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Sample records for gt1-7 hypothalamic neurons

  1. Cytotoxic effects of oxysterols produced during ozonolysis of cholesterol in murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, K; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Uppu, Rao M

    2007-01-01

    Ozone present in the photochemical smog or generated at the inflammatory sites is known to oxidize cholesterol and its 3-acyl esters. The oxidation results in the formation of multiple "ozone-specific" oxysterols, some of which are known to cause abnormalities in the metabolism of cholesterol and exert cytotoxicity. The ozone-specific oxysterols have been shown to favor the formation of atherosclerotic plaques and amyloid fibrils involving pro-oxidant processes. In the present communication, cultured murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons were studied in the context of cholesterol metabolism, formation of reactive oxygen species, intracellular Ca2 + levels and cytotoxicity using two most commonly occurring cholesterol ozonolysis products, 3beta- hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al (ChSeco) and 5beta, 6beta-epoxy-cholesterol (ChEpo). It was found that ChSeco elicited cytotoxicity at lower concentration (IC50 = 21 +/- 2.4 microM) than did ChEpo (IC50 = 43 +/- 3.7 microM). When tested at their IC50 concentrations in GT1-7 cells, both ChSeco and ChEpo resulted in the generation of ROS, the magnitude of which was comparable. N-acetyl-l-cysteine and Trolox attenuated the cytotoxic effects of ChSeco and ChEpo. The intracellular Ca2 + levels were not altered by either ChSeco or ChEpo. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrins, which cause depletion of cellular cholesterol, prevented ChSeco- but not ChEpo-induced cytotoxicity. The cell death caused by ChEpo, but not ChSeco, was prevented by exogenous cholesterol. Although oxidative stress plays a significant role, the results of the present study indicate differences in the pathways of cell death induced by ChSeco and ChEpo in murine GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. PMID:17164181

  2. An In Vitro System Comprising Immortalized Hypothalamic Neuronal Cells (GT1-7 Cells) for Evaluation of the Neuroendocrine Effects of Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Dai; Konoha-Mizuno, Keiko; Mori, Miwako; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Haneda, Toshihiro; Koyama, Hironari; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Aromatherapy and plant-based essential oils are widely used as complementary and alternative therapies for symptoms including anxiety. Furthermore, it was reportedly effective for the care of several diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and depressive illness. To investigate the pharmacological effects of essential oils, we developed an in vitro assay system using immortalized hypothalamic neuronal cells (GT1-7 cells). In this study, we evaluated the effects of essential oils on neuronal death induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), aluminum, zinc, or the antagonist of estrogen receptor (tamoxifen). Among tests of various essential oils, we found that H2O2-induced neuronal death was attenuated by the essential oils of damask rose, eucalyptus, fennel, geranium, ginger, kabosu, mandarin, myrrh, and neroli. Damask rose oil had protective effects against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity, while geranium and rosemary oil showed protective activity against zinc-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, geranium oil and ginger oil enhanced the neurotoxicity of tamoxifen. Our in vitro assay system could be useful for the neuropharmacological and endocrine pharmacological studies of essential oils. PMID:26576190

  3. L-type channel inhibition by CB1 cannabinoid receptors is mediated by PTX-sensitive G proteins and cAMP/PKA in GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Hoddah, Hanaa; Marcantoni, Andrea; Comunanza, Valentina; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Using immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 neurons, which express the CB1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1R) and three Ca2+ channel types (T, R and L), we found that the CB1R agonist WIN 55,212-2 inhibited the voltage-gated Ca2+ currents by about 35%. The inhibition by WIN 55,212-2 (10 microM) was reversible and prevented by nifedipine (3 microM), suggesting a selective action on L-type Ca2+ channels (LTCCs). WIN 55,212-2 action exhibited all the features of voltage-independent Ca2+ channel modulation: (1) no changes of the activation kinetics, (2) equal depressive action at all potentials and (3) no facilitation following strong prepulses. At variance with WIN 55,212-2, the CB1R inverse agonist AM-251 (10 microM) caused 20% increase of Ca2+ currents. The inhibition of LTCCs by WIN 55,212-2 was prevented by overnight PTX-incubation and by intracellular perfusion with GDP-beta-S. The latter caused also a 20% Ca2+ current up-regulation. WIN 55,212-2 action was also prevented by application of the PKA-blocker H89 or by loading the neurons with 8-CPT-cAMP. Our results suggest that LTCCs in GT1-7 neurons are partially inhibited at rest due to a constitutive CB1R activity removed by AM-251 and GDP-beta-S. Activation of CB1R via PTX-sensitive G proteins and cAMP/PKA pathway selectively depresses LTCCs that critically control the synchronized spontaneous firing and pulsatile release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone in GT1-7 neurons. PMID:19818494

  4. Inhibitory action of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone on the signaling pathways induced by kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7.

    PubMed

    Son, You Lee; Ubuka, Takayoshi; Soga, Tomoko; Yamamoto, Kazutoshi; Bentley, George E; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) acts as a negative regulator of reproduction by acting on gonadotropes and gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. Despite its functional significance, the molecular mechanism of GnIH action in the target cells has not been fully elucidated. To expand our previous study on GnIH actions in gonadotropes, we investigated the potential signal transduction pathway that conveys the inhibitory action of GnIH in GnRH neurons by using the GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7. We examined whether GnIH inhibits the action of kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), positive regulators of GnRH neurons. Although GnIH significantly suppressed the stimulatory effect of kisspeptin on GnRH release in hypothalamic culture, GnIH had no inhibitory effect on kisspeptin stimulation of serum response element and nuclear factor of activated T-cell response element activities and ERK phosphorylation, indicating that GnIH may not directly inhibit kisspeptin signaling in GnRH neurons. On the contrary, GnIH effectively eliminated the stimulatory effect of VIP on p38 and ERK phosphorylation, c-Fos mRNA expression, and GnRH release. The use of pharmacological modulators strongly demonstrated the specific inhibitory action of GnIH on the adenylate cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A pathway, suggesting a common inhibitory mechanism of GnIH action in GnRH neurons and gonadotropes.-Son, Y. L., Ubuka, T., Soga, T., Yamamoto, K., Bentley, G. E., Tsutsui, K. Inhibitory action of gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone on the signaling pathways induced by kisspeptin and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide in GnRH neuronal cell line, GT1-7. PMID:26929433

  5. Effects of aqueous extracts of Halimeda incrassata (Ellis) Lamouroux and Bryothamnion triquetrum (S.G.Gmelim) Howe on hydrogen peroxide and methyl mercury-induced oxidative stress in GT1-7 mouse hypothalamic immortalized cells.

    PubMed

    Fallarero, A; Loikkanen, J J; Männistö, P T; Castañeda, O; Vidal, A

    2003-01-01

    The current investigation focuses attention on the neuroprotective and antioxidant properties of aqueous extracts from Halimeda incrassata (Hi) and Bryothamniom triquetrum (Bt) in the mouse immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line. Under basal oxidative conditions, Hi extract reduces intracellular reactive oxygen species production, as assessed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein fluorescence, while Bt extract does not contribute to basal ROS generation. Both extracts, at concentrations higher than 0.20 mg/ml, exert protection against hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell death, although only Hi extract can additionally prevent hydrogen peroxide-induced ROS production. The two seaweed aqueous extracts, at concentrations higher than 0.05 mg/ml, also display protection against neuronal death induced by methyl mercury chloride, as well as against methyl mercury chloride-mediated ROS generation. None of the extracts increase GSH intracellular pools, in basal conditions, after depleting its levels with either hydrogen peroxide or methyl mercury chloride. Some comments on the probable targets of the neuroprotection exerted by these two extracts are included in this paper. PMID:12622462

  6. Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 Expression in GT1-7 GnRH-Secreting Neurons Is Androgen-Independent, but Can Be Upregulated by the Inhibition of DNA Methyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Linscott, Megan L.; Chung, Wilson C. J.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) is a potent morphogen that regulates the embryonic development of hypothalamic neuroendocrine cells. Indeed, using Fgf8 hypomorphic mice, we showed that reduced Fgf8 mRNA expression completely eliminated the presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons. These findings suggest that FGF8 signaling is required during the embryonic development of mouse GnRH neurons. Additionally, in situ hybridization studies showed that the embryonic primordial birth place of GnRH neurons, the olfactory placode, is highly enriched for Fgf8 mRNA expression. Taken together these data underscore the importance of FGF8 signaling for GnRH emergence. However, an important question remains unanswered: How is Fgf8 gene expression regulated in the developing embryonic mouse brain? One major candidate is the androgen receptor (AR), which has been shown to upregulate Fgf8 mRNA in 60–70% of newly diagnosed prostate cancers. Therefore, we hypothesized that ARs may be involved in the regulation of Fgf8 transcription in the developing mouse brain. To test this hypothesis, we used chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to elucidate whether ARs interact with the 5′UTR region upstream of the translational start site of the Fgf8 gene in immortalized mouse GnRH neurons (GT1-7) and nasal explants. Our data showed that while AR interacts with the Fgf8 promoter region, this interaction was androgen-independent, and that androgen treatment did not affect Fgf8 mRNA levels, indicating that androgen signaling does not induce Fgf8 transcription. In contrast, inhibition of DNA methyltransferases (DNMT) significantly upregulated Fgf8 mRNA levels indicating that Fgf8 transcriptional activity may be dependent on DNA methylation status. PMID:27200347

  7. Effect of Chlorotriazine Pesticides on Gonadotrophin Releasing Hormone in the Neuronal GT1-7 Cell Line and Hypothalamic Explants

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) stimulates the release of pituitary luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle stimulating hormone. These pituitary hormones are necessary for normal reproductive function in both males and females. It is well recognized that disruption of nor...

  8. Algae Undaria pinnatifida Protects Hypothalamic Neurons against Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress through Akt/mTOR Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jongwan; Moon, Il Soo; Goo, Tae-Won; Moon, Seong-Su; Seo, Minchul

    2015-01-01

    Increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is known to be one of the causes of hypothalamic neuronal damage, as well as a cause of metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. Recent evidence has suggested that Undaria pinnatifida (UP), an edible brown algae, has antioxidant activity. However, the neuroprotective effect of UP has yet to be examined. In this study, to investigate the neuroprotective effect of UP on ER stress-induced neuronal damage in mouse hypothalamic neurons, mice immortal hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7) were incubated with extract of UP. ER stress was induced by treating with tunicamycin. Tunicamycin induced apoptotic cell death was compared with the vehicle treatment through excessive ER stress. However UP protected GT1-7 cells from cell death, occurring after treatment with tunicamycin by reducing ER stress. Treatment with UP resulted in reduced increment of ATF6 and CHOP, and recovered the decrease of phosphorylation of Akt/mTOR by tunicamycin and the increment of autophagy. These results show that UP protects GT1-7 cells from ER stress induced cell death through the Akt/mTOR pathway. The current study suggests that UP may have a beneficial effect on cerebral neuronal degeneration in metabolic diseases with elevated ER stress. PMID:26610463

  9. Hypothalamic neuronal responses to cytokines.

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, M.

    1990-01-01

    Fever has been extensively studied in the past few decades. The hypothesis that hypothalamic thermosensitive neurons play a major role in both normal thermoregulation and in fever production and lysis has particularly helped to advance our understanding of the neuronal mechanisms underlying the response to pyrogens. Furthermore, new data in the study of host defense responses induced by pyrogenic cytokines such as interleukin 1, interferon alpha 2, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin 6 have demonstrated that those factors have multiple, yet coordinated, regulatory activities in the central nervous system, so that our understanding of the role of the brain in the activity of these agents requires a new perspective and dimension. Thus, recent evidence from our laboratory indicates that blood-borne cytokines may be detected in the organum vasculosum laminae terminalis and transduced there into neuronal signals. Such signals may then affect distinct, but partially overlapping, sets of neuronal systems in the preoptic area of the anterior hypothalamus, mediating directly and/or indirectly the array of various host defense responses characteristic of infection that are thought to be induced by blood-borne cytokines. PMID:2205055

  10. Transcriptional profiling of fetal hypothalamic TRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During murine hypothalamic development, different neuroendocrine cell phenotypes are generated in overlapping periods; this suggests that cell-type specific developmental programs operate to achieve complete maturation. A balance between programs that include cell proliferation, cell cycle withdrawal as well as epigenetic regulation of gene expression characterizes neurogenesis. Thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) is a peptide that regulates energy homeostasis and autonomic responses. To better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TRH neuron development, we performed a genome wide study of its transcriptome during fetal hypothalamic development. Results In primary cultures, TRH cells constitute 2% of the total fetal hypothalamic cell population. To purify these cells, we took advantage of the fact that the segment spanning -774 to +84 bp of the Trh gene regulatory region confers specific expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the TRH cells. Transfected TRH cells were purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting, various cell preparations pooled, and their transcriptome compared to that of GFP- hypothalamic cells. TRH cells undergoing the terminal phase of differentiation, expressed genes implicated in protein biosynthesis, intracellular signaling and transcriptional control. Among the transcription-associated transcripts, we identified the transcription factors Klf4, Klf10 and Atf3, which were previously uncharacterized within the hypothalamus. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is one of the first reports identifying transcripts with a potentially important role during the development of a specific hypothalamic neuronal phenotype. This genome-scale study forms a rational foundation for identifying genes that might participate in the development and function of hypothalamic TRH neurons. PMID:21569245

  11. Leptin signalling pathways in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Obin; Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Min-Seon

    2016-04-01

    Leptin is the most critical hormone in the homeostatic regulation of energy balance among those so far discovered. Leptin primarily acts on the neurons of the mediobasal part of hypothalamus to regulate food intake, thermogenesis, and the blood glucose level. In the hypothalamic neurons, leptin binding to the long form leptin receptors on the plasma membrane initiates multiple signaling cascades. The signaling pathways known to mediate the actions of leptin include JAK-STAT signaling, PI3K-Akt-FoxO1 signaling, SHP2-ERK signaling, AMPK signaling, and mTOR-S6K signaling. Recent evidence suggests that leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons is also linked to primary cilia function. On the other hand, signaling molecules/pathways mitigating leptin actions in hypothalamic neurons have been extensively investigated in an effort to treat leptin resistance observed in obesity. These include SOCS3, tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B, and inflammatory signaling pathways such as IKK-NFκB and JNK signaling, and ER stress-mitochondrial signaling. In this review, we discuss leptin signaling pathways in the hypothalamus, with a particular focus on the most recently discovered pathways. PMID:26786898

  12. Leptin signaling in astrocytes regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesús; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H; Horvath, Tamas L

    2014-07-01

    We found that leptin receptors were expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that their conditional deletion led to altered glial morphology and synaptic inputs onto hypothalamic neurons involved in feeding control. Leptin-regulated feeding was diminished, whereas feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data reveal an active role of glial cells in hypothalamic synaptic remodeling and control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  13. Generation of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkle, Florian T.; Maroof, Asif; Wataya, Takafumi; Sasai, Yoshiki; Studer, Lorenz; Eggan, Kevin; Schier, Alexander F.

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons orchestrate many essential physiological and behavioral processes via secreted neuropeptides, and are relevant to human diseases such as obesity, narcolepsy and infertility. We report the differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into many of the major types of neuropeptidergic hypothalamic neurons, including those producing pro-opiolemelanocortin, agouti-related peptide, hypocretin/orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, oxytocin, arginine vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) or thyrotropin-releasing hormone. Hypothalamic neurons can be generated using a ‘self-patterning’ strategy that yields a broad array of cell types, or via a more reproducible directed differentiation approach. Stem cell-derived human hypothalamic neurons share characteristic morphological properties and gene expression patterns with their counterparts in vivo, and are able to integrate into the mouse brain. These neurons could form the basis of cellular models, chemical screens or cellular therapies to study and treat common human diseases. PMID:25670790

  14. Efficient Generation of Hypothalamic Neurons from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liheng; Egli, Dieter; Leibel, Rudolph L

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus comprises neuronal clusters that are essential for body weight regulation and other physiological functions. Insights into the complex cellular physiology of this region of the brain are critical to understanding the pathogenesis of obesity, but human hypothalamic cells are largely inaccessible for direct study. Here we describe a technique for generation of arcuate-like hypothalamic neurons from human pluripotent stem (hPS) cells. Early activation of SHH signaling and inhibition of BMP and TGFβ signaling, followed by timed inhibition of NOTCH, can efficiently differentiate hPS cells into NKX2.1+ hypothalamic progenitors. Subsequent incubation with BDNF induces the differentiation and maturation of pro-opiomelanocortin and neuropeptide Y neurons, which are major cell types in the arcuate hypothalamus. These neurons have molecular and cellular characteristics consistent with arcuate neurons. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27367166

  15. Network of hypothalamic neurons that control appetite

    PubMed Central

    Sohn, Jong-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) controls food intake and energy expenditure via tight coordinations between multiple neuronal populations. Specifically, two distinct neuronal populations exist in the arcuate nucleus of hypothalamus (ARH): the anorexigenic (appetite-suppressing) pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons and the orexigenic (appetite-increasing) neuropeptide Y (NPY)/agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons. The coordinated regulation of neuronal circuit involving these neurons is essential in properly maintaining energy balance, and any disturbance therein may result in hyperphagia/obesity or hypophagia/starvation. Thus, adequate knowledge of the POMC and NPY/AgRP neuron physiology is mandatory to understand the pathophysiology of obesity and related metabolic diseases. This review will discuss the history and recent updates on the POMC and NPY/AgRP neuronal circuits, as well as the general anorexigenic and orexigenic circuits in the CNS. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(4): 229-233] PMID:25560696

  16. Hypothalamic POMC neurons promote cannabinoid-induced feeding

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Marco; Varela, Luis; Kim, Jae Geun; Kim, Jung Dae; Hernandez, Francisco; Simonds, Stephanie E; Castorena, Carlos M; Vianna, Claudia R; Elmquist, Joel K; Morozov, Yury M; Rakic, Pasko; Bechmann, Ingo; Cowley, Michael A; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Gao, Xiao-Bing; Diano, Sabrina

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons promote satiety. Cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1R) is critical for central regulation of food intake. We interrogated whether CB1R-controlled feeding is paralleled by decreased activity of POMC neurons. Chemical promotion of CB1R activity increased feeding, and strikingly, CB1R activation also promoted neuronal activity of POMC cells. This paradoxical increase in POMC activity was crucial for CB1R-induced feeding, because Designer-Receptors-Exclusively-Activated-by-Designer-Drugs (DREADD)-mediated inhibition of POMC neurons diminished, while DREADD-mediated activation of POMC neurons enhanced CB1R-driven feeding. The Pomc gene encodes both the anorexigenic peptide, α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), and the peptide, β-endorphin. CB1R activation selectively increased β-endorphin but not α-MSH release in the hypothalamus, and, systemic or hypothalamic administration of the opioid receptor antagonist, naloxone, blocked acute CB1R-induced feeding. These processes involved mitochondrial adaptations, which, when blocked, abolished CB1R-induced cellular responses and feeding. Together, these results unmasked a previously unsuspected role of POMC neurons in promotion of feeding by cannabinoids. PMID:25707796

  17. Hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate complex behaviours after stress

    PubMed Central

    Füzesi, Tamás; Daviu, Nuria; Wamsteeker Cusulin, Jaclyn I.; Bonin, Robert P.; Bains, Jaideep S.

    2016-01-01

    All organisms possess innate behavioural and physiological programmes that ensure survival. In order to have maximum adaptive benefit, these programmes must be sufficiently flexible to account for changes in the environment. Here we show that hypothalamic CRH neurons orchestrate an environmentally flexible repertoire of behaviours that emerge after acute stress in mice. Optical silencing of CRH neurons disrupts the organization of individual behaviours after acute stress. These behavioural patterns shift according to the environment after stress, but this environmental sensitivity is blunted by activation of PVN CRH neurons. These findings provide evidence that PVN CRH cells are part of a previously unexplored circuit that matches precise behavioural patterns to environmental context following stress. Overactivity in this network in the absence of stress may contribute to environmental ambivalence, resulting in context-inappropriate behavioural strategies. PMID:27306314

  18. Ventromedial hypothalamic neurons control a defensive emotion state.

    PubMed

    Kunwar, Prabhat S; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Remedios, Ryan; Cai, Haijiang; Yilmaz, Melis; Meister, Markus; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Defensive behaviors reflect underlying emotion states, such as fear. The hypothalamus plays a role in such behaviors, but prevailing textbook views depict it as an effector of upstream emotion centers, such as the amygdala, rather than as an emotion center itself. We used optogenetic manipulations to probe the function of a specific hypothalamic cell type that mediates innate defensive responses. These neurons are sufficient to drive multiple defensive actions, and required for defensive behaviors in diverse contexts. The behavioral consequences of activating these neurons, moreover, exhibit properties characteristic of emotion states in general, including scalability, (negative) valence, generalization and persistence. Importantly, these neurons can also condition learned defensive behavior, further refuting long-standing claims that the hypothalamus is unable to support emotional learning and therefore is not an emotion center. These data indicate that the hypothalamus plays an integral role to instantiate emotion states, and is not simply a passive effector of upstream emotion centers. PMID:25748136

  19. Somatostatin triggers rhythmic electrical firing in hypothalamic GHRH neurons

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Guillaume; Mitutsova, Violeta; Barre, Alexander; Granier, Manon; Fontanaud, Pierre; Chazalon, Marine; Carmignac, Danielle; Robinson, Iain C. A. F.; Low, Malcolm J.; Plesnila, Nikolaus; Hodson, David J.; Mollard, Patrice; Méry, Pierre-François

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons orchestrate body growth/maturation and have been implicated in feeding responses and ageing. However, the electrical patterns that dictate GHRH neuron functions have remained elusive. Since the inhibitory neuropeptide somatostatin (SST) is considered to be a primary oscillator of the GH axis, we examined its acute effects on GHRH neurons in brain slices from male and female GHRH-GFP mice. At the cellular level, SST irregularly suppressed GHRH neuron electrical activity, leading to slow oscillations at the population level. This resulted from an initial inhibitory action at the GHRH neuron level via K+ channel activation, followed by a delayed, sst1/sst2 receptor-dependent unbalancing of glutamatergic and GABAergic synaptic inputs. The oscillation patterns induced by SST were sexually dimorphic, and could be explained by differential actions of SST on both GABAergic and glutamatergic currents. Thus, a tripartite neuronal circuit involving a fast hyperpolarization and a dual regulation of synaptic inputs appeared sufficient in pacing the activity of the GHRH neuronal population. These “feed-forward loops” may represent basic building blocks involved in the regulation of GHRH release and its downstream sexual specific functions. PMID:27072430

  20. Cell death mechanisms in GT1-7 GnRH cells exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls PCB74, PCB118, and PCB153

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Guevara, Esperanza; Woller, Michael J.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-06-01

    Exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) causes functional deficits in neuroendocrine systems. We used an immortalized hypothalamic GT1-7 cell line, which synthesizes the neuroendocrine peptide gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), to examine the neurotoxic and endocrine disrupting effects of PCBs and their mechanisms of action. Cells were treated for 1, 4, 8, or 24 h with a range of doses of a representative PCB from each of three classes: coplanar (2,4,4',5-tetrachlorobiphenyl: PCB74), dioxin-like coplanar (2',3,4,4',5' pentachlorobiphenyl: PCB118), non-coplanar (2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl: PCB153), or their combination. GnRH peptide concentrations, cell viability, apoptotic and necrotic cell death, and caspase activation were quantified. In general, GnRH peptide levels were suppressed by high doses and longer durations of PCBs, and elevated at low doses and shorter timepoints. The suppression of GnRH peptide levels was partially reversed in cultures co-treated with the estrogen receptor antagonist ICI 182,780. All PCBs reduced viability and increased both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. Although the effects for the three classes of PCBs were often similar, subtle differences in responses, together with evidence that the combination of PCBs acted slightly different from individual PCBs, suggest that the three tested PCB compounds may act via slightly different or more than one mechanism. These results provide evidence that PCB congeners have endocrine disrupting and/or neurotoxic effects on the hypothalamic GnRH cell line, a finding that has implications for environmental endocrine disruption in animals.

  1. Direct innervation and modulation of orexin neurons by lateral hypothalamic LepRb neurons

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Gwendolyn W.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Myers, Martin G.

    2010-01-01

    Leptin, the adipose-derived hormonal signal of body energy stores, acts via the leptin receptor (LepRb) on neurons in multiple brain regions. We previously identified LepRb neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA), which are distinct from neighboring leptin-regulated melanin concentrating hormone (MCH)- or orexin (OX)-expressing cells. Neither the direct synaptic targets of LHA LepRb neurons nor their potential role in the regulation of other LHA neurons have been determined, however. We thus generated several adenoviral and transgenic systems in which cre recombinase promotes the expression of the tracer, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), and utilized these in combination with LepRbcre mice to determine the neuronal targets of LHA LepRb neurons. This analysis revealed that, while some LHA LepRb neurons project to dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), LHA LepRb neurons also densely innervate the LHA where they directly synapse with OX, but not MCH, neurons. Indeed, few other LepRb neurons in the brain project to the OX-containing region of the mouse LHA, and direct leptin action via LHA LepRb neurons regulates gene expression in OX neurons. These findings thus reveal a major role for LHA leptin action in the modulation of OX neurons, suggesting the importance of LHA LepRb neurons in the regulation of OX signaling that is crucial to leptin action and metabolic control. PMID:20739548

  2. Ventromedial hypothalamic neurons control a defensive emotion state

    PubMed Central

    Kunwar, Prabhat S; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Remedios, Ryan; Cai, Haijiang; Yilmaz, Melis; Meister, Markus; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    Defensive behaviors reflect underlying emotion states, such as fear. The hypothalamus plays a role in such behaviors, but prevailing textbook views depict it as an effector of upstream emotion centers, such as the amygdala, rather than as an emotion center itself. We used optogenetic manipulations to probe the function of a specific hypothalamic cell type that mediates innate defensive responses. These neurons are sufficient to drive multiple defensive actions, and required for defensive behaviors in diverse contexts. The behavioral consequences of activating these neurons, moreover, exhibit properties characteristic of emotion states in general, including scalability, (negative) valence, generalization and persistence. Importantly, these neurons can also condition learned defensive behavior, further refuting long-standing claims that the hypothalamus is unable to support emotional learning and therefore is not an emotion center. These data indicate that the hypothalamus plays an integral role to instantiate emotion states, and is not simply a passive effector of upstream emotion centers. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06633.001 PMID:25748136

  3. Analyses of rapid estrogen actions on rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kow, Lee-Ming; Pataky, Stefan; Dupré, Christophe; Phan, Anna; Martin-Alguacil, Nieves; Pfaff, Donald W

    2016-07-01

    Rapid estrogen actions are widely diverse across many cell types. We conducted a series of electrophysiological studies on single rat hypothalamic neurons and found that estradiol (E2) could rapidly and independently potentiate neuronal excitation/depolarizations induced by histamine (HA) and N-Methyl-d-Aspartate (NMDA). Now, the present whole-cell patch study was designed to determine whether E2 potentiates HA and NMDA depolarizations - mediated by distinctly different types of receptors - by the same or by different mechanisms. For this, the actions of HA, NMDA, as well as E2, were investigated first using various ion channel blockers and then by analyzing and comparing their channel activating characteristics. Results indicate that: first, both HA and NMDA depolarize neurons by inhibiting K(+) currents. Second, E2 potentiates both HA and NMDA depolarizations by enhancing the inhibition of K(+) currents, an inhibition caused by the two transmitters. Third, E2 employs the very same mechanism, the enhancement of K(+) current inhibition, thus to rapidly potentiate HA and NMDA depolarizations. These data are of behavioral importance, since the rapid E2 potentiation of depolarization synergizes with nuclear genomic actions of E2 to facilitate lordosis behavior, the primary female-typical reproductive behavior. PMID:27017919

  4. Thyroid hormone is required for hypothalamic neurons regulating cardiovascular functions

    PubMed Central

    Mittag, Jens; Lyons, David J.; Sällström, Johan; Vujovic, Milica; Dudazy-Gralla, Susi; Warner, Amy; Wallis, Karin; Alkemade, Anneke; Nordström, Kristina; Monyer, Hannah; Broberger, Christian; Arner, Anders; Vennström, Björn

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid hormone is well known for its profound direct effects on cardiovascular function and metabolism. Recent evidence, however, suggests that the hormone also regulates these systems indirectly through the central nervous system. While some of the molecular mechanisms underlying the hormone’s central control of metabolism have been identified, its actions in the central cardiovascular control have remained enigmatic. Here, we describe a previously unknown population of parvalbuminergic neurons in the anterior hypothalamus that requires thyroid hormone receptor signaling for proper development. Specific stereotaxic ablation of these cells in the mouse resulted in hypertension and temperature-dependent tachycardia, indicating a role in the central autonomic control of blood pressure and heart rate. Moreover, the neurons exhibited intrinsic temperature sensitivity in patch-clamping experiments, providing a new connection between cardiovascular function and core temperature. Thus, the data identify what we believe to be a novel hypothalamic cell population potentially important for understanding hypertension and indicate developmental hypothyroidism as an epigenetic risk factor for cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, the findings may be beneficial for treatment of the recently identified patients that have a mutation in thyroid hormone receptor α1. PMID:23257356

  5. Activation of Strychnine-Sensitive Glycine Receptors by Shilajit on Preoptic Hypothalamic Neurons of Juvenile Mice.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Janardhan Prasad; Cho, Dong Hyu; Han, Seong Kyu

    2016-02-29

    Shilajit, a mineral pitch, has been used in Ayurveda and Siddha system of medicine to treat many human ailments, and is reported to contain at least 85 minerals in ionic form. This study examined the possible mechanism of Shilajit action on preoptic hypothalamic neurons using juvenile mice. The hypothalamic neurons are the key regulator of many hormonal systems. In voltage clamp mode at a holding potential of -60 mV, and under a high chloride pipette solution, Shilajit induced dose-dependent inward current. Shilajit-induced inward currents were reproducible and persisted in the presence of 0.5 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX) suggesting a postsynaptic action of Shilajit on hypothalamic neurons. The currents induced by Shilajit were almost completely blocked by 2 μM strychnine (Stry), a glycine receptor antagonist. In addition, Shilajit-induced inward currents were partially blocked by bicuculline. Under a gramicidin-perforated patch clamp mode, Shilajit induced membrane depolarization on juvenile neurons. These results show that Shilajit affects hypothalamic neuronal activities by activating the Stry-sensitive glycine receptor with α₂/α₂β subunit. Taken together, these results suggest that Shilajit contains some ingredients with possible glycine mimetic activities and might influence hypothalamic neurophysiology through activation of Stry-sensitive glycine receptor-mediated responses on hypothalamic neurons postsynaptically. PMID:26875561

  6. Regulation of the Hypothalamic Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH) Neuron by Neuronal and Peripheral Inputs

    PubMed Central

    Nillni, Eduardo A.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic pituitary thyroid (HPT) axis plays a critical role in mediating changes in metabolism and thermogenesis. Thus, the central regulation of the thyroid axis by Thyrotropin Releasing Hormone (TRH) neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) is of key importance for the normal function of the axis under different physiological conditions including cold stress and changes in nutritional status. Before the TRH peptide becomes biologically active, a series of tightly regulated processes occur including the proper folding of the prohormone for targeting to the secretory pathway, its post-translational processing, and targeting of the processed peptides to the secretory granules near the plasma membrane of the cell ready for secretion. Multiple inputs coming from the periphery or from neurons present in different areas of the brain including the hypothalamus are responsible for the activation or inhibition of the TRH neuron and in turn affect the output of TRH and the set point of the axis. PMID:20074584

  7. Sex-specific effects of androgen and estrogen on proliferation of the embryonic chicken hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ailing; Zhang, Caiqiao

    2007-04-01

    Effects of androgen and estrogen on proliferation of hypothalamic neurons were evaluated by a chicken hypothalamic neuron-glia coculture model. Hypothalamic cells were dispersed from 17-day-old embryos and challenged with testosterone (T) and 17beta-estradiol (E2) alone or combined with androgen receptor antagonist flutamide, estrogen receptor antagonist tamoxifen, or aromatase inhibitor letrozole for 48 h. The neuron number was counted and the proliferating cells were identified by immunocytochemistry of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation. Results showed that both E2 and T stimulated proliferation of hypothalamic neurons. E2 showed more intensive effect on females and this promoting effect was abrogated by tamoxifen. T played more intensive effect on males and the effect was inhibited by flutamide, tamoxifen, or letrozole. The above results indicated that E2 stimulated neuron proliferation through estrogenic actions with more sensitive effect on females and T promoted neuron proliferation through both androgenic and estrogenic actions with more intense effect on males. These observations suggested that steroid hormones influence the proliferation of hypothalamic neurons in a sexually dimorphic manner during the development of chicken embryos. PMID:17873328

  8. Damage to histaminergic tuberomammillary neurons and other hypothalamic neurons with traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Valko, Philipp O; Gavrilov, Yury V; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Finn, Kristen; Reddy, Hasini; Haybaeck, Johannes; Weis, Serge; Scammell, Thomas E; Baumann, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    The need for increased sleep after traumatic brain injury is a common and disabling complaint, yet its etiology is unknown. Previous studies have demonstrated diffuse damage to various hypothalamic systems, but the integrity of the histaminergic tuberomammillary nucleus, a major arousal-promoting system located in the posterior hypothalamus, has never been examined in head trauma patients. Here, we demonstrate that severe head trauma is associated with a marked loss (41%) of histaminergic neurons. Reduced histamine signaling may contribute to increased sleep need, and therapies that enhance histaminergic tone may improve arousal after head trauma or other conditions. PMID:25363332

  9. Neuroanatomical association of hypothalamic HSD2-containing neurons with ERα, catecholamines, or oxytocin: implications for feeding?

    PubMed Central

    Askew, Maegan L.; Muckelrath, Halie D.; Johnston, Jonathon R.; Curtis, Kathleen S.

    2015-01-01

    This study used immunohistochemical methods to investigate the possibility that hypothalamic neurons that contain 11-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD2) are involved in the control of feeding by rats via neuroanatomical associations with the α subtype of estrogen receptor (ERα), catecholamines, and/or oxytocin (OT). An aggregate of HSD2-containing neurons is located laterally in the hypothalamus, and the numbers of these neurons were greatly increased by estradiol treatment in ovariectomized (OVX) rats compared to numbers in male rats and in OVX rats that were not given estradiol. However, HSD2-containing neurons were anatomically segregated from ERα-containing neurons in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus and the Arcuate Nucleus. There was an absence of OT-immunolabeled fibers in the area of HSD2-labeled neurons. Taken together, these findings provide no support for direct associations between hypothalamic HSD2 and ERα or OT neurons in the control of feeding. In contrast, there was catecholamine-fiber labeling in the area of HSD2-labeled neurons, and these fibers occasionally were in close apposition to HSD2-labeled neurons. Therefore, we cannot rule out interactions between HSD2 and catecholamines in the control of feeding; however, given the relative sparseness of the appositions, any such interaction would appear to be modest. Thus, these studies do not conclusively identify a neuroanatomical substrate by which HSD2-containing neurons in the hypothalamus may alter feeding, and leave the functional role of hypothalamic HSD2-containing neurons subject to further investigation. PMID:26124709

  10. Activation of hypothalamic gono-like neurons in female rats during estrus☆

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Xiaoxuan; Wang, Shaojun; Rong, Peijing; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    In mammals, gonadal function is controlled by the activity of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons, which control the secretion of adenohypophyseal and gonadal hormones. However, there are a number of unanswered questions in relation to gonadal function. It is currently unknown how erotogenic stimulation of the genitals influences the subpopulation of hypothalamic medial preoptic area neurons, antidromically identified as projecting to the median eminence at different periods of the estrous cycle. Additionally, the distinctiveness of hypothalamic medial preoptic area neurons, with respect to methods of feedback control by exogenous hormones, is also unknown. In this study, spontaneous discharges from individual neurons encountered within the medial preoptic area, gono-like neurons, were recorded extracellularly using glass microelectrodes. To confirm the cellular and histochemical properties of the recording units, antidromic stimulation was performed using a side-by-side bipolar stimulating electrode placed into the median eminence, alongside microiontophoretic injections of the conventional tracer, horseradish peroxidase. In addition, further immunohistochemical analyses were performed. Results showed that elevated gono-neuron activity was accompanied by increased background activity and greater responses to erotogenic stimuli during estrus. Application of clitoral traction stimulation resulted in increased activation of the gono-like neurons. This neuronal activity was noticeably inhibited by β-estradiol administration. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed the presence of gonadotropin-releasing hormone-reactive protein in hypothalamic cells in which electrophysiological recordings were taken. Thus, medial preoptic area neurons represent the subset of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons described from brain slices in vitro, and might serve as a useful physiological model to form the basis of future in vivo studies. PMID:25337091

  11. Hypothalamic TLR2 triggers sickness behavior via a microglia-neuronal axis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jae Geun; Park, Jeong Woo; Koch, Marco; Horvath, Tamas L.; Lee, Byung Ju

    2016-01-01

    Various pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to sickness behaviors have been proposed. For example, an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus has been implicated, but the signaling modalities that involve inflammatory mechanisms and neuronal circuit functions are ill-defined. Here, we show that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation by intracerebroventricular injection of its ligand, Pam3CSK4, triggered hypothalamic inflammation and activation of arcuate nucleus microglia, resulting in altered input organization and increased activity of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. These animals developed sickness behavior symptoms, including anorexia, hypoactivity, and hyperthermia. Antagonists of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase pathway and melanocortin receptors 3/4 reversed the anorexia and body weight loss induced by TLR2 activation. These results unmask an important role of TLR2 in the development of sickness behaviors via stimulation of hypothalamic microglia to promote POMC neuronal activation in association with hypothalamic inflammation. PMID:27405276

  12. Hypothalamic TLR2 triggers sickness behavior via a microglia-neuronal axis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Sungho; Kim, Jae Geun; Park, Jeong Woo; Koch, Marco; Horvath, Tamas L; Lee, Byung Ju

    2016-01-01

    Various pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to sickness behaviors have been proposed. For example, an inflammatory process in the hypothalamus has been implicated, but the signaling modalities that involve inflammatory mechanisms and neuronal circuit functions are ill-defined. Here, we show that toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) activation by intracerebroventricular injection of its ligand, Pam3CSK4, triggered hypothalamic inflammation and activation of arcuate nucleus microglia, resulting in altered input organization and increased activity of proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons. These animals developed sickness behavior symptoms, including anorexia, hypoactivity, and hyperthermia. Antagonists of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase pathway and melanocortin receptors 3/4 reversed the anorexia and body weight loss induced by TLR2 activation. These results unmask an important role of TLR2 in the development of sickness behaviors via stimulation of hypothalamic microglia to promote POMC neuronal activation in association with hypothalamic inflammation. PMID:27405276

  13. Leptin signaling in GFAP-expressing adult glia cells regulates hypothalamic neuronal circuits and feeding

    PubMed Central

    Kim1, Jae Geun; Suyama, Shigetomo; Koch, Marco; Jin, Sungho; Argente-Arizon, Pilar; Argente, Jesus; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Zimmer, Marcelo R.; Jeong, Jin Kwon; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Gao, Yuanqing; Garcia-Caceres, Cristina; Yi, Chun-Xia; Salmaso, Natalina; Vaccarino, Flora M.; Chowen, Julie; Diano, Sabrina; Dietrich, Marcelo O; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Horvath, Tamas L.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that synaptic re-organization of hypothalamic feeding circuits in response to metabolic shifts involves astrocytes, cells that can directly respond to the metabolic hormone, leptin, in vitro. It is not known whether the role of glia cells in hypothalamic synaptic adaptions is active or passive. Here we show that leptin receptors are expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes and that conditional, adult deletion of leptin receptors in astrocytes leads to altered glial morphology, decreased glial coverage and elevated synaptic inputs onto pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)- and Agouti-related protein (AgRP)-producing neurons. Leptin-induced suppression of feeding was diminished, while rebound feeding after fasting or ghrelin administration was elevated in mice with astrocyte-specific leptin receptor deficiency. These data unmask an active role of glial cells in the initiation of hypothalamic synaptic plasticity and neuroendocrine control of feeding by leptin. PMID:24880214

  14. MCT2 Expression and Lactate Influx in Anorexigenic and Orexigenic Neurons of the Arcuate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Campos, Christian; Elizondo, Roberto; Carril, Claudio; Martínez, Fernando; Boric, Katica; Nualart, Francisco; Garcia-Robles, Maria Angeles

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurons of the arcuate nucleus control food intake, releasing orexigenic and anorexigenic neuropeptides in response to changes in glucose concentration. Several studies have suggested that the glucosensing mechanism is governed by a metabolic interaction between neurons and glial cells via lactate flux through monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs). Hypothalamic glial cells (tanycytes) release lactate through MCT1 and MCT4; however, similar analyses in neuroendocrine neurons have yet to be undertaken. Using primary rat hypothalamic cell cultures and fluorimetric assays, lactate incorporation was detected. Furthermore, the expression and function of MCT2 was demonstrated in the hypothalamic neuronal cell line, GT1-7, using kinetic and inhibition assays. Moreover, MCT2 expression and localization in the Sprague Dawley rat hypothalamus was analyzed using RT-PCR, in situ hybridization and Western blot analyses. Confocal immunohistochemistry analyses revealed MCT2 localization in neuronal but not glial cells. Moreover, MCT2 was localized to ∼90% of orexigenic and ∼60% of anorexigenic neurons as determined by immunolocalization analysis of AgRP and POMC with MCT2-positives neurons. Thus, MCT2 distribution coupled with lactate uptake by hypothalamic neurons suggests that hypothalamic neurons control food intake using lactate to reflect changes in glucose levels. PMID:23638108

  15. Electrophysiological properties and thermosensitivity of mouse preoptic and anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, I V; Conti, B; Behrens, M; Korn, H; Bartfai, T

    2005-01-01

    Responses of mouse preoptic and anterior hypothalamic neurons to variations of temperature are key elements in regulating the setpoint of homeotherms. The goal of the present work was to assess the relevance of culture preparations for investigating the cellular mechanisms underlying thermosensitivity in hypothalamic cells. Our working hypothesis was that some of the main properties of preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture are similar to those reported by other authors in slice preparations. Indeed, cultured preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons share many of the physiological and morphological properties of neurons in hypothalamic slices. They display heterogenous dendritic arbors and somatic shapes. Most of them are GABAergic and their activity is synaptically driven by the activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid/kainate receptors. Active membrane properties include a depolarizing "sag" in response to hyperpolarization, and a low threshold spike, which is present in a majority of cells and is generated by T-type Ca2+ channels. In a fraction of the cells, the low threshold spike repeats rhythmically, either spontaneously, or in response to depolarization. The background synaptic noise in cultured neurons is characterized by the presence of numerous postsynaptic potentials which can be easily distinguished from the baseline, thus providing an opportunity for assessing their possible roles in thermosensitivity. An unexpected finding was that GABA-A receptors can generate both hyper- and depolarizing postsynaptic potentials in the same neuron. About 20% of the spontaneously firing preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons are warm-sensitive. Warming (32-41 degrees C) depolarizes some cells, a phenomenon which is Na+-dependent and tetrodotoxin-insensitive. The increased firing rate of warm-sensitive cells in response to warming can be prepotential and/or synaptically driven. Overall, our data suggest that a warm

  16. Leptin Acts via Lateral Hypothalamic Area Neurotensin Neurons to Inhibit Orexin Neurons by Multiple GABA-Independent Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Goforth, Paulette B.; Leinninger, Gina M.; Patterson, Christa M.

    2014-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin modulates neural systems appropriately for the status of body energy stores. Leptin inhibits lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) orexin (OX; also known as hypocretin)-producing neurons, which control feeding, activity, and energy expenditure, among other parameters. Our previous results suggest that GABAergic LHA leptin receptor (LepRb)-containing and neurotensin (Nts)-containing (LepRbNts) neurons lie in close apposition with OX neurons and control Ox mRNA expression. Here, we show that, similar to leptin, activation of LHA Nts neurons by the excitatory hM3Dq DREADD (designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drugs) hyperpolarizes membrane potential and suppresses action potential firing in OX neurons in mouse hypothalamic slices. Furthermore, ablation of LepRb from Nts neurons abrogated the leptin-mediated inhibition, demonstrating that LepRbNts neurons mediate the inhibition of OX neurons by leptin. Leptin did not significantly enhance GABAA-mediated inhibitory synaptic transmission, and GABA receptor antagonists did not block leptin-mediated inhibition of OX neuron activity. Rather, leptin diminished the frequency of spontaneous EPSCs onto OX neurons. Furthermore, leptin indirectly activated an ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel in OX neurons, which was required for the hyperpolarization of OX neurons by leptin. Although Nts did not alter OX activity, galanin, which is coexpressed in LepRbNts neurons, inhibited OX neurons, whereas the galanin receptor antagonist M40 (galanin-(1–12)-Pro3-(Ala-Leu)2-Ala amide) prevented the leptin-induced hyperpolarization of OX cells. These findings demonstrate that leptin indirectly inhibits OX neurons by acting on LHA LepRbNts neurons to mediate two distinct GABA-independent mechanisms of inhibition: the presynaptic inhibition of excitatory neurotransmission and the opening of KATP channels. PMID:25143620

  17. Effects of auricular stimulation on feeding-related hypothalamic neuronal activity in normal and obese rats.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, T; Onoe, M; Kojima, T; Sameshima, Y; Kageyama, T

    1995-01-01

    It is known that auriculotherapy occasionally affects dramatic body weight reduction for obese patients, although the physiological and anorexigenic functions are not clear. Effects of auricular stimulation on feeding-related lateral (LHA) and ventromedial (VMH) hypothalamic neuronal activity in normal and experimental (hypothalamic and dietary) obese rats were investigated. The LHA and/or VMH neuronal activity were recorded from feeding-related regions in Wistar SPF/VAF male and experimental (hypothalamic and dietary) obese rats, anesthetized with urethane-chloralose, under stereotaxic coordination. Recording was through 3 M KCI glass microelectrodes, while stimulating the ipsilateral vagal innervated region of the auricle. This is equivalent to the cavum conchae in the human, and was identified by resistance less than 10-50 k omega. The stimulating electrode was a stainless steel ear acupuncture (0.12 x 2.0 mm). The latency of potentials evoked in the LHA by unilateral stimulation of a specific site in the ear was 28.1 +/- 3.3 ms (8-92, n = 41). LHA neuronal activity was depressed 45.6% (n = 12, p < 0.01), and VMH activity was excited (60.5%, n = 18, p < 0.01). The auricular acupuncture stimulation clearly modulates feeding-related hypothalamic neuronal activity of experimental (both hypothalamic and dietary) obese rats. These auricle acupuncture stimulation effects were correlated to the degree of obesity. In conclusion, the results suggest that auricular acupuncture stimulation may not reduce appetite, but is more likely concerned with satiation formation and preservation. Thus, auricular acupuncture should be more effective on obese rats than on normal rats. PMID:7895091

  18. Chemical identity of hypothalamic neurons engaged by leptin in reproductive control.

    PubMed

    Ratra, Dhirender V; Elias, Carol F

    2014-11-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role as a metabolic cue for the reproductive system. Conditions of low leptin levels observed in negative energy balance and loss-of-function mutations of leptin or leptin receptor genes are characterized by decreased fertility. In recent years, advances have been made for identifying possible hypothalamic neurons relaying leptin's neuroendocrine control of reproductive function. Studies from different laboratories have demonstrated that leptin action in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is exerted via hypothalamic interneurons regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells, oppose to direct action on GnRH neurons. Following this observation, studies focused on identifying leptin responsive interneurons. Using a Cre-loxP system to re-express or delete the leptin receptor long form (LepRb) from kisspeptin neurons, our laboratory found that leptin's action on kiss1 cells is neither required nor sufficient for leptin's role in reproductive function. Endogenous re-expression of LepRb however, in glutamatergic neurons of the ventral premammilary nucleus (PMV) or ablation of agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons from leptin signaling-deficient mice are both sufficient to induce puberty and improve fertility. Recent studies have also shown that leptin action in first order GABAergic neurons is required for fertility. Together, these studies begin to delineate key neuronal populations involved in leptin's action in reproduction. In this review, we discuss recent advances made in the field and highlight the questions yet to be answered. PMID:24915437

  19. Understanding how discrete populations of hypothalamic neurons orchestrate complicated behavioral states

    PubMed Central

    Graebner, Allison K.; Iyer, Manasi; Carter, Matthew E.

    2015-01-01

    A major question in systems neuroscience is how a single population of neurons can interact with the rest of the brain to orchestrate complex behavioral states. The hypothalamus contains many such discrete neuronal populations that individually regulate arousal, feeding, and drinking. For example, hypothalamic neurons that express hypocretin (Hcrt) neuropeptides can sense homeostatic and metabolic factors affecting wakefulness and orchestrate organismal arousal. Neurons that express agouti-related protein (AgRP) can sense the metabolic needs of the body and orchestrate a state of hunger. The organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT) can detect the hypertonicity of blood and orchestrate a state of thirst. Each hypothalamic population is sufficient to generate complicated behavioral states through the combined efforts of distinct efferent projections. The principal challenge to understanding these brain systems is therefore to determine the individual roles of each downstream projection for each behavioral state. In recent years, the development and application of temporally precise, genetically encoded tools has greatly improved our understanding of the structure and function of these neural systems. This review will survey recent advances in our understanding of how these individual hypothalamic populations can orchestrate complicated behavioral states due to the combined efforts of individual downstream projections. PMID:26300745

  20. Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates progenitor maintenance and differentiation of hypothalamic arcuate neurons

    PubMed Central

    Aujla, Paven K.; Naratadam, George T.; Xu, Liwen; Raetzman, Lori T.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc), containing pro-opoiomelanocortin (POMC), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons, regulates feeding, energy balance and body size. Dysregulation of this homeostatic mediator underlies diseases ranging from growth failure to obesity. Despite considerable investigation regarding the function of Arc neurons, mechanisms governing their development remain unclear. Notch signaling factors such as Hes1 and Mash1 are present in hypothalamic progenitors that give rise to Arc neurons. However, how Notch signaling controls these progenitor populations is unknown. To elucidate the role of Notch signaling in Arc development, we analyzed conditional loss-of-function mice lacking a necessary Notch co-factor, Rbpjκ, in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (Rbpjκ cKO), as well as mice with expression of the constitutively active Notch1 intracellular domain (NICD) in Nkx2.1-cre-expressing cells (NICD Tg). We found that loss of Rbpjκ results in absence of Hes1 but not of Hes5 within the primordial Arc at E13.5. Additionally, Mash1 expression is increased, coincident with increased proliferation and accumulation of Arc neurons at E13.5. At E18.5, Rbpjκ cKO mice have few progenitors and show increased numbers of differentiated Pomc, NPY and Ghrh neurons. By contrast, NICD Tg mice have increased hypothalamic progenitors, show an absence of differentiated Arc neurons and aberrant glial differentiation at E18.5. Subsequently, both Rbpjκ cKO and NICD Tg mice have changes in growth and body size during postnatal development. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Notch/Rbpjκ signaling regulates the generation and differentiation of Arc neurons, which contribute to homeostatic regulation of body size. PMID:23884446

  1. Neuromedin B stimulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male rats.

    PubMed

    Boughton, C K; Patel, S A; Thompson, E L; Patterson, M; Curtis, A E; Amin, A; Chen, K; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R; Murphy, K G

    2013-11-10

    Neuromedin B (NMB) is a highly conserved bombesin-related peptide found in mammals. NMB mRNA is detected in the central nervous system (CNS) and is highly expressed in the rat hypothalamus, in particular the medial preoptic area and the arcuate nucleus. The mammalian bombesin family of receptors consists of three closely related G protein coupled receptors, BB1, BB2 and BB3. The BB1 receptor subtype has the highest affinity for NMB. NMB has well documented roles in the regulation of the thyroid axis and the stress axis in rats. However, there is little available data regarding the role of NMB in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. It is known that the NMB receptor is expressed in immortalised gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH) releasing GT1-7 cells and murine forebrain GnRH neurons, and that anterior pituitary NMB-immunoreactivity is altered by changes in the sex steroid environment. The objective of these studies was thus to further investigate the effects of NMB on the HPG axis. Intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of NMB (10 nmol) to adult male rats significantly increased plasma luteinising hormone (LH) levels 30 min after injection (plasma LH ng/ml; saline 0.69±0.07, 10 nmol NMB 1.33±0.17, P<0.01). In vitro, NMB stimulated GnRH release from hypothalamic explants from male rats and from hypothalamic GT1-7 cells. NMB had no significant effect on LH release from anterior pituitary explants from male rats, or from pituitary LβT2 cells in vitro. These results suggest a previously unreported role for NMB in the stimulation of the HPG axis via hypothalamic GnRH. Further work is now required to determine the receptor mediating the effects of NMB on the reproductive axis and the physiological role of NMB in reproduction. PMID:24120470

  2. Monosodium glutamate-sensitive hypothalamic neurons contribute to the control of bone mass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elefteriou, Florent; Takeda, Shu; Liu, Xiuyun; Armstrong, Dawna; Karsenty, Gerard

    2003-01-01

    Using chemical lesioning we previously identified hypothalamic neurons that are required for leptin antiosteogenic function. In the course of these studies we observed that destruction of neurons sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) in arcuate nuclei did not affect bone mass. However MSG treatment leads to hypogonadism, a condition inducing bone loss. Therefore the normal bone mass of MSG-treated mice suggested that MSG-sensitive neurons may be implicated in the control of bone mass. To test this hypothesis we assessed bone resorption and bone formation parameters in MSG-treated mice. We show here that MSG-treated mice display the expected increase in bone resorption and that their normal bone mass is due to a concomitant increase in bone formation. Correction of MSG-induced hypogonadism by physiological doses of estradiol corrected the abnormal bone resorptive activity in MSG-treated mice and uncovered their high bone mass phenotype. Because neuropeptide Y (NPY) is highly expressed in MSG-sensitive neurons we tested whether NPY regulates bone formation. Surprisingly, NPY-deficient mice had a normal bone mass. This study reveals that distinct populations of hypothalamic neurons are involved in the control of bone mass and demonstrates that MSG-sensitive neurons control bone formation in a leptin-independent manner. It also indicates that NPY deficiency does not affect bone mass.

  3. Prostaglandin E2-increased thermosensitivity of anterior hypothalamic neurons is associated with depressed inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V; Behrens, M Margarita; Bartfai, Tamas; Korn, Henri

    2004-02-24

    Temperature responses of anterior hypothalamic neurons are considered key elements in the regulation of the temperature setpoint of homeotherms. We have investigated the sensitivity to warming of cultured neurons of the AH from mice with electrophysiological and immunocytochemical techniques. In control experiments, only approximately 9% of the 3- to 5-week-old cells exhibited changes of their basic firing rate when the temperature was raised from 37 degrees C to 40 degrees C. This ratio was increased to 27% after the cultures were "primed" by adding prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an endogenous pyrogen, in the extracellular medium. In these neurons the firing rate was significantly increased, and the frequency of the gamma gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory postsynaptic potentials was markedly decreased. In contrast, the resting potential and membrane resistance of the recorded cells remained unchanged. PGE2 was found to decrease the level of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 in a subset of GABAergic neurons that express the E-prostanoid receptor type 3. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0126 mimicked the effects of PGE2. These data indicate that PGE2 acts primarily on the excitability of GABAergic presynaptic cells, most likely via alterations of voltage-gated K+ channels. Our results also suggest that far from being an inherent property of a specialized class of neurons, the degree of thermosensitivity can be strongly modulated by synaptic activity and is a more adaptive property of hypothalamic neurons than previously thought. PMID:14983053

  4. Hypothalamic Non-AgRP, Non-POMC GABAergic Neurons Are Required for Postweaning Feeding and NPY Hyperphagia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Ran; Wu, Zhaofei; Sun, Hao; Xu, Yuanzhong; Mangieri, Leandra R.; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is critical for feeding and body weight regulation. Prevailing studies focus on hypothalamic neurons that are defined by selectively expressing transcription factors or neuropeptides including those expressing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptides (AgRP). The Cre expression driven by the pancreas-duodenum homeobox 1 promoter is abundant in several hypothalamic nuclei but not in AgRP or POMC neurons. Using this line, we generated mice with disruption of GABA release from a major subset of non-POMC, non-AgRP GABAergic neurons in the hypothalamus. These mice exhibited a reduction in postweaning feeding and growth, and disrupted hyperphagic responses to NPY. Disruption of GABA release severely diminished GABAergic input to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH). Furthermore, disruption of GABA-A receptor function in the PVH also reduced postweaning feeding and blunted NPY-induced hyperphagia. Given the limited knowledge on postweaning feeding, our results are significant in identifying GABA release from a major subset of less appreciated hypothalamic neurons as a key mediator for postweaning feeding and NPY hyperphagia, and the PVH as one major downstream site that contributes significantly to the GABA action. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Prevalent studies on feeding in the hypothalamus focus on well characterized, selective groups neurons [e.g., proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons], and as a result, the role of the majority of other hypothalamic neurons is largely neglected. Here, we demonstrated an important role for GABAergic projections from non-POMC non-AgRP neurons to the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus in promoting postweaning (mainly nocturnal) feeding and mediating NPY-induced hyperphagia. Thus, these results signify an importance to study those yet to be defined hypothalamic neurons in the regulation of energy balance and reveal a neural basis for postweaning (nocturnal) feeding and NPY

  5. Near-Perfect Synaptic Integration by Nav1.7 in Hypothalamic Neurons Regulates Body Weight.

    PubMed

    Branco, Tiago; Tozer, Adam; Magnus, Christopher J; Sugino, Ken; Tanaka, Shinsuke; Lee, Albert K; Wood, John N; Sternson, Scott M

    2016-06-16

    Neurons are well suited for computations on millisecond timescales, but some neuronal circuits set behavioral states over long time periods, such as those involved in energy homeostasis. We found that multiple types of hypothalamic neurons, including those that oppositely regulate body weight, are specialized as near-perfect synaptic integrators that summate inputs over extended timescales. Excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) are greatly prolonged, outlasting the neuronal membrane time-constant up to 10-fold. This is due to the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.7 (Scn9a), previously associated with pain-sensation but not synaptic integration. Scn9a deletion in AGRP, POMC, or paraventricular hypothalamic neurons reduced EPSP duration, synaptic integration, and altered body weight in mice. In vivo whole-cell recordings in the hypothalamus confirmed near-perfect synaptic integration. These experiments show that integration of synaptic inputs over time by Nav1.7 is critical for body weight regulation and reveal a mechanism for synaptic control of circuits regulating long term homeostatic functions. PMID:27315482

  6. The improvement of exercise performance by physical training is related to increased hypothalamic neuronal activation.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Henrique P; Leite, Laura H R; Lima, Paulo Marcelo A; Rodovalho, Gisele V; Szawka, Raphael E; Coimbra, Cândido C

    2016-01-01

    The effects of physical training on hypothalamic activation after exercise and their relationship with heat dissipation were investigated. Following 8 weeks of physical training, trained (TR, n = 9) and untrained (UN, n = 8) Wistar rats were submitted to a regimen of incremental running until fatigue while body and tail temperatures were recorded. After exercise, hypothalamic c-Fos immunohistochemistry analysis was performed. The workload, body-heating rate, heat storage and body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation were calculated. Physical training increased the number of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in the paraventricular, medial preoptic and median preoptic nucleus by 112%, 90% and 65% (P < 0.01) after exercise, respectively. In these hypothalamic regions, increased neuronal activation was directly associated with the increased workload performed by TR animals (P < 0.01). Moreover, a reduction of 0.6°C in the body temperature threshold for cutaneous vasodilation was shown by TR animals (P < 0.01). This reduction was possibly responsible for the lower body-heating rate (0.019 ± 0.002°C/min, TR vs 0.030 ± 0.005°C/min, UN, P < 0.05) and the decreased ratio between heat storage and the workload performed by TR animals (18.18 ± 1.65 cal/kg, TR vs 31.38 ± 5.35 cal/kg, UN, P < 0.05). The data indicate that physical training enhances hypothalamic neuronal activation during exercise. This enhancement is the central adaptation relating to better physical performance, characterized by a lower ratio of heat stored to workload performed, due to improved heat dissipation. PMID:26475529

  7. Electrophysiology of Hypothalamic Magnocellular Neurons In vitro: A Rhythmic Drive in Organotypic Cultures and Acute Slices

    PubMed Central

    Israel, Jean-Marc; Oliet, Stéphane H.; Ciofi, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic neurohormones are released in a pulsatile manner. The mechanisms of this pulsatility remain poorly understood and several hypotheses are available, depending upon the neuroendocrine system considered. Among these systems, hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal magnocellular neurons have been early-considered models, as they typically display an electrical activity consisting of bursts of action potentials that is optimal for the release of boluses of the neurohormones oxytocin and vasopressin. The cellular mechanisms underlying this bursting behavior have been studied in vitro, using either acute slices of the adult hypothalamus, or organotypic cultures of neonatal hypothalamic tissue. We have recently proposed, from experiments in organotypic cultures, that specific central pattern generator networks, upstream of magnocellular neurons, determine their bursting activity. Here, we have tested whether a similar hypothesis can be derived from in vitro experiments in acute slices of the adult hypothalamus. To this aim we have screened our electrophysiological recordings of the magnocellular neurons, previously obtained from acute slices, with an analysis of autocorrelation of action potentials to detect a rhythmic drive as we recently did for organotypic cultures. This confirmed that the bursting behavior of magnocellular neurons is governed by central pattern generator networks whose rhythmic drive, and thus probably integrity, is however less satisfactorily preserved in the acute slices from adult brains. PMID:27065780

  8. Vasopressin regularizes the phasic firing pattern of rat hypothalamic magnocellular vasopressin neurons.

    PubMed

    Gouzènes, L; Desarménien, M G; Hussy, N; Richard, P; Moos, F C

    1998-03-01

    Vasopressin (AVP) magnocellular neurons of hypothalamic nuclei express specific phasic firing (successive periods of activity and silence), which conditions the mode of neurohypophyseal vasopression release. In situations favoring plasmatic secretion of AVP, the hormone is also released at the somatodendritic level, at which it is believed to modulate the activity of AVP neurons. We investigated the nature of this autocontrol by testing the effects of juxtamembrane applications of AVP on the extracellular activity of presumed AVP neurons in paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei of anesthetized rats. AVP had three effects depending on the initial firing pattern: (1) excitation of faintly active neurons (periods of activity of <10 sec), which acquired or reinforced their phasic pattern; (2) inhibition of quasi-continuously active neurons (periods of silences of <10 sec), which became clearly phasic; and (3) no effect on neurons already showing an intermediate phasic pattern (active and silent periods of 10-30 sec). Consequently, AVP application resulted in a narrower range of activity patterns of the population of AVP neurons, with a Gaussian distribution centered around a mode of 57% of time in activity, indicating a homogenization of the firing pattern. The resulting phasic pattern had characteristics close to those established previously for optimal release of AVP from neurohypophyseal endings. These results suggest a new role for AVP as an optimizing factor that would foster the population of AVP neurons to discharge with a phasic pattern known to be most efficient for hormone release. PMID:9465012

  9. Nitric Oxide Exerts Basal and Insulin-Dependent Anorexigenic Actions in POMC Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Wellhauser, Leigh; Chalmers, Jennifer A; Belsham, Denise D

    2016-04-01

    The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus represents a key center for the control of appetite and feeding through the regulation of 2 key neuronal populations, notably agouti-related peptide/neuropeptide Y and proopimelanocortin (POMC)/cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript neurons. Altered regulation of these neuronal networks, in particular the dysfunction of POMC neurons upon high-fat consumption, is a major pathogenic mechanism involved in the development of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Efforts are underway to preserve the integrity or enhance the functionality of POMC neurons in order to prevent or treat these metabolic diseases. Here, we report for the first time that the nitric oxide (NO(-)) donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP) mediates anorexigenic actions in both hypothalamic tissue and hypothalamic-derived cell models by mediating the up-regulation of POMC levels. SNP increased POMC mRNA in a dose-dependent manner and enhanced α-melanocortin-secreting hormone production and secretion in mHypoA-POMC/GFP-2 cells. SNP also enhanced insulin-driven POMC expression likely by inhibiting the deacetylase activity of sirtuin 1. Furthermore, SNP enhanced insulin-dependent POMC expression, likely by reducing the transcriptional repression of Foxo1 on the POMC gene. Prolonged SNP exposure prevented the development of insulin resistance. Taken together, the NO(-) donor SNP enhances the anorexigenic potential of POMC neurons by promoting its transcriptional expression independent and in cooperation with insulin. Thus, increasing cellular NO(-) levels represents a hormone-independent method of promoting anorexigenic output from the existing POMC neuronal populations and may be advantageous in the fight against these prevalent disorders. PMID:26930171

  10. Chemical Identity of Hypothalamic Neurons Engaged by Leptin in Reproductive Control

    PubMed Central

    Ratra, Dhirender V.; Elias, Carol F.

    2014-01-01

    The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin plays a critical role as a metabolic cue for the reproductive system. Conditions of low leptin levels observed in negative energy balance and loss-of-function mutations of leptin or leptin receptor genes are characterized by decreased fertility. In recent years, advances have been made identifying possible hypothalamic neurons relaying leptin’s neuroendocrine control of reproductive function. Studies from different laboratories have demonstrated that leptin action in the hypothalamo-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is exerted via hypothalamic interneurons regulating gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) cells, oppose to direct action on GnRH neurons. Following this observation, studies focused on identifying leptin responsive interneurons. Using a Cre-loxP system to re-express or delete the leptin receptor long form (LepRb) from Kisspeptin neurons, our laboratory found that leptin’s action on Kiss1 cells is neither required nor sufficient for leptin’s role in reproductive function. Endogenous re-expression of LepRb however, in glutamatergic neurons of the ventral premammilary nucleus (PMV) or ablation of agouti-related protein (AgRP) neurons from leptin signaling-deficient mice are both sufficient to induce puberty and improve fertility. Recent studies have also shown that leptin action in first order GABAergic neurons is required for fertility. Together, these studies begin to delineate key neuronal populations involved in leptin’s action in reproduction. In this review, we discuss recent advances made in the field and highlight the questions yet to be answered. PMID:24915437

  11. Functional pharmacology of H1 histamine receptors expressed in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, I V

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Histamine H1 receptors are highly expressed in hypothalamic neurons and mediate histaminergic modulation of several brain-controlled physiological functions, such as sleep, feeding and thermoregulation. In spite of the fact that the mouse is used as an experimental model for studying histaminergic signalling, the pharmacological characteristics of mouse H1 receptors have not been studied. In particular, selective and potent H1 receptor agonists have not been identified. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Ca2+ imaging using fura-2 fluorescence signals and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were carried out in mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons in culture. KEY RESULTS The H1 receptor antagonists mepyramine and trans-triprolidine potently antagonized the activation by histamine of these receptors with IC50 values of 0.02 and 0.2 μM respectively. All H1 receptor agonists studied had relatively low potency at the H1 receptors expressed by these neurons. Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine had full-agonist activity with potencies similar to that of histamine. In contrast, 2-pyridylethylamine and betahistine showed only partial agonist activity and lower potency than histamine. The histamine receptor agonist, 6-[2-(4-imidazolyl)ethylamino]-N-(4-trifluoromethylphenyl)heptanecarboxamide (HTMT) had no agonist activity at the H1 receptors H1 receptors expressed by mouse preoptic/anterior hypothalamic neurons but displayed antagonist activity. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Methylhistaprodifen and 2-(3-trifluoromethylphenyl)histamine were identified as full agonists of mouse H1 receptors. These results also indicated that histamine H1 receptors in mice exhibited a pharmacological profile in terms of agonism, significantly different from those of H1 receptors expressed in other species. PMID:23808378

  12. Local synaptic release of glutamate from neurons in the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus.

    PubMed Central

    Belousov, A B; van den Pol, A N

    1997-01-01

    1. The hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) contains neuroendocrine neurons that regulate endocrine secretions by releasing substances which control anterior pituitary hormonal release into the portal blood stream. Many neuroactive substances have been identified in the ARC, but the existence of excitatory neurons in the ARC and the identity of an excitatory transmitter have not been investigated physiologically. 2. In the present experiments using whole-cell current- and voltage-clamp recording of neurons from cultures and slices of the ARC, we demonstrate for the first time that some of the neurons in the ARC secrete glutamate as their transmitter. 3. Using microdrop stimulation of presynaptic neurons in ARC slices, we found that local axons from these glutamatergic neurons make local synaptic contact with other neurons in the ARC and that all evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials could be blocked by the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX; 10 microM) and D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (AP5; 100 microM). To determine the identity of ARC neurons postsynaptic to local glutamatergic neurons, we used antidromic stimulation to reveal that many of these cells were neuroendocrine neurons by virtue of their maintaining axon terminals in the median eminence. 4. In ARC cultures, postsynaptic potentials, both excitatory and inhibitory, were virtually eliminated by the glutamate receptor antagonists AP5 and CNQX, underlining the functional importance of glutamate within this part of the neuroendocrine brain. 5. GABA was secreted by a subset of ARC neurons from local axons. The GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline released glutamatergic neurons from chronic inhibition mediated by synaptically released GABA, resulting in further depolarization and an increase in the amplitude and frequency of glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic potentials. Images Figure 1 PMID:9130170

  13. Thermal stimulation of hypothalamic neurones in unanaesthetized rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Hellon, R. F.

    1967-01-01

    1. A technique has been devised for recording unit activity in the anterior hypothalamus of conscious rabbits during the controlled displacement of local temperature by 1-2° C. The region at 1 and 2 mm from the mid line was explored. 2. All the units studied showed spontaneous activity before thermal stimulation with a mean rate of 9 impulses/sec (range 1/16 sec to 65/sec). 3. Twenty-seven (10%) of the recorded neurones showed a change in firing rate which could be related to the temperature changes. Twenty-one of the cells were `warm-sensitive' and were excited when temperature was raised or inhibited when it was lowered. The other six units were `cold-sensitive' and showed the opposite type of response. 4. Apart from this directional grouping, it was possible to classify the responses into four categories: A, five cells whose firing rate was always proportional to local temperature over a range from 2° C below to 2° C above body temperature; B, six cells whose average level of firing changed during the period of observation, but whose sensitivity to temperature was not affected; C, eight cells which showed a threshold and were only affected by temperature above or below a certain level; D, four cells whose changes in frequency either led or lagged behind the temperature changes. 5. The positions of these sensitive units in the hypothalamus did not show any apparent pattern, except that 75% of them were found 1 mm lateral to the mid line; the remaining 25% were 2 mm lateral. PMID:6065885

  14. Cell type-specific transcriptomics of hypothalamic energy-sensing neuron responses to weight-loss

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Fredrick E; Sugino, Ken; Tozer, Adam; Branco, Tiago; Sternson, Scott M

    2015-01-01

    Molecular and cellular processes in neurons are critical for sensing and responding to energy deficit states, such as during weight-loss. Agouti related protein (AGRP)-expressing neurons are a key hypothalamic population that is activated during energy deficit and increases appetite and weight-gain. Cell type-specific transcriptomics can be used to identify pathways that counteract weight-loss, and here we report high-quality gene expression profiles of AGRP neurons from well-fed and food-deprived young adult mice. For comparison, we also analyzed Proopiomelanocortin (POMC)-expressing neurons, an intermingled population that suppresses appetite and body weight. We find that AGRP neurons are considerably more sensitive to energy deficit than POMC neurons. Furthermore, we identify cell type-specific pathways involving endoplasmic reticulum-stress, circadian signaling, ion channels, neuropeptides, and receptors. Combined with methods to validate and manipulate these pathways, this resource greatly expands molecular insight into neuronal regulation of body weight, and may be useful for devising therapeutic strategies for obesity and eating disorders. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09800.001 PMID:26329458

  15. Lipoprotein lipase is an important modulator of lipid uptake and storage in hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Libby, Andrew E; Wang, Hong; Mittal, Richa; Sungelo, Mitchell; Potma, Eric; Eckel, Robert H

    2015-09-18

    LPL is the rate-limiting enzyme for uptake of TG-derived FFA in peripheral tissues, and the enzyme is expressed in the brain and CNS. We previously created a mouse which lacks neuronal LPL. This animal becomes obese on a standard chow, and we observed reduced lipid uptake in the hypothalamus at 3 months preceding obesity. In our present study, we replicated the animal phenotype in an immortalized mouse hypothalamic cell line (N41) to examine how LPL affects expression of AgRP as well as entry and storage of lipids into neurons. We show that LPL is able to modulate levels of the orexigenic peptide AgRP. LPL also exerts effects on lipid uptake into culture neurons, and that uptake of neutral lipid can be enhanced even by mutant LPL lacking catalytic activity. N41 cells also accumulate neutral lipid in droplets, and this is at least in part regulated by LPL. These data in addition to those published in mice with neuron-specific deletion of LPL suggest that neuronal LPL is an important regulator of lipid homeostasis in neurons and that alterations in LPL levels may have important effects on systemic metabolism and neuronal lipid biology. PMID:26265042

  16. Distribution of hypothalamic vasoactive intestinal peptide immunoreactive neurons in the male native Thai chicken.

    PubMed

    Kamkrathok, Boonyarit; Sartsoongnoen, Natagarn; Prakobsaeng, Nattiya; Rozenboim, Israel; Porter, Tom E; Chaiseha, Yupaporn

    2016-08-01

    Avian prolactin (PRL) secretion is under stimulatory control by the PRL-releasing factor (PRF), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). The neuroendocrine regulation of the avian reproductive system has been extensively studied in females. However, there are limited data in males. The aim of this study was to elucidate the VIPergic system and its relationship to PRL and testosterone (T) in the male native Thai chicken. The distributions of VIP-immunoreactive (-ir) neurons and fibers were determined by immunohistochemistry. Changes in VIP-ir neurons within the nucleus inferioris hypothalami (IH) and nucleus infundibuli hypothalami (IN) areas were compared across the reproductive stages. Plasma levels of PRL and T were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and then compared across the reproductive stages. The results revealed that the highest accumulations of VIP-ir neurons were concentrated only within the IH-IN, and VIP-ir neurons were not detected within other hypothalamic nuclei. Within the IH-IN, VIP-ir neurons were low in premature and aging males and markedly increased in mature males. Changes in VIP-ir neurons within the IH-IN were directly mirrored with changes in PRL and T levels across the reproductive stages. These results suggested that VIP neurons in the IH-IN play a regulatory role in year-round reproductive activity in males. The present study also provides additional evidence that VIP is the PRF in non-seasonal, continuously breeding equatorial species. PMID:27269881

  17. Prostaglandin E2-increased thermosensitivity of anterior hypothalamic neurons is associated with depressed inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.; Behrens, M. Margarita; Bartfai, Tamas; Korn, Henri

    2004-01-01

    Temperature responses of anterior hypothalamic neurons are considered key elements in the regulation of the temperature setpoint of homeotherms. We have investigated the sensitivity to warming of cultured neurons of the AH from mice with electrophysiological and immunocytochemical techniques. In control experiments, only ≈9% of the 3- to 5-week-old cells exhibited changes of their basic firing rate when the temperature was raised from 37°C to 40°C. This ratio was increased to 27% after the cultures were “primed” by adding prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), an endogenous pyrogen, in the extracellular medium. In these neurons the firing rate was significantly increased, and the frequency of the gamma γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory postsynaptic potentials was markedly decreased. In contrast, the resting potential and membrane resistance of the recorded cells remained unchanged. PGE2 was found to decrease the level of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 in a subset of GABAergic neurons that express the E-prostanoid receptor type 3. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by U0126 mimicked the effects of PGE2. These data indicate that PGE2 acts primarily on the excitability of GABAergic presynaptic cells, most likely via alterations of voltage-gated K+ channels. Our results also suggest that far from being an inherent property of a specialized class of neurons, the degree of thermosensitivity can be strongly modulated by synaptic activity and is a more adaptive property of hypothalamic neurons than previously thought. PMID:14983053

  18. The Brain-to-Pancreatic Islet Neuronal Map Reveals Differential Glucose Regulation From Distinct Hypothalamic Regions.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Wilfredo; Singh, Inderroop; Wautlet, Arnaud; Patterson, Christa; Flak, Jonathan; Becker, Thomas C; Ali, Almas; Tamarina, Natalia; Philipson, Louis H; Enquist, Lynn W; Myers, Martin G; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2016-09-01

    The brain influences glucose homeostasis, partly by supplemental control over insulin and glucagon secretion. Without this central regulation, diabetes and its complications can ensue. Yet, the neuronal network linking to pancreatic islets has never been fully mapped. Here, we refine this map using pseudorabies virus (PRV) retrograde tracing, indicating that the pancreatic islets are innervated by efferent circuits that emanate from the hypothalamus. We found that the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC), ventromedial nucleus (VMN), and lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) significantly overlap PRV and the physiological glucose-sensing enzyme glucokinase. Then, experimentally lowering glucose sensing, specifically in the ARC, resulted in glucose intolerance due to deficient insulin secretion and no significant effect in the VMN, but in the LHA it resulted in a lowering of the glucose threshold that improved glucose tolerance and/or improved insulin sensitivity, with an exaggerated counter-regulatory response for glucagon secretion. No significant effect on insulin sensitivity or metabolic homeostasis was noted. Thus, these data reveal novel direct neuronal effects on pancreatic islets and also render a functional validation of the brain-to-islet neuronal map. They also demonstrate that distinct regions of the hypothalamus differentially control insulin and glucagon secretion, potentially in partnership to help maintain glucose homeostasis and guard against hypoglycemia. PMID:27207534

  19. Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Neurons in an Animal Model of Seasonal Affective Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Deats, Sean P.; Adidharma, Widya; Yan, Lily

    2015-01-01

    Light has profound effects on mood regulation as exemplified in Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and the therapeutic benefits of light therapy. However, the underlying neural pathways through which light regulates mood are not well understood. Our previous work has developed the diurnal grass rat, Arvicanthis niloticus, as an animal model of SAD. Following housing conditions of either 12:12hr Dim Light:Dark (DLD) or 8:16hr Short Photoperiod (SP), which mimic the lower light intensity or short day-length of winter, respectively, grass rats exhibit an increase in depression-like behavior compared to those housed in a 12:12hr Bright Light:Dark (BLD) condition. Furthermore, we revealed that the orexinergic system is involved in mediating the effects of light on mood and anxiety. To explore other potential neural substrates involved in the depressive phenotype, the present study examined hypothalamic dopaminergic (DA) and somatostatin (SST) neurons in the brains of grass rats housed in DLD, SP and BLD. Using immunostaining for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and SST, we found that the number of TH- and SST-ir cells in the hypothalamus was significantly lower in the DLD and SP groups compared to the BLD group. We also found that treating BLD animals with a selective orexin receptor 1 (OX1R) antagonist SB-334867 significantly reduced the number of hypothalamic TH-ir cells. The present study suggests that the hypothalamic DA neurons are sensitive to daytime light deficiency and are regulated by an orexinergic pathway. The results support the hypothesis that the orexinergic pathways mediate the effects of light on other neuronal systems that collectively contribute to light-dependent changes in the affective state. PMID:26116821

  20. Islet 1 specifies the identity of hypothalamic melanocortin neurons and is critical for normal food intake and adiposity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Nasif, Sofia; de Souza, Flavio S. J.; González, Laura E.; Yamashita, Miho; Orquera, Daniela P.; Rubinstein, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Food intake and body weight regulation depend on proper expression of the proopiomelanocortin gene (Pomc) in a group of neurons located in the mediobasal hypothalamus of all vertebrates. These neurons release POMC-encoded melanocortins, which are potent anorexigenic neuropeptides, and their absence from mice or humans leads to hyperphagia and severe obesity. Although the pathophysiology of hypothalamic POMC neurons is well understood, the genetic program that establishes the neuronal melanocortinergic phenotype and maintains a fully functional neuronal POMC phenotype throughout adulthood remains unknown. Here, we report that the early expression of the LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Islet 1 (ISL1) in the developing hypothalamus promotes the terminal differentiation of melanocortinergic neurons and is essential for hypothalamic Pomc expression since its initial onset and throughout the entire lifetime. We detected ISL1 in the prospective hypothalamus just before the onset of Pomc expression and, from then on, Pomc and Isl1 coexpress. ISL1 binds in vitro and in vivo to critical homeodomain binding DNA motifs present in the neuronal Pomc enhancers nPE1 and nPE2, and mutations of these sites completely disrupt the ability of these enhancers to drive reporter gene expression to hypothalamic POMC neurons in transgenic mice and zebrafish. ISL1 is necessary for hypothalamic Pomc expression during mouse and zebrafish embryogenesis. Furthermore, conditional Isl1 inactivation from POMC neurons impairs Pomc expression, leading to hyperphagia and obesity. Our results demonstrate that ISL1 specifies the identity of hypothalamic melanocortin neurons and is required for melanocortin-induced satiety and normal adiposity throughout the entire lifespan. PMID:25825735

  1. Glucose Regulates Hypothalamic Long-chain Fatty Acid Metabolism via AMP-activated Kinase (AMPK) in Neurons and Astrocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Taïb, Bouchra; Bouyakdan, Khalil; Hryhorczuk, Cécile; Rodaros, Demetra; Fulton, Stephanie; Alquier, Thierry

    2013-01-01

    Hypothalamic controls of energy balance rely on the detection of circulating nutrients such as glucose and long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) by the mediobasal hypothalamus (MBH). LCFA metabolism in the MBH plays a key role in the control of food intake and glucose homeostasis, yet it is not known if glucose regulates LCFA oxidation and esterification in the MBH and, if so, which hypothalamic cell type(s) and intracellular signaling mechanisms are involved. The aim of this study was to determine the impact of glucose on LCFA metabolism, assess the role of AMP-activated Kinase (AMPK), and to establish if changes in LCFA metabolism and its regulation by glucose vary as a function of the kind of LCFA, cell type, and brain region. We show that glucose inhibits palmitate oxidation via AMPK in hypothalamic neuronal cell lines, primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures, and MBH slices ex vivo but not in cortical astrocytes and slice preparations. In contrast, oleate oxidation was not affected by glucose or AMPK inhibition in MBH slices. In addition, our results show that glucose increases palmitate, but not oleate, esterification into neutral lipids in neurons and MBH slices but not in hypothalamic astrocytes. These findings reveal for the first time the metabolic fate of different LCFA in the MBH, demonstrate AMPK-dependent glucose regulation of LCFA oxidation in both astrocytes and neurons, and establish metabolic coupling of glucose and LCFA as a distinguishing feature of hypothalamic nuclei critical for the control of energy balance. PMID:24240094

  2. Developmental programming of hypothalamic neuronal circuits: impact on energy balance control.

    PubMed

    Gali Ramamoorthy, Thanuja; Begum, Ghazala; Harno, Erika; White, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity in adults and children has increased globally at an alarming rate. Mounting evidence from both epidemiological studies and animal models indicates that adult obesity and associated metabolic disorders can be programmed by intrauterine and early postnatal environment- a phenomenon known as "fetal programming of adult disease." Data from nutritional intervention studies in animals including maternal under- and over-nutrition support the developmental origins of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The hypothalamic neuronal circuits located in the arcuate nucleus controlling appetite and energy expenditure are set early in life and are perturbed by maternal nutritional insults. In this review, we focus on the effects of maternal nutrition in programming permanent changes in these hypothalamic circuits, with experimental evidence from animal models of maternal under- and over-nutrition. We discuss the epigenetic modifications which regulate hypothalamic gene expression as potential molecular mechanisms linking maternal diet during pregnancy to the offspring's risk of obesity at a later age. Understanding these mechanisms in key metabolic genes may provide insights into the development of preventative intervention strategies. PMID:25954145

  3. Neuropeptide co-expression in hypothalamic kisspeptin neurons of laboratory animals and the human

    PubMed Central

    Skrapits, Katalin; Borsay, Beáta Á.; Herczeg, László; Ciofi, Philippe; Liposits, Zsolt; Hrabovszky, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamic peptidergic neurons using kisspeptin (KP) and its co-transmitters for communication are critically involved in the regulation of mammalian reproduction and puberty. This article provides an overview of neuropeptides present in KP neurons, with a focus on the human species. Immunohistochemical studies reveal that large subsets of human KP neurons synthesize neurokinin B, as also shown in laboratory animals. In contrast, dynorphin described in KP neurons of rodents and sheep is found rarely in KP cells of human males and postmenopausal females. Similarly, galanin is detectable in mouse, but not human, KP cells, whereas substance P, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript and proenkephalin-derived opioids are expressed in varying subsets of KP neurons in humans, but not reported in ARC of other species. Human KP neurons do not contain neurotensin, cholecystokinin, proopiomelanocortin-derivatives, agouti-related protein, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin or tyrosine hydroxylase (dopamine). These data identify the possible co-transmitters of human KP cells. Neurochemical properties distinct from those of laboratory species indicate that humans use considerably different neurotransmitter mechanisms to regulate fertility. PMID:25713511

  4. To ingest or rest? Specialized roles of lateral hypothalamic area neurons in coordinating energy balance

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliette A.; Woodworth, Hillary L.; Leinninger, Gina M.

    2015-01-01

    Survival depends on an organism’s ability to sense nutrient status and accordingly regulate intake and energy expenditure behaviors. Uncoupling of energy sensing and behavior, however, underlies energy balance disorders such as anorexia or obesity. The hypothalamus regulates energy balance, and in particular the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) is poised to coordinate peripheral cues of energy status and behaviors that impact weight, such as drinking, locomotor behavior, arousal/sleep and autonomic output. There are several populations of LHA neurons that are defined by their neuropeptide content and contribute to energy balance. LHA neurons that express the neuropeptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) or orexins/hypocretins (OX) are best characterized and these neurons play important roles in regulating ingestion, arousal, locomotor behavior and autonomic function via distinct neuronal circuits. Recently, another population of LHA neurons containing the neuropeptide Neurotensin (Nts) has been implicated in coordinating anorectic stimuli and behavior to regulate hydration and energy balance. Understanding the specific roles of MCH, OX and Nts neurons in harmonizing energy sensing and behavior thus has the potential to inform pharmacological strategies to modify behaviors and treat energy balance disorders. PMID:25741247

  5. Stress and Sucrose Intake Modulate Neuronal Activity in the Anterior Hypothalamic Area in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Arojit; Guèvremont, Geneviève; Timofeeva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The anterior hypothalamic area (AHA) is an important integrative relay structure for a variety of autonomic, endocrine, and behavioral responses including feeding behavior and response to stress. However, changes in the activity of the AHA neurons during stress and feeding in freely moving rats are not clear. The present study investigated the firing rate and burst activity of neurons in the central nucleus of the AHA (cAHA) during sucrose intake in non-stressful conditions and after acute stress in freely behaving rats. Rats were implanted with micro-electrodes into the cAHA, and extracellular multi-unit activity was recorded during 1-h access to 10% sucrose in non-stressful conditions or after acute foot shock stress. Acute stress significantly reduced sucrose intake, total sucrose lick number, and lick frequency in licking clusters, and increased inter-lick intervals. At the cluster start (CS) of sucrose licking, the cAHA neurons increased (CS-excited, 20% of the recorded neurons), decreased (CS-inhibited, 42% of the neurons) or did not change (CS-nonresponsive, 38% of the neurons) their firing rate. Stress resulted in a significant increase in the firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons by decreasing inter-spike intervals within the burst firing of these neurons. This increase in the stress-induced firing rate of the CS-inhibited neurons was accompanied by a disruption of the correlation between the firing rate of CS-inhibited and CS-nonresponsive neurons that was observed in non-stressful conditions. Stress did not affect the firing rate of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons. However, stress changed the pattern of burst firing of the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons by decreasing and increasing the burst number in the CS-excited and CS-nonresponsive neurons, respectively. These results suggest that the cAHA neurons integrate the signals related to stress and intake of palatable food and play a role in the stress- and eating-related circuitry

  6. Pre-optic and hypothalamic neurons accumulate [3H]medroxyprogesterone acetate in male cynomolgus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Rees, H D; Bonsall, R W; Michael, R P

    1986-10-13

    Medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is a synthetic progestin that is reported to be effective in the treatment of paraphilic behavior, including paraphilic aggression, in men. The mechanisms and sites of action for its behavioral effects are not known. Thaw-mount autoradiography was used to help identify sites in the brain at which MPA may act in a male primate. Two adult, castrated male cynomolgus monkeys were administered [3H]MPA and killed one hour later. Radioactivity was concentrated in the nuclei of many neurons in the medial preoptic nucleus (n.), anterior hypothalamic area, ventromedial hypothalamic n., and arcuate n. Virtually no labeled cells were observed in the bed n. of the stria terminalis, lateral septal n., or amygdala. Analysis by high performance liquid chromatography of brain samples from the same animals demonstrated that 84% of the extractable radioactivity in cell nuclei from the hypothalamus and preoptic area was in the form of unmetabolized [3H]MPA. The localization of MPA-concentrating neurons in regions of the brain known to be implicated in regulating both sexual behavior and pituitary function suggests that, among other sites of action, MPA may act directly upon the brain. PMID:2945066

  7. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  8. Hypothalamic AgRP-neurons control peripheral substrate utilization and nutrient partitioning

    PubMed Central

    Joly-Amado, Aurélie; Denis, Raphaël G P; Castel, Julien; Lacombe, Amélie; Cansell, Céline; Rouch, Claude; Kassis, Nadim; Dairou, Julien; Cani, Patrice D; Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Prola, Alexandre; Flamment, Melissa; Foufelle, Fabienne; Magnan, Christophe; Luquet, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Obesity-related diseases such as diabetes and dyslipidemia result from metabolic alterations including the defective conversion, storage and utilization of nutrients, but the central mechanisms that regulate this process of nutrient partitioning remain elusive. As positive regulators of feeding behaviour, agouti-related protein (AgRP) producing neurons are indispensible for the hypothalamic integration of energy balance. Here, we demonstrate a role for AgRP-neurons in the control of nutrient partitioning. We report that ablation of AgRP-neurons leads to a change in autonomic output onto liver, muscle and pancreas affecting the relative balance between lipids and carbohydrates metabolism. As a consequence, mice lacking AgRP-neurons become obese and hyperinsulinemic on regular chow but display reduced body weight gain and paradoxical improvement in glucose tolerance on high-fat diet. These results provide a direct demonstration of a role for AgRP-neurons in the coordination of efferent organ activity and nutrient partitioning, providing a mechanistic link between obesity and obesity-related disorders. PMID:22990237

  9. Sex Differences in the Dendritic Arbor of Hypothalamic Ventromedial Nucleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Gerald D.; Flanagan-Cato, Loretta M.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMH) displays sexual dichotomies in its overall size, neurochemistry, and neuronal morphology. These differences may underlie the sex differences observed in functions mediated by the VMH, such as reproductive behaviors and energy balance. A previous Golgi impregnation analysis of VMH dendrites reported sex differences in total dendrite length the ventrolateral region of the VMH [15]. The present study tested the hypothesis that this sex difference is localized to a specific dendrite type. VMH neurons were visualized with Golgi impregnation. Overall, male rats displayed significantly longer dendrites than females for VMH neurons. This sex difference was apparent in both the dorsomedial and the ventrolateral subdivisions of the VMH. When neurons were classified based on dendrite type, namely long primary, short primary and secondary dendrites, the increased length for males was observed for all dendrite types. Furthermore, when long primary dendrites were categorized according to whether they extended in the dorsomedial, ventrolateral, ventromedial or dorsolateral direction, the sex difference in length occurred for all directions. These results indicate that the previously identified dendrite categories for VMH neurons are integral to VMH circuitry for both males and females. Given that the sex difference in dendrite length applied to all dendrite types, the elongated male VMH dendrites may provide additional sites to process input from both local interneurons and extranuclear afferents. PMID:19254731

  10. Zebrafish adult-derived hypothalamic neurospheres generate gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cortés-Campos, Christian; Letelier, Joaquín; Ceriani, Ricardo; Whitlock, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) is a hypothalamic decapeptide essential for fertility in vertebrates. Human male patients lacking GnRH and treated with hormone therapy can remain fertile after cessation of treatment suggesting that new GnRH neurons can be generated during adult life. We used zebrafish to investigate the neurogenic potential of the adult hypothalamus. Previously we have characterized the development of GnRH cells in the zebrafish linking genetic pathways to the differentiation of neuromodulatory and endocrine GnRH cells in specific regions of the brain. Here, we developed a new method to obtain neural progenitors from the adult hypothalamus in vitro. Using this system, we show that neurospheres derived from the adult hypothalamus can be maintained in culture and subsequently differentiate glia and neurons. Importantly, the adult derived progenitors differentiate into neurons containing GnRH and the number of cells is increased through exposure to either testosterone or GnRH, hormones used in therapeutic treatment in humans. Finally, we show in vivo that a neurogenic niche in the hypothalamus contains GnRH positive neurons. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that neurospheres can be derived from the hypothalamus of the adult zebrafish and that these neural progenitors are capable of producing GnRH containing neurons. PMID:26209533

  11. Single Cell Transcriptomics of Hypothalamic Warm Sensitive Neurons that Control Core Body Temperature and Fever Response

    PubMed Central

    Eberwine, James; Bartfai, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    We report on an ‘unbiased’ molecular characterization of individual, adult neurons, active in a central, anterior hypothalamic neuronal circuit, by establishing cDNA libraries from each individual, electrophysiologically identified warm sensitive neuron (WSN). The cDNA libraries were analyzed by Affymetrix microarray. The presence and frequency of cDNAs was confirmed and enhanced with Illumina sequencing of each single cell cDNA library. cDNAs encoding the GABA biosynthetic enzyme. GAD1 and of adrenomedullin, galanin, prodynorphin, somatostatin, and tachykinin were found in the WSNs. The functional cellular and in vivo studies on dozens of the more than 500 neurotransmitter -, hormone- receptors and ion channels, whose cDNA was identified and sequence confirmed, suggest little or no discrepancy between the transcriptional and functional data in WSNs; whenever agonists were available for a receptor whose cDNA was identified, a functional response was found.. Sequencing single neuron libraries permitted identification of rarely expressed receptors like the insulin receptor, adiponectin receptor2 and of receptor heterodimers; information that is lost when pooling cells leads to dilution of signals and mixing signals. Despite the common electrophysiological phenotype and uniform GAD1 expression, WSN- transcriptomes show heterogenity, suggesting strong epigenetic influence on the transcriptome. Our study suggests that it is well-worth interrogating the cDNA libraries of single neurons by sequencing and chipping. PMID:20970451

  12. Lateral Hypothalamic Area Glutamatergic Neurons and Their Projections to the Lateral Habenula Regulate Feeding and Reward

    PubMed Central

    Stamatakis, Alice M.; Van Swieten, Maaike; Basiri, Marcus L.; Blair, Grace A.; Kantak, Pranish

    2016-01-01

    The overconsumption of calorically dense, highly palatable foods is thought to be a major contributor to the worldwide obesity epidemic; however, the precise neural circuits that directly regulate hedonic feeding remain elusive. Here, we show that lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) glutamatergic neurons, and their projections to the lateral habenula (LHb), negatively regulate the consumption of palatable food. Genetic ablation of LHA glutamatergic neurons increased daily caloric intake and produced weight gain in mice that had access to a high-fat diet, while not altering general locomotor activity. Anterior LHA glutamatergic neurons send a functional glutamatergic projection to the LHb, a brain region involved in processing aversive stimuli and negative reward prediction outcomes. Pathway-specific, optogenetic stimulation of glutamatergic LHA-LHb circuit resulted in detectable glutamate-mediated EPSCs as well as GABA-mediated IPSCs, although the net effect of neurotransmitter release was to increase the firing of most LHb neurons. In vivo optogenetic inhibition of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers produced a real-time place preference, whereas optogenetic stimulation of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers had the opposite effect. Furthermore, optogenetic inhibition of LHA-LHb glutamatergic fibers acutely increased the consumption of a palatable liquid caloric reward. Collectively, these results demonstrate that LHA glutamatergic neurons are well situated to bidirectionally regulate feeding and potentially other behavioral states via their functional circuit connectivity with the LHb and potentially other brain regions. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In this study, we show that the genetic ablation of LHA glutamatergic neurons enhances caloric intake. Some of these LHA glutamatergic neurons project to the lateral habenula, a brain area important for generating behavioral avoidance. Optogenetic stimulation of this circuit has net excitatory effects on postsynaptic LHb neurons. This is the

  13. Circadian and other rhythmic activity of neurones in the ventromedial nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area.

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, K; Nishino, H

    1976-01-01

    1. The frequency of firing was simultaneously recorded from single neurones of the ventromedial nuclei (VMN) and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) in urethane anaesthetized rats for many hours. 2. There were circadian changes of VMN and LHA neurone activity. The pattern of this circadian rhythm is as follows: throughout the day LHA neurones show higher activity than that of VMN, as indicated by higher frequency and more fluctuations in their rates of firing. In late afternoon the discharge rate of LHA neurones increases further, showing oscillations of short duration. In the early evening hours LHA neurone activity gradually goes down, as the VMN neurones become active. Throughout the night, VMN neurones are more active than those of LHA, just the opposite of the day period. In early morning hours VMN neurones gradually become quiet, while LHA neurones begin to show activity. 3. Superimposed on the circadian rhythm, at certain periods of the day, VMN and LHA neurones showed short duration oscillations in rate of firing, roughly every 7-15 sec and every 3-5 min. 4. Activities in neurones of the VMN and LHA were reciprocally related; a decrease in firing rate of one was associated with an increase in the other. This phenomenon was shown clearly by analysis of auto- and cross-correlation functions of firing patterns of VMN and LHA neurones. 5. The effects of stimulations of the prefrontal cortex and splanchnic afferents on VMN and LHA neurones depended on the basic firing frequency, thus they varied with the time of day. Definite relationships exist between basic firing frequency of a cell and the magnitude of changes evoked by these stimuli. Reactions of VMN and LHA neurones were the opposite in most instances. Septal stimulations (at more than 10/sec) always produced inhibition of LHA neurone activity. 6. Intravenous injection of glucose inhibited LHA neurones and accelerated firing of VMN cells. This was true during the day period as well as at night when

  14. The Foxb1-expressing neurons of the ventrolateral hypothalamic parvafox nucleus project to defensive circuits.

    PubMed

    Bilella, Alessandro; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Celio, Marco R

    2016-10-15

    The parvafox nucleus is an elongated structure that is lodged within the ventrolateral hypothalamus and lies along the optic tract. It comprises axially located parvalbumin (Parv)-positive neurons and a peripheral cuff of Foxb1-expressing ones. In the present study, injections of Cre-dependent adenoviral constructs were targeted to the ventrolateral hypothalamus of Foxb1/Cre mice to label specifically and map the efferent connections of the Foxb1-expressing subpopulation of neurons of the parvafox nucleus. These neurons project more widely than do the Parv-positive ones and implicate a part of the axons known to emanate from the lateral hypothalamus. High labeling densities were found in the dorsolateral and the upper lateral portion of the periaqueductal gray (PAG), the Su3 and PV2 nuclei of the ventrolateral PAG, the cuneiform nucleus, the mesencephalic reticular formation, and the superior colliculus. Intermediate densities of terminals were encountered in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, substantia innominata, various thalamic and hypothalamic nuclei, pedunculopontine nucleus, Barrington's nucleus, retrofacial nucleus, and retroambigual nucleus. Scattered terminals were observed in the olfactory bulbs, the prefrontal cortex and the lamina X of the cervical spinal cord. Because the terminals were demonstrated to express the glutamate transporter VGlut2, the projections are presumed to be excitatory. A common denominator of the main target sites of the Foxb1-positive axons of the parvafox nucleus appears to be an involvement in the defensive reactions to life-threatening situations. The hypothalamic parvafox nucleus may contribute to the autonomic manifestations that accompany the expression of emotions. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2955-2981, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27292133

  15. Distribution of osmoregulatory peptides and neuronal-glial configuration in the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei of desert rodents.

    PubMed

    Ouali-Hassenaoui, Saliha; Bendjelloul, Mounira; Dekar, Aicha; Theodosis, Dionysia

    2011-12-01

    The desert rodents Psammomys obesus and Gerbillus tarabuli live under extreme conditions and overcome food and water shortage by modes of food and fluid intake specific to each species. Using immunohistochemistry and electron microscopy, we found that the hypothalamic magnocellular nuclei, and in particular, their vasopressinergic component, is highly and similarly developed in Psammomys and Gerbillus. In comparison to other rodents, the hypothalamus in both species contains more magnocellular VP neurons that, together with oxytocin neurons, accumulate in distinct and extensive nuclei. As in dehydrated rodents, many magnocellular neurons contained both neuropeptides. A striking feature of the hypothalamic magnocellular system of Psammomys and Gerbillus was its display of ultrastructural properties related to heightened neurosecretion, namely, a significant reduction in glial coverage of neuronal somata and dendrites in the hypothalamic nuclei. There were many neuronal elements whose surfaces were directly juxtaposed and shared the same synapses. Their magnocellular nuclei also showed a high level of sialylated isoform of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (PSA-NCAM) that underlies their capacity for neuronal and glial plasticity. These species thus offer striking models of structural neuronal and glial plasticity linked to natural conditions of heightened neurosecretion. PMID:22123087

  16. A Novel Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone 1 (Gnrh1) Enhancer-Derived Noncoding RNA Regulates Gnrh1 Gene Expression in GnRH Neuronal Cell Models

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Polly P.; Brusman, Liza E.; Iyer, Anita K.; Webster, Nicholas J. G.

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), a neuropeptide released from a small population of neurons in the hypothalamus, is the central mediator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, and is required for normal reproductive development and function. Evolutionarily conserved regulatory elements in the mouse, rat, and human Gnrh1 gene include three enhancers and the proximal promoter, which confer Gnrh1 gene expression specifically in GnRH neurons. In immortalized mouse hypothalamic GnRH (GT1-7) neurons, which show pulsatile GnRH release in culture, RNA sequencing and RT-qPCR revealed that expression of a novel long noncoding RNA at Gnrh1 enhancer 1 correlates with high levels of GnRH mRNA expression. In GT1-7 neurons, which contain a transgene carrying 3 kb of the rat Gnrh1 regulatory region, both the mouse and rat Gnrh1 enhancer-derived noncoding RNAs (GnRH-E1 RNAs) are expressed. We investigated the characteristics and function of the endogenous mouse GnRH-E1 RNA. Strand-specific RT-PCR analysis of GnRH-E1 RNA in GT1-7 cells revealed GnRH-E1 RNAs that are transcribed in the sense and antisense directions from distinct 5’ start sites, are 3’ polyadenylated, and are over 2 kb in length. These RNAs are localized in the nucleus and have a half-life of over 8 hours. In GT1-7 neurons, siRNA knockdown of mouse GnRH-E1 RNA resulted in a significant decrease in the expression of the Gnrh1 primary transcript and Gnrh1 mRNA. Over-expression of either the sense or antisense mouse GnRH-E1 RNA in immature, migratory GnRH (GN11) neurons, which do not express either GnRH-E1 RNA or GnRH mRNA, induced the transcriptional activity of co-transfected rat Gnrh1 gene regulatory elements, where the induction requires the presence of the rat Gnrh1 promoter. Together, these data indicate that GnRH-E1 RNA is an inducer of Gnrh1 gene expression. GnRH-E1 RNA may play an important role in the development and maturation of GnRH neurons. PMID:27389022

  17. Preoptic and hypothalamic neurons and the initiation of locomotion in the anesthetized rat.

    PubMed

    Sinnamon, H M

    1993-09-01

    Despite its insensate condition and apparent motoric depression, the anesthetized rat can provide useful information about the systems involved in locomotor initiation. The preparation appears to be particularly appropriate for the study of the appetitive locomotor systems and may be more limited for the study of the circuits involved in exploratory and defensive locomotion. In the anesthetized rat, pharmacological evidence indicates that the preoptic basal forebrain contains neurons which initiate locomotor stepping. Mapping with low levels of electrical stimulation indicates, but does not prove, that a region centered in the lateral preoptic area might be the location of these neurons. Several lines of evidence indicate that locomotor stepping elicited by electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus is mediated by neurons in the perifornical and lateral hypothalamus. Locomotor effects of hypothalamic stimulation persist in the absence of descending fibers of passage from the ipsilateral preoptic locomotor regions but are severely impaired by kainic acid lesions in the area of stimulation. Injections of glutamate into the perifornical and lateral hypothalamus elicit locomotor stepping at short latencies. Anatomical evidence suggests that the two regions are components of a network for appetitive locomotion. The recognition that multiple systems initiate locomotion both clarifies and complicates the study of locomotion. It provides a framework that incorporates disparate findings but it also underscores the need for increased attention to behavioral issues in studies of locomotor circuitry. PMID:8105509

  18. Dopamine/Tyrosine Hydroxylase Neurons of the Hypothalamic Arcuate Nucleus Release GABA, Communicate with Dopaminergic and Other Arcuate Neurons, and Respond to Dynorphin, Met-Enkephalin, and Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaobing

    2015-01-01

    We employ transgenic mice with selective expression of tdTomato or cre recombinase together with optogenetics to investigate whether hypothalamic arcuate (ARC) dopamine/tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) neurons interact with other ARC neurons, how they respond to hypothalamic neuropeptides, and to test whether these cells constitute a single homogeneous population. Immunostaining with dopamine and TH antisera was used to corroborate targeted transgene expression. Using whole-cell recording on a large number of neurons (n = 483), two types of neurons with different electrophysiological properties were identified in the dorsomedial ARC where 94% of TH neurons contained immunoreactive dopamine: bursting and nonbursting neurons. In contrast to rat, the regular oscillations of mouse bursting neurons depend on a mechanism involving both T-type calcium and A-type potassium channel activation, but are independent of gap junction coupling. Optogenetic stimulation using cre recombinase-dependent ChIEF-AAV-DJ expressed in ARC TH neurons evoked postsynaptic GABA currents in the majority of neighboring dopamine and nondopamine neurons, suggesting for the first time substantial synaptic projections from ARC TH cells to other ARC neurons. Numerous met-enkephalin (mENK) and dynorphin-immunoreactive boutons appeared to contact ARC TH neurons. mENK inhibited both types of TH neuron through G-protein coupled inwardly rectifying potassium currents mediated by δ and μ opioid receptors. Dynorphin-A inhibited both bursting and nonbursting TH neurons by activating κ receptors. Oxytocin excited both bursting and nonbursting neurons. These results reveal a complexity of TH neurons that communicate extensively with neurons within the ARC. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Here, we show that the great majority of mouse hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons that synthesize TH in the dorsomedial ARC also contain immunoreactive dopamine, and show either bursting or nonbursting electrical activity. Unlike

  19. Nicotine excites corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA-expressing neuron in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in vitro in rats.

    PubMed

    Cui, Bai-Ri; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Chu, Chun-Ping; Cui, Xun; Qiu, De-Lai

    2016-05-25

    Nicotine is known to modulate the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by stimulating corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) release from the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). However, the mechanism by which nicotine affects the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by modulating PVN CRH neuronal activity is currently unclear. Here, we examined the effects of nicotine on PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons in vitro in rats by whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, biocytin staining, and single-cell reverse transcription-multiplex PCR techniques. Of the 146 PVN putative parvocellular neurons, 17.1% (25/146) coexpressed GAPDH mRNA and CRH mRNA. Under current-clamp recording conditions, application of nicotine (1 μM) induced excitation in 92% (23/25) PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons, which showed a significant increase in the spike firing rate accompanied by a depolarization of the membrane potential. Nicotine induced an increase in the spike firing rate of PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons in a concentration-dependent manner. The half-effective concentration (EC50) of nicotine for increasing the spike firing rate of PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons was 1.6 μM. Extracellular application of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (1 mM) abolished the nicotine-induced excitation of PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons. Moreover, application of nicotine induced a significant increase in the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents frequency, but without significantly altering the spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents amplitude of the CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons. Biocytin staining confirmed that the nicotine-sensitive CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons were located in the PVN parvocellular division. These results indicated that extracellular administration of nicotine indirectly excited PVN CRH-mRNA-expressing neurons, suggesting that nicotine modulated PVN CRH secretion by enhancement of both the presynaptic action potential drive and

  20. β-Arrestin Regulates Estradiol Membrane-Initiated Signaling in Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Angela M.; Abrams, Matthew C.; Micevych, Paul E.

    2015-01-01

    Estradiol (E2) action in the nervous system is the result of both direct nuclear and membrane-initiated signaling (EMS). E2 regulates membrane estrogen receptor-α (ERα) levels through opposing mechanisms of EMS-mediated trafficking and internalization. While ß-arrestin-mediated mERα internalization has been described in the cortex, a role of ß-arrestin in EMS, which underlies multiple physiological processes, remains undefined. In the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH), membrane-initiated E2 signaling modulates lordosis behavior, a measure of female sexually receptivity. To better understand EMS and regulation of ERα membrane levels, we examined the role of ß-arrestin, a molecule associated with internalization following agonist stimulation. In the present study, we used an immortalized neuronal cell line derived from embryonic hypothalamic neurons, the N-38 line, to examine whether ß-arrestins mediate internalization of mERα. β-arrestin-1 (Arrb1) was found in the ARH and in N-38 neurons. In vitro, E2 increased trafficking and internalization of full-length ERα and ERαΔ4, an alternatively spliced isoform of ERα, which predominates in the membrane. Treatment with E2 also increased phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) in N-38 neurons. Arrb1 siRNA knockdown prevented E2-induced ERαΔ4 internalization and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. In vivo, microinfusions of Arrb1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN) into female rat ARH knocked down Arrb1 and prevented estradiol benzoate-induced lordosis behavior compared with nonsense scrambled ODN (lordosis quotient: 3 ± 2.1 vs. 85.0 ± 6.0; p < 0.0001). These results indicate a role for Arrb1 in both EMS and internalization of mERα, which are required for the E2-induction of female sexual receptivity. PMID:25803606

  1. Effect of hypothalamic proline-rich peptide (PRP-1) on neuronal and bone marrow cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Galoyan, Armen A; Krieglstein, Josef; Klumpp, Susanne; Danielian, Kristina E; Galoian, Karine A; Kremers, Wolfram; Bezirganyan, Kristina B; Davtyan, Tigran K

    2007-11-01

    The AGAPEPAEPAQPGVY proline-rich peptide (PRP-1) was isolated from neurosecretory granules of the bovine neurohypophysis; it is produced by N. supraopticus and N. paraventricularis. It has been shown that PRP-1 has many potentially beneficial biological effects including immunoregulatory, hematopoietic, antimicrobial and anti-neurodegenerative properties. Here we investigated the influence of PRP-1 on staurosporine-induced apoptosis of postnatal hippocampal cells and on doxorubicin-induced bone marrow granulocyte- and monocyte apoptosis. The intention was to further characterize the effect of PRP-1 on the survival rate of neurons and in context with myelopoiesis. We demonstrate that PRP-1 significantly reduced apoptosis of postnatal hippocampal cells induced by staurosporine. The protective effect of PRP-1 against apoptotic cell death was shown to be both time- and dose-dependent. Neuroprotection was more pronounced after prolonged pretreatment of the cells with PRP-1 before the induction of apoptosis with staurosporine. The related peptide [arg(8)]vasopressin did not reveal neuroprotection. PRP-1 also significantly reduced apoptosis of bone marrow monocytes and granulocytes induced by doxorubicin. This protective effect lasted for 2-4 h and was not detectable anymore after 24 h when PRP-1 and doxorubicin were added simultaneously. Previously obtained data and results of the current studies suggested that the hypothalamic PRP-1 possibly represents an endogenous peptide whose primary functions are to regulate myelopoiesis and neuron survival as we provide evidence that PRP can differentially reduce both staurosporine- and doxorubicin-induced hippocampal and bone marrow cell apoptosis. PMID:17549627

  2. Corticotropin releasing factor excites neurons of posterior hypothalamic nucleus to produce tachycardia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, He-Ren; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Li, Bin; Li, Hong-Zhao; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jing-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), a peptide hormone involved in the stress response, holds a key position in cardiovascular regulation. Here, we report that the central effect of CRF on cardiovascular activities is mediated by the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH), an important structure responsible for stress-induced cardiovascular changes. Our present results demonstrate that CRF directly excites PH neurons via two CRF receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2, and consequently increases heart rate (HR) rather than the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Bilateral vagotomy does not influence the tachycardia response to microinjection of CRF into the PH, while β adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol almost totally abolishes the tachycardia. Furthermore, microinjecting CRF into the PH primarily increases neuronal activity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM), but does not influence that of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV). These findings suggest that the PH is a critical target for central CRF system in regulation of cardiac activity and the PH-RVLM/RVMM-cardiac sympathetic nerve pathways, rather than PH-DMNV-vagus pathway, may contribute to the CRF-induced tachycardia. PMID:26831220

  3. Characterization of the inward current induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation in rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K; Boden, P R

    1997-01-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones in slices of brain tissue in vitro. Bath application of 50 microM (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) depolarized all neurones tested by activation of an inward current of approximately 55 pA at -60 mV. 2. The inward current elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD was unaffected by K+ channel blockade with external Cs+, Ba2+ or TEA. However, the current was significantly reduced by replacement of the external NaCl with either Tris-HCl or LiCl. 3. The 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current was reduced by the heavy metal ions Ni2+ or La3+ and also by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current inhibitor 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil. 4. The effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were mimicked by the group I metabotropic agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) but not by the group III selective agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4). Furthermore, the effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were inhibited by the metabotropic antagonists alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) but not by the presynaptic metabotropic receptor antagonists alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). 5. Photorelease of caged GDP beta S inside neurones irreversibly blocked the 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current whilst photolysis of caged GTP gamma S inside neurones irreversibly potentiated this current. 6. The PLC inhibitor U-73,122 significantly reduced the size of the inward current induced by 1S,3R-ACPD. This effect was not mimicked by the inactive analogue U-73,343. 7. Flash photolysis of the caged calcium chelator diazo-2 inside neurones diminished the response to 1S,3R-ACPD. 8. It is concluded that group I metabotropic glutamate receptors depolarize neurones in the VMH by activation of a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current through a G-protein coupled increase in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:9401972

  4. Characterization of the inward current induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation in rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    PubMed

    Lee, K; Boden, P R

    1997-11-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones in slices of brain tissue in vitro. Bath application of 50 microM (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) depolarized all neurones tested by activation of an inward current of approximately 55 pA at -60 mV. 2. The inward current elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD was unaffected by K+ channel blockade with external Cs+, Ba2+ or TEA. However, the current was significantly reduced by replacement of the external NaCl with either Tris-HCl or LiCl. 3. The 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current was reduced by the heavy metal ions Ni2+ or La3+ and also by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current inhibitor 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil. 4. The effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were mimicked by the group I metabotropic agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) but not by the group III selective agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4). Furthermore, the effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were inhibited by the metabotropic antagonists alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) but not by the presynaptic metabotropic receptor antagonists alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). 5. Photorelease of caged GDP beta S inside neurones irreversibly blocked the 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current whilst photolysis of caged GTP gamma S inside neurones irreversibly potentiated this current. 6. The PLC inhibitor U-73,122 significantly reduced the size of the inward current induced by 1S,3R-ACPD. This effect was not mimicked by the inactive analogue U-73,343. 7. Flash photolysis of the caged calcium chelator diazo-2 inside neurones diminished the response to 1S,3R-ACPD. 8. It is concluded that group I metabotropic glutamate receptors depolarize neurones in the VMH by activation of a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current through a G-protein coupled increase in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:9401972

  5. Neuronal activity and the expression of hypothalamic oxytocin and vasopressin in social versus cocaine conditioning.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaobao; Wang, Jianli; Zhan, Bo; Cheng, Guangchao

    2016-09-01

    Although drug rewards and natural rewards share neural substrates, the neuronal activation patterns and mechanisms behind the interaction between cocaine and social reward are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the conditioned place preference (CPP) in social (conspecific) vs cocaine conditioning, and the expression of central c-Fos, hypothalamic oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) in ICR mice. We found that the mice produced CPP when conditioned with unfamiliar conspecific or cocaine alone. However, the mice failed to produce CPP when the two stimuli were concurrently conditioned. Compared to conditioning with conspecific alone, the mice decreased preference for conspecific when conditioning with social vs cocaine. We observed differential expression of c-Fos-immunoreactive neurons in the ventral anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, accumbens (shell and core), medial nucleus of the amygdale and the ventral pallidum when comparing the control (CK), social (SC) or cocaine conditioning (CC) group, and social vs cocaine conditioning (SCC) group. Compared to the CK group, the SC or CC group had higher OT expression in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and lower AVP expression in the PVN and supraoptic nucleus. The SCC group showed lower OT expression compared to the SC group, and higher OT and AVP expression in the PVN compared to the CC group. These results indicate that cocaine impairs social preference through competing with social reward. The differential activations of neurons within specific reward areas, and differential expression of OT and AVP are likely to play an important role in mediating the interaction between social and cocaine rewards. PMID:27163750

  6. Adenovirus-mediated gene delivery to hypothalamic magnocellular neurons in mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, E. C.; Beltz, T. G.; Meyrelles, S. S.; Johnson, A. K.

    1999-01-01

    Vasopressin is synthesized by magnocellular neurons in supraoptic (SON) and paraventricular (PVN) hypothalamic nuclei and released by their axon terminals in the neurohypophysis (NH). With its actions as an antidiuretic hormone and vasoactive agent, vasopressin plays a pivotal role in the control of body fluids and cardiovascular homeostasis. Because of its well-defined neurobiology and functional importance, the SON/PVN-NH system is ideal to establish methods for gene transfer of genetic material into specific pathways in the mouse central nervous system. In these studies, we compared the efficiency of transferring the gene lacZ, encoding for beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), versus a gene encoding for green fluorescent protein by using replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad) vectors in adult mice. Transfection with viral concentrations up to 2 x 10(7) plaque-forming units per coverslip of NH, PVN, and SON in dissociated, cultured cells caused efficient transfection without cytotoxicity. However, over an extended period of time, higher levels (50% to 75% of the cells) of beta-gal expression were detected in comparison with green fluorescent protein (5% to 50% of the cells). With the use of a stereotaxic approach, the pituitary glands of mice were injected with Ad (4 x 10(6) plaque-forming units). In material from these animals, we were able to visualize the expression of the beta-gal gene in the NH and in magnocellular neurons of both the PVN and SON. The results of these experiments indicate that Ad-Rous sarcoma virus promoter-beta-gal is taken up by nerve terminals at the injection site (NH) and retrogradely transported to the soma of the neurons projecting to the NH. We conclude that the application of these experimental approaches will provide powerful tools for physiological studies and potential approaches to deliver therapeutic genes to treat diseases.

  7. Evaluation of Ca2+ permeability of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in hypothalamic histaminergic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Uteshev, Victor V.

    2010-01-01

    Hypothalamic histaminergic tuberomammillary (TM) neurons express nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with kinetic and pharmacological properties resembling those of highly Ca2+ permeable α7 nAChRs. However, the Ca2+ permeability of TM nAChR channels has not been determined. To directly evaluate the Ca2+ permeability of TM nAChRs, patch-clamp recordings were conducted using non-cultured acutely dissociated TM neurons and external solutions containing low (2 mM) and high (20 mM) concentrations of Ca2+. A shift in the reversal potentials was determined from the current–voltage relationships and the permeability ratio, PCa/PNa, was estimated within the Goldman-Hodgkin-Katz constant field approximation. TM nAChRs were found to be highly Ca2+ permeable with the permeability ratio, PCa/PNa(nAChR) being ∼5.9 and the fractional Ca2+ current, Pf(nAChR) being ∼10.1% at −60 mV. As a positive control for the applied methods and analysis, the permeability ratio, PCa/PNa(NMDAR) being ∼8.3 and the fractional Ca2+ current, Pf(NMDAR) being ∼13.6% at −60 mV for NMDA receptors were determined using non-cultured acutely dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons and found similar to previously reported values. Therefore, these results demonstrate that native TM nAChRs are highly Ca2+ permeable, but ∼1.4 fold less permeable to Ca2+ than native hippocampal pyramidal NMDA receptors. PMID:20043042

  8. Effect of acute ethanol on beta-endorphin secretion from rat fetal hypothalamic neurons in primary cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, D.K.; Minami, S. )

    1990-01-01

    To characterize the effect of ethanol on the hypothalamic {beta}-endorphin-containing neurons, rat fetal hypothalamic neurons were maintained in primary culture, and the secretion of {beta}-endorphin ({beta}-EP) was determined after ethanol challenges. Constant exposure to ethanol at doses of 6-50 mM produced a dose-dependent increase in basal secretion of {beta}-EP from these cultured cells. These doses of ethanol did not produce any significant effect on cell viability, DNA or protein content. The stimulated secretion of {beta}-EP following constant ethanol exposure is short-lasting. However, intermittent ethanol exposures maintained the ethanol stimulatory action on {beta}-EP secretion for a longer time. The magnitude of the {beta}-EP response to 50 mM ethanol is similar to that of the {beta}-EP response to 56 mM of potassium. Ethanol-stimulated {beta}-EP secretion required extracellular calcium and was blocked by a calcium channel blocker; a sodium channel blocker did not affect ethanol-stimulated secretion. These results suggest that the neuron culture system is a useful model for studying the cellular mechanisms involved in the ethanol-regulated hypothalamic opioid secretion.

  9. Sex difference in physical activity, energy expenditure and obesity driven by a subpopulation of hypothalamic POMC neurons

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Luke K.; Doslikova, Barbora; D'Agostino, Giuseppe; Greenwald-Yarnell, Megan; Georgescu, Teodora; Chianese, Raffaella; Martinez de Morentin, Pablo B.; Ogunnowo-Bada, Emmanuel; Cansell, Celine; Valencia-Torres, Lourdes; Garfield, Alastair S.; Apergis-Schoute, John; Lam, Daniel D.; Speakman, John R.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Low, Malcolm J.; Rochford, Justin J.; Myers, Martin G.; Evans, Mark L.; Heisler, Lora K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Obesity is one of the primary healthcare challenges of the 21st century. Signals relaying information regarding energy needs are integrated within the brain to influence body weight. Central among these integration nodes are the brain pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) peptides, perturbations of which disrupt energy balance and promote severe obesity. However, POMC neurons are neurochemically diverse and the crucial source of POMC peptides that regulate energy homeostasis and body weight remains to be fully clarified. Methods Given that a 5-hydroxytryptamine 2c receptor (5-HT2CR) agonist is a current obesity medication and 5-HT2CR agonist's effects on appetite are primarily mediated via POMC neurons, we hypothesized that a critical source of POMC regulating food intake and body weight is specifically synthesized in cells containing 5-HT2CRs. To exclusively manipulate Pomc synthesis only within 5-HT2CR containing cells, we generated a novel 5-HT2CRCRE mouse line and intercrossed it with Cre recombinase-dependent and hypothalamic specific reactivatable PomcNEO mice to restrict Pomc synthesis to the subset of hypothalamic cells containing 5-HT2CRs. This provided a means to clarify the specific contribution of a defined subgroup of POMC peptides in energy balance and body weight. Results Here we transform genetically programed obese and hyperinsulinemic male mice lacking hypothalamic Pomc with increased appetite, reduced physical activity and compromised brown adipose tissue (BAT) into lean, healthy mice via targeted restoration of Pomc function only within 5-HT2CR expressing cells. Remarkably, the same metabolic transformation does not occur in females, who despite corrected feeding behavior and normalized insulin levels remain physically inactive, have lower energy expenditure, compromised BAT and develop obesity. Conclusions These data provide support for the functional heterogeneity of hypothalamic POMC neurons, revealing that Pomc expression within 5-HT2CR

  10. Knockin of Cre Gene at Ins2 Locus Reveals No Cre Activity in Mouse Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Gao, Lin; Wang, Kejia; Ma, Xianhua; Chang, Xusheng; Shi, Jian-Hui; Zhang, Ye; Yin, Kai; Liu, Zhimin; Shi, Yuguang; Xie, Zhifang; Zhang, Weiping J.

    2016-01-01

    The recombination efficiency and cell specificity of Cre driver lines are critical for exploring pancreatic β cell biology with the Cre/LoxP approach. Some commonly used Cre lines are based on the short Ins2 promoter fragment and show recombination activity in hypothalamic neurons; however, whether this stems from endogenous Ins2 promoter activity remains controversial. In this study, we generated Ins2-Cre knockin mice with a targeted insertion of IRES-Cre at the Ins2 locus and demonstrated with a cell lineage tracing study that the Ins2 gene is not transcriptionally active in the hypothalamus. The Ins2-Cre driver line displayed robust Cre expression and activity in pancreatic β cells without significant alterations in insulin expression. In the brain, Cre activity was mainly restricted to the choroid plexus, without significant recombination detected in the hippocampus or hypothalamus by the LacZ or fluorescent tdTomato reporters. Furthermore, Ins2-Cre mice exhibited normal glucose tolerance and insulin secretion upon glucose stimulation in vivo. In conclusion, this Ins2-Cre driver line allowed high-fidelity detection of endogenous Ins2 promoter activity in vivo, and the negative activity in the hypothalamus demonstrated that this system is a promising alternative tool for studying β cell biology. PMID:26830324

  11. Aggressive experience affects the sensitivity of neurons towards pharmacological treatment in the hypothalamic attack area.

    PubMed

    Haller, J; Abrahám, I; Zelena, D; Juhász, G; Makara, G B; Kruk, M R

    1998-09-01

    Early investigators of brain stimulation-evoked complex behaviours (attack, escape, feeding, self-grooming, sexual behaviour) reported that experience may affect the behavioural outcome of brain stimulation. This intriguing example of functional neuronal plasticity was later totally neglected. The present experiment investigated the behavioural outcome of in vivo microdialysis perfusion of the glutamate agonist kainate and/or the GABAA antagonist bicuculline into the hypothalamic attack area (HAA) of (1) animals naive to dyadic encounters; (2) animals with a recent aggressive experience (the probe being implanted 6-24 h after the last of a series of dyadic encounters); and (3) animals with an earlier aggressive experience (probe being implanted 2 weeks after the last aggressive experience). On the experimental day, rats received two 5-min infusions during a dyadic encounter lasting 35 min with an unknown opponent. Flow rate was 1.5-2 microliters/min, drug concentrations were 1.8 x 10(-5) and 1.5 x 10(-5) M for kainate and bicuculline, respectively. Behaviour was analysed before, during and after perfusions. Only the combined kainate + bicuculline treatment had significant effects on behaviour at the doses studied. A significant increase in aggressive behaviour was elicited only in animals with a recent aggressive experience, while naive animals and with an earlier experience responded to the treatments by grooming. These results appear to support early observations indicating that one important aspect of brain stimulation effects is previous experience. PMID:9832932

  12. Postsynaptic Depolarization Enhances GABA Drive to Dorsomedial Hypothalamic Neurons through Somatodendritic Cholecystokinin Release.

    PubMed

    Crosby, Karen M; Baimoukhametova, Dinara V; Bains, Jaideep S; Pittman, Quentin J

    2015-09-23

    Somatodendritically released peptides alter synaptic function through a variety of mechanisms, including autocrine actions that liberate retrograde transmitters. Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a neuropeptide expressed in neurons in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DMH), a region implicated in satiety and stress. There are clear demonstrations that exogenous CCK modulates food intake and neuropeptide expression in the DMH, but there is no information on how endogenous CCK alters synaptic properties. Here, we provide the first report of somatodendritic release of CCK in the brain in male Sprague Dawley rats. CCK is released from DMH neurons in response to repeated postsynaptic depolarizations, and acts in an autocrine fashion on CCK2 receptors to enhance postsynaptic NMDA receptor function and liberate the retrograde transmitter, nitric oxide (NO). NO subsequently acts presynaptically to enhance GABA release through a soluble guanylate cyclase-mediated pathway. These data provide the first demonstration of synaptic actions of somatodendritically released CCK in the hypothalamus and reveal a new form of retrograde plasticity, depolarization-induced potentiation of inhibition. Significance statement: Somatodendritic signaling using endocannabinoids or nitric oxide to alter the efficacy of afferent transmission is well established. Despite early convincing evidence for somatodendritic release of neurohypophysial peptides in the hypothalamus, there is only limited evidence for this mode of release for other peptides. Here, we provide the first evidence for somatodendritic release of the satiety peptide cholecystokinin (CCK) in the brain. We also reveal a new form of synaptic plasticity in which postsynaptic depolarization results in enhancement of inhibition through the somatodendritic release of CCK. PMID:26400945

  13. Changes of reactions of neurones in dorsal raphe nucleus and locus coeruleus to electroacupuncture by hypothalamic arcuate nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Q H; Mao, J R; Guo, S Y

    1988-01-01

    In this experiment the role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) in acupuncture analgesia and its mechanisms were studied with behavioural and electrophysiological methods. After ARC stimulation the analgesic effect of acupuncture was enhanced significantly and the responses of neurones to electroacupuncture were increased in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and reduced in the locus coeruleus (LC), which could be reversed by intraperitoneal injection of naloxone. The results indicate that ARC might participate in acupuncture analgesia via changing the responses of DR and LC neurones to electroacupuncture, a process in which opiate-like substances (probably beta-endorphin) are involved. PMID:3192102

  14. The MAPK and PI3K pathways mediate CNTF-induced neuronal survival and process outgrowth in hypothalamic organotypic cultures.

    PubMed

    Askvig, Jason M; Watt, John A

    2015-09-01

    While collateral sprouting has been shown to occur in a variety of neuronal populations, the factor or factors responsible for mediating the sprouting response remain largely un-defined. There is evidence indicating that ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) may play an important role in promoting neuronal survival and process outgrowth in neuronal phenotypes tested to date. We previously demonstrated that the astrocytic Jak-STAT pathway is necessary to mediate CNTF-induced oxytocinergic (OT) neuronal survival; however, the mechanism (s) of CNTF-mediated process outgrowth remain unknown. Our working hypothesis is that CNTF mediates differential neuroprotective responses via different intracellular signal transduction pathways. In order to test this hypothesis, we utilized stationary hypothalamic organotypic cultures to assess the contribution of the MAPK-ERK and PI3-AKT pathways to OT neuron survival and process outgrowth. Our results demonstrate that the MAPK-ERK½ pathway mediates CNTF-induced neuronal survival. Moreover, we show that inhibition of the p38-, JNK-MAPK, and mTOR pathways prevents loss OT neurons following axotomy. We also provide quantitative evidence indicating that CNTF promotes process outgrowth of OT neurons via the PI3K-AKT pathway. Together, these data indicate that distinct intracellular signaling pathways mediate diverse neuroprotective processes in response to CNTF. PMID:25698661

  15. Hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor neurons fire in synchrony with the female reproductive cycle

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Christian; Tong, Tong; Petitjean, Hugues; Blum, Thomas; Peron, Sophie; Mai, Oliver; Schmitz, Frank; Boehm, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) controls mammalian reproduction via the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (hpg) axis, acting on gonadotrope cells in the pituitary gland that express the GnRH receptor (GnRHR). Cells expressing the GnRHR have also been identified in the brain. However, the mechanism by which GnRH acts on these potential target cells remains poorly understood due to the difficulty of visualizing and identifying living GnRHR neurons in the central nervous system. We have developed a mouse strain in which GnRHR neurons express a fluorescent marker, enabling the reliable identification of these cells independent of the hormonal status of the animal. In this study, we analyze the GnRHR neurons of the periventricular hypothalamic nucleus in acute brain slices prepared from adult female mice. Strikingly, we find that the action potential firing pattern of these neurons alternates in synchrony with the estrous cycle, with pronounced burst firing during the preovulatory period. We demonstrate that GnRH stimulation is sufficient to trigger the conversion from tonic to burst firing in GnRHR neurons. Furthermore, we show that this switch in the firing pattern is reversed by a potent GnRHR antagonist. These data suggest that endogenous GnRH acts on GnRHR neurons and triggers burst firing in these cells during late proestrus and estrus. Our data have important clinical implications in that they indicate a novel mode of action for GnRHR agonists and antagonists in neurons of the central nervous system that are not part of the classical hpg axis. PMID:26063780

  16. Area-specific analysis of the distribution of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the rat ventral tegmental area, with special reference to the GABAergic and glutamatergic efferents

    PubMed Central

    Kalló, Imre; Molnár, Csilla S.; Szöke, Sarolta; Fekete, Csaba; Hrabovszky, Erik; Liposits, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a main regulator of reward and integrates a wide scale of hormonal and neuronal information. Feeding-, energy expenditure-, stress, adaptation- and reproduction-related hypothalamic signals are processed in the VTA and influence the reward processes. However, the neuroanatomical origin and chemical phenotype of neurons mediating these signals to the VTA have not been fully characterized. In this study we have systematically mapped hypothalamic neurons that project to the VTA using the retrograde tracer Choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) and analyzed their putative gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and/or glutamate character with in situ hybridization in male rats. 23.93 ± 3.91% of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the VTA was found in preoptic and 76.27 ± 4.88% in anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamic regions. Nearly half of the retrogradely-labeled neurons in the preoptic, and more than one third in the anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus appeared in medially located regions. The analyses of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) and glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) mRNA expression revealed both amino acid markers in different subsets of retrogradely-labeled hypothalamic neurons, typically with the predominance of the glutamatergic marker VGLUT2. About one tenth of CTB-IR neurons were GAD65-positive even in hypothalamic nuclei expressing primarily VGLUT2. Some regions were populated mostly by GAD65 mRNA-containing retrogradely-labeled neurons. These included the perifornical part of the lateral hypothalamus where 58.63 ± 19.04% of CTB-IR neurons were GABAergic. These results indicate that both the medial and lateral nuclear compartments of the hypothalamus provide substantial input to the VTA. Furthermore, colocalization studies revealed that these projections not only use glutamate but also GABA for neurotransmission. These GABAergic afferents may underlie important inhibitory mechanism to fine-tune the

  17. Area-specific analysis of the distribution of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the rat ventral tegmental area, with special reference to the GABAergic and glutamatergic efferents.

    PubMed

    Kalló, Imre; Molnár, Csilla S; Szöke, Sarolta; Fekete, Csaba; Hrabovszky, Erik; Liposits, Zsolt

    2015-01-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA) is a main regulator of reward and integrates a wide scale of hormonal and neuronal information. Feeding-, energy expenditure-, stress, adaptation- and reproduction-related hypothalamic signals are processed in the VTA and influence the reward processes. However, the neuroanatomical origin and chemical phenotype of neurons mediating these signals to the VTA have not been fully characterized. In this study we have systematically mapped hypothalamic neurons that project to the VTA using the retrograde tracer Choleratoxin B subunit (CTB) and analyzed their putative gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and/or glutamate character with in situ hybridization in male rats. 23.93 ± 3.91% of hypothalamic neurons projecting to the VTA was found in preoptic and 76.27 ± 4.88% in anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamic regions. Nearly half of the retrogradely-labeled neurons in the preoptic, and more than one third in the anterior, tuberal and mammillary hypothalamus appeared in medially located regions. The analyses of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (VGLUT2) and glutamate decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) mRNA expression revealed both amino acid markers in different subsets of retrogradely-labeled hypothalamic neurons, typically with the predominance of the glutamatergic marker VGLUT2. About one tenth of CTB-IR neurons were GAD65-positive even in hypothalamic nuclei expressing primarily VGLUT2. Some regions were populated mostly by GAD65 mRNA-containing retrogradely-labeled neurons. These included the perifornical part of the lateral hypothalamus where 58.63 ± 19.04% of CTB-IR neurons were GABAergic. These results indicate that both the medial and lateral nuclear compartments of the hypothalamus provide substantial input to the VTA. Furthermore, colocalization studies revealed that these projections not only use glutamate but also GABA for neurotransmission. These GABAergic afferents may underlie important inhibitory mechanism to fine-tune the

  18. Lateral hypothalamic orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone neurons provide direct input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the human.

    PubMed

    Skrapits, Katalin; Kanti, Vivien; Savanyú, Zsófia; Maurnyi, Csilla; Szenci, Ottó; Horváth, András; Borsay, Beáta Á; Herczeg, László; Liposits, Zsolt; Hrabovszky, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hypophysiotropic projections of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-synthesizing neurons form the final common output way of the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. Several peptidergic neuronal systems of the medial hypothalamus innervate human GnRH cells and mediate crucially important hormonal and metabolic signals to the reproductive axis, whereas much less is known about the contribution of the lateral hypothalamic area to the afferent control of human GnRH neurons. Orexin (ORX)- and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-synthesizing neurons of this region have been implicated in diverse behavioral and autonomic processes, including sleep and wakefulness, feeding and other functions. In the present immunohistochemical study, we addressed the anatomical connectivity of these neurons to human GnRH cells in post-mortem hypothalamic samples obtained from autopsies. We found that 38.9 ± 10.3% and 17.7 ± 3.3% of GnRH-immunoreactive (IR) perikarya in the infundibular nucleus of human male subjects received ORX-IR and MCH-IR contacts, respectively. On average, each 1 mm segment of GnRH dendrites received 7.3 ± 1.1 ORX-IR and 3.7 ± 0.5 MCH-IR axo-dendritic appositions. Overall, the axo-dendritic contacts dominated over the axo-somatic contacts and represented 80.5 ± 6.4% of ORX-IR and 76.7 ± 4.6% of MCH-IR inputs to GnRH cells. Based on functional evidence from studies of laboratory animals, the direct axo-somatic and axo-dendritic input from ORX and MCH neurons to the human GnRH neuronal system may convey critical metabolic and other homeostatic signals to the reproducive axis. In this study, we also report the generation and characterization of new antibodies for immunohistochemical detection of GnRH neurons in histological sections. PMID:26388735

  19. Lateral hypothalamic orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone neurons provide direct input to gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons in the human

    PubMed Central

    Skrapits, Katalin; Kanti, Vivien; Savanyú, Zsófia; Maurnyi, Csilla; Szenci, Ottó; Horváth, András; Borsay, Beáta Á.; Herczeg, László; Liposits, Zsolt; Hrabovszky, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Hypophysiotropic projections of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH)-synthesizing neurons form the final common output way of the hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine control of reproduction. Several peptidergic neuronal systems of the medial hypothalamus innervate human GnRH cells and mediate crucially important hormonal and metabolic signals to the reproductive axis, whereas much less is known about the contribution of the lateral hypothalamic area to the afferent control of human GnRH neurons. Orexin (ORX)- and melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH)-synthesizing neurons of this region have been implicated in diverse behavioral and autonomic processes, including sleep and wakefulness, feeding and other functions. In the present immunohistochemical study, we addressed the anatomical connectivity of these neurons to human GnRH cells in post-mortem hypothalamic samples obtained from autopsies. We found that 38.9 ± 10.3% and 17.7 ± 3.3% of GnRH-immunoreactive (IR) perikarya in the infundibular nucleus of human male subjects received ORX-IR and MCH-IR contacts, respectively. On average, each 1 mm segment of GnRH dendrites received 7.3 ± 1.1 ORX-IR and 3.7 ± 0.5 MCH-IR axo-dendritic appositions. Overall, the axo-dendritic contacts dominated over the axo-somatic contacts and represented 80.5 ± 6.4% of ORX-IR and 76.7 ± 4.6% of MCH-IR inputs to GnRH cells. Based on functional evidence from studies of laboratory animals, the direct axo-somatic and axo-dendritic input from ORX and MCH neurons to the human GnRH neuronal system may convey critical metabolic and other homeostatic signals to the reproducive axis. In this study, we also report the generation and characterization of new antibodies for immunohistochemical detection of GnRH neurons in histological sections. PMID:26388735

  20. Ventromedial hypothalamic lesions change the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Kiba, Takayoshi; Kintaka, Yuri; Suzuki, Yoko; Nakata, Eiko; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Inoue, Shuji

    2009-05-01

    There are no reports that hypothalamus can directly affect the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in liver. We identified genes of which expression profiles showed significant modulation in rat liver after ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH) lesions. Total RNA was extracted, and differences in the gene expression profiles between rats at day 3 after VMH lesioning and sham-VMH lesioned rats were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The result revealed that VMH lesions regulated the genes that were involved in functions related to neuronal development and immunofunction in the liver. Real-time PCR also confirmed that gene expression of SULT4A1 was upregulated, but expression of ACSL1 and CISH were downregulated at day 3 after VMH lesions. VMH lesions may change the expression of neuron-related genes and immune-related genes in rat liver. PMID:19429097

  1. Prenatal fat exposure and hypothalamic PPAR β/δ: Possible relationship to increased neurogenesis of orexigenic peptide neurons.

    PubMed

    Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Lukatskaya, O; Leibowitz, S F

    2016-05-01

    Gestational exposure to a fat-rich diet, while elevating maternal circulating fatty acids, increases in the offspring's hypothalamus and amygdala the proliferation and density of neurons that express neuropeptides known to stimulate consummatory behavior. To understand the relationship between these phenomena, this study examined in the brain of postnatal offspring (day 15) the effect of prenatal fat exposure on the transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ, which is sensitive to fatty acids, and the relationship of PPAR β/δ to the orexigenic neuropeptides, orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, and enkephalin. Prenatal exposure to a fat-rich diet compared to low-fat chow increased the density of cells immunoreactive for PPAR β/δ in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), perifornical lateral hypothalamus (PFLH), and central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), but not the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus or basolateral amygdaloid nucleus. It also increased co-labeling of PPAR β/δ with the cell proliferation marker, BrdU, or neuronal marker, NeuN, and the triple labeling of PPAR β/δ with BrdU plus NeuN, indicating an increase in proliferation and density of new PPAR β/δ neurons. Prenatal fat exposure stimulated the double-labeling of PPAR β/δ with orexin or melanin-concentrating hormone in the PFLH and enkephalin in the PVN and CeA and also triple-labeling of PPAR β/δ with BrdU and these neuropeptides, indicating that dietary fat increases the genesis of PPAR β/δ neurons that produce these peptides. These findings demonstrate a close anatomical relationship between PPAR β/δ and the increased proliferation and density of peptide-expressing neurons in the hypothalamus and amygdala of fat-exposed offspring. PMID:27002387

  2. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass

    PubMed Central

    Farman, H. H.; Windahl, S. H.; Westberg, L.; Isaksson, H.; Egecioglu, E.; Schele, E.; Ryberg, H.; Jansson, J. O.; Tuukkanen, J.; Koskela, A.; Xie, S. K.; Hahner, L.; Zehr, J.; Clegg, D. J.; Lagerquist, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα−/−). Female POMC-ERα−/− and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα−/− mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice. PMID:27254004

  3. Female Mice Lacking Estrogen Receptor-α in Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin (POMC) Neurons Display Enhanced Estrogenic Response on Cortical Bone Mass.

    PubMed

    Farman, H H; Windahl, S H; Westberg, L; Isaksson, H; Egecioglu, E; Schele, E; Ryberg, H; Jansson, J O; Tuukkanen, J; Koskela, A; Xie, S K; Hahner, L; Zehr, J; Clegg, D J; Lagerquist, M K; Ohlsson, C

    2016-08-01

    Estrogens are important regulators of bone mass and their effects are mainly mediated via estrogen receptor (ER)α. Central ERα exerts an inhibitory role on bone mass. ERα is highly expressed in the arcuate (ARC) and the ventromedial (VMN) nuclei in the hypothalamus. To test whether ERα in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, located in ARC, is involved in the regulation of bone mass, we used mice lacking ERα expression specifically in POMC neurons (POMC-ERα(-/-)). Female POMC-ERα(-/-) and control mice were ovariectomized (OVX) and treated with vehicle or estradiol (0.5 μg/d) for 6 weeks. As expected, estradiol treatment increased the cortical bone thickness in femur, the cortical bone mechanical strength in tibia and the trabecular bone volume fraction in both femur and vertebrae in OVX control mice. Importantly, the estrogenic responses were substantially increased in OVX POMC-ERα(-/-) mice compared with the estrogenic responses in OVX control mice for cortical bone thickness (+126 ± 34%, P < .01) and mechanical strength (+193 ± 38%, P < .01). To test whether ERα in VMN is involved in the regulation of bone mass, ERα was silenced using an adeno-associated viral vector. Silencing of ERα in hypothalamic VMN resulted in unchanged bone mass. In conclusion, mice lacking ERα in POMC neurons display enhanced estrogenic response on cortical bone mass and mechanical strength. We propose that the balance between inhibitory effects of central ERα activity in hypothalamic POMC neurons in ARC and stimulatory peripheral ERα-mediated effects in bone determines cortical bone mass in female mice. PMID:27254004

  4. Regulation of Energy Balance via BDNF Expressed in Nonparaventricular Hypothalamic Neurons.

    PubMed

    Yang, Haili; An, Juan Ji; Sun, Chao; Xu, Baoji

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expressed in the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH) has been shown to play a key role in regulating energy intake and energy expenditure. BDNF is also expressed in other hypothalamic nuclei; however, the role in the control of energy balance for BDNF produced in these structures remains largely unknown. We found that deleting the Bdnf gene in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) during embryogenesis using the Sf1-Cre transgene had no effect on body weight in mice. In contrast, deleting the Bdnf gene in the adult VMH using Cre-expressing virus led to significant hyperphagia and obesity. These observations indicate that the lack of a hyperphagia phenotype in the Sf1-Cre/Bdnf mutant mice is likely due to developmental compensation. To investigate the role of BDNF expressed in other hypothalamic areas, we employed the hypothalamus-specific Nkx2.1-Cre transgene to delete the Bdnf gene. We found that the Nkx2.1-Cre transgene could abolish BDNF expression in many hypothalamic nuclei, but not in the PVH, and that the resulting mutant mice developed modest obesity due to reduced energy expenditure. Thus, BDNF produced in the VMH plays a role in regulating energy intake. Furthermore, BDNF expressed in hypothalamic areas other than PVH and VMH is also involved in the control of energy expenditure. PMID:27003443

  5. Stimulation of the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus Modulates Cardiorespiratory Responses via Oxytocinergic Innervation of Neurons in Pre-Bötzinger Complex

    PubMed Central

    Mack, S.O.; Wu, M.; Kc, P.; Haxhiu, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Previously we reported that oxytocin (OT)-containing neurons of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) project to the preBötzinger complex (preBötC) region and phrenic motoneurons innervating the diaphragm (D). The aim of these studies was to determine pathways involved in PVN stimulation-induced changes in upper airway and chest wall pumping muscle activity. In addition, we determined the role of OT-containing neurons in the PVN in mediating increased respiratory output elicited by PVN stimulation. Neuroanatomical experiments, using pseudorabies virus (PRV) as a transneuronal tracer in C8 spinalectomized animals showed that PVN neurons project to hypoglossal motoneurons innervating the genioglossus (GG) muscle. Furthermore, microinjection of the PVN with bicuculline, a GABAA receptor antagonist, significantly increased (P<0.05) peak electromyographic activity of GG (GGEMG) and of DEMG, frequency discharge, and arterial blood pressure (BP) and heart rate. Prior injection of oxytocin antagonist [d-(CH2)5, Tyr(Me)2,Orn8]-vasotocin(OVT) intracisternally or blockade of oxytocin receptors in the preBötC region with oxytocin antagonist L-368,899, diminished GGEMG and DEMG responses and blunted the increase in BP and heart rate to PVN stimulation. These data show that PVN stimulation affects central regulatory mechanisms via the preBötC region controlling both respiratory and cardiovascular functions. The parallel changes induced by PVN stimulation were mediated mainly through an OT-OT receptor signaling pathway. PMID:16857863

  6. Variation in sodium current amplitude between vasopressin and oxytocin hypothalamic supraoptic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lie; Teruyama, Ryoichi; Armstrong, William E.

    2013-01-01

    Biophysical characteristics of tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium (Na+) currents were studied in vasopressin (VP) and oxytocin (OT) supraoptic neurons acutely isolated from rat hypothalamus. Na+ current density (pA/pF) was significantly greater in VP neurons than in OT neurons. No significant difference between VP and OT neurons was detected regarding the voltage dependence of activation and steady-state inactivation, or rate of recovery from inactivation of Na+ currents. In both VP and OT neurons, the macroscopic inactivation of the Na+ currents was best fitted with a double-exponential expression suggesting two rates of inactivation. Also in both types, the time course of recovery from inactivation proceeded with fast and slow time constants averaging around 8 and 350 ms, respectively, suggesting the presence of multiple pathways of recovery from inactivation. The slower time constant of recovery of inactivation may be involved in the decrease in action potential (AP) amplitude that occurs after the first spike during burst firing in both neuronal types. The larger amplitude of Na+ currents in VP vs. OT neurons may explain the previous observations that VP neurons exhibit a lower AP threshold and greater AP amplitude than OT neurons, and may serve to differently tune the firing properties and responses to neuromodulators of the respective neuronal types. PMID:23175803

  7. Transgenic Mice Overexpressing Amyloid Precursor Protein Exhibit Early Metabolic Deficits and a Pathologically Low Leptin State Associated with Hypothalamic Dysfunction in Arcuate Neuropeptide Y Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Makoto; Wang, Gang; Racchumi, Gianfranco; Dyke, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Weight loss is a prominent early feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) that often precedes the cognitive decline and clinical diagnosis. While the exact pathogenesis of AD remains unclear, accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) derived from the amyloid precursor protein (APP) in the brain is thought to lead to the neuronal dysfunction and death underlying the dementia. In this study, we examined whether transgenic mice overexpressing the Swedish mutation of APP (Tg2576), recapitulating selected features of AD, have hypothalamic leptin signaling dysfunction leading to early body weight deficits. We found that 3-month-old Tg2576 mice, before amyloid plaque formation, exhibit decreased weight with markedly decreased adiposity, low plasma leptin levels, and increased energy expenditure without alterations in feeding behavior. The expression of the orexigenic neuropeptide Y (NPY) in the hypothalamus to the low leptin state was abnormal at basal and fasting conditions. In addition, arcuate NPY neurons exhibited abnormal electrophysiological responses to leptin in Tg2576 hypothalamic slices or wild-type slices treated with Aβ. Finally, the metabolic deficits worsened as Tg2576 mice aged and amyloid burden increased in the brain. These results indicate that excess Aβ can potentially disrupt hypothalamic arcuate NPY neurons leading to weight loss and a pathologically low leptin state early in the disease process that progressively worsens as the amyloid burden increases. Collectively, these findings suggest that weight loss is an intrinsic pathological feature of Aβ accumulation and identify hypothalamic leptin signaling as a previously unrecognized pathogenic site of action for Aβ. PMID:24990930

  8. Gq Protein-Coupled Membrane-Initiated Estrogen Signaling Rapidly Excites Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons in the Hypothalamic Paraventricular Nucleus in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Pu; Liu, Ji; Yasrebi, Ali; Gotthardt, Juliet D; Bello, Nicholas T; Pang, Zhiping P; Roepke, Troy A

    2016-09-01

    CRH neurons in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) play a central role in regulating the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and are directly influenced by 17β-estradiol (E2). Although compelling evidence has suggested the existence of membrane-associated estrogen receptors (mERs) in hypothalamic and other central nervous system neurons, it remains unknown whether E2 impacts CRH neuronal excitability through this mechanism. The purpose of the current study is to examine the existence and function of mER signaling in PVN CRH neurons. Whole-cell recordings were made from CRH neurons identified by Alexa Fluor 594 labeling and post hoc immunostaining in ovariectomized female mice. E2 (100nM) rapidly suppressed the M-current (a voltage-dependent K(+) current) and potentiated glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic currents. The putative Gq-coupled mER (Gq-mER) characterized in hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin neurons initiates a phospholipase C-protein kinase C-protein kinase A pathway; therefore, we examined the involvement of this pathway using selective inhibitors. Indeed, the ER antagonist ICI 182780 and inhibitors of Gq-phospholipase C-protein kinase C-protein kinase A blocked E2's actions, suggesting dependence on the Gq-mER. Furthermore, STX, a selective ligand for the Gq-mER, mimicked E2's actions. Finally, to examine the in vivo effect of Gq-mER activation, E2 or STX injection increased c-fos expression in CRH neurons in the PVN, suggesting CRH neuronal activation. This corresponded to an increase in plasma corticosterone. We conclude that the Gq-mER plays a critical role in the rapid regulation of CRH neuronal activity and the HPA axis. Our findings provide a potential underlying mechanism for E2's involvement in the pathophysiology of HPA-associated mood disorders. PMID:27387482

  9. PROTECTIVE EFFECTS OF HYPOTHALAMIC BETA-ENDORPHIN NEURONS AGAINST ALCOHOL-INDUCED LIVER INJURIES AND LIVER CANCERS IN RAT ANIMAL MODELS

    PubMed Central

    Murugan, Sengottuvelan; Boyadjieva, Nadka; Sarkar, Dipak K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Recently, retrograde tracing has provided evidence for an influence of hypothalamic β-endorphin (BEP) neurons on the liver, but functions of these neurons are not known. We evaluated the effect of BEP neuronal activation on alcohol-induced liver injury and hepatocellular cancer. Methods Male rats received either BEP neuron transplants or control transplants in the hypothalamus and randomly assigned to feeding alcohol-containing liquid diet or control liquid diet for 8 weeks or to treatment of a carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DEN). Liver tissues of these animals were analyzed histochemically and biochemically for tissue injuries or cancer. Results Alcohol-feeding increased liver weight and induced several histopathological changes such as prominent microvesicular steatosis and hepatic fibrosis. Alcohol feeding also increased protein levels of triglyceride, hepatic stellate cell activation factors and catecholamines in the liver and endotoxin levels in the plasma. However, these effects of alcohol on the liver were reduced in animals with BEP neuron transplants. BEP neuron transplants also suppressed carcinogen-induced liver histopathologies such as extensive fibrosis, large focus of inflammatory infiltration, hepatocelluar carcinoma, collagen deposition, numbers of preneoplastic foci, levels of hepatic stellate cell activation factors and catecholamines, as well as inflammatory milieu and the levels of NK cell cytotoxic factors in the liver. Conclusion These findings are the first evidence for a role of hypothalamic BEP neurons in influencing liver functions. Additionally, the data identify that BEP neuron transplantation prevents hepatocellular injury and hepatocellular carcinoma formation possibly via influencing the immune function. PMID:25581653

  10. Neuroplastic changes in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus: the estradiol effect is accompanied by increased exoendocytotic activity of neuronal membranes.

    PubMed

    Párducz, A; Szilágyi, T; Hoyk, S; Naftolin, F; Garcia-Segura, L M

    1996-04-01

    1. In the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus, estradiol induces coordinated changes in the number of axosomatic synapses, the amount of glial ensheathing, and the ultrastructure of the membrane of neuronal somas. In the present study we used conventional electron microscopy and freeze-fracture to examine cellular mechanisms responsible for the estradiol-induced changes at the membrane level. 2. In freeze-fracture replicas taken 10-60 min and 24 hr after injection of 17 beta-estradiol to adult ovariectomized females, it was found that there was a rapid increase in the number of exoendocytotic images that reached a plateau by 30 min. 3. In thin sections from animals injected 24 hr earlier we demonstrated a significant increase in coated vesicles in the periphery of the neurons and coated pits in the perikaryal membranes and decreased axosomatic synapses. 4. We conclude that these morphological alterations are signaling estrogen-induced transport and/or turnover of perikaryal membrane constituents and extracellular components which may affect interneuronal and neuroglial interactions. PMID:8743973

  11. Modulation of body temperature and LH secretion by hypothalamic KNDy (kisspeptin, neurokinin B and dynorphin) neurons: A novel hypothesis on the mechanism of hot flushes

    PubMed Central

    Rance, Naomi E.; Dacks, Penny A.; Mittelman-Smith, Melinda A.; Romanovsky, Andrej A.; Krajewski-Hall, Sally J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite affecting millions of individuals, the etiology of hot flushes remains unknown. Here we review the physiology of hot flushes, CNS pathways regulating heat-dissipation effectors, and effects of estrogen on thermoregulation in animal models. Based on the marked changes in hypothalamic kisspeptin, neurokinin B and dynorphin (KNDy) neurons in postmenopausal women, we hypothesize that KNDy neurons play a role in the mechanism of flushes. In the rat, KNDy neurons project to preoptic thermoregulatory areas that express the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R), the primary receptor for NKB. Furthermore, activation of NK3R in the median preoptic nucleus, part of the heat-defense pathway, reduces body temperature. Finally, ablation of KNDy neurons reduces cutaneous vasodilatation and partially blocks the effects of estrogen on thermoregulation. These data suggest that arcuate KNDy neurons relay estrogen signals to preoptic structures regulating heat-dissipation effectors, supporting the hypothesis that KNDy neurons participate in the generation of flushes. PMID:23872331

  12. Modulation of AgRP-neuronal function by SOCS3 as an initiating event in diet-induced hypothalamic leptin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Louise E.; Unger, Elizabeth K.; Cheung, Clement C.; Xu, Allison W.

    2013-01-01

    Chronic consumption of a fat-rich diet leads to attenuation of leptin signaling in hypothalamic neurons, a hallmark feature of cellular leptin resistance. To date, little is known about the temporal and spatial dysregulation of neuronal function under conditions of nutrient excess. We show that agouti-related protein (AgRP)-expressing neurons precede proopiomelanocortin neurons in developing diet-induced cellular leptin resistance. High-fat diet-induced up-regulation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) occurs in AgRP neurons before proopiomelanocortin and other hypothalamic neurons. SOCS3 expression in AgRP neurons increases after 2 d of high-fat feeding, but reduces after switching to a low-fat diet for 1 d. Consistently, transgenic overexpression of SOCS3 in AgRP neurons produces metabolic phenotypes resembling those observed after short-term high-fat feeding. We further show that AgRP neurons are the predominant cell type situated outside the blood-brain barrier in the mediobasal hypothalamus. AgRP neurons are more responsive to low levels of circulating leptin, but they are also more prone to development of leptin resistance in response to a small increase in blood leptin concentrations. Collectively, these results suggest that AgRP neurons are able to sense slight changes in plasma metabolic signals, allowing them to serve as first-line responders to fluctuation of energy intake. Furthermore, modulation of SOCS3 expression in AgRP neurons may play a dynamic and physiological role in metabolic fine tuning in response to short-term changes of nutritional status. PMID:23386726

  13. Evidence that diet-induced hyperleptinemia, but not hypothalamic gliosis, causes ghrelin resistance in NPY/AgRP neurons of male mice.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Dana I; Lockie, Sarah H; Benzler, Jonas; Wu, Qunli; Stark, Romana; Reichenbach, Alex; Hoy, Andrew J; Lemus, Moyra B; Coleman, Harold A; Parkington, Helena C; Tups, Alex; Andrews, Zane B

    2014-07-01

    High-fat diet (HFD) feeding causes ghrelin resistance in arcuate neuropeptide Y (NPY)/Agouti-related peptide neurons. In the current study, we investigated the time course over which this occurs and the mechanisms responsible for ghrelin resistance. After 3 weeks of HFD feeding, neither peripheral nor central ghrelin increased food intake and or activated NPY neurons as demonstrated by a lack of Fos immunoreactivity or whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Pair-feeding studies that matched HFD calorie intake with chow calorie intake show that HFD exposure does not cause ghrelin resistance independent of body weight gain. We observed increased plasma leptin in mice fed a HFD for 3 weeks and show that leptin-deficient obese ob/ob mice are still ghrelin sensitive but become ghrelin resistant when central leptin is coadministered. Moreover, ob/ob mice fed a HFD for 3 weeks remain ghrelin sensitive, and the ability of ghrelin to induce action potential firing in NPY neurons was blocked by leptin. We also examined hypothalamic gliosis in mice fed a chow diet or HFD, as well as in ob/ob mice fed a chow diet or HFD and lean controls. HFD-fed mice exhibited increased glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells compared with chow-fed mice, suggesting that hypothalamic gliosis may underlie ghrelin resistance. However, we also observed an increase in hypothalamic gliosis in ob/ob mice fed a HFD compared with chow-fed ob/ob and lean control mice. Because ob/ob mice fed a HFD remain ghrelin sensitive, our results suggest that hypothalamic gliosis does not underlie ghrelin resistance. Further, pair-feeding a HFD to match the calorie intake of chow-fed controls did not increase body weight gain or cause central ghrelin resistance; thus, our evidence suggests that diet-induced hyperleptinemia, rather than diet-induced hypothalamic gliosis or HFD exposure, causes ghrelin resistance. PMID:24742194

  14. Regulation of ERα protein expression by 17β-estradiol in cultured neurons of hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus.

    PubMed

    Malikov, V; Madeira, M D

    2013-01-01

    The activation of the subtype α of estrogen receptors (ERα) in the hypothalamic ventromedial nucleus (VMNvl) is required to stimulate female sexual receptivity. Moreover, the hormone was found to govern the expression of the receptor. Its removal due to ovariectomy and subsequent substitution suggest that the hormone down-regulates the expression of ERα. In contrast, in normally cycling animals the expression of the receptor peaks at proestrus, the phase of highest concentration of 17β-estradiol in estrous cycle. Therefore, in this study we examined the influence of the hormone on ERα expression in primary dissociated cultures of neurons isolated from the VMNvl of young adult female rats. Measurements of ERα immunofluorescence revealed that both supraphysiological and physiological concentrations of 17β-estradiol increase the expression of ERα. Analyses with selective agonists showed that both nuclear ERs are able to mediate the action of the hormone. However, the activation of ERα had a stronger effect on the expression of its own receptor than the activation of ERβ. Simultaneous activation of both receptors attenuated the influence of ERα alone. Physiological concentrations of progesterone were found to revoke the effect of 17β-estradiol, whereas the expression of ERα is up-regulated by progesterone alone. These data indicate that the expression of ERα in VMNvl neurons is under the control of both types of nuclear ERs and, in addition, progesterone receptors (PRs). The particular contribution of the receptors is dependent on their level of expression and the hormonal context. In neurons expressing high quantity of ERα, ERβ attenuates the overall expression of the receptor, whereas in cells containing mostly ERβ it contributes to the up-regulation of ERα synthesis. Simultaneous activation of ERs and PRs reverses the influences of the receptors due to inter-inhibition of their transcriptional activities. PMID:22987058

  15. Genetic Isolation of Hypothalamic Neurons that Regulate Context-Specific Male Social Behavior.

    PubMed

    Soden, Marta E; Miller, Samara M; Burgeno, Lauren M; Phillips, Paul E M; Hnasko, Thomas S; Zweifel, Larry S

    2016-07-12

    Nearly all animals engage in a complex assortment of social behaviors that are essential for the survival of the species. In mammals, these behaviors are regulated by sub-nuclei within the hypothalamus, but the specific cell types within these nuclei responsible for coordinating behavior in distinct contexts are only beginning to be resolved. Here, we identify a population of neurons in the ventral premammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus (PMV) that are strongly activated in male intruder mice in response to a larger resident male but that are not responsive to females. Using a combination of molecular and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that these PMV neurons regulate intruder-specific male social behavior and social novelty recognition in a manner dependent on synaptic release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. These data provide direct evidence for a unique population of neurons that regulate social behaviors in specific contexts. PMID:27346361

  16. Suprachiasmatic nuclei and Circadian rhythms. The role of suprachiasmatic nuclei on rhythmic activity of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area, ventromedian nuclei and pineal gland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishino, H.

    1977-01-01

    Unit activity of lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) and Ventromedian nuclei (VMN) was recorded in urethane anesthetized male rats. A 5 to 10 sec. a 3-5 min and a circadian rhythmicity were observed. In about 15% of all neurons, spontaneous activity of LHA and VMN showed reciprocal relationships. Subthreshold stimuli applied at a slow rate in the septum and the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) suppressed the rhythms without changing firing rates. On the other hand, stimulation of the optic nerve at a rate of 5 to 10/sec increased firing rates in 1/3 of neurons of SCN. Iontophoretically applied acetylcholine increased 80% of tested neurons of SCN, whereas norepinephrine, dopamine and 5 HT inhibited 64, 60 and 75% of SCN neurons respectively. These inhibitions were much stronger in neurons, the activity of which was increased by optic nerve stimulation. Stimulation of the SCN inhibited the tonic activity in cervical sympathetic nerves.

  17. LMO4 is essential for paraventricular hypothalamic neuronal activity and calcium channel expression to prevent hyperphagia.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Tariq; Zhou, Xun; Pandey, Nihar R; Qin, Zhaohong; Keyhanian, Kianoosh; Wen, Kendall; Courtney, Ryan D; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Chen, Hsiao-Huei

    2014-01-01

    The dramatic increase in the prevalence of obesity reflects a lack of progress in combating one of the most serious health problems of this century. Recent studies have improved our understanding of the appetitive network by focusing on the paraventricular hypothalamus (PVH), a key region responsible for the homeostatic balance of food intake. Here we show that mice with PVH-specific ablation of LIM domain only 4 (Lmo4) become rapidly obese when fed regular chow due to hyperphagia rather than to reduced energy expenditure. Brain slice recording of LMO4-deficient PVH neurons showed reduced basal cellular excitability together with reduced voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents. Real-time PCR quantification revealed that LMO4 regulates the expression of Ca(2+) channels (Cacna1h, Cacna1e) that underlie neuronal excitability. By increasing neuronal activity using designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs technology, we could suppress food intake of PVH-specific LMO4-deficient mice. Together, these results demonstrate that reduced neural activity in LMO4-deficient PVH neurons accounts for hyperphagia. Thus, maintaining PVH activity is important to prevent hyperphagia-induced obesity. PMID:24381275

  18. The effects of intragastric infusion of umami solutions on amygdalar and lateral hypothalamic neurons in rats.

    PubMed

    Davaasuren, Munkhzul; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Chinzorig, Choijiljav; Nakamura, Tomoya; Takamura, Yusaku; Patrono, Enrico; Kondoh, Takashi; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-10-01

    Previous behavioral studies have suggested that l-glutamate, an umami substance, is detected in the gut, and that this information regarding glutamate is conveyed from the gut to the amygdala and the lateral hypothalamus (LH) through the vagus nerve to establish glutamate preference. In this study, we investigated the roles of the amygdala and LH in the information processing of gut glutamate. We recorded the activity of amygdalar and LH neurons during the intragastric administration of five test solutions (monosodium l-glutamate [MSG, 60 mmol/L]; inosine monophosphate [IMP, 60 mmol/L]; a mixture of MSG and IMP; NaCl [60 mmol/L]; or physiological saline) in intact and subdiaphragmatic vagotomized awake rats. In intact rats, 349 and 189 neurons were recorded from the amygdala and LH, respectively, while in vagotomized rats, 104 and 90 neurons were recorded from the amygdala and LH, respectively. In intact rats, similar percentages of neurons (30-60%) in the amygdala and LH responded to the intragastric infusion of the solutions. Vagotomy significantly altered responses to the MSG and NaCl solutions. In particular, vagotomy suppressed the inhibitory responses to the NaCl solution. Furthermore, vagotomy increased the response similarity between the MSG and NaCl solutions, suggesting that vagotomy impaired the coding of the postingestive consequences of the MSG solution in the amygdala and LH, which are unique for glutamate. The present results provide the first neurophysiological evidence that amygdalar and LH neurons process glutamate signals from the gut. PMID:26438732

  19. The effects of intragastric infusion of umami solutions on amygdalar and lateral hypothalamic neurons in rats

    PubMed Central

    Davaasuren, Munkhzul; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Chinzorig, Choijiljav; Nakamura, Tomoya; Takamura, Yusaku; Patrono, Enrico; Kondoh, Takashi; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Previous behavioral studies have suggested that l-glutamate, an umami substance, is detected in the gut, and that this information regarding glutamate is conveyed from the gut to the amygdala and the lateral hypothalamus (LH) through the vagus nerve to establish glutamate preference. In this study, we investigated the roles of the amygdala and LH in the information processing of gut glutamate. We recorded the activity of amygdalar and LH neurons during the intragastric administration of five test solutions (monosodium l-glutamate [MSG, 60 mmol/L]; inosine monophosphate [IMP, 60 mmol/L]; a mixture of MSG and IMP; NaCl [60 mmol/L]; or physiological saline) in intact and subdiaphragmatic vagotomized awake rats. In intact rats, 349 and 189 neurons were recorded from the amygdala and LH, respectively, while in vagotomized rats, 104 and 90 neurons were recorded from the amygdala and LH, respectively. In intact rats, similar percentages of neurons (30–60%) in the amygdala and LH responded to the intragastric infusion of the solutions. Vagotomy significantly altered responses to the MSG and NaCl solutions. In particular, vagotomy suppressed the inhibitory responses to the NaCl solution. Furthermore, vagotomy increased the response similarity between the MSG and NaCl solutions, suggesting that vagotomy impaired the coding of the postingestive consequences of the MSG solution in the amygdala and LH, which are unique for glutamate. The present results provide the first neurophysiological evidence that amygdalar and LH neurons process glutamate signals from the gut. PMID:26438732

  20. Interleukin-1beta induces hyperpolarization and modulates synaptic inhibition in preoptic and anterior hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, I V; Korn, H; Bartfai, T

    2006-09-15

    Most of the inflammatory effects of the cytokine interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta) are mediated by induction of cyclooxygenase (COX)2 and the subsequent synthesis and release of prostaglandin E2. This transcription-dependent process takes 45-60 min, but IL-1beta, a well-characterized endogenous pyrogen also exerts faster neuronal actions in the preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus. Here, we have studied the fast (1-3 min) signaling by IL-1beta using whole-cell patch clamp recordings in preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus neurons. Exposure to IL-1beta (0.1-1 nM) hyperpolarized a subset ( approximately 20%) of preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus neurons, decreased their input resistance and reduced their firing rate. These effects were associated with an increased frequency of bicuculline-sensitive spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents and putative miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents, strongly suggesting a presynaptic mechanism of action. These effects require the type 1 interleukin 1 receptor (IL-1R1), and the adapter protein myeloid differentiation primary response protein (MyD88), since they were not observed in cultures obtained from IL-1R1 (-/-) or from MyD88 (-/-) mice. Ceramide, a second messenger of the IL-1R1-dependent fast signaling cascade, is produced by IL-1R1-MyD88-mediated activation of the neutral sphingomyelinase. C2-ceramide, its cell penetrating analog, also increased the frequency of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents in a subset of cells. Both IL-1beta and ceramide reduced the delayed rectifier and the A-type K(+) currents in preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus neurons. The latter effect may account in part for the increased spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency as suggested by experiments with the A-type K(+) channel blockers 4-aminopyridine. Taken together our data suggest that IL-1beta inhibits the activity of preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus neurons by increasing the presynaptic release of GABA. PMID

  1. The Synaptic Cell Adhesion Molecule, SynCAM1, Mediates Astrocyte-to-Astrocyte and Astrocyte-to-GnRH Neuron Adhesiveness in the Mouse Hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Sandau, Ursula S.; Mungenast, Alison E.; McCarthy, Jack; Biederer, Thomas; Corfas, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    We previously identified synaptic cell adhesion molecule 1 (SynCAM1) as a component of a genetic network involved in the hypothalamic control of female puberty. Although it is well established that SynCAM1 is a synaptic adhesion molecule, its contribution to hypothalamic function is unknown. Here we show that, in addition to the expected neuronal localization illustrated by its presence in GnRH neurons, SynCAM1 is expressed in hypothalamic astrocytes. Cell adhesion assays indicated that SynCAM is recognized by both GnRH neurons and astrocytes as an adhesive partner and promotes cell-cell adhesiveness via homophilic, extracellular domain-mediated interactions. Alternative splicing of the SynCAM1 primary mRNA transcript yields four mRNAs encoding membrane-spanning SynCAM1 isoforms. Variants 1 and 4 are predicted to be both N and O glycosylated. Hypothalamic astrocytes and GnRH-producing GT1-7 cells express mainly isoform 4 mRNA, and sequential N- and O-deglycosylation of proteins extracted from these cells yields progressively smaller SynCAM1 species, indicating that isoform 4 is the predominant SynCAM1 variant expressed in astrocytes and GT1-7 cells. Neither cell type expresses the products of two other SynCAM genes (SynCAM2 and SynCAM3), suggesting that SynCAM-mediated astrocyte-astrocyte and astrocyte-GnRH neuron adhesiveness is mostly mediated by SynCAM1 homophilic interactions. When erbB4 receptor function is disrupted in astrocytes, via transgenic expression of a dominant-negative erbB4 receptor form, SynCAM1-mediated adhesiveness is severely compromised. Conversely, SynCAM1 adhesive behavior is rapidly, but transiently, enhanced in astrocytes by ligand-dependent activation of erbB4 receptors, suggesting that erbB4-mediated events affecting SynCAM1 function contribute to regulate astrocyte adhesive communication. PMID:21486931

  2. Maternal high-fat diet and fetal programming: Increased proliferation of hypothalamic peptide-producing neurons that increase risk for overeating and obesity

    PubMed Central

    Chang, G.-Q.; Gaysinskaya, V.; Karatayev, O.; Leibowitz, S. F.

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies in adult and weanling rats show that dietary fat, in close association with circulating lipids, can stimulate expression of hypothalamic peptides involved in controlling food intake and body weight. In the present study, we examined the possibility that a fat-rich diet during pregnancy alters the development of these peptide systems in utero, producing neuronal changes in the offspring that persist postnatally in the absence of the diet and have long-term consequences. The offspring of dams on a high-fat (HFD) vs balanced diet (BD), from embryonic day 6 to postnatal day 15 (P15), showed increased expression of orexigenic peptides, galanin, enkephalin and dynorphin, in the paraventricular nucleus and orexin and melanin-concentrating hormone in the perifornical lateral hypothalamus. The increased density of these peptide-expressing neurons, evident in newborn offspring as well as P15 offspring cross-fostered at birth to dams on the BD, led us to examine events that might be occurring in utero. During gestation, the HFD stimulated the proliferation of neuroepithelial and neuronal precursor cells of the embryonic hypothalamic third ventricle. It also stimulated the proliferation and differentiation of neurons and their migration toward hypothalamic areas where ultimately a greater proportion of the new neurons expressed the orexigenic peptides. This increase in neurogenesis, closely associated with a marked increase in lipids in the blood, may have a role in producing the long-term behavioral and physiological changes observed in offspring after weaning, including an increase in food intake, preference for fat, hyperlipidemia, and higher body weight. PMID:19005075

  3. IL-1beta induces a MyD88-dependent and ceramide-mediated activation of Src in anterior hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed

    Davis, Christopher N; Tabarean, Iustin; Gaidarova, Svetlana; Behrens, M Margarita; Bartfai, Tamas

    2006-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1beta (IL-1beta), acting at IL-1R1 receptors, affects neuronal signaling under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. The molecular mechanism of the rapid synaptic actions of IL-1beta in neurons is not known. We show here that within minutes of IL-1beta exposure, the firing rate of anterior hypothalamic (AH) neurons in culture was inhibited. This effect was prevented by pre-exposure of the cells to the Src family inhibitor, PP2, suggesting the involvement of Src in the hyperpolarizing effects of IL-1beta. The IL-1beta stimulation of neurons induced a rapid increase in the phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase Src and kinase suppressor of Ras (ceramide activated protein kinase (CAPK)/KSR) in neurons grown on glia from IL-1RI(-/-) mice. These effects of IL-1beta were dependent on the association of the cytosolic adaptor protein, MyD88, to the IL-1 receptor, and on the activation of the neutral sphingomyelinase, leading to production of ceramide. A cell-permeable analog of ceramide mimicked the effects of IL-1beta on the cultured AH neurons. These results suggest that ceramide may be the second messenger of the fast IL-1beta actions in AH neurons, and that this IL-1beta/ceramide pathway may underlie the fast non-transcription-dependent, electrophysiological effects of IL-1beta observed in AH neurons in vivo. PMID:16771830

  4. Central action of FGF19 reduces hypothalamic AGRP/NPY neuron activity and improves glucose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Marcelin, Geneviève; Jo, Young-Hwan; Li, Xiaosong; Schwartz, Gary J; Zhang, Ying; Dun, Nae J; Lyu, Rong-Ming; Blouet, Clémence; Chang, Jaw K; Chua, Streamson

    2014-02-01

    Tight control of glucose excursions has been a long-standing goal of treatment for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in order to ameliorate the morbidity and mortality associated with hyperglycemia. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) 19 is a hormone-like enterokine released postprandially that emerged as a potential therapeutic agent for metabolic disorders, including diabetes and obesity. Remarkably, FGF19 treatment has hypoglycemic actions that remain potent in models of genetic and acquired insulin resistance. Here, we provided evidence that the central nervous system responds to FGF19 administered in the periphery. Then, in two mouse models of insulin resistance, leptin-deficiency and high-fat diet feeding, third intra-cerebro-ventricular infusions of FGF19 improved glycemic status, reduced insulin resistance and potentiated insulin signaling in the periphery. In addition, our study highlights a new mechanism of central FGF19 action, involving the suppression of AGRP/NPY neuronal activity. Overall, our work unveils novel regulatory pathways induced by FGF19 that will be useful in the design of novel strategies to control diabetes in obesity. PMID:24567901

  5. Short-Term Enrichment Makes Male Rats More Attractive, More Defensive and Alters Hypothalamic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Rupshi; Sapolsky, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Innate behaviors are shaped by contingencies built during evolutionary history. On the other hand, environmental stimuli play a significant role in shaping behavior. In particular, a short period of environmental enrichment can enhance cognitive behavior, modify effects of stress on learned behaviors and induce brain plasticity. It is unclear if modulation by environment can extend to innate behaviors which are preserved by intense selection pressure. In the present report we investigate this issue by studying effects of relatively short (14-days) environmental enrichment on two prominent innate behaviors in rats, avoidance of predator odors and ability of males to attract mates. We show that enrichment has strong effects on both the innate behaviors: a) enriched males were more avoidant of a predator odor than non-enriched controls, and had a greater rise in corticosterone levels in response to the odor; and b) had higher testosterone levels and were more attractive to females. Additionally, we demonstrate decrease in dendritic length of neurons of ventrolateral nucleus of hypothalamus, important for reproductive mate-choice and increase in the same in dorsomedial nucleus, important for defensive behavior. Thus, behavioral and hormonal observations provide evidence that a short period of environmental manipulation can alter innate behaviors, providing a good example of gene-environment interaction. PMID:22567125

  6. Effects of embryonic ethanol exposure at low doses on neuronal development, voluntary ethanol consumption and related behaviors in larval and adult zebrafish: Role of hypothalamic orexigenic peptides.

    PubMed

    Sterling, M E; Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Chang, S Y; Leibowitz, S F

    2016-05-01

    Embryonic exposure to ethanol is known to affect neurochemical systems in rodents and increase alcohol drinking and related behaviors in humans and rodents. With zebrafish emerging as a powerful tool for uncovering neural mechanisms of numerous diseases and exhibiting similarities to rodents, the present report building on our rat studies examined in zebrafish the effects of embryonic ethanol exposure on hypothalamic neurogenesis, expression of orexigenic neuropeptides, and voluntary ethanol consumption and locomotor behaviors in larval and adult zebrafish, and also effects of central neuropeptide injections on these behaviors affected by ethanol. At 24h post-fertilization, zebrafish embryos were exposed for 2h to ethanol, at low concentrations of 0.25% and 0.5%, in the tank water. Embryonic ethanol compared to control dose-dependently increased hypothalamic neurogenesis and the proliferation and expression of the orexigenic peptides, galanin (GAL) and orexin (OX), in the anterior hypothalamus. These changes in hypothalamic peptide neurons were accompanied by an increase in voluntary consumption of 10% ethanol-gelatin and in novelty-induced locomotor and exploratory behavior in adult zebrafish and locomotor activity in larvae. After intracerebroventricular injection, these peptides compared to vehicle had specific effects on these behaviors altered by ethanol, with GAL stimulating consumption of 10% ethanol-gelatin more than plain gelatin food and OX stimulating novelty-induced locomotor behavior while increasing intake of food and ethanol equally. These results, similar to those obtained in rats, suggest that the ethanol-induced increase in genesis and expression of these hypothalamic peptide neurons contribute to the behavioral changes induced by embryonic exposure to ethanol. PMID:26778786

  7. Estradiol target neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus and lateral ventromedial nucleus of young adult, reproductively senescent, and monosodium glutamate-lesioned female golden hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Blaha, G.C.; Lamperti, A.A.

    1983-09-01

    Histoautoradiographic methods were used to assess estrogen target neurons in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) and ventromedial nucleus, lateral portion (LVM), comparing young adult and aged female golden hamsters. A subgroup of young adult females had ARC lesions induced by monosodium glutamate at neonatal day 8. All were ovariectomized to remove endogenous estrogens. Controls were given nonradioactive estradiol. After /sup 3/H-estradiol (/sup 3/H-E2) was injected intravenously, hypothalami were removed, frozen, and processed for histoautoradiography. In the ARC and LVM the ratio of /sup 3/H-E2 labelled neurons to total neurons counted was significantly lower in the older animals. Young females with ARC lesions had very few /sup 3/H-E2 labelled neurons remaining in the ARC but had a normal complement in the LVM. Although /sup 3/H-E2 labelled ARC neurons were notably decreased in old females, those ARC neurons that were labelled in the old had virtually the same frequency distribution of the labelling index as in the young, suggesting no change in the average estrogen uptake per target cell.

  8. Stressor-responsive central nesfatin-1 activates corticotropin-releasing hormone, noradrenaline and serotonin neurons and evokes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Natsu; Maejima, Yuko; Sedbazar, Udval; Ando, Akihiko; Kurita, Hideharu; Damdindorj, Boldbaatar; Takano, Eisuke; Gantulga, Darambazar; Iwasaki, Yusaku; Kurashina, Tomoyuki; Onaka, Tatsushi; Dezaki, Katsuya; Nakata, Masanori; Mori, Masatomo; Yada, Toshihiko

    2010-01-01

    A recently discovered satiety molecule, nesfatin-1, is localized in neurons of the hypothalamus and brain stem and colocalized with stress-related substances, corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), oxytocin, proopiomelanocortin, noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT). Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of nesfatin-1 produces fear-related behaviors and potentiates stressor-induced increases in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels in rats. These findings suggest a link between nesfatin-1 and stress. In the present study, we aimed to further clarify the neuronal network by which nesfatin-1 could induce stress responses in rats. Restraint stress induced c-Fos expressions in nesfatin-1-immunoreactive neurons in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and supraoptic nucleus (SON) of the hypothalamus, and in the nucleus of solitary tract (NTS), locus coeruleus (LC) and dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) in the brain stem, without altering plasma nesfatin-1 levels. Icv nesfatin-1 induced c-Fos expressions in the PVN, SON, NTS, LC, DR and median raphe nucleus, including PVN-CRH, NTS-NA, LC-NA and DR-5-HT neurons. Nesfatin-1 increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in the CRH-immunoreactive neurons isolated from PVN. Icv nesfatin-1 increased plasma ACTH and corticosterone levels. These results indicate that the central nesfatin-1 system is stimulated by stress and activates CRH, NA and 5-HT neurons and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, evoking both central and peripheral stress responses. PMID:20966530

  9. Hypothalamic sidedness in mitochondrial metabolism: new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Toth, Istvan; Kiss, David Sandor; Goszleth, Greta; Bartha, Tibor; Frenyo, Laszlo V; Naftolin, Frederick; Horvath, Tamas L; Zsarnovszky, Attila

    2014-12-01

    Morphofunctional changes in hypothalamic neurons are highly energy dependent and rely on mitochondrial metabolism. Therefore, mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate production plays a permissive role in hypothalamic regulatory events. Here, we demonstrated that in the female rat hypothalamus, mitochondrial metabolism and tissue oxygenation show an asymmetric lateralization during the estrous cycle. This asymmetry was not detected in males. The observed sidedness suggests that estrous cycle-linked hypothalamic functions in females are based on hemispheric distinction. The novel concept of hypothalamic asymmetry necessitates the revision of hypothalamic neural circuits, synaptic reorganization, and the role of hypothalamic sides in the regulation of integrated homeostatic functions. PMID:24740989

  10. Co-localization of hypocretin-1 and leucine-enkephalin in hypothalamic neurons projecting to the nucleus of the solitary tract and their effect on arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Ciriello, J; Caverson, M M; McMurray, J C; Bruckschwaiger, E B

    2013-10-10

    Experiments were done to investigate whether hypothalamic hypocretin-1 (hcrt-1; orexin-A) neurons that sent axonal projections to cardiovascular responsive sites in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) co-expressed leucine-enkephalin (L-Enk), and to determine the effects of co-administration of hcrt-1 and D-Ala2,D-Leu5-Enkephalin (DADL) into NTS on mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate. In the first series, in the Wistar rat the retrograde tract-tracer fluorogold (FG) was microinjected (50nl) into caudal NTS sites at which L-glutamate (0.25 M; 10 nl) elicited decreases in MAP and where fibers hcrt-1 immunoreactive fibers were observed that also contained L-Enk immunoreactivity. Of the number of hypothalamic hcrt-1 immunoreactive neurons identified ipsilateral to the NTS injection site (1207 ± 78), 32.3 ± 2.3% co-expressed L-Enk immunoreactivity and of these, 2.6 ± 1.1% were retrogradely labeled with FG. Hcrt-1/L-Enk neurons projecting to NTS were found mainly within the perifornical region. In the second series, the region of caudal NTS found to contain axons that co-expressed hcrt-1 and L-Enk immunoreactivity was microinjected with a combination of hcrt-1 and DADL in α-chloralose anesthetized Wistar rats. Microinjection of DADL into NTS elicited depressor and bradycardia responses similar to those elicited by microinjection of hcrt-1. An hcrt-1 injection immediately after the DADL injection elicited an almost twofold increase in the magnitude of the depressor and bradycardia responses compared to those elicited by hcrt-1 alone. Prior injections of the non-specific opioid receptor antagonist naloxone or the specific opioid δ-receptor antagonist ICI 154,129 significantly attenuated the cardiovascular responses to the combined hcrt-1-DADL injections. Taken together, these data suggest that activation of hypothalamic-opioidergic neuronal systems contribute to the NTS hcrt-1 induced cardiovascular responses, and that this descending hypothalamo

  11. Intracellular oxidative stress and cytotoxicity in rat primary cortical neurons exposed to cholesterol secoaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Raghavamenon, Achuthan C; Gernapudi, Ramkishore; Babu, Sainath; D'Auvergne, Oswald; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Kadowitz, Philip J; Uppu, Rao M

    2009-08-14

    Cholesterol secoaldehyde (ChSeco or 3beta-hydroxy-5-oxo-5,6-secocholestan-6-al) has been shown to induce Abeta aggregation and apoptosis in GT1-7 hypothalamic neurons. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of ChSeco on rat primary cortical neuronal cells. ChSeco was cytotoxic at concentrations ranging from 5 to 20 microM, while cholesterol of comparable concentrations showed little or no toxicity. In ChSeco-exposed neuronal cells, there was an increased formation of intracellular peroxide or peroxide-like substance(s), the levels of which were comparable to those found in typical menadione exposures. There was a loss in the mitochondrial transmembrane potential, the extent of which was dependent on concentration of ChSeco employed. Pre-treatment with N-acetyl-L-cysteine (5 mM; 1 h) offered protection against the cytotoxicity and the generation of intracellular oxidants. Cytotoxicity of ChSeco was evidenced by the loss of axonal branches and also condensed apoptotic nuclei in these cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a decreased intracellular Abeta42 staining proportional to the loss in the axonal out growth and dendritic branches. The observed decrease in Abeta42 has been suggested to be due to loss of integrity of dendrites and the plasma membrane, possibly resulting from increased production of reactive oxygen species. PMID:19505436

  12. Phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor-associated neuronal nitric oxide synthase depends on estrogens and modulates hypothalamic nitric oxide production during the ovarian cycle

    PubMed Central

    Parkash, Jyoti; D'Anglemont De Tassigny, Xavier; Bellefontaine, Nicole; Campagne, Celine; Mazure, Danièle; Buée-Scherrer, Valérie; Prevot, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Within the preoptic region, nitric oxide (NO) production varies during the ovarian cycle and has the ability to impact hypothalamic reproductive function. One mechanism for the regulation of NO release mediated by estrogens during the estrous cycle includes physical association of the calcium-activated neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) enzyme with the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels via the postsynaptic density 95 (PSD 95) scaffolding protein. Here, we demonstrate that endogenous variations in estrogens levels during the estrous cycle also coincide with corresponding changes in the state of nNOS Ser1412 phosphorylation, the level of association of this isoform with the NMDA receptor/PSD-95 complex at the plasma membrane and the activity of NOS. Neuronal NOS Ser1412 phosphorylation is maximal on the afternoon of proestrus, when both the levels of estrogens and the physical association of nNOS with NMDA receptors are highest. Estradiol mimicked these effects in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. In addition, the catalytic activity of NOS in membrane protein extracts from the preoptic region, i.e., independent of any functional protein-protein interactions or cell-cell signaling, was significantly increased in estradioltreated OVX rats compared to OVX rats. Finally, λ phosphatase-mediated nNOS dephosphorylation dramatically impaired NOS activity in preoptic region protein extracts, thus demonstrating the important role of phosphorylation in the regulation of NO production in the preoptic region. Taken together, these results yield new insights into the regulation of neuron-derived NO production by gonadal steroids within the preoptic region and raise the possibility that changes in nNOS phosphorylation during fluctuating physiological conditions may be involved in the hypothalamic control of key neuroendocrine functions, such as reproduction. PMID:20371700

  13. Arcuate hypothalamic AgRP and putative POMC neurons show opposite changes in spiking across multiple timescales

    PubMed Central

    Mandelblat-Cerf, Yael; Ramesh, Rohan N; Burgess, Christian R; Patella, Paola; Yang, Zongfang; Lowell, Bradford B; Andermann, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Agouti-related-peptide (AgRP) neurons—interoceptive neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARC)—are both necessary and sufficient for driving feeding behavior. To better understand the functional roles of AgRP neurons, we performed optetrode electrophysiological recordings from AgRP neurons in awake, behaving AgRP-IRES-Cre mice. In free-feeding mice, we observed a fivefold increase in AgRP neuron firing with mounting caloric deficit in afternoon vs morning recordings. In food-restricted mice, as food became available, AgRP neuron firing dropped, yet remained elevated as compared to firing in sated mice. The rapid drop in spiking activity of AgRP neurons at meal onset may reflect a termination of the drive to find food, while residual, persistent spiking may reflect a sustained drive to consume food. Moreover, nearby neurons inhibited by AgRP neuron photostimulation, likely including satiety-promoting pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, demonstrated opposite changes in spiking. Finally, firing of ARC neurons was also rapidly modulated within seconds of individual licks for liquid food. These findings suggest novel roles for antagonistic AgRP and POMC neurons in the regulation of feeding behaviors across multiple timescales. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07122.001 PMID:26159614

  14. An In Vitro System Comprising Immortalized Hypothalamic Neuronal Cells (GT1–7 Cells) for Evaluation of the Neuroendocrine Effects of Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Dai; Konoha-Mizuno, Keiko; Mori, Miwako; Yamazaki, Kentaro; Haneda, Toshihiro; Koyama, Hironari; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    Aromatherapy and plant-based essential oils are widely used as complementary and alternative therapies for symptoms including anxiety. Furthermore, it was reportedly effective for the care of several diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and depressive illness. To investigate the pharmacological effects of essential oils, we developed an in vitro assay system using immortalized hypothalamic neuronal cells (GT1–7 cells). In this study, we evaluated the effects of essential oils on neuronal death induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), aluminum, zinc, or the antagonist of estrogen receptor (tamoxifen). Among tests of various essential oils, we found that H2O2-induced neuronal death was attenuated by the essential oils of damask rose, eucalyptus, fennel, geranium, ginger, kabosu, mandarin, myrrh, and neroli. Damask rose oil had protective effects against aluminum-induced neurotoxicity, while geranium and rosemary oil showed protective activity against zinc-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, geranium oil and ginger oil enhanced the neurotoxicity of tamoxifen. Our in vitro assay system could be useful for the neuropharmacological and endocrine pharmacological studies of essential oils. PMID:26576190

  15. Prenatal exposure to ethanol stimulates hypothalamic CCR2 chemokine receptor system: Possible relation to increased density of orexigenic peptide neurons and ethanol drinking in adolescent offspring.

    PubMed

    Chang, G-Q; Karatayev, O; Leibowitz, S F

    2015-12-01

    Clinical and animal studies indicate that maternal consumption of ethanol during pregnancy increases alcohol drinking in the offspring. Possible underlying mechanisms may involve orexigenic peptides, which are stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure and themselves promote drinking. Building on evidence that ethanol stimulates neuroimmune factors such as the chemokine CCL2 that in adult rats is shown to colocalize with the orexigenic peptide, melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) in the lateral hypothalamus (LH), the present study sought to investigate the possibility that CCL2 or its receptor CCR2 in LH is stimulated by prenatal ethanol exposure, perhaps specifically within MCH neurons. Our paradigm of intraoral administration of ethanol to pregnant rats, at low-to-moderate doses (1 or 3g/kg/day) during peak hypothalamic neurogenesis, caused in adolescent male offspring twofold increase in drinking of and preference for ethanol and reinstatement of ethanol drinking in a two-bottle choice paradigm under an intermittent access schedule. This effect of prenatal ethanol exposure was associated with an increased expression of MCH and density of MCH(+) neurons in LH of preadolescent offspring. Whereas CCL2(+) cells at this age were low in density and unaffected by ethanol, CCR2(+) cells were dense in LH and increased by prenatal ethanol, with a large percentage (83-87%) identified as neurons and found to colocalize MCH. Prenatal ethanol also stimulated the genesis of CCR2(+) and MCH(+) neurons in the embryo, which co-labeled the proliferation marker, BrdU. Ethanol also increased the genesis and density of neurons that co-expressed CCR2 and MCH in LH, with triple-labeled CCR2(+)/MCH(+)/BrdU(+) neurons that were absent in control rats accounting for 35% of newly generated neurons in ethanol-exposed rats. With both the chemokine and MCH systems believed to promote ethanol consumption, this greater density of CCR2(+)/MCH(+) neurons in the LH of preadolescent rats suggests that

  16. Diet composition, not calorie intake, rapidly alters intrinsic excitability of hypothalamic AgRP/NPY neurons in mice

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wei; Pham, Kevin; Gammons, Jesse W.; Sutherland, Daniel; Liu, Yanyun; Smith, Alana; Kaczorowski, Catherine C.; O’Connell, Kristen M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic condition resulting from a long-term pattern of poor diet and lifestyle. Long-term consumption of high-fat diet (HFD) leads to persistent activation and leptin resistance in AgRP neurons in the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus (ARH). Here, for the first time, we demonstrate acute effects of HFD on AgRP neuronal excitability and highlight a critical role for diet composition. In parallel with our earlier finding in obese, long-term HFD mice, we found that even brief HFD feeding results in persistent activation of ARH AgRP neurons. However, unlike long-term HFD-fed mice, AgRP neurons from short-term HFD-fed mice were still leptin-sensitive, indicating that the development of leptin-insensitivity is not a prerequisite for the increased firing rate of AgRP neurons. To distinguish between diet composition, caloric intake, and body weight, we compared acute and long-term effects of HFD and CD in pair-fed mice on AgRP neuronal spiking. HFD consumption in pair-fed mice resulted in a significant increase in AgRP neuronal spiking despite controls for weight gain and caloric intake. Taken together, our results suggest that diet composition may be more important than either calorie intake or body weight for electrically remodeling arcuate AgRP/NPY neurons. PMID:26592769

  17. Direct innervation of GnRH neurons by metabolic- & sexual odorant-sensing leptin receptor neurons in the hypothalamic ventral premammillary nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Leshan, Rebecca L.; Louis, Gwendolyn W.; Jo, Young-Hwan; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Münzberg, Heike; Myers, Martin G.

    2009-01-01

    Leptin acts via its receptor (LepRb) on specific CNS neurons to signal the adequacy of long-term energy stores, thereby permitting the expenditure of resources on energy-intensive processes such as reproduction. The ventral premammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus (PMv), which has been implicated in the stimulation of gonadotropin release by olfactory cues, contains numerous LepRb neurons, suggesting a potential role for LepRb PMv neurons in transmitting both metabolic and odorant signals to the neuroendocrine reproductive system. Indeed, Fos-immunoreactivity (-IR) and electrophysiologic recordings revealed the direct activation of LepRb PMv neurons by leptin, and exposure to odors from mice of the opposite sex promoted Fos-IR in many LepRb PMv neurons. To determine the regions innervated by the LepRb PMv neurons, we utilized two novel cre-activated tract-tracing systems in Leprcre animals; data from these systems and from standard tracing techniques revealed that LepRb PMv neurons project to a subset of the regions, including the preoptic area (POA), that are innervated by the PMv as a whole. Furthermore, the retrograde accumulation in LepRb PMv neurons of a trans-synaptic tracer from GnRH neurons revealed the direct innervation of GnRH neurons by many LepRb PMv neurons. Thus, LepRb PMv neurons sense metabolic and sexual odorant cues and project to the rostral hypothalamus to directly innervate GnRH neurons. These results are consistent with a role for LepRb PMv neurons in regulating the reproductive axis in response to metabolic and odorant stimuli. PMID:19279251

  18. Osmotic regulation of neuronal activity: a new role for taurine and glial cells in a hypothalamic neuroendocrine structure.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Deleuze, C; Desarménien, M G; Moos, F C

    2000-10-01

    Maintenance of osmotic pressure is a primary regulatory process essential for normal cell function. The osmolarity of extracellular fluids is regulated by modifying the intake and excretion of salts and water. A major component of this regulatory process is the neuroendocrine hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system, which consists of neurons located in the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei. These neurons synthesize the neurohormones vasopressin and oxytocin and release them in the blood circulation. We here review the mechanisms responsible for the osmoregulation of the activity of these neurons. Notably, the osmosensitivity of the supraoptic nucleus is described including the recent data that suggests an important participation of taurine in the transmission of the osmotic information. Taurine is an amino acid mainly known for its involvement in cell volume regulation, as it is one of the major inorganic osmolytes used by cells to compensate for changes in extracellular osmolarity. In the supraoptic nucleus, taurine is highly concentrated in astrocytes, and released in an osmodependent manner through volume-sensitive anion channels. Via its agonist action on neuronal glycine receptors, taurine is likely to contribute to the inhibition of neuronal activity induced by hypotonic stimuli. This inhibitory influence would complement the intrinsic osmosensitivity of supraoptic neurons, mediated by excitatory mechanoreceptors activated under hypertonic conditions. These observations extend the role of taurine from the regulation of cell volume to that of the whole body fluid balance. They also point to a new role of supraoptic glial cells as active components in a neuroendocrine regulatory loop. PMID:10828380

  19. Alzheimer's disease amyloid beta-protein forms Zn(2+)-sensitive, cation-selective channels across excised membrane patches from hypothalamic neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Kawahara, M; Arispe, N; Kuroda, Y; Rojas, E

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that the 40-residue peptide termed amyloid beta-protein (A beta P[1-40]) in solution forms cation-selective channels across artificial phospholipid bilayer membranes. To determine whether A beta P[1-40] also forms channels across natural membranes, we used electrically silent excised membrane patches from a cell line derived from hypothalamic gonadotrophin-releasing hormone GnRH neurons. We found that exposing either the internal or the external side of excised membrane patches to A beta P[1-40] leads to the spontaneous formation of cation-selective channels. With Cs+ as the main cation in both the external as well as the internal saline, the amplitude of the A beta P[1-40] channel currents was found to follow the Cs+ gradient and to exhibit spontaneous conductance changes over a wide range (50-500 pS). We also found that free zinc (Zn2+), reported to bind to amyloid beta-protein in solution, can block the flow of Cs+ through the A beta P[1-40] channel. Because the Zn2+ chelator o-phenanthroline can reverse this blockade, we conclude that the underlying mechanism involves a direct interaction between the transition element Zn2+ and sites in the A beta P[1-40] channel pore. These properties of the A beta P[1-40] channel are rather similar to those observed in the artificial bilayer system. We also show here, by immunocytochemical confocal microscopy, that amyloid beta-protein molecules form deposits closely associated with the plasma membrane of a substantial fraction of the GnRH neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that the interactions between amyloid beta-protein and neuronal membranes also occur in vivo, lending further support to the idea that A beta P[1-40] channel formation might be a mechanism of amyloid beta-protein neurotoxicity. Images FIGURE 5 PMID:9199772

  20. Short stressor induced long-lasting increases of vasopressin stores in hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, E D; Binnekade, R; Janszen, A W; Tilders, F J

    1996-09-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that single administration of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1) to adult rats induces a long-lasting (weeks) increase of vasopressin (AVP) stores in terminals of CRH neurons in the external zone of the median eminence (ZEME). This is accompanied by hypersecretion of AVP into the pituitary portal circulation and long-lasting hyperresponsiveness of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stressors. Here, we determine whether this form of plasticity of hypothalamic CRH neurons is specific for IL-1 or represents a general response to a stressor. Single exposure of rats to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), IL-1, brain surgery or electric footshocks increases the AVP stores in the ZEME 7 and 11 days later. Exposure to insulin or ether does not affect the AVP stores. The stressors have little or no effect on the CRH stores in the ZEME. The amplitude of the increase in AVP as measured 7-11 days after stimulation correlates with the overall ACTH response to the stressor (area under curve, r = 0.89, P < 0.0001), with the peak ACTH levels (r = 0.52, P < 0.05), but not with the duration of the ACTH response nor with any parameter of the corticosterone response. Administration of ACTH or corticosterone at doses that mimic stress-induced plasma levels does not increase AVP stores 7 days later. We conclude that long-lasting increases of AVP stores in CRH terminals in the ZEME can be induced by various stressors and postulate that the amplitude of such increases depends on the degree of activation of the CRH neurons by the stressor. (NWO grant: 900-543-101.) PMID:8877819

  1. Recruitment of hypothalamic orexin neurons after formalin injections in adult male rats exposed to a neonatal immune challenge

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Erin J.; Watters, Stephanie M.; Zouikr, Ihssane; Hodgson, Deborah M.; Dayas, Christopher V.

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to early life physiological stressors, such as infection, is thought to contribute to the onset of psychopathology in adulthood. In animal models, injections of the bacterial immune challenge, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), during the neonatal period has been shown to alter both neuroendocrine function and behavioral pain responses in adulthood. Interestingly, recent evidence suggests a role for the lateral hypothalamic peptide orexin in stress and nociceptive processing. However, whether neonatal LPS exposure affects the reactivity of the orexin system to formalin-induced inflammatory pain in later life remains to be determined. Male Wistar rats (n = 13) were exposed to either LPS or saline (0.05 mg/kg, i.p) on postnatal days (PND) 3 and 5. On PND 80–97, all rats were exposed to a subcutaneous hindpaw injection of 2.25% formalin. Following behavioral testing, animals were perfused and brains processed for Fos-protein and orexin immunohistochemistry. Rats treated with LPS during the neonatal period exhibited decreased licking behaviors during the interphase of the formalin test, the period typically associated with the active inhibition of pain, and increased grooming responses to formalin in adulthood. Interestingly, these behavioral changes were accompanied by an increase in the percentage of Fos-positive orexin cells in the dorsomedial and perifornical hypothalamus in LPS-exposed animals. Similar increases in Fos-protein were also observed in stress and pain sensitive brain regions that receive orexinergic inputs. These findings highlight a potential role for orexin in the behavioral responses to pain and provide further evidence that early life stress can prime the circuitry responsible for these responses in adulthood. PMID:25805965

  2. AdipoR1 and 2 are expressed on warm sensitive neurons of the hypothalamic preoptic area and contribute to central hyperthermic effects of adiponectin.

    PubMed

    Klein, Izabella; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Tabarean, Iustin; Schaefer, Jean; Holmberg, Kristina H; Klaus, Joe; Xia, Fengcheng; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Dubins, Jeffrey S; Morrison, Brad; Zhukov, Viktor; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Mitsukawa, Kayo; Hadcock, John R; Bartfai, Tamas; Conti, Bruno

    2011-11-14

    Adiponectin can act in the brain to increase energy expenditure and reduce body weight by mechanisms not entirely understood. We found that adiponectin type 1 and type 2 receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) are expressed in warm sensitive neurons of the hypothalamic preoptic area (POA) which play a critical role in the regulation of core body temperature (CBT) and energy balance. Thus, we tested the ability of adiponectin to influence CBT in wild-type mice and in mice deficient for AdipoR1 or AdipoR2. Local injection of adiponectin into the POA induced prolonged elevation of core body temperature and decreased respiratory exchange ratio (RER) indicating that increased energy expenditure is associated with increased oxidation of fat over carbohydrates. In AdipoR1 deficient mice, the ability of adiponectin to raise CBT was significantly blunted and its ability to decrease RER was completely lost. In AdipoR2 deficient mice, adiponectin had only diminished hyperthermic effects but reduced RER similarly to wild type mice. These results indicate that adiponectin can contribute to energy homeostasis by regulating CBT by direct actions on AdipoR1 and R2 in the POA. PMID:22000082

  3. Control of Energy Balance by Hypothalamic Gene Circuitry Involving Two Nuclear Receptors, Neuron-Derived Orphan Receptor 1 and Glucocorticoid Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Soo-Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate diverse physiological processes, including the central nervous system control of energy balance. However, the molecular mechanisms for the central actions of NRs in energy balance remain relatively poorly defined. Here we report a hypothalamic gene network involving two NRs, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which directs the regulated expression of orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in response to peripheral signals. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic signal leptin induces NOR1 expression likely via the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the orexigenic signal glucocorticoid mobilizes GR to inhibit NOR1 expression by antagonizing the action of CREB. Also, NOR1 suppresses glucocorticoid-dependent expression of AgRP and NPY. Consistently, relative to wild-type mice, NOR1-null mice showed significantly higher levels of AgRP and NPY and were less responsive to leptin in decreasing the expression of AgRP and NPY. These results identify mutual antagonism between NOR1 and GR to be a key rheostat for peripheral metabolic signals to centrally control energy balance. PMID:23897430

  4. Control of energy balance by hypothalamic gene circuitry involving two nuclear receptors, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 and glucocorticoid receptor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Gyun; Lee, Bora; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kim, Juhee; Lee, Seunghee; Lee, Soo-Kyung; Lee, Jae W

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) regulate diverse physiological processes, including the central nervous system control of energy balance. However, the molecular mechanisms for the central actions of NRs in energy balance remain relatively poorly defined. Here we report a hypothalamic gene network involving two NRs, neuron-derived orphan receptor 1 (NOR1) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR), which directs the regulated expression of orexigenic neuropeptides agouti-related peptide (AgRP) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) in response to peripheral signals. Our results suggest that the anorexigenic signal leptin induces NOR1 expression likely via the transcription factor cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB), while the orexigenic signal glucocorticoid mobilizes GR to inhibit NOR1 expression by antagonizing the action of CREB. Also, NOR1 suppresses glucocorticoid-dependent expression of AgRP and NPY. Consistently, relative to wild-type mice, NOR1-null mice showed significantly higher levels of AgRP and NPY and were less responsive to leptin in decreasing the expression of AgRP and NPY. These results identify mutual antagonism between NOR1 and GR to be a key rheostat for peripheral metabolic signals to centrally control energy balance. PMID:23897430

  5. Correlation between the cumulative analgesic effect of electroacupuncture intervention and synaptic plasticity of hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus neurons in rats with sciatica☆

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiuling; Liu, Tao; Chen, Shuping; Gao, Yonghui; Wang, Junying; Qiao, Lina; Liu, Junling

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a rat model of chronic neuropathic pain was established by ligation of the sciatic nerve and a model of learning and memory impairment was established by ovariectomy to investigate the analgesic effect of repeated electroacupuncture stimulation at bilateral Zusanli (ST36) and Yanglingquan (GB34). In addition, associated synaptic changes in neurons in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus were examined. Results indicate that the thermal pain threshold (paw withdrawal latency) was significantly increased in rats subjected to 2-week electroacupuncture intervention compared with 2-day electroacupuncture, but the analgesic effect was weakened remarkably in ovariectomized rats with chronic constrictive injury. 2-week electroacupuncture intervention substantially reversed the chronic constrictive injury-induced increase in the synaptic cleft width and thinning of the postsynaptic density. These findings indicate that repeated electroacupuncture at bilateral Zusanli and Yanglingquan has a cumulative analgesic effect and can effectively relieve chronic neuropathic pain by remodeling the synaptic structure of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus. PMID:25206591

  6. AdipoR1 and 2 are expressed on warm sensitive neurons of the hypothalamic preoptic area and contribute to central hyperthermic effects of adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Izabella; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Tabarean, Iustin; Schaefer, Jean; Holmberg, Kristina H.; Klaus, Joe; Xia, Fengcheng; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Dubins, Jeffrey S.; Morrison, Brad; Zhukov, Viktor; Sanchez-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Mitsukawa, Kayo; Hadcock, John R.; Bartfai, Tamas; Conti, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Adiponectin can act in the brain to increase energy expenditure and reduce body weight by mechanisms not entirely understood. We found that adiponectin type 1 and type 2 receptors (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) are expressed in warm sensitive neurons of the hypothalamic preoptic area (POA) which play a critical role in the regulation of core body temperature (CBT) and energy balance. Thus, we tested the ability of adiponectin to influence CBT in wild-type mice and in mice deficient for AdipoR1 or AdipoR2. Local injection of adiponectin into the POA induced prolonged elevation of core body temperature and decreased respiratory exchange ratio (RER) indicating that increased energy expenditure is associated with increased oxidation of fat over carbohydrates. In AdipoR1 deficient mice, the ability of adiponectin to raise CBT was significantly blunted and its ability to decrease RER was completely lost. In AdipoR2 deficient mice, adiponectin had only diminished hyperthermic effects but reduced RER similarly to wild type mice. These results indicate that adiponectin can contribute to energy homeostasis by regulating CBT by direct actions on AdipoR1 and R2 in the POA. PMID:22000082

  7. Angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptors have a major somatodendritic distribution in vasopressin-containing neurons in the mouse hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Christal G.; Anrather, Josef; Iadecola, Costantino; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2009-01-01

    The hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and angiotensin II (AngII) play critical roles in cardiovascular and neurohumoral regulation ascribed in part to vasopressin (VP) release. The AngII actions in the PVN are mediated largely through AngII type 1 (AT1) receptors. However, there is indirect evidence that the functionally elusive central AngII type 2 (AT2) receptors are also mediators of AngII signaling in the PVN. We used electron microscopic dual immunolabeling of antisera recognizing the AT2 receptor and VP to test the hypothesis that PVN neurons expressing VP are among the cellular sites where this receptor has a subcellular distribution conducive to local activation. Immunoreactivity for the AT2 receptor was detected in somatodendritic profiles, of which ~60% of the somata and ~28% of the dendrites also contained VP. In comparison with somata and dendrites, axons, axon terminals, and glia less frequently contained the AT2 receptor. Somatic labeling for the AT2 receptor was often seen in the cytoplasm near the Golgi lamellae and other endomembrane structures implicated in receptor trafficking. AT2 receptor immunoreactivity in dendrites was commonly localized to cytoplasmic endomembranes, but was occasionally observed on extra- or peri-synaptic portions of the plasma membrane apposed by astrocytic processes or by unlabeled axon terminals. The labeled dendritic plasmalemmal segments containing AT2 receptors received asymmetric excitatory-type or more rarely symmetric inhibitory-type contacts from unlabeled axon terminals containing dense core vesicles, many of which are known to store neuropeptides. These results provide the first ultrastructural evidence that AT2 receptors in PVN neurons expressing vasopressin and other neuromodulators are strategically positioned for surface activation by AngII and/or intracellular trafficking. PMID:19539723

  8. Disinhibition of perifornical hypothalamic neurones activates noradrenergic neurones and blocks pontine carbachol-induced REM sleep-like episodes in rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jackie W; Fenik, Victor B; Branconi, Jennifer L; Mann, Graziella L; Rukhadze, Irma; Kubin, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Studies in behaving animals suggest that neurones located in the perifornical (PF) region of the posterior hypothalamus promote wakefulness and suppress sleep. Among such cells are those that synthesize the excitatory peptides, orexins (ORX). Lack of ORX, or their receptors, is associated with narcolepsy/cataplexy, a disorder characterized by an increased pressure for rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. We used anaesthetized rats in which pontine microinjections of a cholinergic agonist, carbachol, can repeatedly elicit REM sleep-like episodes to test whether activation of PF cells induced by antagonism of endogenous, GABAA receptor-mediated, inhibition suppresses the ability of the brainstem to generate REM sleep-like state. Microinjections of the GABAA receptor antagonist, bicuculline (20 nl, 1 mm), into the PF region elicited cortical and hippocampal activation, increased the respiratory rate and hypoglossal nerve activity, induced c-fos expression in ORX and other PF neurones, and increased c-fos expression in pontine A7 and other noradrenergic neurones. The ability of pontine carbachol to elicit any cortical, hippocampal or brainstem component of the REM sleep-like response was abolished during the period of bicuculline-induced activation. The activating and REM sleep-suppressing effect of PF bicuculline was not attenuated by systemic administration of the ORX type 1 receptor antagonist, SB334867. Thus, activation of PF neurones that are endogenously inhibited by GABAA receptors is sufficient to turn off the brainstem REM sleep-generating network; the effect is, at least in part, due to activation of pontine noradrenergic neurones, but is not mediated by ORX type 1 receptors. A malfunction of the pathway that originates in GABAA receptor-expressing PF neurones may cause narcolepsy/cataplexy. PMID:17495048

  9. Topography of subnuclei of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus in rats and sensitivity of their neurons to insulin defficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Goufman, E.I.

    1985-07-01

    This investigation was undertaken to study the reaction of paraventricular nuclei (PVN) subnuclei to insulin deficiency and to elevation of the blood glucose level under conditions of experimental alloxan diabetes. Experiments were carried out on 15 control and 15 experimental mature male Wistar rats. The state of the carbohydrate metabolism of the diabetic and control animals was judged by the blood glucose and radioimmune insulin levels. The results of these investigations show that both magnocellular and parvocellular neurons of PVN react to alloxan diabetes, which supports the hypothesis that PVN of the hypothalamus participates in the control of carbohydrate metabolism.

  10. Hypothalamic lipophagy and energetic balance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rajat

    2011-10-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular turnover process that degrades unwanted cytoplasmic material within lysosomes. Through "in bulk" degradation of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles, including lipid droplets, autophagy helps provide an alternative fuel source, in particular, when nutrients are scarce. Recent work demonstrates a role for autophagy in hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons in regulation of food intake and energy balance. The induction of autophagy in hypothalamic neurons during starvation mobilizes neuronal neutral lipids to generate neuron-intrinsic free fatty acids that serve to upregulate fasting-induced AgRP levels. Blocking autophagy in AgRP neurons in mice reduces fasting-induced food intake, and increases constitutive levels of anorexigenic hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin and its cleavage product α-melanocyte stimulating hormone. The energetic consequences of these molecular events are decreased body weight and reduced adiposity. The present article discusses this recent finding, as well as considers possible future directions that may help better understand how neuronal autophagy, and its possible reduction during aging, may affect whole body energy balance. PMID:22024462

  11. Hypothalamic oxytocin and vasopressin neurons exert sex-specific effects on pair bonding, gregariousness, and aggression in finches.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Aubrey M; Goodson, James L

    2014-04-22

    Antagonism of oxytocin (OT) receptors (OTRs) impairs the formation of pair bonds in prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) and zebra finches (Taenioypygia guttata), and also reduces the preference for the larger of two groups ("gregariousness") in finches. These effects tend to be stronger in females. The contributions of specific peptide cell groups to these processes remain unknown, however. This issue is complicated by the fact that OTRs in finches and voles bind not only forms of OT, but also vasopressin (VP), and >10 cell groups produce each peptide in any given species. Using RNA interference, we found that knockdown of VP and OT production in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus exerts diverse behavioral effects in zebra finches, most of which are sexually differentiated. Our data show that knockdown of VP production significantly reduces gregariousness in both sexes and exerts sex-specific effects on aggression directed toward opposite-sex birds (increases in males; decreases in females), whereas OT knockdown produces female-specific deficits in gregariousness, pair bonding, and nest cup ownership; reduces side-by-side perching in both sexes; modulates stress coping; and induces hyperphagia in males. These findings demonstrate that paraventricular neurons are major contributors to the effects of VP-OT peptides on pair bonding and gregariousness; reveal previously unknown effects of sex-specific peptide on opposite-sex aggression; and demonstrate a surprising lack of effects on same-sex aggression. Finally, the observed effects of OT knockdown on feeding and stress coping parallel findings in mammals, suggesting that OT modulation of these processes is evolutionarily conserved across the amniote vertebrate classes. PMID:24711411

  12. Tyrosine Hydroxylase Is Short-Term Regulated by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in PC12 Cells and Hypothalamic and Brainstem Neurons from Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Possible Implications in Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Carbajosa, Nadia A. Longo; Corradi, Gerardo; Verrilli, María A. Lopez; Guil, María J.; Vatta, Marcelo S.; Gironacci, Mariela M.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrations in the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) are implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamines biosynthesis, is involved in hypertension development. In this study we investigated whether UPS regulated TH turnover in PC12 cells and hypothalamic and brainstem neurons from spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and whether this system was impaired in hypertension. PC12 cells were exposed to proteasome or lysosome inhibitors and TH protein level evaluated by Western blot. Lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, induced an increase of 86±15% in TH levels after 30 min of incubation, then it started to decrease up to 6 h to reach control levels and finally it rose up to 35.2±8.5% after 24 h. Bafilomycin, a lysosome inhibitor, did not alter TH protein levels during short times, but it increased TH by 92±22% above basal after 6 h treatment. Before degradation proteasome substrates are labeled by conjugation with ubiquitin. Efficacy of proteasome inhibition on TH turnover was evidenced by accumulation of ubiquitinylated TH after 30 min. Further, the inhibition of proteasome increased the quantity of TH phosphorylated at Ser40, which is essential for TH activity, by 2.7±0.3 fold above basal. TH protein level was upregulated in neurons from hypothalami and brainstem of SHR when the proteasome was inhibited during 30 min, supporting that neuronal TH is also short-term regulated by the proteasome. Since the increased TH levels reported in hypertension may result from proteasome dysfunction, we evaluate proteasme activity. Proteasome activity was significantly reduced by 67±4% in hypothalamic and brainstem neurons from SHR while its protein levels did not change. Present findings show that TH is regulated by the UPS. The impairment in proteasome activity observed in SHR neurons may be one of the causes of the increased TH protein levels reported in hypertension. PMID:25710381

  13. Supression of the steroid-primed luteinizing hormone surge in the female rat by sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate: Relationship to hypothalamic catecholamines and GnRH neuronal activation

    EPA Science Inventory

    In female rodents, hypothalamic norepinephrine (NE) has a role in stimulating the secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) that triggers the ovulatory surge of luteinizing hormone (LH). NE synthesis from dopamine requires the presence of dopamine--hydroxylase (DH) an...

  14. Molecular regulation of hypothalamic development and physiological functions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanxia; Sun, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The hypothalamus is composed of many heterogeneous nuclei that control distinct physiological functions. Investigating molecular mechanisms that regulate the specification of these nuclei and specific neuronal subtypes, and their contribution to diverse hypothalamic functions, is an exciting research focus. Here, we begin by summarizing the hypothalamic functions of feeding regulation, sleep-wake cycles, stress responses, and circadian rhythm, and describing their anatomical bases. Next, we review the molecular regulation of formation of hypothalamic territories, specification of nuclei and subnuclei, and generation of specific neurons. Finally, we highlight physiological and behavioral consequences of altered hypothalamic development. Identifying molecules that regulate hypothalamic development and function will increase our understanding of hypothalamus-related disorders, such as obesity and diabetes, and aid in the development of therapies aimed specifically at their etiologies. PMID:26223804

  15. Metabolic Benefit of Chronic Caloric Restriction and Activation of Hypothalamic AGRP/NPY Neurons in Male Mice Is Independent of Ghrelin.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Nicole H; Walsh, Heidi; Alvarez-Garcia, Oscar; Park, Seongjoon; Gaylinn, Bruce; Thorner, Michael O; Smith, Roy G

    2016-04-01

    Aging is associated with attenuated ghrelin signaling. During aging, chronic caloric restriction (CR) produces health benefits accompanied by enhanced ghrelin production. Ghrelin receptor (GH secretagogue receptor 1a) agonists administered to aging rodents and humans restore the young adult phenotype; therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the metabolic benefits of CR are mediated by endogenous ghrelin. Three month-old male mice lacking ghrelin (Ghrelin-/-) or ghrelin receptor (Ghsr-/-), and their wild-type (WT) littermates were randomly assigned to 2 groups: ad libitum (AL) fed and CR, where 40% food restriction was introduced gradually to allow Ghrelin-/- and Ghsr-/- mice to metabolically adapt and avoid severe hypoglycemia. Twelve months later, plasma ghrelin, metabolic parameters, ambulatory activity, hypothalamic and liver gene expression, as well as body composition were measured. CR increased plasma ghrelin and des-acyl ghrelin concentrations in WT and Ghsr-/- mice. CR of WT, Ghsr-/-, and Ghrelin-/- mice markedly improved metabolic flexibility, enhanced ambulatory activity, and reduced adiposity. Inactivation of Ghrelin or Ghsr had no effect on AL food intake or food anticipatory behavior. In contrast to the widely held belief that endogenous ghrelin regulates food intake, CR increased expression of hypothalamic Agrp and Npy, with reduced expression of Pomc across genotypes. In the AL context, ablation of ghrelin signaling markedly inhibited liver steatosis, which correlated with reduced Pparγ expression and enhanced Irs2 expression. Although CR and administration of GH secretagogue receptor 1a agonists both benefit the aging phenotype, we conclude the benefits of chronic CR are a consequence of enhanced metabolic flexibility independent of endogenous ghrelin or des-acyl ghrelin signaling. PMID:26812158

  16. Role of developmental factors in hypothalamic function

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Jakob; Tahor, Maayan; Wircer, Einav; Levkowitz, Gil

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a brain region which regulates homeostasis by mediating endocrine, autonomic and behavioral functions. It is comprised of several nuclei containing distinct neuronal populations producing neuropeptides and neurotransmitters that regulate fundamental body functions including temperature and metabolic rate, thirst and hunger, sexual behavior and reproduction, circadian rhythm, and emotional responses. The identity, number and connectivity of these neuronal populations are established during the organism’s development and are of crucial importance for normal hypothalamic function. Studies have suggested that developmental abnormalities in specific hypothalamic circuits can lead to obesity, sleep disorders, anxiety, depression and autism. At the molecular level, the development of the hypothalamus is regulated by transcription factors (TF), secreted growth factors, neuropeptides and their receptors. Recent studies in zebrafish and mouse have demonstrated that some of these molecules maintain their expression in the adult brain and subsequently play a role in the physiological functions that are regulated by hypothalamic neurons. Here, we summarize the involvement of some of the key developmental factors in hypothalamic development and function by focusing on the mouse and zebrafish genetic model organisms. PMID:25954163

  17. The role of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing.

    PubMed

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortes-Campos, Christian; Barahona, Maria J; Oyarce, Karina A; Carril, Claudio A; García-Robles, Maria A

    2015-07-01

    Tanycytes are elongated hypothalamic glial cells that cover the basal walls of the third ventricle; their apical regions contact the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and their processes reach hypothalamic neuronal nuclei that control the energy status of an organism. These nuclei maintain the balance between energy expenditure and intake, integrating several peripheral signals and triggering cellular responses that modify the feeding behaviour and peripheral glucose homeostasis. One of the most important and well-studied signals that control this process is glucose; however, the mechanism by which this molecule is sensed remains unknown. We along with others have proposed that tanycytes play a key role in this process, transducing changes in CSF glucose concentration to the neurons that control energy status. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression and function of monocarboxylate transporters and canonical pancreatic β cell glucose sensing molecules, including glucose transporter 2 and glucokinase, in tanycytes. These and other data, which will be discussed in this review, suggest that hypothalamic glucosensing is mediated through a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and neurons through lactate. This article will summarize the recent evidence that supports the importance of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing, and discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Finally, it is important to highlight that a detailed analysis of this mechanism could represent an opportunity to understand the evolution of associated pathologies, including diabetes and obesity, and identify new candidates for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26081217

  18. The role of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing

    PubMed Central

    Elizondo-Vega, Roberto; Cortes-Campos, Christian; Barahona, Maria J; Oyarce, Karina A; Carril, Claudio A; García-Robles, Maria A

    2015-01-01

    Tanycytes are elongated hypothalamic glial cells that cover the basal walls of the third ventricle; their apical regions contact the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and their processes reach hypothalamic neuronal nuclei that control the energy status of an organism. These nuclei maintain the balance between energy expenditure and intake, integrating several peripheral signals and triggering cellular responses that modify the feeding behaviour and peripheral glucose homeostasis. One of the most important and well-studied signals that control this process is glucose; however, the mechanism by which this molecule is sensed remains unknown. We along with others have proposed that tanycytes play a key role in this process, transducing changes in CSF glucose concentration to the neurons that control energy status. Recent studies have demonstrated the expression and function of monocarboxylate transporters and canonical pancreatic β cell glucose sensing molecules, including glucose transporter 2 and glucokinase, in tanycytes. These and other data, which will be discussed in this review, suggest that hypothalamic glucosensing is mediated through a metabolic interaction between tanycytes and neurons through lactate. This article will summarize the recent evidence that supports the importance of tanycytes in hypothalamic glucosensing, and discuss the possible mechanisms involved in this process. Finally, it is important to highlight that a detailed analysis of this mechanism could represent an opportunity to understand the evolution of associated pathologies, including diabetes and obesity, and identify new candidates for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26081217

  19. Effects of Hypothalamic Neurodegeneration on Energy Balance

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Normal aging in humans and rodents is accompanied by a progressive increase in adiposity. To investigate the role of hypothalamic neuronal circuits in this process, we used a Cre-lox strategy to create mice with specific and progressive degeneration of hypothalamic neurons that express agouti-related protein (Agrp) or proopiomelanocortin (Pomc), neuropeptides that promote positive or negative energy balance, respectively, through their opposing effects on melanocortin receptor signaling. In previous studies, Pomc mutant mice became obese, but Agrp mutant mice were surprisingly normal, suggesting potential compensation by neuronal circuits or genetic redundancy. Here we find that Pomc-ablation mice develop obesity similar to that described for Pomc knockout mice, but also exhibit defects in compensatory hyperphagia similar to what occurs during normal aging. Agrp-ablation female mice exhibit reduced adiposity with normal compensatory hyperphagia, while animals ablated for both Pomc and Agrp neurons exhibit an additive interaction phenotype. These findings provide new insight into the roles of hypothalamic neurons in energy balance regulation, and provide a model for understanding defects in human energy balance associated with neurodegeneration and aging. PMID:16296893

  20. Comparison of abnormal isoform of prion protein in prion-infected cell lines and primary-cultured neurons by PrPSc-specific immunostaining.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Misaki; Fujiwara, Ai; Suzuki, Akio; Yamasaki, Takeshi; Hasebe, Rie; Masujin, Kentaro; Horiuchi, Motohiro

    2016-08-01

    We established abnormal isoform of prion protein (PrPSc)-specific double immunostaining using mAb 132, which recognizes aa 119-127 of the PrP molecule, and novel PrPSc-specific mAb 8D5, which recognizes the N-terminal region of the PrP molecule. Using the PrPSc-specific double immunostaining, we analysed PrPSc in immortalized neuronal cell lines and primary cerebral-neuronal cultures infected with prions. The PrPSc-specific double immunostaining showed the existence of PrPSc positive for both mAbs 132 and 8D5, as well as those positive only for either mAb 132 or mAb 8D5. This indicated that double immunostaining detects a greater number of PrPSc species than single immunostaining. Double immunostaining revealed cell-type-dependent differences in PrPSc staining patterns. In the 22 L prion strain-infected Neuro2a (N2a)-3 cells, a subclone of N2a neuroblastoma cell line, or GT1-7, a subclone of the GT1 hypothalamic neuronal cell line, granular PrPSc stains were observed at the perinuclear regions and cytoplasm, whereas unique string-like PrPSc stains were predominantly observed on the surface of the 22 L strain-infected primary cerebral neurons. Only 14 % of PrPSc in the 22 L strain-infected N2a-3 cells were positive for mAb 8D5, indicating that most of the PrPSc in N2a-3 lack the N-terminal portion. In contrast, nearly half PrPSc detected in the 22 L strain-infected primary cerebral neurons were positive for mAb 8D5, suggesting the abundance of full-length PrPSc that possesses the N-terminal portion of PrP. Further analysis of prion-infected primary neurons using PrPSc-specific immunostaining will reveal the neuron-specific mechanism for prion propagation. PMID:27267758

  1. Effects of ciliary neurotrophic factor and leukemia inhibiting factor on oxytocin and vasopressin magnocellular neuron survival in rat and mouse hypothalamic organotypic cultures

    PubMed Central

    House, Shirley B.; Li, Congyu; Yue, Chunmei; Gainer, Harold

    2008-01-01

    Organotypic cultures of mouse and rat magnocellular neurons (MCNs) in the hypothalamo-neurohypophysial system (HNS) have served as important experimental models for the molecular and physiological study of this neuronal phenotype. However, it has been difficult to maintain significant numbers of the MCNs, particularly vasopressin MCNs, in these cultures for long periods. In this paper, we describe the use of the neurotrophic factors, leukemia inhibiting factor (LIF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) to rescue rat vasopressin (Avp)- and oxytocin (Oxt) – MCNs from axotomy-induced, programmed cell death in vitro. Quantitative data are presented for the efficacy of the LIF family of neurotrophic factors on the survival of MCNs in three nuclei, the paraventricular (PVN), supraoptic (SON), and accessory (ACC) nuclei in the mouse and rat hypothalamus. PMID:19118574

  2. Slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension and concomitant dendritic NMDA receptor trafficking in estrogen receptor β-containing neurons of the mouse hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus are sex and age dependent.

    PubMed

    Marques-Lopes, Jose; Van Kempen, Tracey; Waters, Elizabeth M; Pickel, Virginia M; Iadecola, Costantino; Milner, Teresa A

    2014-09-01

    The incidence of hypertension increases after menopause. Similar to humans, "slow-pressor" doses of angiotensin II (AngII) increase blood pressure in young males, but not in young female mice. However, AngII increases blood pressure in aged female mice, paralleling reproductive hormonal changes. These changes could influence receptor trafficking in central cardiovascular circuits and contribute to hypertension. Increased postsynaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor activity in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) is crucial for the sympathoexcitation driving AngII hypertension. Estrogen receptors β (ERβs) are present in PVN neurons. We tested the hypothesis that changes in ovarian hormones with age promote susceptibility to AngII hypertension, and influence NMDA receptor NR1 subunit trafficking in ERβ-containing PVN neurons. Transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in ERβ-containing cells were implanted with osmotic minipumps delivering AngII (600 ng/kg/min) or saline for 2 weeks. AngII increased blood pressure in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females, but not in 2-month-old females. By electron microscopy, NR1-silver-intensified immunogold (SIG) was mainly in ERβ-EGFP dendrites. At baseline, NR1-SIG density was greater in 2-month-old females than in 2-month-old males or 18-month-old females. After AngII infusion, NR1-SIG density was decreased in 2-month-old females, but increased in 2-month-old males and 18-month-old females. These findings suggest that, in young female mice, NR1 density is decreased in ERβ-PVN dendrites thus reducing NMDA receptor activity and preventing hypertension. Conversely, in young males and aged females, NR1 density is upregulated in ERβ-PVN dendrites and ultimately leads to the neurohumoral dysfunction driving hypertension. PMID:24639345

  3. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Grattan, David R.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  4. A Relationship between Reduced Nucleus Accumbens Shell and Enhanced Lateral Hypothalamic Orexin Neuronal Activation in Long-Term Fructose Bingeing Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Rorabaugh, Jacki M.; Stratford, Jennifer M.; Zahniser, Nancy R.

    2014-01-01

    Fructose accounts for 10% of daily calories in the American diet. Fructose, but not glucose, given intracerebroventricularly stimulates homeostatic feeding mechanisms within the hypothalamus; however, little is known about how fructose affects hedonic feeding centers. Repeated ingestion of sucrose, a disaccharide of fructose and glucose, increases neuronal activity in hedonic centers, the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell and core, but not the hypothalamus. Rats given glucose in the intermittent access model (IAM) display signatures of hedonic feeding including bingeing and altered DA receptor (R) numbers within the NAc. Here we examined whether substituting fructose for glucose in this IAM produces bingeing behavior, alters DA Rs and activates hedonic and homeostatic feeding centers. Following long-term (21-day) exposure to the IAM, rats given 8–12% fructose solutions displayed fructose bingeing but unaltered DA D1R or D2R number. Fructose bingeing rats, as compared to chow bingeing controls, exhibited reduced NAc shell neuron activation, as determined by c-Fos-immunoreactivity (Fos-IR). This activation was negatively correlated with orexin (Orx) neuron activation in the lateral hypothalamus/perifornical area (LH/PeF), a brain region linking homeostatic to hedonic feeding centers. Following short-term (2-day) access to the IAM, rats exhibited bingeing but unchanged Fos-IR, suggesting only long-term fructose bingeing increases Orx release. In long-term fructose bingeing rats, pretreatment with the Ox1R antagonist SB-334867 (30 mg/kg; i.p.) equally reduced fructose bingeing and chow intake, resulting in a 50% reduction in calories. Similarly, in control rats, SB-334867 reduced chow/caloric intake by 60%. Thus, in the IAM, Ox1Rs appear to regulate feeding based on caloric content rather than palatability. Overall, our results, in combination with the literature, suggest individual monosaccharides activate distinct neuronal circuits to promote feeding behavior

  5. Hypothalamic survival circuits: blueprints for purposive behaviors.

    PubMed

    Sternson, Scott M

    2013-03-01

    Neural processes that direct an animal's actions toward environmental goals are critical elements for understanding behavior. The hypothalamus is closely associated with motivated behaviors required for survival and reproduction. Intense feeding, drinking, aggressive, and sexual behaviors can be produced by a simple neuronal stimulus applied to discrete hypothalamic regions. What can these "evoked behaviors" teach us about the neural processes that determine behavioral intent and intensity? Small populations of neurons sufficient to evoke a complex motivated behavior may be used as entry points to identify circuits that energize and direct behavior to specific goals. Here, I review recent applications of molecular genetic, optogenetic, and pharmacogenetic approaches that overcome previous limitations for analyzing anatomically complex hypothalamic circuits and their interactions with the rest of the brain. These new tools have the potential to bridge the gaps between neurobiological and psychological thinking about the mechanisms of complex motivated behavior. PMID:23473313

  6. Hypothalamic Survival Circuits: Blueprints for Purposive Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Sternson, Scott M.

    2015-01-01

    Neural processes that direct an animal’s actions toward environmental goals are critical elements for understanding behavior. The hypothalamus is closely associated with motivated behaviors required for survival and reproduction. Intense feeding, drinking, aggressive, and sexual behaviors can be produced by a simple neuronal stimulus applied to discrete hypothalamic regions. What can these “evoked behaviors” teach us about the neural processes that determine behavioral intent and intensity? Small populations of neurons sufficient to evoke a complex motivated behavior may be used as entry points to identify circuits that energize and direct behavior to specific goals. Here, I review recent applications of molecular genetic, optogenetic, and pharmacogenetic approaches that overcome previous limitations for analyzing anatomically complex hypothalamic circuits and their interactions with the rest of the brain. These new tools have the potential to bridge the gaps between neurobiological and psychological thinking about the mechanisms of complex motivated behavior. PMID:23473313

  7. MECHANISMS IN ENDOCRINOLOGY: Hypothalamic inflammation and nutrition.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Eliana P; Moraes, Juliana C; Cintra, Dennys E; Velloso, Licio A

    2016-09-01

    Selected subpopulations of hypothalamic neurons play important roles in the regulation of whole body energy homeostasis. Studies have shown that the saturated fats present in large amounts in western diets can activate an inflammatory response in the hypothalamus, affecting the capacity of such neurons to respond appropriately to satiety and adipostatic signals. In the first part of this review, we will explore the mechanisms behind saturated fatty acid-induced hypothalamic dysfunction. Next, we will present and discuss recent studies that have identified the mechanisms that mediate some of the anti-inflammatory actions of unsaturated fatty acids in the hypothalamus and the potential for exploring these mechanisms to prevent or treat obesity. PMID:27006108

  8. Pubertas praecox and hypothalamic hamartoma.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, J; Handa, H

    1985-01-01

    Precocious puberty of cerebral origin is classified into pseudoprecocious puberty and true precocious puberty. Pseudoprecocious puberty is caused by HCG secreting tumours. True precocious puberty is caused by various hypothalamic diseases. Among them, hypothalamic hamartoma is the most common cause. Precocious puberty is caused by elevated blood pituitary gonadotropin concentration, secondary to the elevated hypothalamic LHRH secretion. The hypothalamic hamartoma is not infrequently associated with laughing (gelastic) seizures as well as convulsions. Diagnosis of a hypothalamic hamartoma is easily made by CT. Although the hypothalamic hamartoma is difficult to operate on, the value of surgery is stressed for treatment of precocious puberty. This is also confirmed by recent reports. PMID:3897897

  9. Differential subcellular mRNA targeting: deletion of a single nucleotide prevents the transport to axons but not to dendrites of rat hypothalamic magnocellular neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, E; Morris, J F; Richter, D

    1995-01-01

    It has previously been shown that mRNA encoding the arginine vasopressin (AVP) precursor is targeted to axons of rat magnocellular neurons of the hypothalamo-neurohypophyseal tract. In the homozygous Brattle-boro rat, which has a G nucleotide deletion in the coding region of the AVP gene, no such targeting is observed although the gene is transcribed. RNase protection and heteroduplex analyses demonstrate that, in heterozygous animals, which express both alleles of the AVP gene, the wild-type but not the mutant transcript is subject to axonal compartmentation. In contrast, wild-type and mutant AVP mRNAs are present in dendrites. These data suggest the existence of different mechanisms for mRNA targeting to the two subcellular compartments. Axonal mRNA localization appears to take place after protein synthesis; the mutant transcript is not available for axonal targeting because it lacks a stop codon preventing its release from ribosomes. Dendritic compartmentation, on the other hand, is likely to precede translation and, thus, would be unable to discriminate between the two mRNAs. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7753814

  10. Alterations in the subcellular distribution of NADPH oxidase p47(phox) in hypothalamic paraventricular neurons following slow-pressor angiotensin II hypertension in female mice with accelerated ovarian failure.

    PubMed

    Van Kempen, Tracey A; Narayan, Ankita; Waters, Elizabeth M; Marques-Lopes, Jose; Iadecola, Costantino; Glass, Michael J; Pickel, Virginia M; Milner, Teresa A

    2016-08-01

    At younger ages, women have a lower risk for hypertension than men, but this sexual dimorphism declines with the onset of menopause. These differences are paralleled in rodents following "slow-pressor" angiotensin II (AngII) administration: young male and aged female mice, but not young females, develop hypertension. There is also an established sexual dimorphism both in the cardiovascular response to the neurohypophyseal hormone arginine vasopressin (AVP) and in the expression of oxidative stress. We examined the relationship between AngII-mediated hypertension and the cellular distribution of the superoxide generating NADPH oxidase (NOX) in AVP-expressing hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons in "menopausal" female mice. Dual-labeling immunoelectron microscopy was used to determine whether the subcellular distribution of the organizer/adapter NOX p47(phox) subunit is altered in PVN dendrites following AngII administered (14 days) during the "postmenopausal" stage of accelerated ovarian failure (AOF) in young female mice treated with 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide. Slow-pressor AngII elevated blood pressure in AOF females and induced a significant increase in near plasmalemmal p47(phox) and a decrease in cytoplasmic p47(phox) in PVN AVP dendrites. These changes are the opposite of those observed in AngII-induced hypertensive male mice (Coleman et al. [2013] J. Neurosci. 33:4308-4316) and may be ascribed in part to baseline differences between young females and males in the near plasmalemmal p47(phox) on AVP dendrites seen in the present study. These findings highlight fundamental differences in the neural substrates of oxidative stress in the PVN associated with AngII hypertension in postmenopausal females compared with males. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2251-2265, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26659944

  11. Hypothalamic glucose sensing: making ends meet

    PubMed Central

    Routh, Vanessa H.; Hao, Lihong; Santiago, Ammy M.; Sheng, Zhenyu; Zhou, Chunxue

    2014-01-01

    The neuroendocrine system governs essential survival and homeostatic functions. For example, growth is needed for development, thermoregulation maintains optimal core temperature in a changing environment, and reproduction ensures species survival. Stress and immune responses enable an organism to overcome external and internal threats while the circadian system regulates arousal and sleep such that vegetative and active functions do not overlap. All of these functions require a significant portion of the body's energy. As the integrator of the neuroendocrine system, the hypothalamus carefully assesses the energy status of the body in order to appropriately partition resources to provide for each system without compromising the others. While doing so the hypothalamus must ensure that adequate glucose levels are preserved for brain function since glucose is the primary fuel of the brain. To this end, the hypothalamus contains specialized glucose sensing neurons which are scattered throughout the nuclei controlling distinct neuroendocrine functions. We hypothesize that these neurons play a key role in enabling the hypothalamus to partition energy to meet these peripheral survival needs without endangering the brain's glucose supply. This review will first describe the varied mechanisms underlying glucose sensing in neurons within discrete hypothalamic nuclei. We will then evaluate the way in which peripheral energy status regulates glucose sensitivity. For example, during energy deficit such as fasting specific hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons become sensitized to decreased glucose. This increases the gain of the information relay when glucose availability is a greater concern for the brain. Finally, changes in glucose sensitivity under pathological conditions (e.g., recurrent insulin-hypoglycemia, diabetes) will be addressed. The overall goal of this review is to place glucose sensing neurons within the context of hypothalamic control of neuroendocrine function

  12. Hypothalamic Nesfatin-1 Stimulates Sympathetic Nerve Activity via Hypothalamic ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Tanida, Mamoru; Gotoh, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Wang, Mofei; Kuda, Yuhichi; Kurata, Yasutaka; Mori, Masatomo; Shibamoto, Toshishige

    2015-11-01

    Nesfatin-1 acts on the hypothalamus and regulates the autonomic nervous system. However, the hypothalamic mechanisms of nesfatin-1 on the autonomic nervous system are not well understood. In this study, we found that intracerebroventricular (ICV) administration of nesfatin-1 increased the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activity in rats. Furthermore, the activity of sympathetic nerves, in the kidneys, liver, and white adipose tissue (WAT), and blood pressure was stimulated by the ICV injection of nesfatin-1, and these effects were abolished owing to pharmacological inhibition of ERK. Renal sympathoexcitatory and hypertensive effects were also observed with nesfatin-1 microinjection into the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVN). Moreover, nesfatin-1 increased the number of phospho (p)-ERK1/2-positive neurons in the PVN and coexpression of the protein in neurons expressing corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH). Pharmacological blockade of CRH signaling inhibited renal sympathetic and hypertensive responses to nesfatin-1. Finally, sympathetic stimulation of WAT and increased p-ERK1/2 levels in response to nesfatin-1 were preserved in obese animals such as rats that were fed a high-fat diet and leptin receptor-deficient Zucker fatty rats. These findings indicate that nesfatin-1 regulates the autonomic nervous system through ERK signaling in PVN-CRH neurons to maintain cardiovascular function and that the antiobesity effect of nesfatin-1 is mediated by hypothalamic ERK-dependent sympathoexcitation in obese animals. PMID:26310564

  13. The Role of Hypothalamic Neuropeptides in Neurogenesis and Neuritogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bakos, Jan; Zatkova, Martina; Bacova, Zuzana; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a source of neural progenitor cells which give rise to different populations of specialized and differentiated cells during brain development. Newly formed neurons in the hypothalamus can synthesize and release various neuropeptides. Although term neuropeptide recently undergoes redefinition, small-size hypothalamic neuropeptides remain major signaling molecules mediating short- and long-term effects on brain development. They represent important factors in neurite growth and formation of neural circuits. There is evidence suggesting that the newly generated hypothalamic neurons may be involved in regulation of metabolism, energy balance, body weight, and social behavior as well. Here we review recent data on the role of hypothalamic neuropeptides in adult neurogenesis and neuritogenesis with special emphasis on the development of food intake and social behavior related brain circuits. PMID:26881105

  14. Increasing Fatty Acid Oxidation Remodels the Hypothalamic Neurometabolome to Mitigate Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Joseph W.; Aja, Susan; Li, Qun; Bandaru, Veera V. R.; Kim, Eun-Kyoung; Haughey, Norman J.; Kuhajda, Francis P.; Ronnett, Gabriele V.

    2014-01-01

    Modification of hypothalamic fatty acid (FA) metabolism can improve energy homeostasis and prevent hyperphagia and excessive weight gain in diet-induced obesity (DIO) from a diet high in saturated fatty acids. We have shown previously that C75, a stimulator of carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 (CPT-1) and fatty acid oxidation (FAOx), exerts at least some of its hypophagic effects via neuronal mechanisms in the hypothalamus. In the present work, we characterized the effects of C75 and another anorexigenic compound, the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAT) inhibitor FSG67, on FA metabolism, metabolomics profiles, and metabolic stress responses in cultured hypothalamic neurons and hypothalamic neuronal cell lines during lipid excess with palmitate. Both compounds enhanced palmitate oxidation, increased ATP, and inactivated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in hypothalamic neurons in vitro. Lipidomics and untargeted metabolomics revealed that enhanced catabolism of FA decreased palmitate availability and prevented the production of fatty acylglycerols, ceramides, and cholesterol esters, lipids that are associated with lipotoxicity-provoked metabolic stress. This improved metabolic signature was accompanied by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and yet favorable changes in oxidative stress, overt ER stress, and inflammation. We propose that enhancing FAOx in hypothalamic neurons exposed to excess lipids promotes metabolic remodeling that reduces local inflammatory and cell stress responses. This shift would restore mitochondrial function such that increased FAOx can produce hypothalamic neuronal ATP and lead to decreased food intake and body weight to improve systemic metabolism. PMID:25541737

  15. Histaminergic neurons in the hypothalamic thermoregulatory pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Lomax, P.; Green, M.D.

    1981-11-01

    Based on neurochemical and neurophysiological research, especially over the past decade, considerable evidence exists for accepting histamine as a central neurotransmitter alongside the other neuroamines. The data supporting a functional role are not complete, but they do exhibit a consistent pattern in the case of the central thermoregulatory pathways. Thus, the region of the thermoregulatory centers in the rostral hypothalamus contains relatively high concentrations of histamine and the enzyme systems for its synthesis and degradation: degeneration studies indicate histaminergic pathways in the hypothalamus; thermoregulatory changes can be induced by activation of either H/sub 1/ or H/sub 2/ receptors; behavioral studies reveal different functional roles for H/sub 1/ and H/sub 2/ receptors; and the thermoregulatory responses to histamine are detectable across different species, even in nonhomeothermic animals. This evidence supports assigning a transmitter function to histamine in the central thermoregulatory pathways that would appear to be as well-founded as the comparable data amassed for other neuroamines.

  16. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  17. Activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus by posterior hypothalamic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fortuna, Michal G; Stornetta, Ruth L; West, Gavin H; Guyenet, Patrice G

    2009-01-01

    The retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) contains chemically defined neurons (ccRTN neurons) that provide a pH-regulated excitatory drive to the central respiratory pattern generator. Here we test whether ccRTN neurons respond to stimulation of the perifornical hypothalamus (PeF), a region that regulates breathing during sleep, stress and exercise. PeF stimulation with gabazine increased blood pressure, phrenic nerve discharge (PND) and the firing rate of ccRTN neurons in isoflurane-anaesthetized rats. Gabazine produced an approximately parallel upward shift of the steady-state relationship between ccRTN neuron firing rate and end-tidal CO2, and a similar shift of the relationship between PND and end-tidal CO2. The central respiratory modulation of ccRTN neurons persisted after gabazine without a change in pattern. Morphine administration typically abolished PND and reduced the discharge rate of most ccRTN neurons (by 25% on average). After morphine administration, PeF stimulation activated the ccRTN neurons normally but PND activation and the central respiratory modulation of the ccRTN neurons were severely attenuated. In the same rat preparation, most (58%) ccRTN neurons expressed c-Fos after exposure to hypercapnic hyperoxia (6–7% end-tidal CO2; 3.5 h; no hypothalamic stimulation) and 62% expressed c-Fos under hypocapnia (∼3% end-tidal CO2) after PeF stimulation. Under baseline conditions (∼3% end-tidal CO2, hyperoxia, no PeF stimulation) few (11%) ccRTN neurons expressed c-Fos. In summary, most ccRTN neurons are excited by posterior hypothalamic stimulation while retaining their normal response to CNS acidification. ccRTN neurons probably contribute both to the chemical drive of breathing and to the feed-forward control of breathing associated with emotions and or locomotion. PMID:19752119

  18. Hypothalamic control of brown adipose tissue thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Labbé, Sebastien M.; Caron, Alexandre; Lanfray, Damien; Monge-Rofarello, Boris; Bartness, Timothy J.; Richard, Denis

    2015-01-01

    It has long been known, in large part from animal studies, that the control of brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenesis is insured by the central nervous system (CNS), which integrates several stimuli in order to control BAT activation through the sympathetic nervous system (SNS). SNS-mediated BAT activity is governed by diverse neurons found in brain structures involved in homeostatic regulations and whose activity is modulated by various factors including oscillations of energy fluxes. The characterization of these neurons has always represented a challenging issue. The available literature suggests that the neuronal circuits controlling BAT thermogenesis are largely part of an autonomic circuitry involving the hypothalamus, brainstem and the SNS efferent neurons. In the present review, we recapitulate the latest progresses in regards to the hypothalamic regulation of BAT metabolism. We briefly addressed the role of the thermoregulatory pathway and its interactions with the energy balance systems in the control of thermogenesis. We also reviewed the involvement of the brain melanocortin and endocannabinoid systems as well as the emerging role of steroidogenic factor 1 (SF1) neurons in BAT thermogenesis. Finally, we examined the link existing between these systems and the homeostatic factors that modulate their activities. PMID:26578907

  19. Hypothalamic miRNAs: emerging roles in energy balance control

    PubMed Central

    Schneeberger, Marc; Gomez-Valadés, Alicia G.; Ramirez, Sara; Gomis, Ramon; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a crucial central nervous system area controlling appetite, body weight and metabolism. It consists in multiple neuronal types that sense, integrate and generate appropriate responses to hormonal and nutritional signals partly by fine-tuning the expression of specific batteries of genes. However, the mechanisms regulating these neuronal gene programmes in physiology and pathophysiology are not completely understood. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are key regulators of gene expression that recently emerged as pivotal modulators of systemic metabolism. In this article we will review current evidence indicating that miRNAs in hypothalamic neurons are also implicated in appetite and whole-body energy balance control. PMID:25729348

  20. Hypocretin/orexin loss changes the hypothalamic immune response.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Susumu; Takizawa, Nae; Honda, Yoshiko; Koike, Taro; Oe, Souichi; Toyoda, Hiromi; Kodama, Tohru; Yamada, Hisao

    2016-10-01

    Hypocretin, also known as orexin, maintains the vigilance state and regulates various physiological processes, such as arousal, sleep, food intake, energy expenditure, and reward. Previously, we found that when wild-type mice and hypocretin/ataxin-3 littermates (which are depleted of hypothalamic hypocretin-expressing neurons postnatally) were administered lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the two genotypes exhibited significant differences in their sleep/wake cycle, including differences in the degree of increase in sleep periods and in recovery from sickness behaviour. In the present study, we examined changes in the hypothalamic vigilance system and in the hypothalamic expression of inflammatory factors in response to LPS in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Peripheral immune challenge with LPS affected the hypothalamic immune response and vigilance states. This response was altered by the loss of hypocretin. Hypocretin expression was inhibited after LPS injection in both hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice and their wild-type littermates, but expression was completely abolished only in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice. Increases in the number of histidine decarboxylase (HDC)-positive cells and in Hdc mRNA expression were found in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice, and this increase was suppressed by LPS. Hypocretin loss did not impact the change in expression of hypothalamic inflammatory factors in response to LPS, except for interferon gamma and colony stimulating factor 3. The number of c-Fos-positive/HDC-positive cells in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice administered LPS injections was elevated, even during the rest period, in all areas, suggesting that there is an increase in the activity of histaminergic neurons in hypocretin/ataxin-3 mice following LPS injection. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for hypocretin in the hypothalamic response to peripheral immune challenge. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. PMID:27318095

  1. Hypothalamic BOLD response to glucose intake and hypothalamic volume are similar in anorexia nervosa and healthy control subjects

    PubMed Central

    van Opstal, Anna M.; Westerink, Anna M.; Teeuwisse, Wouter M.; van der Geest, Mirjam A. M.; van Furth, Eric F.; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Background: Inconsistent findings about the neurobiology of Anorexia Nervosa (AN) hinder the development of effective treatments for this severe mental disorder. Therefore, the need arises for elucidation of neurobiological factors involved in the pathophysiology of AN. The hypothalamus plays a key role in the neurobiological processes that govern food intake and energy homeostasis, processes that are disturbed in anorexia nervosa (AN). The present study will assess the hypothalamic response to energy intake and the hypothalamic structure in patients with AN and healthy controls. Methods: Ten women aged 18–30 years diagnosed with AN and 11 healthy, lean (BMI < 23 kg/m2) women in the same age range were recruited. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine function of the hypothalamus in response to glucose. Structural MRI was used to determine differences in hypothalamic volume and local gray matter volume using manual segmentation and voxel-based morphometry. Results: No differences were found in hypothalamic volume and neuronal activity in response to a glucose load between the patients and controls. Whole brain structural analysis showed a significant decrease in gray matter volume in the cingulate cortex in the AN patients, bilaterally. Conclusions: We argue that in spite of various known changes in the hypothalamus the direct hypothalamic response to glucose intake is similar in AN patients and healthy controls. PMID:25999808

  2. Hypothalamic and dietary control of temperature-mediated longevity

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin; Morrison, Brad; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia; Bartfai, Tamas; Conti, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Temperature is an important modulator of longevity and aging in both poikilotherms and homeotherm animals. In homeotherms, temperature homeostasis is regulated primarily in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus. This region receives and integrates peripheral, central and environmental signals and maintains a nearly constant core body temperature (Tcore) by regulating the autonomic and hormonal control of heat production and heat dissipation. Temperature sensitive neurons found in the POA are considered key elements of the neuronal circuitry modulating these effects. Nutrient homeostasis is also a hypothalamically regulated modulator of aging as well as one of the signals that can influence Tcore in homeotherms. Investigating the mechanisms of the regulation of nutrient and temperature homeostasis in the hypothalamus is important to understand how these two elements of energy homeostasis influence longevity and aging as well as how aging can affect hypothalamic homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:19631766

  3. Hypothalamic and dietary control of temperature-mediated longevity.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin; Morrison, Brad; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia; Bartfai, Tamas; Conti, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Temperature is an important modulator of longevity and aging in both poikilotherms and homeotherm animals. In homeotherms, temperature homeostasis is regulated primarily in the preoptic area (POA) of the hypothalamus. This region receives and integrates peripheral, central and environmental signals and maintains a nearly constant core body temperature (T(core)) by regulating the autonomic and hormonal control of heat production and heat dissipation. Temperature sensitive neurons found in the POA are considered key elements of the neuronal circuitry modulating these effects. Nutrient homeostasis is also a hypothalamically regulated modulator of aging as well as one of the signals that can influence T(core) in homeotherms. Investigating the mechanisms of the regulation of nutrient and temperature homeostasis in the hypothalamus is important to understanding how these two elements of energy homeostasis influence longevity and aging as well as how aging can affect hypothalamic homeostatic mechanisms. PMID:19631766

  4. Organotypic slice culture of the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of rat

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Eun Seong; Lee, So Yeong; Park, Jae-Yong; Hong, Seong-Geun

    2007-01-01

    Organotypic slice cultures have been developed as an alternative to acute brain slices because the neuronal viability and synaptic connectivity in these cultures can be preserved well for a prolonged period of time. This study evaluated a stationary organotypic slice culture developed for the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of rat. The results showed that the slice cultures maintain the typical shape of the nucleus, the immunocytochemical signals for oxytocin, vasopressin, and corticotropin-releasing hormone, and the electrophysiological properties of PVN neurons for up to 3 weeks in vitro. The PVN neurons in the culture expressed the green fluorescent protein gene that had been delivered by the adenoviral vectors. The results indicate that the cultured slices preserve the properties of the PVN neurons, and can be used in longterm studies on these neurons in vitro. PMID:17322769

  5. Orexin A attenuates palmitic acid-induced hypothalamic cell death.

    PubMed

    Duffy, Cayla M; Nixon, Joshua P; Butterick, Tammy A

    2016-09-01

    Palmitic acid (PA), an abundant dietary saturated fatty acid, contributes to obesity and hypothalamic dysregulation in part through increase in oxidative stress, insulin resistance, and neuroinflammation. Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a result of PA exposure contributes to the onset of neuronal apoptosis. Additionally, high fat diets lead to changes in hypothalamic gene expression profiles including suppression of the anti-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein B cell lymphoma 2 associated X protein (Bax). Orexin A (OXA), a hypothalamic peptide important in obesity resistance, also contributes to neuroprotection. Prior studies have demonstrated that OXA attenuates oxidative stress induced cell death. We hypothesized that OXA would be neuroprotective against PA induced cell death. To test this, we treated an immortalized hypothalamic cell line (designated mHypoA-1/2) with OXA and PA. We demonstrate that OXA attenuates PA-induced hypothalamic cell death via reduced caspase-3/7 apoptosis, stabilization of Bcl-2 gene expression, and reduced Bax/Bcl-2 gene expression ratio. We also found that OXA inhibits ROS production after PA exposure. Finally, we show that PA exposure in mHypoA-1/2 cells significantly reduces basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. However, OXA treatment reverses PA-induced changes in intracellular metabolism, increasing basal respiration, maximum respiration, ATP production, and reserve capacity. Collectively, these results support that OXA protects against PA-induced hypothalamic dysregulation, and may represent one mechanism through which OXA can ameliorate effects of obesogenic diet on brain health. PMID:27449757

  6. Functional Interrogation of Adult Hypothalamic Neurogenesis with Focal Radiological Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daniel A.; Salvatierra, Juan; Velarde, Esteban; Wong, John; Ford, Eric C.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2013-01-01

    The functional characterization of adult-born neurons remains a significant challenge. Approaches to inhibit adult neurogenesis via invasive viral delivery or transgenic animals have potential confounds that make interpretation of results from these studies difficult. New radiological tools are emerging, however, that allow one to noninvasively investigate the function of select groups of adult-born neurons through accurate and precise anatomical targeting in small animals. Focal ionizing radiation inhibits the birth and differentiation of new neurons, and allows targeting of specific neural progenitor regions. In order to illuminate the potential functional role that adult hypothalamic neurogenesis plays in the regulation of physiological processes, we developed a noninvasive focal irradiation technique to selectively inhibit the birth of adult-born neurons in the hypothalamic median eminence. We describe a method for Computer tomography-guided focal irradiation (CFIR) delivery to enable precise and accurate anatomical targeting in small animals. CFIR uses three-dimensional volumetric image guidance for localization and targeting of the radiation dose, minimizes radiation exposure to nontargeted brain regions, and allows for conformal dose distribution with sharp beam boundaries. This protocol allows one to ask questions regarding the function of adult-born neurons, but also opens areas to questions in areas of radiobiology, tumor biology, and immunology. These radiological tools will facilitate the translation of discoveries at the bench to the bedside. PMID:24300415

  7. Involvement of neurogenesis in the hypothalamic area in establishing long-term heat acclimation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Shido, Osamu; Matsuzaki, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    This review summarizes earlier studies of long-term heat acclimation (LHA) in rats. Since thermoregulatory changes of LHA are stable and sustained, persisting functional and morphological changes are expected to occur in the thermoregulatory centers. Heat exposure increases the number of newborn cells in the ependymal layer of the third ventricle. With time, these newborn cells migrate into the hypothalamic parenchyma and differentiate to immature or mature neurons, some of which integrate into hypothalamic neuralne tworks. The generation of new functional neurons in the hypothalamus may be an important mechanism of LHA.

  8. Specification of select hypothalamic circuits and innate behaviors by the embryonic patterning gene Dbx1

    PubMed Central

    Sokolowski, Katie; Esumi, Shigeyuki; Hirata, Tsutomu; Kamal, Yasman; Tran, Tuyen; Lam, Andrew; Oboti, Livio; Brighthaupt, Sherri-Chanelle; Zaghlula, Manar; Martinez, Jennifer; Ghimbovschi, Svetlana; Knoblach, Susan; Pierani, Alessandra; Tamamaki, Nobuaki; Shah, Nirao M; Jones, Kevin S; Corbin, Joshua G

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The hypothalamus integrates information required for the production of a variety of innate behaviors such as feeding, mating, aggression and predator avoidance. Despite an extensive knowledge of hypothalamic function, how embryonic genetic programs specify circuits that regulate these behaviors remains unknown. Here, we find that in the hypothalamus the developmentally regulated homeodomain-containing transcription factor Dbx1 is required for the generation of specific subclasses of neurons within the lateral hypothalamic area/zona incerta (LH) and the arcuate (Arc) nucleus. Consistent with this specific developmental role, Dbx1 hypothalamic-specific conditional-knockout mice display attenuated responses to predator odor and feeding stressors but do not display deficits in other innate behaviors such as mating or conspecific aggression. Thus, activity of a single developmentally regulated gene, Dbx1, is a shared requirement for the specification of hypothalamic nuclei governing a subset of innate behaviors. PMID:25864637

  9. Glucose Enhances Basal or Melanocortin-Induced cAMP-Response Element Activity in Hypothalamic Cells.

    PubMed

    Breit, Andreas; Wicht, Kristina; Boekhoff, Ingrid; Glas, Evi; Lauffer, Lisa; Mückter, Harald; Gudermann, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Melanocyte-stimulating hormone (MSH)-induced activation of the cAMP-response element (CRE) via the CRE-binding protein in hypothalamic cells promotes expression of TRH and thereby restricts food intake and increases energy expenditure. Glucose also induces central anorexigenic effects by acting on hypothalamic neurons, but the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. It has been proposed that glucose activates the CRE-binding protein-regulated transcriptional coactivator 2 (CRTC-2) in hypothalamic neurons by inhibition of AMP-activated protein kinases (AMPKs), but whether glucose directly affects hypothalamic CRE activity has not yet been shown. Hence, we dissected effects of glucose on basal and MSH-induced CRE activation in terms of kinetics, affinity, and desensitization in murine, hypothalamic mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells that stably express a CRE-dependent reporter gene construct. Physiologically relevant increases in extracellular glucose enhanced basal or MSH-induced CRE-dependent gene transcription, whereas prolonged elevated glucose concentrations reduced the sensitivity of mHypoA-2/10-CRE cells towards glucose. Glucose also induced CRCT-2 translocation into the nucleus and the AMPK activator metformin decreased basal and glucose-induced CRE activity, suggesting a role for AMPK/CRTC-2 in glucose-induced CRE activation. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of CRTC-2 expression decreased glucose-induced CRE-dependent reporter activation. Of note, glucose also induced expression of TRH, suggesting that glucose might affect the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis via the regulation of hypothalamic CRE activity. These findings significantly advance our knowledge about the impact of glucose on hypothalamic signaling and suggest that TRH release might account for the central anorexigenic effects of glucose and could represent a new molecular link between hyperglycaemia and thyroid dysfunction. PMID:27144291

  10. Dissecting the hypothalamic pathways that underlie innate behaviors.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xi; Xu, Xiaohong

    2015-12-01

    Many complex behaviors that do not require learning are displayed and are termed innate. Although traditionally the subject matter of ethology, innate behaviors offer a unique entry point for neuroscientists to dissect the physiological mechanisms governing complex behaviors. Since the last century, converging evidence has implicated the hypothalamus as the central brain area that controls innate behaviors. Recent studies using cutting-edge tools have revealed that genetically-defined populations of neurons residing in distinct hypothalamic nuclei and their associated neural pathways regulate the initiation and maintenance of diverse behaviors including feeding, sleep, aggression, and parental care. Here, we review the newly-defined hypothalamic pathways that regulate each innate behavior. In addition, emerging general principles of the neural control of complex behaviors are discussed. PMID:26552801

  11. Implications of mitochondrial dynamics on neurodegeneration and on hypothalamic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Zorzano, Antonio; Claret, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics is a term that encompasses the movement of mitochondria along the cytoskeleton, regulation of their architecture, and connectivity mediated by tethering and fusion/fission. The importance of these events in cell physiology and pathology has been partially unraveled with the identification of the genes responsible for the catalysis of mitochondrial fusion and fission. Mutations in two mitochondrial fusion genes (MFN2 and OPA1) cause neurodegenerative diseases, namely Charcot-Marie Tooth type 2A and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA). Alterations in mitochondrial dynamics may be involved in the pathophysiology of prevalent neurodegenerative conditions. Moreover, impairment of the activity of mitochondrial fusion proteins dysregulates the function of hypothalamic neurons, leading to alterations in food intake and in energy homeostasis. Here we review selected findings in the field of mitochondrial dynamics and their relevance for neurodegeneration and hypothalamic dysfunction. PMID:26113818

  12. Hypothalamic neurogenesis persists in the aging brain and is controlled by energy-sensing IGF-I pathway.

    PubMed

    Chaker, Zayna; George, Caroline; Petrovska, Marija; Caron, Jean-Baptiste; Lacube, Philippe; Caillé, Isabelle; Holzenberger, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Hypothalamic tanycytes are specialized glial cells lining the third ventricle. They are recently identified as adult stem and/or progenitor cells, able to self-renew and give rise to new neurons postnatally. However, the long-term neurogenic potential of tanycytes and the pathways regulating lifelong cell replacement in the adult hypothalamus are largely unexplored. Using inducible nestin-CreER(T2) for conditional mutagenesis, we performed lineage tracing of adult hypothalamic stem and/or progenitor cells (HySC) and demonstrated that new neurons continue to be born throughout adult life. This neurogenesis was targeted to numerous hypothalamic nuclei and produced different types of neurons in the dorsal periventricular regions. Some adult-born neurons integrated the median eminence and arcuate nucleus during aging and produced growth hormone releasing hormone. We showed that adult hypothalamic neurogenesis was tightly controlled by insulin-like growth factors (IGF). Knockout of IGF-1 receptor from hypothalamic stem and/or progenitor cells increased neuronal production and enhanced α-tanycyte self-renewal, preserving this stem cell-like population from age-related attrition. Our data indicate that adult hypothalamus retains the capacity of cell renewal, and thus, a substantial degree of structural plasticity throughout lifespan. PMID:27103519

  13. SF-1 in the ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus: A key regulator of homeostasis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ventral medial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) regulates food intake and body weight homeostasis. The nuclear receptor NR5A1 (steroidogenic factor 1; SF-1) is a transcription factor whose expression is highly restricted in the VMH and is required for the development of the nucleus. Neurons expressing...

  14. An indirect action contributes to c-fos induction in paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus by neuropeptide Y

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a well-established orexigenic peptide and hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVH) is one major brain site that mediates the orexigenic action of NPY. NPY induces abundant expression of C-Fos, an indicator for neuronal activation, in the PVH, which has been used extensively...

  15. Hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1 axis controls energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Vagner R R; Micheletti, Thayana O; Pimentel, Gustavo D; Katashima, Carlos K; Lenhare, Luciene; Morari, Joseane; Mendes, Maria Carolina S; Razolli, Daniela S; Rocha, Guilherme Z; de Souza, Claudio T; Ryu, Dongryeol; Prada, Patrícia O; Velloso, Lício A; Carvalheira, José B C; Pauli, José Rodrigo; Cintra, Dennys E; Ropelle, Eduardo R

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1PR1) is a G-protein-coupled receptor for sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) that has a role in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here we show that the S1P/S1PR1 signalling pathway in hypothalamic neurons regulates energy homeostasis in rodents. We demonstrate that S1PR1 protein is highly enriched in hypothalamic POMC neurons of rats. Intracerebroventricular injections of the bioactive lipid, S1P, reduce food consumption and increase rat energy expenditure through persistent activation of STAT3 and the melanocortin system. Similarly, the selective disruption of hypothalamic S1PR1 increases food intake and reduces the respiratory exchange ratio. We further show that STAT3 controls S1PR1 expression in neurons via a positive feedback mechanism. Interestingly, several models of obesity and cancer anorexia display an imbalance of hypothalamic S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 axis, whereas pharmacological intervention ameliorates these phenotypes. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the neuronal S1P/S1PR1/STAT3 signalling axis plays a critical role in the control of energy homeostasis in rats. PMID:25255053

  16. Glucose and hypothalamic astrocytes: More than a fueling role?

    PubMed

    Leloup, C; Allard, C; Carneiro, L; Fioramonti, X; Collins, S; Pénicaud, L

    2016-05-26

    Brain plays a central role in energy homeostasis continuously integrating numerous peripheral signals such as circulating nutrients, and in particular blood glucose level, a variable that must be highly regulated. Then, the brain orchestrates adaptive responses to modulate food intake and peripheral organs activity in order to achieve the fine tuning of glycemia. More than fifty years ago, the presence of glucose-sensitive neurons was discovered in the hypothalamus, but what makes them specific and identifiable still remains disconnected from their electrophysiological signature. On the other hand, astrocytes represent the major class of macroglial cells and are now recognized to support an increasing number of neuronal functions. One of these functions consists in the regulation of energy homeostasis through neuronal fueling and nutrient sensing. Twenty years ago, we discovered that the glucose transporter GLUT2, the canonical "glucosensor" of the pancreatic beta-cell together with the glucokinase, was also present in astrocytes and participated in hypothalamic glucose sensing. Since then, many studies have identified other actors and emphasized the astroglial participation in this mechanism. Growing evidence suggest that astrocytes form a complex network and have to be considered as spatially coordinated and regulated metabolic units. In this review we aim to provide an updated view of the molecular and respective cellular pathways involved in hypothalamic glucose sensing, and their relevance in physiological and pathological states. PMID:26071958

  17. Female protection from slow-pressor effects of AngII involves prevention of ROS production independent of NMDA receptor trafficking in hypothalamic neurons expressing angiotensin-1A receptors

    PubMed Central

    Marques-Lopes, Jose; Lynch, Mary-Katherine; Van Kempen, Tracey A.; Waters, Elizabeth M.; Wang, Gang; Iadecola, Costantino; Pickel, Virginia M.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2014-01-01

    Renin-angiotensin system over-activity, up-regulation of post-synaptic NMDA receptor function, and increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) are hallmarks of angiotensin II (AngII)-induced hypertension, which is far more common in young males than in young females. We hypothesize that the sex differences in hypertension are related to differential AngII-induced changes in post-synaptic trafficking of the essential NMDA receptor GluN1 subunit and ROS production in PVN cells expressing angiotensin type 1a receptor (AT1aR). We tested this hypothesis using slow-pressor (14 day) infusion of AngII (600ng/kg/min) in mice, which elicits hypertension in males but not in young females. Two month-old male and female transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in AT1aR-containing cells were used. In males, but not females, AngII increased blood pressure and ROS production in AT1aR-EGFP PVN cells at baseline and following NMDA treatment. Electron microscopy showed that AngII increased cytoplasmic and total GluN1-silver-intensified immunogold (SIG) densities, and induced a trend towards an increase in near plasmalemmal GluN1-SIG density in AT1aR-EGFP dendrites of males and females. Moreover, AngII decreased dendritic area and diameter in males, but increased dendritic area of small (<1μm) dendrites and decreased diameter of large (>1μm) dendrites in females. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that AT1aR and estrogen receptor β do not co-localize suggesting that, if estrogen is involved, its effect is indirect. The data suggest that the sexual dimorphism in AngII-induced hypertension is associated with sex differences in ROS production in AT1aR-containing PVN cells, but not with post-synaptic NMDA receptor trafficking. PMID:25559190

  18. Hypothalamic neurohormones and immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Quintanar, J. Luis; Guzmán-Soto, Irene

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive examination of the current literature describing the neural-immune interactions, with emphasis on the most recent findings of the effects of neurohormones on immune system. Particularly, the role of hypothalamic hormones such as Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH), Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH). In the past few years, interest has been raised in extrapituitary actions of these neurohormones due to their receptors have been found in many non-pituitary tissues. Also, the receptors are present in immune cells, suggesting an autocrine or paracrine role within the immune system. In general, these neurohormones have been reported to exert immunomodulatory effects on cell proliferation, immune mediators release and cell function. The implications of these findings in understanding the network of hypothalamic neuropeptides and immune system are discussed. PMID:23964208

  19. Hypothalamic signaling mechanisms in hypertension.

    PubMed

    Carmichael, Casey Y; Wainford, Richard D

    2015-05-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system. Increased activation of the central nervous system, driving enhanced sympathetic outflow and increased blood pressure, has emerged as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The hypothalamus is a key brain site acting to integrate central and peripheral inputs to ultimately impact blood pressure in multiple disease states that evoke hypertension. This review highlights recent advances that have identified novel signal transduction mechanisms within multiple hypothalamic nuclei (e.g., paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus) acting to drive the pathophysiology of hypertension in neurogenic hypertension, angiotensin II hypertension, salt-sensitive hypertension, chronic intermittent hypoxia, and obesity-induced hypertension. Increased understanding of hypothalamic activity in hypertension has the potential to identify novel targets for future therapeutic interventions designed to treat hypertension. PMID:25860531

  20. The Recreational Drug Ecstasy Disrupts the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Gonadal Reproductive Axis in Adult Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Sarah M.; Walker, Deena M.; Reveron, Maria E.; Duvauchelle, Christine L.; Gore, Andrea C.

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive function involves an interaction of three regulatory levels: hypothalamus, pituitary, and gonad. The primary drive upon this system comes from hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurosecretory cells, which receive afferent inputs from other neurotransmitter systems in the central nervous system to result in the proper coordination of reproduction and the environment. Here, we hypothesized that the recreational drug ±-3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; “ecstasy”), which acts through several of the neurotransmitter systems that affect GnRH neurons, suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) reproductive axis of male rats. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats self-administered saline or MDMA or saline either once (acute) or for 20 days (chronic), and were euthanized 7 days following last administration. We quantified hypothalamic GnRH mRNA, serum luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations, and serum testosterone levels, as indices of hypothalamic, pituitary, and gonadal functions, respectively. The results indicate that the hypothalamic and gonadal levels of the HPG axis are significantly altered by MDMA, with GnRH mRNA and serum testosterone levels suppressed in rats administered MDMA compared to saline. Furthermore, our finding that hypothalamic GnRH mRNA levels are suppressed in the context of low testosterone concentrations suggests that the central GnRH neurosecretory system may be a primary target of inhibitory regulation by MDMA usage. PMID:18309234

  1. A genomic atlas of mouse hypothalamic development

    PubMed Central

    Shimogori, Tomomi; Lee, Daniel A; Miranda-Angulo, Ana; Yang, Yanqin; Wang, Hong; Jiang, Lizhi; Yoshida, Aya C; Kataoka, Ayane; Mashiko, Hiromi; Avetisyan, Marina; Qi, Lixin; Qian, Jiang; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is a central regulator of many behaviors that are essential for survival, such as temperature regulation, food intake and circadian rhythms. However, the molecular pathways that mediate hypothalamic development are largely unknown. To identify genes expressed in developing mouse hypothalamus, we performed microarray analysis at 12 different developmental time points. We then conducted developmental in situ hybridization for 1,045 genes that were dynamically expressed over the course of hypothalamic neurogenesis. We identified markers that stably labeled each major hypothalamic nucleus over the entire course of neurogenesis and constructed a detailed molecular atlas of the developing hypothalamus. As a proof of concept of the utility of these data, we used these markers to analyze the phenotype of mice in which Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) was selectively deleted from hypothalamic neuroepithelium and found that Shh is essential for anterior hypothalamic patterning. Our results serve as a resource for functional investigations of hypothalamic development, connectivity, physiology and dysfunction. PMID:20436479

  2. Paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus: axonal projections to the brainstem

    PubMed Central

    Geerling, Joel C.; Shin, Jung-Won; Chimenti, Peter C.; Loewy, Arthur D.

    2010-01-01

    The paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) contains many neurons that innervate the brainstem, but information regarding their target sites remains incomplete. Here, we labeled neurons in the rat PVH with an anterograde axonal tracer, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL) and studied their descending projections in reference to specific neuronal subpopulations throughout the brainstem. While many of their target sites were identified previously, numerous new observations were made. Major findings include: (1) In the midbrain, the PVH projects lightly to the ventral tegmental area, Edinger-Westphal nucleus, ventrolateral periaqueductal gray matter, reticular formation, pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. (2) In the dorsal pons, the PVH projects heavily to the pre-locus coeruleus, yet very little to the catecholamine neurons in the locus coeruleus, and selectively targets the viscerosensory subregions of the parabrachial nucleus; (3) In the ventral medulla, the superior salivatory nucleus, retrotrapezoid nucleus, compact and external formations of the nucleus ambiguus, A1 and caudal C1 catecholamine neurons, and caudal pressor area receive dense axonal projections, generally exceeding the PVH projection to the rostral C1 region; (4) The medial nucleus of the solitary tract (including A2 noradrenergic and aldosterone-sensitive neurons) receives the most extensive projections of the PVH, substantially more than the dorsal vagal nucleus or area postrema. Our findings suggest that the PVH may modulate a range of homeostatic functions, including cerebral and ocular blood flow, corneal and nasal hydration, ingestive behavior, sodium intake, and glucose metabolism, as well as cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and respiratory activities. PMID:20187136

  3. Computational Analysis of the Hypothalamic Control of Food Intake

    PubMed Central

    Tabe-Bordbar, Shayan; Anastasio, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Food-intake control is mediated by a heterogeneous network of different neural subtypes, distributed over various hypothalamic nuclei and other brain structures, in which each subtype can release more than one neurotransmitter or neurohormone. The complexity of the interactions of these subtypes poses a challenge to understanding their specific contributions to food-intake control, and apparent consistencies in the dataset can be contradicted by new findings. For example, the growing consensus that arcuate nucleus neurons expressing Agouti-related peptide (AgRP neurons) promote feeding, while those expressing pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC neurons) suppress feeding, is contradicted by findings that low AgRP neuron activity and high POMC neuron activity can be associated with high levels of food intake. Similarly, the growing consensus that GABAergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus suppress feeding is contradicted by findings suggesting the opposite. Yet the complexity of the food-intake control network admits many different network behaviors. It is possible that anomalous associations between the responses of certain neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with known interactions, but their effect on feeding depends on the responses of the other neural subtypes in the network. We explored this possibility through computational analysis. We made a computer model of the interactions between the hypothalamic and other neural subtypes known to be involved in food-intake control, and optimized its parameters so that model behavior matched observed behavior over an extensive test battery. We then used specialized computational techniques to search the entire model state space, where each state represents a different configuration of the responses of the units (model neural subtypes) in the network. We found that the anomalous associations between the responses of certain hypothalamic neural subtypes and feeding are actually consistent with the known structure

  4. Multiple hypothalamic cell populations encoding distinct visual information

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Timothy M; Wynne, Jonathan; Piggins, Hugh D; Lucas, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Environmental illumination profoundly influences mammalian physiology and behaviour through actions on a master circadian oscillator in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) and other hypothalamic nuclei. The retinal and central mechanisms that shape daily patterns of light-evoked and spontaneous activity in this network of hypothalamic cells are still largely unclear. Similarly, the exact nature of the sensory information conveyed by such cells is unresolved. Here we set out to address these issues, through multielectrode recordings from the hypothalamus of red cone knockin mice (Opn1mwR). With this powerful mouse model, the photoreceptive origins of any response can be readily identified on the basis of their relative sensitivity to short and long wavelength light. Our experiments revealed that the firing pattern of many hypothalamic cells was influenced by changes in light levels and/or according to the steady state level of illumination. These ‘contrast’ and ‘irradiance’ responses were driven primarily by cone and melanopsin photoreceptors respectively, with rods exhibiting a much more subtle influence. Individual hypothalamic neurons differentially sampled from these information streams, giving rise to four distinct response types. The most common response phenotype in the SCN itself was sustained activation. Cells with this behaviour responded to all three photoreceptor classes in a manner consistent with their distinct contributions to circadian photoentrainment. These ‘sustained’ cells were also unique in our sample in expressing circadian firing patterns with highest activity during the mid projected day. Surprisingly, we also found a minority of SCN neurons that lacked the melanopsin-derived irradiance signal and responded only to light transitions, allowing for the possibility that rod–cone contrast signals may be routed to SCN output targets without influencing neighbouring circadian oscillators. Finally, an array of cells extending throughout

  5. Hypothalamic proline rich polypeptide regulates hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Bezirganyan, Kristina B; Davtyan, Tigran K; Galoyan, Armen A

    2010-06-01

    The AGAPEPAEPAQPGVY proline-rich polypeptide (PRP-1) was isolated from neurosecretory granules of the bovine neurohypophysis; it is produced by N. supraopticus and N. paraventricularis. It has been shown that PRP-1 has many potentially beneficial biological effects including immunoregulatory, hematopoietic, antimicrobial and anti-neurodegenerative properties. Here we demonstrated that PRP-1 administration influence on redistribution of monocytes, granulocytes and lymphocytes between bone marrow (BM) and peripheral blood and promotes the influx of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages from BM into peripheral blood and accumulation of immature granulocyte and monocyte in BM and delayed the maturation of T cells in BM. PRP-1 increased colony-forming cell proliferation in rat cells in vivo. In PRP-treated rat BM, the CFU number at day 4, 7 and 14 was considerably increased in comparison with untreated rats BM and no difference was found at day 21 and day 28. We found that PRP-1 enhances erythroid and myeloid colonies formation in human CD34(+) progenitor cell culture in the presence of different growth factors and down-regulates T cells colony formation and specific surface markers expression during induction of human CD34(+) progenitor cells differentiation into T lymphocytes lineage. We suggested that the hypothalamic PRP-1 possibly represents an endogenous peptide whose primary functions are to regulate neuronal survival and differentiation and hematopoiesis within neurosecretory hypothalamus-bone marrow humoral axis. PMID:20020325

  6. Hypothalamic PKA regulates leptin sensitivity and adiposity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Linghai; McKnight, G. Stanley

    2015-01-01

    Mice lacking the RIIβ regulatory subunit of cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) display reduced adiposity and resistance to diet-induced obesity. Here we show that RIIβ knockout (KO) mice have enhanced sensitivity to leptin's effects on both feeding and energy metabolism. After administration of a low dose of leptin, the duration of hypothalamic JAK/STAT3 signalling is increased, resulting in enhanced POMC mRNA induction. Consistent with the extended JAK/STAT3 activation, we find that the negative feedback regulator of leptin receptor signalling, Socs3, is inhibited in the hypothalamus of RIIβ KO mice. During fasting, RIIβ–PKA is activated and this correlates with an increase in CREB phosphorylation. The increase in CREB phosphorylation is absent in the fasted RIIβ KO hypothalamus. Selective inhibition of PKA activity in AgRP neurons partially recapitulates the leanness and resistance to diet-induced obesity of RIIβ KO mice. Our findings suggest that RIIβ–PKA modulates the duration of leptin receptor signalling and therefore the magnitude of the catabolic response to leptin. PMID:26381935

  7. Differential Acute and Chronic Effects of Leptin on Hypothalamic Astrocyte Morphology and Synaptic Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    García-Cáceres, Cristina; Fuente-Martín, Esther; Burgos-Ramos, Emma; Granado, Miriam; Frago, Laura M.; Barrios, Vicente; Horvath, Tamas

    2011-01-01

    Astrocytes participate in neuroendocrine functions partially through modulation of synaptic input density in the hypothalamus. Indeed, glial ensheathing of neurons is modified by specific hormones, thus determining the availability of neuronal membrane space for synaptic inputs, with the loss of this plasticity possibly being involved in pathological processes. Leptin modulates synaptic inputs in the hypothalamus, but whether astrocytes participate in this action is unknown. Here we report that astrocyte structural proteins, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and vimentin, are induced and astrocyte morphology modified by chronic leptin administration (intracerebroventricular, 2 wk), with these changes being inversely related to modifications in synaptic protein densities. Similar changes in glial structural proteins were observed in adult male rats that had increased body weight and circulating leptin levels due to neonatal overnutrition (overnutrition: four pups/litter vs. control: 12 pups/litter). However, acute leptin treatment reduced hypothalamic GFAP levels and induced synaptic protein levels 1 h after administration, with no effect on vimentin. In primary hypothalamic astrocyte cultures leptin also reduced GFAP levels at 1 h, with an induction at 24 h, indicating a possible direct effect of leptin. Hence, one mechanism by which leptin may affect metabolism is by modifying hypothalamic astrocyte morphology, which in turn could alter synaptic inputs to hypothalamic neurons. Furthermore, the responses to acute and chronic leptin exposure are inverse, raising the possibility that increased glial activation in response to chronic leptin exposure could be involved in central leptin resistance. PMID:21343257

  8. Alterations in the hypothalamic melanocortin pathway in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Vercruysse, Pauline; Sinniger, Jérôme; El Oussini, Hajer; Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Dengler, Reinhard; Meyer, Thomas; Zierz, Stephan; Kassubek, Jan; Fischer, Wilhelm; Dreyhaupt, Jens; Grehl, Torsten; Hermann, Andreas; Grosskreutz, Julian; Witting, Anke; Van Den Bosch, Ludo; Spreux-Varoquaux, Odile; Ludolph, Albert C; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, the most common adult-onset motor neuron disease, leads to death within 3 to 5 years after onset. Beyond progressive motor impairment, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis suffer from major defects in energy metabolism, such as weight loss, which are well correlated with survival. Indeed, nutritional intervention targeting weight loss might improve survival of patients. However, the neural mechanisms underlying metabolic impairment in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis remain elusive, in particular due to the lack of longitudinal studies. Here we took advantage of samples collected during the clinical trial of pioglitazone (GERP-ALS), and characterized longitudinally energy metabolism of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in response to pioglitazone, a drug with well-characterized metabolic effects. As expected, pioglitazone decreased glycaemia, decreased liver enzymes and increased circulating adiponectin in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, showing its efficacy in the periphery. However, pioglitazone did not increase body weight of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis independently of bulbar involvement. As pioglitazone increases body weight through a direct inhibition of the hypothalamic melanocortin system, we studied hypothalamic neurons producing proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and the endogenous melanocortin inhibitor agouti-related peptide (AGRP), in mice expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis-linked mutant SOD1(G86R). We observed lowerPomcbut higherAgrpmRNA levels in the hypothalamus of presymptomatic SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistently, numbers of POMC-positive neurons were decreased, whereas AGRP fibre density was elevated in the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus of SOD1(G86R) mice. Consistent with a defect in the hypothalamic melanocortin system, food intake after short term fasting was increased in SOD1(G86R) mice. Importantly, these findings were replicated in two other amyotrophic lateral

  9. Diurnal regulation of hypothalamic kisspeptin is disrupted during mouse pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Yap, Cassandra C; Wharfe, Michaela D; Mark, Peter J; Waddell, Brendan J; Smith, Jeremy T

    2016-06-01

    Kisspeptin, the neuropeptide product of the Kiss1 gene, is critical in driving the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Kisspeptin neurons in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) and arcuate nucleus (Arc) of the hypothalamus mediate differential effects, with the Arc regulating negative feedback of sex steroids and the AVPV regulating positive feedback, vital for the preovulatory surge and gated under circadian control. We aimed to characterize hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression in nonpregnant and pregnant mice, and investigate potential circadian regulation. Anterior and posterior hypothalami were collected from C57BL/6J mice at diestrus, proestrus, and days 6, 10, 14, and 18 of pregnancy, at six time points across 24h, for real-time PCR analysis of gene expression. Analysis confirmed that Kiss1 mRNA expression in the AVPV increased at ZT13 during proestrus, with a luteinizing hormone surge observed thereafter. No diurnal regulation was seen at diestrus or at any stage of pregnancy. Anterior hypothalamic Avp mRNA expression exhibited no diurnal variation, but Avpr1a peaked at 12:00h during proestrus, possibly reflecting the circadian input from the suprachiasmatic nucleus to AVPV Kiss1 neurons. Rfrp (Npvf) expression in the posterior hypothalamus did not demonstrate diurnal variation at any stage. Clock genes Bmal1 and Rev-erbα were strongly diurnal, but there was little change between diestrus/proestrus and pregnancy. Our data indicate the absence of the circadian input to Kiss1 in pregnancy, despite high gestational estradiol levels and normal clock gene expression, and may suggest a disruption of a kisspeptin-specific diurnal rhythm that operates in the nonpregnant state. PMID:27068699

  10. Sodium coupled glucose co-transporters contribute to hypothalamic glucose-sensing

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Dervla; Reimann, Frank; Simpson, Anna K; Gribble, Fiona M

    2007-01-01

    Specialised neurons within the hypothalamus have the ability to sense and respond to changes in ambient glucose concentrations. We investigated the mechanisms underlying glucose-triggered activity in glucose-excited (GE) neurons, using primary cultures of rat hypothalamic neurons monitored by fluorescence calcium imaging. 35% (738/2139) of neurons were excited by increasing glucose from 3 to 15mM, but only 9% (6/64) of these GE neurons were activated by tolbutamide, suggesting the involvement of a KATP channel-independent mechanism. α-Methylglucopyranoside (αMDG, 12mM), a non-metabolisable substrate of sodium glucose co-transporters (SGLTs), mimicked the effect of high glucose in 67% of GE neurons, and both glucose and αMDG-triggered excitation were blocked by Na+ removal or by the SGLT inhibitor, phloridzin (100nM). In the presence of 0.5mM glucose and tolbutamide, responses could also be triggered by 3.5mM αMDG, supporting a role for an SGLT-associated mechanism at low as well as high substrate concentrations. By RT-PCR, we detected SGLT1, SGLT3a, SGLT3b in both cultured neurons and adult rat hypothalamus. Our findings suggest a novel role for SGLTs in glucose-sensing by hypothalamic GE neurons. PMID:17130483

  11. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L; Frago, Laura M; Dickson, Suzanne L; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  12. Ghrelin Regulates Glucose and Glutamate Transporters in Hypothalamic Astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Granado, Miriam; Freire-Regatillo, Alejandra; Castro-González, David; Ceballos, María L.; Frago, Laura M.; Dickson, Suzanne L.; Argente, Jesús; Chowen, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic astrocytes can respond to metabolic signals, such as leptin and insulin, to modulate adjacent neuronal circuits and systemic metabolism. Ghrelin regulates appetite, adiposity and glucose metabolism, but little is known regarding the response of astrocytes to this orexigenic hormone. We have used both in vivo and in vitro approaches to demonstrate that acylated ghrelin (acyl-ghrelin) rapidly stimulates glutamate transporter expression and glutamate uptake by astrocytes. Moreover, acyl-ghrelin rapidly reduces glucose transporter (GLUT) 2 levels and glucose uptake by these glial cells. Glutamine synthetase and lactate dehydrogenase decrease, while glycogen phosphorylase and lactate transporters increase in response to acyl-ghrelin, suggesting a change in glutamate and glucose metabolism, as well as glycogen storage by astrocytes. These effects are partially mediated through ghrelin receptor 1A (GHSR-1A) as astrocytes do not respond equally to desacyl-ghrelin, an isoform that does not activate GHSR-1A. Moreover, primary astrocyte cultures from GHSR-1A knock-out mice do not change glutamate transporter or GLUT2 levels in response to acyl-ghrelin. Our results indicate that acyl-ghrelin may mediate part of its metabolic actions through modulation of hypothalamic astrocytes and that this effect could involve astrocyte mediated changes in local glucose and glutamate metabolism that alter the signals/nutrients reaching neighboring neurons. PMID:27026049

  13. Regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical stress response

    PubMed Central

    Herman, James P.; McKlveen, Jessica M.; Ghosal, Sriparna; Kopp, Brittany; Wulsin, Aynara; Makinson, Ryan; Scheimann, Jessie; Myers, Brent

    2016-01-01

    The hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA axis) is required for stress adaptation. Activation of the HPA axis causes secretion of glucocorticoids, which act on multiple organ systems to redirect energy resources to meet real or anticipated demand. The HPA stress response is driven primarily by neural mechanisms, invoking corticotrophin releasing hormone (CRH) release from hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons. Pathways activating CRH release are stressor dependent: reactive responses to homeostatic disruption frequently involve direct noradrenergic or peptidergic drive of PVN neurons by sensory relays, whereas anticipatory responses use oligosynaptic pathways originating in upstream limbic structures. Anticipatory responses are driven largely by disinhibition, mediated by trans-synaptic silencing of tonic PVN inhibition via GABAergic neurons in the amygdala. Stress responses are inhibited by negative feedback mechanisms, whereby glucocorticoids act to diminish drive (brainstem), promote trans-synaptic inhibition by limbic structures (e.g, hippocampus). Glucocorticoids also act at the PVN to rapidly inhibit CRH neuronal activity via membrane glucocorticoid receptors. Chronic stress-induced activation of the HPA axis takes many forms (chronic basal hypersecretion, sensitized stress responses, even adrenal exhaustion), with manifestation dependent upon factors such as stressor chronicity, intensity, frequency and modality. Neural mechanisms driving chronic stress responses can be distinct from those controlling acute reactions, including recruitment of novel limbic, hypothalamic and brainstem circuits. Importantly, an individual’s response to acute or chronic stress is determined by numerous factors, including genetics, early life experience, environmental conditions, sex and age. The context in which stressors occur will determine whether an individual’s acute or chronic stress responses are adaptive or maladaptive (pathological). PMID:27065163

  14. Nonsocial functions of hypothalamic oxytocin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-Peng; Wang, Liwei; Han, Liqun; Wang, Stephani C

    2013-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a hypothalamic neuropeptide composed of nine amino acids. The functions of OXT cover a variety of social and nonsocial activity/behaviors. Therapeutic effects of OXT on aberrant social behaviors are attracting more attention, such as social memory, attachment, sexual behavior, maternal behavior, aggression, pair bonding, and trust. The nonsocial behaviors/functions of brain OXT have also received renewed attention, which covers brain development, reproduction, sex, endocrine, immune regulation, learning and memory, pain perception, energy balance, and almost all the functions of peripheral organ systems. Coordinating with brain OXT, locally produced OXT also involves the central and peripheral actions of OXT. Disorders in OXT secretion and functions can cause a series of aberrant social behaviors, such as depression, autism, and schizophrenia as well as disturbance of nonsocial behaviors/functions, such as anorexia, obesity, lactation failure, osteoporosis, diabetes, and carcinogenesis. As more and more OXT functions are identified, it is essential to provide a general view of OXT functions in order to explore the therapeutic potentials of OXT. In this review, we will focus on roles of hypothalamic OXT on central and peripheral nonsocial functions. PMID:24967304

  15. Suppression of the HPA Axis During Cholestasis Can Be Attributed to Hypothalamic Bile Acid Signaling.

    PubMed

    McMillin, Matthew; Frampton, Gabriel; Quinn, Matthew; Divan, Ali; Grant, Stephanie; Patel, Nisha; Newell-Rogers, Karen; DeMorrow, Sharon

    2015-12-01

    Suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis has been shown to occur during cholestatic liver injury. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that in a model of cholestasis, serum bile acids gain entry into the brain via a leaky blood brain barrier and that hypothalamic bile acid content is increased. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to determine the effects of bile acid signaling on the HPA axis. The data presented show that HPA axis suppression during cholestatic liver injury, specifically circulating corticosterone levels and hypothalamic corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) expression, can be attenuated by administration of the bile acid sequestrant cholestyramine. Secondly, treatment of hypothalamic neurons with various bile acids suppressed CRH expression and secretion in vitro. However, in vivo HPA axis suppression was only evident after the central injection of the bile acids taurocholic acid or glycochenodeoxycholic acid but not the other bile acids studied. Furthermore, we demonstrate that taurocholic acid and glycochenodeoxycholic acid are exerting their effects on hypothalamic CRH expression after their uptake through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and subsequent activation of the glucocorticoid receptor. Taken together with previous studies, our data support the hypothesis that during cholestatic liver injury, bile acids gain entry into the brain, are transported into neurons through the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter and can activate the glucocorticoid receptor to suppress the HPA axis. These data also lend themselves to the broader hypothesis that bile acids may act as central modulators of hypothalamic peptides that may be altered during liver disease. PMID:26431088

  16. Hypothalamic radial glia function as self-renewing neural progenitors in the absence of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Robert N; Xie, Yuanyuan; McPherson, Adam D; Taibi, Andrew V; Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Douglass, Adam D; Dorsky, Richard I

    2016-01-01

    The vertebrate hypothalamus contains persistent radial glia that have been proposed to function as neural progenitors. In zebrafish, a high level of postembryonic hypothalamic neurogenesis has been observed, but the role of radial glia in generating these new neurons is unclear. We have used inducible Cre-mediated lineage labeling to show that a population of hypothalamic radial glia undergoes self-renewal and generates multiple neuronal subtypes at larval stages. Whereas Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been demonstrated to promote the expansion of other stem and progenitor cell populations, we find that Wnt/β-catenin pathway activity inhibits this process in hypothalamic radial glia and is not required for their self-renewal. By contrast, Wnt/β-catenin signaling is required for the differentiation of a specific subset of radial glial neuronal progeny residing along the ventricular surface. We also show that partial genetic ablation of hypothalamic radial glia or their progeny causes a net increase in their proliferation, which is also independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Hypothalamic radial glia in the zebrafish larva thus exhibit several key characteristics of a neural stem cell population, and our data support the idea that Wnt pathway function may not be homogeneous in all stem or progenitor cells. PMID:26603385

  17. The role of insulin receptor substrate 2 in hypothalamic and β cell function

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Agharul I.; Heffron, Helen; Smith, Mark A.; Al-Qassab, Hind; Xu, Allison W.; Selman, Colin; Simmgen, Marcus; Clements, Melanie; Claret, Marc; MacColl, Gavin; Bedford, David C.; Hisadome, Kazunari; Diakonov, Ivan; Moosajee, Vazira; Bell, Jimmy D.; Speakman, John R.; Batterham, Rachel L.; Barsh, Gregory S.; Ashford, Michael L.J.; Withers, Dominic J.

    2005-01-01

    Insulin receptor substrate 2 (Irs2) plays complex roles in energy homeostasis. We generated mice lacking Irs2 in β cells and a population of hypothalamic neurons (RIPCreIrs2KO), in all neurons (NesCreIrs2KO), and in proopiomelanocortin neurons (POMCCreIrs2KO) to determine the role of Irs2 in the CNS and β cell. RIPCreIrs2KO mice displayed impaired glucose tolerance and reduced β cell mass. Overt diabetes did not ensue, because β cells escaping Cre-mediated recombination progressively populated islets. RIPCreIrs2KO and NesCreIrs2KO mice displayed hyperphagia, obesity, and increased body length, which suggests altered melanocortin action. POMCCreIrs2KO mice did not display this phenotype. RIPCreIrs2KO and NesCreIrs2KO mice retained leptin sensitivity, which suggests that CNS Irs2 pathways are not required for leptin action. NesCreIrs2KO and POMCCreIrs2KO mice did not display reduced β cell mass, but NesCreIrs2KO mice displayed mild abnormalities of glucose homeostasis. RIPCre neurons did not express POMC or neuropeptide Y. Insulin and a melanocortin agonist depolarized RIPCre neurons, whereas leptin was ineffective. Insulin hyperpolarized and leptin depolarized POMC neurons. Our findings demonstrate a critical role for IRS2 in β cell and hypothalamic function and provide insights into the role of RIPCre neurons, a distinct hypothalamic neuronal population, in growth and energy homeostasis. PMID:15841180

  18. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Souza, Gabriela F P; Solon, Carina; Nascimento, Lucas F; De-Lima-Junior, Jose C; Nogueira, Guilherme; Moura, Rodrigo; Rocha, Guilherme Z; Fioravante, Milena; Bobbo, Vanessa; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela; Araujo, Eliana P; Velloso, Licio A

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic POMC is the earliest marker distinguishing obesity-prone from obesity-resistant mice. The early inhibition of hypothalamic POMC was sufficient to transform obesity-resistant in obesity-prone mice. In addition, the post-prandial change in the blood level of β-endorphin, a POMC-derived peptide, correlates with body mass gain in rodents and humans. Taken together, these results suggest that defective regulation of POMC expression, which leads to a change of β-endorphin levels, is the earliest hypothalamic defect leading to obesity. PMID:27373214

  19. Defective regulation of POMC precedes hypothalamic inflammation in diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Gabriela F. P.; Solon, Carina; Nascimento, Lucas F.; De-Lima-Junior, Jose C.; Nogueira, Guilherme; Moura, Rodrigo; Rocha, Guilherme Z.; Fioravante, Milena; Bobbo, Vanessa; Morari, Joseane; Razolli, Daniela; Araujo, Eliana P.; Velloso, Licio A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is the result of a long-term positive energy balance in which caloric intake overrides energy expenditure. This anabolic state results from the defective activity of hypothalamic neurons involved in the sensing and response to adiposity. However, it is currently unknown what the earliest obesity-linked hypothalamic defect is and how it orchestrates the energy imbalance present in obesity. Using an outbred model of diet-induced obesity we show that defective regulation of hypothalamic POMC is the earliest marker distinguishing obesity-prone from obesity-resistant mice. The early inhibition of hypothalamic POMC was sufficient to transform obesity-resistant in obesity-prone mice. In addition, the post-prandial change in the blood level of β-endorphin, a POMC-derived peptide, correlates with body mass gain in rodents and humans. Taken together, these results suggest that defective regulation of POMC expression, which leads to a change of β-endorphin levels, is the earliest hypothalamic defect leading to obesity. PMID:27373214

  20. Neurokinin B Causes Acute GnRH Secretion and Repression of GnRH Transcription in GT1–7 GnRH Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Shao, Paul P.; Iyer, Anita K.; Grove, Anna M. H.; Meadows, Jason D.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic studies in human patients with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (IHH) identified mutations in the genes that encode neurokinin B (NKB) and the neurokinin 3 receptor (NK3R). However, determining the mechanism whereby NKB regulates gonadotropin secretion has been difficult because of conflicting results from in vivo studies investigating the luteinizing hormone (LH) response to senktide, a NK3R agonist. NK3R is expressed in a subset of GnRH neurons and in kisspeptin neurons that are known to regulate GnRH secretion. Thus, one potential source of inconsistency is that NKB could produce opposing direct and indirect effects on GnRH secretion. Here, we employ the GT1-7 cell model to elucidate the direct effects of NKB on GnRH neuron function. We find that GT1-7 cells express NK3R and respond to acute senktide treatment with c-Fos induction and increased GnRH secretion. In contrast, long-term senktide treatment decreased GnRH secretion. Next, we focus on the examination of the mechanism underlying the long-term decrease in secretion and determine that senktide treatment represses transcription of GnRH. We further show that this repression of GnRH transcription may involve enhanced c-Fos protein binding at novel activator protein-1 (AP-1) half-sites identified in enhancer 1 and the promoter, as well as chromatin remodeling at the promoter of the GnRH gene. These data indicate that NKB could directly regulate secretion from NK3R-expressing GnRH neurons. Furthermore, whether the response is inhibitory or stimulatory toward GnRH secretion could depend on the history or length of exposure to NKB because of a repressive effect on GnRH transcription. PMID:23393128

  1. PI3K in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus mediates estrogenic actions on energy expenditure in female mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estrogens act in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMH) to regulate body weight homeostasis. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these estrogenic effects are unknown. We show that activation of estrogen receptor-a (ERa) stimulates neural firing of VMH neurons expressing ERa, and these ...

  2. The contribution of hypothalamic macroglia to the regulation of energy homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Buckman, Laura B.; Ellacott, Kate L. J.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamus is critical for the regulation of energy homeostasis. Genetic and pharmacologic studies have identified a number of key hypothalamic neuronal circuits that integrate signals controlling food intake and energy expenditure. Recently, studies have begun to emerge demonstrating a role for non-neuronal cell types in the regulation of energy homeostasis. In particular the potential importance of different glial cell types is increasingly being recognized. A number of studies have described changes in the activity of hypothalamic macroglia (principally astrocytes and tanycytes) in response to states of positive and negative energy balance, such as obesity and fasting. This article will review these studies and discuss how these findings are changing our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which energy homeostasis is regulated. PMID:25374514

  3. Comparison of melanin-concentrating hormone and hypocretin/orexin peptide expression patterns in a current parceling scheme of the lateral hypothalamic zone.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Joel D

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of hypothalamic neurons expressing the peptides melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH; 'MCH neurons') or hypocretin/orexin (H/O; 'H/O neurons') was assessed with immunocytochemistry in male rats at high spatial resolution. Data were plotted on a rat brain atlas that includes a recently revised parcellation scheme for the lateral hypothalamic zone. Quantitative analysis revealed approximately three times more MCH neurons than H/O neurons in the hypothalamus, and approximately twice as many within the parcellations of the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA). The LHA contained 60% of MCH neurons and 81% of H/O neurons, and the same five LHA regions contained the vast majority of MCH (87%) or H/O (93%) neurons present within the LHA: namely the LHA dorsal region (LHAd: 31% of H/O; 38% of MCH), suprafornical region (LHAs: 28% of H/O; 11% of MCH), ventral region medial zone (LHAvm: 15% of H/O; 16% of MCH), juxtadorsomedial region (LHAjd: 14% of H/O and MCH) and magnocellular nucleus (LHAm: 5% of H/O; 7% of MCH). The zona incerta (ZI) contained 18% of MCH neurons. A high co-abundance of MCH and H/O neurons outside of the LHA was present in the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH: 11% of H/O; 9% of MCH). Morphological analysis revealed MCH and H/O neurons as typically tri-polar with irregularly shaped somata. These data provide a quantitative analysis of neurons expressing either MCH or H/O peptides within the rat hypothalamus, and they clarify differences in the distribution pattern for different subsets of these neuron types, especially within the LHA. PMID:19850103

  4. Impact of hypothalamic reactive oxygen species in the regulation of energy metabolism and food intake

    PubMed Central

    Drougard, Anne; Fournel, Audren; Valet, Philippe; Knauf, Claude

    2015-01-01

    Hypothalamus is a key area involved in the control of metabolism and food intake via the integrations of numerous signals (hormones, neurotransmitters, metabolites) from various origins. These factors modify hypothalamic neurons activity and generate adequate molecular and behavioral responses to control energy balance. In this complex integrative system, a new concept has been developed in recent years, that includes reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a critical player in energy balance. ROS are known to act in many signaling pathways in different peripheral organs, but also in hypothalamus where they regulate food intake and metabolism by acting on different types of neurons, including proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and agouti-related protein (AgRP)/neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons. Hypothalamic ROS release is under the influence of different factors such as pancreatic and gut hormones, adipokines (leptin, apelin,…), neurotransmitters and nutrients (glucose, lipids,…). The sources of ROS production are multiple including NADPH oxidase, but also the mitochondria which is considered as the main ROS producer in the brain. ROS are considered as signaling molecules, but conversely impairment of this neuronal signaling ROS pathway contributes to alterations of autonomic nervous system and neuroendocrine function, leading to metabolic diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes. In this review we focus our attention on factors that are able to modulate hypothalamic ROS release in order to control food intake and energy metabolism, and whose deregulations could participate to the development of pathological conditions. This novel insight reveals an original mechanism in the hypothalamus that controls energy balance and identify hypothalamic ROS signaling as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:25759638

  5. NEUROENDOCRINE ACTIONS AND REGULATION OF HYPOTHALAMIC NEUROPEPTIDE Y DURING LACTATION

    PubMed Central

    Crowley, W,R.; Ramoz, G.; Torto, R.; Keefe, K.A.; Wang, J. J.; Kalra, S. P.

    2007-01-01

    The expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and its co-messenger, agouti-related peptide (AgRP), in arcuate neurons of the hypothalamus is increased during lactation in rats. Our research has been addressing the questions of the physiological actions of these peptides during lactation and the physiological signals associated with lactation that result in increased expression of their genes. Our studies indicate that NPY and AgRP exert pleiotropic actions during lactation that help integrate neuroendocrine regulation of energy balance with controls over anterior and posterior pituitary hormone secretion. Further, reciprocal signaling to the NPY/AgRP system by leptin and ghrelin is responsible for the changes in expression of these hypothalamic peptides in lactating animals, and thus, may contribute to regulation of food intake and the various neuroendocrine adaptations of lactation. PMID:17241697

  6. Nicotinic α4 Receptor-Mediated Cholinergic Influences on Food Intake and Activity Patterns in Hypothalamic Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Schaaf, Laura; Heeley, Nicholas; Heuschmid, Lena; Bai, Yunjing; Barrantes, Francisco J.; Apergis-Schoute, John

    2015-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) play an important role in regulating appetite and have been shown to do so by influencing neural activity in the hypothalamus. To shed light on the hypothalamic circuits governing acetylcholine’s (ACh) regulation of appetite this study investigated the influence of hypothalamic nAChRs expressing the α4 subunit. We found that antagonizing the α4β2 nAChR locally in the lateral hypothalamus with di-hydro-ß-erythroidine (DHβE), an α4 nAChR antagonist with moderate affinity, caused an increase in food intake following free access to food after a 12 hour fast, compared to saline-infused animals. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that orexin/hypocretin (HO), oxytocin, and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons in the A13 and A12 of the hypothalamus expressed the nAChR α4 subunit in varying amounts (34%, 42%, 50%, and 51%, respectively) whereas melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons did not, suggesting that DHβE-mediated increases in food intake may be due to a direct activation of specific hypothalamic circuits. Systemic DHβE (2 mg/kg) administration similarly increased food intake following a 12 hour fast. In these animals a subpopulation of orexin/hypocretin neurons showed elevated activity compared to control animals and MCH neuronal activity was overall lower as measured by expression of the immediate early gene marker for neuronal activity cFos. However, oxytocin neurons in the paraventricular hypothalamus and TH-containing neurons in the A13 and A12 did not show differential activity patterns. These results indicate that various neurochemically distinct hypothalamic populations are under the influence of α4β2 nAChRs and that cholinergic inputs to the lateral hypothalamus can affect satiety signals through activation of local α4β2 nAChR-mediated transmission. PMID:26247203

  7. Dopamine Autoreceptor Regulation of a Hypothalamic Dopaminergic Network

    PubMed Central

    Stagkourakis, Stefanos; Kim, Hoseok; Lyons, David J.; Broberger, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Summary How autoreceptors contribute to maintaining a stable output of rhythmically active neuronal circuits is poorly understood. Here, we examine this issue in a dopamine population, spontaneously oscillating hypothalamic rat (TIDA) neurons, that underlie neuroendocrine control of reproduction and neuroleptic side effects. Activation of dopamine receptors of the type 2 family (D2Rs) at the cell-body level slowed TIDA oscillations through two mechanisms. First, they prolonged the depolarizing phase through a combination of presynaptic increases in inhibition and postsynaptic hyperpolarization. Second, they extended the discharge phase through presynaptic attenuation of calcium currents and decreased synaptic inhibition. Dopamine reuptake blockade similarly reconfigured the oscillation, indicating that ambient somatodendritic transmitter concentration determines electrical behavior. In the absence of D2R feedback, however, discharge was abolished by depolarization block. These results indicate the existence of an ultra-short feedback loop whereby neuroendocrine dopamine neurons tune network behavior to echoes of their own activity, reflected in ambient somatodendritic dopamine, and also suggest a mechanism for antipsychotic side effects. PMID:27149844

  8. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sapru, Hreday N.

    2012-01-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  9. The hypothalamic neuropeptide FF network is impaired in hypertensive patients

    PubMed Central

    Goncharuk, Valeri D; Buijs, Ruud M; Jhamandas, Jack H; Swaab, Dick F

    2014-01-01

    Background The human hypothalamus contains the neuropeptide FF (NPFF) neurochemical network. Animal experiments demonstrated that NPFF is implicated in the central cardiovascular regulation. We therefore studied expression of this peptide in the hypothalamus of individuals who suffered from essential hypertension (n = 8) and died suddenly due to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and compared to that of healthy individuals (controls) (n = 6) who died abruptly due to mechanical trauma of the chest. Methods The frozen right part of the hypothalamus was cut coronally into serial sections of 20 μm thickness, and each tenth section was stained immunohistochemically using antibody against NPFF. The central section through each hypothalamic nucleus was characterized by the highest intensity of NPFF immunostaining and thus was chosen for quantitative densitometry. Results In hypertensive patients, the area occupied by NPFF immunostained neuronal elements in the central sections through the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh), paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (Pa), bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BST), perinuclear zone (PNZ) of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), dorso- (DMH), ventromedial (VMH) nuclei, and perifornical nucleus (PeF) was dramatically decreased compared to controls, ranging about six times less in the VMH to 15 times less in the central part of the BST (BSTC). The NPFF innervation of both nonstained neuronal profiles and microvasculature was extremely poor in hypertensive patients compared to control. Conclusions The decreased NPFF expression in the hypothalamus of hypertensive patients might be a cause of impairment of its interaction with other neurochemical systems, and thereby might be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25161813

  10. Role of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus in cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Sapru, Hreday N

    2013-04-01

    Recently the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (Arc) has been implicated in cardiovascular regulation. Both pressor and depressor responses can be elicited by the chemical stimulation of the Arc. The direction of cardiovascular responses (increase or decrease) elicited from the Arc depends on the baseline blood pressure. The pressor responses are mediated via increase in sympathetic nerve activity and involve activation of the spinal ionotropic glutamate receptors. Arc-stimulation elicits tachycardic responses which are mediated via inhibition of vagal input and excitation of sympathetic input to the heart. The pathways within the brain mediating the pressor and tachycardic responses elicited from the Arc have not been delineated. The depressor responses to the Arc-stimulation are mediated via the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN). Gamma aminobutyric acid type A receptors, neuropeptide Y1 receptors, and opiate receptors in the PVN mediate the depressor responses elicited from the Arc. Some circulating hormones (e.g., leptin and insulin) may reach the Arc via the leaky blood-brain barrier and elicit their cardiovascular effects. Although the Arc is involved in mediating the cardiovascular responses to intravenously injected angiotensin II and angiotensin-(1-12), these effects may not be due to leakage of these peptides across the blood-brain barrier in the Arc; instead, circulating angiotensins may act on neurons in the SFO and mediate cardiovascular actions via the projections of SFO neurons to the Arc. Cardiovascular responses elicited by acupuncture have been reported to be mediated by direct and indirect projections of the Arc to the RVLM. PMID:23260431

  11. Stimulation of the hypothalamic arcuate nucleus increases brown adipose tissue nerve activity via hypothalamic paraventricular and dorsomedial nuclei.

    PubMed

    Chitravanshi, Vineet C; Kawabe, Kazumi; Sapru, Hreday N

    2016-08-01

    Hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARCN) stimulation elicited increases in sympathetic nerve activity (IBATSNA) and temperature (TBAT) of interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). The role of hypothalamic dorsomedial (DMN) and paraventricular (PVN) nuclei in mediating these responses was studied in urethane-anesthetized, artificially ventilated, male Wistar rats. In different groups of rats, inhibition of neurons in the DMN and PVN by microinjections of muscimol attenuated the increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by microinjections of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid into the ipsilateral ARCN. In other groups of rats, blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors by combined microinjections of D(-)-2-amino-7-phosphono-heptanoic acid (D-AP7) and NBQX into the DMN and PVN attenuated increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ARCN stimulation. Blockade of melanocortin 3/4 receptors in the DMN and PVN in other groups of rats resulted in attenuation of increases in IBATSNA and TBAT elicited by ipsilateral ARCN stimulation. Microinjections of Fluoro-Gold into the DMN resulted in retrograde labeling of cells in the ipsilateral ARCN, and some of these cells contained proopiomelanocortin (POMC), α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH), or vesicular glutamate transporter-3. Since similar projections from ARCN to the PVN have been reported by us and others, these results indicate that neurons containing POMC, α-MSH, and glutamate project from the ARCN to the DMN and PVN. Stimulation of ARCN results in the release of α-MSH and glutamate in the DMN and PVN which, in turn, cause increases in IBATSNA and TBAT. PMID:27402666

  12. Lessons from 8 years' experience of hypothalamic stimulation in cluster headache.

    PubMed

    Leone, M; Proietti Cecchini, A; Franzini, A; Broggi, G; Cortelli, P; Montagna, P; May, A; Juergens, T; Cordella, R; Carella, F; Bussone, G

    2008-07-01

    Neuroimaging studies in cluster headache (CH) patients have increased understanding of attack-associated events and provided clues to the pathophysiology of the condition. They have also suggested stimulation of the ipsilateral posterior inferior hypothalamus as a treatment for chronic intractable CH. After 8 years of experience, stimulation has proved successful in controlling the pain attacks in almost 60% of chronic CH patients implanted at various centres. Although hypothalamic implant is not without risks, it has generally been performed safely. Implantation affords an opportunity to perform microrecordings of individual posterior hypothalamic neurons. These studies are at an early stage, but suggest the possibility of identifying precisely the target site by its electrophysiological characteristics. Autonomic studies of patients undergoing posterior hypothalamic stimulation provide further evidence that long-term stimulation is safe, revealing that it can cause altered modulation of the mechanisms of orthostatic adaptation without affecting the baroreflex, cardiorespiratory interactions or efferent sympathetic and vagal functions. Chronically stimulated patients have an increased threshold for cold pain at the site of the first trigeminal branch ipsilateral to the stimulated side; when the stimulator is switched off, changes in sensory and pain thresholds do not occur immediately, suggesting that long-term stimulation is required to induce sensory and nociceptive changes. Posterior inferior hypothalamic stimulation is now established as a treatment for many chronic CH patients. The technique is shedding further light on the pathophysiology of the disease, and is also providing clues to functioning of the hypothalamus itself. PMID:18547215

  13. Hypothalamic mitochondrial dysfunction associated with anorexia in the anx/anx mouse

    PubMed Central

    Lindfors, Charlotte; Nilsson, Ida A. K.; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M.; Zuberi, Aamir R.; Karimi, Mohsen; Donahue, Leah Rae; Roopenian, Derry C.; Mulder, Jan; Uhlén, Mathias; Ekström, Tomas J.; Davisson, Muriel T.; Hökfelt, Tomas G. M.; Schalling, Martin; Johansen, Jeanette E.

    2011-01-01

    The anorectic anx/anx mouse exhibits disturbed feeding behavior and aberrances, including neurodegeneration, in peptidergic neurons in the appetite regulating hypothalamic arcuate nucleus. Poor feeding in infants, as well as neurodegeneration, are common phenotypes in human disorders caused by dysfunction of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). We therefore hypothesized that the anorexia and degenerative phenotypes in the anx/anx mouse could be related to defects in the OXPHOS. In this study, we found reduced efficiency of hypothalamic OXPHOS complex I assembly and activity in the anx/anx mouse. We also recorded signs of increased oxidative stress in anx/anx hypothalamus, possibly as an effect of the decreased hypothalamic levels of fully assembled complex I, that were demonstrated by native Western blots. Furthermore, the Ndufaf1 gene, encoding a complex I assembly factor, was genetically mapped to the anx interval and found to be down-regulated in anx/anx mice. These results suggest that the anorexia and hypothalamic neurodegeneration of the anx/anx mouse are associated with dysfunction of mitochondrial complex I. PMID:22025706

  14. Hypothalamic dysfunction following whole-brain irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mechanick, J.I.; Hochberg, F.H.; LaRocque, A.

    1986-10-01

    The authors describe 15 cases with evidence of hypothalamic dysfunction 2 to 9 years following megavoltage whole-brain x-irradiation for primary glial neoplasm. The patients received 4000 to 5000 rads in 180- to 200-rad fractions. Dysfunction occurred in the absence of computerized tomography-delineated radiation necrosis or hypothalamic invasion by tumor, and antedated the onset of dementia. Fourteen patients displayed symptoms reflecting disturbances of personality, libido, thirst, appetite, or sleep. Hyperprolactinemia (with prolactin levels up to 70 ng/ml) was present in all of the nine patients so tested. Of seven patients tested with thyrotropin-releasing hormone, one demonstrated an abnormal pituitary gland response consistent with a hypothalamic disorder. Seven patients developed cognitive abnormalities. Computerized tomography scans performed a median of 4 years after tumor diagnosis revealed no hypothalamic tumor or diminished density of the hypothalamus. Cortical atrophy was present in 50% of cases and third ventricular dilatation in 58%. Hypothalamic dysfunction, heralded by endocrine, behavioral, and cognitive impairment, represents a common, subtle form of radiation damage.

  15. Bardoxolone methyl prevents obesity and hypothalamic dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Camer, Danielle; Yu, Yinghua; Szabo, Alexander; Wang, Hongqin; Dinh, Chi H L; Huang, Xu-Feng

    2016-08-25

    High-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity is associated with hypothalamic leptin resistance and low grade chronic inflammation, which largely impairs the neuroregulation of negative energy balance. Neuroregulation of negative energy balance is largely controlled by the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus via leptin signal transduction. Recently, a derivative of oleanolic acid, bardoxolone methyl (BM), has been shown to have anti-inflammatory effects. We tested the hypothesis that BM would prevent HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation in mice fed a HF diet. Oral administration of BM via drinking water (10 mg/kg daily) for 21 weeks significantly prevented an increase in body weight, energy intake, hyperleptinemia, and peripheral fat accumulation in mice fed a HF diet. Furthermore, BM treatment prevented HF diet-induced decreases in the anorexigenic effects of peripheral leptin administration. In the mediobasal and paraventricular nuclei regions of the hypothalamus, BM administration prevented HF diet-induced impairments of the downstream protein kinase b (Akt) pathway of hypothalamic leptin signalling. BM treatment also prevented an increase in inflammatory cytokines, tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) in these two hypothalamic regions. These results identify a potential novel neuropharmacological application for BM in preventing HF diet-induced obesity, hypothalamic leptin resistance, and inflammation. PMID:27417254

  16. Sonic hedgehog lineage in the mouse hypothalamus: from progenitor domains to hypothalamic regions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The hypothalamus is a brain region with essential functions for homeostasis and energy metabolism, and alterations of its development can contribute to pathological conditions in the adult, like hypertension, diabetes or obesity. However, due to the anatomical complexity of the hypothalamus, its development is not well understood. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is a key developmental regulator gene expressed in a dynamic pattern in hypothalamic progenitor cells. To obtain insight into hypothalamic organization, we used genetic inducible fate mapping (GIFM) to map the lineages derived from Shh-expressing progenitor domains onto the four rostrocaudally arranged hypothalamic regions: preoptic, anterior, tuberal and mammillary. Results Shh-expressing progenitors labeled at an early stage (before embryonic day (E)9.5) contribute neurons and astrocytes to a large caudal area including the mammillary and posterior tuberal regions as well as tanycytes (specialized median eminence glia). Progenitors labeled at later stages (after E9.5) give rise to neurons and astrocytes of the entire tuberal region and in particular the ventromedial nucleus, but not to cells in the mammillary region and median eminence. At this stage, an additional Shh-expressing domain appears in the preoptic area and contributes mostly astrocytes to the hypothalamus. Shh-expressing progenitors do not contribute to the anterior region at any stage. Finally, we show a gradual shift from neurogenesis to gliogenesis, so that progenitors expressing Shh after E12.5 generate almost exclusively hypothalamic astrocytes. Conclusions We define a fate map of the hypothalamus, based on the dynamic expression of Shh in the hypothalamic progenitor zones. We provide evidence that the large neurogenic Shh-expressing progenitor domains of the ventral diencephalon are continuous with those of the midbrain. We demonstrate that the four classical transverse zones of the hypothalamus have clearly defined progenitor domains

  17. Cross-talk between metabolism and reproduction: The role of POMC and SF1 neurons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Energy homeostasis and reproduction require tight coordination, but the mechanisms underlying their interaction are not fully understood. Two sets of hypothalamic neurons, namely pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in the arcuate nucleus and steroidogenic factor-1 (SF1) neurons in the ventromedial h...

  18. Neonatal insulin action impairs hypothalamic neurocircuit formation in response to maternal high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    Vogt, Merly C; Paeger, Lars; Hess, Simon; Steculorum, Sophie M; Awazawa, Motoharu; Hampel, Brigitte; Neupert, Susanne; Nicholls, Hayley T; Mauer, Jan; Hausen, A Christine; Predel, Reinhard; Kloppenburg, Peter; Horvath, Tamas L; Brüning, Jens C

    2014-01-30

    Maternal metabolic homeostasis exerts long-term effects on the offspring's health outcomes. Here, we demonstrate that maternal high-fat diet (HFD) feeding during lactation predisposes the offspring for obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in mice, which is associated with an impairment of the hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry. Whereas the number and neuropeptide expression of anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and orexigenic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons, electrophysiological properties of POMC neurons, and posttranslational processing of POMC remain unaffected in response to maternal HFD feeding during lactation, the formation of POMC and AgRP projections to hypothalamic target sites is severely impaired. Abrogating insulin action in POMC neurons of the offspring prevents altered POMC projections to the preautonomic paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), pancreatic parasympathetic innervation, and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in response to maternal overnutrition. These experiments reveal a critical timing, when altered maternal metabolism disrupts metabolic homeostasis in the offspring via impairing neuronal projections, and show that abnormal insulin signaling contributes to this effect. PMID:24462248

  19. Neonatal insulin action impairs hypothalamic neurocircuit formation in response to maternal high fat feeding

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Merly C.; Paeger, Lars; Hess, Simon; Steculorum, Sophie M.; Awazawa, Motoharu; Hampel, Brigitte; Neupert, Susanne; Nicholls, Hayley T.; Mauer, Jan; Hausen, A. Christine; Predel, Reinhard; Kloppenburg, Peter; Horvath, Tamas L.; Brüning, Jens C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Maternal metabolic homeostasis exerts long-term effects on the offspring's health outcomes. Here, we demonstrate that maternal high fat diet (HFD)-feeding during lactation predisposes the offspring for obesity and impaired glucose homeostasis in mice, which is associated with an impairment of the hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry. Whereas the number and neuropeptide expression of anorexigenic proopiomelanocortin-(POMC) and orexigenic agoui-related peptide (AgRP)-neurons, electrophysiological properties of POMC-neurons and posttranslational processing of POMC remain unaffected in response to maternal HFD-feeding during lactation, the formation of POMC- and AgRP-projections to hypothalamic target sites is severely impaired. Abrogating insulin action in POMC-neurons of the offspring prevents altered POMC-projections to the preautonomic paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH), pancreatic parasympathetic innervation and impaired glucose-stimulated insulin-secretion in response to maternal overnutrition. These experiments reveal a critical timing, when altered maternal metabolism disrupts metabolic homeostasis in the offspring via impairing neuronal projections and that abnormal insulin signaling contributes to this effect. PMID:24462248

  20. Litter Size Variation in Hypothalamic Gene Expression Determines Adult Metabolic Phenotype in Brandt's Voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Ying; Zhang, Qiang; Wang, De-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Background Early postnatal environments may have long-term and potentially irreversible consequences on hypothalamic neurons involved in energy homeostasis. Litter size is an important life history trait and negatively correlated with milk intake in small mammals, and thus has been regarded as a naturally varying feature of the early developmental environment. Here we investigated the long-term effects of litter size on metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide mRNA expression involved in the regulation of energy homeostasis, using the offspring reared from large (10–12) and small (3–4) litter sizes, of Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii), a rodent species from Inner Mongolia grassland in China. Methodology/Principal Findings Hypothalamic leptin signaling and neuropeptides were measured by Real-Time PCR. We showed that offspring reared from small litters were heavier at weaning and also in adulthood than offspring from large litters, accompanied by increased food intake during development. There were no significant differences in serum leptin levels or leptin receptor (OB-Rb) mRNA in the hypothalamus at weaning or in adulthood, however, hypothalamic suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3) mRNA in adulthood increased in small litters compared to that in large litters. As a result, the agouti-related peptide (AgRP) mRNA increased in the offspring from small litters. Conclusions/Significance These findings support our hypothesis that natural litter size has a permanent effect on offspring metabolic phenotype and hypothalamic neuropeptide expression, and suggest central leptin resistance and the resultant increase in AgRP expression may be a fundamental mechanism underlying hyperphagia and the increased risk of overweight in pups of small litters. Thus, we conclude that litter size may be an important and central determinant of metabolic fitness in adulthood. PMID:21637839

  1. Telemetric control of peripheral lipophagy by hypothalamic autophagy.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lopez, Nuria; Singh, Rajat

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy maintains cellular quality control by degrading organelles, and cytosolic proteins and their aggregates in lysosomes. Autophagy also degrades lipid droplets (LD) through a process termed lipophagy. During lipophagy, LD are sequestered within autophagosomes and degraded by lysosomal acid lipases to generate free fatty acids that are β-oxidized for energy. Lipophagy was discovered in hepatocytes, and since then has been shown to function in diverse cell types. Whether lipophagy degrades LD in the major fat storing cell-the adipocyte-remained unclear. We have found that blocking autophagy in brown adipose tissues (BAT) by deleting the autophagy gene Atg7 in BAT MYF5 (myogenic factor 5)-positive progenitors increases basal lipid content in BAT and decreases lipid utilization during cold exposure-indicating that lipophagy contributes to lipohomeostasis in the adipose tissue. Surprisingly, knocking out Atg7 in hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons also blocks lipophagy in BAT and liver suggesting that specific neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) exert telemetric control over lipophagy in BAT and liver. PMID:27341145

  2. Prenatal fat-rich diet exposure alters responses of embryonic neurons to the chemokine, CCL2, in the hypothalamus.

    PubMed

    Poon, K; Abramova, D; Ho, H T; Leibowitz, S

    2016-06-01

    Maternal consumption of a high-fat diet (HFD) during pregnancy is found to stimulate the genesis of hypothalamic orexigenic peptide neurons in the offspring, while HFD intake in adult animals produces a systemic low-grade inflammation which increases neuroimmune factors that may affect neurogenesis and neuronal migration. Building on this evidence and our recent study showing that the inflammatory chemokine, CCL2, stimulates the migration of hypothalamic neurons and expression of orexigenic neuropeptides, we tested here the possibility that prenatal exposure to a HFD in rats affects this chemokine system, both CCL2 and its receptors, CCR2 and CCR4, and alters its actions on hypothalamic neurons, specifically those expressing the neuropeptides, enkephalin (ENK) and galanin (GAL). Using primary dissociated hypothalamic neurons extracted from embryos on embryonic day 19, we found that prenatal HFD exposure compared to chow control actually reduces the expression of CCL2 in these hypothalamic neurons, while increasing CCR2 and CCR4 expression, and also reduces the sensitivity of hypothalamic neurons to CCL2. The HFD abolished the dose-dependent, stimulatory effect of CCL2 on the number of migrated neurons and even shifted its normal stimulatory effect on migrational velocity and distance traveled by control neurons to an inhibition of migration. Further, it abolished the dose-dependent, stimulatory effect of CCL2 on neuronal expression of ENK and GAL. These results demonstrate that prenatal HFD exposure greatly disturbs the functioning of the CCL2 chemokine system in embryonic hypothalamic neurons, reducing its endogenous levels and ability to promote the migration of neurons and their expression of orexigenic peptides. PMID:26979053

  3. Hyperprolactinemia from radiation-induced hypothalamic hypopituitarism

    SciTech Connect

    Corkill, G.; Hanson, F.W.; Gold, E.M.; White, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    In 1975 Samaan et al., described the effects of radiation damage of the hypothalamus in 15 patients with head and neck cancer. Shalet et al., in 1977 described endocrine morbidity in adults who as children had been irradiated for brain tumors. This report describes instances of hyperprolactinemia and associated hypothalamic, pituitary, and thyroid dysfunction following irradiation of a young adult female for brain neoplasia.

  4. Flatfish metamorphosis: a hypothalamic independent process?

    PubMed

    Campinho, Marco A; Silva, Nadia; Roman-Padilla, Javier; Ponce, Marian; Manchado, Manuel; Power, Deborah M

    2015-03-15

    Anuran and flatfish metamorphosis are tightly regulated by thyroid hormones that are the necessary and sufficient factors that drive this developmental event. In the present study whole mount in situ hybridization (WISH) and quantitative PCR in sole are used to explore the central regulation of flatfish metamorphosis. Central regulation of the thyroid in vertebrates is mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis. Teleosts diverge from other vertebrates as hypothalamic regulation in the HPT axis is proposed to be through hypothalamic inhibition although the regulatory factor remains enigmatic. The dynamics of the HPT axis during sole metamorphosis revealed integration between the activity of the thyrotrophes in the pituitary and the thyroid follicles. No evidence was found supporting a role for thyroid releasing hormone (trh) or corticotrophin releasing hormone (crh) in hypothalamic control of TH production during sole metamorphosis. Intriguingly the results of the present study suggest that neither hypothalamic trh nor crh expression changes during sole metamorphosis and raises questions about the role of these factors and the hypothalamus in regulation of thyrotrophs. PMID:25575457

  5. Fetal Alcohol Programming of Hypothalamic Proopiomelanocortin System by Epigenetic Mechanisms and Later Life Vulnerability to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Bekdash, Rola; Zhang, Changqing; Sarkar, Dipak

    2014-01-01

    Hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons, one of the major regulators of the HPA axis, immune functions, and energy homeostasis, are vulnerable to the adverse effects of fetal alcohol exposure (FAE). These effects are manifested in POMC neurons by a decrease in Pomc gene expression, a decrement in the levels of its derived peptide β-endorphin (β-EP) and a dysregulation of the stress response in the adult offspring. The HPA axis is a major neuroendocrine system with pivotal physiological functions and mode of regulation. This system has been shown to be perturbed by prenatal alcohol exposure. It has been demonstrated that the perturbation of the HPA axis by FAE is long-lasting and is linked to molecular, neurophysiological and behavioral changes in exposed individuals. Recently, we showed that the dysregulation of the POMC system function by FAE is induced by epigenetic mechanisms such as hypermethylation of POMC gene promoter and an alteration in histone marks in POMC neurons. This developmental programming of the POMC system by FAE altered the transcriptome in POMC neurons and induced a hyperresponse to stress in adulthood. These long-lasting epigenetic changes influenced subsequent generations via the male germline. We also demonstrated that the epigenetic programming of the POMC system by FAE was reversed in adulthood with the application of the inhibitors of DNA methylation or histone modifications. Thus, prenatal environmental influences such as alcohol exposure could epigenetically modulate POMC neuronal circuits and function to shape adult behavioral patterns. Identifying specific epigenetic factors in hypothalamic POMC neurons that are modulated by fetal alcohol and target Pomc gene could be potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches to treat stress-related diseases in patients with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders. PMID:25069392

  6. Melanocortin 4 receptors in autonomic neurons regulate thermogenesis and glycemia

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Eric D.; Liu, Tiemin; Kong, Xingxing; Sohn, Jong-Woo; Vong, Linh; Deng, Zhuo; Lee, Charlotte E.; Lee, Syann; Williams, Kevin W.; Olson, David P.; Scherer, Philipp E.; Lowell, Bradford B.; Elmquist, Joel K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Melanocortin 4 receptors (Mc4rs) are expressed by extra-hypothalamic neurons including cholinergic autonomic pre-ganglionic neurons. However, whether Mc4rs in these neurons are required to control energy and glucose homeostasis is unclear. Here we report that Mc4rs in sympathetic, but not parasympathetic, pre-ganglionic neurons are required to regulate energy expenditure and body weight including brown and white adipose tissue thermogenic responses to diet and cold exposure. In addition, deletion of Mc4rs in both sympathetic and parasympathetic cholinergic neurons impairs glucose homeostasis. PMID:24908101

  7. Familial hypothalamic digoxin deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2004-01-01

    The case report of a family with coexistence of hypotension, recurrent respiratory infection, motor tics, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), major depressive disorder, early onset osteoporosis, low body mass index, bulimia nervosa, and healthy aging with longevity is described. The family members had hyposexual behavior and less tendency toward spirituality. They did not have insomnia, but they did display tendency toward increased somnolence. No addictive behavior was observed. The family demonstrated a high level of bonding and affectionate behavior, and they were less creative, with an average intelligence quotient (IQ). There was a total absence of vascular thrombosis, systemic neoplasms and neuronal degeneration in the indexed family. All members of the indexed family were left hemispheric dominant. The levels of serum digoxin, HMG-CoA reductase activity, and dolichol were found to be decreased in the members of the indexed family, with a corresponding increase in red blood cell (RBC) Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, serum ubiquinone and magnesium levels. There was increase in tyrosine catabolites and a reduction in tryptophan catabolites in the serum. The total and individual glycosaminoglycan fractions, carbohydrate residues of glycoproteins, activity of glycosaminoglycans (GAG) degrading enzymes, and glycohydrolases were decreased in the serum. The concentration of RBC membrane total GAG and carbohydrate residues of glycoproteins increased, while the cholesterol: phospholipid ratio of the membrane decreased. The activity of free radical scavenging enzymes were increased, while the concentration of free radicals decreased significantly. The same biochemical patterns were observed in left hemispheric dominance as opposed to right hemispheric dominance. The significance of these findings in the pathogenesis of these disorders is discussed. PMID:14990764

  8. Membrane potential dye imaging of ventromedial hypothalamus neurons from adult mice to study glucose sensing.

    PubMed

    Vazirani, Reema P; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H

    2013-01-01

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age. PMID:24326343

  9. Membrane Potential Dye Imaging of Ventromedial Hypothalamus Neurons From Adult Mice to Study Glucose Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Vazirani, Reema P.; Fioramonti, Xavier; Routh, Vanessa H.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of neuronal activity are often performed using neurons from rodents less than 2 months of age due to the technical difficulties associated with increasing connective tissue and decreased neuronal viability that occur with age. Here, we describe a methodology for the dissociation of healthy hypothalamic neurons from adult-aged mice. The ability to study neurons from adult-aged mice allows the use of disease models that manifest at a later age and might be more developmentally accurate for certain studies. Fluorescence imaging of dissociated neurons can be used to study the activity of a population of neurons, as opposed to using electrophysiology to study a single neuron. This is particularly useful when studying a heterogeneous neuronal population in which the desired neuronal type is rare such as for hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons. We utilized membrane potential dye imaging of adult ventromedial hypothalamic neurons to study their responses to changes in extracellular glucose. Glucose sensing neurons are believed to play a role in central regulation of energy balance. The ability to study glucose sensing in adult rodents is particularly useful since the predominance of diseases related to dysfunctional energy balance (e.g. obesity) increase with age. PMID:24326343

  10. Hypothalamic thyroid hormone feedback in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Fliers, Eric; Alkemade, Anneke; Wiersinga, Wilmar M; Swaab, Dick F

    2006-01-01

    The role of the human hypothalamus in the neuroendocrine response to illness has only recently begun to be explored. Extensive changes in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) axis occur within the framework of critical illness. The best-documented change in the HPT axis is a decrease in serum concentrations of the biologically active thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (T3). From studies in post-mortem human hypothalamus it appeared that low serum T3 and thyrotropin (TSH) during illness (nonthyroidal illness, NTI) are paralleled by decreased thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)mRNA expression in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN), pointing to a major alteration in HPT axis setpoint regulation. A strong decrease in TRHmRNA expression is also present in the PVN of patients with major depression as well as in glucocorticoid-treated patients. By inference, hypercortisolism in hospitalized patients with severe depression or in critical illness may induce down-regulation of the HPT axis at the level of the hypothalamus. In order to start defining the determinants and mechanisms of these setpoint changes in various clinical conditions, it is important to note that an increasing number of hypothalamic proteins appears to be involved in central thyroid hormone metabolism. In recent studies, we have investigated the distribution and expression of thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, type 2 and type 3 deiodinase (D2 and D3), and the thyroid hormone transporter monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8) in the human hypothalamus by a combination of immunocytochemistry, mRNA in situ hybridization and enzyme activity assays. Both D2 and D3 enzyme activities are detectable in the mediobasal hypothalamus. D2 immunoreactivity is prominent in glial cells of the infundibular nucleus/median eminence region and in tanycytes lining the third ventricle. Combined D2, D3, MCT8 or TR immunocytochemistry and TRHmRNA in situ hybridization indicates that D3, MCT8 and TRs are all