Irradiated fibroblasts, but not non-irradiated ones, formed irradiation-induced foci (IRIF) of the genomic instability marker p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1) and expressed transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF- beta1). Irradiated fibroblasts in turn enabled SCC cells to enhance 53BP1 IRIF formation more extensively than non-irradiated fibroblasts. Finally, effects of irradiated fibroblasts on growth and apoptosis of another HEp-2 SCC cell type were similar to those of T3M-1. These results suggest that irradiated fibroblasts promotes invasion and growth of SCC cells by enhancement of invasive growth-related molecules above through TGF- beta1-mediated bystander mechanism, in which irradiated fibroblast-induced genomic instability of SCC cells may be involved. PMID:19018771

  12. Analysis of a Stochastic Model for Bacterial Growth and the Lognormality of the Cell-Size Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Ken; Wakita, Jun-ichi

    2016-07-01

    This paper theoretically analyzes a phenomenological stochastic model for bacterial growth. This model comprises cell division and the linear growth of cells, where growth rates and cell cycles are drawn from lognormal distributions. We find that the cell size is expressed as a sum of independent lognormal variables. We show numerically that the quality of the lognormal approximation greatly depends on the distributions of the growth rate and cell cycle. Furthermore, we show that actual parameters of the growth rate and cell cycle take values that give a good lognormal approximation; thus, the experimental cell-size distribution is in good agreement with a lognormal distribution.

  13. Stimulation of proliferation of a human osteosarcoma cell line by exogenous acidic fibroblast growth factor requires both activation of receptor tyrosine kinase and growth factor internalization.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedłocha, A; Falnes, P O; Rapak, A; Muñoz, R; Klingenberg, O; Olsnes, S

    1996-01-01

    U2OS Dr1 cells, originating from a human osteosarcoma, are resistant to the intracellular action of diphtheria toxin but contain toxin receptors on their surfaces. These cells do not have detectable amounts of fibroblast growth factor receptors. When these cells were transfected with fibroblast growth factor receptor 4, the addition of acidic fibroblast growth factor to the medium induced tyrosine phosphorylation, DNA synthesis, and cell proliferation. A considerable fraction of the cell-associated growth factor was found in the nuclear fraction. When the growth factor was fused to the diphtheria toxin A fragment, it was still bound to the growth factor receptor and induced tyrosine phosphorylation but did not induce DNA synthesis or cell proliferation, nor was any fusion protein recovered in the nuclear fraction. On the other hand, when the fusion protein was associated with the diphtheria toxin B fragment to allow translocation to the cytosol by the toxin pathway, the fusion protein was targeted to the nucleus and stimulated both DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. In untransfected cells containing toxin receptors but not fibroblast growth factor receptors, the fusion protein was translocated to the cytosol and targeted to the nucleus, but in this case, it stimulated only DNA synthesis. These data indicate that the following two signals are required to stimulate cell proliferation in transfected U2OS Dr1 cells: the tyrosine kinase signal from the activated fibroblast growth factor receptor and translocation of the growth factor into the cell. PMID:8524304

  14. Entropy production of a steady-growth cell with catalytic reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Himeoka, Yusuke; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2014-10-01

    Cells generally convert external nutrient resources to support metabolism and growth. Understanding the thermodynamic efficiency of this conversion is essential to determine the general characteristics of cellular growth. Using a simple protocell model with catalytic reaction dynamics to synthesize the necessary enzyme and membrane components from nutrients, the entropy production per unit-cell-volume growth is calculated analytically and numerically based on the rate equation for chemical kinetics and linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. The minimal entropy production per unit-cell growth is found to be achieved at a nonzero nutrient uptake rate rather than at a quasistatic limit as in the standard Carnot engine. This difference appears because the equilibration mediated by the enzyme exists only within cells that grow through enzyme and membrane synthesis. Optimal nutrient uptake is also confirmed by protocell models with many chemical components synthesized through a catalytic reaction network. The possible relevance of the identified optimal uptake to optimal yield for cellular growth is also discussed.

  15. Live cell imaging of neuronal growth cone motility and guidance in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Suter, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The neuronal growth cone, a highly motile structure at the tip of neuronal processes, is an excellent model system for studying directional cell movements. While biochemical and genetic approaches unveiled molecular interactions between ligand, receptor, signaling and cytoskeleton-associated proteins controlling axonal growth and guidance, in vitro live cell imaging has emerged as a crucial approach for dissecting cellular mechanisms of growth cone motility and guidance. Important insights into these mechanisms have been gained from studies using the large growth cones elaborated by Aplysia californica neurons, an outstanding model system for live cell imaging for a number of reasons. Identified neurons can be isolated and imaged at room temperature. Aplysia growth cones are 5–10 times larger than growth cones from other species, making them suitable for quantitative high-resolution imaging of cytoskeletal protein dynamics and biophysical approaches. Lastly, protein, RNA, fluorescent probes and small molecules can be microinjected into the neuronal cell body for localization and functional studies. The following chapter describes culturing of Aplysia bag cell neurons, live cell imaging of neuronal growth cones using differential interference contrast and fluorescent speckle microscopy as well as the restrained bead interaction assay to induce adhesion-mediated growth cone guidance in vitro. PMID:21748670

  16. Perineural Growth in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Joseph; Muelleman, Thomas; Tawfik, Ossama; Thomas, Sufi M

    2014-01-01

    Perineural growth is a unique route of tumor metastasis that is associated with poor prognosis in several solid malignancies. It is diagnosed by the presence of tumor cells inside the neural space seen on histological or imaging evaluations. Little is known about molecular mechanisms involved in the growth and spread of tumor cells in neural spaces. The poor prognosis associated with perineural growth and lack of targeted approaches necessitates the study of molecular factors involved in communication between tumor and neural cells. Perineural growth rates, shown to be as high as 63% in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), correlate with increased local recurrence and decreased disease-free survival. Here we describe the literature on perineural growth in HNSCC. In addition, we discuss factors implicated in perineural growth of cancer. These factors include brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), neurotropin-3 and -4, glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), substance P (SP), and chemokines. We also explore the literature on membrane receptors, including the Trk family and the low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor. This review highlights areas for further study of the mechanisms of perineural invasion which may facilitate the identification of therapeutic targets in HNSCC. PMID:25456006

  17. Growth Kinetics of Suspended Microbial Cells: From Single-Substrate-Controlled Growth to Mixed-Substrate Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Kovárová-Kovar, Karin; Egli, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Growth kinetics, i.e., the relationship between specific growth rate and the concentration of a substrate, is one of the basic tools in microbiology. However, despite more than half a century of research, many fundamental questions about the validity and application of growth kinetics as observed in the laboratory to environmental growth conditions are still unanswered. For pure cultures growing with single substrates, enormous inconsistencies exist in the growth kinetic data reported. The low quality of experimental data has so far hampered the comparison and validation of the different growth models proposed, and only recently have data collected from nutrient-controlled chemostat cultures allowed us to compare different kinetic models on a statistical basis. The problems are mainly due to (i) the analytical difficulty in measuring substrates at growth-controlling concentrations and (ii) the fact that during a kinetic experiment, particularly in batch systems, microorganisms alter their kinetic properties because of adaptation to the changing environment. For example, for Escherichia coli growing with glucose, a physiological long-term adaptation results in a change in KS for glucose from some 5 mg liter−1 to ca. 30 μg liter−1. The data suggest that a dilemma exists, namely, that either “intrinsic” KS (under substrate-controlled conditions in chemostat culture) or μmax (under substrate-excess conditions in batch culture) can be measured but both cannot be determined at the same time. The above-described conventional growth kinetics derived from single-substrate-controlled laboratory experiments have invariably been used for describing both growth and substrate utilization in ecosystems. However, in nature, microbial cells are exposed to a wide spectrum of potential substrates, many of which they utilize simultaneously (in particular carbon sources). The kinetic data available to date for growth of pure cultures in carbon-controlled continuous culture

  18. Growth retardation in sickle-cell disease treated by nutritional support.

    PubMed

    Heyman, M B; Vichinsky, E; Katz, R; Gaffield, B; Hurst, D; Castillo, R; Chiu, D; Kleman, K; Ammann, A J; Thaler, M M

    1985-04-20

    The effect of increased nutritional intake was evaluated in 5 growth-retarded children with sickle-cell disease. Growth on recommended daily calorie and protein intakes had been inadequate in all 5. Fat absorption and intestinal mucosal morphology were normal in all 5. 2 children were given nutritional supplementation by nasogastric intubation, 1 received nightly oral formula supplements, and 2 were supplemented with zinc, iron, folate, and vitamin E only. Nutritional supplementation by the nasogastric route produced a rapid sustained increase in growth rate, associated with striking reductions in pain crises and infections which had previously necessitated many hospital admissions. Oral supplementation improved the clinical course but had no effect on growth rate. Mineral and vitamin supplements influenced neither the growth rate nor the clinical course. The observations indicate that nasogastric nutritional supplementation may accelerate growth and reduce the incidence and severity of complications in growth-retarded children with sickle-cell disease. PMID:2858749

  19. Sexual dimorphism in epigenomicresponses of stem cells to extreme fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Delahaye, Fabien; Wijetunga, N. Ari; Heo, Hye J.; Tozour, Jessica N.; Zhao, Yong Mei; Greally, John M.; Einstein, Francine H.

    2014-01-01

    Extreme fetal growth is associated with increased susceptibility to a range of adult diseases through an unknown mechanism of cellular memory. We tested whether heritable epigenetic processes in long-lived CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) showed evidence for re-programming associated with the extremes of fetal growth. Here we show that both fetal growth restriction and over-growth are associated with global shifts towards DNA hypermethylation, targeting cis-regulatory elements in proximity to genes involved in glucose homeostasis and stem cell function. We find a sexually dimorphic response; intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is associated with substantially greater epigenetic dysregulation in males, whereas large for gestational age (LGA) growth predominantly affects females. The findings are consistent with extreme fetal growth interacting with variable fetal susceptibility to influence cellular aging and metabolic characteristics through epigenetic mechanisms, potentially generating biomarkers that could identify infants at higher risk for chronic disease later in life. PMID:25300954

  20. Methanolic Extract Isolated from Root of Lycoris aurea Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth and Endothelial Cell Tube Formation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Moo Rim; Lee, Chang Woo; Yun, Jieun; Oh, Soo Jin; Park, Song-Kyu; Lee, Kiho; Kim, Hwan Mook; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Hyoung-Chin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of methanolic extract isolated from the root of Lycoris aurea (LA) on the growth of cancer cells and the tube formation activity of endothelial cells. Various cancer cells were treated with LA at doses of 0.3, 1, 3, 10 or 30 μg/ml and LA significantly suppressed the growth of several cancer cell lines, including ACHN, HCT-15, K-562, MCF-7, PC-3 and SK-OV-3, in a dose-dependent manner. We also found that LA induced cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in ACHN renal cell adenocarcinoma cells. Further study demonstrated that LA concentration-dependently inhibited the tube formation, which is a widely used in vitro model of reorganization stage of angiogenesis, in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Collectively, these results show that LA inhibits the growth of cancer cells and tube formation of endothelial cells and the growth-inhibitory effect of LA might be mediated, at least in part, by blocking cell cycle progression. PMID:24278587

  1. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  2. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells on Insoluble Plant Biomass Growth Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Alvelo-Maurosa, Jesús G.; Lee, Scott J.; Hazen, Samuel P.

    2015-01-01

    A dual-fluorescent-dye protocol to visualize and quantify Clostridium phytofermentans ISDg (ATCC 700394) cells growing on insoluble cellulosic substrates was developed by combining calcofluor white staining of the growth substrate with cell staining using the nucleic acid dye Syto 9. Cell growth, cell substrate attachment, and fermentation product formation were investigated in cultures containing either Whatman no. 1 filter paper, wild-type Sorghum bicolor, or a reduced-lignin S. bicolor double mutant (bmr-6 bmr-12 double mutant) as the growth substrate. After 3 days of growth, cell numbers in cultures grown on filter paper as the substrate were 6.0- and 2.2-fold higher than cell numbers in cultures with wild-type sorghum and double mutant sorghum, respectively. However, cells produced more ethanol per cell when grown with either sorghum substrate than with filter paper as the substrate. Ethanol yields of cultures were significantly higher with double mutant sorghum than with wild-type sorghum or filter paper as the substrate. Moreover, ethanol production correlated with cell attachment in sorghum cultures: 90% of cells were directly attached to the double mutant sorghum substrate, while only 76% of cells were attached to wild-type sorghum substrate. With filter paper as the growth substrate, ethanol production was correlated with cell number; however, with either wild-type or mutant sorghum, ethanol production did not correlate with cell number, suggesting that only a portion of the microbial cell population was active during growth on sorghum. The dual-staining procedure described here may be used to visualize and enumerate cells directly on insoluble cellulosic substrates, enabling in-depth studies of interactions of microbes with plant biomass. PMID:26637592

  3. Direct Image-Based Enumeration of Clostridium phytofermentans Cells o