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Sample records for growth regulatory mediator

  1. Toll-like receptor 2-mediated modulation of growth and functions of regulatory T cells by oral streptococci.

    PubMed

    Saeki, A; Segawa, T; Abe, T; Sugiyama, M; Arimoto, T; Hara, H; Hasebe, A; Ohtani, M; Tanizume, N; Ohuchi, M; Kataoka, H; Kawanami, M; Yokoyama, A; Shibata, K

    2013-08-01

    This study was designed to determine whether oral streptococci modulate the growth and functions of regulatory T cells. Heat-killed cells of wild-type strains of Streptococcus gordonii and Streptococcus mutans induced the Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) -mediated nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) activation, but their lipoprotein-deficient strains did not. Stimulation with these streptococci resulted in a significant increase in the frequency of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in splenocytes derived from both TLR2(+/+) and TLR2(-/-) mice, but the level of increase in TLR2(+/+) splenocytes was stronger than that in TLR2(-/-) splenocytes. Both strains of S. gordonii enhanced the proliferation of CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells isolated from TLR2(+/+) mice at the same level as those from TLR2(-/-) mice in an interleukin-2-independent manner. However, wild-type and lipoprotein-deficient strains of both streptococci did not enhance the suppressive activity of the isolated regulatory T cells in vitro, but rather inhibited it. TLR ligands also inhibited the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Inhibition of the suppressive activity was recovered by the addition of anti-IL-6 antibody. Pretreatment of antigen-presenting cells with the NF-κB inhibitor BAY11-7082 enhanced the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. These results suggested that interleukin-6 produced by antigen-presenting cells inhibits the suppressive activity of the regulatory T cells. Wild-type strain, but not lipoprotein-deficient strain, of S. gordonii reduced the frequency of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells in the acute infection model, whereas both strains of S. gordonii increased it in the chronic infection model mice. Hence, this study suggests that oral streptococci are capable of modulating the growth and functions of regulatory T cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23413817

  2. Class IA PI3Kinase Regulatory Subunit, p85α, Mediates Mast Cell Development through Regulation of Growth and Survival Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Subha; Mali, Raghuveer Singh; Koehler, Karl R.; Vemula, Sasidhar; Chatterjee, Anindya; Ghosh, Joydeep; Ramdas, Baskar; Ma, Peilin; Hashino, Eri; Kapur, Reuben

    2012-01-01

    Stem cell factor (SCF) mediated KIT receptor activation plays a pivotal role in mast cell growth, maturation and survival. However, the signaling events downstream from KIT are poorly understood. Mast cells express multiple regulatory subunits of class 1A PI3Kinase (PI3K) including p85α, p85β, p50α, and p55α. While it is known that PI3K plays an essential role in mast cells; the precise mechanism by which these regulatory subunits impact specific mast cell functions including growth, survival and cycling are not known. We show that loss of p85α impairs the growth, survival and cycling of mast cell progenitors (MCp). To delineate the molecular mechanism (s) by which p85α regulates mast cell growth, survival and cycling, we performed microarray analyses to compare the gene expression profile of MCps derived from WT and p85α-deficient mice in response to SCF stimulation. We identified 151 unique genes exhibiting altered expression in p85α-deficient cells in response to SCF stimulation compared to WT cells. Functional categorization based on DAVID bioinformatics tool and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software relates the altered genes due to lack of p85α to transcription, cell cycle, cell survival, cell adhesion, cell differentiation, and signal transduction. Our results suggest that p85α is involved in mast cell development through regulation of expression of growth, survival and cell cycle related genes. PMID:22238586

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor-23-mediated Inhibition of Renal Phosphate Transport in Mice Requires Sodium-Hydrogen Exchanger Regulatory Factor-1 (NHERF-1) and Synergizes with Parathyroid Hormone*

    PubMed Central

    Weinman, Edward J.; Steplock, Deborah; Shenolikar, Shirish; Biswas, Rajatsubhra

    2011-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23) inhibits sodium-dependent phosphate transport in brush border membrane vesicles derived from hormone-treated kidney slices of the mouse and in mouse proximal tubule cells by processes involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) but not protein kinase A (PKA) or protein kinase C (PKC). By contrast, phosphate transport in brush border membrane vesicles and proximal tubule cells from sodium-hydrogen exchanger regulatory factor-1 (NHERF-1)-null mice were resistant to the inhibitory effect of FGF-23 (10−9 m). Infection of NHERF-1-null proximal tubule cells with wild-type adenovirus-GFP-NHERF-1 increased basal phosphate transport and restored the inhibitory effect of FGF-23. Infection with adenovirus-GFP-NHERF-1 containing a S77A or T95D mutation also increased basal phosphate transport, but the cells remained resistant to FGF-23 (10−9 m). Low concentrations of FGF-23 (10−13 m) and PTH (10−11 m) individually did not inhibit phosphate transport or activate PKA, PKC, or MAPK. When combined, however, these hormones markedly inhibited phosphate transport associated with activation of PKC and PKA but not MAPK. These studies indicate that FGF-23 inhibits phosphate transport in the mouse kidney by processes that involve the scaffold protein NHERF-1. In addition, FGF-23 synergizes with PTH to inhibit phosphate transport by facilitating the activation of the PTH signal transduction pathway. PMID:21908609

  4. CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic ductal cells into islet {beta}-cells mediated by hepatocyte growth factor

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xin-Yu; Zhan, Xiao-Rong; Liu, Xiao-Min; Wang, Xiao-Chen

    2011-01-14

    Research highlights: {yields} CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in pancreatic duct cells. {yields} Activation of the PI3K/AKT/CREB pathway plays a critical role in the HGF-mediated differentiation of pancreatic duct cells in vivo. {yields} CREB was causally linked to the expression of transcription factors during PDEC differentiation induced by HGF. -- Abstract: We have previously reported that the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is involved in hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced differentiation of adult rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells (PDECs) into islet {beta}-cells in vitro. The transcription factor CREB is one of the downstream key effectors of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Recent studies showing that CREB is required for the survival of certain cell types prompted us to examine whether CREB is a nuclear target for activation via the HGF-dependent Ser/Thr kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic duct cell into islet {beta}-cells. In this study, we first attempted to examine whether HGF modulates the Akt-dependent activation of target gene CREB and then investigated whether CREB activity affects the differentiation of HGF-induced PDECs. Finally, we studied the role of CREB in modulating the expression of transcription factors in PDECs during the differentiation of HGF-induced PDECs. Our results demonstrated that CREB is a regulatory target for the protein kinase Akt/PKB in the differentiation of pancreatic ductal cells into islet {beta}-cells mediated by HGF.

  5. Fur-Mediated Global Regulatory Circuits in Pathogenic Neisseria Species

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunxiao

    2012-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) protein has been shown to function as a repressor of transcription in a number of diverse microorganisms. However, recent studies have established that Fur can function at a global level as both an activator and a repressor of transcription through both direct and indirect mechanisms. Fur-mediated indirect activation occurs via the repression of additional repressor proteins, or small regulatory RNAs, thereby activating transcription of a previously silent gene. Fur mediates direct activation through binding of Fur to the promoter regions of genes. Whereas the repressive mechanism of Fur has been thoroughly investigated, emerging studies on direct and indirect Fur-mediated activation mechanisms have revealed novel global regulatory circuits. PMID:22885296

  6. Regulatory T cells in immune-mediated renal disease.

    PubMed

    Ghali, Joanna R; Wang, Yuan Min; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2016-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are CD4+ T cells that can suppress immune responses by effector T cells, B cells and innate immune cells. This review discusses the role that Tregs play in murine models of immune-mediated renal diseases and acute kidney injury and in human autoimmune kidney disease (such as systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-glomerular basement membrane disease, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis). Current research suggests that Tregs may be reduced in number and/or have impaired regulatory function in these diseases. Tregs possess several mechanisms by which they can limit renal and systemic inflammatory immune responses. Potential therapeutic applications involving Tregs include in vivo induction of Tregs or inducing Tregs from naïve CD4+ T cells or expanding natural Tregs ex vivo, to use as a cellular therapy. At present, the optimal method of generating a phenotypically stable pool of Tregs with long-lasting suppressive effects is not established, but human studies in renal transplantation are underway exploring the therapeutic potential of Tregs as a cellular therapy, and if successful may have a role as a novel therapy in immune-mediated renal diseases. PMID:26206106

  7. Interface-mediated growth of monodispersed nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xun; Peng, Qing; Li, Yadong

    2007-08-01

    This Account focuses on the recent development of interface-mediated growth of monodispersed nanostructures in our laboratory. By rationally tuning the chemical reactions at various gas-liquid, solid-solid, liquid-liquid, and liquid-solid-solution interfaces, we could readily synthesize nanostructures such as hollow microspheres, core-shell nanoparticles, and monodispersed nanocrystals. These advances in interface-mediated synthesis could lead to progress in the development of nanocrystal crystallography and encourage some more unique and exciting research and applications to nanoscience and nanotechnology. PMID:17500508

  8. Multiple Regulatory Systems Coordinate DNA Replication with Cell Growth in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Heath; Koh, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In many bacteria the rate of DNA replication is linked with cellular physiology to ensure that genome duplication is coordinated with growth. Nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation has been appreciated for decades, however the mechanism(s) that connects these cell cycle activities has eluded understanding. In order to help address this fundamental question we have investigated regulation of DNA replication in the model organism Bacillus subtilis. Contrary to the prevailing view we find that changes in DnaA protein level are not sufficient to account for nutrient-mediated growth rate control of DNA replication initiation, although this regulation does require both DnaA and the endogenous replication origin. We go on to report connections between DNA replication and several essential cellular activities required for rapid bacterial growth, including respiration, central carbon metabolism, fatty acid synthesis, phospholipid synthesis, and protein synthesis. Unexpectedly, the results indicate that multiple regulatory systems are involved in coordinating DNA replication with cell physiology, with some of the regulatory systems targeting oriC while others act in a oriC-independent manner. We propose that distinct regulatory systems are utilized to control DNA replication in response to diverse physiological and chemical changes. PMID:25340815

  9. Secretory pattern and regulatory mechanism of growth hormone in cattle.

    PubMed

    Kasuya, Etsuko

    2016-02-01

    The ultradian rhythm of growth hormone (GH) secretion has been known in several animal species for years and has recently been observed in cattle. Although the physiological significance of the rhythm is not yet fully understood, it appears essential for normal growth. In this review, previous studies concerning the GH secretory pattern in cattle, including its ultradian rhythm, are introduced and the regulatory mechanism is discussed on the basis of recent findings. PMID:26260675

  10. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth. PMID:20491794

  11. A coculture model mimicking the intestinal mucosa reveals a regulatory role for myofibroblasts in immune-mediated barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, L E M; Schreurs, C C H M; Kroes, H; Spillenaar Bilgen, E J; Van Deventer, S J H; Van Tol, E A F

    2002-10-01

    The pathogenesis of Crohn's disease involves a mucosal inflammatory response affecting the barrier function of the gut. Myofibroblasts directly underlining the intestinal epithelium may have a regulatory role in immune-mediated barrier disruption. A coculture system of T84 epithelial and CCD-18Co myofibroblasts was established in order to mimic the in situ spatial interactions between these cell types and to evaluate their role in barrier: integrity. Lamina propria mononuclear cells (LPMC) were introduced in co- and monocultures. Effects of immune cells on barrier integrity was determined by measuring resistance and permeability for macromolecules. Introduction of LPMC in both culture systems caused a time-dependent decrease in barrier integrity. This was found to be less pronounced in cocultures indicating a regulatory role for mesenchymal cells. The effects were also found to depend on the route of LPMC stimulation. Additional analyses suggested that the regulatory role of myofibroblasts in barrier integrity involves production of growth factors. PMID:12395905

  12. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  13. BET bromodomain inhibition releases the Mediator complex from select cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwat, Anand S.; Roe, Jae-Seok; Mok, Beverly A.; Hohmann, Anja F.; Shi, Junwei; Vakoc, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) protein BRD4 can physically interact with the Mediator complex, but the relevance of this association to the therapeutic effects of BET inhibitors in cancer is unclear. Here, we show that BET inhibition causes a rapid release of Mediator from a subset of cis-regulatory elements in the genome of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. These sites of Mediator eviction were highly correlated with transcriptional suppression of neighboring genes, which are enriched for targets of the transcription factor MYB and for functions related to leukemogenesis. An shRNA screen of Mediator in AML cells identified the MED12, MED13, MED23, and MED24 subunits as performing a similar regulatory function to BRD4 in this context, including a shared role in sustaining a block in myeloid maturation. These findings suggest that the interaction between BRD4 and Mediator has functional importance for gene-specific transcriptional activation and for AML maintenance. PMID:27068464

  14. Interrogating Transcriptional Regulatory Sequences in Tol2-Mediated Xenopus Transgenics

    PubMed Central

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Bergmann, Anne; Hum, Nicholas R.; Oldenburg, Catherine E.; Wills, Andrea E.; Hu, Na; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Harland, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Identifying gene regulatory elements and their target genes in vertebrates remains a significant challenge. It is now recognized that transcriptional regulatory sequences are critical in orchestrating dynamic controls of tissue-specific gene expression during vertebrate development and in adult tissues, and that these elements can be positioned at great distances in relation to the promoters of the genes they control. While significant progress has been made in mapping DNA binding regions by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and next generation sequencing, functional validation remains a limiting step in improving our ability to correlate in silico predictions with biological function. We recently developed a computational method that synergistically combines genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to predict tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this method to 270 genes highly expressed in skeletal muscle and predicted 190 putative cis-regulatory modules. Furthermore, we optimized Tol2 transgenic constructs in Xenopus laevis to interrogate 20 of these elements for their ability to function as skeletal muscle-specific transcriptional enhancers during embryonic development. We found 45% of these elements expressed only in the fast muscle fibers that are oriented in highly organized chevrons in the Xenopus laevis tadpole. Transcription factor binding site analysis identified >2 Mef2/MyoD sites within ∼200 bp regions in 6 of the validated enhancers, and systematic mutagenesis of these sites revealed that they are critical for the enhancer function. The data described herein introduces a new reporter system suitable for interrogating tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements which allows monitoring of enhancer activity in real time, throughout early stages of embryonic development, in Xenopus. PMID:23874664

  15. The Battle Against Immunopathology: Infectious Tolerance Mediated by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gravano, David M.; Vignali, Dario A.A.

    2012-01-01

    Infectious tolerance is a process whereby one regulatory lymphoid population confers suppressive capacity on another. Diverse immune responses are induced following infection or inflammatory insult that can protect the host, or potentially cause damage if not properly controlled. Thus, the process of infectious tolerance may be critical in vivo for exerting effective immune control and maintaining immune homeostasis by generating specialized regulatory subpopulations with distinct mechanistic capabilities. Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a central mediator of infectious tolerance through their ability to convert conventional T cells into induced regulatory T cells (iTregs) directly by secretion of the suppressive cytokines TGF-β, IL-10 or IL-35, or indirectly via dendritic cells. In this review we will discuss the mechanisms and cell populations that mediate and contribute to infectious tolerance, with a focus on the intestinal environment, where tolerance induction to foreign material is critical. PMID:22205213

  16. Regulatory focus and burnout in nurses: The mediating effect of perception of transformational leadership.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Zhang, Shilei; Xu, Hang; Liu, Xufeng; Miao, Danmin

    2015-12-01

    This correlation study investigated the relationship between nurses' regulatory focus and burnout, as mediated by their perceptions of transformational leadership, using a cross-sectional research design with anonymous questionnaires. In July-August 2012, data were collected from 378 nurses from three hospitals in Shaanxi Province, China, using self-report questionnaires for measuring the nurses' regulatory focus, their level of burnout and their perception of whether the leadership of their supervisor was transformational. Structural equation modelling and bootstrapping procedures were used to identify the mediating effect of their perceptions of transformational leadership. The results supported our hypothesized model. The type of regulatory focus emerged as a significant predictor of burnout. Having a perception of transformational leadership partially mediated the relationship between regulatory focus and burnout. Having a promotion focus reduced burnout when the participants perceived transformational leadership, whereas having a prevention focus exhibited the opposite pattern. The mediating effect of the perception of transformational leadership suggests that a promotion focus may help diminish burnout, directly and indirectly. Nurse managers must be aware of the role of a regulatory focus and cultivate promotion focus in their followers. PMID:24724736

  17. Growth Factor Mediated Signaling in Pancreatic Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nandy, Debashis; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2011-01-01

    Functionally, the pancreas consists of two types of tissues: exocrine and endocrine. Exocrine pancreatic disorders mainly involve acute and chronic pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis typically is benign, while chronic pancreatitis is considered a risk factor for developing pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic carcinoma is the fourth leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. Most pancreatic cancers develop in the exocrine tissues. Endocrine pancreatic tumors are more uncommon, and typically are less aggressive than exocrine tumors. However, the endocrine pancreatic disorder, diabetes, is a dominant cause of morbidity and mortality. Importantly, different growth factors and their receptors play critical roles in pancreatic pathogenesis. Hence, an improved understanding of how various growth factors affect pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma is necessary to determine appropriate treatment. This chapter describes the role of different growth factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), insulin-like growth factor (IGF), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and transforming growth factor (TGF) in various pancreatic pathophysiologies. Finally, the crosstalk between different growth factor axes and their respective signaling mechanisms, which are involved in pancreatitis and pancreatic carcinoma, are also discussed. PMID:24212642

  18. Cpeb4-mediated translational regulatory circuitry controls terminal erythroid differentiation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenqian; Yuan, Bingbing; Lodish, Harvey F

    2014-09-29

    While we have considerable understanding of the transcriptional networks controlling mammalian cell differentiation, our knowledge of posttranscriptional regulatory events is very limited. Using differentiation of primary erythroid cells as a model, we show that the sequence-specific mRNA-binding protein Cpeb4 is strongly induced by the erythroid-important transcription factors Gata1 and Tal1 and is essential for terminal erythropoiesis. By interacting with the translation initiation factor eIF3, Cpeb4 represses the translation of a large set of mRNAs, including its own mRNA. Thus, transcriptional induction and translational repression combine to form a negative feedback loop to control Cpeb4 protein levels within a specific range that is required for terminal erythropoiesis. Our study provides an example of how translational control is integrated with transcriptional regulation to precisely control gene expression during mammalian cell differentiation. PMID:25220394

  19. Bayesian non-negative factor analysis for reconstructing transcription factor mediated regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Transcriptional regulation by transcription factor (TF) controls the time and abundance of mRNA transcription. Due to the limitation of current proteomics technologies, large scale measurements of protein level activities of TFs is usually infeasible, making computational reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory network a difficult task. Results We proposed here a novel Bayesian non-negative factor model for TF mediated regulatory networks. Particularly, the non-negative TF activities and sample clustering effect are modeled as the factors from a Dirichlet process mixture of rectified Gaussian distributions, and the sparse regulatory coefficients are modeled as the loadings from a sparse distribution that constrains its sparsity using knowledge from database; meantime, a Gibbs sampling solution was developed to infer the underlying network structure and the unknown TF activities simultaneously. The developed approach has been applied to simulated system and breast cancer gene expression data. Result shows that, the proposed method was able to systematically uncover TF mediated transcriptional regulatory network structure, the regulatory coefficients, the TF protein level activities and the sample clustering effect. The regulation target prediction result is highly coordinated with the prior knowledge, and sample clustering result shows superior performance over previous molecular based clustering method. Conclusions The results demonstrated the validity and effectiveness of the proposed approach in reconstructing transcriptional networks mediated by TFs through simulated systems and real data. PMID:22166063

  20. The expanding regulatory network of STING-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Surpris, Guy; Poltorak, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The identification and characterization of DNA-sensing pathways has been a subject of intensive investigation for the last decade. This interest, in part, is supported by the fact that the main outcome of DNA-responses is production of type I interferon (IFN-I), which, if produced in excessive amounts, leads to various pathologies. STING (stimulator of interferon genes) is positioned in the center of these responses and is activated either via direct sensing of second messengers or via interaction with upstream sensors of dsDNA. STING mediates responses to pathogens as well as host-derived DNA and is, therefore, linked to various autoimmune diseases, cancer predisposition and ageing. Recent mouse models of DNA damage showed the adaptor STING to be crucial for heightened resting levels of IFN-I. In this review, we will focus on recent advances in understanding the regulation of STING-signaling and identification of its novel components. PMID:27414485

  1. Growth mediated feedback and the abrupt onset of antibiotic resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett Deris, J.

    2010-03-01

    Recent results in our lab indicate that global gene expression will change in a growth-dependent manner for bacteria in sublethal antibiotic levels. We analyzed a system containing a constitutively expressed drug resistance gene and found that growth-mediated feedback provided a mechanism for bistable growth rates. That is, two identical cell-lines in the same antibiotic-infused media may respond with distinct growth rates. Our experimental work with cells carrying this resistance gene has shown that a rapid drop in growth occurs over a relatively small range of antibiotic. This result is consistent with a growth plateau arising in our analysis of the feedback mechanism. Furthermore, experiments have shown that a culture's degree of drug resistance depends on the initial growth conditions prior to exposure to high levels of antibiotics. This result is consistent with the predicted existence of a hysteretic regime near the growth plateau. The work reveals concrete mechanisms by which bacteria cope with high levels of antibiotics and illustrates the importance of considering growth-mediated feedback on gene circuits.

  2. CD28 superagonist-mediated boost of regulatory T cells increases thrombo-inflammation and ischemic neurodegeneration during the acute phase of experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Michael K; Kraft, Peter; Stoll, Guido; Lorenz, Kristina; Meuth, Sven G; Wiendl, Heinz; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Sparwasser, Tim; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Kerkau, Thomas; Kleinschnitz, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    While the detrimental role of non-regulatory T cells in ischemic stroke is meanwhile unequivocally recognized, there are controversies about the properties of regulatory T cells (Treg). The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of Treg by applying superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody expansion of Treg. Stroke outcome, thrombus formation, and brain-infiltrating cells were determined on day 1 after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. Antibody-mediated expansion of Treg enhanced stroke size and worsened functional outcome. Mechanistically, Treg increased thrombus formation in the cerebral microvasculature. These findings confirm that Treg promote thrombo-inflammatory lesion growth during the acute stage of ischemic stroke. PMID:25315859

  3. Mediation Analysis in a Latent Growth Curve Modeling Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Soest, Tilmann; Hagtvet, Knut A.

    2011-01-01

    This article presents several longitudinal mediation models in the framework of latent growth curve modeling and provides a detailed account of how such models can be constructed. Logical and statistical challenges that might arise when such analyses are conducted are also discussed. Specifically, we discuss how the initial status (intercept) and…

  4. Neuropilin 1 deficiency on CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells impairs mouse melanoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Hutzler, Marina; Abel, Simone; Alter, Christina; Stockmann, Christian; Kliche, Stefanie; Albert, Juliane; Sparwasser, Tim; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Westendorf, Astrid M.; Schadendorf, Dirk; Buer, Jan; Helfrich, Iris

    2012-01-01

    Infiltration of Foxp3+ regulatory T (T reg) cells is considered to be a critical step during tumor development and progression. T reg cells supposedly suppress locally an effective anti-tumor immune response within tumor tissues, although the precise mechanism by which T reg cells infiltrate the tumor is still unclear. We provide evidence that Neuropilin 1 (Nrp-1), highly expressed by Foxp3+ T reg cells, regulates the immunological anti-tumor control by guiding T reg cells into the tumor in response to tumor-derived vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). We demonstrate for the first time that T cell–specific ablation of Nrp-1 expression results in a significant breakdown in tumor immune escape in various transplantation models and in a spontaneous, endogenously driven melanoma model associated with strongly reduced tumor growth and prolonged tumor-free survival. Strikingly, numbers of tumor-infiltrating Foxp3+ T reg cells were significantly reduced accompanied by enhanced activation of CD8+ T cells within tumors of T cell–specific Nrp-1–deficient mice. This phenotype can be reversed by adoptive transfer of Nrp-1+ T reg cells from wild-type mice. Thus, our data strongly suggest that Nrp-1 acts as a key mediator of Foxp3+ T reg cell infiltration into the tumor site resulting in a dampened anti-tumor immune response and enhanced tumor progression. PMID:23045606

  5. RARalpha is a regulatory factor for Am-80-induced cell growth inhibition of hematologic malignant cells.

    PubMed

    Jimi, Shiro; Mashima, Kota; Matsumoto, Taichi; Hara, Shuji; Suzumiya, Junji; Tamura, Kazuo

    2007-08-01

    Retinoids are used for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Am-80, Tamibarotene, binds to retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha) more specifically than all-trans retinoic acid. We studied the tumor cell suppressive effects of Am-80, with respect to cytotoxicity and growth inhibition using eight myeloid and lymphoid malignant cells in culture (HL-60, HL-60R, K-562, Kasumi-1, MEG01, Raji, U266B1, and U937). The effects of Am-80 were examined during 9 days of incubation with 10(-7)-10(-5) M of Am-80 in culture medium, which was changed every 3 days. HL-60 were the only cells sensitive to Am-80-induced cytotoxicity; the latter reached more than 95% after 9 days of incubation, and death was primarily through apoptosis. The total mass of RARalpha in HL-60 was significantly greater (p<0.006) than in ATRA-resistant HL-60 (HL-60R) as well as all of other cells tested. However, in all cells excluding HL-60, Am-80 induced time- and dose-dependent cell growth inhibition without noticeable cytotoxicity. TGF-beta2 was released into the media containing cells incubated with Am-80 for 3 days. A dose-dependent increment of phosphorylation of Smad-2 was also detected. The relative amount of secreted TGF-beta2 correlated with the growth inhibition rates in all cells tested excluding HL-60, and with the total mass of RARalpha in the cells (p=0.0137). Our results indicate that Am-80-induced cell-type non-specific growth inhibition is mediated by TGF-beta2, where the total mass of RARalpha could be an important regulatory factor in hematologic malignant cells. PMID:17611697

  6. The dual effects of leading for safety: The mediating role of employee regulatory focus.

    PubMed

    Kark, Ronit; Katz-Navon, Tal; Delegach, Marianna

    2015-09-01

    This study examined the underlying mechanisms through which transformational and transactional leadership influence employee safety behaviors. Linking leadership theory with self-regulatory focus (SRF) theory, we examined a model of dual effects of leadership on safety initiative and safety compliance behaviors as mediated by promotion and prevention self-regulations. We conducted an experimental study (N = 107), an online study (N = 99) and a field study (N = 798 employees and 49 managers). Results demonstrated that followers' situational promotion focus mediated the positive relationship between transformational leadership and safety initiative behaviors. Through all 3 studies, transactional active leadership was positively associated with followers' situational prevention focus, however, the association between followers' prevention focus and safety compliance behaviors was inconsistent, showing the expected mediation relationships in the experimental setting, but not in the online and field studies. We discuss theoretical and practical implications of the findings. PMID:25664472

  7. Identification of bolting-related microRNAs and their targets reveals complex miRNA-mediated flowering-time regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Nie, Shanshan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Huang, Danqiong; Muleke, Everlyne M; Sun, Xiaochuan; Wang, Ronghua; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital regulatory roles in plant growth and development. The phase transition from vegetative growth to flowering is crucial in the life cycle of plants. To date, miRNA-mediated flowering regulatory networks remain largely unexplored in radish. In this study, two small RNA libraries from radish leaves at vegetative and reproductive stages were constructed and sequenced by Solexa sequencing. A total of 94 known miRNAs representing 21 conserved and 13 non-conserved miRNA families, and 44 potential novel miRNAs, were identified from the two libraries. In addition, 42 known and 17 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed and identified as bolting-related miRNAs. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that some miRNAs exhibited tissue- or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. Moreover, 154 target transcripts were identified for 50 bolting-related miRNAs, which were predominately involved in plant development, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Based on the characterization of bolting-related miRNAs and their target genes, a putative schematic model of miRNA-mediated bolting and flowering regulatory network was proposed. These results could provide insights into bolting and flowering regulatory networks in radish, and facilitate dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying bolting and flowering time regulation in vegetable crops. PMID:26369897

  8. Identification of bolting-related microRNAs and their targets reveals complex miRNA-mediated flowering-time regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shanshan; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Huang, Danqiong; Muleke, Everlyne M.; Sun, Xiaochuan; Wang, Ronghua; Xie, Yang; Gong, Yiqin; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play vital regulatory roles in plant growth and development. The phase transition from vegetative growth to flowering is crucial in the life cycle of plants. To date, miRNA-mediated flowering regulatory networks remain largely unexplored in radish. In this study, two small RNA libraries from radish leaves at vegetative and reproductive stages were constructed and sequenced by Solexa sequencing. A total of 94 known miRNAs representing 21 conserved and 13 non-conserved miRNA families, and 44 potential novel miRNAs, were identified from the two libraries. In addition, 42 known and 17 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed and identified as bolting-related miRNAs. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that some miRNAs exhibited tissue- or developmental stage-specific expression patterns. Moreover, 154 target transcripts were identified for 50 bolting-related miRNAs, which were predominately involved in plant development, signal transduction and transcriptional regulation. Based on the characterization of bolting-related miRNAs and their target genes, a putative schematic model of miRNA-mediated bolting and flowering regulatory network was proposed. These results could provide insights into bolting and flowering regulatory networks in radish, and facilitate dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying bolting and flowering time regulation in vegetable crops. PMID:26369897

  9. Penfluridol suppresses pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Ranjan, Alok; Srivastava, Sanjay K.

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors exhibit enhanced autophagy as compared to any other cancer, making it resistant to chemotherapy. We evaluated the effect of penfluridol against pancreatic cancer. Penfluridol treatment induced apoptosis and inhibited the growth of Panc-1, BxPC-3 and AsPC-1, pancreatic cancer cells with IC50 ranging between 6–7 μM after 24 h of treatment. Significant autophagy was induced by penfluridol treatment in pancreatic cancer cells. Punctate LC3B and autophagosomes staining confirmed autophagy. Inhibiting autophagy by chloroquine, bafilomycin, 3-methyladenine or LC3BsiRNA, significantly blocked penfluridol-induced apoptosis, suggesting that autophagy lead to apoptosis in our model. Penfluridol treatment suppressed the growth of BxPC-3 tumor xenografts by 48% as compared to 17% when treated in combination with chloroquine. Similarly, penfluridol suppressed the growth of AsPC-1 tumors by 40% versus 16% when given in combination with chloroquine. TUNEL staining and caspase-3 cleavage revealed less apoptosis in the tumors from mice treated with penfluridol and chloroquine as compared to penfluridol alone. Penfluridol treatment also suppressed the growth of orthotopically implanted Panc-1 tumors by 80% by inducing autophagy-mediated apoptosis in the tumors. These studies established that penfluridol inhibits pancreatic tumor growth by autophagy-mediated apoptosis. Since penfluridol is already in clinic, positive findings from our study will accelerate its clinical development. PMID:27189859

  10. Drug-device combination products: regulatory landscape and market growth.

    PubMed

    Bayarri, L

    2015-08-01

    Combination products are therapeutic and diagnostic products that combine drugs, devices and/or biological products, leading to safer and more effective treatments thanks to careful and precise drug targeting, local administration and individualized therapy. These technologies can especially benefit patients suffering from serious diseases and conditions such as cancer, heart disease, multiple sclerosis and diabetes, among others. On the other hand, drug-device combination products have also introduced a new dynamic in medical product development, regulatory approval and corporate interaction. Due to the increasing integration of drugs and devices observed in the latest generation of combination products, regulatory agencies have developed specific competences and regulations over the last decade. Manufacturers are required to fully understand the specific requirements in each country in order to ensure timely and accurate market access of new combination products, and the development of combination products involves a very specific pattern of interactions between manufacturers and regulatory agencies. The increased sophistication of the products brought to market over the last couple of decades has accentuated the need to develop drugs and devices collaboratively using resources from both industries, fostering the need of business partnering and technology licensing. This review will provide a global overview of the market trends, as well as (in the last section) an analysis of the drug-device combination products approved by the FDA during the latest 5 years. PMID:26380388

  11. Genetic modification through oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis. A GMO regulatory challenge?

    PubMed

    Breyer, Didier; Herman, Philippe; Brandenburger, Annick; Gheysen, Godelieve; Remaut, Erik; Soumillion, Patrice; Van Doorsselaere, Jan; Custers, René; Pauwels, Katia; Sneyers, Myriam; Reheul, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    In the European Union, the definition of a GMO is technology-based. This means that a novel organism will be regulated under the GMO regulatory framework only if it has been developed with the use of defined techniques. This approach is now challenged with the emergence of new techniques. In this paper, we describe regulatory and safety issues associated with the use of oligonucleotide-mediated mutagenesis to develop novel organisms. We present scientific arguments for not having organisms developed through this technique fall within the scope of the EU regulation on GMOs. We conclude that any political decision on this issue should be taken on the basis of a broad reflection at EU level, while avoiding discrepancies at international level. PMID:19833073

  12. Regulatory Focus as a Mediator of the Influence of Initiating Structure and Servant Leadership on Employee Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubert, Mitchell J.; Kacmar, K. Michele; Carlson, Dawn S.; Chonko, Lawrence B.; Roberts, James A.

    2008-01-01

    In this research, the authors test a model in which the regulatory focus of employees at work mediates the influence of leadership on employee behavior. In a nationally representative sample of 250 workers who responded over 2 time periods, prevention focus mediated the relationship of initiating structure to in-role performance and deviant…

  13. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahani, Ashwin J.; Gulsoy, E. Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2016-06-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth.

  14. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved.

    PubMed

    Shahani, Ashwin J; Gulsoy, E Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W

    2016-01-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth. PMID:27346073

  15. Twin-mediated crystal growth: an enigma resolved

    PubMed Central

    Shahani, Ashwin J.; Gulsoy, E. Begum; Poulsen, Stefan O.; Xiao, Xianghui; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    During crystal growth, faceted interfaces may be perturbed by defects, leading to a rich variety of polycrystalline growth forms. One such defect is the coherent Σ3 {111} twin boundary, which is widely known to catalyze crystal growth. These defects have a profound effect on the properties of many materials: for example, electron-hole recombination rates strongly depend on the character of the twin boundaries in polycrystalline Si photovoltaic cells. However, the morphology of the twinned interface during growth has long been a mystery due to the lack of four-dimensional (i.e., space and time resolved) experiments. Many controversial mechanisms have been proposed for this process, most of which lack experimental verification. Here, we probe the real-time interfacial dynamics of polycrystalline Si particles growing from an Al-Si-Cu liquid via synchrotron-based X-ray tomography. Our novel analysis of the time evolution of the interfacial normals allows us to quantify unambiguously the habit plane and grain boundary orientations during growth. This, when combined with direct measurements of the interfacial morphology provide the first confirmation of twin-mediated growth, proposed over 50 years ago. Using the insights provided by these experiments, we have developed a unified picture of the phenomena responsible for the dynamics of faceted Si growth. PMID:27346073

  16. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition.

    PubMed

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  17. Deciphering Cis-Regulatory Element Mediated Combinatorial Regulation in Rice under Blast Infected Condition

    PubMed Central

    Deb, Arindam; Kundu, Sudip

    2015-01-01

    Combinations of cis-regulatory elements (CREs) present at the promoters facilitate the binding of several transcription factors (TFs), thereby altering the consequent gene expressions. Due to the eminent complexity of the regulatory mechanism, the combinatorics of CRE-mediated transcriptional regulation has been elusive. In this work, we have developed a new methodology that quantifies the co-occurrence tendencies of CREs present in a set of promoter sequences; these co-occurrence scores are filtered in three consecutive steps to test their statistical significance; and the significantly co-occurring CRE pairs are presented as networks. These networks of co-occurring CREs are further transformed to derive higher order of regulatory combinatorics. We have further applied this methodology on the differentially up-regulated gene-sets of rice tissues under fungal (Magnaporthe) infected conditions to demonstrate how it helps to understand the CRE-mediated combinatorial gene regulation. Our analysis includes a wide spectrum of biologically important results. The CRE pairs having a strong tendency to co-occur often exhibit very similar joint distribution patterns at the promoters of rice. We couple the network approach with experimental results of plant gene regulation and defense mechanisms and find evidences of auto and cross regulation among TF families, cross-talk among multiple hormone signaling pathways, similarities and dissimilarities in regulatory combinatorics between different tissues, etc. Our analyses have pointed a highly distributed nature of the combinatorial gene regulation facilitating an efficient alteration in response to fungal attack. All together, our proposed methodology could be an important approach in understanding the combinatorial gene regulation. It can be further applied to unravel the tissue and/or condition specific combinatorial gene regulation in other eukaryotic systems with the availability of annotated genomic sequences and suitable

  18. Glucocorticoid receptor-mediated cell cycle arrest is achieved through distinct cell-specific transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Rogatsky, I; Trowbridge, J M; Garabedian, M J

    1997-01-01

    Glucocorticoids inhibit proliferation of many cell types, but the events leading from the activated glucocorticoid receptor (GR) to growth arrest are not understood. Ectopic expression and activation of GR in human osteosarcoma cell lines U2OS and SAOS2, which lack endogenous receptors, result in a G1 cell cycle arrest. GR activation in U2OS cells represses expression of the cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) CDK4 and CDK6 as well as their regulatory partner, cyclin D3, leading to hypophosphorylation of the retinoblastoma protein (Rb). We also demonstrate a ligand-dependent reduction in the expression of E2F-1 and c-Myc, transcription factors involved in the G1-to-S-phase transition. Mitogen-activated protein kinase, CDK2, cyclin E, and the CDK inhibitors (CDIs) p27 and p21 are unaffected by receptor activation in U2OS cells. The receptor's N-terminal transcriptional activation domain is not required for growth arrest in U2OS cells. In Rb-deficient SAOS2 cells, however, the expression of p27 and p21 is induced upon receptor activation. Remarkably, in SAOS2 cells that express a GR deletion derivative lacking the N-terminal transcriptional activation domain, induction of CDI expression is abolished and the cells fail to undergo ligand-dependent cell cycle arrest. Similarly, murine S49 lymphoma cells, which, like SAOS2 cells, lack Rb, require the N-terminal activation domain for growth arrest and induce CDI expression upon GR activation. These cell-type-specific differences in receptor domains and cellular targets linking GR activation to cell cycle machinery suggest two distinct regulatory mechanisms of GR-mediated cell cycle arrest: one involving transcriptional repression of G1 cyclins and CDKs and the other involving enhanced transcription of CDIs by the activated receptor. PMID:9154817

  19. Requirements for growth and IL-10 expression of highly purified human T regulatory cells

    PubMed Central

    Bonacci, Benedetta; Edwards, Brandon; Jia, Shuang; Williams, Calvin; Hessner, Martin J.; Gauld, Stephen; Verbsky, James

    2013-01-01

    Human regulatory T cells (TR) cells have potential for the treatment of a variety of immune mediated diseases but the anergic phenotype of these cells makes them difficult to expand in vitro. We have examined the requirements for growth and cytokine expression from highly purified human TR cells, and correlated these findings with the signal transduction events of these cells. We demonstrate that these cells do not proliferate or secrete IL-10 even in the presence of high doses of IL-2. Stimulation with a superagonistic anti-CD28 antibody (clone 9D4) and IL-2 partially reversed the proliferative defect, and this correlated with reversal of the defective calcium mobilization in these cells. Dendritic cells were effective at promoting TR cell proliferation, and under these conditions the proliferative capacity of TR cells was comparable to conventional CD4 lymphocytes. Blocking TGF-β activity abrogated IL-10 expression from these cells, while addition of TGF-β resulted in IL-10 production. These data demonstrate that highly purified populations of TR cells are anergic even in the presence of high doses of IL-2. Furthermore, antigen presenting cells provide proper co-stimulation to overcome the anergic phenotype of TR cells, and under these conditions they are highly sensitive to IL-2. In addition, these data demonstrate for the first time that TGF-β is critical to enable human TR cells to express IL-10. PMID:22562448

  20. Integrative analyses reveal a long noncoding RNA-mediated sponge regulatory network in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhou; Sun, Tong; Hacisuleyman, Ezgi; Fei, Teng; Wang, Xiaodong; Brown, Myles; Rinn, John L.; Lee, Mary Gwo-Shu; Chen, Yiwen; Kantoff, Philip W.; Liu, X. Shirley

    2016-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) can function as microRNA sponges and compete for microRNA binding to protein-coding transcripts. However, the prevalence, functional significance and targets of lncRNA-mediated sponge regulation of cancer are mostly unknown. Here we identify a lncRNA-mediated sponge regulatory network that affects the expression of many protein-coding prostate cancer driver genes, by integrating analysis of sequence features and gene expression profiles of both lncRNAs and protein-coding genes in tumours. We confirm the tumour-suppressive function of two lncRNAs (TUG1 and CTB-89H12.4) and their regulation of PTEN expression in prostate cancer. Surprisingly, one of the two lncRNAs, TUG1, was previously known for its function in polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2)-mediated transcriptional regulation, suggesting its sub-cellular localization-dependent function. Our findings not only suggest an important role of lncRNA-mediated sponge regulation in cancer, but also underscore the critical influence of cytoplasmic localization on the efficacy of a sponge lncRNA. PMID:26975529

  1. Exchange Protein Directly Activated by cAMP Modulates Regulatory T-Cell-Mediated Immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Almahariq, Muayad; Mei, Fang C.; Wang, Hui; Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Soong, Lynn; Sun, Jiaren; Cong, Yingzi; Chen, Ju; Cheng, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling pathway plays an essential role in immune functions. In this study we examined the role of the cAMP/EPAC1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP) axis in regulatory T-cell (Treg)-mediated immune suppression using genetic and pharmacologic approaches. Genetic deletion of EPAC1 in Treg and effector T-cells (Teff) synergistically attenuated Treg-mediated suppression of Teff. Mechanistically, EPAC1 inhibition enhanced activation of the transcription factor STAT3 and up-regulated SMAD7 expression while down-regulating expression of SMAD4. Consequently, CD4+T-cells were desensitized to TGF-β1, a cytokine employed by Treg cells to exert a broad inhibitory function within the immune system. Furthermore, deletion of EPAC1 led to production of significant levels of OVA-IgG antibodies in a low dose oral tolerance mouse mode. These in vivo observations are consistent with the finding that EPAC1 plays an important role in Treg-mediated suppression. More importantly, pharmacological inhibition of EPAC1 using an EPAC specific inhibitor recapitulates the EPAC1 deletion phenotype both in vivo and in vitro. Our results show that EPAC1 boosts Treg-mediated suppression, and identify EPAC1 as a target with broad therapeutic potential since Treg cells are involved in numerous pathologies including autoimmunity, infections, and a wide range of cancers. PMID:25339598

  2. Understanding microRNA-mediated gene regulatory networks through mathematical modelling.

    PubMed

    Lai, Xin; Wolkenhauer, Olaf; Vera, Julio

    2016-07-27

    The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) has added a new player to the regulation of gene expression. With the increasing number of molecular species involved in gene regulatory networks, it is hard to obtain an intuitive understanding of network dynamics. Mathematical modelling can help dissecting the role of miRNAs in gene regulatory networks, and we shall here review the most recent developments that utilise different mathematical modelling approaches to provide quantitative insights into the function of miRNAs in the regulation of gene expression. Key miRNA regulation features that have been elucidated via modelling include: (i) the role of miRNA-mediated feedback and feedforward loops in fine-tuning of gene expression; (ii) the miRNA-target interaction properties determining the effectiveness of miRNA-mediated gene repression; and (iii) the competition for shared miRNAs leading to the cross-regulation of genes. However, there is still lack of mechanistic understanding of many other properties of miRNA regulation like unconventional miRNA-target interactions, miRNA regulation at different sub-cellular locations and functional miRNA variant, which will need future modelling efforts to deal with. This review provides an overview of recent developments and challenges in this field. PMID:27317695

  3. Advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks

    PubMed Central

    Bourqui, Romain; Benchimol, William; Gaspin, Christine; Sirand-Pugnet, Pascal; Uricaru, Raluca; Dutour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The revolution in high-throughput sequencing technologies has enabled the acquisition of gigabytes of RNA sequences in many different conditions and has highlighted an unexpected number of small RNAs (sRNAs) in bacteria. Ongoing exploitation of these data enables numerous applications for investigating bacterial transacting sRNA-mediated regulation networks. Focusing on sRNAs that regulate mRNA translation in trans, recent works have noted several sRNA-based regulatory pathways that are essential for key cellular processes. Although the number of known bacterial sRNAs is increasing, the experimental validation of their interactions with mRNA targets remains challenging and involves expensive and time-consuming experimental strategies. Hence, bioinformatics is crucial for selecting and prioritizing candidates before designing any experimental work. However, current software for target prediction produces a prohibitive number of candidates because of the lack of biological knowledge regarding the rules governing sRNA–mRNA interactions. Therefore, there is a real need to develop new approaches to help biologists focus on the most promising predicted sRNA–mRNA interactions. In this perspective, this review aims at presenting the advantages of mixing bioinformatics and visualization approaches for analyzing predicted sRNA-mediated regulatory bacterial networks. PMID:25477348

  4. A serum component mediates food restriction-induced growth attenuation.

    PubMed

    Pando, Rakefet; Shtaif, Biana; Phillip, Moshe; Gat-Yablonski, Galia

    2014-03-01

    Proper nutrition in terms of calories and essential food components is required to maximize longitudinal growth in children. Our previous study showed that prepubertal male rats subjected to 10 days of 40% food restriction (RES) exhibited a dramatic reduction in weight and epiphyseal growth plate height, as well as changes in gene expression and microRNAs (miRNAs) in the epiphyseal growth plate. These findings reversed rapidly after renewal of the regular food supply (catch-up [CU]). To further elucidate the mechanisms underlying the nutrition-growth association, serum collected from the RES and CU rats and control rats fed ad libitum (AL) was added to the culture medium of the chondrocyte cell line ATDC5 (instead of fetal calf serum). Serum from the RES group induced a reduction in cell viability (25%, P < .05) concomitant with an increase in cell differentiation compared with that for the AL group serum. The most interesting observation, in our opinion, was the significant reduction in the expression of specific miRNAs, including the chondro-specific miR-140. These effects were not observed for serum from refed (CU) rats. Serum levels of IGF-I, leptin, and fibroblast growth factor 21 were reduced by food restriction. The addition of IGF-I and leptin to the culture increased cell viability, whereas fibroblast growth factor 21 reduced it, suggesting the involvement of IGF-I, leptin, and possibly other still unidentified serum factors in chondrocyte cell growth. In conclusion, specific miRNAs respond to nutritional cues, and these effects are mediated by serum-borne factors. These results may promote the development of superior interventions for children with malnutrition and growth abnormalities. PMID:24456162

  5. Regulatory effects of matrix protein variations on influenza virus growth.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, J; Toyoda, T; Nakayama, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    Influenza virus A/WSN/33 forms large plaques (> 3 mm diameter) on MDCK cells whereas A/Aichi/2/68 forms only small plaques (< 1 mm diameter). Fast growing reassortants (AWM), isolated by mixed infection of MDCK cells with these two virus strains in the presence of anti-WSN antibodies, all carried the M gene from WSN. On MDCK cells, these reassortants produced progeny viruses as rapidly as did WSN, and the virus yield was as high as Aichi. The fast-growing reassortants overcame the growth inhibitory effect of lignins. Pulse-labeling experiments at various times after virus infection showed that the reassortant AWM started to synthesize viral proteins earlier than Aichi. Taken together, we conclude that upon infecting MDCK cells, the reassortant viruses advance rapidly into the growth cycle, thereby leading to an elevated level of progeny viruses in the early period of infection. Possible mechanisms of the M gene involvement in the determination of virus growth rate are discussed, in connection with multiple functions of the M proteins. PMID:8257290

  6. TGF-β Controls miR-181/ERK Regulatory Network during Retinal Axon Specification and Growth

    PubMed Central

    Carrella, Sabrina; Salierno, Francesco Giuseppe; Manfredi, Anna; Banfi, Sandro; Conte, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Retinal axon specification and growth are critically sensitive to the dosage of numerous signaling molecules and transcription factors. Subtle variations in the expression levels of key molecules may result in a variety of axonal growth anomalies. miR-181a and miR-181b are two eye-enriched microRNAs whose inactivation in medaka fish leads to alterations of the proper establishment of connectivity and function in the visual system. miR-181a/b are fundamental regulators of MAPK signaling and their role in retinal axon growth and specification is just beginning to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate that miR-181a/b are key nodes in the interplay between TGF-β and MAPK/ERK within the functional pathways that control retinal axon specification and growth. Using a variety of in vivo and in vitro approaches in medaka fish, we demonstrate that TGF-β signaling controls the miR-181/ERK regulatory network, which in turn strengthens the TGF-β-mediated regulation of RhoA degradation. Significantly, these data uncover the role of TGF-β signaling in vivo, for the first time, in defining the correct wiring and assembly of functional retina neural circuits and further highlight miR-181a/b as key factors in axon specification and growth. PMID:26641497

  7. Regulatory Effect of Cinnamaldehyde on Monocyte/Macrophage-Mediated Inflammatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Hun; Lee, Yong Gyu; Lee, Jaehwi; Lee, Joo Young; Cho, Jae Youl

    2010-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) has been known to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anticancer effects. Although numerous pharmacological effects have been demonstrated, regulatory effect of CA on the functional activation of monocytes and macrophages has not been fully elucidated yet. To evaluate its monocyte/macrophage-mediated immune responses, macrophages activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and monocytes treated with proaggregative antibodies, and extracellular matrix protein fibronectin were employed. CA was able to suppress both the production of nitric oxide (NO) and upregulation of surface levels of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD69) and pattern recognition receptors (toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and complement receptor (CR3)). In addition, CA also blocked cell-cell adhesion induced by the activation of CD29 and CD43 but not cell-fibronectin adhesion. Immunoblotting analysis suggested that CA inhibition was due to the inhibition of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and phosphoinositide-dependent kinase (PDK)1 as well as nuclear factor-(NF-) κB activation. In particular, thiol compounds with sulphydryl group, L-cysteine and dithiothreitol (DTT), strongly abrogated CA-mediated NO production and NF-κB activation. Therefore, our results suggest that CA can act as a strong regulator of monocyte/macrophage-mediated immune responses by thiolation of target cysteine residues in PI3K or PDK1. PMID:20467561

  8. microRNA 21-mediated suppression of Sprouty1 by Pokemon affects liver cancer cell growth and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiu-Li; Sun, Qin-Sheng; Liu, Feng; Yang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Min; Liu, Hong-Xia; Xu, Wei; Jiang, Yu-Yang

    2013-07-01

    Transcriptional repressor Pokemon is a critical factor in embryogenesis, development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and oncogenesis, thus behaving as an oncogene. Oncomine database suggests a potential correlation between the expressions of Pokemon and Sprouty1. This study investigated the regulatory role of Pokemon in Sprouty1 expression and the effect on liver cancer cell growth and proliferation, revealing a novel miR-21-mediated regulatory circuit. In normal (HL-7702) and cancer (QGY-7703) liver cell lines, Sprouty1 expression is inversely correlated with Pokemon levels. Targeted expression or siRNA-mediated silencing showed that Pokemon is a repressor of Sprouty1 expression at both mRNA and protein levels, but Pokemon cannot affect the promoter activity of Sprouty1. Sprouty1 is a target of miR-21 and interestingly, we found that miR-21 is up-regulated by Pokemon in liver cancer cells. Luciferase reporter assays showed that Pokemon up-regulated miR-21 transcription in a dose-dependent manner, and ChIP assay exhibited a direct binding of Pokemon to the miR-21 promoter at -747 to -399 bp. Site-directed mutagenesis of the GC boxes at -684 to -679 bp and -652 to -647 bp of miR-21 promoter abolished the regulatory activity by Pokemon. Furthermore, we found that the modulation of Pokemon and miR-21 expression affected the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells QGY-7703. In summary, our findings demonstrate that Pokemon suppresses Sprouty1 expression through a miR-21-mediated mechanism, affecting the growth and proliferation of liver cancer cells. This study recognized miR-21 and Sprouty1 as novel targets of the Pokemon regulatory network. PMID:23355454

  9. Regulatory focus as a mediator of the influence of initiating structure and servant leadership on employee behavior.

    PubMed

    Neubert, Mitchell J; Kacmar, K Michele; Carlson, Dawn S; Chonko, Lawrence B; Roberts, James A

    2008-11-01

    In this research, the authors test a model in which the regulatory focus of employees at work mediates the influence of leadership on employee behavior. In a nationally representative sample of 250 workers who responded over 2 time periods, prevention focus mediated the relationship of initiating structure to in-role performance and deviant behavior, whereas promotion focus mediated the relationship of servant leadership to helping and creative behavior. The results indicate that even though initiating structure and servant leadership share some variance in explaining other variables, each leadership style incrementally predicts disparate outcomes after controlling for the other style and dispositional tendencies. A new regulatory focus scale, the Work Regulatory Focus (WRF) Scale, also was developed and initially validated for this study. Implications for the results and the WRF Scale are discussed. PMID:19025244

  10. A Wave of Regulatory T Cells into Neonatal Skin Mediates Tolerance to Commensal Microbes.

    PubMed

    Scharschmidt, Tiffany C; Vasquez, Kimberly S; Truong, Hong-An; Gearty, Sofia V; Pauli, Mariela L; Nosbaum, Audrey; Gratz, Iris K; Otto, Michael; Moon, James J; Liese, Jan; Abbas, Abul K; Fischbach, Michael A; Rosenblum, Michael D

    2015-11-17

    The skin is a site of constant dialog between the immune system and commensal bacteria. However, the molecular mechanisms that allow us to tolerate the presence of skin commensals without eliciting destructive inflammation are unknown. Using a model system to study the antigen-specific response to S. epidermidis, we demonstrated that skin colonization during a defined period of neonatal life was required for establishing immune tolerance to commensal microbes. This crucial window was characterized by an abrupt influx of highly activated regulatory T (Treg) cells into neonatal skin. Selective inhibition of this Treg cell wave completely abrogated tolerance. Thus, the host-commensal relationship in the skin relied on a unique Treg cell population that mediated tolerance to bacterial antigens during a defined developmental window. This suggests that the cutaneous microbiome composition in neonatal life is crucial in shaping adaptive immune responses to commensals, and disrupting these interactions might have enduring health implications. PMID:26588783

  11. A multilevel examination of the relationships among training outcomes, mediating regulatory processes, and adaptive performance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gilad; Thomas, Brian; Wallace, J Craig

    2005-09-01

    This study examined whether cognitive, affective-motivational, and behavioral training outcomes relate to posttraining regulatory processes and adaptive performance similarly at the individual and team levels of analysis. Longitudinal data were collected from 156 individuals composing 78 teams who were trained on and then performed a simulated flight task. Results showed that posttraining regulation processes related similarly to adaptive performance across levels. Also, regulation processes fully mediated the influences of self- and collective efficacy beliefs on individual and team adaptive performance. Finally, knowledge and skill more strongly and directly related to adaptive performance at the individual than the team level of analysis. Implications to theory and practice, limitations, and future directions are discussed. PMID:16162057

  12. Inferring transcriptional and microRNA-mediated regulatory programs in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Setty, Manu; Helmy, Karim; Khan, Aly A; Silber, Joachim; Arvey, Aaron; Neezen, Frank; Agius, Phaedra; Huse, Jason T; Holland, Eric C; Leslie, Christina S

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale cancer genomics projects are profiling hundreds of tumors at multiple molecular layers, including copy number, mRNA and miRNA expression, but the mechanistic relationships between these layers are often excluded from computational models. We developed a supervised learning framework for integrating molecular profiles with regulatory sequence information to reveal regulatory programs in cancer, including miRNA-mediated regulation. We applied our approach to 320 glioblastoma profiles and identified key miRNAs and transcription factors as common or subtype-specific drivers of expression changes. We confirmed that predicted gene expression signatures for proneural subtype regulators were consistent with in vivo expression changes in a PDGF-driven mouse model. We tested two predicted proneural drivers, miR-124 and miR-132, both underexpressed in proneural tumors, by overexpression in neurospheres and observed a partial reversal of corresponding tumor expression changes. Computationally dissecting the role of miRNAs in cancer may ultimately lead to small RNA therapeutics tailored to subtype or individual. PMID:22929615

  13. Constitutive Smad linker phosphorylation in melanoma: a mechanism of resistance to transforming growth factor-β-mediated growth inhibition.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Solal, Karine A; Merrigan, Kim T; Chan, Joseph L-K; Goydos, James S; Chen, Wenjin; Foran, David J; Liu, Fang; Lasfar, Ahmed; Reiss, Michael

    2011-06-01

    Melanoma cells are resistant to transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ)-induced cell-cycle arrest. In this study, we investigated a mechanism of resistance involving a regulatory domain, called linker region, in Smad2 and Smad3, main downstream effectors of TGFβ. Melanoma cells in culture and tumor samples exhibited constitutive Smad2 and Smad3 linker phosphorylation. Treatment of melanoma cells with the MEK1/2 inhibitor, U0126, or the two pan-CDK and GSK3 inhibitors, Flavopiridol and R547, resulted in decreased linker phosphorylation of Smad2 and Smad3. Overexpression of the linker phosphorylation-resistant Smad3 EPSM mutant in melanoma cells resulted in an increase in expression of p15(INK4B) and p21(WAF1) , as compared with cells transfected with wild-type (WT) Smad3. In addition, the cell numbers of EPSM Smad3-expressing melanoma cells were significantly reduced compared with WT Smad3-expressing cells. These results suggest that the linker phosphorylation of Smad3 contributes to the resistance of melanoma cells to TGFβ-mediated growth inhibition. PMID:21477078

  14. Intrinsic Mathematics Motivation as a Mediator between Regulatory Fit and Mathematics Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Slooten, Courtney

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory Fit Theory research has indicated that the presence of a regulatory fit between an individuals chronic regulatory focus orientation and induced regulatory state can increase motivation, performance, and achievement. The research in support of regulatory fit theory is immense; however, there has been little research that focuses on…

  15. A simple model for dislocation emission mediated dynamic nanovoid growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkerson, Justin; Ramesh, K. T.

    2015-06-01

    Failure of ductile metals has long been attributed to the microscopic processes of void nucleation, growth, and finally coalescence leading to fracture. Our traditional view of void nucleation is associated with interface debonding at second-phase particles. However, much of this understanding has been gleaned from observations of quasi-static fracture surfaces. Under more extreme dynamic loading conditions second-phase particles may not necessarily be the dominant source of void nucleating material defects, and a few key experimental observations of laser spall surfaces seem to support this assertion. Here, we motivate an alternative mechanism to the traditional view, namely shock-induced vacancy generation and clustering followed by nanovoid growth mediated by dislocation emission. This mechanism only becomes active at very large stresses, and thus it is desirable to establish a closed-form criterion for the macroscopic stress required to activate dislocation emission in porous materials. Following an approach similar to Lubarda and co-workers, we make use of stability arguments applied to the analytic solutions of the elastic interactions of dislocations and voids to derive the desired criterion. We then propose a dynamic nanovoid growth law that is motivated by the kinetics of dislocation emission. The resulting failure model is validated against a number of molecular dynamics simulations with favorable agreement. Lastly, we make use of our simple model to predict some interesting anomalous behaviors associated with high surface energies and nonlinear elasticity.

  16. Novel alleles of the transforming growth factor β-1 regulatory region and exon 1.

    PubMed

    Arrieta-Bolaños, E; Madrigal, J A; Shaw, B E

    2015-06-01

    Transforming growth factor β-1, encoded by the TGFB1 gene, is a cytokine that plays a central role in many physiologic and pathogenic processes with pleiotropic effects. Regulatory activity for this gene has been shown for 3.0 kb between positions -2665 and +423 from its translational start site. At least 17 TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles have been defined on the basis of 18 polymorphic sites. Polymorphisms in TGFB1's regulatory region have been associated with differential levels of expression of this cytokine and to genetic risk in cancer and transplantation. In this report, we present 19 novel TGFB1 regulatory region and exon 1 alleles: p018-p036. Amplification of TGFB1's regulatory region was performed with an in-house protocol, and novel alleles were defined by either allele-specific amplification and/or molecular cloning of the amplicons, followed by sequencing in isolation. Three of these novel alleles (p018, p019, and p020) are shown to be formed by novel combinations of the aforementioned known polymorphic positions. Another 16 novel alleles are shown to carry additional known and unknown single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Polymorphism in TGFB1's regulatory region could have an impact on important processes, including embryogenesis, hematopoiesis, carcinogenesis, angiogenesis, fibrosis, immune responses, and transplantation, making its characterization necessary. PMID:25808355

  17. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth.

    PubMed

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK. PMID:19932089

  18. Study of surfactant mediated growth of Ni/V superlattices

    SciTech Connect

    Amir, S. M.; Gupta, Mukul; Potdar, Satish; Gupta, Ajay; Stahn, Jochen

    2013-07-14

    The Ni/V multilayers are useful as soft x-ray mirrors, polarizers, and phase retarders. For these applications, it is necessary that the interfaces roughness and interdiffusion must be as small as possible. The V-on-Ni and Ni-on-V interfaces are asymmetric due to the difference in the surface free energy of Ni and V. In this work, we report Ag surfactant mediated growth of Ni/V superlattices prepared using ion beam sputter deposition technique. These superlattices were studied using x-ray and neutron scattering techniques. It was found that when added in an optimum amount, Ag surfactant results in reduced interface roughness and interdiffusion across the interfaces. Obtained results can be understood with the surfactant floating-off mechanism leading to a balance in the surface free energy of Ni and V.

  19. Sphingosine kinase-1 mediates androgen-induced osteoblast cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Claire; Lafosse, Jean-Michel; Malavaud, Bernard; Cuvillier, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Herein we report that the lipid kinase sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK1) is instrumental in mediating androgen-induced cell proliferation in osteoblasts. Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) triggered cell growth in steroid-deprived MC3T3 cells, which was associated with a rapid stimulation of SphK1 and activation of both Akt and ERK signaling pathways. This mechanism relied on functional androgen receptor/PI3K/Akt nongenotropic signaling as pharmacological antagonists could block SphK1 stimulation by DHT and its consequences. Finally, SphK1 inhibition not only abrogated DHT-induced ERK activation but also blocked cell proliferation, while ERK inhibition had no impact, suggesting that SphK1 was critical for DHT signaling yet independently of the ERK.

  20. Rotavirus NSP1 Mediates Degradation of Interferon Regulatory Factors through Targeting of the Dimerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Michelle M.; Barro, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 can inhibit expression of interferon (IFN) and IFN-stimulated gene products by inducing proteasome-mediated degradation of IFN-regulatory factors (IRFs), including IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7. All IRF proteins share an N-terminal DNA-binding domain (DBD), and IRF3, IRF5, and IRF7 contain a similar C-proximal IRF association domain (IAD) that mediates IRF dimerization. An autoinhibitory domain (ID) at the extreme C terminus interacts with the IAD, burying residues necessary for IRF dimerization. Phosphorylation of serine/threonine residues in the ID induces charge repulsions that unmask the IAD, enabling IRF dimerization and subsequent nuclear translocation. To define the region of IRF proteins targeted for degradation by NSP1, we generated IRF3 and IRF7 truncation mutants and transiently expressed each with simian SA11-4F NSP1. These assays indicated that the IAD represented a necessary and sufficient target for degradation. Because NSP1 did not mediate degradation of truncated forms of the IAD, NSP1 likely requires a structurally intact IAD for recognition and targeting of IRF proteins. IRF9, which contains an IAD-like region that directs interactions with signal inducer and activator of transcription (STAT) proteins, was also targeted for degradation by NSP1, while IRF1, which lacks an IAD, was not. Analysis of mutant forms of IRF3 unable to undergo dimerization or that were constitutively dimeric showed that both were targeted for degradation by NSP1. These results indicate that SA11-4F NSP1 can induce degradation of inactive and activated forms of IAD-containing IRF proteins (IRF3 to IRF9), allowing a multipronged attack on IFN-based pathways that promote antiviral innate and adaptive immune responses. PMID:23824805

  1. Self-Regulatory Processes Mediating between Career Calling and Perceived Employability and Life Satisfaction in Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praskova, Anna; Creed, Peter A.; Hood, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    We tested a cross-sectional, mediation model of career calling, in which career calling was associated positively with life satisfaction and perceptions of future employability, and these relationships were explained by the self-regulatory mechanisms of work effort, career strategies, and emotional regulation. Using a sample of 664 emerging adults…

  2. Axl as a mediator of cellular growth and survival

    PubMed Central

    Axelrod, Haley; Pienta, Kenneth J.

    2014-01-01

    The control of cellular growth and proliferation is key to the maintenance of homeostasis. Survival, proliferation, and arrest are regulated, in part, by Growth Arrest Specific 6 (Gas6) through binding to members of the TAM receptor tyrosine kinase family. Activation of the TAM receptors leads to downstream signaling through common kinases, but the exact mechanism within each cellular context varies and remains to be completely elucidated. Deregulation of the TAM family, due to its central role in mediating cellular proliferation, has been implicated in multiple diseases. Axl was cloned as the first TAM receptor in a search for genes involved in the progression of chronic to acute-phase leukemia, and has since been established as playing a critical role in the progression of cancer. The oncogenic nature of Axl is demonstrated through its activation of signaling pathways involved in proliferation, migration, inhibition of apoptosis, and therapeutic resistance. Despite its recent discovery, significant progress has been made in the development of effective clinical therapeutics targeting Axl. In order to accurately define the role of Axl in normal and diseased processes, it must be analyzed in a cell type-specific context. PMID:25344858

  3. Syntrophic growth via quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica A.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which microbial species exchange electrons are of interest because interspecies electron transfer can expand the metabolic capabilities of microbial communities. Previous studies with the humic substance analog anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) suggested that quinone-mediated interspecies electron transfer (QUIET) is feasible, but it was not determined if sufficient energy is available from QUIET to support the growth of both species. Furthermore, there have been no previous studies on the mechanisms for the oxidation of anthrahydroquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AHQDS). A co-culture of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate much faster in the presence of AQDS, and there was an increase in cell protein. G. sulfurreducens was more abundant, consistent with G. sulfurreducens obtaining electrons from acetate that G. metallireducens produced from ethanol, as well as from AHQDS. Co-cultures initiated with a citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens that was unable to use acetate as an electron donor also metabolized ethanol with the reduction of fumarate and cell growth, but acetate accumulated over time. G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens were equally abundant in these co-cultures reflecting the inability of the citrate synthase-deficient strain of G. sulfurreducens to metabolize acetate. Evaluation of the mechanisms by which G. sulfurreducens accepts electrons from AHQDS demonstrated that a strain deficient in outer-surface c-type cytochromes that are required for AQDS reduction was as effective at QUIET as the wild-type strain. Deletion of additional genes previously implicated in extracellular electron transfer also had no impact on QUIET. These results demonstrate that QUIET can yield sufficient energy to support the growth of both syntrophic partners, but that the mechanisms by which electrons are derived from extracellular hydroquinones require further investigation. PMID

  4. Tumor-secreted miR-214 induces regulatory T cells: a major link between immune evasion and tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yuan; Cai, Xing; Chen, Xi; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Wang, Zuoyun; Chen, Xiulan; Zhang, Wen; Yokoyama, Seiji; Wang, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Limin; Hou, Dongxia; Dong, Lei; Xu, Tao; Hiroi, Takachika; Yang, Fuquan; Ji, Hongbin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2014-10-01

    An increased population of CD4(+)CD25(high)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor-associated microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immune evasion. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed an increased secretion of miR-214 in various types of human cancers and mouse tumor models. Tumor-secreted miR-214 was sufficiently delivered into recipient T cells by microvesicles (MVs). In targeted mouse peripheral CD4(+) T cells, tumor-derived miR-214 efficiently downregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and promoted Treg expansion. The miR-214-induced Tregs secreted higher levels of IL-10 and promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, in vivo studies indicated that Treg expansion mediated by cancer cell-secreted miR-214 resulted in enhanced immune suppression and tumor implantation/growth in mice. The MV delivery of anti-miR-214 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) into mice implanted with tumors blocked Treg expansion and tumor growth. Our study reveals a novel mechanism through which cancer cell actively manipulates immune response via promoting Treg expansion. PMID:25223704

  5. Tumor-secreted miR-214 induces regulatory T cells: a major link between immune evasion and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yuan; Cai, Xing; Chen, Xi; Liang, Hongwei; Zhang, Yujing; Li, Jing; Wang, Zuoyun; Chen, Xiulan; Zhang, Wen; Yokoyama, Seiji; Wang, Cheng; Li, Liang; Li, Limin; Hou, Dongxia; Dong, Lei; Xu, Tao; Hiroi, Takachika; Yang, Fuquan; Ji, Hongbin; Zhang, Junfeng; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu

    2014-01-01

    An increased population of CD4+CD25highFoxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the tumor-associated microenvironment plays an important role in cancer immune evasion. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we observed an increased secretion of miR-214 in various types of human cancers and mouse tumor models. Tumor-secreted miR-214 was sufficiently delivered into recipient T cells by microvesicles (MVs). In targeted mouse peripheral CD4+ T cells, tumor-derived miR-214 efficiently downregulated phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and promoted Treg expansion. The miR-214-induced Tregs secreted higher levels of IL-10 and promoted tumor growth in nude mice. Furthermore, in vivo studies indicated that Treg expansion mediated by cancer cell-secreted miR-214 resulted in enhanced immune suppression and tumor implantation/growth in mice. The MV delivery of anti-miR-214 antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) into mice implanted with tumors blocked Treg expansion and tumor growth. Our study reveals a novel mechanism through which cancer cell actively manipulates immune response via promoting Treg expansion. PMID:25223704

  6. CHIP-mediated degradation of transglutaminase 2 negatively regulates tumor growth and angiogenesis in renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Min, B; Park, H; Lee, S; Li, Y; Choi, J-M; Lee, J Y; Kim, J; Choi, Y D; Kwon, Y-G; Lee, H-W; Bae, S-C; Yun, C-O; Chung, K C

    2016-07-14

    The multifunctional enzyme transglutaminase 2 (TG2) primarily catalyzes cross-linking reactions of proteins via (γ-glutamyl) lysine bonds. Several recent findings indicate that altered regulation of intracellular TG2 levels affects renal cancer. Elevated TG2 expression is observed in renal cancer. However, the molecular mechanism underlying TG2 degradation is not completely understood. Carboxyl-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) functions as an ubiquitin E3 ligase. Previous studies reveal that CHIP deficiency mice displayed a reduced life span with accelerated aging in kidney tissues. Here we show that CHIP promotes polyubiquitination of TG2 and its subsequent proteasomal degradation. In addition, TG2 upregulation contributes to enhanced kidney tumorigenesis. Furthermore, CHIP-mediated TG2 downregulation is critical for the suppression of kidney tumor growth and angiogenesis. Notably, our findings are further supported by decreased CHIP expression in human renal cancer tissues and renal cancer cells. The present work reveals that CHIP-mediated TG2 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation represent a novel regulatory mechanism that controls intracellular TG2 levels. Alterations in this pathway result in TG2 hyperexpression and consequently contribute to renal cancer. PMID:26568304

  7. Amphiregulin enhances regulatory T cell-suppressive function via the epidermal growth factor receptor.

    PubMed

    Zaiss, Dietmar M W; van Loosdregt, Jorg; Gorlani, Andrea; Bekker, Cornelis P J; Gröne, Andrea; Sibilia, Maria; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Roovers, Rob C; Coffer, Paul J; Sijts, Alice J A M

    2013-02-21

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is known to be critically involved in tissue development and homeostasis as well as in the pathogenesis of cancer. Here we showed that Foxp3(+) regulatory T (Treg) cells express EGFR under inflammatory conditions. Stimulation with the EGF-like growth factor Amphiregulin (AREG) markedly enhanced Treg cell function in vitro, and in a colitis and tumor vaccination model we showed that AREG was critical for efficient Treg cell function in vivo. In addition, mast cell-derived AREG fully restored optimal Treg cell function. These findings reveal EGFR as a component in the regulation of local immune responses and establish a link between mast cells and Treg cells. Targeting of this immune regulatory mechanism may contribute to the therapeutic successes of EGFR-targeting treatments in cancer patients. PMID:23333074

  8. Alu-mediated deletion of SOX10 regulatory elements in Waardenburg syndrome type 4.

    PubMed

    Bondurand, Nadége; Fouquet, Virginie; Baral, Viviane; Lecerf, Laure; Loundon, Natalie; Goossens, Michel; Duriez, Benedicte; Labrune, Philippe; Pingault, Veronique

    2012-09-01

    Waardenburg syndrome type 4 (WS4) is a rare neural crest disorder defined by the combination of Waardenburg syndrome (sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentation defects) and Hirschsprung disease (intestinal aganglionosis). Three genes are known to be involved in this syndrome, that is, EDN3 (endothelin-3), EDNRB (endothelin receptor type B), and SOX10. However, 15-35% of WS4 remains unexplained at the molecular level, suggesting that other genes could be involved and/or that mutations within known genes may have escaped previous screenings. Here, we searched for deletions within recently identified SOX10 regulatory sequences and describe the first characterization of a WS4 patient presenting with a large deletion encompassing three of these enhancers. Analysis of the breakpoint region suggests a complex rearrangement involving three Alu sequences that could be mediated by a FosTes/MMBIR replication mechanism. Taken together with recent reports, our results demonstrate that the disruption of highly conserved non-coding elements located within or at a long distance from the coding sequences of key genes can result in several neurocristopathies. This opens up new routes to the molecular dissection of neural crest disorders. PMID:22378281

  9. Streptococcus pyogenes CovRS mediates growth in iron starvation and in the presence of the human cationic antimicrobial peptide LL-37.

    PubMed

    Froehlich, Barbara J; Bates, Christopher; Scott, June R

    2009-01-01

    We found that the global regulatory two-component signal transduction system CovRS mediates the ability of group A streptococcus (GAS) to grow under two stresses encountered during infection: iron starvation and the presence of LL-37. We also showed that CovRS regulates transcription of the multimetal transporter operon that is important for GAS growth in a low concentration of iron. PMID:18996992

  10. A regulatory network of two galectins mediates the earliest steps of avian limb skeletal morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The skeletal elements of vertebrate embryonic limbs are prefigured by rod- and spot-like condensations of precartilage mesenchymal cells. The formation of these condensations depends on cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions, but how they are initiated and patterned is as yet unresolved. Results Here we provide evidence that galectins, β-galactoside-binding lectins with β-sandwich folding, play fundamental roles in these processes. We show that among the five chicken galectin (CG) genes, two, CG-1A, and CG-8, are markedly elevated in expression at prospective sites of condensation in vitro and in vivo, with their protein products appearing earlier in development than any previously described marker. The two molecules enhance one another's gene expression but have opposite effects on condensation formation and cartilage development in vivo and in vitro: CG-1A, a non-covalent homodimer, promotes this process, while the tandem-repeat-type CG-8 antagonizes it. Correspondingly, knockdown of CG-1A inhibits the formation of skeletal elements while knockdown of CG-8 enhances it. The apparent paradox of mutual activation at the gene expression level coupled with antagonistic roles in skeletogenesis is resolved by analysis of the direct effect of the proteins on precartilage cells. Specifically, CG-1A causes their aggregation, whereas CG-8, which has no adhesive function of its own, blocks this effect. The developmental appearance and regulation of the unknown cell surface moieties ("ligands") to which CG-1A and CG-8 bind were indicative of specific cognate- and cross-regulatory interactions. Conclusion Our findings indicate that CG-1A and CG-8 constitute a multiscale network that is a major mediator, earlier-acting than any previously described, of the formation and patterning of precartilage mesenchymal condensations in the developing limb. This network functions autonomously of limb bud signaling centers or other limb bud positional cues. PMID:21284876

  11. Glucitol induction in Bacillus subtilis is mediated by a regulatory factor, GutR.

    PubMed Central

    Ye, R; Rehemtulla, S N; Wong, S L

    1994-01-01

    Expression of the glucitol dehydrogenase gene (gutB) is suggested to be regulated both positively and negatively in Bacillus subtilis. A mutation in the gutR locus results in the constitutive expression of gutB. The exact nature of this mutation and the function of gutR are still unknown. Cloning and characterization of gutR indicated that this gene is located immediately upstream of gutB and is transcribed in the opposite direction relative to gutB. GutR is suggested to be a 95-kDa protein with a putative helix-turn-helix motif and a nucleotide binding domain at the N-terminal region. At the C-terminal region, a short sequence of GutR shows homology with two proteins, Cyc8 (glucose repression mediator protein) and GsiA (glucose starvation-inducible protein), known to be directly or indirectly involved in catabolite repression. Part of the C-terminal conserved sequence from these proteins shows all the features observed in the tetratricopeptide motif found in many eucaryotic proteins. To study the functional role of gutR, chromosomal gutR was insertionally inactivated. A total loss of glucitol inducibility was observed. Reintroduction of a functional gutR to the GutR-deficient strain through integration at the amyE locus restores the inducibility. Therefore, GutR serves as a regulatory factor to modulate glucitol induction. The nature of the gutR1 mutation was also determined. A single amino acid change (serine-289 to arginine-289) near the putative nucleotide binding motif B in GutR is responsible for the observed phenotype. Possible models for the action of GutR are discussed. Images PMID:8195087

  12. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  13. Common and small molecules as the ultimate regulatory and effector mediators of antigen-specific transplantation reactions

    PubMed Central

    Holan, Vladimir; Krulova, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    In spite of intensive research, the molecular basis of allograft and xenograft rejection still remains not fully understood. The acute rejection of an allograft is associated with the intragraft Th1 cytokine response, while tolerance of an allograft or xenograft rejection is accompanied by a higher production of the Th2 cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10. Nevertheless, these cytokines are not the final regulatory and effector molecules mediating transplantation reactions. Data indicate that the functioning of common molecules with enzymatic activities, such are inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), arginase, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) or indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), the bioavailability of their substrates (L-arginine, tryptophan, heme) and the cytotoxic and regulatory actions of their small gaseous products (NO, CO) can be the ultimate mechanisms responsible for effector or regulatory reactions. Using models of transplantation immunity and tolerance we show that T cell receptor-mediated recognition of allogeneic or xenogeneic antigens as well as the balance between immunity/tolerance induces distinct cytokine production profiles. The ratio between Th1 and Th2 cytokines efficiently regulates the expression of genes for common enzymes, such as iNOS, arginase, HO-1 and IDO. These enzymes may compete for substrates, such as L-arginine or tryptophan, and the final product of their activity are small molecules (NO, CO) displaying effector or regulatory functions of the immune system. Thus, it is suggested that in spite of the high immunological specificity of transplatation reaction, the ultimate players in regulatory and effector functions could be small and common molecules. PMID:24392309

  14. The Transcriptional and Gene Regulatory Network of Lactococcus lactis MG1363 during Growth in Milk

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Anne; Hansen, Morten E.; Kuipers, Oscar P.; Kilstrup, Mogens; Kok, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In the present study we examine the changes in the expression of genes of Lactococcus lactis subspecies cremoris MG1363 during growth in milk. To reveal which specific classes of genes (pathways, operons, regulons, COGs) are important, we performed a transcriptome time series experiment. Global analysis of gene expression over time showed that L. lactis adapted quickly to the environmental changes. Using upstream sequences of genes with correlated gene expression profiles, we uncovered a substantial number of putative DNA binding motifs that may be relevant for L. lactis fermentative growth in milk. All available novel and literature-derived data were integrated into network reconstruction building blocks, which were used to reconstruct and visualize the L. lactis gene regulatory network. This network enables easy mining in the chrono-transcriptomics data. A freely available website at http://milkts.molgenrug.nl gives full access to all transcriptome data, to the reconstructed network and to the individual network building blocks. PMID:23349698

  15. Spatio-temporal sequence of cross-regulatory events in root meristem growth

    PubMed Central

    Scacchi, Emanuele; Salinas, Paula; Gujas, Bojan; Santuari, Luca; Krogan, Naden; Ragni, Laura; Berleth, Thomas; Hardtke, Christian S.

    2010-01-01

    A central question in developmental biology is how multicellular organisms coordinate cell division and differentiation to determine organ size. In Arabidopsis roots, this balance is controlled by cytokinin-induced expression of SHORT HYPOCOTYL 2 (SHY2) in the so-called transition zone of the meristem, where SHY2 negatively regulates auxin response factors (ARFs) by protein–protein interaction. The resulting down-regulation of PIN-FORMED (PIN) auxin efflux carriers is considered the key event in promoting differentiation of meristematic cells. Here we show that this regulation involves additional, intermediary factors and is spatio-temporally constrained. We found that the described cytokinin–auxin crosstalk antagonizes BREVIS RADIX (BRX) activity in the developing protophloem. BRX is an auxin-responsive target of the prototypical ARF MONOPTEROS (MP), a key promoter of vascular development, and transiently enhances PIN3 expression to promote meristem growth in young roots. At later stages, cytokinin induction of SHY2 in the vascular transition zone restricts BRX expression to down-regulate PIN3 and thus limit meristem growth. Interestingly, proper SHY2 expression requires BRX, which could reflect feedback on the auxin responsiveness of SHY2 because BRX protein can directly interact with MP, likely acting as a cofactor. Thus, cross-regulatory antagonism between BRX and SHY2 could determine ARF activity in the protophloem. Our data suggest a model in which the regulatory interactions favor BRX expression in the early proximal meristem and SHY2 prevails because of supplementary cytokinin induction in the later distal meristem. The complex equilibrium of this regulatory module might represent a universal switch in the transition toward differentiation in various developmental contexts. PMID:21149702

  16. Innovation of a Regulatory Mechanism Modulating Semi-determinate Stem Growth through Artificial Selection in Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Jieqing; Li, Shuai; Chen, Zhixiang; Ma, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Terminal Flowering 1 (TFL1) in Arabidopsis and its functional orthologs in other plants specify indeterminate stem growth through their specific expression that represses floral identity genes in shoot apical meristems (SAMs), and that the loss-of-function mutations at these functional counterparts result in the transition of SAMs from the vegetative to reproductive state that is essential for initiation of terminal flowering and thus formation of determinate stems. However, little is known regarding how semi-determinate stems, which produce terminal racemes similar to those observed in determinate plants, are specified in any flowering plants. Here we show that semi-determinacy in soybean is modulated by transcriptional repression of Dt1, the functional ortholog of TFL1, in SAMs. Such repression is fulfilled by recently enabled spatiotemporal expression of Dt2, an ancestral form of the APETALA1/FRUITFULL orthologs, which encodes a MADS-box factor directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Dt1. In addition, Dt2 triggers co-expression of the putative SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (GmSOC1) in SAMs, where GmSOC1 interacts with Dt2, and also directly binds to the Dt1 regulatory sequence. Heterologous expression of Dt2 and Dt1 in determinate (tfl1) Arabidopsis mutants enables creation of semi-determinacy, but the same forms of the two genes in the tfl1 and soc1 background produce indeterminate stems, suggesting that Dt2 and SOC1 both are essential for transcriptional repression of Dt1. Nevertheless, the expression of Dt2 is unable to repress TFL1 in Arabidopsis, further demonstrating the evolutionary novelty of the regulatory mechanism underlying stem growth in soybean. PMID:26807727

  17. Innovation of a Regulatory Mechanism Modulating Semi-determinate Stem Growth through Artificial Selection in Soybean.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Dajian; Ping, Jieqing; Li, Shuai; Chen, Zhixiang; Ma, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that Terminal Flowering 1 (TFL1) in Arabidopsis and its functional orthologs in other plants specify indeterminate stem growth through their specific expression that represses floral identity genes in shoot apical meristems (SAMs), and that the loss-of-function mutations at these functional counterparts result in the transition of SAMs from the vegetative to reproductive state that is essential for initiation of terminal flowering and thus formation of determinate stems. However, little is known regarding how semi-determinate stems, which produce terminal racemes similar to those observed in determinate plants, are specified in any flowering plants. Here we show that semi-determinacy in soybean is modulated by transcriptional repression of Dt1, the functional ortholog of TFL1, in SAMs. Such repression is fulfilled by recently enabled spatiotemporal expression of Dt2, an ancestral form of the APETALA1/FRUITFULL orthologs, which encodes a MADS-box factor directly binding to the regulatory sequence of Dt1. In addition, Dt2 triggers co-expression of the putative SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (GmSOC1) in SAMs, where GmSOC1 interacts with Dt2, and also directly binds to the Dt1 regulatory sequence. Heterologous expression of Dt2 and Dt1 in determinate (tfl1) Arabidopsis mutants enables creation of semi-determinacy, but the same forms of the two genes in the tfl1 and soc1 background produce indeterminate stems, suggesting that Dt2 and SOC1 both are essential for transcriptional repression of Dt1. Nevertheless, the expression of Dt2 is unable to repress TFL1 in Arabidopsis, further demonstrating the evolutionary novelty of the regulatory mechanism underlying stem growth in soybean. PMID:26807727

  18. Methionine Enkephalin (MENK) Inhibits tumor growth through regulating CD4+Foxp3+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Meng, Yiming; Plotnikoff, Nicolas P; Youkilis, Gene; Griffin, Noreen; Wang, Enhua; Lu, Changlong; Shan, Fengping

    2015-01-01

    Methionine enkephalin (MENK), an endogenous neuropeptide, plays an crucial role in both neuroendocrine and immune systems. CD4+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are identified as a major subpopulation of T lymphocytes in suppressing immune system to keep balanced immunity. The aim of this research work was to elucidate the mechanisms via which MENK interacts with Tregs in cancer situation. The influence of MENK on transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) mediated conversion from naïve CD4+CD25- T cells to CD4+CD25+ Tregs was determined and the data from flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that MENK effectively inhibited the expression of Foxp3 during the process of TGF-βinduction. Furthermore, this inhibiting process was accompanied by diminishing phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of Smad2/3, confirmed by western blot (WB) analysis and immunofluorescence (IF) at molecular level. We established sarcoma mice model with S180 to investigate whether MENK could modulate Tregs in tumor circumstance. Our findings showed that MENK delayed the development of tumor in S180 tumor bearing mice and down-regulated level of Tregs. Together, these novel findings reached a conclusion that MENK could inhibit Tregs activity directly and retard tumor development through down-regulating Tregs in mice. This work advances the deepening understanding of the influence of MENK on Tregs in cancer situation, and relation of MENK with immune system, supporting the implication of MENK as a new strategy for cancer immunotherapy. PMID:25701137

  19. MEK inhibition prevents tumour-shed transforming growth factor-β-induced T-regulatory cell augmentation in tumour milieu.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Dewan M S; Panda, Abir K; Chakrabarty, Sreeparna; Bhattacharjee, Pushpak; Kajal, Kirti; Mohanty, Suchismita; Sarkar, Irene; Sarkar, Diptendra K; Kar, Santosh K; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2015-04-01

    Tumour progression is associated with immune-suppressive conditions that facilitate the escape of tumour cells from the regimen of immune cells, subsequently paralysing the host defence mechanisms. Induction of CD4(+)  CD25(+)  FoxP3(+) T regulatory (Treg) cells has been implicated in the tumour immune escape mechanism, although the novel anti-cancer treatment strategies targeting Treg cells remain unknown. The focus of this study is to define the interaction between tumour and immune system, i.e. how immune tolerance starts and gradually leads to the induction of adaptive Treg cells in the tumour microenvironment. Our study identified hyperactivated mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) -signalling as a potential target for reversing Treg cell augmentation in breast cancer patients. In more mechanistic detail, pharmacological inhibitors of MEK/ERK signalling inhibited transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production in tumour cells that essentially blocked TGF-β-SMAD3/SMAD4-mediated induction of CD25/interleukin-2 receptor α on CD4(+) T-cell surface. As a result high-affinity binding of interleukin-2 on those cells was prohibited, causing lack of Janus kinase 1 (JAK1)/JAK3-mediated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3)/STAT5 activation required for FoxP3 expression. Finally, for a more radical approach towards a safe MEK inhibitor, we validate the potential of multi-kinase inhibitor curcumin, especially the nano-curcumin made out of pure curcumin with greater bioavailability; in repealing tumour-shed TGF-β-induced Treg cell augmentation. PMID:25284464

  20. Galectin-1 suppresses autoimmune retinal disease by promoting concomitant Th2- and T regulatory-mediated anti-inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Marta A; Commodaro, Alessandra G; Ilarregui, Juan M; Bianco, Germán A; Liberman, Ana; Serra, Horacio M; Hirabayashi, Jun; Rizzo, Luiz V; Rabinovich, Gabriel A

    2006-05-15

    Intraocular inflammatory diseases are a common cause of severe visual impairment and blindness. In this study, we investigated the immunoregulatory role of galectin-1 (Gal-1), an endogenous lectin found at sites of T cell activation and immune privilege, in experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), a Th1-mediated model of retinal disease. Treatment with rGal-1 either early or late during the course of interphotoreceptor retinoid-binding protein-induced EAU was sufficient to suppress ocular pathology, inhibit leukocyte infiltration, and counteract pathogenic Th1 cells. Administration of rGal-1 at the early or late phases of EAU ameliorated disease by skewing the uveitogenic response toward nonpathogenic Th2 or T regulatory-mediated anti-inflammatory responses. Consistently, adoptive transfer of CD4(+) regulatory T cells obtained from rGal-1-treated mice prevented the development of active EAU in syngeneic recipients. In addition, increased levels of apoptosis were detected in lymph nodes from mice treated with rGal-1 during the efferent phase of the disease. Our results underscore the ability of Gal-1 to counteract Th1-mediated responses through different, but potentially overlapping anti-inflammatory mechanisms and suggest a possible therapeutic use of this protein for the treatment of human uveitic diseases of autoimmune etiology. PMID:16670344

  1. STAT1 and STAT3 do not participate in FGF-mediated growth arrest in chondrocytes.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Pavel; Salazar, Lisa; Goodridge, Helen S; Kashiwada, Tamara A; Schibler, Matthew J; Jelinkova, Petra; Thompson, Leslie Michels; Wilcox, William R

    2008-02-01

    Activating mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) cause several human skeletal dysplasias as a result of attenuation of cartilage growth. It is believed that FGFR3 inhibits chondrocyte proliferation via activation of signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) proteins, although the exact mechanism of both STAT activation and STAT-mediated inhibition of chondrocyte growth is unclear. We show that FGFR3 interacts with STAT1 in cells and is capable of activating phosphorylation of STAT1 in a kinase assay, thus potentially serving as a STAT1 kinase in chondrocytes. However, as demonstrated by western blotting with phosphorylation-specific antibodies, imaging of STAT nuclear translocation, STAT transcription factor assays and STAT luciferase reporter assays, FGF does not activate STAT1 or STAT3 in RCS chondrocytes, which nevertheless respond to a FGF stimulus with potent growth arrest. Moreover, addition of active STAT1 and STAT3 to the FGF signal, by means of cytokine treatment, SRC-mediated STAT activation or expression of constitutively active STAT mutants does not sensitize RCS chondrocytes to FGF-mediated growth arrest. Since FGF-mediated growth arrest is rescued by siRNA-mediated downregulation of the MAP kinase ERK1/2 but not STAT1 or STAT3, our data support a model whereby the ERK arm but not STAT arm of FGF signaling in chondrocytes accounts for the growth arrest phenotype. PMID:18198189

  2. Underpotential deposition-mediated layer-by-layer growth of thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia Xu; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-05-19

    A method of depositing contiguous, conformal submonolayer-to-multilayer thin films with atomic-level control is described. The process involves the use of underpotential deposition of a first element to mediate the growth of a second material by overpotential deposition. Deposition occurs between a potential positive to the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element where a full monolayer of mediating element forms, and a potential which is less than, or only slightly greater than, the bulk deposition potential of the material to be deposited. By cycling the applied voltage between the bulk deposition potential for the mediating element and the material to be deposited, repeated desorption/adsorption of the mediating element during each potential cycle can be used to precisely control film growth on a layer-by-layer basis. This process is especially suitable for the formation of a catalytically active layer on core-shell particles for use in energy conversion devices such as fuel cells.

  3. USP17 is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jaworski, Jakub; de la Vega, Michelle; Fletcher, Sarah J.; McFarlane, Cheryl; Greene, Michelle K.; Smyth, Andrew W.; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Johnston, James A.; Scott, Christopher J.; Rappoport, Joshua Z.; Burrows, James F.

    2014-01-01

    Previously we have shown that expression of the deubiquitinating enzyme USP17 is required for cell proliferation and motility. More recently we reported that USP17 deubiquitinates RCE1 isoform 2 and thus regulates the processing of ‘CaaX’ motif proteins. Here we now show that USP17 expression is induced by epidermal growth factor and that USP17 expression is required for clathrin mediated endocytosis of epidermal growth factor receptor. In addition, we show that USP17 is required for the endocytosis of transferrin, an archetypal substrate for clathrin mediated endocytosis, and that USP17 depletion impedes plasma membrane recruitment of the machinery required for clathrin mediated endocytosis. Thus, our data reveal that USP17 is necessary for epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin endocytosis via clathrin coated pits, indicate this is mediated via the regulation of the recruitment of the components of the endocytosis machinery and suggest USP17 may play a general role in receptor endocytosis. PMID:25026282

  4. Transcriptome-wide analysis of chromium-stress responsive microRNAs to explore miRNA-mediated regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Shen, Hong; Zhu, Xianwen; Zhang, Keyun; Chen, Yinglong; Yu, Rugang; Limera, Cecilia; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play pivotal roles in plant growth, development and stress response. Chromium (Cr) is one of common environmental contaminants possessing potential health hazards to living organisms. To date, little is known about the regulatory roles of miRNAs in response to Cr stress in radish. To systematically identify Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish, two sRNA libraries derived from Cr-free (CK) and Cr-treated (Cr200) roots were constructed. With Solexa sequencing, 81 known and 72 novel miRNAs were identified, from which 54 known and 16 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed under Cr stress. Several target genes for Cr-responsive miRNAs encode different transcription factor (TF) families, including SPLs, MYBs, ERFs and bZIPs, might regulate corresponding HM-related transcriptional processes in plants. Notably, a few key responsive enzymes or proteins, including HMA, YSL1 and ABC transporter protein were involved in Cr uptake and homeostasis process. Furthermore, the expression patterns of some Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets were validated by RT-qPCR. This study represents the first characterization of Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish. The outcomes of this study could provide novel insights into miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms underlying plant response to Cr stress in root vegetable crops. PMID:26357995

  5. Transcriptome-wide analysis of chromium-stress responsive microRNAs to explore miRNA-mediated regulatory networks in radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Shen, Hong; Zhu, Xianwen; Zhang, Keyun; Chen, Yinglong; Yu, Rugang; Limera, Cecilia; Liu, Liwang

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs that play pivotal roles in plant growth, development and stress response. Chromium (Cr) is one of common environmental contaminants possessing potential health hazards to living organisms. To date, little is known about the regulatory roles of miRNAs in response to Cr stress in radish. To systematically identify Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish, two sRNA libraries derived from Cr-free (CK) and Cr-treated (Cr200) roots were constructed. With Solexa sequencing, 81 known and 72 novel miRNAs were identified, from which 54 known and 16 novel miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed under Cr stress. Several target genes for Cr-responsive miRNAs encode different transcription factor (TF) families, including SPLs, MYBs, ERFs and bZIPs, might regulate corresponding HM-related transcriptional processes in plants. Notably, a few key responsive enzymes or proteins, including HMA, YSL1 and ABC transporter protein were involved in Cr uptake and homeostasis process. Furthermore, the expression patterns of some Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets were validated by RT-qPCR. This study represents the first characterization of Cr-responsive miRNAs and their targets in radish. The outcomes of this study could provide novel insights into miRNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms underlying plant response to Cr stress in root vegetable crops. PMID:26357995

  6. Small regulatory RNA-induced growth rate heterogeneity of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Mars, Ruben A T; Nicolas, Pierre; Ciccolini, Mariano; Reilman, Ewoud; Reder, Alexander; Schaffer, Marc; Mäder, Ulrike; Völker, Uwe; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Denham, Emma L

    2015-03-01

    Isogenic bacterial populations can consist of cells displaying heterogeneous physiological traits. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) could affect this heterogeneity since they act by fine-tuning mRNA or protein levels to coordinate the appropriate cellular behavior. Here we show that the sRNA RnaC/S1022 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis can suppress exponential growth by modulation of the transcriptional regulator AbrB. Specifically, the post-transcriptional abrB-RnaC/S1022 interaction allows B. subtilis to increase the cell-to-cell variation in AbrB protein levels, despite strong negative autoregulation of the abrB promoter. This behavior is consistent with existing mathematical models of sRNA action, thus suggesting that induction of protein expression noise could be a new general aspect of sRNA regulation. Importantly, we show that the sRNA-induced diversity in AbrB levels generates heterogeneity in growth rates during the exponential growth phase. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that the resulting subpopulations of fast- and slow-growing B. subtilis cells reflect a bet-hedging strategy for enhanced survival of unfavorable conditions. PMID:25790031

  7. Impact of Age at Administration, Lysosomal Storage, and Transgene Regulatory Elements on AAV2/8-Mediated Rat Liver Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Cotugno, Gabriella; Annunziata, Patrizia; Barone, Maria Vittoria; Karali, Marianthi; Banfi, Sandro; Auricchio, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Liver-directed gene transfer is being investigated for the treatment of systemic or liver-specific diseases. Recombinant vectors based on adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV2/8) efficiently transduce liver cells allowing long term transgene expression after a single administration in animal models and in patients. We evaluated the impact on AAV2/8-mediated rat liver transduction of the following variables: i) age at vector administration, ii) presence of lysosomal storage in liver cells, and iii) regulatory elements included in the transgene expression cassette. We found that systemic administration of AAV2/8 to newborn rats results in vector genome dilution and reduced transduction efficacy when compared to adult injected animals, presumably due to hepatocyte proliferation. Accumulation of glycosaminoglycans in lysosomes does not impact on levels and distribution of AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction. Transgene expression occurs in hepatocytes but not in Kupffer or liver endothelial cells when the liver-specific thyroxine-binding-globulin promoter is used. However, extra-hepatic transduction is observed in the spleen and kidney of animals injected at birth. The use of target sequences for the hematopoietic-specific microRNA miR142-3p does not improve liver transduction efficacy neither reduce immune responses to the lysosomal enzyme arylsulfatase B. The inclusion of a variant of the Woodchuck hepatitis virus post-transcriptional regulatory element (WPRE-m) decreases AAV2/8-mediated liver transduction levels. As AAV2/8-mediated liver gene transfer is entering in the clinical arena, these data will provide relevant information to the design of efficient AAV2/8-based therapeutic strategies. PMID:22428010

  8. Industry growth, work role characteristics, and job satisfaction: a cross-level mediation model.

    PubMed

    Ford, Michael T; Wooldridge, Jessica D

    2012-10-01

    The associations between industry revenue growth, individual work role characteristics, and job satisfaction were examined in this cross-level mediation analysis. Work roles were expected to be more autonomous, involve greater skill variety, and offer more opportunities for growth and development for workers in growing industries than for workers in declining industries. Supervisor support was also hypothesized to be stronger for workers in high-growth industries. Results from a nationally representative (U.S.) sample of service industry workers, using multilevel modeling, supported these propositions and suggest that job enrichment mediates relations between industry growth and job satisfaction. Associations between industry growth and autonomy were also stronger among workers in occupations that are less normatively autonomous, suggesting that industry growth fosters a weakening, and industry decline a strengthening, of traditional differences in autonomy across work roles. These results contribute to a multilevel perspective on organizational environments, individual work roles, and worker attitudes and well-being. PMID:22888860

  9. Sterol regulatory element binding protein-dependent regulation of lipid synthesis supports cell survival and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Regulation of lipid metabolism via activation of sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) has emerged as an important function of the Akt/mTORC1 signaling axis. Although the contribution of dysregulated Akt/mTORC1 signaling to cancer has been investigated extensively and altered lipid metabolism is observed in many tumors, the exact role of SREBPs in the control of biosynthetic processes required for Akt-dependent cell growth and their contribution to tumorigenesis remains unclear. Results We first investigated the effects of loss of SREBP function in non-transformed cells. Combined ablation of SREBP1 and SREBP2 by siRNA-mediated gene silencing or chemical inhibition of SREBP activation induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress and engaged the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway, specifically under lipoprotein-deplete conditions in human retinal pigment epithelial cells. Induction of ER-stress led to inhibition of protein synthesis through increased phosphorylation of eIF2α. This demonstrates for the first time the importance of SREBP in the coordination of lipid and protein biosynthesis, two processes that are essential for cell growth and proliferation. SREBP ablation caused major changes in lipid composition characterized by a loss of mono- and poly-unsaturated lipids and induced accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Alterations in lipid composition and increased ROS levels, rather than overall changes to lipid synthesis rate, were required for ER-stress induction. Next, we analyzed the effect of SREBP ablation in a panel of cancer cell lines. Importantly, induction of apoptosis following SREBP depletion was restricted to lipoprotein-deplete conditions. U87 glioblastoma cells were highly susceptible to silencing of either SREBP isoform, and apoptosis induced by SREBP1 depletion in these cells was rescued by antioxidants or by restoring the levels of mono-unsaturated fatty acids. Moreover, silencing of SREBP1

  10. HDM2 promotes WIP1-mediated medulloblastoma growth

    PubMed Central

    Buss, Meghan C.; Read, Tracy-Ann; Schniederjan, Matthew J.; Gandhi, Khanjan; Castellino, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant childhood brain tumor. The protein phosphatase and oncogene WIP1 is over-expressed or amplified in a significant number of primary human medulloblastomas and cell lines. In the present study, we examine an important mechanism by which WIP1 promotes medulloblastoma growth using in vitro and in vivo models. Human cell lines and intracerebellar xenografted animal models were used to study the role of WIP1 and the major TP53 regulator, HDM2, in medulloblastoma growth. Stable expression of WIP1 enhances growth of TP53 wild-type medulloblastoma cells, compared with cells with stable expression of an empty-vector or mutant WIP1. In an animal model, WIP1 enhances proliferation and reduces the survival of immunodeficient mice bearing intracerebellar xenografted human medulloblastoma cells. Cells with increased WIP1 expression also exhibit increased expression of HDM2. HDM2 knockdown or treatment with the HDM2 inhibitor Nutlin-3a, the active enantomer of Nutlin-3, specifically inhibits the growth of medulloblastoma cells with increased WIP1 expression. Nutlin-3a does not affect growth of medulloblastoma cells with stable expression of an empty vector or of mutant WIP1. Knockdown of WIP1 or treatment with the WIP1 inhibitor CCT007093 results in increased phosphorylation of known WIP1 targets, reduced HDM2 expression, and reduced growth specifically in WIP1 wild-type and high-expressing medulloblastoma cells. Combined WIP1 and HDM2 inhibition is more effective than WIP1 inhibition alone in blocking growth of WIP1 high-expressing medulloblastoma cells. Our preclinical study supports a role for therapies that target WIP1 and HDM2 in the treatment of medulloblastoma. PMID:22379189

  11. Lipopolysaccharide from Rhodobacter sphaeroides Attenuates Microglia-Mediated Inflammation and Phagocytosis and Directs Regulatory T Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Gaikwad, Sagar; Agrawal-Rajput, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Microglia activation and neuroinflammation are key events during the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Microglia exhibits toll-like receptors (TLRs), with predominant expression of TLR4, inducing aberrant neuroinflammation and exacerbated neurotoxicity. Studies suggest that microglia initiate infiltration of T cells into the brain that critically influence disease conditions. We report that LPS-Rs, through TLR4 antagonism, significantly inhibit TLR4 mediated inflammatory molecules like IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, COX-2, iNOS, and NO. LPS-Rs regulates JNK/p38 MAPKs and p65-NF-κB signaling pathways, which we report as indispensible for LPS induced neuroinflammation. LPS-Rs mitigates microglial phagocytic activity and we are first to report regulatory role of LPS-Rs which blocked microglia mediated inflammation and apoptotic cell death. LPS-Rs significantly inhibits expression of costimulatory molecules CD80, CD86, and CD40. Chemokine receptor, CCR5, and T cell recruitment chemokines, MIP-1α and CCL5, were negatively regulated by LPS-Rs. Furthermore, LPS-Rs significantly inhibited lymphocyte proliferation with skewed regulatory T (Treg) cell response as evidenced by increased FOXP3, IL-10, and TGF-β. Additionally, LPS-Rs serves to induce coordinated immunosuppressive response and confer tolerogenic potential to activated microglia extending neurosupportive microenvironment. TLR4 antagonism can be a strategy providing neuroprotection through regulation of microglia as well as the T cells. PMID:26457222

  12. Glucagon-like peptide 2 may mediate growth and development of the bovine gastrointestinal tract

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2), secreted by enteroendocrine cells, promotes growth, reduces apoptosis, and enhances blood flow, nutrient absorption, and barrier function in intestinal epithelium of monogastric species. Regulatory functions of GLP-2 in the ruminant gastrointestinal tract (GIT) are u...

  13. Collapsin Response Mediator Protein-2 (Crmp2) Regulates Trafficking by Linking Endocytic Regulatory Proteins to Dynein Motors*

    PubMed Central

    Rahajeng, Juliati; Giridharan, Sai S. P.; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Endocytosis is a conserved cellular process in which nutrients, lipids, and receptors are internalized and transported to early endosomes, where they are sorted and either channeled to degradative pathways or recycled to the plasma membrane. MICAL-L1 and EHD1 are important regulatory proteins that control key endocytic transport steps. However, the precise mechanisms by which they mediate transport, and particularly the mode by which they connect to motor proteins, have remained enigmatic. Here we have identified the collapsin response mediator protein-2 (Crmp2) as an interaction partner of MICAL-L1 in non-neuronal cells. Crmp2 interacts with tubulin dimers and kinesin and negatively regulates dynein-based transport in neuronal cells, but its expression and function in non-neuronal cells have remained poorly characterized. Upon Crmp2 depletion, we observed dramatic relocalization of internalized transferrin (Tf) from peripheral vesicles to the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), similar to the effect of depleting either MICAL-L1 or EHD1. Moreover, Tf relocalization to the ERC could be inhibited by interfering with microtubule polymerization, consistent with a role for uncoupled motor protein-based transport upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. Finally, transfection of dynamitin, a component of the dynactin complex whose overexpression inhibits dynein activity, prevented the relocalization of internalized Tf to the ERC upon depletion of Crmp2, MICAL-L1, or EHD1. These data provide the first trafficking regulatory role for Crmp2 in non-neuronal cells and support a model in which Crmp2 is an important endocytic regulatory protein that links MICAL-L1·EHD1-based vesicular transport to dynein motors. PMID:20801876

  14. A MicroRNA-Mediated Positive Feedback Regulatory Loop of the NF-κB Pathway in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Hongliang; Yuan, Jia; Chen, Yonggui; Li, Sedong; Su, Ziqi; Wei, Erman; Li, Chaozheng; Weng, Shaoping; Xu, Xiaopeng; He, Jianguo

    2016-05-01

    In the evolutionarily conserved canonical NF-κB pathway, degradation of the NF-κB inhibitor IκB in the cytoplasmic NF-κB/IκB complex allows the liberated NF-κB to translocate into the nucleus to activate various target genes. The regulatory mechanism governing this process needs further investigation. In this study, a novel microRNA, temporarily named miR-1959, was first identified from an invertebrate Litopenaeus vannamei miR-1959 targets the 3'-untranslated region of the IκB homolog Cactus gene and reduces the protein level of Cactus in vivo, whereas the NF-κB homolog Dorsal directly binds the miR-1959 promoter to activate its transcription. Therefore, miR-1959 mediates a positive feedback regulatory loop, in that Dorsal activates miR-1959 expression, and in turn, miR-1959 inhibits the expression of Cactus, further leading to enhanced activation of Dorsal. Moreover, miR-1959 regulates the expression of many antimicrobial peptides in vivo and is involved in antibacterial immunity. To our knowledge, it is the first discovery of a microRNA-mediated feedback loop that directly regulates the NF-κB/IκB complex. This positive feedback loop could collaborate with the known NF-κB/IκB negative loop to generate a dynamic balance to regulate the activity of NF-κB, thus constituting an effective regulatory mechanism at the critical node of the NF-κB pathway. PMID:26994223

  15. The growth regulatory fibroblast IK channel is the prominent electrophysiological feature of rat prostatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rane, S G

    2000-03-16

    Physiological effectors for mitogenic cell growth control remain to be determined for mammalian tumor cells, particularly those derived from prostatic tissue. One such effector for mitogenic Ras/MAPK signaling in fibroblasts is an intermediate-conductance, calcium-activated potassium channel (FIK). In this study patch-clamp electrophysiology was used to show that both AT2.1 and MatLyLu rat prostate cancer cell lines express high levels of a current identified as FIK, based on the following criteria: activation by elevation of intracellular calcium, voltage independence, potassium selectivity, and block by charybdotoxin (ChTX) and the Stichodactyla helianthus potassium channel neurotoxin (StK). FIK current densities in AT2.1 and MatLyLu cells were comparable to the high levels seen in fibroblasts transfected with oncogenic Ras or Raf, suggesting hyperactivity of the Ras/MAPK pathway in prostatic cancer cells. Voltage-gated sodium current was present in most MatLyLu cells but absent from AT2.1 cells, and all AT2.1 cells had voltage-gated potassium currents. Thus, FIK is the main electrophysiological feature of rat prostatic cancer cells as it is for mitogenically active fibroblasts, suggesting it may play a similar growth regulatory role in both. PMID:10708575

  16. Antioxidant and insect growth regulatory activities of stilbenes and extracts from Yucca periculosa.

    PubMed

    Torres, Patricio; Avila, J Guillermo; Romo de Vivar, Alfonso; García, Ana M; Marín, Juan C; Aranda, Eduardo; Céspedes, Carlos L

    2003-09-01

    The methanol extract from the bark of Yucca periculosa F. Baker afforded 4,4'-dihydroxstilbene, resveratrol and 3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4-methoxystilbene and had growth regulatory activity against the Fall Army worm (Spodoptera frugiperda J.E. Smith, Lepidoptera:Noctuidae) an insect pest of corn. The most active compound was 3,3',5,5'-tetrahydroxy-4-methoxystilbene which had significant effects at 3 microg/g in diets. In addition to the inhibitory activity on bleaching of crocin induced by alkoxyl radicals, these compounds also demonstrated scavenging properties toward 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl in TLC autographic and spectrophotometric assays. Our results indicate that these compounds could be involved in interference of sclerotization and moulting. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of the insect. The results were fully comparable to known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and Cedrela extracts and have had a possible role as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:12943764

  17. Light-Mediated Hormonal Regulation of Plant Growth and Development.

    PubMed

    de Wit, Mieke; Galvão, Vinicius Costa; Fankhauser, Christian

    2016-04-29

    Light is crucial for plant life, and perception of the light environment dictates plant growth, morphology, and developmental changes. Such adjustments in growth and development in response to light conditions are often established through changes in hormone levels and signaling. This review discusses examples of light-regulated processes throughout a plant's life cycle for which it is known how light signals lead to hormonal regulation. Light acts as an important developmental switch in germination, photomorphogenesis, and transition to flowering, and light cues are essential to ensure light capture through architectural changes during phototropism and the shade avoidance response. In describing well-established links between light perception and hormonal changes, we aim to give insight into the mechanisms that enable plants to thrive in variable light environments. PMID:26905653

  18. Regulation of gene expression mediating indeterminate muscle growth in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Ahammad, A K Shakur; Asaduzzaman, Md; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo; Kinoshita, Shigeharu

    2015-08-01

    Teleosts are unique among vertebrates due to their indeterminate muscle growth, i.e., continued production of neonatal muscle fibers until death. However, the molecular mechanism(s) underlying this property is unknown. Here, we focused on the torafugu (Takifugu rubripes) myosin heavy chain gene, MYHM2528-1, which is specifically expressed in neonatal muscle fibers produced by indeterminate muscle growth. We examined the flanking region of MYHM2528-1 through an in vivo reporter assay using zebrafish (Danio rerio) and identified a 2100 bp 5'-flanking sequence that contained sufficient promoter activity to allow specific gene expression. The effects of enhanced promoter activity were observed at the outer region of the fast muscle and the dorsal edge of slow muscle in zebrafish larvae. At the juvenile stage, the promoter was specifically activated in small diameter muscle fibers scattered throughout fast muscle and in slow muscle near the septum separating slow and fast muscles. This spatio-temporal promoter activity overlapped with known myogenic zones involved in teleost indeterminate muscle growth. A deletion mutant analysis revealed that the -2100 to -600 bp 5'flanking sequence of MYHM2528-1 is essential for promoter activity. This region contains putative binding sites for several representative myogenesis-related transcription factors and nuclear factor of activated T-cell (NFAT), a transcription activator involved in regeneration of mammalian adult skeletal muscle. A significant reduction in the promoter activity of the MYHM2528-1 deletion constructs was observed in accordance with a reduction in the number of these binding sites, suggesting the involvement of specific transcription factors in indeterminate muscle growth. PMID:25842264

  19. Regulatory elements mediating transcription from the Drosophila melanogaster actin 5C proximal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Y T; Keller, E B

    1990-01-01

    The major cytoskeletal actin gene of Drosophila melanogaster, the actin 5C gene, has two promoters, the proximal one of which controls constitutive synthesis of actin in all growing tissues. To locate regulatory elements required for constitutive activity of the proximal promoter, mutants of this promoter were fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and assayed for transient expression activity in cultured Drosophila embryonic Schneider line 2 cells. An essential regulatory element has been located 313 base pairs upstream from the cap site. Deletion of this element lowered expression to one-third of the wild-type level. The element has the sequence AAGTTGTAGTTG, as shown by protein-binding footprinting with the reagent methidiumpropyl-EDTA-Fe(II). This element is probably not a general one, since it was not detected in a search of the published 5'-flanking sequences of 27 Drosophila genes. In addition to this regulatory element, there are five GAGA elements in the actin 5C proximal promoter, some or all of which are essential for the promoter activity as shown by an in vivo competition assay. Although this promoter has no classical TATA element, there is an essential promoter region about 35 base pairs upstream from the cap site that could be a TATA surrogate. The promoter also shows sequences homologous to the alcohol dehydrogenase factor 1-binding site and to the core of the vertebrate serum response element, but mutations of these sites did not affect promoter activity in transient expression assays. Images PMID:2104658

  20. Pathogen Virulence Impedes Mutualist-Mediated Enhancement of Host Juvenile Growth via Inhibition of Protein Digestion

    PubMed Central

    Erkosar, Berra; Storelli, Gilles; Mitchell, Mélanie; Bozonnet, Loan; Bozonnet, Noémie; Leulier, François

    2015-01-01

    Summary The microbial environment impacts many aspects of metazoan physiology through largely undefined molecular mechanisms. The commensal strain Lactobacillus plantarumWJL (LpWJL) sustains Drosophila hormonal signals that coordinate systemic growth and maturation of the fly. Here we examine the underlying mechanisms driving these processes and show that LpWJL promotes intestinal peptidase expression, leading to increased intestinal proteolytic activity, enhanced dietary protein digestion, and increased host amino acid levels. LpWJL-mediated peptidase upregulation is partly driven by the peptidoglycan recognition and signaling cascade PGRP-LE/Imd/Relish. Additionally, this mutualist-mediated physiological benefit is antagonized upon pathogen infection. Pathogen virulence selectively impedes LpWJL-mediated intestinal peptidase activity enhancement and juvenile growth promotion but does not alter growth of germ-free animals. Our study reveals the adaptability of host physiology to the microbial environment, whereby upon acute infection the host switches to pathogen-mediated host immune defense at the expense of mutualist-mediated growth promotion. PMID:26439865

  1. Plasmodesmata-mediated intercellular signaling during plant growth and development

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Shri R.; Yan, Dawei; Sevilem, Iris; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) are cytoplasmic channels that connect neighboring cells for cell-to-cell communication. PD structure and function vary temporally and spatially to allow formation of symplastic domains during different stages of plant development. Reversible deposition of callose at PD plays an important role in controlling molecular trafficking through PD by regulating their size exclusion limit. Previously, we reported several semi-dominant mutants for CALLOSE SYNTHASE 3 (CALS3) gene, which overproduce callose at PD in Arabidopsis. By combining two of these mutations in a LexA-VP16-ER (XVE)-based estradiol inducible vector system, a tool known as the “icals3m system” was developed to temporally obstruct the symplastic connections in a specified spatial domain. The system has been successfully tested and used, in combination with other methods, to investigate the route for mobile signals such as the SHR protein, microRNA165/6, and cytokinins in Arabidopsis roots, and also to understand the role of symplastic domain formation during lateral root development. We envision that this tool may also be useful for identifying tissue-specific symplastic regulatory networks and to analyze symplastic movement of metabolites. PMID:24596574

  2. Dynamic designing of microstructures by chemical gradient-mediated growth

    PubMed Central

    Shim, Tae Soup; Yang, Seung-Man; Kim, Shin-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Shape is one of the most important determinants of the properties of microstructures. Despite of a recent progress on microfabrication techniques, production of three-dimensional micro-objects are yet to be fully achieved. Nature uses reaction–diffusion process during bottom-up self-assembly to create functional shapes and patterns with high complexity. Here we report a method to produce polymeric microstructures by using a dynamic reaction–diffusion process during top-down photolithography, providing unprecedented control over shape and composition. In radical polymerization, oxygen inhibits reaction, and therefore diffusion of oxygen significantly alters spatial distribution of growth rate. Therefore, growth pathways of the microstructures can be controlled by engineering a concentration gradient of oxygen. Moreover, stepwise control of chemical gradients enables the creation of highly complex microstructures. The ease of use and high controllability of this technology provide new opportunities for microfabrication and for fundamental studies on the relationships between shape and function for the materials. PMID:25766762

  3. Autophagy is required for IL-2-mediated fibroblast growth

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Rui; Tang, Daolin; Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh III, Herbert J.

    2013-02-15

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved pathway responsible for delivery of cytoplasmic material into the lysosomal degradation pathway to enable vesicular exocytosis. Interleukin (IL)-2 is produced by T-cells and its activity is important for immunoregulation. Fibroblasts are an immune competent cell type, playing a critical role in wound healing, chronic inflammation, and tumor development. Although autophagy plays an important role in each of these processes, whether it regulates IL-2 activity in fibroblasts is unknown. Here, we show that autophagy is required for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts. IL-2 significantly induced autophagy in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and primary lung fibroblasts. Autophagy inhibitors (e.g., 3-methylamphetamine and bafilomycin A1) or knockdown of ATG5 and beclin 1 blocked clinical grade IL-2-induced autophagy. Moreover, IL-2 induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation in MEFs and promoted interaction between HMGB1 and beclin1, which is required for autophagy induction. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of autophagy inhibited IL-2-induced cell proliferation and enhanced IL-2-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that autophagy is an important pro-survival regulator for IL-2-induced cell growth in fibroblasts.

  4. Evolutionary, regulatory and mediation aspects of T.b. rhodesiense and its endemicity in Lambwe Valley, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Mwanje, Justus I.; Mwanje, M. T.

    1995-11-01

    The transmission of the human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) infection, also known as human sleeping sickness, depends on environmental factors operating at the mega-, macro-, and micro-scale levels. However, at the latter level T.b. rhodesiense parasite undergoes metacyclic development processes, controlled by its evolution, regulatory and mediation factors. Selective pressures acting on host-parasite interactions are thought to influence the genetics of the parasite and its hosts. In retrospect, the phenotypic difference responsible for the change in fitness of the parasite is complicated, since natural variation in a phenotype may be maintained by frequency-dependent selection, with species-specific fitness dynamics. Although little evidence exists on aspects of mutualism o f trypanosomes, it is possible that synergistic interactions among pathogens may be involved in the complex of phenotype variations. This paper considers the underlying dynamics with reference to the endemicity of the infection in Lambwe Valley ecosystem. PMID:12160423

  5. Methylselenocysteine Resets the Rhythmic Expression of Circadian and Growth Regulatory Genes Disrupted by Nitrosomethylurea in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ming Zhu; Zhang, Xun; Zarbl, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological and animal studies indicate that disruption of circadian rhythm increases breast cancer risk. Previously, we demonstrated that methylselenocysteine (MSC) reduced the incidence of N-nitroso-N-methylurea (NMU)-induced mammary carcinomas in Fischer 344 rats by 63%. MSC also increased the expression of Period 2 (Per2) and D-binding protein (DBP), providing evidence for a link between circadian rhythm and chemoprevention. Here, we report that NMU disrupted the expression of core circadian genes (Per1, Per2, Cry1, Cry2, and RevErbAα) and circadian-controlled genes (CCGs), including melatonin receptor 1α (MTNR1A), estrogen receptors (ER a and β), and growth regulatory genes (Trp53, p21, Gadd45α, and c-Myc) in mammary glands of F344 rats. By contrast, dietary MSC (3 ppm Selenium) given for 30 days, significantly enhanced the circadian expression of these genes (except for Cry1 and Cry2). The largest effect was on the levels of the Per2, MTNR1A, and ERβ mRNAs, which respectively showed 16.5-, 4.7-, and 9.5-fold increases in their rhythm-adjusted means, and 44.5-, 6.5-, and 9.7-fold increases in amplitude as compared to the control diet. MSC also shifted the peak expression times of these genes to Zeitgeber Time 12 (ZT12; light off). MSC also induced rhythmic expression of Trp53, p21, and Gadd45α mRNAs with peak levels at ZT12, when c-Myc expression was at its lowest level. However, MSC had no significant impact on the circadian expression of these genes in liver. These results suggest that dietary MSC counteracted the disruptive effect of NMU on circadian expression of genes essential to the normal mammary cell growth and differentiation. PMID:20424134

  6. Insulin-like growth factor-1 stimulates regulatory T cells and suppresses autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Bilbao, Daniel; Luciani, Luisa; Johannesson, Bjarki; Piszczek, Agnieszka; Rosenthal, Nadia

    2014-01-01

    The recent precipitous rise in autoimmune diseases is placing an increasing clinical and economic burden on health systems worldwide. Current therapies are only moderately efficacious, often coupled with adverse side effects. Here, we show that recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-1 (rhIGF-1) stimulates proliferation of both human and mouse regulatory T (Treg) cells in vitro and when delivered systemically via continuous minipump, it halts autoimmune disease progression in mouse models of type 1 diabetes (STZ and NOD) and multiple sclerosis (EAE) in vivo. rhIGF-1 administration increased Treg cells in affected tissues, maintaining their suppressive properties. Genetically, ablation of the IGF-1 receptor specifically on Treg cell populations abrogated the beneficial effects of rhIGF-1 administration on the progression of multiple sclerotic symptoms in the EAE model, establishing a direct effect of IGF-1 on Treg cell proliferation. These results establish systemically delivered rhIGF-1 as a specific, effective stimulator of Treg cell action, underscoring the clinical feasibility of manipulating natural tolerance mechanisms to suppress autoimmune disease. PMID:25339185

  7. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-05-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors.

  8. Regulatory Mode and Risk-Taking: The Mediating Role of Anticipated Regret

    PubMed Central

    Panno, Angelo; Lauriola, Marco; Pierro, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We propose that decision maker’s regulatory mode affects risk-taking through anticipated regret. In the Study 1 either a locomotion or an assessment orientation were experimentally induced, and in the Studies 2 and 3 these different orientations were assessed as chronic individual differences. To assess risk-taking we used two behavioral measures of risk: BART and hot-CCT. The results show that experimentally induced assessment orientation–compared to locomotion–leads to decreased risk-taking through increased anticipated regret (Study 1). People chronically predisposed to be in the assessment state take less risk through increased anticipated regret (Study 2 and Study 3). Study 2 results also show a marginally non-significant indirect effect of chronic locomotion mode on BART through anticipated regret. Differently, Study 3 shows that people chronically predisposed to be in the locomotion state take greater risk through decreased anticipated regret, when play a dynamic risk task triggering stronger emotional arousal. Through all three studies, the average effect size for the relationship of assessment with anticipated regret was in the moderate-large range, whereas for risk-taking was in the moderate range. The average effect size for the relationship of locomotion with anticipated regret was in the moderate range, whereas for risk-taking was in the small-moderate range. These results increase our understanding of human behavior under conditions of risk obtaining novel insights into regulatory mode theory and decision science. PMID:26580960

  9. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met(5)]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met(5)]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors. PMID:27193598

  10. The simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster Crassostrea gigas mediates complex functions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaoqun; Wang, Lingling; Zhou, Zhi; Sun, Ying; Wang, Mengqiang; Wang, Hao; Hou, Zhanhui; Gao, Dahai; Gao, Qiang; Song, Linsheng

    2016-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-immune (NEI) regulatory network is a complex system, which plays an indispensable role in the immunity of the host. In the present study, the bioinformatical analysis of the transcriptomic data from oyster Crassostrea gigas and further biological validation revealed that oyster TNF (CgTNF-1 CGI_10018786) could activate the transcription factors NF-κB and HSF (heat shock transcription factor) through MAPK signaling pathway, and then regulate apoptosis, redox reaction, neuro-regulation and protein folding in oyster haemocytes. The activated immune cells then released neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, norepinephrine and [Met5]-enkephalin to regulate the immune response by arising the expression of three TNF (CGI_10005109, CGI_10005110 and CGI_10006440) and translocating two NF-κB (Cgp65, CGI_10018142 and CgRel, CGI_10021567) between the cytoplasm and nuclei of haemocytes. Neurotransmitters exhibited the immunomodulation effects by influencing apoptosis and phagocytosis of oyster haemocytes. Acetylcholine and norepinephrine could down-regulate the immune response, while [Met5]-enkephalin up-regulate the immune response. These results suggested that the simple neuroendocrine-immune regulatory network in oyster might be activated by oyster TNF and then regulate the immune response by virtue of neurotransmitters, cytokines and transcription factors. PMID:27193598

  11. Profiling CCK-mediated pancreatic growth: the dynamic genetic program and the role of STATs as potential regulators

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jackie Y.; Guo, LiLi; Ernst, Stephen A.; Williams, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Feeding mice with protease inhibitor (PI) leads to increased endogenous cholecystokinin (CCK) release and results in pancreatic growth. This adaptive response requires calcineurin (CN)-NFAT and AKT-mTOR pathways, but the genes involved, the dynamics of their expression, and other regulatory pathways remain unknown. Here, we examined the early (1–8 h) transcriptional program that underlies pancreatic growth. We found 314 upregulated and 219 downregulated genes with diverse temporal and functional profiles. Several new identifications include the following: stress response genes Gdf15 and Txnip, metabolic mediators Pitpnc1 and Hmges2, as well as components of growth factor response Fgf21, Atf3, and Egr1. The genes fell into seven self-organizing clusters, each with a distinct pattern of expression; a representative gene within each of the upregulated clusters (Egr1, Gadd45b, Rgs2, and Serpinb1a) was validated by qRT-PCR. Genes up at any point throughout the time course and CN-dependent genes were subjected to further bioinformatics-based networking and promoter analysis, yielding STATs as potential transcriptional regulators. As shown by PCR, qPCR, and Western blots, the active phospho-form of STAT3 and the Jak-STAT feedback inhibitor Socs2 were both increased throughout early pancreatic growth. Moreover, immunohistochemistry showed a CCK-dependent and acinar cell-specific increase in nuclear localization of p-STAT3, with >75% nuclear occupancy in PI-fed mice vs. <0.1% in controls. Thus, the study identified novel genes likely to be important for CCK-driven pancreatic growth, characterized and biologically validated the dynamic pattern of their expression and investigated STAT-Socs signaling as a new player in this trophic response. PMID:22010007

  12. Social support influences on eating awareness in children and adolescents: the mediating effect of self-regulatory strategies.

    PubMed

    Gaspar de Matos, Margarida; Palmeira, Antonio L; Gaspar, Tania; De Wit, John B F; Luszczynska, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the social environment on healthy eating awareness results from complex interactions among physical, economic, cultural, interpersonal and individual characteristics. This study investigated the impact of social support and social influence on healthy eating awareness, controlling for socio-economic status, gender and age. Additionally, the mediating effect of self-regulation strategies was examined. A total of 2764 children and adolescents aged 10-17 from four European countries completed self-report measures on healthy eating awareness, social influence and the use of self-regulation strategies. Healthy eating awareness and the use of self-regulation strategies were more likely to occur among younger participants. An interaction between gender and age was related to the use of some self-regulation strategies; compared to girls, boys decreased the use of self-regulation strategies more from pre-adolescence to adolescence. Peer social influence was associated with more unhealthy eating in older participants. Results suggest a need to promote self-regulatory competences among young people in order to assist them with regulating their eating behaviours, especially in the presence of peers. Both school-based interventions and family-based interventions, focusing on self-regulation cognitions and social (peer) influence, could help children and adolescents to use self-regulatory strategies which are essential to eat healthier. PMID:26564992

  13. The kinases MEKK2 and MEKK3 regulate transforming growth factor-β-mediated helper T cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Xing; Liu, Fang; Wang, Xiaofang; Lin, Aiping; Zhao, Hongyu; Su, Bing

    2011-02-25

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key mediators of the T cell receptor (TCR) signals but their roles in T helper (Th) cell differentiation are unclear. Here we showed that the MAPK kinase kinases MEKK2 (encoded by Map3k2) and MEKK3 (encoded by Map3k3) negatively regulated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)-mediated Th cell differentiation. Map3k2(-/-)Map3k3(Lck-Cre/-) mice showed an abnormal accumulation of regulatory T (Treg) and Th17 cells in the periphery, consistent with Map3k2(-/-)Map3k3(Lck-Cre/-) naive CD4(+) T cells' differentiation into Treg and Th17 cells with a higher frequency than wild-type (WT) cells after TGF-β stimulation in vitro. In addition, Map3k2(-/-)Map3k3(Lck-Cre/-) mice developed more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Map3k2(-/-)Map3k3(Lck-Cre/-) T cells exhibited impaired phosphorylation of SMAD2 and SMAD3 proteins at their linker regions, which negatively regulated the TGF-β responses in T cells. Thus, the crosstalk between TCR-induced MAPK and the TGF-β signaling pathways is important in regulating Th cell differentiation. PMID:21333552

  14. Investigation of Mediational Processes Using Parallel Process Latent Growth Curve Modeling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheong, JeeWon; MacKinnon, David P.; Khoo, Siek Toon

    2003-01-01

    Investigated a method to evaluate mediational processes using latent growth curve modeling and tested it with empirical data from a longitudinal steroid use prevention program focusing on 1,506 high school football players over 4 years. Findings suggest the usefulness of the approach. (SLD)

  15. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Bianka; Steffen-Heins, Anja; Sauter, Margret

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism, and non-enzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical, and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS. PMID:23761805

  16. Anion-Mediated End-Shape Control in Seed-Mediated Growth of Gold Nanorods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Youl; Kim, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Minsoo P; Yi, Gi-Ra

    2016-06-01

    End-shape-controlled gold nanorods (GNRs) were synthesized at room-temperature by a seeded-growth method, in which hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was used as a stabilizer and capping agent. The average dimension of the GNRs was 46 nm in length and 15 nm in diameter, which corresponds to aspect ratio of c.a. 3.0. Then, their both ends were further grown at the presence of silver precursor (AgNO3), resulting in formation of arrow-head GNRs. By tuning the amount of the silver precursor, the end-shape of the GNRs was changed to dumbbell like shape. Moreover, the growth rate of gold could be controlled by tuning the amount of hydrochloric acid (HCl). While arrow-headed GNRs having sharp edges were produced without HCl, the GNRs having dog-bone like or round-head shape at both ends were obtained with HCl. PMID:27427712

  17. Mutant huntingtin downregulates myelin regulatory factor-mediated myelin gene expression and affects mature oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Brenda; Wei, WenJie; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A; Feng, Yue; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2015-03-18

    Growing evidence indicates that non-neuronal mutant huntingtin toxicity plays an important role in Huntington's disease (HD); however, whether and how mutant huntingtin affects oligodendrocytes, which are vitally important for neural function and axonal integrity, remains unclear. We first verified the presence of mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes in HD140Q knockin mice. We then established transgenic mice (PLP-150Q) that selectively express mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes. PLP-150Q mice show progressive neurological symptoms and early death, as well as age-dependent demyelination and reduced expression of myelin genes that are downstream of myelin regulatory factor (MYRF or MRF), a transcriptional regulator that specifically activates and maintains the expression of myelin genes in mature oligodendrocytes. Consistently, mutant huntingtin binds abnormally to MYRF and affects its transcription activity. Our findings suggest that dysfunction of mature oligodendrocytes is involved in HD pathogenesis and may also make a good therapeutic target. PMID:25789755

  18. Mutant Huntingtin Downregulates Myelin Regulatory Factor-Mediated Myelin Gene Expression and Affects Mature Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Brenda; Wei, Wenjie; Wang, Guohao; Gaertig, Marta A.; Feng, Yue; Wang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shihua

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Growing evidence indicates that non-neuronal mutant huntingtin toxicity plays an important role in Huntington’s disease (HD); however, whether and how mutant huntingtin affects oligodendrocytes, which are vitally important for neural function and axonal integrity, remain unclear. We first verified the presence of mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes in HD140Q knock-in mice. We then established transgenic mice (PLP-150Q) that selectively express mutant huntingtin in oligodendrocytes. PLP-150Q mice show progressive neurological symptoms and early death, as well as age-dependent demyelination and reduced expression of myelin genes that are downstream of myelin regulatory factor (MYRF or MRF), a transcriptional regulator that specifically activates and maintains the expression of myelin genes in mature oligodendrocytes. Consistently, mutant huntingtin binds abnormally to MYRF and affects its transcription activity. Our findings suggest that dysfunction of mature oligodendrocytes is involved in HD pathogenesis and may also make a good therapeutic target. PMID:25789755

  19. Spalt-mediated dve repression is a critical regulatory motif and coordinates with Iroquois complex in Drosophila vein formation.

    PubMed

    Sugimori, Seiko; Hasegawa, Aya; Nakagoshi, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    Veins are longitudinal cuticular structures that maintain shape of the wing. Drosophila melanogaster has six longitudinal veins (L1-L6) and two cross veins. The Zn-finger transcription factors of Spalt-complex (Sal) are required for positioning of the L2 and L5, and the homeodomain transcription factors of Iroquois complex (Iro-C) are required for formation of the L3 and L5 veins. The homeodomain transcriptional repressor Defective proventriculus (Dve) is uniformly expressed in the wing pouch of the larval imaginal disc. However, dve mutant wings showed loss of the L2 and L5, but not of the L3 and L4 veins. Temporal dve knockdown experiments indicate that the Dve activity is required for vein formation from late third larval instar to the prepupal stage. In the prepupal wing, Dve expression becomes nearly complementary to that of Sal through the Sal-mediated dve repression. Furthermore, coexpression of Dve and Iro-C relieved of Sal-mediated repression is required for the L5 formation in a dose-dependent manner. The relationship between Sal, Dve, and Iro-C in wing vein specification is quite similar to that in ommatidial cell-type specification. Our results provide information about the conserved function of dve regulatory motifs in cell differentiation. PMID:27349585

  20. Evaluation of thyroid-mediated otolith growth of larval and juvenile tilapia.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Jen-Chieh; Wu, Su-Mei; Hwang, Yi-Ping; Wu, Done-Ping; Hwang, Pung-Pung

    2008-06-01

    Thyroid-mediated otolith growth in tilapia was evaluated by the ontogenic triiodothyronine (T3) profile revealed by radioimmunoassay during the first month after hatching. Thyroid hormone receptor genes (TRalpha and TRbeta) were cloned and only the expression of TRalpha mRNA, quantified by real-time PCR, was similar to the T3 profile. Variations in otolith growth showed median correlation with the T3 profile and TRalpha mRNA expression pattern. Hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism were induced in tilapia juveniles and larvae by administration of different concentrations of thiourea (TU) and T3, respectively, for 13 days. T3 and TU had little effect on otolith growth during the larval stage. However, T3 increased otolith growth and TU retarded, or stopped, otolith growth during the juvenile stage. Furthermore, TU treatment caused permanent changes in otolith shape in the ventral area. Otolith growth recovered slowly from hypothyroidism, requiring 2 days to form an increment during the first week. These results suggest that otolith growth, at least during the juvenile stage, is regulated by the thyroid hormones and the process may be mediated by TRalpha. PMID:18515722

  1. IL-9 contributes to immunosuppression mediated by regulatory T cells and mast cells in B-cell non-hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Feng, Li-Li; Gao, Jun-Ming; Li, Pei-Pei; Wang, Xin

    2011-12-01

    It has been known that regulatory T (Treg) cells and mast cells (MCs) are involved in tumor immunity regulation, but the exact roles and mechanisms of Treg cells and MCs in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are incompletely defined. In the present study, we found that the number of Foxp3(+) Treg cells and CD117(+) MCs increased in B-cell NHL patients. Concomitantly, a high level of interleukin (IL)-9 was observed in the sera from B-cell NHL patients. Neutralizing IL-9 significantly inhibited tumor growth in the lymphoma model of murine, and this process was associated with down-regulation of Treg cells and MCs. Furthermore, IL-9 was also demonstrated to induce expression of MC-related genes and proliferation of MCs from the bone marrow stem cells. Collectively, our results indicate that Treg cell and MCs are involved in immunosuppression in B-cell NHL, and IL-9 is a key mediator of Treg cells and MCs in that process. These findings provide novel insight for the pathogenesis and possible therapeutic strategy of B-cell NHL. PMID:21898141

  2. Hormone-Mediated Pattern Formation in Seedling of Plants: a Competitive Growth Dynamics Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Mimura, Masayasu; Ohya, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Noriko; Okabe, Hirotaka; Kai, Shoichi

    2001-10-01

    An ecologically relevant pattern formation process mediated by hormonal interactions among growing seedlings is modeled based on the experimental observations on the effects of indole acetic acid, which can act as an inhibitor and activator of root growth depending on its concentration. In the absence of any lateral root with constant hormone-sensitivity, the edge effect phenomenon is obtained depending on the secretion rate of hormone from the main root. Introduction of growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity drastically amplifies the initial randomness, resulting in spatially irregular macroscopic patterns. When the lateral root growth is introduced, periodic patterns are obtained whose periodicity depends on the length of lateral roots. The growth-stage-dependent hormone-sensitivity and the lateral root growth are crucial for macroscopic periodic-pattern formation.

  3. Combined Large-Scale Phenotyping and Transcriptomics in Maize Reveals a Robust Growth Regulatory Network.

    PubMed

    Baute, Joke; Herman, Dorota; Coppens, Frederik; De Block, Jolien; Slabbinck, Bram; Dell'Acqua, Matteo; Pè, Mario Enrico; Maere, Steven; Nelissen, Hilde; Inzé, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Leaves are vital organs for biomass and seed production because of their role in the generation of metabolic energy and organic compounds. A better understanding of the molecular networks underlying leaf development is crucial to sustain global requirements for food and renewable energy. Here, we combined transcriptome profiling of proliferative leaf tissue with in-depth phenotyping of the fourth leaf at later stages of development in 197 recombinant inbred lines of two different maize (Zea mays) populations. Previously, correlation analysis in a classical biparental mapping population identified 1,740 genes correlated with at least one of 14 traits. Here, we extended these results with data from a multiparent advanced generation intercross population. As expected, the phenotypic variability was found to be larger in the latter population than in the biparental population, although general conclusions on the correlations among the traits are comparable. Data integration from the two diverse populations allowed us to identify a set of 226 genes that are robustly associated with diverse leaf traits. This set of genes is enriched for transcriptional regulators and genes involved in protein synthesis and cell wall metabolism. In order to investigate the molecular network context of the candidate gene set, we integrated our data with publicly available functional genomics data and identified a growth regulatory network of 185 genes. Our results illustrate the power of combining in-depth phenotyping with transcriptomics in mapping populations to dissect the genetic control of complex traits and present a set of candidate genes for use in biomass improvement. PMID:26754667

  4. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  5. Nitric Oxide Mediated Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Activation of Multiple Regulatory Pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Adil; Mun, Bong-Gyu; Imran, Qari M.; Lee, Sang-Uk; Adamu, Teferi A.; Shahid, Muhammad; Kim, Kyung-Min; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance between the accumulation and removal of nitric oxide and its derivatives is a challenge faced by all plants at the cellular level, and is especially important under stress conditions. Exposure of plants to various biotic and abiotic stresses causes rapid changes in cellular redox tone potentiated by the rise in reactive nitrogen species that serve as signaling molecules in mediating defensive responses. To understand mechanisms mediated by these signaling molecules, we performed a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome induced by nitrosative stress. We generated an average of 84 and 91 million reads from three replicates each of control and 1 mM S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO)-infiltrated Arabidopsis leaf samples, respectively. After alignment, more than 95% of all reads successfully mapped to the reference and 32,535 genes and 55,682 transcripts were obtained. CysNO infiltration caused differential expression of 6436 genes (3448 up-regulated and 2988 down-regulated) and 6214 transcripts (3335 up-regulated and 2879 down-regulated) 6 h post-infiltration. These differentially expressed genes were found to be involved in key physiological processes, including plant defense against various biotic and abiotic stresses, hormone signaling, and other developmental processes. After quantile normalization of the FPKM values followed by student's T-test (P < 0.05) we identified 1165 DEGs (463 up-regulated and 702 down-regulated) with at least 2-folds change in expression after CysNO treatment. Expression patterns of selected genes involved in various biological pathways were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. This study provides comprehensive information about plant responses to nitrosative stress at transcript level and would prove helpful in understanding and incorporating mechanisms associated with nitrosative stress responses in plants. PMID:27446194

  6. Notch1 Pathway Activity Determines the Regulatory Role of Cancer-Associated Fibroblasts in Melanoma Growth and Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Hongwei; Kong, Ranran; Ferrari, Massimiliano L.; Radtke, Freddy; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Liu, Zhao-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAF) play a crucial role in regulating cancer progression, yet the molecular determinant that governs the tumor regulatory role of CAF remains unknown. Using a mouse melanoma model in which exogenous melanoma cells were grafted on the skin of two lines of mice where the genetic activation or inactivation of Notch1 signaling specifically occurs in natural host stromal fibroblasts, we demonstrated that Notch1 pathway activity could determine the tumor-promoting or tumor-suppressing phenotype in CAF. CAF carrying elevated Notch1 activity significantly inhibited melanoma growth and invasion, while those with a null Notch1 promoted melanoma invasion. These findings identify the Notch1 pathway as a molecular determinant that controls the regulatory role of CAF in melanoma skin growth and invasion, unveiling Notch1 signaling as a potential therapeutic target for melanoma and potentially other solid tumors. PMID:26562315

  7. Coping Strategies as a Mediator of Posttraumatic Growth among Adult Survivors of the Wenchuan Earthquake

    PubMed Central

    He, Lili; Xu, Jiuping; Wu, Zhibin

    2013-01-01

    Objective By testing the mediating effect of coping strategies on the relationship between social support (SS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG), the aim of this research was to develop a new approach for the study of post-disaster psychological intervention. Methods A mediating effect model analysis was conducted on 2080 adult survivors selected from 19 of the counties hardest-hit by the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake. The Social Support Rating Scale and the Coping Scale were used to predict the PTG. Results A bivariate correlation analysis showed that there was a correlation between posttraumatic growth, social support and coping strategies. The mediation analysis revealed that coping strategies played a mediating role between social support and posttraumatic growth in survivors after the earthquake. Conclusion The results demonstrated that mental health programs for survivors need to focus on the establishment of a good social support network, which was found to be conductive to maintaining and increasing mental health levels. At the same time, adequate social support is able to assist survivors in adopting mature coping strategies, such as problem solving and asking for help. Hence, social support was found to play a vital role in balancing and protecting mental health. PMID:24386345

  8. Ultrasound-mediated interferon {beta} gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-{beta} genes both in vitro and in vivo. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. {yields} Ultrasound-mediated IFN-{beta} transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon {beta} (IFN-{beta}) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-{beta} in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-{beta} genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-{beta} gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-{beta} gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  9. MicroRNA-24/MODY Gene Regulatory Pathway Mediates Pancreatic β-Cell Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunxia; You, Weiyan; Wang, Hongdong; Li, Yating; Qiao, Nan; Shi, Yuguang; Zhang, Chenyu; Bleich, David; Han, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Overnutrition and genetics both contribute separately to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction, but how these factors interact is unclear. This study was aimed at determining whether microRNAs (miRNAs) provide a link between these factors. In this study, miRNA-24 (miR-24) was highly expressed in pancreatic β-cells and further upregulated in islets from genetic fatty (db/db) or mice fed a high-fat diet, and islets subject to oxidative stress. Overexpression of miR-24 inhibited insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation, potentially involving 351 downregulated genes. By using bioinformatic analysis combined with luciferase-based promoter activity assays and quantitative real-time PCR assays, we identified two maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY) genes as direct targets of miR-24. Silencing either of these MODY genes (Hnf1a and Neurod1) mimicked the cellular phenotype caused by miR-24 overexpression, whereas restoring their expression rescued β-cell function. Our findings functionally link the miR-24/MODY gene regulatory pathway to the onset of type 2 diabetes and create a novel network between nutrient overload and genetic diabetes via miR-24. PMID:23761103

  10. Stem cell regulatory function mediated by expression of a novel mouse Oct4 pseudogene

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Huey; Shabbir, Arsalan; Molnar, Merced; Lee, Techung . E-mail: chunglee@buffalo.edu

    2007-03-30

    Multiple pseudogenes have been proposed for embryonic stem (ES) cell-specific genes, and their abundance suggests that some of these potential pseudogenes may be functional. ES cell-specific expression of Oct4 regulates stem cell pluripotency and self-renewing state. Although Oct4 expression has been reported in adult tissues during gene reprogramming, the detected Oct4 signal might be contributed by Oct4 pseudogenes. Among the multiple Oct4 transcripts characterized here is a {approx}1 kb clone derived from P19 embryonal carcinoma stem cells, which shares a {approx}87% sequence homology with the parent Oct4 gene, and has the potential of encoding an 80-amino acid product (designated as Oct4P1). Adenoviral expression of Oct4P1 in mesenchymal stem cells promotes their proliferation and inhibits their osteochondral differentiation. These dual effects of Oct4P1 are reminiscent of the stem cell regulatory function of the parent Oct4, and suggest that Oct4P1 may be a functional pseudogene or a novel Oct4-related gene with a unique function in stem cells.

  11. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    SciTech Connect

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela; Tora, Laszlo

    2009-04-15

    TAF15 (formerly TAF{sub II}68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  12. T regulatory cell chemokine production mediates pathogenic T cell attraction and suppression

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Scott J.; Pesenacker, Anne M.; Wang, Adele Y.; Gillies, Jana; Mojibian, Majid; Morishita, Kim; Tan, Rusung; Kieffer, Timothy J.; Verchere, C. Bruce; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Levings, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory cells (Tregs) control immune homeostasis by preventing inappropriate responses to self and nonharmful foreign antigens. Tregs use multiple mechanisms to control immune responses, all of which require these cells to be near their targets of suppression; however, it is not known how Treg-to-target proximity is controlled. Here, we found that Tregs attract CD4+ and CD8+ T cells by producing chemokines. Specifically, Tregs produced both CCL3 and CCL4 in response to stimulation, and production of these chemokines was critical for migration of target T cells, as Tregs from Ccl3–/– mice, which are also deficient for CCL4 production, did not promote migration. Moreover, CCR5 expression by target T cells was required for migration of these cells to supernatants conditioned by Tregs. Tregs deficient for expression of CCL3 and CCL4 were impaired in their ability to suppress experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis or islet allograft rejection in murine models. Moreover, Tregs from subjects with established type 1 diabetes were impaired in their ability to produce CCL3 and CCL4. Together, these results demonstrate a previously unappreciated facet of Treg function and suggest that chemokine secretion by Tregs is a fundamental aspect of their therapeutic effect in autoimmunity and transplantation. PMID:26854929

  13. Regulatory T-lymphocytes mediate amyotrophic lateral sclerosis progression and survival

    PubMed Central

    Henkel, Jenny S; Beers, David R; Wen, Shixiang; Rivera, Andreana L; Toennis, Karen M; Appel, Joan E; Zhao, Weihua; Moore, Dan H; Powell, Suzanne Z; Appel, Stanley H

    2013-01-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) mice, regulatory T-lymphocytes (Tregs) are neuroprotective, slowing disease progression. To address whether Tregs and FoxP3, a transcription factor required for Treg function, similarly influence progression rates of ALS patients, T-lymphocytes from patients were assessed by flow cytometry. Both numbers of Tregs and their FoxP3 protein expressions were reduced in rapidly progressing ALS patients and inversely correlated with progression rates. The mRNA levels of FoxP3, TGF-β, IL4 and Gata3, a Th2 transcription factor, were reduced in rapidly progressing patients and inversely correlated with progression rates. Both FoxP3 and Gata3 were accurate indicators of progression rates. No differences in IL10, Tbx21, a Th1 transcription factor or IFN-γ expression were found between slow and rapidly progressing patients. A 3.5-year prospective study with a second larger cohort revealed that early reduced FoxP3 levels were indicative of progression rates at collection and predictive of future rapid progression and attenuated survival. Collectively, these data suggest that Tregs and Th2 lymphocytes influence disease progression rates. Importantly, early reduced FoxP3 levels could be used to identify rapidly progressing patients. PMID:23143995

  14. Low-Dose IL-2 Induces Regulatory T Cell-Mediated Control of Experimental Food Allergy.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Benjamin; Vigneron, James; Levacher, Béatrice; Vazquez, Thomas; Pitoiset, Fabien; Brimaud, Faustine; Churlaud, Guillaume; Klatzmann, David; Bellier, Bertrand

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are pivotal for maintenance of immune self-tolerance and also regulate immune responses to exogenous Ags, including allergens. Both decreased Treg number and function have been reported in allergic patients, offering new therapeutic perspectives. We previously demonstrated that Tregs can be selectively expanded and activated by low doses of IL-2 (ld-IL-2) inducing immunoregulation without immunosuppression and established its protective effect in autoimmune diseases. In this study, we evaluated the ability of ld-IL-2 to control allergy in an experimental model of food allergy. Ld-IL-2 induced Treg expansion and activation that elicited protection against clinical manifestations of food allergy in two mouse models with OVA and peanut. This clinical effect was lost in Treg-depleted mice, demonstrating the major contribution of Tregs in ld-IL-2 efficacy. Mechanistic studies further indicated that protection from allergy could be explained by a Treg-dependent local modification of the Th1/Th2 balance and an inhibition of mast cell recruitment and activation. Preventive and therapeutic effects of ld-IL-2 were observed over a 7-mo-period, highlighting its long-term efficacy. This study demonstrated that ld-IL-2 is efficient to prevent and to treat allergic immune responses, and thus represents a promising therapeutic strategy for managing allergic diseases. PMID:27259854

  15. Positive and negative regulatory elements mediating transcription from the Drosophila melanogaster actin 5C distal promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Y T; Keller, E B

    1990-01-01

    The major cytoskeletal actin gene of Drosophila melanogaster, the actin 5C gene, has two promoters, the distal one of which controls synthesis of actin in a tissue- and developmental stage-specific manner. This very strong promoter has widely been used for expression of heterologous genes in cultured cells. To locate functional regulatory elements in this distal promoter, mutants of the promoter were fused to the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene and assayed for transient expression activity in cultured Drosophila embryonic Schneider line 2 cells. The results showed that the upstream end of the promoter extends to 522 bp from the transcription start site. In addition, there are two remote activating regions about 2 kb upstream. Between -522 and -379 are two regions that exert a strong negative effect. Downstream from these negative regions are at least six positive regions and a TATA element. The strongest positive determinant of the promoter was identified at -320 as AAAATGTG by footprinting and by a replacement experiment. When the relevant region was replaced by a synthetic sequence containing this element in a random context, the transient expression activity was restored. The sequence TGTATG located at -355 was also identified as a positive element by a similar replacement approach. Apparently the very high activity of this promoter is the result of the combined activities of multiple factors. Images PMID:2123290

  16. Adenosine and Prostaglandin E2 Cooperate in the Suppression of Immune Responses Mediated by Adaptive Regulatory T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Mandapathil, Magis; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; Szajnik, Marta; Ren, Jin; Jackson, Edwin K.; Johnson, Jonas T.; Gorelik, Elieser; Lang, Stephan; Whiteside, Theresa L.

    2010-01-01

    Adaptive regulatory T cells (Tr1) are induced in the periphery upon encountering cognate antigens. In cancer, their frequency is increased; however, Tr1-mediated suppression mechanisms are not yet defined. Here, we evaluate the simultaneous involvement of ectonucleotidases (CD39/CD73) and cyclooxygenase 2 (COX-2) in Tr1-mediated suppression. Human Tr1 cells were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cell-derived, sorted CD4+CD25− T cells and incubated with autologous immature dendritic cells, irradiated COX-2+ or COX-2− tumor cells, and IL-2, IL-10, and IL-15 (each at 10–15 IU/ml) for 10 days as described (Bergmann, C., Strauss, L., Zeidler, R., Lang, S., and Whiteside, T. L. (2007) Cancer Immunol. Immunother. 56, 1429–1442). Tr1 were phenotyped by multicolor flow cytometry, and suppression of proliferating responder cells was assessed in carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester-based assays. ATP hydrolysis was measured using a luciferase detection assay, and levels of adenosine or prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in cell supernatants were analyzed by mass spectrometry or ELISA, respectively. Intracellular cAMP levels were measured by enzyme immunoassay. The COX-2+ tumor induced a greater number of Tr1 than COX-2− tumor (p < 0.05). Tr1 induced by COX-2+ tumor were more suppressive, hydrolyzed more exogenous ATP (p < 0.05), and produced higher levels of adenosine and PGE2 (p < 0.05) than Tr1 induced by COX-2− tumor. Inhibitors of ectonucleotidase activity, A2A and EP2 receptor antagonists, or an inhibitor of the PKA type I decreased Tr1-mediated suppression (p < 0.05), whereas rolipram, a PDE4 inhibitor, increased the intracellular cAMP level in responder cells and their susceptibility to Tr1-mediated suppression. Tr1 present in tumors or the peripheral blood of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma patients co-expressed COX-2, CD39, and CD73. A concomitant inhibition of PGE2 and adenosine via the common intracellular cAMP pathway might be a novel

  17. Complement Regulatory Activity of Normal Human Intraocular Fluid Is Mediated by MCP, DAF, and CD59

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jeong-Hyeon; Kaplan, Henry J.; Suk, Hye-Jung; Bora, Puran S.; Bora, Nalini S.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To identify the molecules in normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) that inhibit the functional activity of the complement system. Methods Aqueous humor and vitreous were obtained from patients with noninflammatory ocular disease at the time of surgery. Samples were incubated with normal human serum (NHS), and the mixture assayed for inhibition of the classical and alternative complement pathways using standard CH50 and AH50 hemolytic assays, respectively. Both aqueous humor and vitreous were fractionated by microconcentrators and size exclusion column chromatography. The inhibitory molecules were identified by immunoblotting as well as by studying the effect of depletion of membrane cofactor protein (MCP), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and CD59 on inhibitory activity. Results Both aqueous humor and vitreous inhibited the activity of the classical pathway (CH50). Microcentrifugation revealed the major inhibitory activity resided in the fraction with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa. Chromatography on an S-100-HR column demonstrated that the most potent inhibition was associated with the high-molecular-weight fractions (≥ 19.5 kDa). In contrast to unfractionated aqueous and vitreous, fractions with an Mr ≥ 3 kDa also had an inhibitory effect on the alternative pathway activity (AH50). The complement regulatory activity in normal human intraocular fluid was partially blocked by monoclonal antibodies against MCP, DAF, and CD59. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the presence of these three molecules in normal intraocular fluid. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that normal human intraocular fluid (aqueous humor and vitreous) contains complement inhibitory factors. Furthermore, the high-molecular-weight factors appear to be the soluble forms of MCP, DAF, and CD59. PMID:11095615

  18. Hormone stimulation of androgen receptor mediates dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns at regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Vineet K.; Attwood, Kristopher; Campbell, Moray J.; Smiraglia, Dominic J.

    2015-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that contributes to stable gene silencing by interfering with the ability of transcriptional regulators to bind to DNA. Recent findings have revealed that hormone stimulation of certain nuclear receptors induces rapid, dynamic changes in DNA methylation patterns alongside transcriptional responses at a subset of target loci, over time. However, the ability of androgen receptor (AR) to dynamically regulate gene transcription is relatively under-studied and its role in the regulation of DNA methylation patterns remains to be elucidated. Here we demonstrate in normal prostate cells that hormone stimulated AR activity results in dynamic changes in the transcription rate and DNA methylation patterns at the AR target genes, TIPARP and SGK1. Time-resolved chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments on the SGK1 locus reveals dynamic recruitment of AR and RNA Polymerase II, as well as the recruitment of proteins involved in the DNA demethylation process, TET1 and TDG. Furthermore, the presence of DNA methylation at dynamic regions inhibits protein binding and transcriptional activity of SGK1. These findings establish AR activity as a contributing factor to the dynamic regulation of DNA methylation patterns at target genes in prostate biology and infer further complexity involved in nuclear receptor mediation of transcriptional regulation. PMID:26646795

  19. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay modulate expression of important regulatory genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kalyna, Maria; Simpson, Craig G.; Syed, Naeem H.; Lewandowska, Dominika; Marquez, Yamile; Kusenda, Branislav; Marshall, Jacqueline; Fuller, John; Cardle, Linda; McNicol, Jim; Dinh, Huy Q.; Barta, Andrea; Brown, John W. S.

    2012-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) coupled to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) is a post-transcriptional mechanism for regulating gene expression. We have used a high-resolution AS RT–PCR panel to identify endogenous AS isoforms which increase in abundance when NMD is impaired in the Arabidopsis NMD factor mutants, upf1-5 and upf3-1. Of 270 AS genes (950 transcripts) on the panel, 102 transcripts from 97 genes (32%) were identified as NMD targets. Extrapolating from these data around 13% of intron-containing genes in the Arabidopsis genome are potentially regulated by AS/NMD. This cohort of naturally occurring NMD-sensitive AS transcripts also allowed the analysis of the signals for NMD in plants. We show the importance of AS in introns in 5′ or 3′UTRs in modulating NMD-sensitivity of mRNA transcripts. In particular, we identified upstream open reading frames overlapping the main start codon as a new trigger for NMD in plants and determined that NMD is induced if 3′-UTRs were >350 nt. Unexpectedly, although many intron retention transcripts possess NMD features, they are not sensitive to NMD. Finally, we have shown that AS/NMD regulates the abundance of transcripts of many genes important for plant development and adaptation including transcription factors, RNA processing factors and stress response genes. PMID:22127866

  20. A new regulatory element modulates homoserine lactone-mediated autoinduction of Ti plasmid conjugal transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, I; Cook, D M; Farrand, S K

    1995-01-01

    Conjugal transfer of the Agrobacterium tumefaciens nopaline-type Ti plasmid pTiC58 is induced by agrocinopines A and B, opines secreted by crown gall tumors induced by the bacterium. This regulation functions through the transcriptional repressor, AccR. However, actual transcription of the tra genes is regulated by autoinduction through the activator TraR and the substituted homoserine lactone second messenger, Agrobacterium autoinducer (AAI). We have identified a new regulatory element that modulates the response of TraR to AAI. The gene, called traM, suppresses TraR-AAI activation of transcription of tra genes carried on recombinant clones. The suppression could be relieved by increasing the expression of TraR but not by increasing AAI levels. traM is located between traR and traAF on pTiC58 and is transcribed in the clockwise direction. The 306-bp gene encodes an 11.2-kDa protein showing no significant relatedness to other proteins in the databases. Mutations in traM in pTiC58 conferred a transfer-constitutive phenotype, and strains harboring the Ti plasmid produced easily detectable amounts of AAI. These same mutations engineered into the transfer-constitutive Ti plasmid pTiC58 delta accR conferred a hyperconjugal phenotype and very high levels of AAI production. Expression of traM required TraR, indicating that transcription of the gene is regulated by the autoinduction system. TraM had no effect on the expression of traR, demonstrating that the suppressive effect is not due to repression of the gene encoding the activator. These results suggest that TraM is not a direct transcriptional regulator. Since the suppressive effect is demonstrable only when traM is overexpressed with respect to traR, we suggest that TraM functions to sequester TraR from the very small amounts of AAI produced under conditions when the agrocinopines are not present. PMID:7814335

  1. Cryptotanshinone Suppresses Androgen Receptor-mediated Growth in Androgen Dependent and Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Li, Shaoshun; Da, Jun; Wen, Xing-Qiao; Ding, Jiang; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) is the major therapeutic target for the treatment of prostate cancer (PCa). Anti-androgens to reduce or prevent androgens binding to AR are widely used to suppress AR-mediated PCa growth; however, the androgen depletion therapy is only effective for a period of time. Here we found a natural product/Chinese herbal medicine cryptotanshinone (CTS), with a structure similar to dihydrotestosterone (DHT), can effectively inhibit the DHT-induced AR transactivation and prostate cancer cell growth. Our results indicated that 0.5 µM CTS effectively suppresses the growth of AR-positive PCa cells, but has little effect on AR negative PC-3 cells and non-malignant prostate epithelial cells. Furthermore, our data indicated that CTS could modulate AR transactivation and suppress the DHT-mediated AR target genes (PSA, TMPRSS2, and TMEPA1) expression in both androgen responsive PCa LNCaP cells and castration resistant CWR22rv1 cells. Importantly, CTS selective inhibits AR without repressing the activities of other nuclear receptors, including ERα, GR, and PR. The mechanistic studies indicate that CTS functions as an AR inhibitor to suppress androgen/AR-mediated cell growth and PSA expression by blocking AR dimerization and the AR–coregulator complex formation. Furthermore, we showed that CTS effectively inhibits CWR22Rv1 cell growth in the xenograft animal model. The previously un-described mechanisms of CTS may explain how CTS inhibits the growth of PCa cells and help us to establish new therapeutic concepts for the treatment of PCa. PMID:22154085

  2. Interferon regulatory factor 4 is activated through c-Src-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation in virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Ning, Shunbin

    2013-09-01

    The importance of the oncogenic transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 4 (IRF4) in hematological malignancies has been increasingly recognized. We have previously identified the B cell integration cluster (BIC), the gene encoding miR-155, as the first microRNA (miRNA)-encoding gene transcriptionally targeted by IRF4 in virus-transformed cancer cells. Activation of IRFs is prerequisite for their functions. However, how IRF4 is activated in cancer is an open question. Our phosphoproteome profiling has identified several tyrosine phosphorylation sites on IRF4 in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed cells. Further, we show here that c-Src dramatically stimulates IRF4 phosphorylation and activity and that Y61 and Y124 are two key sites responding to c-Src-mediated activation. Consistently, c-Src is constitutively expressed and active in EBV-transformed cells. However, c-Src is unlikely to be a direct kinase for IRF4. Furthermore, we have a polyclonal antibody specific to phospho-IRF4(Y121/124) developed in rabbit. We have further shown that inhibition of c-Src activity reduces p-IRF4(Y121/124) and significantly represses transcription of the IRF4 target BIC in EBV-transformed cells. Our results therefore, for the first time, demonstrate that IRF4 is phosphorylated and activated through a c-Src-mediated pathway in virus-transformed cells. These findings will improve our understanding of IRF4 in neoplasia and will provide profound insights into the interaction of oncogenic viruses with IRF4 in the development of hematological malignancies. PMID:23804646

  3. Posttraumatic stress and growth among Tibetan refugees: the mediating role of cognitive-emotional regulation strategies.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Dilwar; Bhushan, Braj

    2011-07-01

    This study examined posttraumatic stress (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) among 226 Tibetan refugees across two generations. Additional objectives were to (i) examine the sex and generation differences on the scores of trauma, PTS, and PTG, (ii) explore the relationship between traumatic experiences, PTS and PTG, and (iii) investigate the mediating effect of cognitive-emotional regulation strategies between the traumatic experiences and PTS as well as PTG. Females scored higher on trauma, PTS, and PTG. The trauma, PTS, and PTG scores of the two generations were significantly different. Acceptance and putting into perspective partially mediated the relationship between traumatic experience and PTS. Positive refocusing, refocus on planning, putting into perspective, and catastrophisizing partially mediated the relationship between traumatic experiences and PTG. PMID:21455959

  4. Chirality-dependent boron-mediated growth of nitrogen-doped single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiltshire, Joseph G.; Li, Lain-Jong; Herz, Laura M.; Nicholas, Robin J.; Glerup, Marianne; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis; Khlobystov, Andrei N.

    2005-11-01

    A change in the relative abundance of single-walled carbon nanotubes, due to the presence of both nitrogen and boron during synthesis, has been identified through Raman and absorption spectroscopy. Raman spectroscopy shows that for two specific branches boron mediates the growth of smaller-diameter zigzag or near-zigzag nanotubes. We combine our experimental results with an improved Kataura model to identify two of the preferentially grown species as (16,0) and (14,1).

  5. Identification of microRNAs and Their Target Genes Explores miRNA-Mediated Regulatory Network of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Occurrence during Anther Development in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Ronghua; Zhang, Yang; Muleke, Everlyne M; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a type of endogenous non-coding small RNAs that play critical roles in plant growth and developmental processes. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is typically a maternally inherited trait and widely used in plant heterosis utilization. However, the miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development remains largely unknown in radish. In this study, a comparative small RNAome sequencing was conducted in floral buds of CMS line 'WA' and its maintainer line 'WB' by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 162 known miRNAs belonging to 25 conserved and 24 non-conserved miRNA families were isolated and 27 potential novel miRNA families were identified for the first time in floral buds of radish. Of these miRNAs, 28 known and 14 potential novel miRNAs were differentially expressed during anther development. Several target genes for CMS occurrence-related miRNAs encode important transcription factors and functional proteins, which might be involved in multiple biological processes including auxin signaling pathways, signal transduction, miRNA target silencing, floral organ development, and organellar gene expression. Moreover, the expression patterns of several CMS occurrence-related miRNAs and their targets during three stages of anther development were validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a potential miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development was firstly proposed in radish. These findings could contribute new insights into complex miRNA-mediated genetic regulatory network of CMS occurrence and advance our understanding of the roles of miRNAs during CMS occurrence and microspore formation in radish and other crops. PMID:27499756

  6. Identification of microRNAs and Their Target Genes Explores miRNA-Mediated Regulatory Network of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility Occurrence during Anther Development in Radish (Raphanus sativus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Xie, Yang; Xu, Liang; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Xianwen; Wang, Ronghua; Zhang, Yang; Muleke, Everlyne M.; Liu, Liwang

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a type of endogenous non-coding small RNAs that play critical roles in plant growth and developmental processes. Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) is typically a maternally inherited trait and widely used in plant heterosis utilization. However, the miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development remains largely unknown in radish. In this study, a comparative small RNAome sequencing was conducted in floral buds of CMS line ‘WA’ and its maintainer line ‘WB’ by high-throughput sequencing. A total of 162 known miRNAs belonging to 25 conserved and 24 non-conserved miRNA families were isolated and 27 potential novel miRNA families were identified for the first time in floral buds of radish. Of these miRNAs, 28 known and 14 potential novel miRNAs were differentially expressed during anther development. Several target genes for CMS occurrence-related miRNAs encode important transcription factors and functional proteins, which might be involved in multiple biological processes including auxin signaling pathways, signal transduction, miRNA target silencing, floral organ development, and organellar gene expression. Moreover, the expression patterns of several CMS occurrence-related miRNAs and their targets during three stages of anther development were validated by qRT-PCR. In addition, a potential miRNA-mediated regulatory network of CMS occurrence during anther development was firstly proposed in radish. These findings could contribute new insights into complex miRNA-mediated genetic regulatory network of CMS occurrence and advance our understanding of the roles of miRNAs during CMS occurrence and microspore formation in radish and other crops. PMID:27499756

  7. MACROD2 overexpression mediates estrogen independent growth and tamoxifen resistance in breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni, Morassa; Cidado, Justin; Croessmann, Sarah; Cravero, Karen; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Wong, Hong Yuen; Scharpf, Rob; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Abukhdeir, Abde M.; Garay, Joseph P.; Wang, Grace M.; Beaver, Julia A.; Cochran, Rory L.; Blair, Brian G.; Rosen, D. Marc; Erlanger, Bracha; Argani, Pedram; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; Park, Ben Ho

    2014-01-01

    Tamoxifen is effective for treating estrogen receptor-alpha (ER) positive breast cancers. However, few molecular mediators of tamoxifen resistance have been elucidated. Here we describe a previously unidentified gene, MACROD2 that confers tamoxifen resistance and estrogen independent growth. We found MACROD2 is amplified and overexpressed in metastatic tamoxifen-resistant tumors. Transgene overexpression of MACROD2 in breast cancer cell lines results in tamoxifen resistance, whereas RNAi-mediated gene knock down reverses this phenotype. MACROD2 overexpression also leads to estrogen independent growth in xenograft assays. Mechanistically, MACROD2 increases p300 binding to estrogen response elements in a subset of ER regulated genes. Primary breast cancers and matched metastases demonstrate MACROD2 expression can change with disease evolution, and increased expression and amplification of MACROD2 in primary tumors is associated with worse overall survival. These studies establish MACROD2 as a key mediator of estrogen independent growth and tamoxifen resistance, as well as a potential novel target for diagnostics and therapy. PMID:25422431

  8. Crystal structure of the human protein kinase CK2 regulatory subunit reveals its zinc finger-mediated dimerization.

    PubMed Central

    Chantalat, L; Leroy, D; Filhol, O; Nueda, A; Benitez, M J; Chambaz, E M; Cochet, C; Dideberg, O

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is a tetramer composed of two alpha catalytic subunits and two beta regulatory subunits. The structure of a C-terminal truncated form of the human beta subunit has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.7 A resolution. One dimer is observed in the asymmetric unit of the crystal. The most striking feature of the structure is the presence of a zinc finger mediating the dimerization. The monomer structure consists of two domains, one entirely alpha-helical and one including the zinc finger. The dimer has a crescent shape holding a highly acidic region at both ends. We propose that this acidic region is involved in the interactions with the polyamines and/or catalytic subunits. Interestingly, conserved amino acid residues among beta subunit sequences are clustered along one linear ridge that wraps around the entire dimer. This feature suggests that protein partners may interact with the dimer through a stretch of residues in an extended conformation. PMID:10357806

  9. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Mediates Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis During LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dongdong; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lemeng; Qin, Qingwu; Tan, Hongyi; Huang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-09-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that pyroptosis in alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays an essential role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we show that the absence of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in genetic knock-out mice strongly abrogates pyroptosis in AMs and alleviates the LPS-induced lung injury and systemic inflammation. Our study demonstrates that IRF-1 contributes to caspase-1 activation and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain pyroptosome formation in AMs and leads to downstream inflammatory cytokine release, including that of IL-1β, IL-18, and HMGB1. The nuclear translocation of IRF-1 is linked to the presence of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our findings suggest that pyroptosis and the downstream inflammatory response in AMs induced by LPS is a process that is dependent on TLR4-mediated up-regulation of IRF-1. In summary, IRF-1 plays a key role in controlling caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis and inflammation. PMID:26939040

  10. Cd47-Signal Regulatory Protein α (Sirpα) Regulates Fcγ and Complement Receptor–Mediated Phagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Oldenborg, Per-Arne; Gresham, Hattie D.; Lindberg, Frederik P.

    2001-01-01

    In autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA), circulating red blood cells (RBCs) opsonized with autoantibody are recognized by macrophage Fcγ and complement receptors. This triggers phagocytosis and elimination of RBCs from the circulation by splenic macrophages. We recently found that CD47 on unopsonized RBCs binds macrophage signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα), generating a negative signal that prevents phagocytosis of the unopsonized RBCs. We show here that clearance and phagocytosis of opsonized RBCs is also regulated by CD47-SIRPα. The inhibition generated by CD47-SIRPα interaction is strongly attenuated but not absent in mice with only residual activity of the phosphatase Src homology 2 domain–containing protein tyrosine phosphatase (SHP)-1, suggesting that most SIRPα signaling in this system is mediated by SHP-1 phosphatase activity. The macrophage phagocytic response is controlled by an integration of the inhibitory SIRPα signal with prophagocytic signals such as from Fcγ and complement receptor activation. Thus, augmentation of inhibitory CD47-SIRPα signaling may prevent or attenuate RBC clearance in AIHA. PMID:11283158

  11. How, with whom and when: an overview of CD147-mediated regulatory networks influencing matrix metalloproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Grass, G. Daniel; Toole, Bryan P.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) comprise a family of 23 zinc-dependent enzymes involved in various pathologic and physiologic processes. In cancer, MMPs contribute to processes from tumour initiation to establishment of distant metastases. Complex signalling and protein transport networks regulate MMP synthesis, cell surface presentation and release. Earlier attempts to disrupt MMP activity in patients have proven to be intolerable and with underwhelming clinical efficacy; thus targeting ancillary proteins that regulate MMP activity may be a useful therapeutic approach. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) was originally characterized as a factor present on lung cancer cells, which stimulated collagenase (MMP-1) production in fibroblasts. Subsequent studies demonstrated that EMMPRIN was identical with several other protein factors, including basigin (Bsg), all of which are now commonly termed CD147. CD147 modulates the synthesis and activity of soluble and membrane-bound [membrane-type MMPs (MT-MMPs)] in various contexts via homophilic/heterophilic cell interactions, vesicular shedding or cell-autonomous processes. CD147 also participates in inflammation, nutrient and drug transporter activity, microbial pathology and developmental processes. Despite the hundreds of manuscripts demonstrating CD147-mediated MMP regulation, the molecular underpinnings governing this process have not been fully elucidated. The present review summarizes our present knowledge of the complex regulatory systems influencing CD147 biology and provides a framework to understand how CD147 may influence MMP activity. PMID:26604323

  12. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals the Regulatory Mechanism Underlying Pollination Dependent and Parthenocarpic Fruit Set Mainly Mediated by Auxin and Gibberellin

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ning; Deng, Wei; Hu, Guojian; Hu, Nan; Li, Zhengguo

    2015-01-01

    Background Fruit set is a key process for crop production in tomato which occurs after successful pollination and fertilization naturally. However, parthenocarpic fruit development can be uncoupled from fertilization triggered by exogenous auxin or gibberellins (GAs). Global transcriptome knowledge during fruit initiation would help to characterize the molecular mechanisms by which these two hormones regulate pollination-dependent and -independent fruit set. Principal Findings In this work, digital gene expression tag profiling (DGE) technology was applied to compare the transcriptomes from pollinated and 2, 4-D/GA3-treated ovaries. Activation of carbohydrate metabolism, cell division and expansion as well as the down-regulation of MADS-box is a comprehensive regulatory pathway during pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set. The signaling cascades of auxin and GA are significantly modulated. The feedback regulations of Aux/IAAs and DELLA genes which functioned to fine-tune auxin and GA response respectively play fundamental roles in triggering fruit initiation. In addition, auxin regulates GA synthesis via up-regulation of GA20ox1 and down-regulation of KNOX. Accordingly, the effect of auxin on fruit set is mediated by GA via ARF2 and IAA9 down-regulation, suggesting that both pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set depend on the crosstalk between auxin and GA. Significance This study characterizes the transcriptomic features of ovary development and more importantly unravels the integral roles of auxin and GA on pollination-dependent and parthenocarpic fruit set. PMID:25909657

  13. Cis-regulatory Changes at FLOWERING LOCUS T Mediate Natural Variation in Flowering Responses of Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Christopher; Balasubramanian, Sureshkumar; Warthmann, Norman; Michael, Todd P.; Lempe, Janne; Sureshkumar, Sridevi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Maloof, Julin N.; Borevitz, Justin O.; Chory, Joanne; Weigel, Detlef

    2009-01-01

    Flowering time, a critical adaptive trait, is modulated by several environmental cues. These external signals converge on a small set of genes that in turn mediate the flowering response. Mutant analysis and subsequent molecular studies have revealed that one of these integrator genes, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), responds to photoperiod and temperature cues, two environmental parameters that greatly influence flowering time. As the central player in the transition to flowering, the protein coding sequence of FT and its function are highly conserved across species. Using QTL mapping with a new advanced intercross-recombinant inbred line (AI-RIL) population, we show that a QTL tightly linked to FT contributes to natural variation in the flowering response to the combined effects of photoperiod and ambient temperature. Using heterogeneous inbred families (HIF) and introgression lines, we fine map the QTL to a 6.7 kb fragment in the FT promoter. We confirm by quantitative complementation that FT has differential activity in the two parental strains. Further support for FT underlying the QTL comes from a new approach, quantitative knockdown with artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Consistent with the causal sequence polymorphism being in the promoter, we find that the QTL affects FT expression. Taken together, these results indicate that allelic variation at pathway integrator genes such as FT can underlie phenotypic variability and that this may be achieved through cis-regulatory changes. PMID:19652183

  14. Interferon Regulatory Factor-1 Mediates Alveolar Macrophage Pyroptosis During LPS-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dongdong; Pan, Pinhua; Su, Xiaoli; Zhang, Lemeng; Qin, Qingwu; Tan, Hongyi; Huang, Li; Li, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previously, we demonstrated that pyroptosis in alveolar macrophages (AMs) plays an essential role in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. However, the underlying mechanism remains largely unclear. Here, we show that the absence of interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF-1) in genetic knock-out mice strongly abrogates pyroptosis in AMs and alleviates the LPS-induced lung injury and systemic inflammation. Our study demonstrates that IRF-1 contributes to caspase-1 activation and apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a caspase activation and recruitment domain pyroptosome formation in AMs and leads to downstream inflammatory cytokine release, including that of IL-1β, IL-18, and HMGB1. The nuclear translocation of IRF-1 is linked to the presence of toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4). Our findings suggest that pyroptosis and the downstream inflammatory response in AMs induced by LPS is a process that is dependent on TLR4-mediated up-regulation of IRF-1. In summary, IRF-1 plays a key role in controlling caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis and inflammation. PMID:26939040

  15. Coordination of the Arc Regulatory System and Pheromone-Mediated Positive Feedback in Controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux Operon

    PubMed Central

    Septer, Alecia N.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pheromone signaling is often governed both by environmentally responsive regulators and by positive feedback. This regulatory combination has the potential to coordinate a group response among distinct subpopulations that perceive key environmental stimuli differently. We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium that colonizes the squid Euprymna scolopes. Bioluminescence in ES114 is controlled in part by N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-L-homoserine lactone (3OC6), a pheromone produced by LuxI that together with LuxR activates transcription of the luxICDABEG operon, initiating a positive feedback loop and inducing luminescence. The lux operon is also regulated by environmentally responsive regulators, including the redox-responsive ArcA/ArcB system, which directly represses lux in culture. Here we show that inactivating arcA leads to increased 3OC6 accumulation to initiate positive feedback. In the absence of positive feedback, arcA-mediated control of luminescence was only ∼2-fold, but luxI-dependent positive feedback contributed more than 100 fold to the net induction of luminescence in the arcA mutant. Consistent with this overriding importance of positive feedback, 3OC6 produced by the arcA mutant induced luminescence in nearby wild-type cells, overcoming their ArcA repression of lux. Similarly, we found that artificially inducing ArcA could effectively repress luminescence before, but not after, positive feedback was initiated. Finally, we show that 3OC6 produced by a subpopulation of symbiotic cells can induce luminescence in other cells co-colonizing the host. Our results suggest that even transient loss of ArcA-mediated regulation in a sub-population of cells can induce luminescence in a wider community. Moreover, they indicate that 3OC6 can communicate information about both cell density and the state of

  16. Selective Photoreceptor Gene Knock-out Reveals a Regulatory Role for the Growth Behavior of Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rashmi; Pathak, Gopal; Drepper, Thomas; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    The plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae (Ps) is a well-established model organism for bacterial infection of plants. The genome sequences of two pathovars, pv. syringae and pv. tomato, revealed one gene encoding a blue and two genes encoding red/far red light-sensing photoreceptors. Continuing former molecular characterization of the photoreceptor proteins, we here report selective photoreceptor gene disruption for pv. tomato aiming at identification of potentially regulatory functions of these photoreceptors. Transformation of Ps cells with linear DNA constructs yielded interposon mutations of the corresponding genes. Cell growth studies of the generated photoreceptor knock-out mutants revealed their role in light-dependent regulation of cell growth and motility. Disruption of the blue-light (BL) receptor gene caused a growth deregulation, in line with an observed increased virulence of this mutant (Moriconi et al., Plant J., 2013, 76, 322). Bacterial phytochrome-1 (BphP1) deletion mutant caused unaltered cell growth, but a stronger swarming capacity. Inactivation of its ortholog, BphP2, however, caused reduced growth and remarkably altered dendritic swarming behavior. Combined knock-out of both bacteriophytochromes reproduced the swarming pattern observed for the BphP2 mutant alone. A triple knock-out mutant showed a growth rate between that of the BL (deregulation) and the phytochrome-2 mutant (growth reduction). PMID:27289014

  17. CD166-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor phosphorylation promotes the growth of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Jia, Guodong; Wang, Xu; Yan, Ming; Chen, Wantao; Zhang, Ping

    2016-08-01

    CD166 has been considered a relatively specific marker of stem cells and cancer stem cells, and the altered expression of CD166 has also been reported as a prognostic marker of several other types of cancer. However, the molecular functions of CD166 in these cancer cells are largely unknown. In this study, we found that CD166 significantly enhanced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation and prolonged epidermal growth factor (EGF)/EGFR signalling activation. In addition, EGF stimulation in CD166-overexpressing oral squamous carcinoma cells led to enhanced colony formation, invasion capacity and cytoskeletal re-organization in vitro and elevated tumourigenesis in vivo. Taken together, the results of our study identify CD166 as an intriguing therapeutic target for patients suffering from oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). PMID:27424177

  18. Trauma or growth after a natural disaster? The mediating role of rumination processes

    PubMed Central

    García, Felipe E.; Cova, Félix; Rincón, Paulina; Vázquez, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test a cognitive model of posttraumatic symptoms (PTS) and posttraumatic growth (PTG) after exposure to a natural disaster. It was hypothesized that although subjective severity of trauma would be related to the severity of PTS, this relation would be mediated by brooding and cognitive strategies related to the presence of repetitive negative content in thoughts. Furthermore, the relation between severity and PTG would be fully mediated by deliberate rumination (DR), cognitive strategies related to conscious efforts focused on handling the event. To evaluate the cognitive model, adults (N=351) who lost their homes as a result of the earthquake and tsunami that occurred in Chile on February 27, 2010, were selected. Structural equation modeling was used to analyze the data. The resulting model had adequate indices of goodness adjustment and showed that brooding completely mediated the relation between subjective severity and PTS, and DR completely mediated the relation between subjective severity, brooding, and PTG. These results highlight the role of both the content and process of rumination in mediating the association between subjective severity of trauma, PTS, and PTG. The implications of these results for a more comprehensive model of symptom severity that occurs after trauma are discussed. PMID:26234365

  19. Hepatocyte growth factor as a downstream mediator of vascular endothelial growth factor-dependent preservation of growth in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Seedorf, Gregory; Metoxen, Alexander J; Rock, Robert; Markham, Neil; Ryan, Sharon; Vu, Thiennu; Abman, Steven H

    2016-06-01

    Impaired vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). We hypothesized that the effects of VEGF on lung structure during development may be mediated through its downstream effects on both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activity, and that, in the absence of eNOS, trophic effects of VEGF would be mediated through HGF signaling. To test this hypothesis, we performed an integrative series of in vitro (fetal rat lung explants and isolated fetal alveolar and endothelial cells) and in vivo studies with normal rat pups and eNOS(-/-) mice. Compared with controls, fetal lung explants from eNOS(-/-) mice had decreased terminal lung bud formation, which was restored with recombinant human VEGF (rhVEGF) treatment. Neonatal eNOS(-/-) mice were more susceptible to hyperoxia-induced inhibition of lung growth than controls, which was prevented with rhVEGF treatment. Fetal alveolar type II (AT2) cell proliferation was increased with rhVEGF treatment only with mesenchymal cell (MC) coculture, and these effects were attenuated with anti-HGF antibody treatment. Unlike VEGF, HGF directly stimulated isolated AT2 cells even without MC coculture. HGF directly stimulates fetal pulmonary artery endothelial cell growth and tube formation, which is attenuated by treatment with JNJ-38877605, a c-Met inhibitor. rHGF treatment preserves alveolar and vascular growth after postnatal exposure to SU-5416, a VEGF receptor inhibitor. We conclude that the effects of VEGF on AT2 and endothelial cells during lung development are partly mediated through HGF-c-Met signaling and speculate that reciprocal VEGF-HGF signaling between epithelia and endothelia is disrupted in infants who develop BPD. PMID:27036872

  20. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Lee, Will M.; John, Constance M.; Turek, Paul J.; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood–testis barrier (BTB)? SUMMARY ANSWER Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5–20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4–200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by

  1. A 3-D constrained mixture model for mechanically mediated vascular growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Wan, William; Hansen, Laura

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the widely applied approach to model soft tissue remodeling employing the concept of volumetric growth, microstructurally motivated models are capable of capturing many of the underlying mechanisms of growth and remodeling; i.e., the production, removal, and remodeling of individual constituents at different rates and to different extents. A 3-dimensional constrained mixture computational framework has been developed for vascular growth and remodeling, considering new, microstructurally motivated kinematics and constitutive equations and new stress and muscle activation mediated evolution equations. Our computational results for alterations in flow and pressure, using reasonable physiological values for rates of constituent growth and turnover, concur with findings in the literature. For example, for flow-induced remodeling, our simulations predict that, although the wall shear stress is restored completely, the circumferential stress is not restored employing realistic physiological rate parameters. Also, our simulations predict different levels of thickening on inner versus outer wall locations, as shown in numerous reports of pressure-induced remodeling. Whereas the simulations are meant to be illustrative, they serve to highlight the experimental data currently lacking to fully quantify mechanically mediated adaptations in the vasculature. PMID:20039091

  2. Drosophila tribbles antagonizes insulin signaling-mediated growth and metabolism via interactions with Akt kinase.

    PubMed

    Das, Rahul; Sebo, Zachary; Pence, Laramie; Dobens, Leonard L

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Tribbles (Trbl) is the founding member of the Trib family of kinase-like docking proteins that modulate cell signaling during proliferation, migration and growth. In a wing misexpression screen for Trbl interacting proteins, we identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase Akt1. Given the central role of Akt1 in insulin signaling, we tested the function of Trbl in larval fat body, a tissue where rapid increases in size are exquisitely sensitive to insulin/insulin-like growth factor levels. Consistent with a role in antagonizing insulin-mediated growth, trbl RNAi knockdown in the fat body increased cell size, advanced the timing of pupation and increased levels of circulating triglyceride. Complementarily, overexpression of Trbl reduced fat body cell size, decreased overall larval size, delayed maturation and lowered levels of triglycerides, while circulating glucose levels increased. The conserved Trbl kinase domain is required for function in vivo and for interaction with Akt in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Consistent with direct regulation of Akt, overexpression of Trbl in the fat body decreased levels of activated Akt (pSer505-Akt) while misexpression of trbl RNAi increased phospho-Akt levels, and neither treatment affected total Akt levels. Trbl misexpression effectively suppressed Akt-mediated wing and muscle cell size increases and reduced phosphorylation of the Akt target FoxO (pSer256-FoxO). Taken together, these data show that Drosophila Trbl has a conserved role to bind Akt and block Akt-mediated insulin signaling, and implicate Trib proteins as novel sites of signaling pathway integration that link nutrient availability with cell growth and proliferation. PMID:25329475

  3. Drosophila Tribbles Antagonizes Insulin Signaling-Mediated Growth and Metabolism via Interactions with Akt Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Das, Rahul; Sebo, Zachary; Pence, Laramie; Dobens, Leonard L.

    2014-01-01

    Drosophila Tribbles (Trbl) is the founding member of the Trib family of kinase-like docking proteins that modulate cell signaling during proliferation, migration and growth. In a wing misexpression screen for Trbl interacting proteins, we identified the Ser/Thr protein kinase Akt1. Given the central role of Akt1 in insulin signaling, we tested the function of Trbl in larval fat body, a tissue where rapid increases in size are exquisitely sensitive to insulin/insulin-like growth factor levels. Consistent with a role in antagonizing insulin-mediated growth, trbl RNAi knockdown in the fat body increased cell size, advanced the timing of pupation and increased levels of circulating triglyceride. Complementarily, overexpression of Trbl reduced fat body cell size, decreased overall larval size, delayed maturation and lowered levels of triglycerides, while circulating glucose levels increased. The conserved Trbl kinase domain is required for function in vivo and for interaction with Akt in a yeast two-hybrid assay. Consistent with direct regulation of Akt, overexpression of Trbl in the fat body decreased levels of activated Akt (pSer505-Akt) while misexpression of trbl RNAi increased phospho-Akt levels, and neither treatment affected total Akt levels. Trbl misexpression effectively suppressed Akt-mediated wing and muscle cell size increases and reduced phosphorylation of the Akt target FoxO (pSer256-FoxO). Taken together, these data show that Drosophila Trbl has a conserved role to bind Akt and block Akt-mediated insulin signaling, and implicate Trib proteins as novel sites of signaling pathway integration that link nutrient availability with cell growth and proliferation. PMID:25329475

  4. Regulatory reform in the oil industry. Hearing before the Subcommittee on National Economic Growth, Natural Resources, and Regulatory Affairs of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second session

    SciTech Connect

    1997-12-31

    This document contains the Hearing before the Subcommittee on National Economic Growth, Natural Resources, and Regulatory Affairs of the Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, Second Session, May 20, 1996 on Regulatory Reform in the Oil Industry. This hearing investigates the federal regulations in the oil and gas industry and whether they are effective at giving us a cleaner, safer, and healthier America, or just higher prices at the gas pump.

  5. Assisted curation of regulatory interactions and growth conditions of OxyR in E. coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Gama-Castro, Socorro; López-Fuentes, Alejandra; Balderas-Martínez, Yalbi Itzel; Clematide, Simon; Ellendorff, Tilia Renate; Santos-Zavaleta, Alberto; Marques-Madeira, Hernani; Collado-Vides, Julio

    2014-01-01

    Given the current explosion of data within original publications generated in the field of genomics, a recognized bottleneck is the transfer of such knowledge into comprehensive databases. We have for years organized knowledge on transcriptional regulation reported in the original literature of Escherichia coli K-12 into RegulonDB (http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx), our database that is currently supported by >5000 papers. Here, we report a first step towards the automatic biocuration of growth conditions in this corpus. Using the OntoGene text-mining system (http://www.ontogene.org), we extracted and manually validated regulatory interactions and growth conditions in a new approach based on filters that enable the curator to select informative sentences from preprocessed full papers. Based on a set of 48 papers dealing with oxidative stress by OxyR, we were able to retrieve 100% of the OxyR regulatory interactions present in RegulonDB, including the transcription factors and their effect on target genes. Our strategy was designed to extract, as we did, their growth conditions. This result provides a proof of concept for a more direct and efficient curation process, and enables us to define the strategy of the subsequent steps to be implemented for a semi-automatic curation of original literature dealing with regulation of gene expression in bacteria. This project will enhance the efficiency and quality of the curation of knowledge present in the literature of gene regulation, and contribute to a significant increase in the encoding of the regulatory network of E. coli. RegulonDB Database URL: http://regulondb.ccg.unam.mx OntoGene URL: http://www.ontogene.org PMID:24903516

  6. Antisense oligonucleotide–mediated MDM4 exon 6 skipping impairs tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Dewaele, Michael; Tabaglio, Tommaso; Willekens, Karen; Bezzi, Marco; Teo, Shun Xie; Low, Diana H.P.; Koh, Cheryl M.; Rambow, Florian; Fiers, Mark; Rogiers, Aljosja; Radaelli, Enrico; Al-Haddawi, Muthafar; Tan, Soo Yong; Hermans, Els; Amant, Frederic; Yan, Hualong; Lakshmanan, Manikandan; Koumar, Ratnacaram Chandrahas; Lim, Soon Thye; Derheimer, Frederick A.; Campbell, Robert M.; Bonday, Zahid; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Shackleton, Mark; Blattner, Christine; Marine, Jean-Christophe; Guccione, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    MDM4 is a promising target for cancer therapy, as it is undetectable in most normal adult tissues but often upregulated in cancer cells to dampen p53 tumor-suppressor function. The mechanisms that underlie MDM4 upregulation in cancer cells are largely unknown. Here, we have shown that this key oncogenic event mainly depends on a specific alternative splicing switch. We determined that while a nonsense-mediated, decay-targeted isoform of MDM4 (MDM4-S) is produced in normal adult tissues as a result of exon 6 skipping, enhanced exon 6 inclusion leads to expression of full-length MDM4 in a large number of human cancers. Although this alternative splicing event is likely regulated by multiple splicing factors, we identified the SRSF3 oncoprotein as a key enhancer of exon 6 inclusion. In multiple human melanoma cell lines and in melanoma patient–derived xenograft (PDX) mouse models, antisense oligonucleotide–mediated (ASO-mediated) skipping of exon 6 decreased MDM4 abundance, inhibited melanoma growth, and enhanced sensitivity to MAPK-targeting therapeutics. Additionally, ASO-based MDM4 targeting reduced diffuse large B cell lymphoma PDX growth. As full-length MDM4 is enhanced in multiple human tumors, our data indicate that this strategy is applicable to a wide range of tumor types. We conclude that enhanced MDM4 exon 6 inclusion is a common oncogenic event and has potential as a clinically compatible therapeutic target. PMID:26595814

  7. Role of Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein in Mediating Internal Initiation of Translation of Interferon Regulatory Factor 2 RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Debojyoti; Venkataramana, Musturi; Ponnuswamy, Anand; Das, Saumitra

    2009-01-01

    Background Earlier we have reported translational control of interferon regulatory factor 2 (IRF2) by internal initiation (Dhar et al, Nucleic Acids Res, 2007). The results implied possible role of IRF2 in controlling the intricate balance of cellular gene expression under stress conditions in general. Here we have investigated the secondary structure of the Internal Ribosome Entry Site of IRF2 RNA and demonstrated the role of PTB protein in ribosome assembly to facilitate internal initiation. Methodology/Principal Findings We have probed the putative secondary structure of the IRF2 5′UTR RNA using various enzymatic and chemical modification agents to constrain the secondary structure predicted from RNA folding algorithm Mfold. The IRES activity was found to be influenced by the interaction of trans-acting factor, polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB). Deletion of 25 nts from the 3′terminus of the 5′untranslated region resulted in reduced binding with PTB protein and also showed significant decrease in IRES activity compared to the wild type. We have also demonstrated putative contact points of PTB on the IRF2–5′UTR using primer extension inhibition assay. Majority of the PTB toe-prints were found to be restricted to the 3′end of the IRES. Additionally, Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra analysis suggested change in the conformation of the RNA upon PTB binding. Further, binding studies using S10 extract from HeLa cells, partially silenced for PTB gene expression, resulted in reduced binding by other trans-acting factors. Finally, we have demonstrated that addition of recombinant PTB enhances ribosome assembly on IRF2 IRES suggesting possible role of PTB in mediating internal initiation of translation of IRF2 RNA. Conclusion/Significance It appears that PTB binding to multiple sites within IRF2 5′UTR leads to a conformational change in the RNA that facilitate binding of other trans-acting factors to mediate internal initiation of translation. PMID

  8. The Pollen Receptor Kinase LePRK2 Mediates Growth-Promoting Signals and Positively Regulates Pollen Germination and Tube Growth

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In flowering plants, the process of pollen germination and tube growth is required for successful fertilization. A pollen receptor kinase from tomato, LePRK2, has been implicated in signaling during pollen germination and tube growth as well as in mediating pollen (tube)-pistil communication. Here w...

  9. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  10. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I.; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created “sialic acid low” tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing “sialic acid low” tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  11. Role of Interferon Regulatory Factor 3-Mediated Apoptosis in the Establishment and Maintenance of Persistent Infection by Sendai Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Saurabh; Fensterl, Volker; Zhang, Ying; Veleeparambil, Manoj; Yamashita, Michifumi

    2013-01-01

    Infection of cultured cells by paramyxoviruses causes cell death, mediated by a newly discovered apoptotic pathway activated by virus infection. The key proapoptotic protein in this pathway is interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF-3), which upon activation by virus infection binds BAX, translocates it to mitochondria, and triggers apoptosis. When IRF-3-knockdown cells were infected with Sendai virus (SeV), persistent infection (PI) was established. The PI cells produced infectious SeV continuously and constitutively expressed many innate immune genes. Interferon signaling was blocked in these cells. The elevated levels of IRF-3-driven genes in the PI cells indicated that the amount of residual IRF-3 activated by endogenous SeV was high enough to drive the transcriptional effects of IRF-3 but too low to trigger its apoptotic activity. We confirmed this IRF-3 threshold idea by generating a tetracycline (Tet)-inducible cell line for IRF-3 expression, which enabled us to express various levels of IRF-3. PI could be established in the Tet-off cell line, and as expected, when doxycycline was withdrawn, the cells underwent apoptosis. Finally, we tested for PI establishment in 12 mouse embryo fibroblasts by natural selection. Eleven lines became persistently infected; although seven out of them had low IRF-3 levels, four did not. When one of the latter four was further analyzed, we observed that it expressed a very low level of caspase 3, the final executor protease of the apoptotic pathway. These results demonstrated that SeV PI can arise from infection of normal wild-type cells, but only if they can find a way to impair the IRF-3-dependent apoptotic pathway. PMID:23077293

  12. Regulatory T Cells Promote β-Catenin–Mediated Epithelium-to-Mesenchyme Transition During Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Shanshan; Pan, Xiujie; Xu, Long; Yang, Zhihua; Guo, Renfeng; Gu, Yongqing; Li, Ruoxi; Wang, Qianjun; Xiao, Fengjun; Du, Li; Zhou, Pingkun; Zhu, Maoxiang

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis results from thoracic radiation therapy and severely limits radiation therapy approaches. CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}FoxP3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) as well as epithelium-to-mesenchyme transition (EMT) cells are involved in pulmonary fibrosis induced by multiple factors. However, the mechanisms of Tregs and EMT cells in irradiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis remain unclear. In the present study, we investigated the influence of Tregs on EMT in radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods and Materials: Mice thoraxes were irradiated (20 Gy), and Tregs were depleted by intraperitoneal injection of a monoclonal anti-CD25 antibody 2 hours after irradiation and every 7 days thereafter. Mice were treated on days 3, 7, and 14 and 1, 3, and 6 months post irradiation. The effectiveness of Treg depletion was assayed via flow cytometry. EMT and β-catenin in lung tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry. Tregs isolated from murine spleens were cultured with mouse lung epithelial (MLE) 12 cells, and short interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown of β-catenin in MLE 12 cells was used to explore the effects of Tregs on EMT and β-catenin via flow cytometry and Western blotting. Results: Anti-CD25 antibody treatment depleted Tregs efficiently, attenuated the process of radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis, hindered EMT, and reduced β-catenin accumulation in lung epithelial cells in vivo. The coculture of Tregs with irradiated MLE 12 cells showed that Tregs could promote EMT in MLE 12 cells and that the effect of Tregs on EMT was partially abrogated by β-catenin knockdown in vitro. Conclusions: Tregs can promote EMT in accelerating radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. This process is partially mediated through β-catenin. Our study suggests a new mechanism for EMT, promoted by Tregs, that accelerates radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  13. The immune tolerance of cancer is mediated by IDO that is inhibited by COX-2 inhibitors through regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Yong; Choi, Hye Kyoung; Lee, Kyoung Ju; Jung, Jin Yong; Hur, Gyu Young; Jung, Ki Hwan; Kim, Je Hyeong; Shin, Chol; Shim, Jae Jeong; In, Kwang Ho; Kang, Kyung Ho; Yoo, Se Hwa

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PGE2), synthesized by cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), is associated with cellular immune tolerance during the process of cancer development. Induction of tolerance requires a specific environment in which dendritic cells and regulatory T cells (Tregs) play an essential role. It was recently shown that maturation of dendritic cells in the presence of indoleamine 2, 3-dioxygenase (IDO) results in activation of Tregs, and inhibition of COX-2 activity regulated IDO expression within the tumor microenvironment. Thus, we hypothesized that the tumor immune tolerance would be inhibited by COX-2 inhibitor and this inhibition would be mediated by IDO-dependent Tregs inhibition. The PGE2 in Lewis lung cancer cells (3LL) and serum of mice were measured for the evaluation of COX-2 inhibitors' local and systemic effects. The production of PGE2 in 3LL cells and serum of 3LL tumor-bearing mice were decreased by COX-2 inhibition. However, there were no significant differences in serum PGE2 levels among normal control and celecoxib-treated nontumor-bearing mice. The accumulation of Tregs was reduced in the celecoxib-treated 3LL tumor-bearing mice. In addition, the expressions of COX-2, IDO, and Foxp3 were reduced in the mice treated with a COX-2 inhibitor, and this was found to correlate with a reduction in the size of tumor mass and metastasis. These results suggest that the antitumor effects of COX-2 inhibitors seemed to be correlated with the inhibition of IDO and Tregs. Therefore, COX-2 inhibitors might provide a therapeutic strategy for Tregs-induced tumor immune tolerance. PMID:19307990

  14. Growth Control in Colon Epithelial Cells: Gadolinium Enhances Calcium-Mediated Growth Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Attili, Durga; Jenkins, Brian; Aslam, Muhammad Nadeem; Dame, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    Gadolinium, a member of the lanthanoid family of transition metals, interacts with calcium-binding sites on proteins and other biological molecules. The overall goal of the present investigation was to determine if gadolinium could enhance calcium-induced epithelial cell growth inhibition in the colon. Gadolinium at concentrations as low as 1–5 µM combined with calcium inhibits proliferation of human colonic epithelial cells more effectively than calcium alone. Gadolinium had no detectable effect on calcium-induced differentiation in the same cells based on change in cell morphology, induction of E-cadherin synthesis, and translocation of E-cadherin from the cytosol to the cell surface. When the colon epithelial cells were treated with gadolinium and then exposed to increased calcium concentrations, movement of extracellular calcium into the cell was suppressed. In contrast, gadolinium treatment had no effect on ionomycin-induced release of stored intracellular calcium into the cytoplasm. Whether these in vitro observations can be translated into an approach for reducing abnormal proliferation in the colonic mucosa (including polyp formation) is not known. These results do, however, provide an explanation for our recent findings that a multi-mineral supplement containing all of the naturally occurring lanthanoid metals including gadolinium are more effective than calcium alone in preventing colon polyp formation in mice on a high-fat diet. PMID:23008064

  15. Differential effects of STAT proteins on growth hormone-mediated IGF-I gene expression.

    PubMed

    Varco-Merth, Ben; Rotwein, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Growth hormone (GH) plays a key role regulating somatic growth and in controlling metabolism and other physiological processes in humans and other animal species. GH acts by binding to the extracellular part of its transmembrane receptor, leading to induction of multiple intracellular signal transduction pathways that culminate in changes in gene and protein expression. A key agent in GH-stimulated growth is the latent transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 5B, one of four STAT proteins induced by the GH receptor in cultured cells and in vivo. As shown by genetic and biochemical studies, GH-activated STAT5B promotes transcription of the gene encoding the critical growth peptide, insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I), and natural null mutations of STAT5B in humans lead to growth failure accompanied by diminished IGF-I expression. Here we have examined the possibility that other GH-activated STATs can enhance IGF-I gene transcription, and thus potentially contribute to GH-regulated somatic growth. We find that human STAT5A is nearly identical to STAT5B in its biochemical and functional responses to GH but that STAT1 and STAT3 show a weaker profile of in vitro binding to STAT DNA elements from the IGF-I gene than STAT5B, and are less potent inducers of gene transcription through these elements. Taken together, our results offer a molecular explanation for why STAT5B is a key in vivo mediator of GH-activated IGF-I gene transcription and thus of GH-regulated somatic growth. PMID:25205818

  16. Conditional Cooperativity of Toxin - Antitoxin Regulation Can Mediate Bistability between Growth and Dormancy

    PubMed Central

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined “conditional cooperativity”. Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state. PMID:24009488

  17. Conditional cooperativity of toxin - antitoxin regulation can mediate bistability between growth and dormancy.

    PubMed

    Cataudella, Ilaria; Sneppen, Kim; Gerdes, Kenn; Mitarai, Namiko

    2013-01-01

    Many toxin-antitoxin operons are regulated by the toxin/antitoxin ratio by mechanisms collectively coined "conditional cooperativity". Toxin and antitoxin form heteromers with different stoichiometric ratios, and the complex with the intermediate ratio works best as a transcription repressor. This allows transcription at low toxin level, strong repression at intermediate toxin level, and then again transcription at high toxin level. Such regulation has two interesting features; firstly, it provides a non-monotonous response to the concentration of one of the proteins, and secondly, it opens for ultra-sensitivity mediated by the sequestration of the functioning heteromers. We explore possible functions of conditional regulation in simple feedback motifs, and show that it can provide bistability for a wide range of parameters. We then demonstrate that the conditional cooperativity in toxin-antitoxin systems combined with the growth-inhibition activity of free toxin can mediate bistability between a growing state and a dormant state. PMID:24009488

  18. Transforming growth factor-beta1 mediates cellular response to DNA damage in situ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ewan, Kenneth B.; Henshall-Powell, Rhonda L.; Ravani, Shraddha A.; Pajares, Maria Jose; Arteaga, Carlos; Warters, Ray; Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2002-01-01

    Transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1 is rapidly activated after ionizing radiation, but its specific role in cellular responses to DNA damage is not known. Here we use Tgfbeta1 knockout mice to show that radiation-induced apoptotic response is TGF-beta1 dependent in the mammary epithelium, and that both apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation in response to DNA damage decrease as a function of TGF-beta1 gene dose in embryonic epithelial tissues. Because apoptosis in these tissues has been shown previously to be p53 dependent, we then examined p53 protein activation. TGF-beta1 depletion, by either gene knockout or by using TGF-beta neutralizing antibodies, resulted in decreased p53 Ser-18 phosphorylation in irradiated mammary gland. These data indicate that TGF-beta1 is essential for rapid p53-mediated cellular responses that mediate cell fate decisions in situ.

  19. Pharmacological inhibition of fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor signaling ameliorates FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemic rickets.

    PubMed

    Wöhrle, Simon; Henninger, Christine; Bonny, Olivier; Thuery, Anne; Beluch, Noemie; Hynes, Nancy E; Guagnano, Vito; Sellers, William R; Hofmann, Francesco; Kneissel, Michaela; Graus Porta, Diana

    2013-04-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) is a circulating factor secreted by osteocytes that is essential for phosphate homeostasis. In kidney proximal tubular cells FGF23 inhibits phosphate reabsorption and leads to decreased synthesis and enhanced catabolism of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25[OH]2 D3 ). Excess levels of FGF23 cause renal phosphate wasting and suppression of circulating 1,25(OH)2 D3 levels and are associated with several hereditary hypophosphatemic disorders with skeletal abnormalities, including X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets (XLH) and autosomal recessive hypophosphatemic rickets (ARHR). Currently, therapeutic approaches to these diseases are limited to treatment with activated vitamin D analogues and phosphate supplementation, often merely resulting in partial correction of the skeletal aberrations. In this study, we evaluate the use of FGFR inhibitors for the treatment of FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemic disorders using NVP-BGJ398, a novel selective, pan-specific FGFR inhibitor currently in Phase I clinical trials for cancer therapy. In two different hypophosphatemic mouse models, Hyp and Dmp1-null mice, resembling the human diseases XLH and ARHR, we find that pharmacological inhibition of FGFRs efficiently abrogates aberrant FGF23 signaling and normalizes the hypophosphatemic and hypocalcemic conditions of these mice. Correspondingly, long-term FGFR inhibition in Hyp mice leads to enhanced bone growth, increased mineralization, and reorganization of the disturbed growth plate structure. We therefore propose NVP-BGJ398 treatment as a novel approach for the therapy of FGF23-mediated hypophosphatemic diseases. PMID:23129509

  20. Fetal production of growth factors and inflammatory mediators predicts pulmonary hypertension in congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Fleck, Shannon; Bautista, Geoanna; Keating, Sheila M.; Lee, Tzong-Hae; Keller, Roberta L.; Moon-Grady, Anita J.; Gonzales, Kelly; Norris, Philip J.; Busch, Michael P.; Kim, CJ; Romero, Roberto; Lee, Hanmin; Miniati, Doug; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) represents a spectrum of lung hypoplasia and consequent pulmonary hypertension is an important cause of postnatal morbidity and mortality. We studied biomarkers at the maternal-fetal interface to understand factors associated with the persistence of pulmonary hypertension. Methods Maternal and cord blood samples from fetuses with CDH and unaffected controls were analyzed using a human 39plex immunoassay kit. Cellular trafficking between the mother and the fetu was quantified using quantitative real-time PCR for non-shared alleles. Biomarker profiles were then correlated with CDH severity based on the degree of pulmonary hypertension. Results Cord blood levels of epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and several inflammatory mediators increased significantly as the severity of CDH increased, while maternal levels growth factors and mediators decreased significantly with CDH severity. Maternal cells were increased in fetuses with severe CDH compared to controls, with elevated levels of the chemokine CXCL-10 in patients with the highest trafficking. Conclusion Patients with CDH demonstrate pro-inflammatory and chemotactic signals in fetal blood at the time of birth. Since some of these molecules have been implicated in the development of pulmonary hypertension, prenatal strategies targeting specific molecular pathways may be useful adjuncts to current fetal therapies. PMID:23770923

  1. 14-3-3 sigma and 14-3-3 zeta plays an opposite role in cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Young; Jeon, Woo-Kwang; Bae, Eun-Jin; Kim, Shin-Tae; Lee, Ho-Jae; Kim, Seong-Jin; Kim, Byung-Chul

    2010-03-01

    The expression of 14-3-3 proteins is dysregulated in various types of cancer. This study was undertaken to investigate the effects of 14-3-3 zeta and 14-3-3 sigma on cell growth inhibition mediated by transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Mouse mammary epithelial cells (Eph4) that are transformed with oncogenic c-H-Ras (EpRas) and no longer sensitive to TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition displayed increased expression of 14-3-3 zeta and decreased expression of 14-3-3 sigma compared with parental Eph4 cells. Using small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown and overexpression of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta, we showed that 14-3-3 sigma is required for TGF-beta1-mediated growth inhibition whereas 14-3-3 zeta negatively modulates this growth inhibitory response. Notably, overexpression of 14-3-3 zeta increased the level of Smad3 protein that is phosphorylated at linker regions and cannot mediate the TGF-beta1 growth inhibitory response. Consistent with this finding, mutation of the 14-3-3 zeta phosphorylation sites in Smad3 markedly reduced the 14-3-3 zeta-mediated inhibition of TGF-beta1-induced p15 promoter-reporter activity and cell cycle arrest, suggesting that these residues are critical targets of 14-3-3 zeta in the suppression of TGF-beta1-mediated growth. Taken together, our findings indicate that dysregulation of 14-3-3 sigma or 14-3-3 zeta contributes to TGF-beta1 resistance in cancer cells. PMID:20082218

  2. Valproic acid overcomes transforming growth factor-β-mediated sorafenib resistance in hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Yasunobu; Wakai, Toshifumi; Kubota, Masayuki; Osawa, Mami; Hirose, Yuki; Sakata, Jun; Kobayashi, Takashi; Fujimaki, Shun; Takamura, Masaaki; Yamagiwa, Satoshi; Aoyagi, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Sorafenib is a multi-kinase inhibitor approved for hepatocellular carcinoma, but rarely causes tumor regression in patients with chronic liver diseases. To investigate whether growth factor-mediated signaling is involved in sorafenib resistance, HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 hepatoma cells were exposed to epidermal growth factor (EGF), hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) or transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) prior to treatment with sorafenib. Furthermore, to identify an effective combination treatment with sorafenib, growth factor-sensitized cells were treated with sorafenib alone or in combination with celecoxib, lovastatin or valproic acid (VPA). Trypan blue staining and Annexin V assays showed that the cytotoxic effect of sorafenib was inhibited by 15-54% in cells sensitized to TGF-β (P<0.05). Western blotting analysis showed that TGF-β significantly activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)-mediated AKT signaling, and sorafenib failed to suppress both ERK and AKT in TGF-β-sensitized cells. The decreased anti-tumor effect of sorafenib was rescued by chemical inhibition of ERK and AKT. When TGF-β-sensitized cells were treated with sorafenib plus VPA, the levels of phosphorylated ERK and AKT were considerably suppressed and the numbers of dead cells were increased by 3.7-5.7-fold compared with those exposed to sorafenib alone (P<0.05). Moreover, low dose sorafenib-induced cell migration was effectively suppressed by combination treatment with sorafenib and VPA. Collectively, TGF-β/ERK/AKT signaling might play a critical role in sorafenib resistance in hepatoma cells, and combination treatment with VPA may be effective against this drug resistance. PMID:24817927

  3. Modulation of cell cycle regulatory protein expression and suppression of tumor growth by mimosine in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Weng, C F; Yen, M H; Chuang, L Y; Hung, W C

    2000-10-01

    Our previous results demonstrated that the plant amino acid mimosine blocked cell cycle progression and suppressed proliferation of human lung cancer cells in vitro by multiple mechanisms. Inhibition of cyclin D1 expression or induction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1 expression was found in mimosine-treated lung cancer cells. However, whether mimosine may modulate the expression of these cell cycle regulatory proteins and suppress tumor growth in vivo is unknown. In this study, we examined the anti-cancer effect of mimosine on human H226 lung cancer cells grown in nude mice. Our results demonstrated that mimosine inhibits cyclin D1 and induces p21WAF1 expression in vivo. Furthermore, results of TUNEL analysis indicated that mimosine may induce apoptosis to suppress tumor growth in nude mice. Collectively, these results suggest that mimosine exerts anti-cancer effect in vivo and might be useful in the therapy of lung cancer. PMID:10995875

  4. Preservation of Gene Duplication Increases the Regulatory Spectrum of Ribosomal Protein Genes and Enhances Growth under Stress.

    PubMed

    Parenteau, Julie; Lavoie, Mathieu; Catala, Mathieu; Malik-Ghulam, Mustafa; Gagnon, Jules; Abou Elela, Sherif

    2015-12-22

    In baker's yeast, the majority of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) are duplicated, and it was recently proposed that such duplications are preserved via the functional specialization of the duplicated genes. However, the origin and nature of duplicated RPGs' (dRPGs) functional specificity remain unclear. In this study, we show that differences in dRPG functions are generated by variations in the modality of gene expression and, to a lesser extent, by protein sequence. Analysis of the sequence and expression patterns of non-intron-containing RPGs indicates that each dRPG is controlled by specific regulatory sequences modulating its expression levels in response to changing growth conditions. Homogenization of dRPG sequences reduces cell tolerance to growth under stress without changing the number of expressed genes. Together, the data reveal a model where duplicated genes provide a means for modulating the expression of ribosomal proteins in response to stress. PMID:26686636

  5. Mediation of wound-related Rous sarcoma virus tumorigenesis by TFG (transforming growth factor)-. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Sieweke, M.H.; Bissell, M.J. ); Thompson, N.L.; Sporn, M.B. )

    1990-06-29

    In Rous sarcoma virus (RSV)-infected chickens, wounding leads to tumor formation with nearly 100% frequency in tissues that would otherwise remain tumor-free. Identifying molecular mediators of this phenomenon should yield important clues to the mechanisms involved in RSV tumorigenesis. Immunohistochemical staining showed that TGF-{beta} is present locally shortly after wounding, but not in unwounded controls. In addition, subcutaneous administration of recombinant transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) could substitute completely for wounding in tumor induction. A treatment protocol of four doses of 800 nanograms of TGF-{beta} resulted in v-src-expressing tumors with 100% frequency; four doses of only 10 nanograms still led to tumor formation in 80% of the animals. This effect was specific, as other growth factors with suggested roles in would healing did not elicit the same response. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) or TGF-{alpha} had no effect, and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) or insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) yielded only occasional tumors after longer latency. TGF-{beta} release during the would-healing response may thus be a critical event that creates a conducive environment for RSV tumorigenesis and may act as a cofactor for transformation in this system. 31 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Synchrotron X-ray and optical studies of the DNA-mediated growth of plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Wang, Geng; Zhang, Xiaonan; Geng, Heping; Xu, Lifeng; Li, Wenqin; Liu, Xin

    2015-03-01

    Reproducible and controllable growth of nanostructures with well-defined physical and chemical properties is a longstanding problem in nanoscience. A key step to address this issue is to understand their underlying growth mechanism, which is often entangled in the complexity of growth environments and obscured by rapid reaction speeds. Synchrotron x-rays, because of their specific wavelengths (nanometers) and advantages of large flux, high penetration and adjustable photon energy, have a particularly important position in structural and electronic characterizations of nanomaterials. Herein, we demonstrate that the evolution of size, surface morphology, and the optical properties of plasmonic nanostructures could be quantitatively intercepted by dynamic and stoichiometric control of the DNA-mediated growth. By combining synchrotron-based small-angle X-ray scattering with transmission electron microscopy, we reliably obtained quantitative structural parameters for these fine nanostructures that correlate well with their optical properties as identified by UV/Vis absorption and dark-field scattering spectroscopy. We report growth mechanisms for SERS active plasmonic nanostructures, and the remarkable interplay between their morphology and plasmonic properties. Work supported by NNSF of China (11375256) and Sci. and Tech. Commission of Shanghai Municipality (14JC1493300).

  7. Vitamin D enhances mitogenesis mediated by keratinocyte growth factor receptor in keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Gamady, Anat; Koren, Ruth; Ron, Dina; Liberman, Uri A; Ravid, Amiram

    2003-06-01

    The hormonally active vitamin D metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) belong to the network of autocrine and paracrine mediators in the skin. Both were shown to modulate keratinocyte proliferation, to reverse epidermal atrophy, to increase wound healing, and to reduce chemotherapy-induced alopecia. The overlap between their activities may suggest that vitamin D exerts some of its actions by modulation of KGF activities in the skin. This notion was examined by using HaCaT keratinocytes cultured in serum-free medium in the absence of exogenous growth factors and in the presence of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG 1478 that blocks their autonomous proliferation. These cells could be stimulated to proliferate by different fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). The relative mitogenic efficacy of basic FGF, acidic FGF, or KGF was in correlation with their affinities for the KGF receptor (KGFR). Forty-eight hour co-treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) enhanced KGFR-mediated cell proliferation in a dose dependent manner. Both ERK1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) were activated by the FGFs. Treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased the activation of ERK but reduced the activation of JNK. Treatment with 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) increased the levels of KGFR in the presence but not in the absence of KGF, probably due to inhibition of ligand-induced receptor degradation. Inhibition of protein kinase C with bisindolylmaleimide did not interfere with the effect of 1,25(OH)(2)D(3) on KGFR-mediated ERK activation. Our results support the notion that the paracrine KGF-KGFR system in the skin can act in concert with the autocrine vitamin D system in keratinocytes to promote keratinocyte proliferation and survival under situations of stress and injury. PMID:12761878

  8. Phosphorylation-Dependent Differential Regulation of Plant Growth, Cell Death, and Innate Immunity by the Regulatory Receptor-Like Kinase BAK1

    PubMed Central

    Schwessinger, Benjamin; Roux, Milena; Kadota, Yasuhiro; Ntoukakis, Vardis; Sklenar, Jan; Jones, Alexandra; Zipfel, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    Plants rely heavily on receptor-like kinases (RLKs) for perception and integration of external and internal stimuli. The Arabidopsis regulatory leucine-rich repeat RLK (LRR-RLK) BAK1 is involved in steroid hormone responses, innate immunity, and cell death control. Here, we describe the differential regulation of three different BAK1-dependent signaling pathways by a novel allele of BAK1, bak1-5. Innate immune signaling mediated by the BAK1-dependent RKs FLS2 and EFR is severely compromised in bak1-5 mutant plants. However, bak1-5 mutants are not impaired in BR signaling or cell death control. We also show that, in contrast to the RD kinase BRI1, the non-RD kinases FLS2 and EFR have very low kinase activity, and we show that neither was able to trans-phosphorylate BAK1 in vitro. Furthermore, kinase activity for all partners is completely dispensable for the ligand-induced heteromerization of FLS2 or EFR with BAK1 in planta, revealing another pathway specific mechanistic difference. The specific suppression of FLS2- and EFR-dependent signaling in bak1-5 is not due to a differential interaction of BAK1-5 with the respective ligand-binding RK but requires BAK1-5 kinase activity. Overall our results demonstrate a phosphorylation-dependent differential control of plant growth, innate immunity, and cell death by the regulatory RLK BAK1, which may reveal key differences in the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of ligand-binding RD and non-RD RKs. PMID:21593986

  9. Hormonal regulatory role of eyestalk factors on growth of heart in mud crab, Scylla serrata

    PubMed Central

    Allayie, Sartaj Ahmad; Ravichandran, S.; Bhat, Bilal Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The present study was attempted to know the growth regulation of eyestalk factors on the growth of heart in Scylla serrata using eyestalk extractions and bilateral eyestalk ablations. The bilateral eyestalk ablation led to the maximum growth indices of the heart ((H) indices) to 0.162 and 0.158 in ablated male and female, respectively, in comparison to 0.153 and 0.167 in the control male and female and 0.147 and 0.157 in injected male and female, respectively. The data have shown that the heart of male crabs grows faster than female crabs. The study has also shown that bilateral eyestalk ablation resulted in a significant increase in the heart indices in males and has least effect on the growth of the female heart. The results presented strongly support a potential role of the eyestalk factors and molting hormone regulating the growth of the heart in S. serrata. PMID:23961136

  10. Vitamin K enhancement of Sorafenib-mediated HCC cell growth inhibition in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Gang; Wang, Meifanf; Hyslop, Terry; Wang, Ziqiu; Carr, Brian I.

    2010-01-01

    The multi-kinase inhibitor Sorafenib, is the first oral agent to show activity against human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Apoptosis has been shown to be induced in HCC by several agents, including Sorafenib, as well as by the naturally occurring K vitamins (VKs). Since few non toxic agents have activity against HCC growth, we evaluated the activity of Sorafenib and K vitamins, both independently and together on the growth in vitro and in vivo of HCC cells. We found that when VK was combined with Sorafenib, the concentration of Sorafenib required for growth inhibition was substantially reduced. Conversely, VK enhanced Sorafenib effects in several HCC cell lines on growth inhibition. Growth could be inhibited at doses of VK plus Sorafenib that were ineffective with either agent alone,using vitamins K1, K2 and K5. Combination VK1 plus Sorafenib induced apoptosis on FACS, TUNEL staining and caspase activation. Phospho-ERK levels were decreased, as was Mcl-1, an ERK target. Sorafenib alone inhibited growth of transplantable HCC in vivo. At sub-effective Sorafenib doses in vivo, addition of VK1 caused major tumor regression, with decreased phospho-ERK and Mcl-1 staining. Thus, combination VK1 plus Sorafenib strongly induced growth inhibition and apoptosis in rodent and human HCC and inhibited the RAF/MEK/ERK pathway. VK1 alone activated PKA, a mediator of inhibitory Raf phosphorylation. Thus, each agent can antagonize Raf; Sorafenib as a direct inhibitor and VK1 through inhibitory Raf phosphorylation. Since both agents are available for human use, the combination has potential for improving Sorafenib effects in HCC. PMID:21351273

  11. Hammerhead Ribozyme-Mediated Knockdown of mRNA for Fibrotic Growth Factors: Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 and Connective Tissue Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Paulette M.; Blalock, Timothy D.; Yuan, Rong; Lewin, Alfred S.; Schultz, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Excessive scarring (fibrosis) is a major cause of pathologies in multiple tissues, including lung, liver, kidney, heart, cornea, and skin. The transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) system has been shown to play a key role in regulating the formation of scar tissue throughout the body. Furthermore, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been shown to mediate most of the fibrotic actions of TGF- β, including stimulation of synthesis of extracellular matrix and differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. Currently, no approved drugs selectively and specifically regulate scar formation. Thus, there is a need for a drug that selectively targets the TGF- β cascade at the molecular level and has minimal off-target side effects. This chapter focuses on the design of hammerhead ribozymes, measurement of kinetic activity, and assessment of knockdown mRNAs of TGF- β and CTGF in cell cultures. PMID:22131029

  12. Antimony mediated growth of high-density InAs quantum dots for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tutu, F. K.; Wu, J.; Lam, P.; Tang, M.; Liu, H.; Miyashita, N.; Okada, Y.; Wilson, J.; Allison, R.

    2013-07-22

    We report enhanced solar cell performance using high-density InAs quantum dots. The high-density quantum dot was grown by antimony mediated molecular beam epitaxy. In-plane quantum dot density over 1 × 10{sup 11} cm{sup −2} was achieved by applying a few monolayers of antimony on the GaAs surface prior to quantum dot growth. The formation of defective large clusters was reduced by optimization of the growth temperature and InAs coverage. Comparing with a standard quantum dot solar cell without the incorporation of antimony, the high-density quantum dot solar cell demonstrates a distinct improvement in short-circuit current from 7.4 mA/cm{sup 2} to 8.3 mA/cm{sup 2}.

  13. Seed-mediated growth of palladium nanocrystals: the effect of pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Niu, Wenxin; Xu, Guobao

    2011-02-01

    In synthesis in a solution phase, adsorbates such as halides can interact selectively with different metal crystal facets and affect the final morphology of nanocrystals. Pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions (SCN-) can also adsorb on the metal surface, but they have never been used for the synthesis of shape-controlled colloidal metal nanocrystals. In this study, we first investigated the effect of SCN- on the morphology of palladium nanocrystals through a seed-mediated growth method. The presence of 1 µM SCN- in the growth solutions could lead to the formation of palladium polyhedra: truncated rhombic dodecahedra enclosed by twelve {110}, eight {111} and six {100} facets. The products were nanocubes enclosed with six {100} facets if cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was the only capping agent. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the effect of SCN- on the morphology of Pd nanocrystals is discussed. PMID:21170425

  14. Dnmt2/Trdmt1 as Mediator of RNA Polymerase II Transcriptional Activity in Cardiac Growth

    PubMed Central

    Polo, Beatrice; Baudouy, Delphine; Kiani, Jafar; Michiels, Jean-François; Cuzin, François; Rassoulzadegan, Minoo

    2016-01-01

    Dnmt2/Trdmt1 is a methyltransferase, which has been shown to methylate tRNAs. Deficient mutants were reported to exhibit various, seemingly unrelated, defects in development and RNA-mediated epigenetic heredity. Here we report a role in a distinct developmental regulation effected by a noncoding RNA. We show that Dnmt2-deficiency in mice results in cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic measurements revealed that cardiac function is preserved notwithstanding the increased dimensions of the organ due to cardiomyocyte enlargement. Mechanistically, activation of the P-TEFb complex, a critical step for cardiac growth, results from increased dissociation of the negatively regulating Rn7sk non-coding RNA component in Dnmt2-deficient cells. Our data suggest that Dnmt2 plays an unexpected role for regulation of cardiac growth by modulating activity of the P-TEFb complex. PMID:27270731

  15. The Involvement of Gibberellins in 1,8-Cineole-Mediated Inhibition of Sprout Growth in Russet Burbank Tubers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The involvement of gibberellins in 1,8-cineole-mediated inhibition of tuber sprout growth was investigated in non-dormant field- and greenhouse-grown tubers of Russet Burbank. Continuous exposure of tubers to cineole in the vapor-phase resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of sprout growth. Comp...

  16. Seed-mediated growth of palladium nanocrystals: The effect of pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Niu, Wenxin; Xu, Guobao

    2011-02-01

    In synthesis in a solution phase, adsorbates such as halides can interact selectively with different metal crystal facets and affect the final morphology of nanocrystals. Pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions (SCN-) can also adsorb on the metal surface, but they have never been used for the synthesis of shape-controlled colloidal metal nanocrystals. In this study, we first investigated the effect of SCN- on the morphology of palladium nanocrystals through a seed-mediated growth method. The presence of 1 µM SCN- in the growth solutions could lead to the formation of palladium polyhedra: truncated rhombic dodecahedra enclosed by twelve {110}, eight {111} and six {100} facets. The products were nanocubes enclosed with six {100} facets if cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was the only capping agent. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the effect of SCN- on the morphology of Pd nanocrystals is discussed.In synthesis in a solution phase, adsorbates such as halides can interact selectively with different metal crystal facets and affect the final morphology of nanocrystals. Pseudo-halide thiocyanate ions (SCN-) can also adsorb on the metal surface, but they have never been used for the synthesis of shape-controlled colloidal metal nanocrystals. In this study, we first investigated the effect of SCN- on the morphology of palladium nanocrystals through a seed-mediated growth method. The presence of 1 µM SCN- in the growth solutions could lead to the formation of palladium polyhedra: truncated rhombic dodecahedra enclosed by twelve {110}, eight {111} and six {100} facets. The products were nanocubes enclosed with six {100} facets if cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) was the only capping agent. Meanwhile, the mechanism of the effect of SCN- on the morphology of Pd nanocrystals is discussed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM, TEM and XRD data. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00622j

  17. Transforming growth factor-β1 sustains the survival of Foxp3(+) regulatory cells during late phase of oropharyngeal candidiasis infection.

    PubMed

    Bhaskaran, N; Quigley, C; Weinberg, A; Huang, A; Popkin, D; Pandiyan, P

    2016-07-01

    As CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) play crucial immunomodulatory roles during infections, one key question is how these cells are controlled during antimicrobial immune responses. Mechanisms controlling their homeostasis are central to ensure efficient protection against pathogens, as well as to control infection-associated immunopathology. Here we studied how their viability is regulated in the context of mouse oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) infection, and found that these cells show increased protection from apoptosis during late phase of infection and reinfection. Tregs underwent reduced cell death because they are refractory to T cell receptor restimulation-induced cell death (RICD). We confirmed their resistance to RICD, using mouse and human Tregs in vitro, and by inducing α-CD3 antibody-mediated apoptosis in vivo. The enhanced viability is dependent on increased transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) signaling that results in upregulation of cFLIP (cellular FLICE (FADD-like IL-1β-converting enzyme)-inhibitory protein) in Tregs. Protection from cell death is abrogated in the absence of TGF-β1 signaling in Tregs during OPC infection. Taken together, our data unravel the previously unrecognized role of TGF-β1 in promoting Treg viability, coinciding with the pronounced immunomodulatory role of these cells during later phase of OPC infection, and possibly other mucosal infections. PMID:26530137

  18. Online Self-Regulatory Learning Behaviors as a Mediator in the Relationship between Online Course Perceptions with Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnard, Lucy; Paton, Valerie; Lan, William

    2008-01-01

    Positive perceptions of online course communication and collaboration have been associated with better academic outcomes, while self-regulatory learning behaviors have also been linked to academic achievement and other positive learning outcomes. In the current study, we examined whether self-regulatory learning behaviors may be considered as…

  19. Transcriptional activation of the fra-1 gene by AP-1 is mediated by regulatory sequences in the first intron.

    PubMed Central

    Bergers, G; Graninger, P; Braselmann, S; Wrighton, C; Busslinger, M

    1995-01-01

    Constitutive expression of c-Fos, FosB, Fra-1, or c-Jun in rat fibroblasts leads to up-regulation of the immediate-early gene fra-1. Using the posttranslational FosER induction system, we demonstrate that this AP-1-dependent stimulation of fra-1 expression is rapid, depends on a functional DNA-binding domain of FosER, and is a general phenomenon observed in different cell types. In vitro mutagenesis and functional analysis of the rat fra-1 gene in stably transfected Rat-1A-FosER fibroblasts indicated that basal and AP-1-regulated expression of the fra-1 gene depends on regulatory sequences in the first intron which comprise a consensus AP-1 site and two AP-1-like elements. We have also investigated the transactivating and transforming properties of the Fra-1 protein to address the significance of fra-1 up-regulation. The entire Fra-1 protein fused to the DNA-binding domain of Ga14 is shown to lack any transactivation function, and yet it possesses oncogenic potential, as overexpression of Fra-1 in established rat fibroblasts results in anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumor development in athymic mice, fra-1 is therefore not only induced by members of the Fos family, but its gene product may also contribute to cellular transformation by these proteins. Together, these data identify fra-1 as a unique member of the fos gene family which is under positive control by AP-1 activity. PMID:7791782

  20. Redox signalling to nuclear regulatory proteins by reactive oxygen species contributes to oestrogen-induced growth of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Okoh, V O; Garba, N A; Penney, R B; Das, J; Deoraj, A; Singh, K P; Sarkar, S; Felty, Q; Yoo, C; Jackson, R M; Roy, D

    2015-01-01

    Background: 17β-Oestradiol (E2)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in regulating the growth of breast cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism of this is not clear. Here we show how ROS through a novel redox signalling pathway involving nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1) and p27 contribute to E2-induced growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Methods: Chromatin immunoprecipitation, qPCR, mass spectrometry, redox western blot, colony formation, cell proliferation, ROS assay, and immunofluorescence microscopy were used to study the role of NRF-1. Results: The major novel finding of this study is the demonstration of oxidative modification of phosphatases PTEN and CDC25A by E2-generated ROS along with the subsequent activation of AKT and ERK pathways that culminated in the activation of NRF-1 leading to the upregulation of cell cycle genes. 17β-Oestradiol-induced ROS by influencing nuclear proteins p27 and Jab1 also contributed to the growth of MCF-7 cells. Conclusions: Taken together, our results present evidence in the support of E2-induced ROS-mediated AKT signalling leading to the activation of NRF-1-regulated cell cycle genes as well as the impairment of p27 activity, which is presumably necessary for the growth of MCF-7 cells. These observations are important because they provide a new paradigm by which oestrogen may contribute to the growth of breast cancer. PMID:25965299

  1. The effects of anxiety and depression on stress-related growth among Chinese army recruits: Resilience and coping as mediators.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongju; Peng, Li; Liu, Botao; Liu, Yunbo; Li, Min; Chen, Long; Xie, Junrun; Li, Jing; Li, Jiawen

    2016-09-01

    Stress-related growth can occur after various traumas or stressful events. In order to investigate how anxiety and depression relate to stress-related growth, this study was conducted with 443 Chinese army recruits who had just finished a 3-month recruit training program. Path analyses revealed that resilience and positive/negative coping partially mediated the effect of anxiety on perceived stress-related growth, while negative coping fully mediated the relationship between depression and perceived stress-related growth. Moreover, positive coping partially carried the influence of resilience on perceived stress-related growth. Anxiety and depression may be potential targets for intervention to enhance the development of stress-related growth among Chinese army recruits. PMID:25631664

  2. Human Sarcoma growth is sensitive to small-molecule mediated AXIN stabilization.

    PubMed

    De Robertis, Alessandra; Mennillo, Federica; Rossi, Marco; Valensin, Silvia; Tunici, Patrizia; Mori, Elisa; Caradonna, Nicola; Varrone, Maurizio; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are mesenchymal tumors showing high molecular heterogeneity, reflected at the histological level by the existence of more than fifty different subtypes. Genetic and epigenetic evidences link aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling to growth and progression of human sarcomas. This phenomenon, mainly accomplished by autocrine loop activity, is sustained by gene amplification, over-expression of Wnt ligands and co-receptors or epigenetic silencing of endogenous Wnt antagonists. We previously showed that pharmacological inhibition of Wnt signaling mediated by Axin stabilization produced in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in glioblastoma tumors. Here, we report that targeting different sarcoma cell lines with the Wnt inhibitor/Axin stabilizer SEN461 produces a less transformed phenotype, as supported by modulation of anchorage-independent growth in vitro. At the molecular level, SEN461 treatment enhanced the stability of the scaffold protein Axin1, a key negative regulator of the Wnt signaling with tumor suppressor function, resulting in downstream effects coherent with inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Genetic phenocopy of small molecule Axin stabilization, through Axin1 over-expression, coherently resulted in strong impairment of soft-agar growth. Importantly, sarcoma growth inhibition through pharmacological Axin stabilization was also observed in a xenograft model in vivo in female CD-1 nude mice. Our findings suggest the usefulness of Wnt inhibitors with Axin stabilization activity as a potentialyl clinical relevant strategy for certain types of sarcomas. PMID:24842792

  3. Human Sarcoma Growth Is Sensitive to Small-Molecule Mediated AXIN Stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Marco; Valensin, Silvia; Tunici, Patrizia; Mori, Elisa; Caradonna, Nicola; Varrone, Maurizio; Salerno, Massimiliano

    2014-01-01

    Sarcomas are mesenchymal tumors showing high molecular heterogeneity, reflected at the histological level by the existence of more than fifty different subtypes. Genetic and epigenetic evidences link aberrant activation of the Wnt signaling to growth and progression of human sarcomas. This phenomenon, mainly accomplished by autocrine loop activity, is sustained by gene amplification, over-expression of Wnt ligands and co-receptors or epigenetic silencing of endogenous Wnt antagonists. We previously showed that pharmacological inhibition of Wnt signaling mediated by Axin stabilization produced in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity in glioblastoma tumors. Here, we report that targeting different sarcoma cell lines with the Wnt inhibitor/Axin stabilizer SEN461 produces a less transformed phenotype, as supported by modulation of anchorage-independent growth in vitro. At the molecular level, SEN461 treatment enhanced the stability of the scaffold protein Axin1, a key negative regulator of the Wnt signaling with tumor suppressor function, resulting in downstream effects coherent with inhibition of canonical Wnt signaling. Genetic phenocopy of small molecule Axin stabilization, through Axin1 over-expression, coherently resulted in strong impairment of soft-agar growth. Importantly, sarcoma growth inhibition through pharmacological Axin stabilization was also observed in a xenograft model in vivo in female CD-1 nude mice. Our findings suggest the usefulness of Wnt inhibitors with Axin stabilization activity as a potentialyl clinical relevant strategy for certain types of sarcomas. PMID:24842792

  4. Does social status within a dominance hierarchy mediate individual growth, residency and relocation?

    PubMed

    Akbaripasand, Abbas; Ramezani, J; Krkosek, Martin; Lokman, P Mark; Closs, Gerard P

    2014-11-01

    The availability of food, and hence energy, is known to influence the abundance, habitat choice and growth of individuals. In contrast, there is a paucity of knowledge on how the interaction of energy supply and social status determines patterns of residency and movement. This study tests whether the presence of conspecifics and an individual's social status in relation to food supply influence the fitness and movement of a drift-feeding fish (Galaxias fasciatus). Using an information-theoretic approach (AIC), our analysis indicated that the most parsimonious model of fish movement among pools was one that included food supply, social rank and fish relative growth rate. Our results indicated that subordinate fish relocated more frequently compared to dominant fish, most likely as a consequence of intra-specific competition that limited the access of these smaller fish to resources and constrained their growth. Our results suggest that energy constraints may force individuals to explore new habitats in an effort to find more energetically profitable patches. We conclude that intra-specific competition mediated through the social hierarchy amongst closely interacting individuals plays a key role in determining individual growth, residency and relocation. PMID:25159213

  5. Brevundimonas diminuta mediated alleviation of arsenic toxicity and plant growth promotion in Oryza sativa L.

    PubMed

    Singh, Namrata; Marwa, Naina; Mishra, Shashank K; Mishra, Jyoti; Verma, Praveen C; Rathaur, Sushma; Singh, Nandita

    2016-03-01

    Arsenic (As), a toxic metalloid adversely affects plant growth in polluted areas. In the present study, we investigated the possibility of improving phytostablization of arsenic through application of new isolated strain Brevundimonas diminuta (NBRI012) in rice plant [Oryza sativa (L.) Var. Sarju 52] at two different concentrations [10ppm (low toxic) and 50ppm (high toxic)] of As. The plant growth promoting traits of bacterial strains revealed the inherent ability of siderophores, phosphate solubilisation, indole acetic acid (IAA), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase production which may be associated with increased biomass, chlorophyll and MDA content of rice and thereby promoting plant growth. The study also revealed the As accumulation property of NBRI012 strain which could play an important role in As removal from contaminated soil. Furthermore, NBRI012 inoculation significantly restored the hampered root epidermal and cortical cell growth of rice plant and root hair elimination. Altogether our study highlights the multifarious role of B. diminuta in mediating stress tolerance and modulating translocation of As in edible part of rice plant. PMID:26650422

  6. Platelet-derived growth factor-BB-mediated glycosaminoglycan synthesis is transduced through Akt.

    PubMed

    Cartel, Nicholas J; Wang, Jinxia; Post, Martin

    2002-04-01

    Previously we have demonstrated that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI-3K) signal-transduction pathway mediates platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis in fetal lung fibroblasts. In the present study we further investigated the signal-transduction pathway(s) that results in PDGF-BB-induced GAG synthesis. Over-expression of a soluble PDGF beta-receptor as well as a mutated form of the beta-receptor, unable to bind PI-3K, diminished GAG synthesis in fetal lung fibroblasts subsequent to PDGF-BB stimulation. The PI-3K inhibitor wortmannin blocked PDGF-BB-induced Akt activity as well as significantly diminishing PDGF-BB-mediated GAG synthesis. Expression of dominant-negative PI-3K also abrogated Akt activity and GAG synthesis. Furthermore, expression of dominant-negative Akt abrogated endogenous Akt activity, Rab3D phosphorylation and GAG synthesis, whereas expression of constitutively activated Akt stimulated Rab3D phosphorylation and GAG synthesis in the absence of PDGF-BB. Over-expression of wild-type PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted in chromosome 10) inhibited Akt activity and concomitantly attenuated GAG synthesis in fibroblasts stimulated with PDGF-BB. These data suggest that Akt is an integral protein involved in PDGF-BB-mediated GAG regulation in fetal lung fibroblasts. PMID:11903042

  7. The Wedelolactone Derivative Inhibits Estrogen Receptor-Mediated Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancer Cells Growth

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Defeng; Lin, Tzu-Hua; Cheng, Max A.; Chen, Lu-Min; Chang, Chawnshang; Yeh, Shuyuan

    2014-01-01

    Estrogen and estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated signaling pathways play important roles in the etiology and progression of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Attenuating ER activities by natural products and their derivatives is a relatively practical strategy to control and reduce breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk. Here, we found 3-butoxy-1,8,9-trihydroxy-6H-benzofuro[3,2-c]benzopyran-6-one (BTB), a new derivative of wedelolactone, could effectively inhibit the 17-estradiol (E2)-induced ER transactivation and suppress the growth of breast cancer as well as endometrial and ovarian cancer cells. Our results indicate that 2.5 μM BTB effectively suppresses ER-positive, but not ER-negative, breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, our data indicate that BTB can modulate ER transactivation and suppress the expression of E2-mediated ER target genes (Cyclin D1, E2F1, and TERT) in the ER-positive MCF-7, Ishikawa, and SKOV-3 cells. Importantly, this BTB mediated inhibition of ER activity is selective since BTB does not suppress the activities of other nuclear receptors, including glucocorticoid receptor and progesterone receptor, suggesting that BTB functions as a selective ER signaling inhibitor with the potential to treat breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PMID:25221777

  8. Inhibition of tumor cell growth by Sigma1 ligand mediated translational repression

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Felix J.; Schrock, Joel M.; Spino, Christina M.; Marino, Jacqueline C.; Pasternak, Gavril W.

    2012-09-21

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sigma1 ligand treatment mediates decrease in tumor cell mass. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of a Sigma1 ligand with reversible translational repressor actions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstration of a role for Sigma1 in cellular protein synthesis. -- Abstract: Treatment with sigma1 receptor (Sigma1) ligands can inhibit cell proliferation in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. However, the cellular pathways engaged in response to Sigma1 ligand treatment that contribute to these outcomes remain largely undefined. Here, we show that treatment with putative antagonists of Sigma1 decreases cell mass. This effect corresponds with repressed cap-dependent translation initiation in multiple breast and prostate cancer cell lines. Sigma1 antagonist treatment suppresses phosphorylation of translational regulator proteins p70S6K, S6, and 4E-BP1. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Sigma1 also results in translational repression, consistent with the effects of antagonist treatment. Sigma1 antagonist mediated translational repression and decreased cell size are both reversible. Together, these data reveal a role for Sigma1 in tumor cell protein synthesis, and demonstrate that small molecule Sigma1 ligands can be used as modulators of protein translation.

  9. Tyk2 mediates effects of urokinase on human vascular smooth muscle cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Patecki, Margret; Schaewen, Markus von; Tkachuk, Sergey; Jerke, Uwe; Dietz, Rainer; Dumler, Inna; Kusch, Angelika . E-mail: angelika.kusch@charite.de

    2007-08-03

    The urokinase (uPA)/uPA receptor (uPAR) system plays a role in the response of the vessel wall to injury, presumably by modulating vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) functional behaviour. The Jak/Stat signaling pathway has been implicated to mediate the uPA/uPAR-directed cell migration and proliferation in VSMC. We have therefore investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms, which remained not completely understood. In particular, we aimed at identification of the kinase involved in the signaling cascade leading to Stat1 phosphorylation by uPA and its impact on VSMC growth. We performed expression in VSMC of kinase-deficient mutant forms of the Janus kinases Jak1 and Tyk2 and used different cell culture models imitating the response to vascular injury. We provide evidence that Tyk2, but not Jak1, mediates uPA-induced Stat1 phosphorylation and VSMC growth inhibition and suggest a novel function for Tyk2 as an important modulator of the uPA-directed VSMC functional behaviour at the place of injury.

  10. INO80 governs superenhancer-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Bingying; Wang, Li; Zhang, Shu; Bennett, Brian D; He, Fan; Zhang, Yan; Xiong, Chengliang; Han, Leng; Diao, Lixia; Li, Pishun; Fargo, David C; Cox, Adrienne D; Hu, Guang

    2016-06-15

    Superenhancers (SEs) are large genomic regions with a high density of enhancer marks. In cancer, SEs are found near oncogenes and dictate cancer gene expression. However, how oncogenic SEs are regulated remains poorly understood. Here, we show that INO80, a chromatin remodeling complex, is required for SE-mediated oncogenic transcription and tumor growth in melanoma. The expression of Ino80, the SWI/SNF ATPase, is elevated in melanoma cells and patient melanomas compared with normal melanocytes and benign nevi. Furthermore, Ino80 silencing selectively inhibits melanoma cell proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, tumorigenesis, and tumor maintenance in mouse xenografts. Mechanistically, Ino80 occupies >90% of SEs, and its occupancy is dependent on transcription factors such as MITF and Sox9. Ino80 binding reduces nucleosome occupancy and facilitates Mediator recruitment, thus promoting oncogenic transcription. Consistently, genes co-occupied by Ino80 and Med1 are selectively expressed in melanomas compared with melanocytes. Together, our results reveal an essential role of INO80-dependent chromatin remodeling in SE function and suggest a novel strategy for disrupting SEs in cancer treatment. PMID:27340176

  11. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P.; Greenaway, A. Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A.; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C.; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analyzed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients’ colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4+CD25hi Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA+ strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10+ Treg response is therefore likely to play a role in H. pylori-mediated

  12. Helicobacter pylori-Mediated Protection from Allergy Is Associated with IL-10-Secreting Peripheral Blood Regulatory T Cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Khiyam; Letley, Darren P; Greenaway, A Borgel; Kenefeck, Rupert; Winter, Jody A; Tomlinson, William; Rhead, Joanne; Staples, Emily; Kaneko, Kazuyo; Atherton, John C; Robinson, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections are usually established in early childhood and continuously stimulate immunity, including T-helper 1 (Th1), Th17, and regulatory T-cell (Treg) responses, throughout life. Although known to be the major cause of peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer, disease occurs in a minority of those who are infected. Recently, there has been much interest in beneficial effects arising from infection with this pathogen. Published data robustly show that the infection is protective against asthma in mouse models. Epidemiological studies show that H. pylori is inversely associated with human allergy and asthma, but there is a paucity of mechanistic data to explain this. Since Th1 and Treg responses are reported to protect against allergic responses, we investigated if there were links between the human systemic Th1 and Treg response to H. pylori and allergen-specific IgE levels. The human cytokine and T-cell responses were examined using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 49 infected and 58 uninfected adult patients. Concentrations of total and allergen-specific plasma IgE were determined by ELISA and ImmunoCAP assays. These responses were analyzed according to major virulence factor genotypes of the patients' colonizing H. pylori strains. An in vitro assay was employed, using PBMCs from infected and uninfected donors, to determine the role of Treg cytokines in the suppression of IgE. Significantly higher frequencies of IL-10-secreting CD4(+)CD25(hi) Tregs, but not H. pylori-specific Th1 cells, were present in the peripheral blood of infected patients. Total and allergen-specific IgE concentrations were lower when there was a strong Treg response, and blocking IL-10 in vitro dramatically restored IgE responses. IgE concentrations were also significantly lower when patients were infected with CagA(+) strains or those expressing the more active i1 form of VacA. The systemic IL-10(+) Treg response is therefore likely to play a role in H

  13. Hormone-mediated growth dynamics of the barley pericarp as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging and transcript profiling

    PubMed Central

    Pielot, Rainer; Kohl, Stefan; Manz, Bertram; Rutten, Twan; Weier, Diana; Tarkowská, Danuše; Rolčík, Jakub; Strnad, Miroslav; Volke, Frank; Weber, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The shape of the maternal pericarp affects cereal grain mass and yield. Pericarp growth was analysed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealing topological maps of mobile water in developing pericarp of barley (Hordeum vulgare) and displaying tissue regions actively elongating in specific temporal–spatial patterns. Correlation analysis of MRI signals and growth rates reveals that growth in length is mediated by dorsal and also lateral rather than ventral regions. Growth in thickness is related to ventral regions. Switching from dorsal to ventral growth is associated with differential expression of axial regulators of the HD-ZipIII and Kanadi/Ettin types, and NPH3 photoreceptors, suggesting light-mediated auxin re-distribution. Auxin increases with the highest levels in the basal pericarp at 6 days after fertilization (DAF), together with transcriptionally up-regulated auxin transport and signalling. Gibberellin biosynthesis is transcriptionally up-regulated only later, and levels of bioactive gibberellins increase from 7 to 13 DAF, with higher levels in ventral than dorsal regions. Differential gene expression related to cell expansion indicates genes related to apoplast acidification, wall relaxation, sugar cleavage, water transport, and cell wall biosynthesis. Candidate genes potentially involved in pericarp extension are distinguished by their temporal expression, representing potential isoforms responsible for dorsal-mediated early growth in length or ventral-mediated late growth in thickness. PMID:26276866

  14. Interleukin 10 and dendritic cells are the main suppression mediators of regulatory T cells in human neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Arce-Sillas, A; Álvarez-Luquín, D D; Cárdenas, G; Casanova-Hernández, D; Fragoso, G; Hernández, M; Proaño Narváez, J V; García-Vázquez, F; Fleury, A; Sciutto, E; Adalid-Peralta, L

    2016-02-01

    Neurocysticercosis is caused by the establishment of Taenia solium cysticerci in the central nervous system. It is considered that, during co-evolution, the parasite developed strategies to modulate the host's immune response. The action mechanisms of regulatory T cells in controlling the immune response in neurocysticercosis are studied in this work. Higher blood levels of regulatory T cells with CD4(+) CD45RO(+) forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(high) and CD4(+) CD25(high) FoxP3(+) CD95(high) phenotype and of non-regulatory CD4(+) CD45RO(+) FoxP3(med) T cells were found in neurocysticercosis patients with respect to controls. Interestingly, regulatory T cells express higher levels of cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4), lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG-3), programmed death 1 (PD-1) and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR), suggesting a cell-to-cell contact mechanism with dendritic cells. Furthermore, higher IL-10 and regulatory T cell type 1 (Tr1) levels were found in neurocysticercosis patients' peripheral blood, suggesting that the action mechanism of regulatory T cells involves the release of immunomodulatory cytokines. No evidence was found of the regulatory T cell role in inhibiting the proliferative response. Suppressive regulatory T cells from neurocysticercosis patients correlated negatively with late activated lymphocytes (CD4(+) CD38(+) ). Our results suggest that, during neurocysticercosis, regulatory T cells could control the immune response, probably by a cell-to-cell contact with dendritic cells and interleukin (IL)-10 release by Tr1, to create an immunomodulatory environment that may favour the development of T. solium cysticerci and their permanence in the central nervous system. PMID:26391104

  15. Identification and characterization of a cell cycle and apoptosis regulatory protein-1 as a novel mediator of apoptosis signaling by retinoid CD437.

    PubMed

    Rishi, Arun K; Zhang, Liyue; Boyanapalli, Madanamohan; Wali, Anil; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Yu, Yingjie; Fontana, Joseph A; Hatfield, James S; Dawson, Marcia I; Majumdar, Adhip P N; Reichert, Uwe

    2003-08-29

    CD437, a novel retinoid, causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a number of cancer cells including human breast carcinoma (HBC) by utilizing an undefined retinoic acid receptor/retinoid X receptor-independent mechanism. To delineate mediators of CD437 signaling, we utilized a random antisense-dependent functional knockout genetic approach. We identified a cDNA that encodes approximately 130-kDa HBC cell perinuclear protein (termed CARP-1). Treatments with CD437 or chemotherapeutic agent adriamycin, as well as serum deprivation of HBC cells, stimulate CARP-1 expression. Reduced levels of CARP-1 result in inhibition of apoptosis by CD437 or adriamycin, whereas increased expression of CARP-1 causes elevated levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21WAF1/CIP1 and apoptosis. CARP-1 interacts with 14-3-3 protein as well as causes reduced expression of cell cycle regulatory genes including c-Myc and cyclin B1. Loss of c-Myc sensitizes cells to apoptosis by CARP-1, whereas expression of c-Myc or 14-3-3 inhibits CARP-1-dependent apoptosis. Thus, apoptosis induction by CARP-1 involves sequestration of 14-3-3 and CARP-1-mediated altered expression of multiple cell cycle regulatory genes. Identification of CARP-1 as a key mediator of signaling by CD437 or adriamycin allows for delineation of pathways that, in turn, may prove beneficial for design and targeting of novel antitumor agents. PMID:12816952

  16. Eugenol-inhibited root growth in Avena fatua involves ROS-mediated oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Nitina; Singh, Harminder Pal; Batish, Daizy Rani; Kohli, Ravinder Kumar

    2015-02-01

    Plant essential oils and their constituent monoterpenes are widely known plant growth retardants but their mechanism of action is not well understood. We explored the mechanism of phytotoxicity of eugenol, a monoterpenoid alcohol, proposed as a natural herbicide. Eugenol (100-1000 µM) retarded the germination of Avena fatua and strongly inhibited its root growth compared to the coleoptile growth. We further investigated the underlying physiological and biochemical alterations leading to the root growth inhibition. Eugenol induced the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress and membrane damage in the root tissue. ROS generation measured in terms of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion and hydroxyl radical content increased significantly in the range of 24 to 144, 21 to 91, 46 to 173% over the control at 100 to 1000 µM eugenol, respectively. The disruption in membrane integrity was indicated by 25 to 125% increase in malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation byproduct), and decreased conjugated diene content (~10 to 41%). The electrolyte leakage suggesting membrane damage increased both under light as well as dark conditions measured over a period from 0 to 30 h. In defense to the oxidative damage due to eugenol, a significant upregulation in the ROS-scavenging antioxidant enzyme machinery was observed. The activities of superoxide dismutases, catalases, ascorbate peroxidases, guaiacol peroxidases and glutathione reductases were elevated by ~1.5 to 2.8, 2 to 4.3, 1.9 to 5.0, 1.4 to 3.9, 2.5 to 5.5 times, respectively, in response to 100 to 1000 µM eugenol. The study concludes that eugenol inhibits early root growth through ROS-mediated oxidative damage, despite an activation of the antioxidant enzyme machinery. PMID:25752432

  17. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant–microbe interactions

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Nicole E.; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H.; Norton, Jeanette M.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant–soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant–microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant–soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m−2. Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant–microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  18. Activated carbon decreases invasive plant growth by mediating plant-microbe interactions.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Nicole E; Kulmatiski, Andrew; Beard, Karen H; Norton, Jeanette M

    2014-01-01

    There is growing appreciation for the idea that plant-soil interactions (e.g. allelopathy and plant-microbe feedbacks) may explain the success of some non-native plants. Where this is the case, native plant restoration may require management tools that change plant-soil interactions. Activated carbon (AC) is one such potential tool. Previous research has shown the potential for high concentrations of AC to restore native plant growth to areas dominated by non-natives on a small scale (1 m × 1 m plots). Here we (i) test the efficacy of different AC concentrations at a larger scale (15 m × 15 m plots), (ii) measure microbial responses to AC treatment and (iii) use a greenhouse experiment to identify the primary mechanism, allelopathy versus microbial changes, through which AC impacts native and non-native plant growth. Three years after large-scale applications, AC treatments decreased non-native plant cover and increased the ratio of native to non-native species cover, particularly at concentrations >400 g m(-2). Activated carbon similarly decreased non-native plant growth in the greenhouse. This effect, however, was only observed in live soils, suggesting that AC effects were microbially mediated and not caused by direct allelopathy. Bacterial community analysis of field soils indicated that AC increased the relative abundance of an unidentified bacterium and an Actinomycetales and decreased the relative abundance of a Flavobacterium, suggesting that these organisms may play a role in AC effects on plant growth. Results support the idea that manipulations of plant-microbe interactions may provide novel and effective ways of directing plant growth and community development (e.g. native plant restoration). PMID:25387751

  19. Disentangling direct and growth-mediated influences on early survival: a mechanistic approach.

    PubMed

    Plard, Floriane; Yoccoz, Nigel G; Bonenfant, Christophe; Klein, François; Warnant, Claude; Gaillard, Jean-Michel

    2015-09-01

    1. Early survival is a key life-history trait that often accounts for a large part of the variation in individual fitness and shapes population dynamics. The factors influencing early survival are multiple in large herbivores, including malnutrition, predation, cohort variation or maternal effects. However, the mechanistic pathways connecting these drivers to variation in early survival are much less studied. Indeed, whether these factors influence early survival directly or indirectly through early growth remains to be disentangled. 2. In this study, we used a path analysis to separate the direct and indirect (i.e. mediated by early growth) pathways through which sex, birth date, cohort and family effects influence early survival. We used a large data set of marked roe deer newborns collected from 1985 to 2010 in the intensively monitored population of Trois Fontaines (France). 3. We found that most drivers have indirect influences on early survival through early growth. Indeed, cohort effects influenced early survival through the indirect effect of precipitation around birth on early growth. Precipitation also had direct effects on early survival. Family effects indirectly influenced early survival. Twins from the same litter grew at about the same rate, so they had the same fate. Moreover, some factors, such as birth date, had both direct and indirect effects on roe deer early survival, with fawns born early in the season benefiting from high early survival both because they have more time to grow before the harsh season and because they grow faster during their first days of life than late-born fawns. 4. These findings suggest that most drivers of early survival previously identified in large mammalian herbivores may affect early survival primarily through their influence on early growth. Disentangling the direct and indirect pathways by which different factors influence early survival is of crucial importance to understand the mechanisms shaping this key

  20. Molecular-mediated crystal growth of PbTiO 3 nanostructure on silicon substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Chunying; Ren, Zhaohui; Liu, Zhenya; Xiao, Zhen; Xu, Gang; Li, Xiang; Wei, Xiao; Shen, Ge; Han, Gaorong

    2011-09-01

    A simple approach based on an organically modified sol-gel process has been developed to fabricate PbTiO3 (PT) nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrate, where the amorphous powder modified by acetylacetone (acac) was used as precursor. After dropping the amorphous powder precursor prepared by freeze-drying process, PT nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrate were obtained after heat treatment at 720 °C for 30 min in air. PT nanocrystals have been detected by XRD to be tetragonal perovskite structure. With the increase of acac/Pb molar ratio, the relative (1 0 0)/(0 0 1) diffraction peak intensity gradually increases, which probably suggested an oriented growth of PT nanocrystal along [1 0 0] on Si (1 0 0) substrates. In addition, Atomic force microscopy (AFM) results indicated that the height and the average lateral size of PT nanocrystal increased and then decreased as the acac/Pb molar ratio increased. Piezoelectric force microscopy (PFM) results demonstrated that all the samples show obvious piezoelectric activity. These results implied that the acetylacetone molecular mediated the growth of PT nanocrystals on Si (1 0 0) substrates possibly by the acac/Pb molar ratio. This simple method has been suggested to be attractive for tailoring an oriented growth of the nanostructures of perovskite oxide systems on Si substrates.

  1. Adeno-associated virus type 2 rep gene-mediated inhibition of basal gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 involves its negative regulatory functions.

    PubMed Central

    Oelze, I; Rittner, K; Sczakiel, G

    1994-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV-2), a human parvovirus which is apathogenic in adults, inhibits replication and gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in human cells. The rep gene of AAV-2, which was shown earlier to be sufficient for this negative interference, also down-regulated the expression of heterologous sequences driven by the long terminal repeat (LTR) of HIV-1. This effect was observed in the absence of the HIV-1 transactivator Tat, i.e., at basal levels of LTR-driven transcription. In this work, we studied the involvement of functional subsequences of the HIV-1 LTR in rep-mediated inhibition in the absence of Tat. Mutated LTRs driving an indicator gene (cat) were cointroduced into human SW480 cells together with rep alone or with double-stranded DNA fragments or RNA containing sequences of the HIV-1 LTR. The results indicate that rep strongly enhances the function of negative regulatory elements of the LTR. In addition, the experiments revealed a transcribed sequence element located within the TAR-coding sequence termed AHHH (AAV-HIV homology element derived from HIV-1) which is involved in rep-mediated inhibition. The AHHH element is also involved in down-regulation of basal expression levels in the absence of rep, suggesting that AHHH also contributes to negative regulatory functions of the LTR of HIV-1. In contrast, positive regulatory elements of the HIV-1 LTR such as the NF kappa B and SP1 binding sites have no significant influence on the rep-mediated inhibition. Images PMID:8289357

  2. PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer growth is mediated by mTORC1

    SciTech Connect

    Dufour, Marc Faes, Seraina Dormond-Meuwly, Anne Demartines, Nicolas Dormond, Olivier

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • PGE{sub 2} activates mTORC1 in colon cancer cells. • Inhibition of mTORC1 blocks PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell growth. • mTORC1 is a signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} induced colon cancer cell responses. - Abstract: The inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}) cytokine plays a key role in the development of colon cancer. Several studies have shown that PGE{sub 2} directly induces the growth of colon cancer cells and furthermore promotes tumor angiogenesis by increasing the production of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The signaling intermediaries implicated in these processes have however not been fully characterized. In this report, we show that the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) plays an important role in PGE{sub 2}-induced colon cancer cell responses. Indeed, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased mTORC1 activity as observed by the augmentation of S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, a downstream effector of mTORC1. The PGE{sub 2} EP{sub 4} receptor was responsible for transducing the signal to mTORC1. Moreover, PGE{sub 2} increased colon cancer cell proliferation as well as the growth of colon cancer cell colonies grown in matrigel and blocking mTORC1 by rapamycin or ATP-competitive inhibitors of mTOR abrogated these effects. Similarly, the inhibition of mTORC1 by downregulation of its component raptor using RNA interference blocked PGE{sub 2}-induced LS174T cell growth. Finally, stimulation of LS174T cells with PGE{sub 2} increased VEGF production which was also prevented by mTORC1 inhibition. Taken together, these results show that mTORC1 is an important signaling intermediary in PGE{sub 2} mediated colon cancer cell growth and VEGF production. They further support a role for mTORC1 in inflammation induced tumor growth.

  3. Transforming growth factor-β: an important mediator in Helicobacter pylori-associated pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianshuang; Xie, Chuan; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori) is a Gram-negative, microaerophilic, helical bacillus that specifically colonizes the gastric mucosa. The interaction of virulence factors, host genetic factors, and environmental factors contributes to the pathogenesis of H. pylori-associated conditions, such as atrophic gastritis and intestinal metaplasia. Infection with H. pylori has recently been recognized as the strongest risk factor for gastric cancer. As a pleiotropic cytokine, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β regulates various biological processes, including cell cycle, proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recent studies have shed new light on the involvement of TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. This review focuses on the potential etiological roles of TGF-β in H. pylori-mediated gastric pathogenesis. PMID:26583078

  4. Cathepsin L knockdown enhances curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Fei, Yao; Xiong, Yajie; Zhao, Yifan; Wang, Wenjuan; Han, Meilin; Wang, Long; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2016-09-01

    Curcumin can be used to prevent and treat cancer. However, its exact underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Cathepsin L, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is overexpressed in several cancer types. This study aimed to determine the role of cathepsin L in curcumin-mediated inhibition of growth, migration, and invasion of glioma cells. Results revealed that the activity of cathepsin L was enhanced in curcumin-treated glioma cells. Cathepsin L knockdown induced by RNA interference significantly promoted curcumin-induced cytotoxicity, apoptosis, and cell cycle arrest. The knockdown also inhibited the migration and invasion of glioma cells. Our results suggested that the inhibition of cathepsin L can enhance the sensitivity of glioma cells to curcumin. Therefore, cathepsin L may be a new target to enhance the efficacy of curcumin against cancers. PMID:27373979

  5. The Role of Endogenous Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Ligands in Mediating Corneal Epithelial Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Joanne L.; Phelps, Eric D.; Doll, Mark A.; Schaal, Shlomit; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To provide a comprehensive study of the biological role and therapeutic potential of six endogenous epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) ligands in corneal epithelial homeostasis. Methods. Kinetic analysis and dose response curves were performed by using in vitro and in vivo wound-healing assays. Biochemical assays were used to determine receptor expression and activity. Human tears were collected and quantitatively analyzed by multianalyte profiling for endogenous EGFR ligands. Results. Epidermal growth factor receptor ligands improved wound closure and activated EGFR, but betacellulin (BTC) was the most efficacious promoter of wound healing in vitro. In contrast, only epidermal growth factor (EGF) promoted wound healing in vivo. Human tears from 25 healthy individuals showed EGFR ligands at these average concentrations: EGF at 2053 ± 312.4 pg/mL, BTC at 207 ± 39.4 pg/mL, heparin-binding EGF at 44 ± 5.8 pg/mL, amphiregulin at 509 ± 28.8 pg/mL, transforming growth factor-α at 84 ± 19 pg/mL, and epiregulin at 52 ± 15 pg/mL. Conclusions. Under unwounded conditions, only EGF was present at concentrations near the ligand's Kd for the receptor, indicating it is the primary mediator of corneal epithelial homeostasis. Other ligands were present but at concentrations 11- to 7500-fold less their Kd, preventing significant ligand binding. Further, the high levels of EGF and its predicted binding preclude receptor occupancy by exogenous ligand and can explain the discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo data. Therefore, therapeutic use of EGFR ligands may be unpredictable and impractical. PMID:24722692

  6. Human polymorphonuclear leukocytes inhibit Aspergillus fumigatus conidial growth by lactoferrin-mediated iron depletion.

    PubMed

    Zarember, Kol A; Sugui, Janyce A; Chang, Yun C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J; Gallin, John I

    2007-05-15

    Aspergillus fumigatus, a common mold, rarely infects humans, except during prolonged neutropenia or in cases of chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the NADPH oxidase that normally produces fungicidal reactive oxygen species. Filamentous hyphae of Aspergillus are killed by normal, but not CGD polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN); however, the few studies on PMN-mediated host defenses against infectious conidia (spores) of this organism have yielded conflicting results, some showing that PMN do not inhibit conidial growth, with others showing that they do, most likely using reactive oxygen species. Given that CGD patients are exposed daily to hundreds of viable A. fumigatus conidia, yet considerable numbers of them survive years without infection, we reasoned that PMN use ROS-independent mechanisms to combat Aspergillus. We show that human PMN from both normal controls and CGD patients are equipotent at arresting the growth of Aspergillus conidia in vitro, indicating the presence of a reactive oxygen species-independent factor(s). Cell-free supernatants of degranulated normal and CGD neutrophils both suppressed fungal growth and were found to be rich in lactoferrin, an abundant PMN secondary granule protein. Purified iron-poor lactoferrin at concentrations occurring in PMN supernatants (and reported in human mucosal secretions in vivo) decreased fungal growth, whereas saturation of lactoferrin or PMN supernatants with iron, or testing in the presence of excess iron in the form of ferritin, completely abolished activity against conidia. These results demonstrate that PMN lactoferrin sequestration of iron is important for host defense against Aspergillus. PMID:17475866

  7. Stromal inhibition of prostatic epithelial cell proliferation not mediated by transforming growth factor beta.

    PubMed Central

    Kooistra, A.; van den Eijnden-van Raaij, A. J.; Klaij, I. A.; Romijn, J. C.; Schröder, F. H.

    1995-01-01

    The paracrine influence of prostatic stroma on the proliferation of prostatic epithelial cells was investigated. Stromal cells from the human prostate have previously been shown to inhibit anchorage-dependent as well as anchorage-independent growth of the prostatic tumour epithelial cell lines PC-3 and LNCaP. Antiproliferative activity, mediated by a diffusible factor in the stromal cell conditioned medium, was found to be produced specifically by prostatic stromal cells. In the present study the characteristics of this factor were examined. It is demonstrated that prostate stroma-derived inhibiting factor is an acid- and heat-labile, dithiothreitol-sensitive protein. Although some similarities with type beta transforming growth factor (TGF-beta)-like inhibitors are apparent, evidence is presented that the factor is not identical to TGF-beta or to the TGF-beta-like factors activin and inhibin. Absence of TGF-beta activity was shown by the lack of inhibitory response of the TGF-beta-sensitive mink lung cell line CCL-64 to prostate stromal cell conditioned medium and to concentrated, partially purified preparations of the inhibitor. Furthermore, neutralising antibodies against TGF-beta 1 or TGF-beta 2 did not cause a decline in the level of PC-3 growth inhibition caused by partially purified inhibitor. Using Northern blot analyses, we excluded the involvement of inhibin or activin. It is concluded that the prostate stroma-derived factor may be a novel growth inhibitor different from any of the currently described inhibiting factors. Images Figure 5 PMID:7543773

  8. Computational comparison of mediated current generation capacity of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii in photosynthetic and respiratory growth modes.

    PubMed

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2014-11-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii possesses many potential advantages to be exploited as a biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. In the present study, we performed computational studies based on flux balance analysis (FBA) to probe the maximum potential of C. reinhardtii for current output and identify the metabolic mechanisms supporting a high current generation in three different cultivation conditions, i.e., heterotrophic, photoautotrophic and mixotrophic growth. The results showed that flux balance limitations allow the highest current output for C. reinhardtii in the mixotrophic growth mode (2.368 A/gDW), followed by heterotrophic growth (1.141 A/gDW) and photoautotrophic growth the lowest (0.7035 A/gDW). The significantly higher mediated electron transfer (MET) rate in the mixotrophic mode is in complete contrast to previous findings for a photosynthetic cyanobacterium, and was attributed to the fact that for C. reinhardtii the photophosphorylation improved the efficiency of converting the acetate into biomass and NADH production. Overall, the cytosolic NADH-dependent current production was mainly associated with five reactions in both mixotrophic and photoautotrophic nutritional modes, whereas four reactions participated in the heterotrophic mode. The mixotrophic and photoautotrophic metabolisms were alike and shared the same set of reactions for maximizing current production, whereas in the heterotrophic mode, the current production was additionally contributed by the metabolic activities in the two organelles: glyoxysome and chloroplast. In conclusion, C. reinhardtii has a potential to be exploited in MFCs of MET mode to produce a high current output. PMID:24875305

  9. Polyethylene glycol-mediated colorectal cancer chemoprevention: roles of epidermal growth factor receptor and Snail.

    PubMed

    Wali, Ramesh K; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Koetsier, Jennifer L; Bissonnette, Marc; Roy, Hemant K

    2008-09-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a clinically widely used agent with profound chemopreventive properties in experimental colon carcinogenesis. We reported previously that Snail/beta-catenin signaling may mediate the suppression of epithelial proliferation by PEG, although the upstream events remain unclear. We report herein the role of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a known mediator of Snail and overexpressed in approximately 80% of human colorectal cancers, on PEG-mediated antiproliferative and hence antineoplastic effects in azoxymethane (AOM) rats and HT-29 colon cancer cells. AOM rats were randomized to either standard diet or one with 10% PEG-3350 and euthanized 8 weeks later. The colonic samples were subjected to immunohistochemical or Western blot analyses. PEG decreased mucosal EGFR by 60% (P < 0.001). Similar PEG effects were obtained in HT-29 cells. PEG suppressed EGFR protein via lysosmal degradation with no change in mRNA levels. To show that EGFR antagonism per se was responsible for the antiproliferative effect, we inhibited EGFR by either pretreating cells with gefitinib or stably transfecting with EGFR-short hairpin RNA and measured the effect of PEG on proliferation. In either case, PEG effect was blunted, suggesting a vital role of EGFR. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that EGFR-short hairpin RNA cells, besides having reduced membrane EGFR, also expressed low Snail levels (40%), corroborating a strong association. Furthermore, in EGFR silenced cells, PEG effect on EGFR or Snail was muted, similar to that on proliferation. In conclusion, we show that EGFR is the proximate membrane signaling molecule through which PEG initiates antiproliferative activity with Snail/beta-catenin pathway playing the central intermediary function. PMID:18790788

  10. Targeting Six1 by lentivirus-mediated RNA interference inhibits colorectal cancer cell growth and invasion

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaoming; Tian, Tian; Hu, Xiaopeng; Zhang, Xudong; Li, Lifeng; Nan, Feifei; Chang, Yu; Wang, Xinhua; Sun, Zhenchang; Lv, Feng; Zhang, Mingzhi

    2014-01-01

    The Six1 homeodomain protein is a developmental transcription factor that has been implicated in tumor onset and progression. Recently, it’s reported that overexpression of Six1 is sufficient to induce epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis of colorectal cancer. Moreover, its expression is significantly associated with poorer overall survival probability in advanced-stage colorectal cancer. To address whether Six1 could serve as a therapeutic target for human colorectal cancer, we used a lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA (shRNA) gene knockdown method to suppress the expression of Six1 in colorectal cancer cells. We showed that lentivirusmediated shRNA targeted to Six1 gene efficiently reduced its expression in colorectal cancer cells at both mRNA and protein levels. In vitro functional assays revealed that knockdown of Six1 significantly suppressed cell proliferation, and inhibited cell migration and invasion of colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, tumor xenograft model demonstrated that downregulation of Six1 dramatically inhibited colorectal cancer growth in vivo. In conclusion, these findings suggest that lentivirus-mediated Six1 inhibition may represent a novel therapeutic approach for treatment of colorectal cancer. PMID:24551283

  11. Desacetyl nimbinene inhibits breast cancer growth and metastasis through reactive oxygen species mediated mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Arumugam, Arunkumar; Subramani, Ramadevi; Nandy, Sushmita; Powell, Sara; Velazquez, Marissa; Orozco, Alexis; Galvez, Adriana; Lakshmanaswamy, Rajkumar

    2016-05-01

    Accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in induction of apoptosis and regulation of key signaling molecules in cancer cells. Phytochemicals are potent source of anticancer drugs as wells as potential inducers of ROS. Neem (Azadirachta indica) is a medicinal plant used for the treatment of various diseases. The main objective of this study is to investigate the anticancer effect of desacetyl nimbinene (DAN; an active ingredient of neem) against breast cancer. Normal and breast cancer cell lines were used for the study. The effect of DAN on cell proliferation, apoptosis, ROS generation, migration, and invasion was analyzed. Antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD)1 and SOD2 were overexpressed to test the effect of DAN-induced ROS generation on breast cancer growth. Key survival and apoptotic protein markers were analyzed to validate the anticancer effect of DAN. Our data demonstrated that DAN inhibited the growth of breast cancer cells by inducing ROS generation. Further investigations revealed that DAN treatment lead to the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential resulting in mitochondria-dependent apoptotic cell death. Increased phosphorylation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) and reduced phosphorylation of p38 were also observed in response to DAN treatment. Inhibition of ROS production by overexpressing antioxidant enzymes SOD1 and SOD2 reduced the DAN-induced cytotoxicity. Additionally, DAN significantly inhibited migration and invasion of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Overall, our data suggest that DAN exerts its anticancer effect on breast cancer by induction of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis mediated by ROS accumulation. PMID:26637227

  12. The GTPase regulatory proteins Pix and Git control tissue growth via the Hippo pathway.

    PubMed

    Dent, Lucas G; Poon, Carole L C; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Degoutin, Joffrey L; Tipping, Marla; Veraksa, Alexey; Harvey, Kieran F

    2015-01-01

    The Salvador-Warts-Hippo (Hippo) pathway is a conserved regulator of organ size and is deregulated in human cancers. In epithelial tissues, the Hippo pathway is regulated by fundamental cell biological properties, such as polarity and adhesion, and coordinates these with tissue growth. Despite its importance in disease, development, and regeneration, the complete set of proteins that regulate Hippo signaling remain undefined. To address this, we used proteomics to identify proteins that bind to the Hippo (Hpo) kinase. Prominent among these were PAK-interacting exchange factor (known as Pix or RtGEF) and G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting protein (Git). Pix is a conserved Rho-type guanine nucleotide exchange factor (Rho-GEF) homologous to Beta-PIX and Alpha-PIX in mammals. Git is the single Drosophila melanogaster homolog of the mammalian GIT1 and GIT2 proteins, which were originally identified in the search for molecules that interact with G-protein-coupled receptor kinases. Pix and Git form an oligomeric scaffold to facilitate sterile 20-like kinase activation and have also been linked to GTPase regulation. We show that Pix and Git regulate Hippo-pathway-dependent tissue growth in D. melanogaster and that they do this in parallel to the known upstream regulator Fat cadherin. Pix and Git influence activity of the Hpo kinase by acting as a scaffold complex, rather than enzymes, and promote Hpo dimerization and autophosphorylation of Hpo's activation loop. Therefore, we provide important new insights into an ancient signaling network that controls the growth of metazoan tissues. PMID:25484297

  13. Sphingosine-1-phosphate mediates epidermal growth factor-induced muscle satellite cell activation

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Yosuke Ohashi, Kazuya; Wada, Eiji; Yuasa, Yuki; Shiozuka, Masataka; Nonomura, Yoshiaki; Matsuda, Ryoichi

    2014-08-01

    Skeletal muscle can regenerate repeatedly due to the presence of resident stem cells, called satellite cells. Because satellite cells are usually quiescent, they must be activated before participating in muscle regeneration in response to stimuli such as injury, overloading, and stretch. Although satellite cell activation is a crucial step in muscle regeneration, little is known of the molecular mechanisms controlling this process. Recent work showed that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) plays crucial roles in the activation, proliferation, and differentiation of muscle satellite cells. We investigated the role of growth factors in S1P-mediated satellite cell activation. We found that epidermal growth factor (EGF) in combination with insulin induced proliferation of quiescent undifferentiated mouse myoblast C2C12 cells, which are also known as reserve cells, in serum-free conditions. Sphingosine kinase activity increased when reserve cells were stimulated with EGF. Treatment of reserve cells with the D-erythro-N,N-dimethylsphingosine, Sphingosine Kinase Inhibitor, or siRNA duplexes specific for sphingosine kinase 1, suppressed EGF-induced C2C12 activation. We also present the evidence showing the S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. Moreover, we demonstrated a combination of insulin and EGF promoted activation of satellite cells on single myofibers in a manner dependent on SPHK and S1P2. Taken together, our observations show that EGF-induced satellite cell activation is mediated by S1P and its receptor. - Highlights: • EGF in combination with insulin induces proliferation of quiescent C2C12 cells. • Sphingosine kinase activity increases when reserve cells are stimulated with EGF. • EGF-induced activation of reserve cells is dependent on sphingosine kinase and ERK. • The S1P receptor S1P2 is involved in EGF-induced reserve cell activation. • EGF-induced reserve cell activation is mediated by S1P and its

  14. The SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module mediates the antagonistic action of gibberellic acid and abscisic acid pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qibing; Wu, Fuqing; Sheng, Peike; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Xin; Guo, Xiuping; Wang, Jiulin; Cheng, Zhijun; Wang, Jie; Wang, Haiyang; Wan, Jianmin

    2015-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellic acid (GA) antagonistically regulate many developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stresses in higher plants. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this antagonism is still poorly understood. Here, we show that loss-of-function mutation in rice Tiller Enhancer (TE), an activator of the APC/CTE complex, causes hypersensitivity and hyposensitivity to ABA and GA, respectively. We find that TE physically interacts with ABA receptor OsPYL/RCARs and promotes their degradation by the proteasome. Genetic analysis also shows OsPYL/RCARs act downstream of TE in mediating ABA responses. Conversely, ABA inhibits APC/CTE activity by phosphorylating TE through activating the SNF1-related protein kinases (SnRK2s), which may interrupt the interaction between TE and OsPYL/RCARs and subsequently stabilize OsPYL/RCARs. In contrast, GA can reduce the level of SnRK2s and may promote APC/CTE-mediated degradation of OsPYL/RCARs. Thus, we propose that the SnRK2-APC/CTE regulatory module represents a regulatory hub underlying the antagonistic action of GA and ABA in plants. PMID:26272249

  15. Germ line and embryonic expression of Fex, a member of the Drosophila F-element retrotransposon family, is mediated by an internal cis-regulatory control region.

    PubMed Central

    Kerber, B; Fellert, S; Taubert, H; Hoch, M

    1996-01-01

    The F elements of Drosophila melanogaster belong to the superfamily of long interspersed nucleotide element retrotransposons. To date, F-element transcription has not been detected in flies. Here we describe the isolation of a member of the F-element family, termed Fex, which is transcribed in specific cells of the female and male germ lines and in various tissues during embryogenesis of D. melanogaster. Sequence analysis revealed that this element contains two complete open reading frames coding for a putative nucleic acid-binding protein and a putative reverse transcriptase. Functional analysis of the 5' region, using germ line transformation of Fex-lacZ reporter gene constructs, demonstrates that major aspects of tissue-specific Fex expression are controlled by internal cis-acting elements that lie in the putative coding region of open reading frame 1. These sequences mediate dynamic gene expression in eight expression domains during embryonic and germ line development. The capacity of the cis-regulatory region of the Fex element to mediate such complex expression patterns is unique among members of the long interspersed nucleotide element superfamily of retrotransposons and is reminiscent of regulatory regions of developmental control genes. PMID:8649411

  16. Growth suppression of Leydig TM3 cells mediated by aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Iseki, Minoru; Ikuta, Togo; Kobayashi, Tetsuya; Kawajiri, Kaname . E-mail: kawajiri@cancer-c.pref.saitama.jp

    2005-06-17

    Exposure to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin induces developmental toxicity in reproductive organs. To elucidate the function of AhR, we generated stable transformants of TM3 cells overexpressing wild-type aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) or its mutants which carried mutations in nuclear localization signal or nuclear export signal. In the presence of 3-methylcholanthrene (MC), proliferation of the cells transfected with wild-type AhR was completely suppressed, whereas cells expressing AhR mutants proliferated in a manner equivalent to control TM3 cells, suggesting AhR-dependent growth inhibition. The suppression was associated with up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21{sup Cip1}, which was abolished by pretreatment with actinomycin D. A p38 MAPK specific inhibitor, SB203580, blocked the increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA in response to MC. Treatment with indigo, another AhR ligand, failed to increase of p21{sup Cip1} mRNA, although up-regulation of mRNA for CYP1A1 was observed. These data suggest AhR in Leydig cells mediates growth inhibition by inducing p21{sup Cip1}.

  17. TGF-β1 mediates the hypertrophic cardiomyocyte growth induced by angiotensin II

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Jo El J.; Witt, Sandra A.; Glascock, Betty J.; Nieman, Michelle L.; Reiser, Peter J.; Nix, Stacey L.; Kimball, Thomas R.; Doetschman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II), a potent hypertrophic stimulus, causes significant increases in TGFb1 gene expression. However, it is not known whether there is a causal relationship between increased levels of TGF-β1 and cardiac hypertrophy. Echocardiographic analysis revealed that TGF-β1–deficient mice subjected to chronic subpressor doses of Ang II had no significant change in left ventricular (LV) mass and percent fractional shortening during Ang IItreatment. In contrast, Ang II–treated wild-type mice showed a >20% increase in LV mass and impaired cardiac function. Cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was also markedly increased in Ang II–treated wild-type mice but unchanged in Ang II–treated TGF-β1–deficient mice. No significant levels of fibrosis, mitotic growth, or cytokine infiltration were detected in Ang II–treated mice. Atrial natriuretic factor expression was ∼6-fold elevated in Ang II–treated wild-type, but not TGF-β1–deficient mice. However, the α- to β-myosin heavy chain switch did not occur in Ang II–treated mice, indicating that isoform switching is not obligatorily coupled with hypertrophy or TGF-β1. The Ang IIeffect on hypertrophy was shown not to result from stimulation of the endogenous renin-angiotensis system. These results indicate that TGF-β1 is an important mediator of the hypertrophic growth response of the heart to Ang II. PMID:11901187

  18. Insect growth regulatory effects of some extracts and sterols from Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) against Spodoptera frugiperda and Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    Céspedes, Carlos L; Salazar, J Rodrigo; Martínez, Mariano; Aranda, Eduardo

    2005-10-01

    A methanol extract from the roots and aerial parts of Myrtillocactus geometrizans (Cactaceae) yielded peniocerol 1, macdougallin 2, and chichipegenin 3. The natural products 1, 2 their mixtures, MeOH and CH(2)Cl(2) extracts showed insecticidal and insect growth regulatory activity against fall armyworm [Spodoptera frugiperda J. E. Smith (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)], an important insect pest of corn, and [Tenebrio molitor (Coleoptera)], a pest of stored grains in Mexico. The most active compounds were 1, 2, and a mixture (M(2)) of 1 and 2 (6:4). All these extracts, compounds and the mixture had insect growth regulating (IGR) activity between 5.0 and 50.0 ppm and insecticidal effects between 50 and 300 ppm in diets. The extracts were insecticidal to larvae, with lethal doses between 100 and 200 ppm. These compounds appear to have selective effects on the pre-emergence metabolism of Coleoptera, because in all treatments of the larvae of T. molitor, pupation were shortened and this process show precociousness in relation to controls. In contrast to S. frugiperda larvae, onset of pupation was noticeably delayed. Emergence in both cases was drastically diminished. In both pupae and in the few adults that were able to emerge, many deformations were observed. The results of these assays indicated that the compounds were more active than other known natural insect growth inhibitors such as gedunin and methanol extracts of Cedrela salvadorensis and Yucca periculosa. Peniocerol, macdougallin and chichipegenin, as well as mixtures of these substances, may be useful as natural insecticidal agents. PMID:16122768

  19. PXR stimulates growth factor-mediated hepatocyte proliferation by cross-talk with the FOXO transcription factor.

    PubMed

    Shizu, Ryota; Abe, Taiki; Benoki, Satoshi; Takahashi, Miki; Kodama, Susumu; Miayata, Masaaki; Matsuzawa, Atsushi; Yoshinari, Kouichi

    2016-02-01

    Growth factor-mediated hepatocyte proliferation is crucial in liver regeneration and the recovery of liver function after injury. The nuclear receptor, pregnane X receptor (PXR), is a key transcription factor for the xenobiotic-induced expression of genes associated with various liver functions. Recently, we reported that PXR activation stimulates xenobiotic-induced hepatocyte proliferation. In the present study, we investigated whether PXR activation also stimulates growth factor-mediated hepatocyte proliferation. In G0 phase-synchronized, immortalized mouse hepatocytes, serum or epidermal growth factor treatment increased cell growth and this growth was augmented by the expression of mouse PXR and co-treatment with pregnenolone 16α-carbonitrile (PCN), a PXR ligand. In a liver regeneration model using carbon tetrachloride, PCN treatment enhanced the injury-induced increase in the number of Ki-67-positive nuclei as well as Ccna2 and Ccnb1 mRNA levels in wild-type (WT) but not Pxr-null mice. Chronological analysis of this model demonstrated that PCN treatment shifted the maximum cell proliferation to an earlier time point and increased the number of M-phase cells at those time points. In WT but not Pxr-null mice, PCN treatment reduced hepatic mRNA levels of genes involved in the suppression of G0/G1- and G1/S-phase transition, e.g. Rbl2, Cdkn1a and Cdkn1b. Analysis of the Rbl2 promoter revealed that PXR activation inhibited its Forkhead box O3 (FOXO3)-mediated transcription. Finally, the PXR-mediated enhancement of hepatocyte proliferation was inhibited by the expression of dominant active FOXO3 in vitro. The results of the present study suggest that PXR activation stimulates growth factor-mediated hepatocyte proliferation in mice, at least in part, through inhibiting FOXO3 from accelerating cell-cycle progression. PMID:26574435

  20. Density and Duration of Pneumococcal Carriage Is Maintained by Transforming Growth Factor β1 and T Regulatory Cells

    PubMed Central

    Coward, William R.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Richards, Luke; Garcia-Garcia, Francesc J.; Dotor, Javier; Gordon, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Nasopharyngeal carriage of Streptococcus pneumoniae is a prerequisite for invasive disease, but the majority of carriage episodes are asymptomatic and self-resolving. Interactions determining the development of carriage versus invasive disease are poorly understood but will influence the effectiveness of vaccines or therapeutics that disrupt nasal colonization. Objectives: We sought to elucidate immunological mechanisms underlying noninvasive pneumococcal nasopharyngeal carriage. Methods: Pneumococcal interactions with human nasopharyngeal and bronchial fibroblasts and epithelial cells were investigated in vitro. A murine model of nasopharyngeal carriage and an experimental human pneumococcal challenge model were used to characterize immune responses in the airways during carriage. Measurements and Main Results: We describe the previously unknown immunological basis of noninvasive carriage and highlight mechanisms whose perturbation may lead to invasive disease. We identify the induction of active transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 by S. pneumoniae in human host cells and highlight the key role for TGF-β1 and T regulatory cells in the establishment and maintenance of nasopharyngeal carriage in mice and humans. We identify the ability of pneumococci to drive TGF-β1 production from nasopharyngeal cells in vivo and show that an immune tolerance profile, characterized by elevated TGF-β1 and high nasopharyngeal T regulatory cell numbers, is crucial for prolonged carriage of pneumococci. Blockade of TGF-β1 signaling prevents prolonged carriage and leads to clearance of pneumococci from the nasopharynx. Conclusions: These data explain the mechanisms by which S. pneumoniae colonize the human nasopharynx without inducing damaging host inflammation and provide insight into the role of bacterial and host constituents that allow and maintain carriage. PMID:24749506

  1. Identification of a regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 1 which mediates blue light signaling for stomatal opening.

    PubMed

    Takemiya, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Shota; Yano, Takayuki; Ariyoshi, Chie; Shimazaki, Ken-ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a eukaryotic serine/threonine protein phosphatase comprised of a catalytic subunit (PP1c) and a regulatory subunit that modulates catalytic activity, subcellular localization and substrate specificity. PP1c positively regulates stomatal opening through blue light signaling between phototropins and the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in guard cells. However, the regulatory subunit functioning in this process is unknown. We identified Arabidopsis PRSL1 (PP1 regulatory subunit2-like protein1) as a regulatory subunit of PP1c. Tautomycin, a selective inhibitor of PP1c, inhibited blue light responses of stomata in the single mutants phot1 and phot2, supporting the idea that signals from phot1 and phot2 converge on PP1c. We obtained PRSL1 based on the sequence similarity to Vicia faba PRS2, a PP1c-binding protein isolated by a yeast two-hybrid screen. PRSL1 bound to Arabidopsis PP1c through its RVxF motif, a consensus PP1c-binding sequence. Arabidopsis prsl1 mutants were impaired in blue light-dependent stomatal opening, H(+) pumping and phosphorylation of the H(+)-ATPase, but showed normal phototropin activities. PRSL1 complemented the prsl1 phenotype, but not if the protein carried a mutation in the RVxF motif, suggesting that PRSL1 functions through binding PP1c via the RVxF motif. PRSL1 did not affect the catalytic activity of Arabidopsis PP1c but it stimulated the localization of PP1c in the cytoplasm. We conclude that PRSL1 functions as a regulatory subunit of PP1 and regulates blue light signaling in stomata. PMID:22585556

  2. Growth factor-mediated mesodermal cell guidance and skeletogenesis during sea urchin gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Adomako-Ankomah, Ashrifia; Ettensohn, Charles A

    2013-10-01

    Growth factor signaling pathways provide essential cues to mesoderm cells during gastrulation in many metazoans. Recent studies have implicated the VEGF and FGF pathways in providing guidance and differentiation cues to primary mesenchyme cells (PMCs) during sea urchin gastrulation, although the relative contributions of these pathways and the cell behaviors they regulate are not fully understood. Here, we show that FGF and VEGF ligands are expressed in distinct domains in the embryonic ectoderm of Lytechinus variegatus. We find that PMC guidance is specifically disrupted in Lv-vegf3 morphants and these embryos fail to form skeletal elements. By contrast, PMC migration is unaffected in Lv-fgfa morphants, and well-patterned but shortened skeletal elements form. We use a VEGFR inhibitor, axitinib, to show that VEGF signaling is essential not only for the initial phase of PMC migration (subequatorial ring formation), but also for the second phase (migration towards the animal pole). VEGF signaling is not required, however, for PMC fusion. Inhibition of VEGF signaling after the completion of PMC migration causes significant defects in skeletogenesis, selectively blocking the elongation of skeletal rods that support the larval arms, but not rods that form in the dorsal region of the embryo. Nanostring nCounter analysis of ∼100 genes in the PMC gene regulatory network shows a decrease in the expression of many genes with proven or predicted roles in biomineralization in vegf3 morphants. Our studies lead to a better understanding of the roles played by growth factors in sea urchin gastrulation and skeletogenesis. PMID:24026121

  3. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis. PMID:27011166

  4. ZmGRF, a GA regulatory factor from maize, promotes flowering and plant growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Miaoyun; Lu, Yunming; Yang, Hongmei; He, Jingcheng; Hu, Zhiqiu; Hu, Xiaolong; Luan, Mingda; Zhang, Lan; Fan, Yunliu; Wang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors that act as positive regulators of gibberellin (GA) biosynthetic genes in plants are not well understood. A nuclear-localized basic leucine zipper transcription factor, ZmGRF, was isolated from maize. The core DNA sequence motif recognized for binding by ZmGRF was CCANNTGGC. ZmGRF overexpression in transgenic Arabidopsis plants promoted flowering, stem elongation, and cell expansion. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that ZmGRF bound directly to the cis-element CCANNTGGC in the promoter of the Arabidopsis ent-kaurene oxidase (AtKO1) gene and promoted AtKO1 expression. GA4 content increased by 372-567% in transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing ZmGRF compared to wild-type control plants. The GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF1 gene, which encodes a GA receptor, was also upregulated and the growth-repressing DELLA protein gene GA INSENSITIVE was downregulated. Our results showed ZmGRF functioned through the GA-signaling pathway. PMID:25477078

  5. A Structural Model of Parental Alcoholism, Family Functioning, and Psychological Health: The Mediating Effects of Hardiness and Personal Growth Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robitschek, Christine; Kashubeck, Susan

    1999-01-01

    This study sought to: (a) determine whether personal-growth orientation and hardiness mediated the relations of parental alcoholism and family functioning to psychological well-being and distress; (b) determine whether this model was invariant across men and women; and (c) examine the role of parental alcoholism in a model that included family…

  6. CD22 expression mediates the regulatory functions of peritoneal B-1a cells during the remission phase of contact hypersensitivity reactions1

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroko; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Rei; Ishiura, Nobuko; Kuwano, Yoshihiro; Okochi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Tedder, Thomas F.; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    While contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered a prototype of T cell-mediated immune reactions, recently a significant contribution of regulatory B cell subsets in the suppression of CHS has been demonstrated. CD22, one of the Siglecs, is a B cell-specific molecule that negatively regulates B cell receptor signaling. To clarify the roles of B cells in CHS, CHS in CD22-/- mice was investigated. CD22-/- mice showed delayed recovery from CHS reactions compared with wild type mice. Transfer of wild type peritoneal B-1a cells reversed the prolonged CHS reaction seen in CD22-/- mice, and this was blocked by the simultaneous injection with IL-10 receptor Ab. While CD22-/- peritoneal B-1a cells were capable of producing IL-10 at wild type levels, intraperitoneal injection of differentially labeled wild type/CD22-/- B cells demonstrated that a smaller number of CD22-/- B cells resided in lymphoid organs 5 days after CHS elicitation, suggesting a defect in survival or retention in activated CD22-/- peritoneal B-1 cells. Thus, our current study reveals a regulatory role for peritoneal B-1a cells in CHS. Two distinct regulatory B cell subsets cooperatively inhibit CHS responses. While splenic CD1dhiCD5+ B cells have a crucial role in suppressing the acute exacerbating phase of CHS, peritoneal B-1a cells are likely to suppress the late remission phase as “regulatory B cells”. CD22 deficiency results in disturbed CHS remission by impaired retention or survival of peritoneal B-1a cells that migrate into lymphoid organs. PMID:20335532

  7. The regulatory role of hepatoma-derived growth factor as an angiogenic factor in the eye

    PubMed Central

    LeBlanc, Michelle E.; Wang, Weiwen; Chen, Xiuping; Ji, Yanli; Shakya, Akhalesh; Shen, Chen; Zhang, Chenming; Gonzalez, Vivianne; Brewer, Megan; Ma, Jian-xing; Wen, Rong; Zhang, Fangliang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) is a mitogen that promotes endothelial proliferation and neuronal survival. Using a unique technology of ligandomics, we recently identified HDGF as a retinal endothelial binding protein. The purpose of this study is to examine the role of HDGF in regulating ocular vasculature and the expression of HDGF in the retina. Methods HDGF expression in the retinal was analyzed with western blot and immunohistochemistry. Angiogenic activity was investigated in human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (HRMVECs) with in vitro endothelial proliferation, migration, and permeability assays. In vivo angiogenic activity was quantified with a corneal pocket assay. The Evans blue assay and western blot using anti-mouse albumin were performed to detect the capacity of HDGF to induce retinal vascular leakage. Results Immunohistochemistry revealed that HDGF is expressed in the retina with a distinct pattern. HDGF was detected in retinal ganglion cells and the inner nuclear layer but not in the inner plexiform layer, suggesting that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus, but not in the cytoplasm, of retinal neurons. In contrast to family member HDGF-related protein 3 (HRP-3) that has no expression in photoreceptors, HDGF is also present in the outer nuclear layer and the inner and outer segments of photoreceptors. This suggests that HDGF is expressed in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm of photoreceptors. In vitro functional assays showed that HDGF induced the proliferation, migration, and permeability of HRMVECs. Corneal pocket assay indicated that HDGF directly stimulated angiogenesis in vivo. Intravitreal injection of HDGF significantly induced retinal vascular leakage. Conclusions These results suggest that HDGF is an angiogenic factor that regulates retinal vasculature in physiologic and pathological conditions. Identification of HDGF by ligandomics and its independent characterization in this study also support the validity of this

  8. Synergetic regulatory networks mediated by oncogene-driven microRNAs and transcription factors in serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Sun, Jingchun; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Although high-grade serous ovarian cancer (OVC) is the most lethal gynecologic malignancy in women, little is known about the regulatory mechanisms in the cellular processes that lead to this cancer. Recently, accumulated lines of evidence have shown that the interplay between transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) is critical in cellular regulation during tumorigenesis. A comprehensive investigation of TFs and miRNAs, and their target genes, may provide a deeper understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in the pathology of OVC. In this study, we have integrated three complementary algorithms into a framework, aiming to infer the regulation by miRNAs and TFs in conjunction with gene expression profiles. We demonstrated the utility of our framework by inferring 67 OVC-specific regulatory feed-forward loops (FFL) initiated by miRNAs or TFs in high-grade serous OVC. By analyzing these regulatory behaviors, we found that all the 67 FFLs are consistent in their regulatory effects on genes that jointly targeted by miRNAs and TFs. Remarkably, we unveiled an unbalanced distribution of FFLs with different oncogenic effects. In total, 31 of the 67 coherent FFLs were mainly initiated by oncogenes. On the contrary, only 4 of the FFLs were initiated by tumor suppressor genes. These overwhelmingly observed oncogenic genes were further detected in a sub-network with 32 FFLs centered by miRNA let-7b and TF TCF7L1 to regulate cell differentiation. Closer inspection of 32 FFLs revealed that 75% of the miRNAs reportedly play functional roles in cell differentiation, especially when enriched in epithelial–mesenchymal transitions. This study provides a comprehensive pathophysiological overview of recurring coherent circuits in OVC that are co-regulated by miRNAs and TFs. The prevalence of oncogenic coherent FFLs in serous OVC suggests that oncogene-driven regulatory motifs could cooperatively act upon critical cellular process such as cell differentiation in a highly

  9. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.; Dix, T. A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during

  10. Redox-mediated activation of latent transforming growth factor-beta 1.

    PubMed

    Barcellos-Hoff, M H; Dix, T A

    1996-09-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF beta) is a multifunctional cytokine that orchestrates response to injury via ubiquitous cell surface receptors. The biological activity of TGF beta is restrained by its secretion as a latent complex (LTGF beta) such that activation determines the extent of TGF beta activity during physiological and pathological events. TGF beta action has been implicated in a variety of reactive oxygen-mediated tissue processes, particularly inflammation, and in pathologies such as reperfusion injury, rheumatoid arthritis, and atherosclerosis. It was recently shown to be rapidly activated after in vivo radiation exposure, which also generates reactive oxygen species (ROS). In the present studies, the potential for redox-mediated LTGF beta activation was investigated using a cell-free system in which ROS were generated in solution by ionizing radiation or metal ion-catalyzed ascorbate reaction. Irradiation (100 Gray) of recombinant human LTGF beta in solution induced 26% activation compared with that elicited by standard thermal activation. Metal-catalyzed ascorbate oxidation elicited extremely efficient recombinant LTGF beta activation that matched or exceeded thermal activation. The efficiency of ascorbate activation depended on ascorbate concentrations and the presence of transition metal ions. We postulate that oxidation of specific amino acids in the latency-conferring peptide leads to a conformation change in the latent complex that allows release of TGF beta. Oxidative activation offers a novel route for the involvement of TGF beta in tissue processes in which ROS are implicated and endows LTGF beta with the ability to act as a sensor of oxidative stress and, by releasing TGF beta, to function as a signal for orchestrating the response of multiple cell types. LTGF beta redox sensitivity is presumably directed toward recovery of homeostasis; however, oxidation may also be a mechanism of LTGF beta activation that can be deleterious during