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Sample records for gtpases regulate neurite

  1. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  2. Computer vision profiling of neurite outgrowth dynamics reveals spatiotemporal modularity of Rho GTPase signaling.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Ludovico; Lefort, Riwal; Smith, Kevin; Benmansour, Fethallah; Gonzalez, German; Barillari, Caterina; Rinn, Bernd; Fleuret, Francois; Fua, Pascal; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rho guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) control the cytoskeletal dynamics that power neurite outgrowth. This process consists of dynamic neurite initiation, elongation, retraction, and branching cycles that are likely to be regulated by specific spatiotemporal signaling networks, which cannot be resolved with static, steady-state assays. We present NeuriteTracker, a computer-vision approach to automatically segment and track neuronal morphodynamics in time-lapse datasets. Feature extraction then quantifies dynamic neurite outgrowth phenotypes. We identify a set of stereotypic neurite outgrowth morphodynamic behaviors in a cultured neuronal cell system. Systematic RNA interference perturbation of a Rho GTPase interactome consisting of 219 proteins reveals a limited set of morphodynamic phenotypes. As proof of concept, we show that loss of function of two distinct RhoA-specific GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) leads to opposite neurite outgrowth phenotypes. Imaging of RhoA activation dynamics indicates that both GAPs regulate different spatiotemporal Rho GTPase pools, with distinct functions. Our results provide a starting point to dissect spatiotemporal Rho GTPase signaling networks that regulate neurite outgrowth. PMID:26728857

  3. Regulating Rho GTPases and their regulators.

    PubMed

    Hodge, Richard G; Ridley, Anne J

    2016-08-01

    Rho GTPases regulate cytoskeletal and cell adhesion dynamics and thereby coordinate a wide range of cellular processes, including cell migration, cell polarity and cell cycle progression. Most Rho GTPases cycle between a GTP-bound active conformation and a GDP-bound inactive conformation to regulate their ability to activate effector proteins and to elicit cellular responses. However, it has become apparent that Rho GTPases are regulated by post-translational modifications and the formation of specific protein complexes, in addition to GTP-GDP cycling. The canonical regulators of Rho GTPases - guanine nucleotide exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins and guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors - are regulated similarly, creating a complex network of interactions to determine the precise spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPases. PMID:27301673

  4. Small GTPases as regulators of cell division

    PubMed Central

    Militello, Rodrigo; Colombo, María I.

    2013-01-01

    The superfamily of small GTPases serves as a signal transducer to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions. The members of this superfamily are structurally and functionally classified into at least 5 groups (Ras, Rho/Rac, Rab, Arf, and Ran) and they are involved in the control of cell proliferation and differentiation, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, membrane trafficking, and nuclear transport. It is widely reported that members of the Rab family participate in the control of intracellular membrane trafficking through the interaction with specific effector molecules. However, many Rabs and other small GTPases have also been shown to function in cell division. In this review, we discuss current knowledge about Rab proteins regulating different stages of the cell cycle, such as the congregation and segregation of chromosomes (during metaphase) and the final stage of cell division known as cytokinesis, in which a cell is cleaved originating 2 daughter cells. PMID:24265858

  5. Small RAB GTPases Regulate Multiple Steps of Mitosis.

    PubMed

    Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Colombo, María I

    2016-01-01

    GTPases of the RAB family are key regulators of multiple steps of membrane trafficking. Several members of the RAB GTPase family have been implicated in mitotic progression. In this review, we will first focus on the function of endosome-associated RAB GTPases reported in early steps of mitosis, spindle pole maturation, and during cytokinesis. Second, we will discuss the role of Golgi-associated RAB GTPases at the metaphase/anaphase transition and during cytokinesis. PMID:26925400

  6. Small RAB GTPases Regulate Multiple Steps of Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Miserey-Lenkei, Stéphanie; Colombo, María I.

    2016-01-01

    GTPases of the RAB family are key regulators of multiple steps of membrane trafficking. Several members of the RAB GTPase family have been implicated in mitotic progression. In this review, we will first focus on the function of endosome-associated RAB GTPases reported in early steps of mitosis, spindle pole maturation, and during cytokinesis. Second, we will discuss the role of Golgi-associated RAB GTPases at the metaphase/anaphase transition and during cytokinesis. PMID:26925400

  7. Small GTPase regulation of GPCR anterograde trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guansong; Wu, Guangyu

    2011-01-01

    The physiological functions of heterotrimeric G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are dictated by their intracellular trafficking and precise targeting to the functional destinations. Over the past decades, most studies on the trafficking of GPCRs have focused on the events involved in endocytosis and recycling. In contrast, the molecular mechanisms underlying anterograde transport of newly synthesized GPCRs from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the cell surface have just begun to be revealed. In this review, we will discuss current advances in understanding the role of Ras-like GTPases, specifically the Rab and Sar1/ARF subfamilies, in regulating cell-surface transport of GPCRs en route from the ER and the Golgi. PMID:22015208

  8. ACAP3 regulates neurite outgrowth through its GAP activity specific to Arf6 in mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuki; Hongu, Tsunaki; Yamauchi, Yohei; Funakoshi, Yuji; Katagiri, Naohiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2016-09-01

    ACAP3 (ArfGAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat and pleckstrin homology domains 3) belongs to the ACAP family of GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) for the small GTPase Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor). However, its specificity to Arf isoforms and physiological functions remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that ACAP3 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth of mouse hippocampal neurons through its GAP activity specific to Arf6. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, knockdown of ACAP3 abrogated neurite outgrowth, which was rescued by ectopically expressed wild-type ACAP3, but not by its GAP activity-deficient mutant. Ectopically expressed ACAP3 in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293T cells showed the GAP activity specific to Arf6. In support of this observation, the level of GTP-bound Arf6 was significantly increased by knockdown of ACAP3 in hippocampal neurons. In addition, knockdown and knockout of Arf6 in mouse hippocampal neurons suppressed neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrate that ACAP3 positively regulates neurite outgrowth through its GAP activity specific to Arf6. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth suppressed by ACAP3 knockdown was rescued by expression of a fast cycle mutant of Arf6 that spontaneously exchanges guanine nucleotides on Arf6, but not by that of wild-type, GTP- or GDP-locked mutant Arf6. Thus cycling between active and inactive forms of Arf6, which is precisely regulated by ACAP3 in concert with a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor(s), seems to be required for neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. PMID:27330119

  9. Timing Is Everything: GTPase Regulation in Phototransduction

    PubMed Central

    Arshavsky, Vadim Y.; Wensel, Theodore G.

    2013-01-01

    As the molecular mechanisms of vertebrate phototransduction became increasingly clear in the 1980s, a persistent problem was the discrepancy between the slow GTP hydrolysis catalyzed by the phototransduction G protein, transducin, and the much more rapid physiological recovery of photoreceptor cells from light stimuli. Beginning with a report published in 1989, a series of studies revealed that transducin GTPase activity could approach the rate needed to explain physiological recovery kinetics in the presence of one or more factors present in rod outer segment membranes. One by one, these factors were identified, beginning with PDEγ, the inhibitory subunit of the cGMP phosphodiesterase activated by transducin. There followed the discovery of the crucial role played by the regulator of G protein signaling, RGS9, a member of a ubiquitous family of GTPase-accelerating proteins, or GAPs, for heterotrimeric G proteins. Soon after, the G protein β isoform Gβ5 was identified as an obligate partner subunit, followed by the discovery or R9AP, a transmembrane protein that anchors the RGS9 GAP complex to the disk membrane, and is essential for the localization, stability, and activity of this complex in vivo. The physiological importance of all of the members of this complex was made clear first by knockout mouse models, and then by the discovery of a human visual defect, bradyopsia, caused by an inherited deficiency in one of the GAP components. Further insights have been gained by high-resolution crystal structures of subcomplexes, and by extensive mechanistic studies both in vitro and in animal models. PMID:24265205

  10. Shoc2/Sur8 Protein Regulates Neurite Outgrowth

    PubMed Central

    Leon, Gonzalo; Sanchez-Ruiloba, Lucia; Perez-Rodriguez, Andrea; Gragera, Teresa; Martinez, Natalia; Hernandez, Silvia; Anta, Berta; Calero, Olga; Garcia-Dominguez, Carlota A.; Dura, Lara M.; Peña-Jimenez, Daniel; Castro, Judit; Zarich, Natasha; Sanchez-Gomez, Pilar; Calero, Miguel; Iglesias, Teresa; Oliva, Jose L.; Rojas, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    The Shoc2 protein has been implicated in the positive regulation of the Ras-ERK pathway by increasing the functional binding interaction between Ras and Raf, leading to increased ERK activity. Here we found that Shoc2 overexpression induced sustained ERK phosphorylation, notably in the case of EGF stimulation, and Shoc2 knockdown inhibited ERK activation. We demonstrate that ectopic overexpression of human Shoc2 in PC12 cells significantly promotes neurite extension in the presence of EGF, a stimulus that induces proliferation rather than differentiation in these cells. Finally, Shoc2 depletion reduces both NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and ERK activation in PC12 cells. Our data indicate that Shoc2 is essential to modulate the Ras-ERK signaling outcome in cell differentiation processes involved in neurite outgrowth. PMID:25514808

  11. Rag GTPases are cardioprotective by regulating lysosomal function

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Chul; Mo, Jung-Soon; Jewell, Jenna L.; Russell, Ryan C.; Wu, Xiaohui; Sadoshima, Junichi; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2014-01-01

    The Rag family proteins are Ras-like small GTPases that play a critical role in amino acid-stimulated mTORC1 activation by recruiting mTORC1 to lysosome. Despite progress in the mechanistic understanding of Rag GTPases in mTORC1 activation, little is known about the physiological function of Rag GTPases in vivo. Here, we show that loss of RagA and RagB (RagA/B) in cardiomyocytes results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and phenocopies lysosomal storage diseases although mTORC1 activity is not substantially impaired in vivo. We demonstrate that despite upregulation of lysosomal protein expression by constitutive activation of the transcription factor EB (TFEB) in RagA/B knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts, lysosomal acidification is compromised due to decreased v-ATPase level in the lysosome fraction. Our study uncovers RagA/B GTPases as key regulators of lysosomal function and cardiac protection. PMID:24980141

  12. Regulation of phagocytosis by Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yingyu; Finnemann, Silvia C

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis is defined as a cellular uptake pathway for particles of greater than 0.5 μm in diameter. Particle clearance by phagocytosis is of critical importance for tissue health and homeostasis. The ultimate goal of anti-pathogen phagocytosis is to destroy engulfed bacteria or fungi and to stimulate cell-cell signaling that mount an efficient immune defense. In contrast, clearance phagocytosis of apoptotic cells and cell debris is anti-inflammatory. High capacity clearance phagocytosis pathways are available to professional phagocytes of the immune system and the retina. Additionally, a low capacity, so-called bystander phagocytic pathway is available to most other cell types. Different phagocytic pathways are stimulated by particle ligation of distinct surface receptors but all forms of phagocytosis require F-actin recruitment beneath tethered particles and F-actin re-arrangement promoting engulfment, which are controlled by Rho family GTPases. The specificity of Rho GTPase activity during the different forms of phagocytosis by mammalian cells is the subject of this review. PMID:25941749

  13. Transglutaminase 2 Regulates the GTPase-activating Activity of Bcr*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Sun-Ju; Groffen, John; Heisterkamp, Nora

    2009-01-01

    Transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is a multifunctional protein that has been implicated in numerous pathologies including that of neurodegeneration and celiac disease, but the molecular interactions that mediate its diverse activities are largely unknown. Bcr and the closely related Abr negatively regulate the small G-protein Rac: loss of their combined function in vivo results in increased reactivity of innate immune cells. Bcr and Abr are GTPase-activating proteins that catalyze the hydrolysis of the GTP bound to Rac. However, how the Bcr and Abr GTPase-activating activity is regulated is not precisely understood. We here report a novel mechanism of regulation through direct protein-protein interaction with TG2. TG2 bound to the Rac-binding pocket in the GTPase-activating domains of Bcr and Abr, blocked Bcr activity and, through this mechanism, increased levels of active GTP-bound Rac and EGF-stimulated membrane ruffling. TG2 exists in at least two different conformations. Interestingly, experiments using TG2 mutants showed that Bcr exhibits preferential binding to the non-compacted conformation of TG2, in which its catalytic domain is exposed, but transamidation is not needed for the interaction. Thus, TG2 regulates levels of cellular GTP-bound Rac and actin cytoskeletal reorganization through a new mechanism involving direct inhibition of Bcr GTPase-activating activity. PMID:19840940

  14. Regulation of autophagy by the Rab GTPase network

    PubMed Central

    Ao, X; Zou, L; Wu, Y

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy (macroautophagy) is a highly conserved intracellular and lysosome-dependent degradation process in which autophagic substrates are enclosed and degraded by a double-membrane vesicular structure in a continuous and dynamic vesicle transport process. The Rab protein is a small GTPase that belongs to the Ras-like GTPase superfamily and regulates the vesicle traffic process. Numerous Rab proteins have been shown to be involved in various stages of autophagy. Rab1, Rab5, Rab7, Rab9A, Rab11, Rab23, Rab32, and Rab33B participate in autophagosome formation, whereas Rab9 is required in non-canonical autophagy. Rab7, Rab8B, and Rab24 have a key role in autophagosome maturation. Rab8A and Rab25 are also involved in autophagy, but their role is unknown. Here, we summarize new findings regarding the involvement of Rabs in autophagy and provide insights regarding future research on the mechanisms of autophagy regulation. PMID:24440914

  15. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by dynamin GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Eleniste, Pierre P; Huang, Su; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Largura, Heather W; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts, but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0-21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased in osteoblasts over-expressing dynamin. Conversely, ALP activity was increased following shRNA-mediated knockdown of dynamin and in osteoblasts treated with the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore. Dynasore also reduced c-fos and osterix expression, markers of early osteoblasts, suggesting a role for dynamin in pre-osteoblast to osteoblast differentiation. Since dynamin GTPase activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, we examined the mechanism of dynamin dephosphorylation in osteoblasts. Dynamin formed a protein complex with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST and inhibition of phosphatase activity increased the level of phosphorylated dynamin. Further, PTP-PEST blocked the Src-mediated increase in the phosphorylation and GTPase activity of wild-type dynamin but not the phosphorylation mutant dynY231F/Y597F. Although ALP activity was increased in osteoblasts expressing GTPase-defective dynK44A, and to a lesser extent dynY231F/Y597F, osteoblast migration was significantly inhibited by dynK44A and dynY231F/Y597F. These studies demonstrate a novel role for dynamin GTPase activity and phosphorylation in osteoblast differentiation and migration, which may be important for bone formation. PMID:24387844

  16. Osteoblast differentiation and migration are regulated by Dynamin GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Eleniste, Pierre P.; Huang, Su; Wayakanon, Kornchanok; Largura, Heather W.; Bruzzaniti, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Bone formation is controlled by osteoblasts but the signaling proteins that control osteoblast differentiation and function are still unclear. We examined if the dynamin GTPase, which is associated with actin remodeling and migration in other cells, plays a role in osteoblast differentiation and migration. Dynamin mRNA was expressed in primary osteoblasts throughout differentiation (0–21 days). However, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, a marker of osteoblast differentiation, was decreased in osteoblasts over-expressing dynamin. Conversely, ALP activity was increased following shRNA-mediated knockdown of dynamin and in osteoblasts treated with the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore. Dynasore also reduced c-fos and osterix expression, markers of early osteoblasts, suggesting a role for dynamin in pre-osteoblast to osteoblast differentiation. Since dynamin GTPase activity is regulated by tyrosine phosphorylation, we examined the mechanism of dynamin dephosphorylation in osteoblasts. Dynamin formed a protein complex with the tyrosine phosphatase PTP-PEST and inhibition of phosphatase activity increased the level of phosphorylated dynamin. Further, PTP-PEST blocked the Src-mediated increase in the phosphorylation and GTPase activity of wild-type dynamin but not the phosphorylation mutant dynY231F/Y597F. Although ALP activity was increased in osteoblasts expressing GTPase-defective dynK44A, and to a lesser extent dynY231F/Y597F, osteoblast migration was significantly inhibited by dynK44A and dynY231F/Y597F. These studies demonstrate a novel role for dynamin GTPase activity and phosphorylation in osteoblast differentiation and migration, which may be important for bone formation. PMID:24387844

  17. Insulin signaling regulates neurite growth during metamorphic neuronal remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Tingting; Zhao, Tao; Hewes, Randall S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the growth capacity of mature neurons is often limited, some neurons can shift through largely unknown mechanisms from stable maintenance growth to dynamic, organizational growth (e.g. to repair injury, or during development transitions). During insect metamorphosis, many terminally differentiated larval neurons undergo extensive remodeling, involving elimination of larval neurites and outgrowth and elaboration of adult-specific projections. Here, we show in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster (Meigen), that a metamorphosis-specific increase in insulin signaling promotes neuronal growth and axon branching after prolonged stability during the larval stages. FOXO, a negative effector in the insulin signaling pathway, blocked metamorphic growth of peptidergic neurons that secrete the neuropeptides CCAP and bursicon. RNA interference and CCAP/bursicon cell-targeted expression of dominant-negative constructs for other components of the insulin signaling pathway (InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, S6K) also partially suppressed the growth of the CCAP/bursicon neuron somata and neurite arbor. In contrast, expression of wild-type or constitutively active forms of InR, Pi3K92E, Akt1, Rheb, and TOR, as well as RNA interference for negative regulators of insulin signaling (PTEN, FOXO), stimulated overgrowth. Interestingly, InR displayed little effect on larval CCAP/bursicon neuron growth, in contrast to its strong effects during metamorphosis. Manipulations of insulin signaling in many other peptidergic neurons revealed generalized growth stimulation during metamorphosis, but not during larval development. These findings reveal a fundamental shift in growth control mechanisms when mature, differentiated neurons enter a new phase of organizational growth. Moreover, they highlight strong evolutionarily conservation of insulin signaling in neuronal growth regulation. PMID:24357229

  18. Ral GTPases regulate exocyst assembly through dual subunit interactions.

    PubMed

    Moskalenko, Serge; Tong, Chao; Rosse, Carine; Mirey, Gladys; Formstecher, Etienne; Daviet, Laurent; Camonis, Jacques; White, Michael A

    2003-12-19

    Ral GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of a variety of dynamic cellular processes including proliferation, oncogenic transformation, actin-cytoskeletal dynamics, endocytosis, and exocytosis. Recently the Sec6/8 complex, or exocyst, a multisubunit complex facilitating post-Golgi targeting of distinct subclasses of secretory vesicles, has been identified as a bona fide Ral effector complex. Ral GTPases regulate exocyst-dependent vesicle trafficking and are required for exocyst complex assembly. Sec5, a membrane-associated exocyst subunit, has been identified as a direct target of activated Ral; however, the mechanism by which Ral can modulate exocyst assembly is unknown. Here we report that an additional component of the exocyst, Exo84, is a direct target of activated Ral. We provide evidence that mammalian exocyst components are present as distinct subcomplexes on vesicles and the plasma membrane and that Ral GTPases regulate the assembly interface of a full octameric exocyst complex through interaction with Sec5 and Exo84. PMID:14525976

  19. Rho-associated protein kinase modulates neurite extension by regulating microtubule remodeling and vinculin distribution

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke’en; Zhang, Wenbin; Chen, Jing; Li, Sumei; Guo, Guoqing

    2013-01-01

    Rho-associated protein kinase is an essential regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics during the process of neurite extension. However, whether Rho kinase regulates microtubule remodeling or the distribution of adhesive proteins to mediate neurite outgrowth remains unclear. By specifically modulating Rho kinase activity with pharmacological agents, we studied the morpho-dynamics of neurite outgrowth. We found that lysophosphatidic acid, an activator of Rho kinase, inhibited neurite outgrowth, which could be reversed by Y-27632, an inhibitor of Rho kinase. Meanwhile, reorganization of microtubules was noticed during these processes, as indicated by their significant changes in the soma and growth cone. In addition, exposure to lysophosphatidic acid led to a decreased membrane distribution of vinculin, a focal adhesion protein in neurons, whereas Y-27632 recruited vinculin to the membrane. Taken together, our data suggest that Rho kinase regulates rat hippocampal neurite growth and microtubule formation via a mechanism associated with the redistribution of vinculin. PMID:25206623

  20. Regulation of vesicular trafficking and leukocyte function by Rab27 GTPases and their effectors

    PubMed Central

    Catz, Sergio Daniel

    2013-01-01

    The Rab27 family of GTPases regulates the efficiency and specificity of exocytosis in hematopoietic cells, including neutrophils, CTLs, NK cells, and mast cells. However, the mechanisms regulated by Rab27 GTPases are cell-specific, as they depend on the differential expression and function of particular effector molecules that are recruited by the GTPases. In addition, Rab27 GTPases participate in multiple steps of the regulation of the secretory process, including priming, tethering, docking, and fusion through sequential interaction with multiple effector molecules. Finally, recent reports suggest that Rab27 GTPases and their effectors regulate vesicular trafficking mechanisms other than exocytosis, including endocytosis and phagocytosis. This review focuses on the latest discoveries on the function of Rab27 GTPases and their effectors Munc13-4 and Slp1 in neutrophil function comparatively to their functions in other leukocytes. PMID:23378593

  1. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology. PMID:26609537

  2. Coevolution of RAC Small GTPases and their Regulators GEF Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    RAC proteins are small GTPases involved in important cellular processes in eukaryotes, and their deregulation may contribute to cancer. Activation of RAC proteins is regulated by DOCK and DBL protein families of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Although DOCK and DBL proteins act as GEFs on RAC proteins, DOCK and DBL family members are evolutionarily unrelated. To understand how DBL and DOCK families perform the same function on RAC proteins despite their unrelated primary structure, phylogenetic analyses of the RAC, DBL, and DOCK families were implemented, and interaction patterns that may suggest a coevolutionary process were searched. Interestingly, while RAC and DOCK proteins are very well conserved in humans and among eukaryotes, DBL proteins are highly divergent. Moreover, correlation analyses of the phylogenetic distances of RAC and GEF proteins and covariation analyses between residues in the interacting domains showed significant coevolution rates for both RAC–DOCK and RAC–DBL interactions. PMID:27226705

  3. Metastasis suppressor 1 regulates neurite outgrowth in primary neuron cultures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Juan; Lin, Shuyun; Wang, Mei; Liang, Lijun; Zou, Zijiao; Zhou, Xinfeng; Wang, Meichi; Chen, Ping; Wang, Ying

    2016-10-01

    Metastasis suppressor 1 (MTSS1) or missing in metastasis (MIM) is an actin- and membrane-binding protein with tumor suppressor functions. MTSS1 is important for cell morphology, motility, metastasis. The role of MTSS1 in cell morphology has been widely investigated in non-neuronal tissues; however the role of MTSS1 in neurite outgrowth remains unclear. Here we investigated the effect of MTSS1 on neurite outgrowth in primary cerebellar granule and hippocampal neurons of mouse. We found that overexpression of MTSS1 in cerebellar granule neurons significantly enhanced dendrite elaboration but inhibited axon elongation. This phenotype was significantly reduced by deletion of the Wiskott-Aldrich homology 2 (WH2) motif and point mutation in the insulin receptor substrate p53 (IRSp53) and MIM/MTSS1 homology (IMD) domain. Furthermore, inhibition of Rac1 activity or blocking of phosphatidyl inositol phosphates (PIPs) signaling decreased the effect of MTSS1 markedly. In accordance with the over-expression data, knockdown of MTSS1 in cerebellar granule neurons could increase the axon length but decrease the dendrite length and the number of dendrites. In addition, MTSS1 knock down in embryonic hippocampal neurons suppressed neurite branching and reduced dendrite length. Our findings have demonstrated that MTSS1 modulates neuronal morphology, possibly through a Rac1-PIPs signaling pathway. PMID:27401056

  4. Rap2B GTPase: structure, functions, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhesi; Di, Jiehui; Lu, Zheng; Gao, Keyu; Zheng, Junnian

    2016-06-01

    Rap2B GTPase, a member of Ras-related protein superfamily, was first discovered from a platelet cDNA library in the early 1990s. Since then, it has been reported to play an important role in regulating cellular processes including cytoskeletal organization, cell growth, and proliferation. It can be stimulated and suppressed by a wide range of external and internal inducers, circulating between GTP-bound active state and GDP-bound inactive state. Increasing focus on Ras signaling pathway reveals critical effects of Rap2B on tumorigenesis. In particular, Rap2B behaves in a p53-dependent manner in regulation of apoptosis and migration. Apart from being an oncogenic activator, Rap2B has been found to participate in many other physiological events via diverse downstream effectors. In this review, we present recent studies on the structure, regulation, and multiple biological functions of Rap2B, shedding light on its potential status in treatment of cancer as well as other diseases. PMID:27012552

  5. Pavarotti/MKLP1 regulates microtubule sliding and neurite outgrowth in Drosophila neurons

    PubMed Central

    del Castillo, Urko; Lu, Wen; Winding, Michael; Lakonishok, Margot; Gelfand, Vladimir I.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Recently, we demonstrated that kinesin-1 can slide microtubules against each other providing the mechanical force required for initial neurite extension in Drosophila neurons. This sliding is only observed in young neurons actively forming neurites and is dramatically downregulated in older neurons. The downregulation is not caused by the global shut-down of kinesin-1, as the ability of kinesin-1 to transport membrane organelles is not diminished in mature neurons, suggesting that microtubule sliding is regulated by a dedicated mechanism [1]. Here, we have identified the “mitotic” kinesin Pavarotti (Pav-KLP) as an inhibitor of kinesin-1-driven microtubule sliding. Depletion of Pav-KLP in neurons strongly stimulated the sliding of long microtubules and neurite outgrowth, while its ectopic overexpression in the cytoplasm blocked both of these processes. Furthermore, postmitotic depletion of Pav-KLP in Drosophila neurons in vivo reduced embryonic/larval viability, with only a few animals surviving to the third instar larval stage. A detailed examination of motor neurons in the surviving larvae revealed the overextension of axons and mistargeting of neuromuscular junctions, resulting in uncoordinated locomotion. Taken together, our results identify a new role for Pav-KLP as a negative regulator of kinesin-1 driven neurite formation. These data suggest an important parallel between long microtubule-microtubule sliding in anaphase B and sliding of interphase microtubules during neurite formation. PMID:25557664

  6. New insights in the regulation of Rab GTPases by G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lachance, Véronik; Angers, Stéphane; Parent, Jean-Luc

    2014-01-01

    Cargo-mediated regulation of vesicular transport has received great attention lately. Rab GTPases, forming the largest branch of the Ras GTPase superfamily, regulate almost every step of vesicle-mediated trafficking. Growing evidence suggests that mutations, aberrant expression, and altered post-translational modifications of Rab GTPases are associated with human diseases. However, their regulatory mechanisms and how they are connected to cargo proteins are still poorly understood. Accumulating data indicate that G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) directly associate with Rab GTPases and that these interactions dictate receptor trafficking. Yet, it remained unclear whether the receptors could regulate the targeting and activity of Rab GTPases in various cell compartments. It is only in recent years that experimental studies showed that GPCR signaling and interaction with Rab-associated regulatory proteins modulate the localization and activity of Rab GTPases. This research is revealing novel regulatory mechanisms of these small GTPases and should contribute to the progress in effective drug development. Recently published in the Journal of Cell Science, Lachance et al. present a novel role for ubiquitylation of Rab11a by a β2AR/HACE1 complex in regulating Rab11a activity and β2AR trafficking. PMID:24950538

  7. Neurolastin, a dynamin family GTPase, regulates excitatory synapses and spine density

    PubMed Central

    Madan Lomash, Richa; Gu, Xinglong; Youle, Richard J.; Lu, Wei; Roche, Katherine W.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Membrane trafficking and spinogenesis contribute significantly to changes in synaptic strength during development and in various paradigms of synaptic plasticity. GTPases of the dynamin family are key players regulating membrane trafficking. Here, we identify a brain-specific dynamin family GTPase, neurolastin (RNF112/Znf179), with closest homology to atlastin. We demonstrate that neurolastin has functional GTPase and RING domains, making it a unique protein identified with this multi-enzymatic domain organization. We also show that neurolastin is a peripheral membrane protein, which localizes to endosomes and affects endosomal membrane dynamics via its RING domain. In addition, neurolastin knockout mice have fewer dendritic spines, and rescue of the wildtype phenotype requires both the GTPase and RING domains. Furthermore, we find fewer functional synapses and reduced paired pulse facilitation in neurolastin knockout mice. Thus, we identify neurolastin as a dynamin family GTPase that affects endosome size and spine density. PMID:26212327

  8. Berberine regulates neurite outgrowth through AMPK-dependent pathways by lowering energy status

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Jiaqi; Cao, Yuanzhao; Cheng, Kuoyuan; Xu, Bo; Wang, Tianchang; Yang, Qi; Yang, Qin; Feng, Xudong; Xia, Qing

    2015-06-10

    As a widely used anti-bacterial agent and a metabolic inhibitor as well as AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, berberine (BBR) has been shown to cross the blood–brain barrier. Its efficacy has been investigated in various disease models of the central nervous system. Neurite outgrowth is critical for nervous system development and is a highly energy-dependent process regulated by AMPK-related pathways. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the effects of BBR on AMPK activation and neurite outgrowth in neurons. The neurite outgrowth of primary rat cortical neurons at different stages of polarization was monitored after exposure of BBR. Intracellular energy level, AMPK activation and polarity-related pathways were also inspected. The results showed that BBR suppressed neurite outgrowth and affected cytoskeleton stability in the early stages of neuronal polarization, which was mediated by lowered energy status and AMPK activation. Liver kinase B1 and PI3K–Akt–GSK3β signaling pathways were also involved. In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress contributed to the lowered energy status induced by BBR. This study highlighted the knowledge of the complex activities of BBR in neurons and corroborated the significance of energy status during the neuronal polarization. - Highlights: • BBR inhibited neurite outgrowth in early stages of neuronal development. • Lowered neuronal energy status was induced by BBR treatment. • Neuronal energy stress induced by BBR activated AMPK-related pathways. • BBR induced mitochondrial dysfunction and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

  9. Inhibition of Nischarin Expression Promotes Neurite Outgrowth through Regulation of PAK Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuemin; Li, Yuying; Lu, Lingchao; Zhang, Ruyi; Zeng, Linghui; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Xiong

    2015-01-01

    Nischarin is a cytoplasmic protein expressed in various organs that plays an inhibitory role in cell migration and invasion and the carcinogenesis of breast cancer cells. We previously reported that Nischarin is highly expressed in neuronal cell lines and is differentially expressed in the brain tissue of adult rats. However, the physiological function of Nischarin in neural cells remains unknown. Here, we show that Nischarin is expressed in rat primary cortical neurons but not in astrocytes. Nischarin is localized around the nucleus and dendrites. Using shRNA to knockdown the expression of endogenous Nischarin significantly increases the percentage of neurite-bearing cells, remarkably increases neurite length, and accelerates neurite extension in neuronal cells. Silencing Nischarin expression also promotes dendrite elongation in rat cortical neurons where Nischarin interacts with p21-activated kinase 1/2 (PAK1/2) and negatively regulates phosphorylation of both PAK1 and PAK2. The stimulation of neurite growth observed in cells with decreased levels of Nischarin is partially abolished by IPA3-mediated inhibition of PAK1 activity. Our findings indicate that endogenous Nischarin inhibits neurite outgrowth by blocking PAK1 activation in neurons. PMID:26670864

  10. The Regulation of Cellular Responses to Mechanical Cues by Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Hoon, Jing Ling; Tan, Mei Hua; Koh, Cheng-Gee

    2016-01-01

    The Rho GTPases regulate many cellular signaling cascades that modulate cell motility, migration, morphology and cell division. A large body of work has now delineated the biochemical cues and pathways, which stimulate the GTPases and their downstream effectors. However, cells also respond exquisitely to biophysical and mechanical cues such as stiffness and topography of the extracellular matrix that profoundly influence cell migration, proliferation and differentiation. As these cellular responses are mediated by the actin cytoskeleton, an involvement of Rho GTPases in the transduction of such cues is not unexpected. In this review, we discuss an emerging role of Rho GTPase proteins in the regulation of the responses elicited by biophysical and mechanical stimuli. PMID:27058559

  11. Gem GTPase acts upstream Gmip/RhoA to regulate cortical actin remodeling and spindle positioning during early mitosis.

    PubMed

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Cuvillier, Olivier; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2014-11-01

    Gem is a small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein within the Ras superfamily, involved in the regulation of voltage-gated calcium channel activity and cytoskeleton reorganization. Gem overexpression leads to stress fiber disruption, actin and cell shape remodeling and neurite elongation in interphase cells. In this study, we show that Gem plays a crucial role in the regulation of cortical actin cytoskeleton that undergoes active remodeling during mitosis. Ectopic expression of Gem leads to cortical actin disruption and spindle mispositioning during metaphase. The regulation of spindle positioning by Gem involves its downstream effector Gmip. Knockdown of Gmip rescued Gem-induced spindle phenotype, although both Gem and Gmip accumulated at the cell cortex. In addition, we implicated RhoA GTPase as an important effector of Gem/Gmip signaling. Inactivation of RhoA by overexpressing dominant-negative mutant prevented normal spindle positioning. Introduction of active RhoA rescued the actin and spindle positioning defects caused by Gem or Gmip overexpression. These findings demonstrate a new role of Gem/Gmip/RhoA signaling in cortical actin regulation during early mitotic stages. PMID:25173885

  12. Regulation of Neurotrophin-Induced Axonal Responses via Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    HANDEÖZDINLER, P.; ERZURUMLU, REHA S.

    2014-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) and related neurotrophins induce differential axon growth patterns from embryonic sensory neurons. In wholemount explant cultures of embryonic rat trigeminal ganglion and brainstem or in dissociated cell cultures of the trigeminal ganglion, exogenous supply of NGF leads to axonal elongation, whereas neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) treatment leads to short branching and arborization. Axonal responses to neurotrophins might be mediated via the Rho GTPases. To investigate this possibility, we prepared wholemount trigeminal pathway cultures from E15 rats. We infected the ganglia with recombinant vaccinia viruses that express GFP-tagged dominant negative Rac, Rho, or constitutively active Rac or treated the cultures with lysophosphatitic acid (LPA) to activate Rho. We then examined axonal responses to NGF by use of the lipophilic tracer DiI. Rac activity induced longer axonal growth from the central trigeminal tract, whereas the dominant negative construct of Rac eliminated NGF-induced axon outgrowth. Rho activity also significantly reduced, and the Rho dominant negative construct increased, axon growth from the trigeminal tract. Similar alterations in axonal responses to NT-3 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor were also noted. Our results demonstrate that Rho GTPases play a major role in neurotrophin-induced axonal differentiation of embryonic trigeminal axons. PMID:11559894

  13. Anillin Regulates Neuronal Migration and Neurite Growth by Linking RhoG to the Actin Cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Tian, Dong; Diao, Min; Jiang, Yuxiang; Sun, Lingfei; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Zhucheng; Huang, Shanjin; Ou, Guangshuo

    2015-05-01

    Neuronal migration and neurite growth are essential events in neural development, but it remains unclear how guidance cues are transduced through receptors to the actin cytoskeleton, which powers these processes. We report that a cytokinetic scaffold protein, Anillin, is redistributed to the leading edge of the C. elegans Q neuroblast during cell migration and neurite growth. To bypass the requirement for Anillin in cytokinesis, we used the somatic CRISPR-Cas9 technique to generate conditional mutations in Anillin. We demonstrate that Anillin regulates cell migration and growth cone extension by stabilizing the F-actin network at the leading edge. Our biochemical analysis shows that the actin-binding domain of Anillin is sufficient to stabilize F-actin by antagonizing the F-actin severing activity of Cofilin. We further uncover that the active form of RhoG/MIG-2 directly binds to Anillin and recruits it to the leading edge. Our results reveal a novel pathway in which Anillin transduces the RhoG signal to the actin cytoskeleton during neuronal migration and neurite growth. PMID:25843030

  14. Optogenetic oligomerization of Rab GTPases regulates intracellular membrane trafficking.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Mai Khanh; Kim, Cha Yeon; Kim, Jin Man; Park, Byung Ouk; Lee, Sangkyu; Park, Hyerim; Heo, Won Do

    2016-06-01

    Intracellular membrane trafficking, which is involved in diverse cellular processes, is dynamic and difficult to study in a spatiotemporal manner. Here we report an optogenetic strategy, termed light-activated reversible inhibition by assembled trap of intracellular membranes (IM-LARIAT), that uses various Rab GTPases combined with blue-light-induced hetero-interaction between cryptochrome 2 and CIB1. In this system, illumination induces a rapid and reversible intracellular membrane aggregation that disrupts the dynamics and functions of the targeted membrane. We applied IM-LARIAT to specifically perturb several Rab-mediated trafficking processes, including receptor transport, protein sorting and secretion, and signaling initiated from endosomes. We finally used this tool to reveal different functions of local Rab5-mediated and Rab11-mediated membrane trafficking in growth cones and soma of young hippocampal neurons. Our results show that IM-LARIAT is a versatile tool that can be used to dissect spatiotemporal functions of intracellular membranes in diverse systems. PMID:27065232

  15. Foxp2 Regulates Gene Networks Implicated in Neurite Outgrowth in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Vernes, Sonja C.; Oliver, Peter L.; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Lockstone, Helen E.; Puliyadi, Rathi; Taylor, Jennifer M.; Ho, Joses; Mombereau, Cedric; Brewer, Ariel; Lowy, Ernesto; Nicod, Jérôme; Groszer, Matthias; Baban, Dilair; Sahgal, Natasha; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Davies, Kay E.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Fisher, Simon E.

    2011-01-01

    Forkhead-box protein P2 is a transcription factor that has been associated with intriguing aspects of cognitive function in humans, non-human mammals, and song-learning birds. Heterozygous mutations of the human FOXP2 gene cause a monogenic speech and language disorder. Reduced functional dosage of the mouse version (Foxp2) causes deficient cortico-striatal synaptic plasticity and impairs motor-skill learning. Moreover, the songbird orthologue appears critically important for vocal learning. Across diverse vertebrate species, this well-conserved transcription factor is highly expressed in the developing and adult central nervous system. Very little is known about the mechanisms regulated by Foxp2 during brain development. We used an integrated functional genomics strategy to robustly define Foxp2-dependent pathways, both direct and indirect targets, in the embryonic brain. Specifically, we performed genome-wide in vivo ChIP–chip screens for Foxp2-binding and thereby identified a set of 264 high-confidence neural targets under strict, empirically derived significance thresholds. The findings, coupled to expression profiling and in situ hybridization of brain tissue from wild-type and mutant mouse embryos, strongly highlighted gene networks linked to neurite development. We followed up our genomics data with functional experiments, showing that Foxp2 impacts on neurite outgrowth in primary neurons and in neuronal cell models. Our data indicate that Foxp2 modulates neuronal network formation, by directly and indirectly regulating mRNAs involved in the development and plasticity of neuronal connections. PMID:21765815

  16. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, William R.; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-08-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac–Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac–Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac–Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac–Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac–Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase (‘wave-pinning’) model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology.

  17. Analysis of a minimal Rho-GTPase circuit regulating cell shape.

    PubMed

    Holmes, William R; Edelstein-Keshet, Leah

    2016-01-01

    Networks of Rho-family GTPases regulate eukaryotic cell polarization and motility by controlling assembly and contraction of the cytoskeleton. The mutually inhibitory Rac-Rho circuit is emerging as a central, regulatory hub that can affect the shape and motility phenotype of eukaryotic cells. Recent experimental manipulation of the amounts of Rac and Rho or their regulators (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors, GTPase-activating proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors) have been shown to bias the prevalence of these different states and promote transitions between them. Here we show that part of this data can be understood in terms of inherent Rac-Rho mutually inhibitory dynamics. We analyze a spatio-temporal mathematical model of Rac-Rho dynamics to produce a detailed set of predictions of how parameters such as GTPase rates of activation and total amounts affect cell decisions (such as Rho-dominated contraction, Rac-dominated spreading, and spatially segregated Rac-Rho polarization). We find that in some parameter regimes, a cell can take on any of these three fates depending on its environment or stimuli. We also predict how experimental manipulations (corresponding to parameter variations) can affect cell shapes observed. Our methods are based on local perturbation analysis (a kind of nonlinear stability analysis), and an approximation of nonlinear feedback by sharp switches. We compare the Rac-Rho model to an even simpler single-GTPase ('wave-pinning') model and demonstrate that the overall behavior is inherent to GTPase properties, rather than stemming solely from network topology. PMID:27434017

  18. SNX9 promotes metastasis by enhancing cancer cell invasion via differential regulation of RhoGTPases

    PubMed Central

    Bendris, Nawal; Williams, Karla C.; Reis, Carlos R.; Welf, Erik S.; Chen, Ping-Hung; Lemmers, Bénédicte; Hahne, Michael; Leong, Hon Sing; Schmid, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Despite current advances in cancer research, metastasis remains the leading factor in cancer-related deaths. Here we identify sorting nexin 9 (SNX9) as a new regulator of breast cancer metastasis. We detect an increase in SNX9 expression in human breast cancer metastases compared with primary tumors and demonstrate that SNX9 expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells is necessary to maintain their ability to metastasize in a chick embryo model. Conversely, SNX9 knockdown impairs this process. In vitro studies using several cancer cell lines derived from a variety of human tumors reveal a role for SNX9 in cell invasion and identify mechanisms responsible for this novel function. We show that SNX9 controls the activation of RhoA and Cdc42 GTPases and also regulates cell motility via the modulation of well-known molecules involved in metastasis, namely RhoA-ROCK and N-WASP. In addition, we find that SNX9 is required for RhoGTPase-dependent, clathrin-independent endocytosis, and in this capacity can functionally substitute to the bona fide Rho GAP, GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase (GRAF1). Taken together, our data establish novel roles for SNX9 as a multifunctional protein scaffold that regulates, and potentially coordinates, several cellular processes that together can enhance cancer cell metastasis. PMID:26960793

  19. Caspases indirectly regulate cleavage of the mitochondrial fusion GTPase OPA1 in neurons undergoing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, F. Alexandra; Schroeder, Emily K.; Zommer, Amelia E.; Hilger, Shea; Kelsey, Natalie A.; Bouchard, Ron J.; Blackstone, Craig; Brewster, Jay L.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2009-01-01

    The critical processes of mitochondrial fission and fusion are regulated by members of the dynamin family of GTPases. Imbalances in mitochondrial fission and fusion contribute to neuronal cell death. For example, increased fission mediated by the dynamin-related GTPase, Drp1, or decreased fusion resulting from inactivating mutations in the OPA1 GTPase, cause neuronal apoptosis and/or neurodegeneration. Recent studies indicate that post-translational processing regulates OPA1 function in non-neuronal cells and moreover, aberrant processing of OPA1 is induced during apoptosis. To date, the post-translational processing of OPA1 during neuronal apoptosis has not been examined. Here, we show that cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs) or neuroblastoma cells exposed to pro-apoptotic stressors display a novel N-terminal cleavage of OPA1 which is blocked by either pan-caspase or caspase-8 selective inhibitors. OPA1 cleavage occurs concurrently with mitochondrial fragmentation and cytochrome c release in CGNs deprived of depolarizing potassium (5K condition). Although a caspase-8 selective inhibitor prevents both 5K-induced OPA1 cleavage and mitochondrial fragmentation, recombinant caspase-8 fails to cleave OPA1 in vitro. In marked contrast, either caspase-8 or caspase-3 stimulates OPA1 cleavage in digitonin-permeabilized rat brain mitochondria, suggesting that OPA1 is cleaved by an intermembrane space protease which is regulated by active caspases. Finally, the N-terminal truncation of OPA1 induced during neuronal apoptosis removes an essential residue (K301) within the GTPase domain. These data are the first to demonstrate OPA1 cleavage during neuronal apoptosis and they implicate caspases as indirect regulators of OPA1 processing in degenerating neurons. PMID:19046944

  20. A new role for the dynamin GTPase in the regulation of fusion pore expansion

    PubMed Central

    Anantharam, Arun; Bittner, Mary A.; Aikman, Rachel L.; Stuenkel, Edward L.; Schmid, Sandra L.; Axelrod, Daniel; Holz, Ronald W.

    2011-01-01

    Dynamin is a master regulator of membrane fission in endocytosis. However, a function for dynamin immediately upon fusion has also been suspected from a variety of experiments that measured release of granule contents. The role of dynamin guanosine triphosphate hydrolase (GTPase) activity in controlling fusion pore expansion and postfusion granule membrane topology was investigated using polarization optics and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (pTIRFM) and amperometry. A dynamin-1 (Dyn1) mutant with increased GTPase activity resulted in transient deformations consistent with rapid fusion pore widening after exocytosis; a Dyn1 mutant with decreased activity slowed fusion pore widening by stabilizing postfusion granule membrane deformations. The experiments indicate that, in addition to its role in endocytosis, GTPase activity of dynamin regulates the rapidity of fusion pore expansion from tens of milliseconds to seconds after fusion. These findings expand the membrane-sculpting repertoire of dynamin to include the regulation of immediate postfusion events in exocytosis that control the rate of release of soluble granule contents. PMID:21460182

  1. SCYL1BP1 modulates neurite outgrowth and regeneration by regulating the Mdm2/p53 pathway

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yonghua; Chen, Ying; Lu, Xiang; Wang, Youhua; Duan, Yinong; Cheng, Chun; Shen, Aiguo

    2012-01-01

    SCY1-like 1–binding protein 1 (SCYL1BP1) is a newly identified transcriptional activator domain containing a protein with many unknown biological functions. Recently emerging evidence has revealed that it is a novel regulator of the p53 pathway, which is required for neurite outgrowth and regeneration. Here we present evidence that SCYL1BP1 inhibits nerve growth factor–mediated neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells and affects morphogenesis of primary cortical neurons by strongly decreasing the p53 protein level in vitro, all of which depends on SCYL1BP1's transcriptional activator domain. Exogenous p53 rescues neurite outgrowth and neuronal morphogenesis defects caused by SCYL1BP1. Furthermore, SCYL1BP1 can directly induce Mdm2 transcription, whereas inhibiting the function of Mdm2 by specific small interfering RNAs results in partial rescue of neurite outgrowth and neuronal morphogenesis defects induced by SCYL1BP1. In vivo experiments show that SCYL1BP1 can also depress axonal regeneration, whereas inhibiting the function of SCYL1BP1 by specific short hairpin RNA enhances it. Taken together, these data strongly suggested that SCYL1BP1 is a novel transcriptional activator in neurite outgrowth by directly modulating the Mdm2/p53-dependent pathway, which might play an important role in CNS development and axonal regeneration after injury. PMID:23051735

  2. Roles of Aspergillus nidulans Cdc42/Rho GTPase regulators in hyphal morphogenesis and development.

    PubMed

    Si, Haoyu; Rittenour, William R; Harris, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    The Rho-related family of GTPases are pivotal regulators of morphogenetic processes in diverse eukaryotic organisms. In the filamentous fungi two related members of this family, Cdc42 and Rac1, perform particularly important roles in the establishment and maintenance of hyphal polarity. The activity of these GTPases is tightly controlled by two sets of regulators: guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). Despite the importance of Cdc42 and Rac1 in polarized hyphal growth, the morphogenetic functions of their cognate GEFs and GAPs have not been widely characterized in filamentous fungi outside the Saccharomycotina. Here we present a functional analysis of the Aspergillus nidulans homologs of the yeast GEF Cdc24 and the yeast GAP Rga1. We show that Cdc24 is required for the establishment of hyphal polarity and localizes to hyphal tips. We also show that Rga1 is necessary for the suppression of branching in developing conidiophores. During asexual development Rga1 appears to act primarily via Cdc42 and in doing so serves as a critical determinant of conidiophore architecture. Our results provide new insight into the roles of Cdc42 during development in A nidulans. PMID:26932184

  3. The conserved GTPase Gem1 regulates endoplasmic reticulum–mitochondria connections

    PubMed Central

    Kornmann, Benoît; Osman, Christof; Walter, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria are connected to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through specialized protein complexes. We recently identified the ER–mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) tethering complex, which plays a role in phospholipid exchange between the two organelles. ERMES also has been implicated in the coordination of mitochondrial protein import, mitochondrial DNA replication, and mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting that these interorganelle contact sites play central regulatory roles in coordinating various aspects of the physiology of the two organelles. Here we purified ERMES complexes and identified the Ca2+-binding Miro GTPase Gem1 as an integral component of ERMES. Gem1 regulates the number and size of the ERMES complexes. In vivo, association of Gem1 to ERMES required the first of Gem1’s two GTPase domains and the first of its two functional Ca2+-binding domains. In contrast, Gem1’s second GTPase domain was required for proper ERMES function in phospholipid exchange. Our results suggest that ERMES is not a passive conduit for interorganellar lipid exchange, but that it can be regulated in response to physiological needs. Furthermore, we provide evidence that the metazoan Gem1 ortholog Miro-1 localizes to sites of ER–mitochondrial contact, suggesting that some of the features ascribed to Gem1 may be evolutionarily conserved. PMID:21825164

  4. Regulation of cerebral cortex development by Rho GTPases: insights from in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Roberta; Kerloch, Thomas; Pacary, Emilie

    2015-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is the site of higher human cognitive and motor functions. Histologically, it is organized into six horizontal layers, each containing unique populations of molecularly and functionally distinct excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons. The stereotyped cellular distribution of cortical neurons is crucial for the formation of functional neural circuits and it is predominantly established during embryonic development. Cortical neuron development is a multiphasic process characterized by sequential steps of neural progenitor proliferation, cell cycle exit, neuroblast migration and neuronal differentiation. This series of events requires an extensive and dynamic remodeling of the cell cytoskeleton at each step of the process. As major regulators of the cytoskeleton, the family of small Rho GTPases has been shown to play essential functions in cerebral cortex development. Here we review in vivo findings that support the contribution of Rho GTPases to cortical projection neuron development and we address their involvement in the etiology of cerebral cortex malformations. PMID:25610373

  5. Regulation of liver metabolism by the endosomal GTPase Rab5.

    PubMed

    Zeigerer, Anja; Bogorad, Roman L; Sharma, Kirti; Gilleron, Jerome; Seifert, Sarah; Sales, Susanne; Berndt, Nikolaus; Bulik, Sascha; Marsico, Giovanni; D'Souza, Rochelle C J; Lakshmanaperumal, Naharajan; Meganathan, Kesavan; Natarajan, Karthick; Sachinidis, Agapios; Dahl, Andreas; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg; Shevchenko, Andrej; Mann, Matthias; Koteliansky, Victor; Zerial, Marino

    2015-05-12

    The liver maintains glucose and lipid homeostasis by adapting its metabolic activity to the energy needs of the organism. Communication between hepatocytes and extracellular environment via endocytosis is key to such homeostasis. Here, we addressed the question of whether endosomes are required for gluconeogenic gene expression. We took advantage of the loss of endosomes in the mouse liver upon Rab5 silencing. Strikingly, we found hepatomegaly and severe metabolic defects such as hypoglycemia, hypercholesterolemia, hyperlipidemia, and glycogen accumulation that phenocopied those found in von Gierke's disease, a glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) deficiency. G6Pase deficiency alone can account for the reduction in hepatic glucose output and glycogen accumulation as determined by mathematical modeling. Interestingly, we uncovered functional alterations in the transcription factors, which regulate G6Pase expression. Our data highlight a requirement of Rab5 and the endosomal system for the regulation of gluconeogenic gene expression that has important implications for metabolic diseases. PMID:25937276

  6. Regulation of Cancer Cell Behavior by the Small GTPase Rab13.

    PubMed

    Ioannou, Maria S; McPherson, Peter S

    2016-05-01

    The members of the Rab family of GTPases are master regulators of cellular membrane trafficking. With ∼70 members in humans, Rabs have been implicated in all steps of membrane trafficking ranging from vesicle formation and transport to vesicle docking/tethering and fusion. Vesicle trafficking controls the localization and levels of a myriad of proteins, thus regulating cellular functions including proliferation, metabolism, cell-cell adhesion, and cell migration. It is therefore not surprising that impairment of Rab pathways is associated with diseases including cancer. In this review, we highlight evidence supporting the role of Rab13 as a potent driver of cancer progression. PMID:27044746

  7. Conserved regulators of Rag GTPases orchestrate amino acid-dependent TORC1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Powis, Katie; De Virgilio, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The highly conserved target of rapamycin complex 1 (TORC1) is the central component of a signaling network that couples a vast range of internal and external stimuli to cell growth, proliferation and metabolism. TORC1 deregulation is associated with a number of human pathologies, including many cancers and metabolic disorders, underscoring its importance in cellular and organismal growth control. The activity of TORC1 is modulated by multiple inputs; however, the presence of amino acids is a stimulus that is essential for its activation. Amino acid sufficiency is communicated to TORC1 via the highly conserved family of Rag GTPases, which assemble as heterodimeric complexes on lysosomal/vacuolar membranes and are regulated by their guanine nucleotide loading status. Studies in yeast, fly and mammalian model systems have revealed a multitude of conserved Rag GTPase modulators, which have greatly expanded our understanding of amino acid sensing by TORC1. Here we review the major known modulators of the Rag GTPases, focusing on recent mechanistic insights that highlight the evolutionary conservation and divergence of amino acid signaling to TORC1. PMID:27462445

  8. Rab-family GTPase regulates TOR complex 2 signaling in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Tatebe, Hisashi; Morigasaki, Susumu; Murayama, Shinichi; Zeng, Cui Tracy; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background From yeast to human, TOR (Target Of Rapamycin) kinase plays pivotal roles in coupling extracellular stimuli to cell growth and metabolism. TOR kinase functions in two distinct protein complexes, TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and 2 (TORC2), which phosphorylate and activate different AGC-family protein kinases. TORC1 is controlled by the small GTPase Rheb, but little is known about TORC2 regulators. Results We have identified the Ryh1 GTPase, a human Rab6 ortholog, as an activator of TORC2 signaling in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Mutational inactivation of Ryh1 or its guanine nucleotide exchange factor compromises the TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of the AGC-family Gad8 kinase. In addition, the effector domain of Ryh1 is important for its physical interaction with TORC2 and for stimulation of TORC2 signaling. Thus, GTP-bound Ryh1 is likely to be the active form stimulatory to TORC2–Gad8 signaling. Consistently, expression of the GTP-locked mutant Ryh1 is sufficient to promote interaction between TORC2 and Gad8 and to induce Gad8 hyper-phosphorylation. The loss of functional Ryh1, TORC2 or Gad8 brings about similar vacuolar fragmentation and stress sensitivity, further corroborating their involvement in a common cellular process. Human Rab6 can substitute Ryh1 in S. pombe and therefore, Rab6 may be a potential activator of TORC2 in mammals. Conclusions In its GTP-bound form, Ryh1, an evolutionarily conserved Rab GTPase, activates TORC2 signaling to the AGC kinase Gad8. The Ryh1 GTPase and the TORC2–Gad8 pathway are required for vacuolar integrity and cellular stress resistance in S. pombe. PMID:21035342

  9. A novel role for RhoA GTPase in the regulation of airway smooth muscle contraction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwu; Huang, Youliang; Wu, Yidi; Gunst, Susan J

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a novel molecular mechanism for the regulation of airway smooth muscle (ASM) contraction by RhoA GTPase. In ASM tissues, both myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and actin polymerization are required for active tension generation. RhoA inactivation dramatically suppresses agonist-induced tension development and completely inhibits agonist-induced actin polymerization, but only slightly reduces MLC phosphorylation. The inhibition of MLC phosphatase does not reverse the effects of RhoA inactivation on contraction or actin polymerization. Thus, RhoA regulates ASM contraction through its effects on actin polymerization rather than MLC phosphorylation. Contractile stimulation of ASM induces the recruitment and assembly of paxillin, vinculin, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) into membrane adhesion complexes (adhesomes) that regulate actin polymerization by catalyzing the activation of cdc42 GTPase by the G-protein-coupled receptor kinase-interacting target (GIT) - p21-activated kinase (PAK) - PAK-interacting exchange factor (PIX) complex. Cdc42 is a necessary and specific activator of the actin filament nucleation activator, N-WASp. The recruitment and activation of paxillin, vinculin, and FAK is prevented by RhoA inactivation, thus preventing cdc42 and N-WASp activation. We conclude that RhoA regulates ASM contraction by catalyzing the assembly and activation of membrane adhesome signaling modules that regulate actin polymerization, and that the RhoA-mediated assembly of adhesome complexes is a fundamental step in the signal transduction process in response to a contractile agonist. PMID:25531582

  10. Select Rab GTPases Regulate the Pulmonary Endothelium via Endosomal Trafficking of Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin.

    PubMed

    Chichger, Havovi; Braza, Julie; Duong, Huetran; Boni, Geraldine; Harrington, Elizabeth O

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary edema occurs in settings of acute lung injury, in diseases, such as pneumonia, and in acute respiratory distress syndrome. The lung interendothelial junctions are maintained in part by vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin, an adherens junction protein, and its surface expression is regulated by endocytic trafficking. The Rab family of small GTPases are regulators of endocytic trafficking. The key trafficking pathways are regulated by Rab4, -7, and -9. Rab4 regulates the recycling of endosomes to the cell surface through a rapid-shuttle process, whereas Rab7 and -9 regulate trafficking to the late endosome/lysosome for degradation or from the trans-Golgi network to the late endosome, respectively. We recently demonstrated a role for the endosomal adaptor protein, p18, in regulation of the pulmonary endothelium through enhanced recycling of VE-cadherin to adherens junction. Thus, we hypothesized that Rab4, -7, and -9 regulate pulmonary endothelial barrier function through modulating trafficking of VE-cadherin-positive endosomes. We used Rab mutants with varying activities and associations to the endosome to study endothelial barrier function in vitro and in vivo. Our study demonstrates a key role for Rab4 activation and Rab9 inhibition in regulation of vascular permeability through enhanced VE-cadherin expression at the interendothelial junction. We further showed that endothelial barrier function mediated through Rab4 is dependent on extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation and activity. Thus, we demonstrate that Rab4 and -9 regulate VE-cadherin levels at the cell surface to modulate the pulmonary endothelium through extracellular signal-regulated kinase-dependent and -independent pathways, respectively. We propose that regulating select Rab GTPases represents novel therapeutic strategies for patients suffering with acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:26551054

  11. P-cadherin-mediated Rho GTPase regulation during collective cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Plutoni, Cédric; Bazellières, Elsa; Gauthier-Rouvière, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This commentary addresses the role of P-cadherin in collective cell migration (CCM), a cooperative and coordinated migration mode, used by cells during normal and pathological migration processes. We discuss how cadherin-mediated cell-cell junctions (CCJs) play a critical role in CCM through their ability to regulate Rho GTPase-dependent pathways and how this leads to the generation and orientation of mechanical forces. We will also highlight the key function of P-cadherin (a poor prognostic marker in several tumors) in promoting collective cell movement in epithelial and mesenchymal cells. PMID:27152729

  12. PAK-PIX interactions regulate adhesion dynamics and membrane protrusion to control neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Santiago-Medina, Miguel; Gregus, Kelly A; Gomez, Timothy M

    2013-03-01

    The roles of P21-activated kinase (PAK) in the regulation of axon outgrowth downstream of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are poorly understood. Here we show that PAK1-3 and PIX are expressed in the developing spinal cord and differentially localize to point contacts and filopodial tips within motile growth cones. Using a specific interfering peptide called PAK18, we found that axon outgrowth is robustly stimulated on laminin by partial inhibition of PAK-PIX interactions and PAK function, whereas complete inhibition of PAK function stalls axon outgrowth. Furthermore, modest inhibition of PAK-PIX stimulates the assembly and turnover of growth cone point contacts, whereas strong inhibition over-stabilizes adhesions. Point mutations within PAK confirm the importance of PIX binding. Together our data suggest that regulation of PAK-PIX interactions in growth cones controls neurite outgrowth by influencing the activity of several important mediators of actin filament polymerization and retrograde flow, as well as integrin-dependent adhesion to laminin. PMID:23321640

  13. MicroRNAs as key regulators of GTPase-mediated apical actin reorganization in multiciliated epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Mercey, Olivier; Kodjabachian, Laurent; Barbry, Pascal; Marcet, Brice

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Multiciliated cells (MCCs), which are present in specialized vertebrate tissues such as mucociliary epithelia, project hundreds of motile cilia from their apical membrane. Coordinated ciliary beating in MCCs contributes to fluid propulsion in several biological processes. In a previous work, we demonstrated that microRNAs of the miR-34/449 family act as new conserved regulators of MCC differentiation by specifically repressing cell cycle genes and the Notch pathway. Recently, we have shown that miR-34/449 also modulate small GTPase pathways to promote, in a later stage of differentiation, the assembly of the apical actin network, a prerequisite for proper anchoring of centrioles-derived neo-synthesized basal bodies. We characterized several miR-34/449 targets related to small GTPase pathways including R-Ras, which represents a key and conserved regulator during MCC differentiation. Direct RRAS repression by miR-34/449 is necessary for apical actin meshwork assembly, notably by allowing the apical relocalization of the actin binding protein Filamin-A near basal bodies. Our studies establish miR-34/449 as central players that orchestrate several steps of MCC differentiation program by regulating distinct signaling pathways. PMID:27144998

  14. RAS and RHO families of GTPases directly regulate distinct phosphoinositide 3-kinase isoforms.

    PubMed

    Fritsch, Ralph; de Krijger, Inge; Fritsch, Kornelia; George, Roger; Reason, Beth; Kumar, Madhu S; Diefenbacher, Markus; Stamp, Gordon; Downward, Julian

    2013-05-23

    RAS proteins are important direct activators of p110α, p110γ, and p110δ type I phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3Ks), interacting via an amino-terminal RAS-binding domain (RBD). Here, we investigate the regulation of the ubiquitous p110β isoform of PI3K, implicated in G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling, PTEN-loss-driven cancers, and thrombocyte function. Unexpectedly, RAS is unable to interact with p110β, but instead RAC1 and CDC42 from the RHO subfamily of small GTPases bind and activate p110β via its RBD. In fibroblasts, GPCRs couple to PI3K through Dock180/Elmo1-mediated RAC activation and subsequent interaction with p110β. Cells from mice carrying mutations in the p110β RBD show reduced PI3K activity and defective chemotaxis, and these mice are resistant to experimental lung fibrosis. These findings revise our understanding of the regulation of type I PI3K by showing that both RAS and RHO family GTPases directly regulate distinct ubiquitous PI3K isoforms and that RAC activates p110β downstream of GPCRs. PMID:23706742

  15. Extracellular Superoxide Dismutase Regulates the Expression of Small GTPase Regulatory Proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI

    PubMed Central

    Laukkanen, Mikko O.; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3–induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3–driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  16. Extracellular superoxide dismutase regulates the expression of small gtpase regulatory proteins GEFs, GAPs, and GDI.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Mikko O; Cammarota, Francesca; Esposito, Tiziana; Salvatore, Marco; Castellone, Maria D

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular superoxide dismutase (SOD3), which catalyzes the dismutation of superoxide anions to hydrogen peroxide at the cell membranes, regulates the cellular growth in a dose-dependent manner. This enzyme induces primary cell proliferation and immortalization at low expression levels whereas it activates cancer barrier signaling through the p53-p21 pathway at high expression levels, causing growth arrest, senescence, and apoptosis. Because previous reports suggested that the SOD3-induced reduction in the rates of cellular growth and migration also occurred in the absence of functional p53 signaling, in the current study we investigated the SOD3-induced growth-suppressive mechanisms in anaplastic thyroid cancer cells. Based on our data, the robust over-expression of SOD3 increased the level of phosphorylation of the EGFR, ERBB2, RYK, ALK, FLT3, and EPHA10 receptor tyrosine kinases with the consequent downstream activation of the SRC, FYN, YES, HCK, and LYN kinases. However, pull-down experiments focusing on the small GTPase RAS, RAC, CDC42, and RHO revealed a reduced level of growth and migration signal transduction, such as the lack of stimulation of the mitogen pathway, in the SOD3 over-expressing cells, which was confirmed by MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 Western blotting analysis. Interestingly, the mRNA expression analyses indicated that SOD3 regulated the expression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (RHO GEF16, RAL GEF RGL1), GTPase-activating proteins (ARFGAP ADAP2, RAS GAP RASAL1, RGS4), and a Rho guanine nucleotide-disassociation inhibitor (RHO GDI 2) in a dose dependent manner, thus controlling signaling through the small G protein GTPases. Therefore, our current data may suggest the occurrence of dose-dependent SOD3-driven control of the GTP loading of small G proteins indicating a novel growth regulatory mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:25751262

  17. The GTPase-Activating Protein Rga1 Interacts with Rho3 GTPase and May Regulate Its Function in Polarized Growth in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    He, Fei; Nie, Wen-Chao; Tong, Zongtian; Yuan, Si-Min; Gong, Ting; Liao, Yuan; Bi, Erfei; Gao, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In budding yeast, Rga1 negatively regulates the Rho GTPase Cdc42 by acting as a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Cdc42. To gain insight into the function and regulation of Rga1, we overexpressed Rga1 and an N-terminally truncated Rga1-C538 (a.a. 538-1007) segment. Overexpression of Rga1-C538 but not full-length Rga1 severely impaired growth and cell morphology in wild-type cells. We show that Rga1 is phosphorylated during the cell cycle. The lack of phenotype for full-length Rga1 upon overexpression may result from a negative regulation by G1-specific Pho85, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK). From a high-copy suppressor screen, we isolated RHO3, SEC9, SEC1, SSO1, SSO2, and SRO7, genes involved in exocytosis, as suppressors of the growth defect caused by Rga1-C538 overexpression. Moreover, we detected that Rga1 interacts with Rho3 in two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays. Rga1 preferentially interacts with the GTP-bound form of Rho3 and the interaction requires the GAP domain and additional sequence upstream of the GAP domain. Our data suggest that the interaction of Rga1 with Rho3 may regulate Rho3’s function in polarized bud growth. PMID:25860339

  18. CD81 regulates cell migration through its association with Rac GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Tejera, Emilio; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; López-Martín, Soraya; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Bachir, Alexia I.; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mo, María

    2013-01-01

    CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family that has been described to have a key role in cell migration of tumor and immune cells. To unravel the mechanisms of CD81-regulated cell migration, we performed proteomic analyses that revealed an interaction of the tetraspanin C-terminal domain with the small GTPase Rac. Direct interaction was confirmed biochemically. Moreover, microscopy cross-correlation analysis demonstrated the in situ integration of both molecules into the same molecular complex. Pull-down experiments revealed that CD81-Rac interaction was direct and independent of Rac activation status. Knockdown of CD81 resulted in enhanced protrusion rate, altered focal adhesion formation, and decreased cell migration, correlating with increased active Rac. Reexpression of wild-type CD81, but not its truncated form lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, rescued these effects. The phenotype of CD81 knockdown cells was mimicked by treatment with a soluble peptide with the C-terminal sequence of the tetraspanin. Our data show that the interaction of Rac with the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD81 is a novel regulatory mechanism of the GTPase activity turnover. Furthermore, they provide a novel mechanism for tetraspanin-dependent regulation of cell motility and open new avenues for tetraspanin-targeted reagents by the use of cell-permeable peptides. PMID:23264468

  19. CD81 regulates cell migration through its association with Rac GTPase.

    PubMed

    Tejera, Emilio; Rocha-Perugini, Vera; López-Martín, Soraya; Pérez-Hernández, Daniel; Bachir, Alexia I; Horwitz, Alan Rick; Vázquez, Jesús; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco; Yáñez-Mo, María

    2013-02-01

    CD81 is a member of the tetraspanin family that has been described to have a key role in cell migration of tumor and immune cells. To unravel the mechanisms of CD81-regulated cell migration, we performed proteomic analyses that revealed an interaction of the tetraspanin C-terminal domain with the small GTPase Rac. Direct interaction was confirmed biochemically. Moreover, microscopy cross-correlation analysis demonstrated the in situ integration of both molecules into the same molecular complex. Pull-down experiments revealed that CD81-Rac interaction was direct and independent of Rac activation status. Knockdown of CD81 resulted in enhanced protrusion rate, altered focal adhesion formation, and decreased cell migration, correlating with increased active Rac. Reexpression of wild-type CD81, but not its truncated form lacking the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain, rescued these effects. The phenotype of CD81 knockdown cells was mimicked by treatment with a soluble peptide with the C-terminal sequence of the tetraspanin. Our data show that the interaction of Rac with the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of CD81 is a novel regulatory mechanism of the GTPase activity turnover. Furthermore, they provide a novel mechanism for tetraspanin-dependent regulation of cell motility and open new avenues for tetraspanin-targeted reagents by the use of cell-permeable peptides. PMID:23264468

  20. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Matthew R; Johnson, William M; Pilat, Jennifer M; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E; Moiseenkova-Bell, Vera Y

    2015-12-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca(2+)-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca(2+)-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca(2+) signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  1. Nerve Growth Factor Regulates Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 2 via Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Signaling To Enhance Neurite Outgrowth in Developing Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Matthew R.; Johnson, William M.; Pilat, Jennifer M.; Kiselar, Janna; DeFrancesco-Lisowitz, Alicia; Zigmond, Richard E.

    2015-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth is key to the formation of functional circuits during neuronal development. Neurotrophins, including nerve growth factor (NGF), increase neurite outgrowth in part by altering the function and expression of Ca2+-permeable cation channels. Here we report that transient receptor potential vanilloid 2 (TRPV2) is an intracellular Ca2+-permeable TRPV channel upregulated by NGF via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway to augment neurite outgrowth. TRPV2 colocalized with Rab7, a late endosome protein, in addition to TrkA and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in neurites, indicating that the channel is closely associated with signaling endosomes. In line with these results, we showed that TRPV2 acts as an ERK substrate and identified the motifs necessary for phosphorylation of TRPV2 by ERK. Furthermore, neurite length, TRPV2 expression, and TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals were reduced by mutagenesis of these key ERK phosphorylation sites. Based on these findings, we identified a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ERK controls TRPV2-mediated Ca2+ signals in developing neurons and further establish TRPV2 as a critical intracellular ion channel in neuronal function. PMID:26416880

  2. Ran GTPase promotes oocyte polarization by regulating ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Dehapiot, Benoit; Halet, Guillaume

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric meiotic divisions in mammalian oocytes are driven by the eccentric positioning of the spindle, along with a dramatic reorganization of the overlying cortex, including a loss of microvilli and formation of a thick actin cap. Actin polarization relies on a Ran-GTP gradient centered on metaphase chromosomes; however, the downstream signaling cascade is not completely understood. In a recent study, we have shown that Ran promotes actin cap formation via the polarized activation of Cdc42. The related GTPase Rac is also activated in a polarized fashion in the oocyte cortex and co-localizes with active Cdc42. In other cells, microvilli collapse can be triggered by inactivation of the ERM (Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin) family of actin-membrane crosslinkers under the control of Rac. Accordingly, we show here that Ran-GTP promotes a substantial loss of phosphorylated ERMs in the cortex overlying the spindle in mouse oocytes. However, this polarized phospho-ERM exclusion zone was unaffected by Rac or Cdc42 inhibition. Therefore, we suggest that Ran activates two distinct pathways to regulate actin cap formation and microvilli disassembly in the polarized cortex of mouse oocytes. The possibility of a crosstalk between Rho GTPase and ERM signaling and a role for ERM inactivation in promoting cortical actin dynamics are also discussed. PMID:23656777

  3. Regulation of Adherens Junctions in Trabecular Meshwork Cells by Rac GTPase and their influence on Intraocular Pressure.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Epstein, David L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-06-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are presumed to influence aqueous humor (AH) drainage via the conventional route, however, their direct role in modulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of Rac GTPase signaling in basal and growth factor-induced formation of adherens junctions in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells as compared to human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and evaluated the effects of inhibition of Rac GTPase activity on IOP in rabbits. Expression of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase or treatment with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a known activator of Rac GTPase, induced formation of β-catenin-based adherens junctions, actin cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane ruffle in HTM cells. In contrast, treatment of HTM cells with inhibitors of Rac GTPase caused cell-cell separation, a decrease in adherens junctions, and reorganization of actin stress fibers to the cell cortical regions and focal adhesion to the cell leading edges. Both, constitutively active Rac1 and PDGF stimulated generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in HTM cells, and ROS were found to increase adherens junction formation and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in HTM cells. Topical application of Rac GTPase inhibitors (EHT1864 and NSC23766), however, only marginally influenced IOP in rabbit eyes. Taken together, these data reveal that while Rac GTPase signaling plays a significant role in regulation of adherens junctions, ROS production and TEER in cells of the AH outflow pathway, Rac inhibitors showed only a marginal influence on IOP in live rabbits. PMID:24932460

  4. Regulation of Adherens Junctions in Trabecular Meshwork Cells by Rac GTPase and their influence on Intraocular Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Epstein, David L; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2013-01-01

    Intercellular adherens junctions and cell-extracellular matrix interactions are presumed to influence aqueous humor (AH) drainage via the conventional route, however, their direct role in modulation of intraocular pressure (IOP) is not well understood. Here, we investigated the role of Rac GTPase signaling in basal and growth factor-induced formation of adherens junctions in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells as compared to human umbilical vascular endothelial cells, and evaluated the effects of inhibition of Rac GTPase activity on IOP in rabbits. Expression of a constitutively active Rac1 GTPase or treatment with platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), a known activator of Rac GTPase, induced formation of β-catenin-based adherens junctions, actin cytoskeletal reorganization and membrane ruffle in HTM cells. In contrast, treatment of HTM cells with inhibitors of Rac GTPase caused cell-cell separation, a decrease in adherens junctions, and reorganization of actin stress fibers to the cell cortical regions and focal adhesion to the cell leading edges. Both, constitutively active Rac1 and PDGF stimulated generation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in HTM cells, and ROS were found to increase adherens junction formation and transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) in HTM cells. Topical application of Rac GTPase inhibitors (EHT1864 and NSC23766), however, only marginally influenced IOP in rabbit eyes. Taken together, these data reveal that while Rac GTPase signaling plays a significant role in regulation of adherens junctions, ROS production and TEER in cells of the AH outflow pathway, Rac inhibitors showed only a marginal influence on IOP in live rabbits. PMID:24932460

  5. ALS/FTLD-linked TDP-43 regulates neurite morphology and cell survival in differentiated neurons

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeong-Ho; Yu, Tae-Hoon; Ryu, Hyun-Hee; Jun, Mi-Hee; Ban, Byung-Kwan; Jang, Deok-Jin; Lee, Jin-A

    2013-08-01

    Tar-DNA binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) has been characterized as a major component of protein aggregates in brains with neurodegenerative diseases such as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). However, physiological roles of TDP-43 and early cellular pathogenic effects caused by disease associated mutations in differentiated neurons are still largely unknown. Here, we investigated the physiological roles of TDP-43 and the effects of missense mutations associated with diseases in differentiated cortical neurons. The reduction of TDP-43 by siRNA increased abnormal neurites and decreased cell viability. ALS/FTLD-associated missense mutant proteins (A315T, Q331K, and M337V) were partially mislocalized to the cytosol and neurites when compared to wild-type and showed abnormal neurites similar to those observed in cases of loss of TDP-43. Interestingly, cytosolic expression of wild-type TDP-43 with mutated nuclear localization signals also induced abnormal neurtie morphology and reduction of cell viability. However, there was no significant difference in the effects of cytosolic expression in neuronal morphology and cell toxicity between wild-type and missense mutant proteins. Thus, our results suggest that mislocalization of missense mutant TDP-43 may contribute to loss of TDP-43 function and affect neuronal morphology, probably via dominant negative action before severe neurodegeneration in differentiated cortical neurons. Highlights: • The function of nuclear TDP-43 in neurite morphology in mature neurons. • Partial mislocalization of TDP-43 missense mutants into cytosol from nucleus. • Abnormal neurite morphology caused by missense mutants of TDP-43. • The effect of cytosolic expression of TDP-43 in neurite morphology and in cell survival.

  6. Structural and functional regulation of tight junctions by RhoA and Rac1 small GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jou, T S; Schneeberger, E E; Nelson, W J

    1998-07-13

    Tight junctions (TJ) govern ion and solute diffusion through the paracellular space (gate function), and restrict mixing of membrane proteins and lipids between membrane domains (fence function) of polarized epithelial cells. We examined roles of the RhoA and Rac1 GTPases in regulating TJ structure and function in MDCK cells using the tetracycline repressible transactivator to regulate RhoAV14, RhoAN19, Rac1V12, and Rac1N17 expression. Both constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA or Rac1 perturbed TJ gate function (transepithelial electrical resistance, tracer diffusion) in a dose-dependent and reversible manner. Freeze-fracture EM and immunofluoresence microscopy revealed abnormal TJ strand morphology and protein (occludin, ZO-1) localization in RhoAV14 and Rac1V12 cells. However, TJ strand morphology and protein localization appeared normal in RhoAN19 and Rac1N17 cells. All mutant GTPases disrupted the fence function of the TJ (interdomain diffusion of a fluorescent lipid), but targeting and organization of a membrane protein in the apical membrane were unaffected. Expression levels and protein complexes of occludin and ZO-1 appeared normal in all mutant cells, although ZO-1 was more readily solubilized from RhoAV14-expressing cells with Triton X-100. These results show that RhoA and Rac1 regulate gate and fence functions of the TJ, and play a role in the spatial organization of TJ proteins at the apex of the lateral membrane. PMID:9660866

  7. Regulation of the endothelial barrier function: a filum granum of cellular forces, Rho-GTPase signaling and microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Amado-Azevedo, Joana; Valent, Erik T; Van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P

    2014-03-01

    Although the endothelium is an extremely thin single-cell layer, it performs exceedingly well in preventing blood fluids from leaking into the surrounding tissues. However, specific pathological conditions can affect this cell layer, compromising the integrity of the barrier. Vascular leakage is a hallmark of many cardiovascular diseases and despite its medical importance, no specialized therapies are available to prevent it or reduce it. Small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) of the Rho family are known to be key regulators of various aspects of cell behavior and studies have shown that they can exert both positive and negative effects on endothelial barrier integrity. Moreover, extracellular matrix stiffness has now been implicated in the regulation of Rho-GTPase signaling, which has a direct impact on the integrity of endothelial junctions. However, knowledge about both the precise mechanism of this regulation and the individual contribution of the specific regulatory proteins remains fragmentary. In this review, we discuss recent findings concerning the balanced activities of Rho-GTPases and, in particular, aspects of the regulation of the endothelial barrier. We highlight the role of Rho-GTPases in the intimate relationships between biomechanical forces, microenvironmental influences and endothelial intercellular junctions, which are all interwoven in a beautiful filigree-like fashion. PMID:24633925

  8. Inhibiting geranylgeranylation increases neurite branching and differentially activates cofilin in cell bodies and growth cones.

    PubMed

    Samuel, Filsy; Reddy, Jairus; Kaimal, Radhika; Segovia, Vianey; Mo, Huanbiao; Hynds, DiAnna L

    2014-08-01

    Inhibitors of the mevalonate pathway, including the highly prescribed statins, reduce the production of cholesterol and isoprenoids such as geranylgeranyl pyrophosphates. The Rho family of small guanine triphosphatases (GTPases) requires isoprenylation, specifically geranylgeranylation, for activation. Because Rho GTPases are primary regulators of actin filament rearrangements required for process extension, neurite arborization, and synaptic plasticity, statins may affect cognition or recovery from nervous system injury. Here, we assessed how manipulating geranylgeranylation affects neurite initiation, elongation, and branching in neuroblastoma growth cones. Treatment with the statin, lovastatin (20 μM), decreased measures of neurite initiation by 17.0 to 19.0 % when a source of cholesterol was present and increased neurite branching by 4.03- to 9.54-fold (regardless of exogenous cholesterol). Neurite elongation was increased by treatment with lovastatin only in cholesterol-free culture conditions. Treatment with lovastatin decreased growth cone actin filament content by up to 24.3 %. In all cases, co-treatment with the prenylation precursor, geranylgeraniol (10 μM), reversed the effect of lovastatin. In a prior work, statin effects on outgrowth were linked to modulating the actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin. In our assays, treatment with lovastatin or geranylgeraniol decreased cofilin phosphorylation in whole cell lysates. However, lovastatin increased cofilin phosphorylation in cell bodies and decreased it in growth cones, indicating differential regulation in specific cell regions. Together, we interpret these data to suggest that protein geranylgeranylation likely regulates growth cone actin filament content and subsequent neurite outgrowth through mechanisms that also affect actin nucleation and polymerization. PMID:24515839

  9. Nercc1, a mammalian NIMA-family kinase, binds the Ran GTPase and regulates mitotic progression

    PubMed Central

    Roig, Joan; Mikhailov, Alexei; Belham, Christopher; Avruch, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    The protein kinase NIMA is an indispensable pleiotropic regulator of mitotic progression in Aspergillus. Although several mammalian NIMA-like kinases (Neks) are known, none appears to have the broad importance for mitotic regulation attributed to NIMA. Nercc1 is a new NIMA-like kinase that regulates chromosome alignment and segregation in mitosis. Its NIMA-like catalytic domain is followed by a noncatalytic tail containing seven repeats homologous to those of the Ran GEF, RCC1, a Ser/Thr/Pro-rich segment, and a coiled-coil domain. Nercc1 binds to another NIMA-like kinase, Nek6, and also binds specifically to the Ran GTPase through both its catalytic and its RCC1-like domains, preferring RanGDP in vivo. Nercc1 exists as a homooligomer and can autoactivate in vitro by autophosphorylation. Nercc1 is a cytoplasmic protein that is activated during mitosis and is avidly phosphorylated by active p34Cdc2. Microinjection of anti-Nercc1 antibodies in prophase results in spindle abnormalities and/or chromosomal misalignment. In Ptk2 cells the outcome is prometaphase arrest or aberrant chromosome segregation and aneuploidy, whereas in CFPAC-1 cells prolonged arrest in prometaphase is the usual response. Nercc1 and its partner Nek6 represent a new signaling pathway that regulates mitotic progression. PMID:12101123

  10. Filamin A regulates monocyte migration through Rho small GTPases during osteoclastogenesis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Roland; Wang, Yongqiang; Cuddy, Karl; Sun, Chunxiang; Magalhaes, Joyce; Grynpas, Marc; Glogauer, Michael

    2010-05-01

    Osteoclastogenesis (OCG) results from the fusion of monocytes after stimulation with macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor activator of NF-kappaB ligand (RANKL). Migration of monocytes into close proximity precedes critical fusion events that are required for osteoclast formation. Cellular migration requires leading-edge actin cytoskeleton assembly that drives cellular locomotion. Filamin A (FLNa) cross-links F-actin filaments in the leading edge of migrating cells and also has been shown to regulate signal transduction during cell migration. However, little is known about the possible role of FLNa in osteoclastogenesis. Our objective in this study was to investigate the role of FLNa in osteoclastogenesis. Bone marrow monocytes isolated from the tibiae and femora of wild type (WT) and Flna-null mice were cultured for 6 days with M-CSF and RANKL, and osteoclasts were identified by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRACP) staining. The Flna-null mouse skeletal phenotype was characterized using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) to analyze the skeleton, as well as tests on blood chemistry. Osteoclast levels in vivo were quantified by counting of TRACP-stained histologic sections of distal femora. To elucidate the mechanisms by which Flna regulates osteoclastogenesis, migration, actin polymerization, and activation of Rho GTPases, Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA were assessed in monocytes during in vitro OCG. Deficiencies in migration were rescued using constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 TAT fusion proteins. The RANKL signaling pathway was evaluated for activation by monitoring nuclear translocation of NF kappaB and c-jun and expression of key osteoclast genes using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Our results show that Flna-null monocytes formed fewer osteoclasts in vitro, and those that were formed were smaller with fewer nuclei. Decreased OCG was reflected in vivo in TRACP-stained histologic bone sections. Flna

  11. Anillin-mediated Targeting of Peanut to Pseudocleavage Furrows Is Regulated by the GTPase Ran

    PubMed Central

    Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind V.; Hales, Karen G.

    2008-01-01

    During early development in Drosophila, pseudocleavage furrows in the syncytial embryo prevent contact between neighboring spindles, thereby ensuring proper chromosome segregation. Here we demonstrate that the GTPase Ran regulates pseudocleavage furrow organization. Ran can exert control on pseudocleavage furrows independently of its role in regulating the microtubule cytoskeleton. Disruption of the Ran pathway prevented pseudocleavage furrow formation and restricted the depth and duration of furrow ingression of those pseudocleavage furrows that did form. We found that Ran was required for the localization of the septin Peanut to the pseudocleavage furrow, but not anillin or actin. Biochemical assays revealed that the direct binding of the nuclear transport receptors importin α and β to anillin prevented the binding of Peanut to anillin. Furthermore, RanGTP reversed the inhibitory action of importin α and β. On expression of a mutant form of anillin that lacked an importin α and β binding site, inhibition of Ran no longer restricted the depth and duration of furrow ingression in those pseudocleavage furrows that formed. These data suggest that anillin and Peanut are involved in pseudocleavage furrow ingression in syncytial embryos and that this process is regulated by Ran. PMID:18579688

  12. Regulation of Neurite Growth by Inorganic Pyrophosphatase 1 via JNK Dephosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Tezuka, Yu; Okada, Mizuki; Tada, Yuka; Yamauchi, Junji; Nishigori, Hideo; Sanbe, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Neural cell differentiation during development is controlled by multiple signaling pathways, in which protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play an important role. In this study, we examined the role of pyrophosphatase1 (PPA1) in neuronal differentiation using the loss and gain of function analysis. Neuronal differentiation induced by external factors was studied using a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (N1E115). The neuronal like differentiation in N1E115 cells was determined by morphological analysis based on neurite growth length. In order to analyze the loss of the PPA1 function in N1E115, si-RNA specifically targeting PPA1 was generated. To study the effect of PPA1 overexpression, an adenoviral gene vector containing the PPA1 gene was utilized to infect N1E115 cells. To address the need for pyrophosphatase activity in PPA1, D117A PPA1, which has inactive pyrophosphatase, was overexpressed in N1E115 cells. We used valproic acid (VPA) as a neuronal differentiator to examine the effect of PPA1 in actively differentiated N1E115 cells. Si-PPA1 treatment reduced the PPA1 protein level and led to enhanced neurite growth in N1E115 cells. In contrast, PPA1 overexpression suppressed neurite growth in N1E115 cells treated with VPA, whereas this effect was abolished in D117A PPA1. PPA1 knockdown enhanced the JNK phosphorylation level, and PPA1 overexpression suppressed it in N1E115 cells. It seems that recombinant PPA1 can dephosphorylate JNK while no alteration of JNK phosphorylation level was seen after treatment with recombinant PPA1 D117A. Enhanced neurite growth by PPA1 knockdown was also observed in rat cortical neurons. Thus, PPA1 may play a role in neuronal differentiation via JNK dephosphorylation. PMID:23626709

  13. Review: Translational GTPases.

    PubMed

    Maracci, Cristina; Rodnina, Marina V

    2016-08-01

    Translational GTPases (trGTPases) play key roles in facilitating protein synthesis on the ribosome. Despite the high degree of evolutionary conservation in the sequences of their GTP-binding domains, the rates of GTP hydrolysis and nucleotide exchange vary broadly between different trGTPases. EF-Tu, one of the best-characterized model G proteins, evolved an exceptionally rapid and tightly regulated GTPase activity, which ensures rapid and accurate incorporation of amino acids into the nascent chain. Other trGTPases instead use the energy of GTP hydrolysis to promote movement or to ensure the forward commitment of translation reactions. Recent data suggest the GTPase mechanism of EF-Tu and provide an insight in the catalysis of GTP hydrolysis by its unusual activator, the ribosome. Here we summarize these advances in understanding the functional cycle and the regulation of trGTPases, stimulated by the elucidation of their structures on the ribosome and the progress in dissecting the reaction mechanism of GTPases. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 463-475, 2016. PMID:26971860

  14. The tumor suppressor PP2A Abeta regulates the RalA GTPase.

    PubMed

    Sablina, Anna A; Chen, Wen; Arroyo, Jason D; Corral, Laura; Hector, Melissa; Bulmer, Sara E; DeCaprio, James A; Hahn, William C

    2007-06-01

    The serine-threonine protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) is a heterotrimeric enzyme family that regulates numerous signaling pathways. Biallelic mutations of the structural PP2A Abeta subunit occur in several types of human tumors; however, the functional consequences of these cancer-associated PP2A Abeta mutations in cell transformation remain undefined. Here we show that suppression of PP2A Abeta expression permits immortalized human cells to achieve a tumorigenic state. Cancer-associated Abeta mutants fail to reverse tumorigenic phenotype induced by PP2A Abeta suppression, indicating that these mutants function as null alleles. Wild-type PP2A Abeta but not cancer-derived Abeta mutants form a complex with the small GTPase RalA. PP2A Abeta-containing complexes dephosphorylate RalA at Ser183 and Ser194, inactivating RalA and abolishing its transforming function. These observations identify PP2A Abeta as a tumor suppressor gene that transforms immortalized human cells by regulating the function of RalA. PMID:17540176

  15. A novel KLF6-Rho GTPase axis regulates hepatocellular carcinoma cell migration and dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Ahronian, Leanne G.; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Chen, Ya-Wen; Chu, Hsiao-Chien; Klimstra, David S.; Lewis, Brian C.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of invasion into the extra-hepatic portion of the portal vein or the development of distant metastases renders hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients ineligible for the only potential curative options for this malignancy - tumor resection or organ transplantation. Gene expression profiling of murine HCC cell lines identified KLF6 as a potential regulator of HCC cell migration. KLF6 knockdown increases cell migration, consistent with the correlation between decreased KLF6 mRNA levels and the presence of vascular invasion in human HCC. Concordantly, single-copy deletion of Klf6 in a HCC mouse model results in increased tumor formation, increased metastasis to the lungs, and decreased survival, indicating that KLF6 suppresses both HCC development and metastasis. By combining gene expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to deep sequencing, we identified novel transcriptional targets of KLF6 in HCC cells including VAV3, a known activator of the RAC1 small GTPase. Indeed, RAC1 activity is increased in KLF6 knockdown cells in a VAV3-dependent manner, and knockdown of either RAC1 or VAV3 impairs HCC cell migration. Together, our data demonstrate a novel function for KLF6 in constraining HCC dissemination through the regulation of a VAV3-RAC1 signaling axis. PMID:26876204

  16. New Insights In Intestinal Sar1B GTPase Regulation and Role in Cholesterol Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Sané, Alain; Seidman, Ernest; Spahis, Schohraya; Lamantia, Valérie; Garofalo, Carole; Montoudis, Alain; Marcil, Valérie; Levy, Emile

    2015-10-01

    Sar1B GTPase is a key component of Coat protein complex II (COPII)-coated vesicles that bud from the endoplasmic reticulum to export newly synthesized proteins. The aims of this study were to determine whether Sar1B responds to lipid regulation and to evaluate its role in cholesterol (CHOL) homeostasis. The influence of lipids on Sar1B protein expression was analyzed in Caco-2/15 cells by Western blot. Our results showed that the presence of CHOL (200 μM) and oleic acid (0.5 mM), bound to albumin, increases Sar1B protein expression. Similarly, supplementation of the medium with micelles composed of taurocholate with monooleylglycerol or oleic acid also stimulated Sar1B expression, but the addition of CHOL (200 μM) to micelle content did not modify its regulation. On the other hand, overexpression of Sar1B impacted on CHOL transport and metabolism in view of the reduced cellular CHOL content along with elevated secretion when incubated with oleic acid-containing micelles for 24 h, thereby disclosing induced CHOL transport. This was accompanied with higher secretion of free- and esterified-CHOL within chylomicrons, which was not the case when oleic acid was replaced with monooleylglycerol or when albumin-bound CHOL was given alone. The aforementioned cellular CHOL depletion was accompanied with a low phosphorylated/non phosphorylated HMG-CoA reductase ratio, indicating elevated enzymatic activity. Combination of Sar1B overexpression with micelle incubation led to reduction in intestinal CHOL transporters (NPC1L1, SR-BI) and metabolic regulators (PCSK9 and LDLR). The present work showed that Sar1B is regulated in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by dietary lipids, suggesting an adaptation to alimentary lipid flux. Our data also suggest that Sar1B overexpression contributes to regulation of CHOL transport and metabolism by facilitating rapid uptake and transport of CHOL. PMID:25826777

  17. Ral GTPases Contribute to Regulation of Cyclin D1 through Activation of NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Dale O.; Moskalenko, Serge A.; Kaur, Kiran J.; Fu, Maofu; Pestell, Richard G.; Camonis, Jacques H.; White, Michael A.

    2000-01-01

    Ral GTPases have been implicated as mediators of Ras-induced signal transduction from observations that Ral-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors associate with Ras and are activated by Ras. The cellular role of Ral family proteins is unclear, as is the contribution that Ral may make to Ras-dependent signaling. Here we show that expression of activated Ral in quiescent rodent fibroblasts is sufficient to induce activation of NF-κB-dependent gene expression and cyclin D1 transcription, two key convergence points for mitogenic and survival signaling. The regulation of cyclin D1 transcription by Ral is dependent on NF-κB activation and is mediated through an NF-κB binding site in the cyclin D1 promoter. Ral activation of these responses is likely through an as yet uncharacterized effector pathway, as we find activation of NF-κB and the cyclin D1 promoter by Ral is independent of association of Ral with active phospholipase D1 or Ral-binding protein 1, two proteins proposed to mediate Ral function in cells. PMID:11027278

  18. Calcium participates in feedback regulation of the oscillating ROP1 Rho GTPase in pollen tubes

    PubMed Central

    Yan, An; Xu, Guanshui; Yang, Zhen-Biao

    2009-01-01

    Biological oscillation occurs at various levels, from cellular signaling to organismal behaviors. Mathematical modeling has allowed a quantitative understanding of slow oscillators requiring changes in gene expression (e.g., circadian rhythms), but few theoretical studies have focused on the rapid oscillation of cellular signaling. The tobacco pollen tube, which exhibits growth bursts every 80 s or so, is an excellent system for investigating signaling oscillation. Pollen tube growth is controlled by a tip-localized ROP1 GTPase, whose activity oscillates in a phase about 90 degrees ahead of growth. We constructed a mathematical model of ROP1 activity oscillation consisting of interlinking positive and negative feedback loops involving F-actin and calcium, ROP1-signaling targets that oscillate in a phase about 20 degrees and 110 degrees behind ROP1 activity, respectively. The model simulates the observed changes in ROP1 activity caused by F-actin disruption and predicts a role for calcium in the negative feedback regulation of the ROP1 activity. Our experimental data strongly support this role of calcium in tip growth. Thus, our findings provide insight into the mechanism of pollen tube growth and the oscillation of cellular signaling. PMID:19955439

  19. Regulation of septum formation by the Bud3-Rho4 GTPase module in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Si, Haoyu; Justa-Schuch, Daniela; Seiler, Stephan; Harris, Steven D

    2010-05-01

    The ability of fungi to generate polarized cells with a variety of shapes likely reflects precise temporal and spatial control over the formation of polarity axes. The bud site selection system of Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents the best-understood example of such a morphogenetic regulatory system. However, the extent to which this system is conserved in the highly polarized filamentous fungi remains unknown. Here, we describe the functional characterization and localization of the Aspergillus nidulans homolog of the axial bud site marker Bud3. Our results show that AnBud3 is not required for polarized hyphal growth per se, but is involved in septum formation. In particular, our genetic and biochemical evidence implicates AnBud3 as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the GTPase Rho4. Additional results suggest that the AnBud3-Rho4 module acts downstream of the septation initiation network to mediate recruitment of the formin SepA to the site of contractile actin ring assembly. Our observations provide new insight into the signaling pathways that regulate septum formation in filamentous fungi. PMID:20176976

  20. Regulation of plasticity and fibrogenic activity of trabecular meshwork cells by Rho GTPase signaling.

    PubMed

    Pattabiraman, Padmanabhan P; Maddala, Rupalatha; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2014-07-01

    Glaucoma, a prevalent blinding disease is commonly associated with increased intraocular pressure due to impaired aqueous humor (AH) drainage through the trabecular meshwork (TM). Although increased TM tissue contraction and stiffness in association with accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) are believed to be partly responsible for increased resistance to AH outflow, the extracellular cues and intracellular mechanisms regulating TM cell contraction and ECM production are not well defined. This study tested the hypothesis that sustained activation of Rho GTPase signaling induced by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), TGF-β, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) influences TM cell plasticity and fibrogenic activity which may eventually impact resistance to AH outflow. Various experiments performed using human TM cells revealed that constitutively active RhoA (RhoAV14), TGF-β2, LPA, and CTGF significantly increase the levels and expression of Fibroblast Specific Protein-1 (FSP-1), α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), collagen-1A1 and secretory total collagen, as determined by q-RT-PCR, immunofluorescence, immunoblot, flow cytometry and the Sircol assay. Significantly, these changes appear to be mediated by Serum Response Factor (SRF), myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF-A), Slug, and Twist-1, which are transcriptional regulators known to control cell plasticity, myofibroblast generation/activation and fibrogenic activity. Additionally, the Rho kinase inhibitor-Y27632 and anti-fibrotic agent-pirfenidone were both found to suppress the TGF-β2-induced expression of αSMA, FSP-1, and collagen-1A1. Taken together, these observations demonstrate the significance of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling in regulation of TM cell plasticity, fibrogenic activity, and myofibroblast activation, events with potential implications for the pathobiology of elevated intraocular pressure in glaucoma patients. PMID:24318513

  1. The stress-regulated protein M6a is a key modulator for neurite outgrowth and filopodium/spine formation.

    PubMed

    Alfonso, Julieta; Fernández, María E; Cooper, Benjamin; Flugge, Gabriele; Frasch, Alberto C

    2005-11-22

    Neuronal remodeling is a fundamental process by which the brain responds to environmental influences, e.g., during stress. In the hippocampus, chronic stress causes retraction of dendrites in CA3 pyramidal neurons. We have recently identified the glycoprotein M6a as a stress-responsive gene in the hippocampal formation. This gene is down-regulated in the hippocampus of both socially and physically stressed animals, and this effect can be reversed by antidepressant treatment. In the present work, we analyzed the biological function of the M6a protein. Immunohistochemistry showed that the M6a protein is abundant in all hippocampal subregions, and subcellular analysis in primary hippocampal neurons revealed its presence in membrane protrusions (filopodia/spines). Transfection experiments revealed that M6a overexpression induces neurite formation and increases filopodia density in hippocampal neurons. M6a knockdown with small interference RNA methodology showed that M6a low-expressing neurons display decreased filopodia number and a lower density of synaptophysin clusters. Taken together, our findings indicate that M6a plays an important role in neurite/filopodium outgrowth and synapse formation. Therefore, reduced M6a expression might be responsible for the morphological alterations found in the hippocampus of chronically stressed animals. Potential mechanisms that might explain the biological effects of M6a are discussed. PMID:16286650

  2. Painful, degenerating intervertebral discs up-regulate neurite sprouting and CGRP through nociceptive factors

    PubMed Central

    Krock, Emerson; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Haglund, Lisbet

    2014-01-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) can result in chronic low back pain, a common cause of morbidity and disability. Inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration, however the relationship between inflammatory factors and chronic low back pain remains unclear. Furthermore, increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are both associated with inflammation and chronic low back pain, but whether degenerating discs release sufficient concentrations of factors that induce nociceptor plasticity remains unclear. Degenerating IVDs from low back pain patients and healthy, painless IVDs from human organ donors were cultured ex vivo. Inflammatory and nociceptive factors released by IVDs into culture media were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and protein arrays. The ability of factors released to induce neurite growth and nociceptive neuropeptide production was investigated. Degenerating discs release increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, NGF and BDNF. Factors released by degenerating IVDs increased neurite growth and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression, both of which were blocked by anti-NGF treatment. Furthermore, protein arrays found increased levels of 20 inflammatory factors, many of which have nociceptive effects. Our results demonstrate that degenerating and painful human IVDs release increased levels of NGF, inflammatory and nociceptive factors ex vivo that induce neuronal plasticity and may actively diffuse to induce neo-innervation and pain in vivo. PMID:24650225

  3. Painful, degenerating intervertebral discs up-regulate neurite sprouting and CGRP through nociceptive factors.

    PubMed

    Krock, Emerson; Rosenzweig, Derek H; Chabot-Doré, Anne-Julie; Jarzem, Peter; Weber, Michael H; Ouellet, Jean A; Stone, Laura S; Haglund, Lisbet

    2014-06-01

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVD) can result in chronic low back pain, a common cause of morbidity and disability. Inflammation has been associated with IVD degeneration, however the relationship between inflammatory factors and chronic low back pain remains unclear. Furthermore, increased levels of nerve growth factor (NGF) and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are both associated with inflammation and chronic low back pain, but whether degenerating discs release sufficient concentrations of factors that induce nociceptor plasticity remains unclear. Degenerating IVDs from low back pain patients and healthy, painless IVDs from human organ donors were cultured ex vivo. Inflammatory and nociceptive factors released by IVDs into culture media were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and protein arrays. The ability of factors released to induce neurite growth and nociceptive neuropeptide production was investigated. Degenerating discs release increased levels of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, NGF and BDNF. Factors released by degenerating IVDs increased neurite growth and calcitonin gene-related peptide expression, both of which were blocked by anti-NGF treatment. Furthermore, protein arrays found increased levels of 20 inflammatory factors, many of which have nociceptive effects. Our results demonstrate that degenerating and painful human IVDs release increased levels of NGF, inflammatory and nociceptive factors ex vivo that induce neuronal plasticity and may actively diffuse to induce neo-innervation and pain in vivo. PMID:24650225

  4. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  5. DBZ regulates cortical cell positioning and neurite development by sustaining the anterograde transport of Lis1 and DISC1 through control of Ndel1 dual-phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Masayuki; Iguchi, Tokuichi; Hattori, Tsuyoshi; Matsuzaki, Shinsuke; Koyama, Yoshihisa; Taniguchi, Manabu; Komada, Munekazu; Xie, Min-Jue; Yagi, Hideshi; Shimizu, Shoko; Konishi, Yoshiyuki; Omi, Minoru; Yoshimi, Tomohiko; Tachibana, Taro; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Katayama, Taiichi; Ito, Akira; Hirotsune, Shinji; Tohyama, Masaya; Sato, Makoto

    2015-02-18

    Cell positioning and neuronal network formation are crucial for proper brain function. Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is anterogradely transported to the neurite tips, together with Lis1, and functions in neurite extension via suppression of GSK3β activity. Then, transported Lis1 is retrogradely transported and functions in cell migration. Here, we show that DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ), together with DISC1, regulates mouse cortical cell positioning and neurite development in vivo. DBZ hindered Ndel1 phosphorylation at threonine 219 and serine 251. DBZ depletion or expression of a double-phosphorylated mimetic form of Ndel1 impaired the transport of Lis1 and DISC1 to the neurite tips and hampered microtubule elongation. Moreover, application of DISC1 or a GSK3β inhibitor rescued the impairments caused by DBZ insufficiency or double-phosphorylated Ndel1 expression. We concluded that DBZ controls cell positioning and neurite development by interfering with Ndel1 from disproportionate phosphorylation, which is critical for appropriate anterograde transport of the DISC1-complex. PMID:25698733

  6. Regulators of G-protein signaling accelerate GPCR signaling kinetics and govern sensitivity solely by accelerating GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Nevin A; Johnston, Christopher A; Cappell, Steven D; Kuravi, Sudhakiranmayi; Kimple, Adam J; Willard, Francis S; Siderovski, David P

    2010-04-13

    G-protein heterotrimers, composed of a guanine nucleotide-binding G alpha subunit and an obligate G betagamma dimer, regulate signal transduction pathways by cycling between GDP- and GTP-bound states. Signal deactivation is achieved by G alpha-mediated GTP hydrolysis (GTPase activity) which is enhanced by the GTPase-accelerating protein (GAP) activity of "regulator of G-protein signaling" (RGS) proteins. In a cellular context, RGS proteins have also been shown to speed up the onset of signaling, and to accelerate deactivation without changing amplitude or sensitivity of the signal. This latter paradoxical activity has been variably attributed to GAP/enzymatic or non-GAP/scaffolding functions of these proteins. Here, we validated and exploited a G alpha switch-region point mutation, known to engender increased GTPase activity, to mimic in cis the GAP function of RGS proteins. While the transition-state, GDP x AlF(4)(-)-bound conformation of the G202A mutant was found to be nearly identical to wild-type, G alpha(i1)(G202A) x GDP assumed a divergent conformation more closely resembling the GDP x AlF(4)(-)-bound state. When placed within Saccharomyces cerevisiae G alpha subunit Gpa1, the fast-hydrolysis mutation restored appropriate dose-response behaviors to pheromone signaling in the absence of RGS-mediated GAP activity. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) readout of heterotrimer activation with high temporal resolution revealed that fast intrinsic GTPase activity could recapitulate in cis the kinetic sharpening (increased onset and deactivation rates) and blunting of sensitivity also engendered by RGS protein action in trans. Thus G alpha-directed GAP activity, the first biochemical function ascribed to RGS proteins, is sufficient to explain the activation kinetics and agonist sensitivity observed from G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling in a cellular context. PMID:20351284

  7. Localized RhoA GTPase activity regulates dynamics of endothelial monolayer integrity

    PubMed Central

    Szulcek, Robert; Beckers, Cora M.L.; Hodzic, Jasmina; de Wit, Jelle; Chen, Zhenlong; Grob, Tim; Musters, Rene J.P.; Minshall, Richard D.; van Hinsbergh, Victor W.M.; van Nieuw Amerongen, Geerten P.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Endothelial cells (ECs) control vascular permeability by forming a monolayer that is sealed by extracellular junctions. Various mediators modulate the endothelial barrier by acting on junctional protein complexes and the therewith connected F-actin cytoskeleton. Different Rho GTPases participate in this modulation, but their mechanisms are still partly resolved. Here, we aimed to elucidate whether the opening and closure of the endothelial barrier are associated with distinct localized RhoA activities at the subcellular level. Methods and results Live fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy revealed spatially distinct RhoA activities associated with different aspects of the regulation of endothelial monolayer integrity. Unstimulated ECs were characterized by hotspots of RhoA activity at their periphery. Thrombin receptor activation in the femoral vein of male wistar rats and in cultured ECs enhanced RhoA activity at membrane protrusions, followed by a more sustained RhoA activity associated with cytoplasmic F-actin filaments, where prolonged RhoA activity coincided with cellular contractility. Unexpectedly, thrombin-induced peripheral RhoA hotspots were not spatially correlated to the formation of large inter-endothelial gaps. Rather, spontaneous RhoA activity at membrane protrusions coincided with the closure of inter-endothelial gaps. Electrical impedance measurements showed that RhoA signalling is essential for this protrusive activity and maintenance of barrier restoration. Conclusion Spontaneous RhoA activity at membrane protrusions is spatially associated with closure, but not formation of inter-endothelial gaps, whereas RhoA activity at distant contractile filaments contributes to thrombin-induced disruption of junctional integrity. Thus, these data indicate that distinct RhoA activities are associated with disruption and re-annealing of endothelial junctions. PMID:23536606

  8. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors: regulators of Rho GTPase activity in development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Danielle R.; Rossman, Kent L.; Der, Channing J.

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant activity of Ras homologous (Rho) family small GTPases (20 human members) has been implicated in cancer and other human diseases. However, in contrast to the direct mutational activation of Ras found in cancer and developmental disorders, Rho GTPases are activated most commonly by indirect mechanisms in disease. One prevalent mechanism involves aberrant Rho activation via the deregulated expression and/or activity of Rho family guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs). RhoGEFs promote formation of the active GTP-bound state of Rho GTPases. The largest family of RhoGEFs is comprised of the Dbl family RhoGEFs with 70 human members. The multitude of RhoGEFs that activate a single Rho GTPase reflect the very specific role of each RhoGEF in controlling distinct signaling mechanisms involved in Rho activation. In this review, we summarize the role of Dbl RhoGEFs in development and disease, with a focus on Ect2, Tiam1, Vav and P-Rex1/2. PMID:24037532

  9. Exocyst Subunits Exo70 and Exo84 Cooperate with Small GTPases to Regulate Behavior and Endocytic Trafficking in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jiu, Yaming; Jin, Congyu; Liu, Yanbo; Holmberg, Carina I.; Jäntti, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    The exocyst complex is required for cell polarity regulation and the targeting and tethering of transport vesicles to the plasma membrane. The complex is structurally well conserved, however, the functions of individual subunits and their regulation is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mutant phenotypes for the exocyst complex genes exoc-7 (exo70) and exoc-8 (exo84) in Caenorhabditis elegans. The mutants display pleiotropic behavior defects that resemble those observed in cilia mutants (slow growth, uncoordinated movement, defects in chemo-, mechano- and thermosensation). However, no obvious morphological defects in cilia were observed. A targeted RNAi screen for small GTPases identified eleven genes with enhanced phenotypes when combined with exoc-7, exoc-8 single and exoc-7;exoc-8 double mutants. The screen verified previously identified functional links between the exocyst complex and small GTPases and, in addition, identified several novel potential regulators of exocyst function. The exoc-8 and exoc-7;exoc-8 mutations caused a significant size increase in the rab-10 RNAi-induced endocytic vacuoles in the intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, exoc-8 and exoc-7;exoc-8 mutations resulted in up-regulation of RAB-10 expression and affected the accumulation of endocytic marker proteins in these cells in response to rab-10 RNAi. The findings identify novel, potential regulators for exocyst function and show that exoc-7 and exoc-8 are functionally linked to rab-10 in endosomal trafficking in intestinal epithelial cells in C. elegans. PMID:22389680

  10. Exocyst subunits Exo70 and Exo84 cooperate with small GTPases to regulate behavior and endocytic trafficking in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Jiu, Yaming; Jin, Congyu; Liu, Yanbo; Holmberg, Carina I; Jäntti, Jussi

    2012-01-01

    The exocyst complex is required for cell polarity regulation and the targeting and tethering of transport vesicles to the plasma membrane. The complex is structurally well conserved, however, the functions of individual subunits and their regulation is poorly understood. Here we characterize the mutant phenotypes for the exocyst complex genes exoc-7 (exo70) and exoc-8 (exo84) in Caenorhabditis elegans. The mutants display pleiotropic behavior defects that resemble those observed in cilia mutants (slow growth, uncoordinated movement, defects in chemo-, mechano- and thermosensation). However, no obvious morphological defects in cilia were observed. A targeted RNAi screen for small GTPases identified eleven genes with enhanced phenotypes when combined with exoc-7, exoc-8 single and exoc-7;exoc-8 double mutants. The screen verified previously identified functional links between the exocyst complex and small GTPases and, in addition, identified several novel potential regulators of exocyst function. The exoc-8 and exoc-7;exoc-8 mutations caused a significant size increase in the rab-10 RNAi-induced endocytic vacuoles in the intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, exoc-8 and exoc-7;exoc-8 mutations resulted in up-regulation of RAB-10 expression and affected the accumulation of endocytic marker proteins in these cells in response to rab-10 RNAi. The findings identify novel, potential regulators for exocyst function and show that exoc-7 and exoc-8 are functionally linked to rab-10 in endosomal trafficking in intestinal epithelial cells in C. elegans. PMID:22389680

  11. MiR-130a regulates neurite outgrowth and dendritic spine density by targeting MeCP2.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunjia; Chen, Mengmeng; Qiu, Zilong; Hu, Keping; McGee, Warren; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Jianghong; Zhu, Li; Wu, Jane Y

    2016-07-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are critical for both development and function of the central nervous system. Significant evidence suggests that abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. MeCP2 protein is an epigenetic regulator repressing or activating gene transcription by binding to methylated DNA. Both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations in the MECP2 gene lead to neurodevelopmental disorders such as Rett syndrome, autism and MECP2 duplication syndrome. In this study, we demonstrate that miR-130a inhibits neurite outgrowth and reduces dendritic spine density as well as dendritic complexity. Bioinformatics analyses, cell cultures and biochemical experiments indicate that miR-130a targets MECP2 and down-regulates MeCP2 protein expression. Furthermore, expression of the wild-type MeCP2, but not a loss-of-function mutant, rescues the miR-130a-induced phenotype. Our study uncovers the MECP2 gene as a previous unknown target for miR-130a, supporting that miR-130a may play a role in neurodevelopment by regulating MeCP2. Together with data from other groups, our work suggests that a feedback regulatory mechanism involving both miR-130a and MeCP2 may serve to ensure their appropriate expression and function in neural development. PMID:27245166

  12. The all-trans retinoic acid (atRA)-regulated gene Calmin (Clmn) regulates cell cycle exit and neurite outgrowth in murine neuroblastoma (Neuro2a) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marzinke, Mark A.; Clagett-Dame, Margaret

    2012-01-01

    The vitamin A metabolite all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) functions in nervous system development and regulates cell proliferation and differentiation. Neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y and Neuro2a or N2A) exposed to atRA undergo growth inhibition and neuronal differentiation, both of which are preceded by an increase in Clmn mRNA. Treatment of N2A cells with atRA produces a reduction in phosphohistone 3 immunostaining and BrdU incorporation, both indicators of a reduction in cell proliferation. These effects are nearly eliminated in atRA-treated shClmn knockdown cells. Loss of Clmn in the mouse N2A cell line also results in a significant reduction of atRA-mediated neurite outgrowth, a response that can be rescued by reintroduction of the Clmn sequence. In contrast, ectopic overexpression of Clmn produces an increase in the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, p21{sup Cip1}, a decrease in cyclin D1 protein and an increase in hypophosphorylated Rb, showing that Clmn participates in G{sub 1}/S arrest. Clmn overexpression alone is sufficient to inhibit N2A cell proliferation, whereas both Clmn and atRA must be present to induce neurite outgrowth. This study shows that the atRA-responsive gene Clmn promotes exit from the cell cycle, a requisite event for neuronal differentiation. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calmin is a retinoic acid-responsive gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calmin promotes cell cycle exit in N2A cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calmin overexpression increases p21Cip1 and decreases cyclin D1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calmin is required for RA-induced growth inhibition and neurite outgrowth.

  13. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuharu; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Chou, Joshua; de Vega, Susana; Mizuniwa, Chihiro; Sekimoto, Kaori; Adachi, Naoki; Kunugi, Hiroshi; Arikawa-Hirasawa, Eri; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2014-01-01

    Teneurin-4 (Ten-4), a transmembrane protein, is highly expressed in the central nervous system; however, its cellular and molecular function in neuronal differentiation remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the function of Ten-4 in neurite outgrowth. Ten-4 expression was induced during neurite outgrowth of the neuroblastoma cell line Neuro-2a. Ten-4 protein was localized at the neurite growth cones. Knockdown of Ten-4 expression in Neuro-2a cells decreased the formation of the filopodia-like protrusions and the length of individual neurites. Conversely, overexpression of Ten-4 promoted filopodia-like protrusion formation. In addition, knockdown and overexpression of Ten-4 reduced and elevated the activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and Rho-family small GTPases, Cdc42 and Rac1, key molecules for the membranous protrusion formation downstream of FAK, respectively. Inhibition of the activation of FAK and neural Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (N-WASP), which is a downstream regulator of FAK and Cdc42, blocked protrusion formation by Ten-4 overexpression. Further, Ten-4 colocalized with phosphorylated FAK in the filopodia-like protrusion regions. Together, our findings show that Ten-4 is a novel positive regulator of cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through the FAK signaling pathway.—Suzuki, N., Numakawa, T., Chou, J., de Vega, S., Mizuniwa, C., Sekimoto, K., Adachi, N., Kunugi, H., Arikawa-Hirasawa, E., Yamada, Y., Akazawa, C. Teneurin-4 promotes cellular protrusion formation and neurite outgrowth through focal adhesion kinase signaling. PMID:24344332

  14. The yeast Arf GTPase-activating protein Age1 is regulated by phospholipase D for post-Golgi vesicular transport.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Jeremy J R; Poon, Pak P; Lewis, Stephen M; Auger, Andréanne; Wong, Tania A; Singer, Richard A; Johnston, Gerald C

    2011-02-18

    Vesicular transport shuttles cargo among intracellular compartments. Several stages of vesicular transport are mediated by the small GTPase Arf, which is controlled in a cycle of GTP binding and hydrolysis by Arf guanine-nucleotide exchange factors and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), respectively. In budding yeast the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair facilitates post-Golgi transport. We have found the AGE1 gene, encoding another ArfGAP, can in high gene-copy number alleviate the temperature sensitivity of cells carrying mutations affecting the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Moreover, increased AGE1 gene dosage compensates for the complete absence of the otherwise essential Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Increased dosage of SFH2, encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, also allows cell growth in the absence of the Age2 + Gcs1 pair, but good growth in this situation requires Age1. The ability of Age1 to overcome the need for Age2 + Gcs1 depends on phospholipase D activity that regulates lipid composition. We show by direct assessment of Age1 ArfGAP activity that Age1 is regulated by lipid composition and can provide ArfGAP function for post-Golgi transport. PMID:21135091

  15. The Yeast Arf GTPase-activating Protein Age1 Is Regulated by Phospholipase D for Post-Golgi Vesicular Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jeremy J. R.; Poon, Pak P.; Lewis, Stephen M.; Auger, Andréanne; Wong, Tania A.; Singer, Richard A.; Johnston, Gerald C.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular transport shuttles cargo among intracellular compartments. Several stages of vesicular transport are mediated by the small GTPase Arf, which is controlled in a cycle of GTP binding and hydrolysis by Arf guanine-nucleotide exchange factors and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), respectively. In budding yeast the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair facilitates post-Golgi transport. We have found the AGE1 gene, encoding another ArfGAP, can in high gene-copy number alleviate the temperature sensitivity of cells carrying mutations affecting the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Moreover, increased AGE1 gene dosage compensates for the complete absence of the otherwise essential Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Increased dosage of SFH2, encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, also allows cell growth in the absence of the Age2 + Gcs1 pair, but good growth in this situation requires Age1. The ability of Age1 to overcome the need for Age2 + Gcs1 depends on phospholipase D activity that regulates lipid composition. We show by direct assessment of Age1 ArfGAP activity that Age1 is regulated by lipid composition and can provide ArfGAP function for post-Golgi transport. PMID:21135091

  16. Arhgap17, a RhoGTPase activating protein, regulates mucosal and epithelial barrier function in the mouse colon

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-young; Kim, Hwain; Kim, Kyoungmi; Lee, Hyunji; Lee, Seungbok; Lee, Daekee

    2016-01-01

    Coordinated regulation of the actin cytoskeleton by the Rho GTPase family is required for the maintenance of polarity in epithelial cells as well as for their proliferation and migration. A RhoGTPase-activating protein 17 (Arhgap17) is known to be involved in multiple cellular processes in vitro, including the maintenance of tight junctions and vesicle trafficking. However, the function of Arhgap17 has not been studied in the physiological context. Here, we generated Arhgap17-deficient mice and examined the effect in the epithelial and mucosal barriers of the intestine. Reporter staining revealed that Arhgap17 expression is limited to the luminal epithelium of intestine. Arhgap17-deficient mice show an increased paracellular permeability and aberrant localization of the apical junction complex in the luminal epithelium, but do not develop spontaneous colitis. The inner mucus layer is impervious to the enteric bacteria irrespective of Tff3 downregulation in the Arhgap17-deficient mice. Interestingly however, treatment with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) causes an increased accumulation of DSS and TNF production in intraluminal cells and rapid destruction of the inner mucus layer, resulting in increased severity of colitis in mutant mice. Overall, these data reveal that Arhgap17 has a novel function in regulating transcellular transport and maintaining integrity of intestinal barriers. PMID:27229483

  17. Mitochondrial association, protein phosphorylation, and degradation regulate the availability of the active Rab GTPase Ypt11 for mitochondrial inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Macfarlane, Jane; Shaw, Janet M.

    2013-01-01

    The Rab GTPase Ypt11 is a Myo2-binding protein implicated in mother-to-bud transport of the cortical endoplasmic reticulum (ER), late Golgi, and mitochondria during yeast division. However, its reported subcellular localization does not reflect all of these functions. Here we show that Ypt11 is normally a low-abundance protein whose ER localization is only detected when the protein is highly overexpressed. Although it has been suggested that ER-localized Ypt11 and ER–mitochondrial contact sites might mediate passive transport of mitochondria into the bud, we found that mitochondrial, but not ER, association is essential for Ypt11 function in mitochondrial inheritance. Our studies also reveal that Ypt11 function is regulated at multiple levels. In addition to membrane targeting and GTPase domain–dependent effector interactions, the abundance of active Ypt11 forms is controlled by phosphorylation status and degradation. We present a model that synthesizes these new features of Ypt11 function and regulation in mitochondrial inheritance. PMID:23427260

  18. Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid, inhibits tumor angiogenesis by targeting rho GTPases and extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Tingfang; Yi, Zhengfang; Cho, Sung Gook; Qu, Weijing; Pinkaew, Decha; Fujise, Ken; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-01-15

    Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid extracted from Garcinia dulcis, has shown antioxidative, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the function and the mechanism of this compound in cancer treatment and tumor angiogenesis have not been elucidated to date. In this study, we postulated that morelloflavone might have the ability to inhibit angiogenesis, the pivotal step in tumor growth, invasiveness, and metastasis. We showed that morelloflavone could inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and capillary-like tube formation of primary cultured human umbilical vascular endothelial cells in a dose-dependent manner. Morelloflavone effectively inhibited microvessel sprouting of endothelial cells in the mouse aortic ring assay and the formation of new blood microvessels induced by VEGF in the mouse Matrigel plug assay. Furthermore, morelloflavone inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in xenograft mouse tumor model in vivo, suggesting that morelloflavone inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanism of morelloflavone on the inhibitory effect of tumor growth and angiogenesis, we showed that morelloflavone could inhibit the activation of both RhoA and Rac1 GTPases but have little effect on the activation of Cdc42 GTPase. Additionally, morelloflavone inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) kinase/ERK pathway kinases without affecting VEGF receptor 2 activity. Together, our results indicate that morelloflavone exerts antiangiogenic action by targeting the activation of Rho-GTPases and ERK signaling pathways. These findings are the first to reveal the novel functions of morelloflavone in tumor angiogenesis and its molecular basis for the anticancer action. PMID:19147565

  19. Spatial Phosphoprotein Profiling Reveals a Compartmentalized Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Switch Governing Neurite Growth and Retraction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Fu, Yi; Huang, Xiahe; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Xining; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Monroe, Matthew E.; Pertz, Olivier C.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Orton, Daniel J.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2011-05-20

    Abstract - Brain development and spinal cord regeneration require neurite sprouting and growth cone navigation in response to extension and collapsing factors present in the extracellular environment. These external guidance cues control neurite growth cone extension and retraction processes through intracellular protein phosphorylation of numerous cytoskeletal, adhesion, and polarity complex signaling proteins. However, the complex kinase/substrate signaling networks that mediate neuritogenesis have not been investigated. Here, we compare the neurite phosphoproteome under growth and retraction conditions using neurite purification methodology combined with mass spectrometry. More than 4000 non-redundant phosphorylation sites from 1883 proteins have been annotated and mapped to signaling pathways that control kinase/phosphatase networks, cytoskeleton remodeling, and axon/dendrite specification. Comprehensive informatics and functional studies revealed a compartmentalized ERK activation/deactivation cytoskeletal switch that governs neurite growth and retraction, respectively. Our findings provide the first system-wide analysis of the phosphoprotein signaling networks that enable neurite growth and retraction and reveal an important molecular switch that governs neuritogenesis.

  20. Sar1 GTPase Activity Is Regulated by Membrane Curvature*♦

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Michael G.; Mela, Ioanna; Wang, Lei; Henderson, Robert M.; Chapman, Edwin R.; Edwardson, J. Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2016-01-01

    The majority of biosynthetic secretory proteins initiate their journey through the endomembrane system from specific subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum. At these locations, coated transport carriers are generated, with the Sar1 GTPase playing a critical role in membrane bending, recruitment of coat components, and nascent vesicle formation. How these events are appropriately coordinated remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Sar1 acts as the curvature-sensing component of the COPII coat complex and highlight the ability of Sar1 to bind more avidly to membranes of high curvature. Additionally, using an atomic force microscopy-based approach, we further show that the intrinsic GTPase activity of Sar1 is necessary for remodeling lipid bilayers. Consistent with this idea, Sar1-mediated membrane remodeling is dramatically accelerated in the presence of its guanine nucleotide-activating protein (GAP), Sec23-Sec24, and blocked upon addition of guanosine-5′-[(β,γ)-imido]triphosphate, a poorly hydrolysable analog of GTP. Our results also indicate that Sar1 GTPase activity is stimulated by membranes that exhibit elevated curvature, potentially enabling Sar1 membrane scission activity to be spatially restricted to highly bent membranes that are characteristic of a bud neck. Taken together, our data support a stepwise model in which the amino-terminal amphipathic helix of GTP-bound Sar1 stably penetrates the endoplasmic reticulum membrane, promoting local membrane deformation. As membrane bending increases, Sar1 membrane binding is elevated, ultimately culminating in GTP hydrolysis, which may destabilize the bilayer sufficiently to facilitate membrane fission. PMID:26546679

  1. RAB and RHO GTPases regulate intestinal crypt cell homeostasis and enterocyte function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao; Gao, Nan

    2016-04-01

    Recent human and mouse genetic studies have highlighted important contributions of several small GTPases, in particular Rab8a, (1) Cdc42, (2-4) and Rab11a, (5-8) to the proper morphogenesis and function of the mature intestinal epithelia. Additional insights about the involvement of these factors in maintaining intestinal stem cell homeostasis have also been obtained. (9,10) These studies suggest a conserved vesicular and membrane trafficking program utilized by the gastrointestinal tissue to support the rapid epithelial cell turnover and the highly sophisticated physiology of mature epithelial cells. PMID:27142493

  2. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell aging by the small RhoGTPase Cdc42

    PubMed Central

    Geiger, Hartmut; Zheng, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aging of stem cells might be the underlying cause of tissue aging in tissue that in the adult heavily rely on stem cell activity, like the blood forming system. Hematopoiesis, the generation of blood forming cells, is sustained by hematopoietic stem cells. In this review article, we introduce the canonical set of phenotypes associated with aged HSCs, focus on the novel aging-associated phenotype apolarity caused by elevated activity of the small RhoGTPase in aged HSCs, disuccs the role of Cdc42 in hematopoiesis and describe that pharmacological inhibition of Cdc42 activity in aged HSCs results in functionally young and thus rejuvenated HSCs. PMID:25220425

  3. IQ Motif-Containing GTPase-Activating Protein 2 (IQGAP2) Is a Novel Regulator of Colonic Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleb, Amr M.; Bialkowska, Agnieszka B.; Snider, Ashley J.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Hannun, Yusuf A.; Yang, Vincent W.; Schmidt, Valentina A.

    2015-01-01

    IQ motif-containing GTPase-activating protein 2 (IQGAP2) is a multidomain scaffolding protein that plays a role in cytoskeleton regulation by juxtaposing Rho GTPase and Ca2+/calmodulin signals. While IQGAP2 suppresses tumorigenesis in liver, its role in pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal tract remains unexplored. Here we report that IQGAP2 is required for the inflammatory response in colon. Mice lacking Iqgap2 gene (Iqgap2-/- mice) were resistant to chemically-induced colitis. Unlike wild-type controls, Iqgap2-/- mice treated with 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in water for 13 days displayed no injury to colonic epithelium. Mechanistically, resistance to colitis was associated with suppression of colonic NF-κB signaling and IL-6 synthesis, along with diminished neutrophil and macrophage production and recruitment in Iqgap2-/- mice. Finally, alterations in IQGAP2 expression were found in colons of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our findings indicate that IQGAP2 promotes inflammatory response at two distinct levels; locally, in colonic epithelium through TLR4/NF-κB signaling pathway, and systemically, via control of maturation and recruitment of myeloid immune cells. This work identifies a novel mechanism of colonic inflammation mediated by signal transducing scaffolding protein IQGAP2. IQGAP2 domain-specific blocking agents may represent a conceptually novel strategy for therapy of IBD and other inflammation-associated disorders, including cancer. PMID:26047140

  4. Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Promote In Vitro Neuronal Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth of Embryonic Neural Stem Cells via Up-Regulating TRPC1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qinlong; Chen, Chunhai; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Min; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Duan, Weixia; Pi, Huifeng; Cao, Zhengwang; Pei, Liping; Li, Min; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhong, Min; Zhou, Zhou; Yu, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) can enhance hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice. However, little is focused on the effects of ELF-EMFs on embryonic neurogenesis. Here, we studied the potential effects of ELF-EMFs on embryonic neural stem cells (eNSCs). We exposed eNSCs to ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT) for 1, 2, and 3 days with 4 hours per day. We found that eNSC proliferation and maintenance were significantly enhanced after ELF-EMF exposure in proliferation medium. ELF-EMF exposure increased the ratio of differentiated neurons and promoted the neurite outgrowth of eNSC-derived neurons without influencing astrocyes differentiation and the cell apoptosis. In addition, the expression of the proneural genes, NeuroD and Ngn1, which are crucial for neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth, was increased after ELF-EMF exposure. Moreover, the expression of transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) was significantly up-regulated accompanied by increased the peak amplitude of intracellular calcium level induced by ELF-EMF. Furthermore, silencing TRPC1 expression eliminated the up-regulation of the proneural genes and the promotion of neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth induced by ELF-EMF. These results suggest that ELF-EMF exposure promotes the neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of eNSCs via up-regulation the expression of TRPC1 and proneural genes (NeuroD and Ngn1). These findings also provide new insights in understanding the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on embryonic brain development. PMID:26950212

  5. Ral-GTPase influences the regulation of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Polzin, Atsuko; Shipitsin, Michail; Goi, Takanori; Feig, Larry A; Turner, Timothy J

    2002-03-01

    The Ral proteins are members of the Ras superfamily of GTPases. Because they reside in synaptic vesicles, we used transgenic mice expressing a dominant inhibitory form of Ral to investigate the role of Ral in neurosecretion. Using a synaptosomal secretion assay, we found that while K(+)-evoked secretion of glutamate was normal, protein kinase C-mediated enhancement of glutamate secretion was suppressed in the mutant mice. Since protein kinase C effects on secretion have been shown to be due to enhancement of the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles docked at the plasma membrane, we directly measured the refilling of this readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles after Ca(2+)-triggered exocytosis. Refilling of the readily releasable pool was suppressed in synaptosomes from mice expressing dominant inhibitory Ral. Moreover, we found that protein kinase C and calcium-induced phosphorylation of proteins thought to influence synaptic vesicle function, such as MARCKS, synapsin, and SNAP-25, were all reduced in synaptosomes from these transgenic mice. Concomitant with these studies, we searched for new functions of Ral by detecting proteins that specifically bind to it in cells. Consistent with the phenotype of the transgenic mice described above, we found that active but not inactive RalA binds to the Sec6/8 (exocyst) complex, whose yeast counterpart is essential for targeting exocytic vesicles to specific docking sites on the plasma membrane. These findings demonstrate a role for Ral-GTPase signaling in the modulation of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles and suggest the possible involvement of Ral-Sec6/8 (exocyst) binding in modulation of synaptic strength. PMID:11865051

  6. RhoA GTPase regulates radiation-induced alterations in endothelial cell adhesion and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseau, Matthieu; Gaugler, Marie-Helene; Rodallec, Audrey; Bonnaud, Stephanie; Paris, Francois; Corre, Isabelle

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We explore the role of RhoA in endothelial cell response to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer RhoA is rapidly activated by single high-dose of radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation leads to RhoA/ROCK-dependent actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced apoptosis does not require the RhoA/ROCK pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation-induced alteration of endothelial adhesion and migration requires RhoA/ROCK. -- Abstract: Endothelial cells of the microvasculature are major target of ionizing radiation, responsible of the radiation-induced vascular early dysfunctions. Molecular signaling pathways involved in endothelial responses to ionizing radiation, despite being increasingly investigated, still need precise characterization. Small GTPase RhoA and its effector ROCK are crucial signaling molecules involved in many endothelial cellular functions. Recent studies identified implication of RhoA/ROCK in radiation-induced increase in endothelial permeability but other endothelial functions altered by radiation might also require RhoA proteins. Human microvascular endothelial cells HMEC-1, either treated with Y-27632 (inhibitor of ROCK) or invalidated for RhoA by RNA interference were exposed to 15 Gy. We showed a rapid radiation-induced activation of RhoA, leading to a deep reorganisation of actin cytoskeleton with rapid formation of stress fibers. Endothelial early apoptosis induced by ionizing radiation was not affected by Y-27632 pre-treatment or RhoA depletion. Endothelial adhesion to fibronectin and formation of focal adhesions increased in response to radiation in a RhoA/ROCK-dependent manner. Consistent with its pro-adhesive role, ionizing radiation also decreased endothelial cells migration and RhoA was required for this inhibition. These results highlight the role of RhoA GTPase in ionizing radiation-induced deregulation of essential endothelial

  7. Angiotensin II AT2 receptors regulate NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth via the NO-cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Hashikawa-Hobara, Narumi; Hashikawa, Naoya

    2016-09-16

    We investigated whether Angiotensin II type 2 (AT2) receptor activation was involved in NGF-induced nerve regeneration. NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth in cultured dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells was significantly inhibited by AT2 receptor antagonist (PD123,319) treatment. AT2 receptor knockdown also inhibited NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth. To determine the mechanisms, we analyzed the NO-cGMP pathway. The cGMP analog increased NGF-mediated nerve elongation, which inhibited by PD123,319. Furthermore, soluble guanylate cyclase expression was significantly less in NGF and PD123,319 treatment DRG than in NGF treatment alone. These results suggest that NGF-mediated neurite outgrowth is suppressed by AT2 receptor signaling via the NO-cGMP-PKG pathway. PMID:27524238

  8. Pike. A nuclear gtpase that enhances PI3kinase activity and is regulated by protein 4.1N.

    PubMed

    Ye, K; Hurt, K J; Wu, F Y; Fang, M; Luo, H R; Hong, J J; Blackshaw, S; Ferris, C D; Snyder, S H

    2000-12-01

    While cytoplasmic PI3Kinase (PI3K) is well characterized, regulation of nuclear PI3K has been obscure. A novel protein, PIKE (PI3Kinase Enhancer), interacts with nuclear PI3K to stimulate its lipid kinase activity. PIKE encodes a 753 amino acid nuclear GTPase. Dominant-negative PIKE prevents the NGF enhancement of PI3K and upregulation of cyclin D1. NGF treatment also leads to PIKE interactions with 4.1N, which has translocated to the nucleus, fitting with the initial identification of PIKE based on its binding 4.1N in a yeast two-hybrid screen. Overexpression of 4.1N abolishes PIKE effects on PI3K. Activation of nuclear PI3K by PIKE is inhibited by the NGF-stimulated 4.1N translocation to the nucleus. Thus, PIKE physiologically modulates the activation by NGF of nuclear PI3K. PMID:11136977

  9. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-01-01

    Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm2) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate that both Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases are critical regulators in shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts. PMID:23524265

  10. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript facilitates the neurite outgrowth in cortical neurons after oxygen and glucose deprivation through PTN-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Qiu, B; Liu, J; Zhu, Wei-Guo; Zhu, S

    2014-09-26

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) is a neuropeptide that plays neuroprotective roles in cerebral ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury in animal models or oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) in cultured neurons. Recent data suggest that intranasal CART treatment facilitates neuroregeneration in stroke brain. However, little is known about the effects of post-treatment with CART during the neuronal recovery after OGD and reoxygenation in cultured primary cortical neurons. The present study was to investigate the role of CART treated after OGD injury in neurons. Primary mouse cortical neurons were subjected to OGD and then treated with CART. Our data show that post-treatment with CART reduced the neuronal apoptosis caused by OGD injury. In addition, CART repaired OGD-impaired cortical neurons by increasing the expression of growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43), which promotes neurite outgrowth. This effect depends on pleiotrophin (PTN) as siRNA-mediated PTN knockdown totally abolished the increase in CART-stimulated GAP43 protein levels. In summary, our findings demonstrate that CART repairs the neuronal injury after OGD by facilitating neurite outgrowth through PTN-dependent pathway. The role for CART in neurite outgrowth makes it a new potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25010400

  11. atonal regulates neurite arborization but does not act as a proneural gene in the Drosophila brain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassan, B. A.; Bermingham, N. A.; He, Y.; Sun, Y.; Jan, Y. N.; Zoghbi, H. Y.; Bellen, H. J.

    2000-01-01

    Drosophila atonal (ato) is the proneural gene of the chordotonal organs (CHOs) in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the larval and adult photoreceptor organs. Here, we show that ato is expressed at multiple stages during the development of a lineage of central brain neurons that innervate the optic lobes and are required for eclosion. A novel fate mapping approach shows that ato is expressed in the embryonic precursors of these neurons and that its expression is reactivated in third instar larvae (L3). In contrast to its function in the PNS, ato does not act as a proneural gene in the embryonic brain. Instead, ato performs a novel function, regulating arborization during larval and pupal development by interacting with Notch.

  12. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco AS; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12813.001 PMID:26824392

  13. Phosphoproteomics reveals that Parkinson's disease kinase LRRK2 regulates a subset of Rab GTPases.

    PubMed

    Steger, Martin; Tonelli, Francesca; Ito, Genta; Davies, Paul; Trost, Matthias; Vetter, Melanie; Wachter, Stefanie; Lorentzen, Esben; Duddy, Graham; Wilson, Stephen; Baptista, Marco As; Fiske, Brian K; Fell, Matthew J; Morrow, John A; Reith, Alastair D; Alessi, Dario R; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in Park8, encoding for the multidomain Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) protein, comprise the predominant genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD). G2019S, the most common amino acid substitution activates the kinase two- to threefold. This has motivated the development of LRRK2 kinase inhibitors; however, poor consensus on physiological LRRK2 substrates has hampered clinical development of such therapeutics. We employ a combination of phosphoproteomics, genetics, and pharmacology to unambiguously identify a subset of Rab GTPases as key LRRK2 substrates. LRRK2 directly phosphorylates these both in vivo and in vitro on an evolutionary conserved residue in the switch II domain. Pathogenic LRRK2 variants mapping to different functional domains increase phosphorylation of Rabs and this strongly decreases their affinity to regulatory proteins including Rab GDP dissociation inhibitors (GDIs). Our findings uncover a key class of bona-fide LRRK2 substrates and a novel regulatory mechanism of Rabs that connects them to PD. PMID:26824392

  14. BRIP1 inhibits the tumorigenic properties of cervical cancer by regulating RhoA GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    ZOU, WEI; MA, XIANGDONG; HUA, WEI; CHEN, BILIANG; HUANG, YANHONG; WANG, DETANG; CAI, GUOQING

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer 1, early onset (BRCA1)-interacting protein 1 (BRIP1), a DNA-dependent adenosine triphosphatase and DNA helicase, is required for BRCA-associated DNA damage repair functions, and may be associated with the tumorigenesis and aggressiveness of various cancers. The present study investigated the expression of BRIP1 in normal cervix tissues and cervical carcinoma via reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunohistochemistry assays. BRIP1 expression was observed to be reduced in squamous cancer tissue and adenocarcinoma compared with normal cervix tissue, and there were significant correlations between the reduction in BRIP1 expression and unfavorable variables, including the International Federation of Gynecologists and Obstetricians stage and presence of lymph node metastases. In order to elucidate the role of BRIP1 in cervical cancer, a BRIP1 recombinant plasmid was constructed and overexpressed in a cervical cancer cell line (HeLa). The ectopic expression of BRIP1 markedly inhibited the tumorigenic properties of HeLa cells in vitro, as demonstrated by decreased cell growth, invasion and adhesion, and increased cell apoptosis. In addition, it was identified that the inhibitory tumorigenic properties of BRIP1 may be partly attributed to the attenuation of RhoA GTPase activity. The present study provides a novel insight into the essential role of BRIP1 in cervical cancer, and suggests that BRIP1 may be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of this common malignancy. PMID:26870246

  15. A noise-reduction GWAS analysis implicates altered regulation of neurite outgrowth and guidance in autism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    coherent pathway that regulates the directional protrusion of axons and dendrites to their appropriate synaptic targets. Conclusions As statistical noise is likely to particularly affect studies of complex disorders, where genetic heterogeneity or interaction between genes may confound the ability to detect association, GWAS-NR offers a powerful method for prioritizing regions for follow-up studies. Applying this method to autism datasets, GWAS-NR analysis indicates that a large subset of genes involved in the outgrowth and guidance of axons and dendrites is implicated in the aetiology of autism. PMID:21247446

  16. The Fer tyrosine kinase regulates interactions of Rho GDP-Dissociation Inhibitor α with the small GTPase Rac

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background RhoGDI proteins are important regulators of the small GTPase Rac, because they shuttle Rac from the cytoplasm to membranes and also protect Rac from activation, deactivation and degradation. How the binding and release of Rac from RhoGDI is regulated is not precisely understood. Results We report that the non-receptor tyrosine kinase Fer is able to phosphorylate RhoGDIα and form a direct protein complex with it. This interaction is mediated by the C-terminal end of RhoGDIα. Activation of Fer by reactive oxygen species caused increased phosphorylation of RhoGDIα and pervanadate treatment further augmented this. Tyrosine phosphorylation of RhoGDIα by Fer prevented subsequent binding of Rac to RhoGDIα, but once a RhoGDIα-Rac complex was formed, the Fer kinase was not able to cause Rac release through tyrosine phosphorylation of preformed RhoGDIα-Rac complexes. Conclusions These results identify tyrosine phosphorylation of RhoGDIα by Fer as a mechanism to regulate binding of RhoGDIα to Rac. PMID:21122136

  17. Interaction of Anesthetics with the Rho GTPase Regulator Rho GDP Dissociation Inhibitor†

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Cojen; Shanmugasundararaj, Sivananthaperumal; Miller, Keith W.; Malinowski, Steve A.; Cook, Anthony C.; Slater, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    The physiological effects of anesthetics have been ascribed to their interaction with hydrophobic sites within functionally relevant CNS proteins. Studies have shown that volatile anesthetics compete for luciferin binding to the hydrophobic substrate binding site within firefly luciferase and inhibit its activity (Franks, N. P., and Lieb, W. R. (1984) Nature 310, 599–601). To assess whether anesthetics also compete for ligand binding to a mammalian signal transduction protein, we investigated the interaction of the volatile anesthetic, halothane, with the Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor (RhoGDIα), which binds the geranylgeranyl moiety of GDP-bound Rho GTPases. Consistent with the existence of a discrete halothane binding site, the intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence of RhoGDIα was quenched by halothane (2-bromo-2-chloro-1,1,1-trifluoroethane) in a saturable, concentration-dependent manner. Bromine quenching of tryptophan fluorescence is short range and W192 and W194 of the RhoGDIα are located within the geranylgeranyl binding pocket, suggesting that halothane binds within this region. Supporting this, N-acetyl-geranylgeranyl cysteine reversed tryptophan quenching by halothane. Short chain n-alcohols (n<6) also reversed tryptophan quenching, suggesting that RhoGDIα may also bind n-alkanols. Consistent with this, E193 was photo-labeled by 3-azibutanol. This residue is located in the vicinity of, but outside, the geranylgeranyl chain binding pocket, suggesting that the alcohol binding site is distinct from that occupied by halothane. Supporting this, N-acetyl-geranylgeranyl cysteine enhanced E193 photo-labeling by 3-azibutanol. Overall, the results suggest that halothane binds to a site within the geranylgeranyl chain binding pocket of RhoGDIα, whereas alcohols bind to a distal site that interacts allosterically with this pocket. PMID:18702520

  18. Acetylcholine binding protein of mollusks is unlikely to act as a regulator of cholinergic neurotransmission at neurite-neurite synaptic sites in vivo.

    PubMed

    Banks, Gareth; Kemenes, Ildiko; Schofield, Michael; O'Shea, Michael; Korneev, Sergei A

    2009-09-01

    A population of glial cells in the central nervous system of the gastropod mollusk Lymnaea stagnalis produces a soluble protein that specifically binds acetylcholine. This protein is named the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP). Experiments performed in vitro indicated that AChBP inactivates released acetylcholine at cholinergic synapses. On the basis of these observations, a similar in vivo role for AChBP was hypothesized. To fulfill this function, AChBP-expressing glia ought to be located in close proximity to cholinergic synapses in vivo. To examine this, we have analyzed the cellular and subcellular expression of AChBP in the intact CNS. Using a variety of molecular techniques, we demonstrate here that AChBP expression is confined to a subpopulation of glial cells located within the peripheral zone of each of the ganglia constituting the CNS. This zone contains the cell bodies of neurons, but few synapses. Conversely, glial cells that do not express the AChBP are predominantly located in the synapse-rich central neuropile zone but are rare in the cell body zone. Thus, our findings are not compatible with the previous conclusions drawn from in vitro studies and suggest that AChBP functions in vivo as a regulator of nonsynaptic cholinergic transmission. PMID:19395478

  19. Rac1 and Cdc42 GTPases regulate shear stress-driven β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Qiaoqiao; Cho, Eunhye; Yokota, Hiroki; Na, Sungsoo

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Shear stress increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated β-catenin nuclear localization. •Rac1, Cdc42, and RhoA displayed distinct dynamic activity patterns under flow. •Rac1 and Cdc42, but not RhoA, regulate shear stress-driven TCF/LEF activation. •Cytoskeleton did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activation. -- Abstract: Beta-catenin-dependent TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphocyte enhancing factor) is known to be mechanosensitive and an important regulator for promoting bone formation. However, the functional connection between TCF/LEF activity and Rho family GTPases is not well understood in osteoblasts. Herein we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying oscillatory shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity in MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells using live cell imaging. We employed fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based and green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based biosensors, which allowed us to monitor signal transduction in living cells in real time. Oscillatory (1 Hz) shear stress (10 dynes/cm{sup 2}) increased TCF/LEF activity and stimulated translocation of β-catenin to the nucleus with the distinct activity patterns of Rac1 and Cdc42. The shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity was blocked by the inhibition of Rac1 and Cdc42 with their dominant negative mutants or selective drugs, but not by a dominant negative mutant of RhoA. In contrast, constitutively active Rac1 and Cdc42 mutants caused a significant enhancement of TCF/LEF activity. Moreover, activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 increased the basal level of TCF/LEF activity, while their inhibition decreased the basal level. Interestingly, disruption of cytoskeletal structures or inhibition of myosin activity did not significantly affect shear stress-induced TCF/LEF activity. Although Rac1 is reported to be involved in β-catenin in cancer cells, the involvement of Cdc42 in β-catenin signaling in osteoblasts has not been identified. Our findings in this study demonstrate

  20. Regulation of Cdc42 polarization by the Rsr1 GTPase and Rga1, a Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein, in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mid Eum; Lo, Wing-Cheong; Miller, Kristi E.; Chou, Ching-Shan; Park, Hay-Oak

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cdc42 plays a central role in establishing polarity in yeast and animals, yet how polarization of Cdc42 is achieved in response to spatial cues is poorly understood. Using live-cell imaging, we found distinct dynamics of Cdc42 polarization in haploid budding yeast in correlation with two temporal steps of the G1 phase. The position at which the Cdc42–GTP cluster develops changes rapidly around the division site during the first step but becomes stabilized in the second step, suggesting that an axis of polarized growth is determined in mid G1. Cdc42 polarization in the first step and its proper positioning depend on Rsr1 and its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) Bud2. Interestingly, Rga1, a Cdc42 GAP, exhibits transient localization to a site near the bud neck and to the division site during cytokinesis and G1, and this temporal change of Rga1 distribution is necessary for determination of a proper growth site. Mathematical modeling suggests that a proper axis of Cdc42 polarization in haploid cells might be established through a biphasic mechanism involving sequential positive feedback and transient negative feedback. PMID:25908844

  1. TaTypA, a Ribosome-Binding GTPase Protein, Positively Regulates Wheat Resistance to the Stripe Rust Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peng; Myo, Thwin; Ma, Wei; Lan, Dingyun; Qi, Tuo; Guo, Jia; Song, Ping; Guo, Jun; Kang, Zhensheng

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation protein A (TypA/BipA) belongs to the ribosome-binding GTPase superfamily. In many bacterial species, TypA acts as a global stress and virulence regulator and also mediates resistance to the antimicrobial peptide bactericidal permeability-increasing protein. However, the function of TypA in plants under biotic stresses is not known. In this study, we isolated and functionally characterized a stress-responsive TypA gene (TaTypA) from wheat, with three copies located on chromosomes 6A, 6B, and 6D, respectively. Transient expression assays indicated chloroplast localization of TaTypA. The transcript levels of TaTypA were up-regulated in response to treatment with methyl viologen, which induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in chloroplasts through photoreaction, cold stress, and infection by an avirulent strain of the stripe rust pathogen. Knock down of the expression of TaTypA through virus-induced gene silencing decreased the resistance of wheat to stripe rust accompanied by weakened ROS accumulation and hypersensitive response, an increase in TaCAT and TaSOD expression, and an increase in pathogen hyphal growth and branching. Our findings suggest that TaTypA contributes to resistance in an ROS-dependent manner. PMID:27446108

  2. Jak3 Enables Chemokine-Dependent Actin Cytoskeleton Reorganization by Regulating Cofilin and Rac/Rhoa GTPases Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ambriz-Peña, Xochitl; García-Zepeda, Eduardo Alberto; Meza, Isaura; Soldevila, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that Jak3 is involved in the signaling pathways of CCR7, CCR9 and CXCR4 in murine T lymphocytes and that Jak3−/− lymphocytes display an intrinsic defect in homing to peripheral lymph nodes. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the defective migration observed in Jak3−/− lymphocytes remains elusive. Here, it is demonstrated for the first time, that Jak3 is required for the actin cytoskeleton reorganization in T lymphocytes responding to chemokines. It was found that Jak3 regulates actin polymerization by controlling cofilin inactivation in response to CCL21 and CXCL12. Interestingly, cofilin inactivation was not precluded in PTX- treated cells despite their impaired actin polymerization. Additionally, Jak3 was required for small GTPases Rac1 and RhoA activation, which are indispensable for acquisition of the migratory cell phenotype and the generation of a functional leading edge and uropod, respectively. This defect correlates with data obtained by time-lapse video-microscopy showing an incompetent uropod formation and impaired motility in Jak3-pharmacologically inhibited T lymphocytes. Our data support a new model in which Jak3 and heterotrimeric G proteins can use independent, but complementary, signaling pathways to regulate actin cytoskeleton dynamics during cell migration in response to chemokines. PMID:24498424

  3. Regulation of β-Adrenergic Receptor Trafficking and Lung Microvascular Endothelial Cell Permeability by Rab5 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junjun; Sun, Huan; Zhang, Jihang; Hu, Mingdong; Wang, Jianchun; Wu, Guangyu; Wang, Guansong

    2015-01-01

    Rab5 GTPase modulates the trafficking of the cell surface receptors, including G protein-coupled β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs). Here, we have determined the role of Rab5 in regulating the internalization of β-ARs in lung microvascular endothelial cells (LMECs) and in maintaining the integrity and permeability of endothelial cell barrier. Our data demonstrate that lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment disrupts LMEC barrier function and reduces the cell surface expression of β-ARs. Furthermore, the activation of β-ARs, particularly β2-AR, is able to protect the LMEC permeability from LPS injury. Moreover, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rab5 inhibits both the basal and agonist-provoked internalization of β-ARs, therefore, enhancing the cell surface expression of the receptors and receptor-mediated ERK1/2 activation. Importantly, knockdown of Rab5 not only inhibits the LPS-induced effects on β-ARs but also protects the LMEC monolayer permeability. All together, these data provide strong evidence indicating a crucial role of Rab5-mediated internalization of β-ARs in functional regulation of LMECs. PMID:26157342

  4. The small GTPase Rap1b negatively regulates neutrophil chemotaxis and transcellular diapedesis by inhibiting Akt activation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sachin; Xu, Juying; Kumar, Rupali Sani; Lakshmikanthan, Sribalaji; Kapur, Reuben; Kofron, Matthew; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Neutrophils are the first line of cellular defense in response to infections and inflammatory injuries. However, neutrophil activation and accumulation into tissues trigger tissue damage due to release of a plethora of toxic oxidants and proteases, a cause of acute lung injury (ALI). Despite its clinical importance, the molecular regulation of neutrophil migration is poorly understood. The small GTPase Rap1b is generally viewed as a positive regulator of immune cell functions by controlling bidirectional integrin signaling. However, we found that Rap1b-deficient mice exhibited enhanced neutrophil recruitment to inflamed lungs and enhanced susceptibility to endotoxin shock. Unexpectedly, Rap1b deficiency promoted the transcellular route of diapedesis through endothelial cell. Increased transcellular migration of Rap1b-deficient neutrophils in vitro was selectively mediated by enhanced PI3K-Akt activation and invadopodia-like protrusions. Akt inhibition in vivo suppressed excessive Rap1b-deficient neutrophil migration and associated endotoxin shock. The inhibitory action of Rap1b on PI3K signaling may be mediated by activation of phosphatase SHP-1. Thus, this study reveals an unexpected role for Rap1b as a key suppressor of neutrophil migration and lung inflammation. PMID:25092872

  5. Non-prenylatable, cytosolic Rac1 alters neurite outgrowth while retaining the ability to be activated.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Jairus M; Samuel, Filsy G; McConnell, Jordan A; Reddy, Cristina P; Beck, Brian W; Hynds, DiAnna L

    2015-03-01

    Rac1 is an important regulator of axon extension, cell migration and actin reorganization. Like all Rho guanine triphosphatases (GTPases), Rac1 is targeted to the membrane by the addition of a geranylgeranyl moiety, an action thought to result in Rac1 guanosine triphosphate (GTP) binding. However, the role that Rac1 localization plays in its activation (GTP loading) and subsequent activation of effectors is not completely clear. To address this, we developed a non-prenylatable emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP)-Rac1 fusion protein (EmGFP-Rac1(C189A)) and assessed how expressing this construct affected neurite outgrowth, Rac1 localization and activation in neuroblastoma cells. Expression of EmGFP-Rac1(C189A) increased localization to the cytosol and induced cell clustering while increasing neurite initiation. EmGFP-Rac1(C189A) expression also increased Rac1 activation in the cytosol, compared to cells expressing wild-type Rac1 (EmGFP-Rac1). These results suggest that activation of Rac1 may not require plasma membrane localization, potentially leading to differential activation of cytosolic signaling pathways that alter cell morphology. Understanding the consequences of differential localization and activation of Rho GTPases, including Rac1, could lead to new therapeutic targets for treating neurological disorders. PMID:25479592

  6. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako; Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira; Maekawa, Shohei; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  7. The Small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 Regulate Cerebellar Development by Controlling Cell Morphogenesis, Migration and Foliation

    PubMed Central

    Mulherkar, Shalaka; Uddin, Mohammad Danish; Couvillon, Anthony D.; Sillitoe, Roy V.; Tolias, Kimberley F.

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPases RhoA and Rac1 are key cytoskeletal regulators that function in a mutually antagonistic manner to control the migration and morphogenesis of a broad range of cell types. However, their role in shaping the cerebellum, a unique brain structure composed of an elaborate set of folia separated by fissures of different lengths, remains largely unexplored. Here we show that dysregulation of both RhoA and Rac1 signaling results in abnormal cerebellar ontogenesis. Ablation of RhoA from neuroprogenitor cells drastically alters the timing and placement of fissure formation, the migration and positioning of granule and Purkinje cells, the alignment of Bergmann glia, and the integrity of the basement membrane, primarily in the anterior lobules. Furthermore, in the absence of RhoA, granule cell precursors located at the base of fissures fail to undergo cell shape changes required for fissure initiation. Many of these abnormalities can be recapitulated by deleting RhoA specifically from granule cell precursors but not postnatal glia, indicating that RhoA functions in granule cell precursors to control cerebellar morphogenesis. Notably, mice with elevated Rac1 activity due to loss of the Rac1 inhibitors Bcr and Abr show similar anterior cerebellar deficits, including ectopic neurons and defects in fissure formation, Bergmann glia organization and basement membrane integrity. Together, our results suggest that RhoA and Rac1 play indispensable roles in patterning cerebellar morphology. PMID:25128586

  8. Glutaminase 2 is a novel negative regulator of small GTPase Rac1 and mediates p53 function in suppressing metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cen; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuhan; Yue, Xuetian; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Xiaolong; Wu, Hao; Blanco, Felix; Li, Shaohua; Bhanot, Gyan; Haffty, Bruce G; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Glutaminase (GLS) isoenzymes GLS1 and GLS2 are key enzymes for glutamine metabolism. Interestingly, GLS1 and GLS2 display contrasting functions in tumorigenesis with elusive mechanism; GLS1 promotes tumorigenesis, whereas GLS2 exhibits a tumor-suppressive function. In this study, we found that GLS2 but not GLS1 binds to small GTPase Rac1 and inhibits its interaction with Rac1 activators guanine-nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn inhibits Rac1 to suppress cancer metastasis. This function of GLS2 is independent of GLS2 glutaminase activity. Furthermore, decreased GLS2 expression is associated with enhanced metastasis in human cancer. As a p53 target, GLS2 mediates p53’s function in metastasis suppression through inhibiting Rac1. In summary, our results reveal that GLS2 is a novel negative regulator of Rac1, and uncover a novel function and mechanism whereby GLS2 suppresses metastasis. Our results also elucidate a novel mechanism that contributes to the contrasting functions of GLS1 and GLS2 in tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10727.001 PMID:26751560

  9. The cytoskeleton and neurite initiation

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Kevin C

    2013-01-01

    Neurons begin their life as simple spheres, but can ultimately assume an elaborate morphology with numerous, highly arborized dendrites, and long axons. This is achieved via an astounding developmental progression which is dependent upon regulated assembly and dynamics of the cellular cytoskeleton. As neurites emerge out of the soma, neurons break their spherical symmetry and begin to acquire the morphological features that define their structure and function. Neurons regulate their cytoskeleton to achieve changes in cell shape, velocity, and direction as they migrate, extend neurites, and polarize. Of particular importance, the organization and dynamics of actin and microtubules directs the migration and morphogenesis of neurons. This review focuses on the regulation of intrinsic properties of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons and how specific cytoskeletal structures and dynamics are associated with the earliest phase of neuronal morphogenesis—neuritogenesis. PMID:24002528

  10. Rho GTPases and their effector proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, A L; Hall, A

    2000-01-01

    Rho GTPases are molecular switches that regulate many essential cellular processes, including actin dynamics, gene transcription, cell-cycle progression and cell adhesion. About 30 potential effector proteins have been identified that interact with members of the Rho family, but it is still unclear which of these are responsible for the diverse biological effects of Rho GTPases. This review will discuss how Rho GTPases physically interact with, and regulate the activity of, multiple effector proteins and how specific effector proteins contribute to cellular responses. To date most progress has been made in the cytoskeleton field, and several biochemical links have now been established between GTPases and the assembly of filamentous actin. The main focus of this review will be Rho, Rac and Cdc42, the three best characterized mammalian Rho GTPases, though the genetic analysis of Rho GTPases in lower eukaryotes is making increasingly important contributions to this field. PMID:10816416

  11. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ–inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C.; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M.; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ–inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ–inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ–dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ–induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2–Irga6 axis of IFN-γ–dependent cell-autonomous immunity. PMID:26240314

  12. RabGDIα is a negative regulator of interferon-γ-inducible GTPase-dependent cell-autonomous immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Jun; Sasai, Miwa; Liu, Jianfa; Yamashita, Kazuo; Ma, Ji Su; Lee, Youngae; Bando, Hironori; Howard, Jonathan C; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Hayashi, Mikako; Takeda, Kiyoshi; Standley, Daron M; Frickel, Eva-Maria; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2015-08-18

    IFN-γ orchestrates cell-autonomous host defense against various intracellular vacuolar pathogens. IFN-γ-inducible GTPases, such as p47 immunity-related GTPases (IRGs) and p65 guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), are recruited to pathogen-containing vacuoles, which is important for disruption of the vacuoles, culminating in the cell-autonomous clearance. Although the positive regulation for the proper recruitment of IRGs and GBPs to the vacuoles has been elucidated, the suppressive mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that Rab GDP dissociation inhibitor α (RabGDIα), originally identified as a Rab small GTPase inhibitor, is a negative regulator of IFN-γ-inducible GTPases in cell-autonomous immunity to the intracellular pathogen Toxoplasma gondii. Overexpression of RabGDIα, but not of RabGDIβ, impaired IFN-γ-dependent reduction of T. gondii numbers. Conversely, RabGDIα deletion in macrophages and fibroblasts enhanced the IFN-γ-induced clearance of T. gondii. Furthermore, upon a high dose of infection by T. gondii, RabGDIα-deficient mice exhibited a decreased parasite burden in the brain and increased resistance in the chronic phase than did control mice. Among members of IRGs and GBPs important for the parasite clearance, Irga6 and Gbp2 alone were more frequently recruited to T. gondii-forming parasitophorous vacuoles in RabGDIα-deficient cells. Notably, Gbp2 positively controlled Irga6 recruitment that was inhibited by direct and specific interactions of RabGDIα with Gbp2 through the lipid-binding pocket. Taken together, our results suggest that RabGDIα inhibits host defense against T. gondii by negatively regulating the Gbp2-Irga6 axis of IFN-γ-dependent cell-autonomous immunity. PMID:26240314

  13. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates hair cell planar polarity and cellular patterning in the developing cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Kirjavainen, Anna; Laos, Maarja; Anttonen, Tommi; Pirvola, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the organ of Corti (OC) of the cochlea exhibit distinct planar polarity, both at the tissue and cellular level. Planar polarity at tissue level is manifested as uniform orientation of the hair cell stereociliary bundles. Hair cell intrinsic polarity is defined as structural hair bundle asymmetry; positioning of the kinocilium/basal body complex at the vertex of the V-shaped bundle. Consistent with strong apical polarity, the hair cell apex displays prominent actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. The Rho GTPase Cdc42 regulates cytoskeletal dynamics and polarization of various cell types, and, thus, serves as a candidate regulator of hair cell polarity. We have here induced Cdc42 inactivation in the late-embryonic OC. We show the role of Cdc42 in the establishment of planar polarity of hair cells and in cellular patterning. Abnormal planar polarity was displayed as disturbances in hair bundle orientation and morphology and in kinocilium/basal body positioning. These defects were accompanied by a disorganized cell-surface microtubule network. Atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), a putative Cdc42 effector, colocalized with Cdc42 at the hair cell apex, and aPKC expression was altered upon Cdc42 depletion. Our data suggest that Cdc42 together with aPKC is part of the machinery establishing hair cell planar polarity and that Cdc42 acts on polarity through the cell-surface microtubule network. The data also suggest that defects in apical polarization are influenced by disturbed cellular patterning in the OC. In addition, our data demonstrates that Cdc42 is required for stereociliogenesis in the immature cochlea. PMID:25770185

  14. Regulation of cell protrusions by small GTPases during fusion of the neural folds

    PubMed Central

    Rolo, Ana; Savery, Dawn; Escuin, Sarah; de Castro, Sandra C; Armer, Hannah EJ; Munro, Peter MG; Molè, Matteo A; Greene, Nicholas DE; Copp, Andrew J

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial fusion is a crucial process in embryonic development, and its failure underlies several clinically important birth defects. For example, failure of neural fold fusion during neurulation leads to open neural tube defects including spina bifida. Using mouse embryos, we show that cell protrusions emanating from the apposed neural fold tips, at the interface between the neuroepithelium and the surface ectoderm, are required for completion of neural tube closure. By genetically ablating the cytoskeletal regulators Rac1 or Cdc42 in the dorsal neuroepithelium, or in the surface ectoderm, we show that these protrusions originate from surface ectodermal cells and that Rac1 is necessary for the formation of membrane ruffles which typify late closure stages, whereas Cdc42 is required for the predominance of filopodia in early neurulation. This study provides evidence for the essential role and molecular regulation of membrane protrusions prior to fusion of a key organ primordium in mammalian development. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13273.001 PMID:27114066

  15. Deregulation of Rho GTPases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Andrew P.; Papaioannou, Alexandra; Malliri, Angeliki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In vitro and in vivo studies and evidence from human tumors have long implicated Rho GTPase signaling in the formation and dissemination of a range of cancers. Recently next generation sequencing has identified direct mutations of Rho GTPases in human cancers. Moreover, the effects of ablating genes encoding Rho GTPases and their regulators in mouse models, or through pharmacological inhibition, strongly suggests that targeting Rho GTPase signaling could constitute an effective treatment. In this review we will explore the various ways in which Rho signaling can be deregulated in human cancers. PMID:27104658

  16. [When we have learned about the brain development from a disease-oriented study: DBZ regulates cortical cell positioning and neurite extension by sustaining the anterograde transport of Lis1/DISC1 through control of Ndel1 phosphorylation].

    PubMed

    Sato, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    Cell positioning and neuronal network formation are crucial for proper brain function. Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) is anterogradely transported to the neurite tips, together with Lis1, and functions in neurite extension via suppression of GSK3β activity. Then, transported Lis1 is retrogradely transported and functions in cell migration. Here, we show that DISC1-binding zinc finger protein (DBZ) regulates mouse cortical cell positioning and neurite development in vivo, together with DISC1. DBZ hindered Ndel1 phosphorylation at threonine 219 and serine 251. DBZ depletion or expression of a double-phosphorylated mimetic form of Ndel1 impaired the transport of Lis1 and DISC1 to the neurite tips and hampered microtubule elongation. Moreover, application of DISC1 or a GSK3β inhibitor rescued the impairments caused by DBZ insufficiency or double-phosphorylated Ndel1 expression. We concluded that DBZ controls cell positioning and neurite development by interfering with Ndel1 from disproportionate phosphorylation, which is critical for appropriate anterograde transport of the DISC1-complex. PMID:27333658

  17. Rab GTPase regulation of retromer-mediated cargo export during endosome maturation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting-Ting; Gomez, Timothy S.; Sackey, Bridget K.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Burd, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    The retromer complex, composed of sorting nexin subunits and a Vps26/Vps29/Vps35 trimer, mediates sorting of retrograde cargo from the endosome to the trans-Golgi network. The retromer trimer subcomplex is an effector of Rab7 (Ypt7 in yeast). Whereas endosome targeting of human retromer has been shown to require Rab7-GTP, targeting of yeast retromer to the endosome is independent of Ypt7-GTP and requires the Vps5 and Vps17 retromer sorting nexin subunits. An evolutionarily conserved amino acid segment within Vps35 is required for Ypt7/Rab7 recognition in vivo by both yeast and human retromer, establishing that Rab recognition is a conserved feature of this subunit. Recognition of Ypt7 by retromer is required for its function in retrograde sorting, and in yeast cells lacking the guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Ypt7, retrograde cargo accumulates in endosomes that are decorated with retromer, revealing an additional role for Rab recognition at the cargo export stage of the retromer functional cycle. In addition, yeast retromer trimer antagonizes Ypt7-regulated organelle tethering and fusion of endosomes/vacuoles via recognition of Ypt7. Thus retromer has dual roles in retrograde cargo export and in controlling the fusion dynamics of the late endovacuolar system. PMID:22593205

  18. A distinct mechanism regulating a pollen-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the small GTPase Rop in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rop/Rac small GTPases are central to diverse developmental and cellular activities in plants, playing an especially important role in polar growth of pollen tubes. Although it is established that a class of plant-specific RopGEFs promotes the activity of Rop/Rac through the catalytic PRONE (Plant sp...

  19. Optimization and stabilization of Rho small GTPase proteins for solution NMR studies: The case of Rnd1.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shufen; Buck, Matthias

    2011-11-01

    Rho GTPases of the Ras superfamily have important roles in regulating the organization of the actin filament system, morphogenesis and migration of cells. Structural details for these proteins are still emerging, and information on their dynamics in solution is much needed to understand the mechanisms underlying their signaling functions. This report reviews conditions for solution NMR studies of Rho GTPases and describes our optimization and stabilization of Rnd1 for such experiments. Rnd1 belongs to the Rnd protein subfamily branch of Rho small GTPases and functions in neurite outgrowth, dendrite development and in axon guidance. However, as we report here, solution NMR studies of this protein are challenging. Multiple methods have been employed to enhance the stability of Rnd1, including by cleavage of an N-terminal His expression tag and by addition of non-hydrolysable GMPPNP (β: γ-imidoguanosine 5'-triphosphate) nucleotide. Further stabilization of Rnd1 against aggregation was achieved through a structure informed point mutation while maintaining its conformation and binding affinity for a partner protein. The NMR spectrum of the optimized protein reveals significant improvement in NMR signal dispersion and intensity. This work paves the way for structural and protein-protein/protein-ligand interaction studies of Rnd1 by solution NMR and also provides a guide for optimization and stabilization of other Rho GTPases. PMID:22545226

  20. SYD-1C, UNC-40 (DCC) and SAX-3 (Robo) Function Interdependently to Promote Axon Guidance by Regulating the MIG-2 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yan; Taru, Hidenori; Jin, Yishi; Quinn, Christopher C.

    2015-01-01

    During development, axons must integrate directional information encoded by multiple guidance cues and their receptors. Axon guidance receptors, such as UNC-40 (DCC) and SAX-3 (Robo), can function individually or combinatorially with other guidance receptors to regulate downstream effectors. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that mediate combinatorial guidance receptor signaling. Here, we show that UNC-40, SAX-3 and the SYD-1 RhoGAP-like protein function interdependently to regulate the MIG-2 (Rac) GTPase in the HSN axon of C. elegans. We find that SYD-1 mediates an UNC-6 (netrin) independent UNC-40 activity to promote ventral axon guidance. Genetic analysis suggests that SYD-1 function in axon guidance requires both UNC-40 and SAX-3 activity. Moreover, the cytoplasmic domains of UNC-40 and SAX-3 bind to SYD-1 and SYD-1 binds to and negatively regulates the MIG-2 (Rac) GTPase. We also find that the function of SYD-1 in axon guidance is mediated by its phylogenetically conserved C isoform, indicating that the role of SYD-1 in guidance is distinct from its previously described roles in synaptogenesis and axonal specification. Our observations reveal a molecular mechanism that can allow two guidance receptors to function interdependently to regulate a common downstream effector, providing a potential means for the integration of guidance signals. PMID:25876065

  1. Wisp2/CCN5 up-regulated in the central nervous system of GM3-only mice facilitates neurite formation in Neuro2a cells via integrin-Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkawa, Yuki; Ohmi, Yuhsuke; Tajima, Orie; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Wisp2/CCN5 was up-regulated in nervous tissues of GM3-only mutant mice. {yields} Wisp2/CCN5 was found in neurons more strongly in the mutant mice. {yields} Wisp2/CCN5 induces Akt phosphorylation via integrins and facilitates neurite formation. {yields} Wisp2/CCN5 conferred resistance to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced apoptosis. {yields} Up-regulation of Wisp2/CCN5 in GM3-only mice seemed for protection of brains from neurodegeneration. -- Abstract: Wisp2/CCN5 belongs to CCN family proteins which are involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, tumorigenesis and wound healing. Although a number of studies on the roles of Wisp2/CCN5 in cancers have been reported, no study on the expression and function of Wisp2/CCN5 in the central nervous system has been reported. In this study, we focused on Wisp2/CCN5 that was up-regulated in nervous tissues in GM3-only mice. Over-expression of Wisp2/CCN5 enhanced neurite outgrowth potently after serum withdrawal with increased phosphorylation levels of Akt and ERKs. When cells were cultured with recombinant Wisp2/CCN5 proteins, more and longer neurites were formed than in the controls. Thus, we demonstrated for the first time that Wisp2/CCN5 facilitates neurite formation in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro2a. Akt phosphorylation induced by recombinant Wisp2/CCN5 was suppressed after knockdown of integrin {beta}1. Moreover, Wisp2/CCN5-over-expressing cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. These results suggested that secreted Wisp2/CCN5 induces Akt and ERK phosphorylation via integrins, and consequently facilitates neurite formation and conferred resistance to apoptosis. Up-regulation of Wisp2/CCN5 in GM3-only mice should be, therefore, a reaction to protect nervous tissues from neurodegeneration caused by ganglioside deficiency.

  2. Tax-interacting protein 1 coordinates the spatiotemporal activation of Rho GTPases and regulates the infiltrative growth of human glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hailun; Han, Miaojun; Whetsell, William; Wang, Jialiang; Rich, Jeremy; Hallahan, Dennis; Han, Zhaozhong

    2014-01-01

    PDZ domains represent one group of the major structural units that mediate protein interactions in intercellular contact, signal transduction and assembly of biological machineries. TIP-1 protein is composed of a single PDZ domain that distinguishes TIP-1 from other PDZ domain proteins that more often contain multiple protein domains and function as scaffolds for protein complex assembly. However, the biological functions of TIP-1, especially in cell transformation and tumor progression, are still controversial as observed in a variety of cell types. In this study, we have identified ARHGEF7, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for Rho GTPases, as one novel TIP-1 interacting protein in human glioblastoma cells. We found that the presence of TIP-1 protein is essential to the intracellular redistribution of ARHGEF7 and rhotekin, one Rho effector, and the spatiotemporally coordinated activation of Rho GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1) in migrating glioblastoma cells. TIP-1 knockdown resulted in both aberrant localization of ARHGEF7 and rhotekin, as well as abnormal activation of Rho GTPases that was accompanied with impaired motility of glioblastoma cells. Furthermore, TIP-1 knockdown suppressed tumor cell dispersal in orthotopic glioblastoma murine models. We also observed high levels of TIP-1 expression in human glioblastoma specimens, and the elevated TIP-1 levels are associated with advanced staging and poor prognosis in glioma patients. Although more studies are needed to further dissect the mechanism(s) by which TIP-1 modulates the intracellular redistribution and activation of Rho GTPases, this study suggests that TIP-1 holds potential as both a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target of malignant gliomas. PMID:23563176

  3. The Wnt Frizzled Receptor MOM-5 Regulates the UNC-5 Netrin Receptor through Small GTPase-Dependent Signaling to Determine the Polarity of Migrating Cells

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Strumpf, Naomi; Krizus, Meghan; Zheng, Hong; Brown, Louise; Culotti, Joseph G.

    2015-01-01

    Wnt and Netrin signaling regulate diverse essential functions. Using a genetic approach combined with temporal gene expression analysis, we found a regulatory link between the Wnt receptor MOM-5/Frizzled and the UNC-6/Netrin receptor UNC-5. These two receptors play key roles in guiding cell and axon migrations, including the migration of the C. elegans Distal Tip Cells (DTCs). DTCs migrate post-embryonically in three sequential phases: in the first phase along the Antero-Posterior (A/P) axis, in the second, along the Dorso-Ventral (D/V) axis, and in the third, along the A/P axis. Loss of MOM-5/Frizzled function causes third phase A/P polarity reversals of the migrating DTCs. We show that an over-expression of UNC-5 causes similar DTC A/P polarity reversals and that unc-5 deficits markedly suppress the A/P polarity reversals caused by mutations in mom-5/frizzled. This implicates MOM-5/Frizzled as a negative regulator of unc-5. We provide further evidence that small GTPases mediate MOM-5’s regulation of unc-5 such that one outcome of impaired function of small GTPases like CED-10/Rac and MIG-2/RhoG is an increase in unc-5 function. The work presented here demonstrates the existence of cross talk between components of the Netrin and Wnt signaling pathways and provides further insights into the way guidance signaling mechanisms are integrated to orchestrate directed cell migration. PMID:26292279

  4. IMPACT Is a Developmentally Regulated Protein in Neurons That Opposes the Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 2α Kinase GCN2 in the modulation of Neurite Outgrowth*

    PubMed Central

    Roffé, Martín; Hajj, Glaucia N. M.; Azevedo, Hátylas F.; Alves, Viviane S.; Castilho, Beatriz A.

    2013-01-01

    The product of the mouse Imprinted and Ancient gene, IMPACT, is preferentially expressed in neurons. We have previously shown that IMPACT overexpression inhibits the activation of the protein kinase GCN2, which signals amino acid starvation. GCN2 phosphorylates the α-subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), resulting in inhibition of general protein synthesis but increased translation of specific messages, such as ATF4. GCN2 is also involved in the regulation of neuronal functions, controlling synaptic plasticity, memory, and feeding behavior. We show here that IMPACT abundance increases during differentiation of neurons and neuron-like N2a cells, whereas GCN2 displays lowered activation levels. Upon differentiation, IMPACT associates with translating ribosomes, enhances translation initiation, and down-regulates the expression of ATF4. We further show that endogenous IMPACT promotes neurite outgrowth whereas GCN2 is a strong inhibitor of spontaneous neuritogenesis. Together, these results uncover the participation of the GCN2-IMPACT module of translational regulation in a highly controlled step in the development of the nervous system. PMID:23447528

  5. IMPACT is a developmentally regulated protein in neurons that opposes the eukaryotic initiation factor 2α kinase GCN2 in the modulation of neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Roffé, Martín; Hajj, Glaucia N M; Azevedo, Hátylas F; Alves, Viviane S; Castilho, Beatriz A

    2013-04-12

    The product of the mouse Imprinted and Ancient gene, IMPACT, is preferentially expressed in neurons. We have previously shown that IMPACT overexpression inhibits the activation of the protein kinase GCN2, which signals amino acid starvation. GCN2 phosphorylates the α-subunit of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α), resulting in inhibition of general protein synthesis but increased translation of specific messages, such as ATF4. GCN2 is also involved in the regulation of neuronal functions, controlling synaptic plasticity, memory, and feeding behavior. We show here that IMPACT abundance increases during differentiation of neurons and neuron-like N2a cells, whereas GCN2 displays lowered activation levels. Upon differentiation, IMPACT associates with translating ribosomes, enhances translation initiation, and down-regulates the expression of ATF4. We further show that endogenous IMPACT promotes neurite outgrowth whereas GCN2 is a strong inhibitor of spontaneous neuritogenesis. Together, these results uncover the participation of the GCN2-IMPACT module of translational regulation in a highly controlled step in the development of the nervous system. PMID:23447528

  6. Approaches of targeting Rho GTPases in cancer drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rho GTPases are master regulators of actomyosin structure and dynamics and play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes including cell morphology, gene transcription, cell cycle progression and cell adhesion. Because aberrant Rho GTPase signaling activities are widely associated with human cancer, key components of Rho GTPase signaling pathways have attracted increasing interest as potential therapeutic targets. Similar to Ras, Rho GTPases themselves were, until recently, deemed “undruggable” because of structure-function considerations. Several approaches to interfere with Rho GTPase signaling have been explored and show promise as new ways for tackling cancer cells. Areas covered This review focuses on the recent progress in targeting the signaling activities of three prototypical Rho GTPases, i.e. RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. The authors describe the involvement of these Rho GTPases, their key regulators and effectors in cancer. Furthermore, the authors discuss the current approaches for rationally targeting aberrant Rho GTPases along their signaling cascades, upstream and downstream of Rho GTPases and posttranslational modifications at a molecular level. Expert opinion To date, while no clinically effective drugs targeting Rho GTPase signaling for cancer treatment are available, tool compounds and lead drugs that pharmacologically inhibit Rho GTPase pathways have shown promise. Small molecule inhibitors targeting Rho GTPase signaling may add new treatment options for future precision cancer therapy, particularly in combination with other anti-cancer agents. PMID:26087073

  7. Mitogen-activated protein kinases regulate expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and neurite outgrowth via non-classical retinoic acid receptor signaling in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Fujibayashi, Tatsuya; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Shudo, Koichi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown that retinoic acid receptor (RAR) stimulation by an agonist Am80 recruits nitric oxide-dependent signaling via increased expression of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in rat midbrain slice cultures. Using neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, here we investigated the mechanisms of RAR-induced nNOS expression, together with relationship between nNOS expression and neurite outgrowth. Am80 promoted neurite outgrowth, which was attenuated by inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K; LY294002), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK; SP600125) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK; SB203580). A selective nNOS inhibitor 3-bromo-nitroindazole also suppressed Am80-induced neurite outgrowth. Am80-induced increase in nNOS protein expression was attenuated by LY294002, SP600125 and SB203580, whereas increase in nNOS mRNA expression was attenuated only by LY294002. Am80-induced activation of JNK and p38 MAPK was blocked by LY294002, suggesting that these kinases acted downstream of PI3K. We also confirmed that DAX1, a nuclear receptor reported to regulate nNOS expression, was up-regulated in response to Am80. siRNA-mediated knockdown of DAX1 abrogated Am80-induced nNOS expression and neurite outgrowth. These results reveal for the first time that nNOS expression is crucial for RAR-mediated neurite outgrowth, and that non-genomic signaling such as JNK and p38 MAPK is involved in RAR-mediated nNOS expression. PMID:26422672

  8. Regulation of neuronal high-voltage activated Ca(V)2 Ca(2+) channels by the small GTPase RhoA.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Matthieu; Cens, Thierry; Menard, Claudine; Bowerman, Melissa; Bellis, Michel; Brusés, Juan; Raoul, Cedric; Scamps, Frédérique; Charnet, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    High-Voltage-Activated (HVA) Ca(2+) channels are known regulators of synapse formation and transmission and play fundamental roles in neuronal pathophysiology. Small GTPases of Rho and RGK families, via their action on both cytoskeleton and Ca(2+) channels are key molecules for these processes. While the effects of RGK GTPases on neuronal HVA Ca(2+) channels have been widely studied, the effects of RhoA on the HVA channels remains however elusive. Using heterologous expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we show that RhoA activity reduces Ba(2+) currents through CaV2.1, CaV2.2 and CaV2.3 Ca(2+) channels independently of CaVβ subunit. This inhibition occurs independently of RGKs activity and without modification of biophysical properties and global level of expression of the channel subunit. Instead, we observed a marked decrease in the number of active channels at the plasma membrane. Pharmacological and expression studies suggest that channel expression at the plasma membrane is impaired via a ROCK-sensitive pathway. Expression of constitutively active RhoA in primary culture of spinal motoneurons also drastically reduced HVA Ca(2+) current amplitude. Altogether our data revealed that HVA Ca(2+) channels regulation by RhoA might govern synaptic transmission during development and potentially contribute to pathophysiological processes when axon regeneration and growth cone kinetics are impaired. PMID:26044639

  9. RabGEF1/Rabex-5 Regulates TrkA-Mediated Neurite Outgrowth and NMDA-Induced Signaling Activation in NGF-Differentiated PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tam, See-Ying; Lilla, Jennifer N.; Chen, Ching-Cheng; Kalesnikoff, Janet; Tsai, Mindy

    2015-01-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) binds to its cognate receptor TrkA and induces neuronal differentiation by activating distinct downstream signal transduction events. RabGEF1 (also known as Rabex-5) is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rab5, which regulates early endosome fusion and vesicular trafficking in endocytic pathways. Here, we used the antisense (AS) expression approach to induce an NGF-dependent sustained knockdown of RabGEF1 protein expression in stable PC12 transfectants. We show that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced neurite outgrowth and modulates other cellular and signaling processes that are activated by the interaction of NGF with TrkA receptors, such as cell cycle progression, cessation of proliferation, and activation of NGF-mediated downstream signaling responses. Moreover, RabGEF1 can bind to Rac1, and the activation of Rac1 upon NGF treatment is significantly enhanced in AS transfectants, suggesting that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of NGF-induced Rac1 activation in PC12 cells. Furthermore, we show that RabGEF1 can also interact with NMDA receptors by binding to the NR2B subunit and its associated binding partner SynGAP, and negatively regulates activation of nitric oxide synthase activity induced by NMDA receptor stimulation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. Our data suggest that RabGEF1 is a negative regulator of TrkA-dependent neuronal differentiation and of NMDA receptor-mediated signaling activation in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. PMID:26588713

  10. RhoGDI-1 modulation of the activity of monomeric RhoGTPase RhoA regulates endothelial barrier function in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Gorovoy, Matvey; Neamu, Radu; Niu, Jiaxin; Vogel, Stephen; Predescu, Dan; Miyoshi, Jun; Takai, Yoshimi; Kini, Vidisha; Mehta, Dolly; Malik, Asrar B; Voyno-Yasenetskaya, Tatyana

    2007-07-01

    Rho family GTPases have been implicated in the regulation of endothelial permeability via their actions on actin cytoskeletal organization and integrity of interendothelial junctions. In cell culture studies, activation of RhoA disrupts interendothelial junctions and increases endothelial permeability, whereas activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 enhances endothelial barrier function by promoting the formation of restrictive junctions. The primary regulators of Rho proteins, guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitors (GDIs), form a complex with the GDP-bound form of the Rho family of monomeric G proteins, and thus may serve as a nodal point regulating the activation state of RhoGTPases. In the present study, we addressed the in vivo role of RhoGDI-1 in regulating pulmonary microvascular permeability using RhoGDI-1(-/-) mice. We observed that basal endothelial permeability in lungs of RhoGDI-1(-/-) mice was 2-fold greater than wild-type mice. This was the result of opening of interendothelial junctions in lung microvessels which are normally sealed. The activity of RhoA (but not of Rac1 or Cdc42) was significantly increased in RhoGDI-1(-/-) lungs as well as in cultured endothelial cells on downregulation of RhoGDI-1 with siRNA, consistent with RhoGDI-1-mediated modulation RhoA activity. Thus, RhoGDI-1 by repressing RhoA activity regulates lung microvessel endothelial barrier function in vivo. In this regard, therapies augmenting endothelial RhoGDI-1 function may be beneficial in reestablishing the endothelial barrier and lung fluid balance in lung inflammatory diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:17525371

  11. Colletotrichum orbiculare Regulates Cell Cycle G1/S Progression via a Two-Component GAP and a GTPase to Establish Plant Infection[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis in filamentous fungi depends on appropriate cell cycle progression. Here, we report that cells of the cucumber anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum orbiculare regulate G1/S progression via a two-component GAP, consisting of Budding-uninhibited-by-benomyl-2 (Bub2) and Byr-four-alike-1 (Bfa1) as well as its GTPase Termination-of-M-phase-1 (Tem1) to establish successful infection. In a random insertional mutagenesis screen of infection-related morphogenesis, we isolated a homolog of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, BUB2, which encodes a two-component Rab GAP protein that forms a GAP complex with Bfa1p and negatively regulates mitotic exit. Interestingly, disruption of either Co BUB2 or Co BFA1 resulted in earlier onset of nuclear division and decreased the time of phase progression from G1 to S during appressorium development. S. cerevisiae GTPase Tem1p is the downstream target of the Bub2p/Bfa1p GAP complex. Introducing the dominant-negative form of Co Tem1 into Co bub2Δ or Co bfa1Δ complemented the defect in G1/S progression, indicating that Co Bub2/Co Bfa1 regulates G1/S progression via Co Tem1. Based on a pathogenicity assay, we found that Co bub2Δ and Co bfa1Δ reduced pathogenesis by attenuating infection-related morphogenesis and enhancing the plant defense response. Thus, during appressorium development, C. orbiculare Bub2/Bfa1 regulates G1/S progression via Co Tem1, and this regulation is essential to establish plant infection. PMID:26320225

  12. MglC, a Paralog of Myxococcus xanthus GTPase-Activating Protein MglB, Plays a Divergent Role in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    McLoon, Anna L.; Wuichet, Kristin; Häsler, Michael; Keilberg, Daniela; Szadkowski, Dobromir

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In order to optimize interactions with their environment and one another, bacteria regulate their motility. In the case of the rod-shaped cells of Myxococcus xanthus, regulated motility is essential for social behaviors. M. xanthus moves over surfaces using type IV pilus-dependent motility and gliding motility. These two motility systems are coordinated by a protein module that controls cell polarity and consists of three polarly localized proteins, the small G protein MglA, the cognate MglA GTPase-activating protein MglB, and the response regulator RomR. Cellular reversals are induced by the Frz chemosensory system, and the output response regulator of this system, FrzZ, interfaces with the MglA/MglB/RomR module to invert cell polarity. Using a computational approach, we identify a paralog of MglB, MXAN_5770 (MglC). Genetic epistasis experiments demonstrate that MglC functions in the same pathway as MglA, MglB, RomR, and FrzZ and is important for regulating cellular reversals. Like MglB, MglC localizes to the cell poles asymmetrically and with a large cluster at the lagging pole. Correct polar localization of MglC depends on RomR and MglB. Consistently, MglC interacts directly with MglB and the C-terminal output domain of RomR, and we identified a surface of MglC that is necessary for the interaction with MglB and for MglC function. Together, our findings identify an additional member of the M. xanthus polarity module involved in regulating motility and demonstrate how gene duplication followed by functional divergence can add a layer of control to the complex cellular processes of motility and motility regulation. IMPORTANCE Gene duplication and the subsequent divergence of the duplicated genes are important evolutionary mechanisms for increasing both biological complexity and regulation of biological processes. The bacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a soil bacterium with an unusually large genome that carries out several social processes, including

  13. A Pan-GTPase Inhibitor as a Molecular Probe

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Lin; Guo, Yuna; BasuRay, Soumik; Agola, Jacob O.; Romero, Elsa; Simpson, Denise S.; Schroeder, Chad E.; Simons, Peter; Waller, Anna; Garcia, Matthew; Carter, Mark; Ursu, Oleg; Gouveia, Kristine; Golden, Jennifer E.; Aubé, Jeffrey; Wandinger-Ness, Angela; Sklar, Larry A.

    2015-01-01

    Overactive GTPases have often been linked to human diseases. The available inhibitors are limited and have not progressed far in clinical trials. We report here a first-in-class small molecule pan-GTPase inhibitor discovered from a high throughput screening campaign. The compound CID1067700 inhibits multiple GTPases in biochemical, cellular protein and protein interaction, as well as cellular functional assays. In the biochemical and protein interaction assays, representative GTPases from Rho, Ras, and Rab, the three most generic subfamilies of the GTPases, were probed, while in the functional assays, physiological processes regulated by each of the three subfamilies of the GTPases were examined. The chemical functionalities essential for the activity of the compound were identified through structural derivatization. The compound is validated as a useful molecular probe upon which GTPase-targeting inhibitors with drug potentials might be developed. PMID:26247207

  14. Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 interacts with p21-activated kinase 6 to control neurite complexity in mammalian brain.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Cirnaru, Maria Daniela; Beilina, Alexandra; Rodella, Umberto; Russo, Isabella; Belluzzi, Elisa; Lobbestael, Evy; Reyniers, Lauran; Hondhamuni, Geshanthi; Lewis, Patrick A; Van den Haute, Chris; Baekelandt, Veerle; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Bubacco, Luigi; Piccoli, Giovanni; Cookson, Mark R; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Greggio, Elisa

    2015-12-01

    Leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is a causative gene for Parkinson's disease, but the physiological function and the mechanism(s) by which the cellular activity of LRRK2 is regulated are poorly understood. Here, we identified p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of the GTPase/ROC domain of LRRK2. p21-activated kinases are serine-threonine kinases that serve as targets for the small GTP binding proteins Cdc42 and Rac1 and have been implicated in different morphogenetic processes through remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton such as synapse formation and neuritogenesis. Using an in vivo neuromorphology assay, we show that PAK6 is a positive regulator of neurite outgrowth and that LRRK2 is required for this function. Analyses of post-mortem brain tissue from idiopathic and LRRK2 G2019S carriers reveal an increase in PAK6 activation state, whereas knock-out LRRK2 mice display reduced PAK6 activation and phosphorylation of PAK6 substrates. Taken together, these results support a critical role of LRRK2 GTPase domain in cytoskeletal dynamics in vivo through the novel interactor PAK6, and provide a valuable platform to unravel the mechanism underlying LRRK2-mediated pathophysiology. We propose p21-activated kinase 6 (PAK6) as a novel interactor of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2), a kinase involved in Parkinson's disease (PD). In health, PAK6 regulates neurite complexity in the brain and LRRK2 is required for its function, (a) whereas PAK6 is aberrantly activated in LRRK2-linked PD brain (b) suggesting that LRRK2 toxicity is mediated by PAK6. PMID:26375402

  15. Ras-Related Small GTPases RalA and RalB Regulate Cellular Survival After Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kidd, Ambrose R.; Snider, Jared L.; Martin, Timothy D.; Graboski, Sarah F.; Der, Channing J.; Cox, Adrienne D.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: Oncogenic activation of Ras renders cancer cells resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), but the mechanisms have not been fully characterized. The Ras-like small GTPases RalA and RalB are downstream effectors of Ras function and are critical for both tumor growth and survival. The Ral effector RalBP1/RLIP76 mediates survival of mice after whole-body irradiation, but the role of the Ral GTPases themselves in response to IR is unknown. We have investigated the role of RalA and RalB in cellular responses to IR. Methods and Materials: RalA, RalB, and their major effectors RalBP1 and Sec5 were knocked down by stable expression of short hairpin RNAs in the K-Ras-dependent pancreatic cancer-derived cell line MIA PaCa-2. Radiation responses were measured by standard clonogenic survival assays for reproductive survival, {gamma}H2AX expression for double-strand DNA breaks (DSBs), and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) cleavage for apoptosis. Results: Knockdown of K-Ras, RalA, or RalB reduced colony-forming ability post-IR, and knockdown of either Ral isoform decreased the rate of DSB repair post-IR. However, knockdown of RalB, but not RalA, increased cell death. Surprisingly, neither RalBP1 nor Sec5 suppression affected colony formation post-IR. Conclusions: Both RalA and RalB contribute to K-Ras-dependent IR resistance of MIA PaCa-2 cells. Sensitization due to suppressed Ral expression is likely due in part to decreased efficiency of DNA repair (RalA and RalB) and increased susceptibility to apoptosis (RalB). Ral-mediated radioresistance does not depend on either the RalBP1 or the exocyst complex, the two best-characterized Ral effectors, and instead may utilize an atypical or novel effector.

  16. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P.; Goody, Roger S.

    2015-07-01

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase-acryl-nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins.

  17. A tale of two GTPases in cotranslational protein targeting

    PubMed Central

    Saraogi, Ishu; Akopian, David; Shan, Shu-Ou

    2011-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) comprise a superfamily of proteins that provide molecular switches to regulate numerous cellular processes. The “GTPase switch” paradigm, in which a GTPase acts as a bimodal switch that is turned “on” and “off” by external regulatory factors, has been used to interpret the regulatory mechanism of many GTPases. Recent work on a pair of GTPases in the signal recognition particle (SRP) pathway has revealed a distinct mode of GTPase regulation. Instead of the classical GTPase switch, the two GTPases in the SRP and SRP receptor undergo a series of conformational changes during their dimerization and reciprocal activation. Each conformational rearrangement provides a point at which these GTPases can communicate with and respond to their upstream and downstream biological cues, thus ensuring the spatial and temporal precision of all the molecular events in the SRP pathway. We suggest that the SRP and SRP receptor represent an emerging class of “multistate” regulatory GTPases uniquely suited to provide exquisite control over complex cellular pathways that require multiple molecular events to occur in a highly coordinated fashion. PMID:21898651

  18. Novel Roles and Mechanism for Krüppel-like Factor 16 (KLF16) Regulation of Neurite Outgrowth and Ephrin Receptor A5 (EphA5) Expression in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Galvao, Joana; Beach, Krista M; Luo, Weijia; Urrutia, Raul A; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Otteson, Deborah C

    2016-08-26

    Regenerative medicine holds great promise for the treatment of degenerative retinal disorders. Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are transcription factors that have recently emerged as key tools in regenerative medicine because some of them can function as epigenetic reprogrammers in stem cell biology. Here, we show that KLF16, one of the least understood members of this family, is a POU4F2 independent transcription factor in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) as early as embryonic day 15. When overexpressed, KLF16 inhibits RGC neurite outgrowth and enhances RGC growth cone collapse in response to exogenous ephrinA5 ligands. Ephrin/EPH signaling regulates RGC connectivity. The EphA5 promoter contains multiple GC- and GT-rich KLF-binding sites, which, as shown by ChIP-assays, bind KLF16 in vivo In electrophoretic mobility shift assays, KLF16 binds specifically to a single KLF site near the EphA5 transcription start site that is required for KLF16 transactivation. Interestingly, methylation of only six of 98 CpG dinucleotides within the EphA5 promoter blocks its transactivation by KLF16 but enables transactivation by KLF2 and KLF15. These data demonstrate a role for KLF16 in regulation of RGC neurite outgrowth and as a methylation-sensitive transcriptional regulator of EphA5 expression. Together, these data identify differential low level methylation as a novel mechanism for regulating KLF16-mediated EphA5 expression across the retina. Because of the critical role of ephrin/EPH signaling in patterning RGC connectivity, understanding the role of KLFs in regulating neurite outgrowth and Eph receptor expression will be vital for successful restoration of functional vision through optic nerve regenerative therapies. PMID:27402841

  19. Synthesis of fusogenic lipids through activation of phospholipase D1 by GTPases and the kinase RSK2 is required for calcium-regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Nicolas

    2010-02-01

    Exocytosis of hormones occurs through the fusion of large dense-core secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. This highly regulated process involves key proteins such as SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) and also specific lipids at the site of membrane fusion. Among the different lipids required for exocytosis, our recent observations have highlighted the crucial role of PA (phosphatidic acid) in the late stages of membrane fusion in various exocytotic events. An RNAi (RNA interference) strategy coupled with the detection of PA in living cells has pointed to plasma membrane-associated PLD1 (phospholipase D(1)) as the main producer of PA in response to secretagogue stimulation. We have identified several GTPases which regulate the activation level of PLD(1) in neuroendocrine cells. Finally, RSK2 (ribosomal S6 kinase 2) appears to phosphorylate and regulate the activity of PLD(1) in a calcium-dependent manner. Altogether our results have unravelled a complex set of regulatory pathways controlling the synthesis of fusogenic lipids at the secretory granule fusion site by PLD(1). PMID:20074053

  20. Rho GTPase/Rho Kinase Negatively Regulates Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase Phosphorylation through the Inhibition of Protein Kinase B/Akt in Human Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xiu-Fen; Viswambharan, Hema; Barandier, Christine; Ruffieux, Jean; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Rusconi, Sandro; Yang, Zhihong

    2002-01-01

    Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) is an important regulator of cardiovascular homeostasis by production of nitric oxide (NO) from vascular endothelial cells. It can be activated by protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt via phosphorylation at Ser-1177. We are interested in the role of Rho GTPase/Rho kinase (ROCK) pathway in regulation of eNOS expression and activation. Using adenovirus-mediated gene transfer in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), we show here that both active RhoA and ROCK not only downregulate eNOS gene expression as reported previously but also inhibit eNOS phosphorylation at Ser-1177 and cellular NO production with concomitant suppression of PKB activation. Moreover, coexpression of a constitutive active form of PKB restores the phosphorylation but not gene expression of eNOS in the presence of active RhoA. Furthermore, we show that thrombin inhibits eNOS phosphorylation, as well as expression via Rho/ROCK pathway. Expression of the active PKB reverses eNOS phosphorylation but has no effect on downregulation of eNOS expression induced by thrombin. Taken together, these data demonstrate that Rho/ROCK pathway negatively regulates eNOS phosphorylation through inhibition of PKB, whereas it downregulates eNOS expression independent of PKB. PMID:12446767

  1. NGL-2 Regulates Pathway-Specific Neurite Growth and Lamination, Synapse Formation, and Signal Transmission in the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Kelly L.; Johnson, Robert E.; Schottler, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Parallel processing is an organizing principle of many neural circuits. In the retina, parallel neuronal pathways process signals from rod and cone photoreceptors and support vision over a wide range of light levels. Toward this end, rods and cones form triad synapses with dendrites of distinct bipolar cell types, and the axons or dendrites, respectively, of horizontal cells (HCs). The molecular cues that promote the formation of specific neuronal pathways remain largely unknown. Here, we discover that developing and mature HCs express the leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing protein netrin-G ligand 2 (NGL-2). NGL-2 localizes selectively to the tips of HC axons, which form reciprocal connections with rods. In mice with null mutations in Ngl-2 (Ngl-2−/−), many branches of HC axons fail to stratify in the outer plexiform layer (OPL) and invade the outer nuclear layer. In addition, HC axons expand lateral territories and increase coverage of the OPL, but establish fewer synapses with rods. NGL-2 can form transsynaptic adhesion complexes with netrin-G2, which we show to be expressed by photoreceptors. In Ngl-2−/− mice, we find specific defects in the assembly of presynaptic ribbons in rods, indicating that reverse signaling of complexes involving NGL-2 regulates presynaptic maturation. The development of HC dendrites and triad synapses of cone photoreceptors proceeds normally in the absence of NGL-2 and in vivo electrophysiology reveals selective defects in rod-mediated signal transmission in Ngl-2−/− mice. Thus, our results identify NGL-2 as a central component of pathway-specific development in the outer retina. PMID:23864682

  2. Redox Regulates Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Activity by Modulating the TSC1/TSC2-Rheb GTPase Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Sei; Hong, Sungki; Suzuki, Tsukasa; Nada, Shigeyuki; Mannan, Aristotle M.; Wang, Junying; Okada, Masato; Guan, Kun-Liang; Inoki, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a kinase that plays a key role in a wide array of cellular processes and exists in two distinct functional complexes, mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) and mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2). Although mTORC2 is primarily activated by growth factors, mTORC1 is regulated by numerous extracellular and intracellular signals such as nutrients, growth factors, and cellular redox. Previous study has shown that cysteine oxidants sufficiently activate mTORC1 activity under amino acid-depleted conditions and that a reducing agent effectively suppresses amino acid-induced mTORC1 activity, thereby raising the possibility that redox-sensitive mechanisms underlie amino acid-dependent mTORC1 regulation. However, the molecular mechanism by which redox regulates mTORC1 activity is not well understood. In this study, we show that the redox-sensitive regulation of mTORC1 occurs via Rheb but not the Rag small GTPase. Enhancing cellular redox potential with cysteine oxidants significantly increases Rheb GTP levels. Importantly, modulation of the cellular redox potential with a cysteine oxidant or reducing agent failed to alter mTORC1 activity in TSC1−/− or TSC2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. Furthermore, a cysteine oxidant has little effect on mTOR localization but sufficiently activates mTORC1 activity in both p18−/− and control mouse embryonic fibroblast cells, suggesting that the redox-sensitive regulation of mTORC1 occurs independent of the Ragulator·Rag complex. Taken together, our results suggest that the TSC complex plays an important role in redox-sensitive mTORC1 regulation and argues for the activation of mTORC1 in places other than the lysosome upon inhibition of the TSC complex. PMID:21784859

  3. Control of Polarized Growth by the Rho Family GTPase Rho4 in Budding Yeast: Requirement of the N-Terminal Extension of Rho4 and Regulation by the Rho GTPase-Activating Protein Bem2

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ting; Liao, Yuan; He, Fei; Yang, Yang; Yang, Dan-Dan; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2013-01-01

    In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Rho4 GTPase partially plays a redundant role with Rho3 in the control of polarized growth, as deletion of RHO4 and RHO3 together, but not RHO4 alone, caused lethality and a loss of cell polarity at 30°C. Here, we show that overexpression of the constitutively active rho4Q131L mutant in an rdi1Δ strain caused a severe growth defect and generated large, round, unbudded cells, suggesting that an excess of Rho4 activity could block bud emergence. We also generated four temperature-sensitive rho4-Ts alleles in a rho3Δ rho4Δ strain. These mutants showed growth and morphological defects at 37°C. Interestingly, two rho4-Ts alleles contain mutations that cause amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal region of Rho4. Rho4 possesses a long N-terminal extension that is unique among the six Rho GTPases in the budding yeast but is common in Rho4 homologs in other yeasts and filamentous fungi. We show that the N-terminal extension plays an important role in Rho4 function since rho3Δ rho4Δ61 cells expressing truncated Rho4 lacking amino acids (aa) 1 to 61 exhibited morphological defects at 24°C and a growth defect at 37°C. Furthermore, we show that Rho4 interacts with Bem2, a Rho GTPase-activating protein (RhoGAP) for Cdc42 and Rho1, by yeast two-hybrid, bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) pulldown assays. Bem2 specifically interacts with the GTP-bound form of Rho4, and the interaction is mediated by its RhoGAP domain. Overexpression of BEM2 aggravates the defects of rho3Δ rho4 mutants. These results suggest that Bem2 might be a novel GAP for Rho4. PMID:23264647

  4. Roles of actin filaments and three second-messenger systems in short-term regulation of chick dorsal root ganglion neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Lankford, K L; Letourneau, P C

    1991-01-01

    In a previous study (J. Cell Biol. 109: 1229-1243, 1989), we reported that conditions which increased growth cone calcium levels and induced neurite retraction in cultured chick DRG neurons also resulted in an apparent loss of actin filaments in the growth cone periphery. We further showed that the actin-stabilizing drug phalloidin could block or reverse calcium-ionophore-induced neurite retraction, indicating that the behavioral changes were mediated, at least in part, by changes in actin filament stability. In this study, we have further characterized the calcium sensitivity of growth cone behavior to identify which features of calcium-induced behavioral effects can be attributed to effects on actin filaments alone, and to assess whether two other second-messenger systems, cAMP and protein kinase C, might influence neurite outgrowth by altering calcium levels or actin stability. The results indicated that growth cone behavior was highly sensitive to small changes in calcium concentrations. Neurite outgrowth was only observed in calcium-permeabilized cells when extracellular calcium concentrations were between 200 and 300 nM, and changes as small as 50 nM commonly produced detectable changes in behavior. Furthermore, low doses of cytochalasins mimicked all of the grossly observable features of growth cone responses to elevation of intracellular calcium, including the apparent preferential destruction of lamellipodial actin filaments and sparing of filopodial actin, suggesting that the behavioral effects of calcium elevation could be explained by loss of actin filaments alone. The effects of cAMP elevation and protein kinase C activation on growth cone behavior, ultrastructure, and fura2-AM-measured calcium levels indicated that the effects of cAMP manipulations could be partially explained by a cAMP-induced lowering of growth cone calcium levels and concomitant increased stabilization of actin filaments, but protein kinase C appeared to act through an independent

  5. Arf GTPase-activating Protein ASAP1 Interacts with Rab11 Effector FIP3 and Regulates Pericentrosomal Localization of Transferrin Receptor–positive Recycling Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroki; Ha, Vi Luan; Prekeris, Rytis

    2008-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs) and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are key regulators of membrane trafficking and the actin cytoskeleton. The Arf GAP ASAP1 contains an N-terminal BAR domain, which can induce membrane tubulation. Here, we report that the BAR domain of ASAP1 can also function as a protein binding site. Two-hybrid screening identified FIP3, which is a putative Arf6- and Rab11-effector, as a candidate ASAP1 BAR domain-binding protein. Both coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro pulldown assays confirmed that ASAP1 directly binds to FIP3 through its BAR domain. ASAP1 formed a ternary complex with Rab11 through FIP3. FIP3 binding to the BAR domain stimulated ASAP1 GAP activity against Arf1, but not Arf6. ASAP1 colocalized with FIP3 in the pericentrosomal endocytic recycling compartment. Depletion of ASAP1 or FIP3 by small interfering RNA changed the localization of transferrin receptor, which is a marker of the recycling endosome, in HeLa cells. The depletion also altered the trafficking of endocytosed transferrin. These results support the conclusion that ASAP1, like FIP3, functions as a component of the endocytic recycling compartment. PMID:18685082

  6. The ARF-Like GTPase ARFRP1 Is Essential for Lipid Droplet Growth and Is Involved in the Regulation of Lipolysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Angela; Hesse, Deike; Völker, Wolfgang; Jaschke, Alexander; Moser, Markus; Engel, Thomas; Blüher, Matthias; Zahn, Claudia; Chadt, Alexandra; Ruschke, Karen; Vogel, Heike; Kluge, Reinhart; Robenek, Horst; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)-related protein 1 (ARFRP1) is a GTPase regulating protein trafficking between intracellular organelles. Here we show that mice lacking Arfrp1 in adipocytes (Arfrp1ad−/−) are lipodystrophic due to a defective lipid droplet formation in adipose cells. Ratios of mono-, di-, and triacylglycerol, as well as the fatty acid composition of triglycerides, were unaltered. Lipid droplets of brown adipocytes of Arfrp1ad−/− mice were considerably smaller and exhibited ultrastructural alterations, such as a disturbed interaction of small lipid-loaded particles with the larger droplets, suggesting that ARFRP1 mediates the transfer of newly formed small lipid particles to the large storage droplets. SNAP23 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa) associated with small lipid droplets of control adipocytes but was located predominantly in the cytosol of Arfrp1ad−/− adipocytes, suggesting that lipid droplet growth is defective in Arfrp1ad−/− mice. In addition, levels of phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were elevated, and association of adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL) with lipid droplets was enhanced in brown adipose tissue from Arfrp1ad−/− mice. Accordingly, basal lipolysis was increased after knockdown of Arfrp1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The data indicate that disruption of ARFRP1 prevents the normal enlargement of lipid droplets and produces an activation of lipolysis. PMID:20038528

  7. The Rho-GTPase effector ROCK regulates meiotic maturation of the bovine oocyte via myosin light chain phosphorylation and cofilin phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Rim; Xu, Yong-Nan; Jo, Yu-Jin; Namgoong, Suk; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2015-11-01

    Oocyte meiosis involves a unique asymmetric division involving spindle movement from the central cytoplasm to the cortex, followed by polar body extrusion. ROCK is a Rho-GTPase effector involved in various cellular functions in somatic cells as well as oocyte meiosis. ROCK was previously shown to promote actin organization by phosphorylating several downstream targets, including LIM domain kinase (LIMK), phosphorylated cofilin (p-cofilin), and myosin light chain (MLC). In this study, we investigated the roles of ROCK and MLC during bovine oocyte meiosis. We found that ROCK was localized around the nucleus at the oocyte's germinal-vesicle (GV) stage, but spreads to the rest of the cytoplasm in later developmental stages. On the other hand, phosphorylated MLC (p-MLC) localized at the cortex, and its abundance decreased by the metaphase-II stage. Disrupting ROCK activity, via RNAi or the chemical inhibitor Y-27632, blocked both cell cycle progression and polar body extrusion. ROCK inhibition also resulted in decreased cortical actin, p-cofilin, and p-MLC levels. Similar to the phenotype associated with inhibition of ROCK activity, inhibition of MLC kinase by the chemical inhibitor ML-7 caused defects in polar body extrusion. Collectively, our results suggest that the ROCK/MLC/actomyosin as well as ROCK/LIMK/cofilin pathways regulate meiotic spindle migration and cytokinesis during bovine oocyte maturation. PMID:26175189

  8. MERTK signaling in the retinal pigment epithelium regulates the tyrosine phosphorylation of GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha from the GDI/CHM family of RAB GTPase effectors.

    PubMed

    Shelby, Shameka J; Feathers, Kecia L; Ganios, Anna M; Jia, Lin; Miller, Jason M; Thompson, Debra A

    2015-11-01

    Photoreceptor outer segments (OS) in the vertebrate retina undergo a process of continual renewal involving shedding of disc membranes that are cleared by phagocytic uptake into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In dystrophic Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats, OS phagocytosis is blocked by a mutation in the gene encoding the receptor tyrosine kinase MERTK. To identify proteins tyrosine-phosphorylated downstream of MERTK in the RPE, MALDI-mass spectrometry with peptide-mass fingerprinting was used in comparative studies of RCS congenic and dystrophic rats. At times corresponding to peak phagocytic activity, the RAB GTPase effector GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (GDI1) was found to undergo tyrosine phosphorylation only in congenic rats. In cryosections of native RPE/choroid, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and the intracellular tyrosine-kinase SRC. In cultured RPE-J cells, and in transfected heterologous cells, MERTK stimulated SRC-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of GDI1. In OS-fed RPE-J cells, GDI1 colocalized with MERTK and SRC on apparent phagosomes located near the apical membrane. In addition, both GDI1 and RAB5, a regulator of vesicular transport, colocalized with ingested OS. Taken together, these findings identify a novel role of MERTK signaling in membrane trafficking in the RPE that is likely to subserve mechanisms of phagosome formation. PMID:26283020

  9. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Shimazu, Sayuri; Takegawa, Kaoru; Noguchi, Tetsuko; Miyamoto, Masaaki

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  10. Regulation of gene expression by the small GTPase Rho through the ERK6 (p38γ) MAP kinase pathway

    PubMed Central

    Marinissen, Maria Julia; Chiariello, Mario; Gutkind, J. Silvio

    2001-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins of the Rho-family, Rho, Rac, and Cdc42, have been traditionally linked to the regulation of the cellular actin-based cytoskeleton. Rac and Cdc42 can also control the activity of JNK, thus acting in a molecular pathway transmitting extracellular signals to the nucleus. Interestingly, Rho can also regulate gene expression, albeit by a not fully understood mechanism. Here, we found that activated RhoA can stimulate c-jun expression and the activity of the c-jun promoter. As the complexity of the signaling pathways controlling the expression of c-jun has begun to be unraveled, this finding provided a unique opportunity to elucidate the biochemical routes whereby RhoA regulates nuclear events. We found that RhoA can initiate a linear kinase cascade leading to the activation of ERK6 (p38γ), a recently identified member of the p38 family of MAPKs. Furthermore, we present evidence that RhoA, PKN, MKK3/MKK6, and ERK6 (p38γ) are components of a novel signal transduction pathway involved in the regulation of gene expression and cellular transformation. PMID:11238375

  11. Juvenile Hormone Regulates the Expression of Drosophila Epac– a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Rap1 Small GTPase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The juvenile hormones (JH) are a key group of insect hormones involved in regulating larval development and adult reproductive processes. Although well-studied from the physiological standpoint, the molecular actions of JH remain unclear. Using cDNA microchip array technology, we previously identifi...

  12. GIT1 enhances neurite outgrowth by stimulating microtubule assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi-sheng; Qin, Li-xia; Liu, Jie; Xia, Wei-liang; Li, Jian-ping; Shen, Hai-lian; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    GIT1, a G-protein-coupled receptor kinase interacting protein, has been reported to be involved in neurite outgrowth. However, the neurobiological functions of the protein remain unclear. In this study, we found that GIT1 was highly expressed in the nervous system, and its expression was maintained throughout all stages of neuritogenesis in the brain. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons from GIT1 knockout mice, there was a significant reduction in total neurite length per neuron, as well as in the average length of axon-like structures, which could not be prevented by nerve growth factor treatment. Overexpression of GIT1 significantly promoted axon growth and fully rescued the axon outgrowth defect in the primary hippocampal neuron cultures from GIT1 knockout mice. The GIT1 N terminal region, including the ADP ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein domain, the ankyrin domains and the Spa2 homology domain, were sufficient to enhance axonal extension. Importantly, GIT1 bound to many tubulin proteins and microtubule-associated proteins, and it accelerated microtubule assembly in vitro. Collectively, our findings suggest that GIT1 promotes neurite outgrowth, at least partially by stimulating microtubule assembly. This study provides new insight into the cellular and molecular pathogenesis of GIT1-associated neurological diseases. PMID:27127481

  13. Rho GTPase signalling in cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Ridley, Anne J

    2015-01-01

    Cells migrate in multiple different ways depending on their environment, which includes the extracellular matrix composition, interactions with other cells, and chemical stimuli. For all types of cell migration, Rho GTPases play a central role, although the relative contribution of each Rho GTPase depends on the environment and cell type. Here, I review recent advances in our understanding of how Rho GTPases contribute to different types of migration, comparing lamellipodium-driven versus bleb-driven migration modes. I also describe how cells migrate across the endothelium. In addition to Rho, Rac and Cdc42, which are well known to regulate migration, I discuss the roles of other less-well characterized members of the Rho family. PMID:26363959

  14. GTP Hydrolysis of TC10 Promotes Neurite Outgrowth through Exocytic Fusion of Rab11- and L1-Containing Vesicles by Releasing Exocyst Component Exo70

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Akane; Koinuma, Shingo; Yasuda, Sayaka; Nagai, Hiroyuki; Kamiguchi, Hiroyuki; Wada, Naoyuki; Nakamura, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    The use of exocytosis for membrane expansion at nerve growth cones is critical for neurite outgrowth. TC10 is a Rho family GTPase that is essential for specific types of vesicular trafficking to the plasma membrane. Recent studies have shown that TC10 and its effector Exo70, a component of the exocyst tethering complex, contribute to neurite outgrowth. However, the molecular mechanisms of the neuritogenesis-promoting functions of TC10 remain to be established. Here, we propose that GTP hydrolysis of vesicular TC10 near the plasma membrane promotes neurite outgrowth by accelerating vesicle fusion by releasing Exo70. Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based biosensors, we show that TC10 activity at the plasma membrane decreased at extending growth cones in hippocampal neurons and nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC12 cells. In neuronal cells, TC10 activity at vesicles was higher than its activity at the plasma membrane, and TC10-positive vesicles were found to fuse to the plasma membrane in NGF-treated PC12 cells. Therefore, activity of TC10 at vesicles is presumed to be inactivated near the plasma membrane during neuronal exocytosis. Our model is supported by functional evidence that constitutively active TC10 could not rescue decrease in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth induced by TC10 depletion. Furthermore, TC10 knockdown experiments and colocalization analyses confirmed the involvement of Exo70 in TC10-mediated trafficking in neuronal cells. TC10 frequently resided on vesicles containing Rab11, which is a key regulator of recycling pathways and implicated in neurite outgrowth. In growth cones, most of the vesicles containing the cell adhesion molecule L1 had TC10. Exocytosis of Rab11- and L1-positive vesicles may play a central role in TC10-mediated neurite outgrowth. The combination of this study and our previous work on the role of TC10 in EGF-induced exocytosis in HeLa cells suggests that the signaling machinery containing TC10 proposed here may be

  15. Co-regulation of root hair tip growth by ROP GTPases and nitrogen source modulated pH fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Daria; Monshausen, Gabriele; Gilroy, Simon; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-03-01

    Growth of plant cells involves tight regulation of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking by processes including the action of the ROP small G proteins together with pH-modulated cell wall modifications. Yet, little is known on how these systems are coordinated. In a paper recently published in Plant Cell and Environment we show that ROPs/RACs function synergistically with NH4NO3-modulated pH fluctuations to regulate root hair growth. Root hairs expand exclusively at their apical end in a strictly polarized manner by a process known as tip growth. The highly polarized secretion at the apex is maintained by a complex network of factors including the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton, tip-focused ion gradients and by small G proteins. Expression of constitutively active ROP mutants disrupts polar growth, inducing the formation of swollen root hairs. Root hairs are also known to elongate in an oscillating manner, which is correlated with oscillatory H(+) fluxes at the tip. Our analysis shows that root hair elongation in wild type plants and swelling in transgenic plants expressing a constitutively active ROP11 (rop11(CA)) is sensitive to the presence of NH4(+) at concentrations higher than 1 mM and on NO3(-). The NH4(+) and NO3(-) ions did not affect the localization of ROP in the membrane but modulated pH fluctuations at the root hair tip. Actin organization and reactive oxygen species distribution were abnormal in rop11CA root hairs but were similar to wild type root hairs when seedlings were grown on medium lacking NH4(+) and / or NO3(-). These observations suggest that the nitrogen source-modulated pH fluctuations may function synergistically with ROP regulated signaling during root hair tip growth. Interestingly, under certain growth conditions, expression of rop11 (CA) suppressed ammonium toxicity, similar to auxin resistant mutants. In this Addendum article we discuss these findings and their implications. PMID:21673509

  16. GTPase Activating Protein (Sh3 Domain) Binding Protein 1 Regulates the Processing of MicroRNA-1 during Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    He, Minzhen; Yang, Zhi; Abdellatif, Maha; Sayed, Danish

    2015-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miR) are small, posttranscriptional regulators, expressed as part of a longer primary transcript, following which they undergo nuclear and cytoplasmic processing by Drosha and Dicer, respectively, to form the functional mature ~20mer that gets incorporated into the silencing complex. Others and we have shown that mature miR-1 levels decrease with pressure-induced cardiac hypertrophy, however, there is little or no change in the primary transcript encompassing miR-1 stem-loop, suggesting critical regulatory step in microRNA processing. The objective of this study was to investigate the underlying mechanisms regulating miR-1 expression in cardiomyocytes. Results Here we report that GTPase–activating protein (SH3 domain) binding protein 1 (G3bp1), an endoribonuclease regulates miR-1 processing in cardiomyocytes. G3bp1 is upregulated during cardiac hypertrophy and restricts miR-1 processing by binding to its consensus sequence in the pre-miR-1-2 stem-loop. In accordance, exogenous G3bp1 is sufficient to reduce miR-1 levels, along with derepression of miR-1 targets; General transcription factor IIB (Gtf2b), cyclin dependent factor 9 (Cdk9) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E (Eif4e). While Cdk9 and Gtf2b are essential for transcription, Eif4e is required for translation. Thus, downregulation of miR-1 is necessary for increase in these molecules. Similar to miR-1 knockdown, G3bp1 overexpression is not sufficient for development of cardiac hypertrophy. Conversely, knockdown of G3bp1 in hypertrophying cardiomyocytes inhibited downregulation of miR-1 and upregulation of its targets along with restricted hypertrophy, suggesting that G3bp1 is necessary for development of cardiac hypertrophy. These results indicate that G3bp1-mediated inhibition of miR-1 processing with growth stimulation results in decrease in mature miR-1 and, thereby, an increase of its targets, which play fundamental roles in the development of hypertrophy. Conclusion G3bp1

  17. Actin cytoskeleton-dependent Rab GTPase-regulated angiotensin type I receptor lysosomal degradation studied by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hewang; Yu, Peiying; Sun, Yuansheng; Felder, Robin A.; Periasamy, Ammasi; Jose, Pedro A.

    2010-09-01

    The dynamic regulation of the cellular trafficking of human angiotensin (Ang) type 1 receptor (AT1R) is not well understood. Therefore, we investigated the cellular trafficking of AT1R-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) (AT1R-EGFP) heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells by determining the change in donor lifetime (AT1R-EGFP) in the presence or absence of acceptor(s) using fluorescence lifetime imaging-fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) microscopy. The average lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in our donor-alone samples was ~2.33 ns. The basal state lifetime was shortened slightly in the presence of Rab5 (2.01+/-0.10 ns) or Rab7 (2.11+/-0.11 ns) labeled with Alexa 555, as the acceptor fluorophore. A 5-min Ang II treatment markedly shortened the lifetime of AT1R-EGFP in the presence of Rab5-Alexa 555 (1.78+/-0.31 ns) but was affected minimally in the presence of Rab7-Alexa 555 (2.09+/-0.37 ns). A 30-min Ang II treatment further decreased the AT1R-EGFP lifetime in the presence of both Rab5- and Rab7-Alexa 555. Latrunculin A but not nocodazole pretreatment blocked the ability of Ang II to shorten the AT1R-EGFP lifetime. The occurrence of FRET between AT1R-EGFP (donor) and LAMP1-Alexa 555 (acceptor) with Ang II stimulation was impaired by photobleaching the acceptor. These studies demonstrate that Ang II-induced AT1R lysosomal degradation through its association with LAMP1 is regulated by Rab5/7 via mechanisms that are dependent on intact actin cytoskeletons.

  18. The dynamics of spatio-temporal Rho GTPase signaling: formation of signaling patterns

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Rafael Dominik; Pertz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases are crucial signaling molecules that regulate a plethora of biological functions. Traditional biochemical, cell biological, and genetic approaches have founded the basis of Rho GTPase biology. The development of biosensors then allowed measuring Rho GTPase activity with unprecedented spatio-temporal resolution. This revealed that Rho GTPase activity fluctuates on time and length scales of tens of seconds and micrometers, respectively. In this review, we describe Rho GTPase activity patterns observed in different cell systems. We then discuss the growing body of evidence that upstream regulators such as guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins shape these patterns by precisely controlling the spatio-temporal flux of Rho GTPase activity. Finally, we comment on additional mechanisms that might feed into the regulation of these signaling patterns and on novel technologies required to dissect this spatio-temporal complexity. PMID:27158467

  19. Phosphorylation-dependent inhibition of Cdc42 GEF Gef1 by 14-3-3 protein Rad24 spatially regulates Cdc42 GTPase activity and oscillatory dynamics during cell morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Maitreyi; Nuñez, Illyce; Rodriguez, Marbelys; Wiley, David J.; Rodriguez, Juan; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, John R.; Buchwald, Peter; Verde, Fulvia

    2015-01-01

    Active Cdc42 GTPase, a key regulator of cell polarity, displays oscillatory dynamics that are anticorrelated at the two cell tips in fission yeast. Anticorrelation suggests competition for active Cdc42 or for its effectors. Here we show how 14-3-3 protein Rad24 associates with Cdc42 guanine exchange factor (GEF) Gef1, limiting Gef1 availability to promote Cdc42 activation. Phosphorylation of Gef1 by conserved NDR kinase Orb6 promotes Gef1 binding to Rad24. Loss of Rad24–Gef1 interaction increases Gef1 protein localization and Cdc42 activation at the cell tips and reduces the anticorrelation of active Cdc42 oscillations. Increased Cdc42 activation promotes precocious bipolar growth activation, bypassing the normal requirement for an intact microtubule cytoskeleton and for microtubule-dependent polarity landmark Tea4-PP1. Further, increased Cdc42 activation by Gef1 widens cell diameter and alters tip curvature, countering the effects of Cdc42 GTPase-activating protein Rga4. The respective levels of Gef1 and Rga4 proteins at the membrane define dynamically the growing area at each cell tip. Our findings show how the 14-3-3 protein Rad24 modulates the availability of Cdc42 GEF Gef1, a homologue of mammalian Cdc42 GEF DNMBP/TUBA, to spatially control Cdc42 GTPase activity and promote cell polarization and cell shape emergence. PMID:26246599

  20. Binding of the vesicle docking protein p115 to the GTPase Rab1b regulates membrane recruitment of the COPI vesicle coat

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yusong; Linstedt, Adam D

    2014-01-01

    Membrane recruitment of the COPI vesicle coat is fundamental to its function and contributes to compartment identity in the early secretory pathway. COPI recruitment is triggered by guanine nucleotide exchange activating the Arf1 GTPase, but the key exchange factor, GBF1, is a peripheral membrane component whose membrane association is dependent on another GTPase, Rab1. Inactive Rab GTPases are in a soluble complex with guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor (GDI) and activation of Rab GTPases by exchange factors can be enhanced by GDI dissociation factors (GDFs). In the present study, we investigated the vesicle docking protein p115 and it’s binding to the Rab1 isoform Rab1b. Inhibition of p115 expression induced dissociation of Rab1b from Golgi membranes. Rab1b bound the cc2 domain of p115 and p115 lacking this domain failed to recruit Rab1b. Further, p115 inhibition blocked association of the COPI coat with Golgi membranes and this was suppressed by constitutive activation of Rab1b. These findings show p115 enhancement of Rab1b activation leading to COPI recruitment suggesting a connection between the vesicle docking machinery and the vesicle coat complex during the establishment of post-ER compartment identity. PMID:25332841

  1. Are There Rab GTPases in Archaea?

    PubMed Central

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B.

    2016-01-01

    A complex endomembrane system is one of the hallmarks of Eukaryotes. Vesicle trafficking between compartments is controlled by a diverse protein repertoire, including Rab GTPases. These small GTP-binding proteins contribute identity and specificity to the system, and by working as molecular switches, trigger multiple events in vesicle budding, transport, and fusion. A diverse collection of Rab GTPases already existed in the ancestral Eukaryote, yet, it is unclear how such elaborate repertoire emerged. A novel archaeal phylum, the Lokiarchaeota, revealed that several eukaryotic-like protein systems, including small GTPases, are present in Archaea. Here, we test the hypothesis that the Rab family of small GTPases predates the origin of Eukaryotes. Our bioinformatic pipeline detected multiple putative Rab-like proteins in several archaeal species. Our analyses revealed the presence and strict conservation of sequence features that distinguish eukaryotic Rabs from other small GTPases (Rab family motifs), mapping to the same regions in the structure as in eukaryotic Rabs. These mediate Rab-specific interactions with regulators of the REP/GDI (Rab Escort Protein/GDP dissociation Inhibitor) family. Sensitive structure-based methods further revealed the existence of REP/GDI-like genes in Archaea, involved in isoprenyl metabolism. Our analysis supports a scenario where Rabs differentiated into an independent family in Archaea, interacting with proteins involved in membrane biogenesis. These results further support the archaeal nature of the eukaryotic ancestor and provide a new insight into the intermediate stages and the evolutionary path toward the complex membrane-associated signaling circuits that characterize the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, and specifically Rab proteins. PMID:27034425

  2. Are There Rab GTPases in Archaea?

    PubMed

    Surkont, Jaroslaw; Pereira-Leal, Jose B

    2016-07-01

    A complex endomembrane system is one of the hallmarks of Eukaryotes. Vesicle trafficking between compartments is controlled by a diverse protein repertoire, including Rab GTPases. These small GTP-binding proteins contribute identity and specificity to the system, and by working as molecular switches, trigger multiple events in vesicle budding, transport, and fusion. A diverse collection of Rab GTPases already existed in the ancestral Eukaryote, yet, it is unclear how such elaborate repertoire emerged. A novel archaeal phylum, the Lokiarchaeota, revealed that several eukaryotic-like protein systems, including small GTPases, are present in Archaea. Here, we test the hypothesis that the Rab family of small GTPases predates the origin of Eukaryotes. Our bioinformatic pipeline detected multiple putative Rab-like proteins in several archaeal species. Our analyses revealed the presence and strict conservation of sequence features that distinguish eukaryotic Rabs from other small GTPases (Rab family motifs), mapping to the same regions in the structure as in eukaryotic Rabs. These mediate Rab-specific interactions with regulators of the REP/GDI (Rab Escort Protein/GDP dissociation Inhibitor) family. Sensitive structure-based methods further revealed the existence of REP/GDI-like genes in Archaea, involved in isoprenyl metabolism. Our analysis supports a scenario where Rabs differentiated into an independent family in Archaea, interacting with proteins involved in membrane biogenesis. These results further support the archaeal nature of the eukaryotic ancestor and provide a new insight into the intermediate stages and the evolutionary path toward the complex membrane-associated signaling circuits that characterize the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, and specifically Rab proteins. PMID:27034425

  3. Coxiella burnetii Phagocytosis Is Regulated by GTPases of the Rho Family and the RhoA Effectors mDia1 and ROCK

    PubMed Central

    Distel, Jesús S.; Aguilera, Milton O.; Colombo, María I.; Berón, Walter

    2015-01-01

    The GTPases belonging to the Rho family control the actin cytoskeleton rearrangements needed for particle internalization during phagocytosis. ROCK and mDia1 are downstream effectors of RhoA, a GTPase involved in that process. Coxiella burnetii, the etiologic agent of Q fever, is internalized by the host´s cells in an actin-dependent manner. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanism involved in this process has been poorly characterized. This work analyzes the role of different GTPases of the Rho family and some downstream effectors in the internalization of C. burnetii by phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. The internalization of C. burnetii into HeLa and RAW cells was significantly inhibited when the cells were treated with Clostridium difficile Toxin B which irreversibly inactivates members of the Rho family. In addition, the internalization was reduced in HeLa cells that overexpressed the dominant negative mutants of RhoA, Rac1 or Cdc42 or that were knocked down for the Rho GTPases. The pharmacological inhibition or the knocking down of ROCK diminished bacterium internalization. Moreover, C. burnetii was less efficiently internalized in HeLa cells overexpressing mDia1-N1, a dominant negative mutant of mDia1, while the overexpression of the constitutively active mutant mDia1-ΔN3 increased bacteria uptake. Interestingly, when HeLa and RAW cells were infected, RhoA, Rac1 and mDia1 were recruited to membrane cell fractions. Our results suggest that the GTPases of the Rho family play an important role in C. burnetii phagocytosis in both HeLa and RAW cells. Additionally, we present evidence that ROCK and mDia1, which are downstream effectors of RhoA, are involved in that process. PMID:26674774

  4. The function of RhoGTPases in axon ensheathment and myelination

    PubMed Central

    Feltri, M. Laura; Suter, Ueli; Relvas, João B.

    2008-01-01

    RhoGTPases are molecular switches that integrate extracellular signals to perform diverse cellular responses. This ability relies on the network of proteins regulating RhoGTPases activity and localization, and on the interaction of RhoGTPases with many different cellular effectors. Myelination is an ideal place for RhoGTPases regulation, as it is the result of fine orchestration of many stimuli from at least two cell types. Recent work has revealed that RhoGTPases are required for Schwann cells to sort, ensheath and myelinate axons. Here we will review recent advances showing the critical roles for RhoGTPases in various aspects of Schwann development and myelination, including the recent discovery of their involvement in Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Comparison with potential roles of RhoGTPases in central nervous system myelination will be drawn. PMID:18803320

  5. Phylogenetic distribution of translational GTPases in bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Margus, Tõnu; Remm, Maido; Tenson, Tanel

    2007-01-01

    Background Translational GTPases are a family of proteins in which GTPase activity is stimulated by the large ribosomal subunit. Conserved sequence features allow members of this family to be identified. Results To achieve accurate protein identification and grouping we have developed a method combining searches with Hidden Markov Model profiles and tree based grouping. We found all the genes for translational GTPases in 191 fully sequenced bacterial genomes. The protein sequences were grouped into nine subfamilies. Analysis of the results shows that three translational GTPases, the translation factors EF-Tu, EF-G and IF2, are present in all organisms examined. In addition, several copies of the genes encoding EF-Tu and EF-G are present in some genomes. In the case of multiple genes for EF-Tu, the gene copies are nearly identical; in the case of multiple EF-G genes, the gene copies have been considerably diverged. The fourth translational GTPase, LepA, the function of which is currently unknown, is also nearly universally conserved in bacteria, being absent from only one organism out of the 191 analyzed. The translation regulator, TypA, is also present in most of the organisms examined, being absent only from bacteria with small genomes. Surprisingly, some of the well studied translational GTPases are present only in a very small number of bacteria. The translation termination factor RF3 is absent from many groups of bacteria with both small and large genomes. The specialized translation factor for selenocysteine incorporation – SelB – was found in only 39 organisms. Similarly, the tetracycline resistance proteins (Tet) are present only in a small number of species. Proteins of the CysN/NodQ subfamily have acquired functions in sulfur metabolism and production of signaling molecules. The genes coding for CysN/NodQ proteins were found in 74 genomes. This protein subfamily is not confined to Proteobacteria, as suggested previously but present also in many other

  6. A Farnesyltransferase Acts to Inhibit Ectopic Neurite Formation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Carr, David; Sanchez-Alvarez, Leticia; Imai, Janice H.; Slatculescu, Cristina; Noblett, Nathaniel; Mao, Lei; Beese, Lorena; Colavita, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Genetic pathways that regulate nascent neurite formation play a critical role in neuronal morphogenesis. The core planar cell polarity components VANG-1/Van Gogh and PRKL-1/Prickle are involved in blocking inappropriate neurite formation in a subset of motor neurons in C. elegans. A genetic screen for mutants that display supernumerary neurites was performed to identify additional factors involved in this process. This screen identified mutations in fntb-1, the β subunit of farnesyltransferase. We show that fntb-1 is expressed in neurons and acts cell-autonomously to regulate neurite formation. Prickle proteins are known to be post-translationally modified by farnesylation at their C-terminal CAAX motifs. We show that PRKL-1 can be recruited to the plasma membrane in both a CAAX-dependent and CAAX-independent manner but that PRKL-1 can only inhibit neurite formation in a CAAX-dependent manner. PMID:27300162

  7. Downregulation of the Ras–Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway by the EphB2 Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Is Required for Ephrin-Induced Neurite Retraction

    PubMed Central

    Elowe, Sabine; Holland, Sacha J.; Kulkarni, Sarang; Pawson, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Activation of the EphB2 receptor tyrosine kinase by clustered ephrin-B1 induces growth cone collapse and neurite retraction in differentiated NG108 neuronal cells. We have investigated the cytoplasmic signaling events associated with EphB2-induced cytoskeletal reorganization in these neuronal cells. We find that unlike other receptor tyrosine kinases, EphB2 induces a pronounced downregulation of GTP-bound Ras and consequently of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. A similar inhibition of the Ras-MAPK pathway was observed on stimulation of endogenous EphB2 in COS-1 cells. Inactivation of Ras, induced by ephrin B1 stimulation of NG108 neuronal cells, requires EphB2 tyrosine kinase activity and is blocked by a truncated form of p120-Ras GTPase-activating protein (p120-RasGAP), suggesting that EphB2 signals through the SH2 domain protein p120-RasGAP to inhibit the Ras-MAPK pathway. Suppression of Ras activity appears functionally important, since expression of a constitutively active variant of Ras impaired the ability of EphB2 to induce neurite retraction. In addition, EphB2 attenuated the elevation in ERK activation induced by attachment of NG108 cells to fibronectin, indicating that the EphB2 receptor can modulate integrin signaling to the Ras GTPase. These results suggest that a primary function of EphB2, a member of the most populous family of receptor tyrosine kinases, is to inactivate the Ras-MAPK pathway in a fashion that contributes to cytoskeletal reorganization and adhesion responses in neuronal growth cones. PMID:11585923

  8. Interferon-Inducible GTPases in Host Resistance, Inflammation and Disease.

    PubMed

    Pilla-Moffett, Danielle; Barber, Matthew F; Taylor, Gregory A; Coers, Jörn

    2016-08-28

    Cell-autonomous immunity is essential for host organisms to defend themselves against invasive microbes. In vertebrates, both the adaptive and the innate branches of the immune system operate cell-autonomous defenses as key effector mechanisms that are induced by pro-inflammatory interferons (IFNs). IFNs can activate cell-intrinsic host defenses in virtually any cell type ranging from professional phagocytes to mucosal epithelial cells. Much of this IFN-induced host resistance program is dependent on four families of IFN-inducible GTPases: the myxovirus resistance proteins, the immunity-related GTPases, the guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs), and the very large IFN-inducible GTPases. These GTPase families provide host resistance to a variety of viral, bacterial, and protozoan pathogens through the sequestration of microbial proteins, manipulation of vesicle trafficking, regulation of antimicrobial autophagy (xenophagy), execution of intracellular membranolytic pathways, and the activation of inflammasomes. This review discusses our current knowledge of the molecular function of IFN-inducible GTPases in providing host resistance, as well as their role in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory Crohn's disease. While substantial advances were made in the recent past, few of the known functions of IFN-inducible GTPases have been explored in any depth, and new functions await discovery. This review will therefore highlight key areas of future exploration that promise to advance our understanding of the role of IFN-inducible GTPases in human diseases. PMID:27181197

  9. Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) enhances neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth of immature neurons in adult mice by up-regulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF).

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Shi-Wei; Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2'-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU-positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of SVHRP

  10. Scorpion Venom Heat-Resistant Peptide (SVHRP) Enhances Neurogenesis and Neurite Outgrowth of Immature Neurons in Adult Mice by Up-Regulating Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Wu, Xue-Fei; Peng, Yan; Cao, Zhen; Ge, Bi-Ying; Wang, Xi; Wu, Qiong; Lin, Jin-Tao; Zhang, Wan-Qin; Li, Shao; Zhao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Scorpion venom heat-resistant peptide (SVHRP) is a component purified from Buthus martensii Karsch scorpion venom. Although scorpions and their venom have been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) to treat chronic neurological disorders, the underlying mechanisms of these treatments remain unknown. We applied SVHRP in vitro and in vivo to understand its effects on the neurogenesis and maturation of adult immature neurons and explore associated molecular mechanisms. SVHRP administration increased the number of 5-bromo-2’-dexoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells, BrdU- positive/neuron-specific nuclear protein (NeuN)-positive neurons, and polysialylated-neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM)-positive immature neurons in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampus. Furthermore immature neurons incubated with SVHRP-pretreated astrocyte-conditioned medium exhibited significantly increased neurite length compared with those incubated with normal astrocyte-conditioned medium. This neurotrophic effect was further confirmed in vivo by detecting an increased average single area and whole area of immature neurons in the SGZ, SVZ and olfactory bulb (OB) in the adult mouse brain. In contrast to normal astrocyte-conditioned medium, higher concentrations of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) but not nerve growth factor (NGF) or glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was detected in the conditioned medium of SVHRP-pretreated astrocytes, and blocking BDNF using anti-BDNF antibodies eliminated these SVHRP-dependent neurotrophic effects. In SVHRP treated mouse brain, more glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-positive cells were detected. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry revealed increased numbers of GFAP/BDNF double-positive cells, which agrees with the observed changes in the culture system. This paper describes novel effects of scorpion venom-originated peptide on the stem cells and suggests the potential therapeutic values of

  11. Analysis of the Small GTPase Gene Superfamily of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Vernoud, Vanessa; Horton, Amy C.; Yang, Zhenbiao; Nielsen, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins regulate diverse processes in eukaryotic cells such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, cytoskeletal organization, and intracellular membrane trafficking. These proteins function as molecular switches that cycle between “active” and “inactive” states, and this cycle is linked to the binding and hydrolysis of GTP. The Arabidopsis genome contains 93 genes that encode small GTP-binding protein homologs. Phylogenetic analysis of these genes shows that plants contain Rab, Rho, Arf, and Ran GTPases, but no Ras GTPases. We have assembled complete lists of these small GTPases families, as well as accessory proteins that control their activity, and review what is known of the functions of individual members of these families in Arabidopsis. We also discuss the possible roles of these GTPases in relation to their similarity to orthologs with known functions and localizations in yeast and/or animal systems. PMID:12644670

  12. Rag GTPase in amino acid signaling.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joungmok; Kim, Eunjung

    2016-04-01

    Rag small GTPases were identified as the sixth subfamily of Ras-related GTPases. Compelling evidence suggests that Rag heterodimer (RagA/B and RagC/D) plays an important role in amino acid signaling toward mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), which is a central player in the control of cell growth in response to a variety of environmental cues, including growth factors, cellular energy/oxygen status, and amino acids. Upon amino acid stimulation, active Rag heterodimer (RagA/B(GTP)-RagC/D(GDP)) recruits mTORC1 to the lysosomal membrane where Rheb resides. In this review, we provide a current understanding on the amino acid-regulated cell growth control via Rag-mTORC1 with recently identified key players, including Ragulator, v-ATPase, and GATOR complexes. Moreover, the functions of Rag in physiological systems and in autophagy are discussed. PMID:26781224

  13. miR-124-regulated RhoG reduces neuronal process complexity via ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 and Cdc42 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Kristin; Otto, Wolfgang; Johannes, Sascha; Baumgart, Jan; Nitsch, Robert; Schumacher, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The small GTPase RhoG plays a central role in actin remodelling during diverse biological processes such as neurite outgrowth, cell migration, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. Although it is known that RhoG stimulates neurite outgrowth in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, neither the physiological function nor the regulation of this GTPase in neuronal differentiation is clear. Here, we identify RhoG as an inhibitor of neuronal process complexity, which is regulated by the microRNA miR-124. We find that RhoG inhibits dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. RhoG also inhibits axonal branching, acting via an ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 signalling pathway. However, RhoG inhibits dendritic branching dependent on the small GTPase Cdc42. Finally, we show that the expression of RhoG in neurons is suppressed by the CNS-specific microRNA miR-124 and connect the regulation of RhoG expression by miR-124 to the stimulation of neuronal process complexity. Thus, RhoG emerges as a cellular conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity, in turn regulated by miR-124 to control axonal and dendritic branching. PMID:22588079

  14. miR-124-regulated RhoG reduces neuronal process complexity via ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 and Cdc42 signalling.

    PubMed

    Franke, Kristin; Otto, Wolfgang; Johannes, Sascha; Baumgart, Jan; Nitsch, Robert; Schumacher, Stefan

    2012-06-29

    The small GTPase RhoG plays a central role in actin remodelling during diverse biological processes such as neurite outgrowth, cell migration, phagocytosis of apoptotic cells, and the invasion of pathogenic bacteria. Although it is known that RhoG stimulates neurite outgrowth in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, neither the physiological function nor the regulation of this GTPase in neuronal differentiation is clear. Here, we identify RhoG as an inhibitor of neuronal process complexity, which is regulated by the microRNA miR-124. We find that RhoG inhibits dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons in vitro and in vivo. RhoG also inhibits axonal branching, acting via an ELMO/Dock180/Rac1 signalling pathway. However, RhoG inhibits dendritic branching dependent on the small GTPase Cdc42. Finally, we show that the expression of RhoG in neurons is suppressed by the CNS-specific microRNA miR-124 and connect the regulation of RhoG expression by miR-124 to the stimulation of neuronal process complexity. Thus, RhoG emerges as a cellular conductor of Rac1 and Cdc42 activity, in turn regulated by miR-124 to control axonal and dendritic branching. PMID:22588079

  15. Rho family GTPases: key players in neuronal development, neuronal survival, and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R.; Linseman, Daniel A.

    2014-01-01

    The Rho family of GTPases belongs to the Ras superfamily of low molecular weight (∼21 kDa) guanine nucleotide binding proteins. The most extensively studied members are RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. In the last few decades, studies have demonstrated that Rho family GTPases are important regulatory molecules that link surface receptors to the organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Indeed, Rho GTPases mediate many diverse critical cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell–cell adhesion, and cell cycle progression. However, Rho GTPases also play an essential role in regulating neuronal morphology. In particular, Rho GTPases regulate dendritic arborization, spine morphogenesis, growth cone development, and axon guidance. In addition, more recent efforts have underscored an important function for Rho GTPases in regulating neuronal survival and death. Interestingly, Rho GTPases can exert either a pro-survival or pro-death signal in neurons depending upon both the cell type and neurotoxic insult involved. This review summarizes key findings delineating the involvement of Rho GTPases and their effectors in the regulation of neuronal survival and death. Collectively, these results suggest that dysregulation of Rho family GTPases may potentially underscore the etiology of some forms of neurodegenerative disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25339865

  16. Rho family GTPases: key players in neuronal development, neuronal survival, and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Stankiewicz, Trisha R; Linseman, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    The Rho family of GTPases belongs to the Ras superfamily of low molecular weight (∼21 kDa) guanine nucleotide binding proteins. The most extensively studied members are RhoA, Rac1, and Cdc42. In the last few decades, studies have demonstrated that Rho family GTPases are important regulatory molecules that link surface receptors to the organization of the actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. Indeed, Rho GTPases mediate many diverse critical cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell-cell adhesion, and cell cycle progression. However, Rho GTPases also play an essential role in regulating neuronal morphology. In particular, Rho GTPases regulate dendritic arborization, spine morphogenesis, growth cone development, and axon guidance. In addition, more recent efforts have underscored an important function for Rho GTPases in regulating neuronal survival and death. Interestingly, Rho GTPases can exert either a pro-survival or pro-death signal in neurons depending upon both the cell type and neurotoxic insult involved. This review summarizes key findings delineating the involvement of Rho GTPases and their effectors in the regulation of neuronal survival and death. Collectively, these results suggest that dysregulation of Rho family GTPases may potentially underscore the etiology of some forms of neurodegenerative disease such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:25339865

  17. Controlling Neurite Outgrowth with Patterned Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, In Hong; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2011-01-01

    In vivo, neurons form neurites, one of which develops into the axon while others become dendrites. While this neuritogenesis process is well programmed in vivo, there are limited methods to control the number and location of neurite extension in vitro. Here we report a method to control neuritogenesis by confining neurons in specific regions using cell resistant poly(oligoethyleneglycol methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid (OEGMA-co-MA)) or poly(ethyleneglycol-block-lactic acid) PEG-PLA. Line patterned substrates reduce multiple extension of neurites and stimulate bi-directional neurite budding for PC12 and cortical neurons. PC12 cells on 20 and 30 µm line patterns extended one neurite in each direction along the line pattern while cortical neuron on 20 and 30 µm line patterns extended one or two neurites in each direction along the line pattern. Statistical analysis of neurite lengths revealed that PC12 cells and cortical neurons on line patterns extend longer neurites. The ability to guide formation of neurites on patterned substrates is useful for generating neural networks and promoting neurite elongation. PMID:21484989

  18. Influence of cAMP and protein kinase A on neurite length from spiral ganglion neurons

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ningyong; Engbers, Jonathan; Khaja, Sobia; Xu, Linjing; Clark, J. Jason; Hansen, Marlan R.

    2011-01-01

    Regrowth of peripheral spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) fibers is a primary objective in efforts to improve cochlear implant outcomes and to potentially reinnervate regenerated hair cells. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) regulates neurite growth and guidance via activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and Exchange Protein directly Activated by Cylic AMP (Epac). Here we explored the effects of cAMP signaling on SGN neurite length in vitro. We find that the cAMP analog, cpt-cAMP, exerts a biphasic effect on neurite length; increasing length at lower concentrations and reducing length at higher concentrations. This biphasic response occurs in cultures plated on laminin, fibronectin, or tenascin C suggesting that it is not substrate dependent. cpt-cAMP also reduces SGN neurite branching. The Epac-specific agonist, 8-pCPT-2’-O-Me-cAMP, does not alter SGN neurite length. Constitutively active PKA isoforms strongly inhibit SGN neurite length similar to higher levels of cAMP. Chronic membrane depolarization activates PKA in SGNs and also inhibits SGN neurite length. However, inhibition of PKA fails to rescue neurite length in depolarized cultures implying that activation of PKA is not necessary for the inhibition of SGN neurite length by chronic depolarization. Expression of constitutively active phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase, isoforms partially rescues SGN neurite length in the presence of activated PKA. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of cAMP/PKA represents a potential strategy to enhance SGN fiber elongation following deafness; however such therapies will likely require careful titration so as to simultaneously promote rather than inhibit nerve fiber regeneration. PMID:22154930

  19. Reverse engineering GTPase programming languages with reconstituted signaling networks.

    PubMed

    Coyle, Scott M

    2016-07-01

    The Ras superfamily GTPases represent one of the most prolific signaling currencies used in Eukaryotes. With these remarkable molecules, evolution has built GTPase networks that control diverse cellular processes such as growth, morphology, motility and trafficking. (1-4) Our knowledge of the individual players that underlie the function of these networks is deep; decades of biochemical and structural data has provided a mechanistic understanding of the molecules that turn GTPases ON and OFF, as well as how those GTPase states signal by controlling the assembly of downstream effectors. However, we know less about how these different activities work together as a system to specify complex dynamic signaling outcomes. Decoding this molecular "programming language" would help us understand how different species and cell types have used the same GTPase machinery in different ways to accomplish different tasks, and would also provide new insights as to how mutations to these networks can cause disease. We recently developed a bead-based microscopy assay to watch reconstituted H-Ras signaling systems at work under arbitrary configurations of regulators and effectors. (5) Here we highlight key observations and insights from this study and propose extensions to our method to further study this and other GTPase signaling systems. PMID:27128855

  20. Cellular Mechanisms of Tissue Fibrosis. 8. Current and future drug targets in fibrosis: focus on Rho GTPase-regulated gene transcription

    PubMed Central

    Tsou, Pei-Suen; Haak, Andrew J.; Khanna, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Tissue fibrosis occurs with excessive extracellular matrix deposition from myofibroblasts, resulting in tissue scarring and inflammation. It is driven by multiple mediators, such as the G protein-coupled receptor ligands lysophosphatidic acid and endothelin, as well as signaling by transforming growth factor-β, connective tissue growth factor, and integrins. Fibrosis contributes to 45% of deaths in the developed world. As current therapeutic options for tissue fibrosis are limited and organ transplantation is the only effective treatment for end-stage disease, there is an imminent need for efficacious antifibrotic therapies. This review discusses the various molecular pathways involved in fibrosis. It highlights the Rho GTPase signaling pathway and its downstream gene transcription output through myocardin-related transcription factor and serum response factor as a convergence point for targeting this complex set of diseases. PMID:24740541

  1. Locking GTPases covalently in their functional states

    PubMed Central

    Wiegandt, David; Vieweg, Sophie; Hofmann, Frank; Koch, Daniel; Li, Fu; Wu, Yao-Wen; Itzen, Aymelt; Müller, Matthias P.; Goody, Roger S.

    2015-01-01

    GTPases act as key regulators of many cellular processes by switching between active (GTP-bound) and inactive (GDP-bound) states. In many cases, understanding their mode of action has been aided by artificially stabilizing one of these states either by designing mutant proteins or by complexation with non-hydrolysable GTP analogues. Because of inherent disadvantages in these approaches, we have developed acryl-bearing GTP and GDP derivatives that can be covalently linked with strategically placed cysteines within the GTPase of interest. Binding studies with GTPase-interacting proteins and X-ray crystallography analysis demonstrate that the molecular properties of the covalent GTPase–acryl–nucleotide adducts are a faithful reflection of those of the corresponding native states and are advantageously permanently locked in a defined nucleotide (that is active or inactive) state. In a first application, in vivo experiments using covalently locked Rab5 variants provide new insights into the mechanism of correct intracellular localization of Rab proteins. PMID:26178622

  2. Established and emerging fluorescence-based assays for G-protein function: Ras-superfamily GTPases.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Rafael J; Kimple, Randall J; Rossman, Kent L; Siderovski, David P; Sondek, John

    2003-06-01

    Ras and Rho GTPases are signaling proteins that regulate a variety of physiological events and are intimately linked to the progression of cancer. Recently, a variety of fluorescence-based assays have been refined to monitor activation of these GTPases. This review summarizes current fluorescence-based techniques for studying Ras superfamily GTPases with an emphasis on practical examples and high-throughput applications. These techniques are not only useful for biochemical characterization of Ras superfamily members, but will also facilitate the discovery of small molecule therapeutics designed to inhibit signal transduction mediated by GTPases. PMID:12769685

  3. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors up-regulate transforming growth factor-β signaling in cultured heart cells via inhibition of geranylgeranylation of RhoA GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ho-Jin; Galper, Jonas B.

    1999-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling has been shown to play a role in cardiac development as well as in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease. Prior studies have suggested a relationship between cholesterol metabolism and TGFβ signaling. Here we demonstrate that induction of the cholesterol metabolic pathway by growth of embryonic chicken atrial cells in medium supplemented with lipoprotein-depleted serum coordinately decreased the expression of the TGFβ type II receptor (TGFβRII), TGFβ1, and TGFβ signaling as measured by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) promoter activity. Inhibition of the cholesterol metabolic pathway by the hydrophobic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMGCoA) reductase inhibitors, simvastatin and atorvastatin, reversed the effect of lipoprotein-depleted serum and up-regulated TGFβRII expression, whereas the hydrophilic HMGCoA reductase inhibitor, pravastatin, had no effect. Simvastatin stimulated the expression of TGFβRII, TGFβ1, and PAI-1 at the level of transcription. Experiments using specific inhibitors of different branches of the cholesterol metabolic pathway demonstrated that simvastatin exerted its effect on TGFβ signaling by inhibition of the geranylgeranylation pathway. C3 exotoxin, which specifically inactivates geranylgeranylated Rho GTPases, mimicked the effect of simvastatin on PAI-1 promoter activity. Cotransfection of cells with a PAI-1 promoter-reporter and a dominant-negative RhoA mutant increased PAI-1 promoter activity, whereas cotransfection with a dominant-active RhoA mutant decreased PAI-1 promoter activity. These data support the conclusion that TGFβ signaling is regulated by RhoA GTPase and demonstrate a relationship between cholesterol metabolism and TGFβ signaling. Our data suggest that in patients treated with HMGCoA reductase inhibitors, these agents may exert effects independent of cholesterol lowering on TGFβ signaling in the heart. PMID:10500210

  4. Triggering of high-speed neurite outgrowth using an optical microheater

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Kotaro; Zeeb, Vadim; Kawamura, Yuki; Arai, Tomomi; Gotoh, Mizuho; Itoh, Hideki; Itabashi, Takeshi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin’ichi

    2015-01-01

    Optical microheating is a powerful non-invasive method for manipulating biological functions such as gene expression, muscle contraction, and cell excitation. Here, we demonstrate its potential usage for regulating neurite outgrowth. We found that optical microheating with a water-absorbable 1,455-nm laser beam triggers directional and explosive neurite outgrowth and branching in rat hippocampal neurons. The focused laser beam under a microscope rapidly increases the local temperature from 36 °C to 41 °C (stabilized within 2 s), resulting in the elongation of neurites by more than 10 μm within 1 min. This high-speed, persistent elongation of neurites was suppressed by inhibitors of both microtubule and actin polymerization, indicating that the thermosensitive dynamics of these cytoskeletons play crucial roles in this heat-induced neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we showed that microheating induced the regrowth of injured neurites and the interconnection of neurites. These results demonstrate the efficacy of optical microheating methods for the construction of arbitrary neural networks. PMID:26568288

  5. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1±0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80±0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine. PMID:26565787

  6. Uridine from Pleurotus giganteus and Its Neurite Outgrowth Stimulatory Effects with Underlying Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phan, Chia-Wei; David, Pamela; Wong, Kah-Hui; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to neuronal cell death and impairment of neurite outgrowth. An edible mushroom, Pleurotus giganteus was found to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro but the chemical constituents and the underlying mechanism is yet to be elucidated. The chemical constituents of P. giganteus (linoleic acid, oleic acid, cinnamic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, succinic acid, benzoic acid, and uridine) were tested for neurite outgrowth activity. Uridine (100 μM) was found to increase the percentage of neurite-bearing cells of differentiating neuroblastoma (N2a) cells by 43.1 ± 0.5%, which was 1.8-fold higher than NGF (50 ng/mL)-treated cells. Uridine which was present in P. giganteus (1.80 ± 0.03 g/100g mushroom extract) increased the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal regulated kinases (ERKs) and protein kinase B (Akt). Further, phosphorylation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was also increased. MEK/ERK and PI3K-Akt-mTOR further induced phosphorylation of cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) and expression of growth associated protein 43 (GAP43); all of which promoted neurite outgrowth of N2a cells. This study demonstrated that P. giganteus may enhance neurite outgrowth and one of the key bioactive molecules responsible for neurite outgrowth is uridine. PMID:26565787

  7. Purines in neurite growth and astroglia activation.

    PubMed

    Heine, Claudia; Sygnecka, Katja; Franke, Heike

    2016-05-01

    The mammalian nervous system is a complex, functional network of neurons, consisting of local and long-range connections. Neuronal growth is highly coordinated by a variety of extracellular and intracellular signaling molecules. Purines turned out to be an essential component of these processes. Here, we review the current knowledge about the involvement of purinergic signaling in the regulation of neuronal development. We particularly focus on its role in neuritogenesis: the formation and extension of neurites. In the course of maturation mammals generally lose their ability to regenerate the central nervous system (CNS) e.g. after traumatic brain injury; although, spontaneous regeneration still occurs in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Thus, it is crucial to translate the knowledge about CNS development and PNS regeneration into novel approaches to enable neurons of the mature CNS to regenerate. In this context we give a general overview of growth-inhibitory and growth-stimulatory factors and mechanisms involved in neurite growth. With regard to neuronal growth, astrocytes are an important cell population. They provide structural and metabolic support to neurons and actively participate in brain signaling. Astrocytes respond to injury with beneficial or detrimental reactions with regard to axonal growth. In this review we present the current knowledge of purines in these glial functions. Moreover, we discuss organotypic brain slice co-cultures as a model which retains neuron-glia interactions, and further presents at once a model for CNS development and regeneration. In summary, the purinergic system is a pivotal factor in neuronal development and in the response to injury. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Purines in Neurodegeneration and Neuroregeneration'. PMID:26498067

  8. CdGAP/ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase regulator, is critical for vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Caron, Christine; DeGeer, Jonathan; Fournier, Patrick; Duquette, Philippe M; Luangrath, Vilayphone; Ishii, Hidetaka; Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Royal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the CdGAP/ARHGAP31 gene, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, have been reported causative in the Adams-Oliver developmental syndrome often associated with vascular defects. However, despite its abundant expression in endothelial cells, CdGAP function in the vasculature remains unknown. Here, we show that vascular development is impaired in CdGAP-deficient mouse embryos at E15.5. This is associated with superficial vessel defects and subcutaneous edema, resulting in 44% embryonic/perinatal lethality. VEGF-driven angiogenesis is defective in CdGAP(-/-) mice, showing reduced capillary sprouting from aortic ring explants. Similarly, VEGF-dependent endothelial cell migration and capillary formation are inhibited upon CdGAP knockdown. Mechanistically, CdGAP associates with VEGF receptor-2 and controls VEGF-dependent signaling. Consequently, CdGAP depletion results in impaired VEGF-mediated Rac1 activation and reduced phosphorylation of critical intracellular mediators including Gab1, Akt, PLCγ and SHP2. These findings are the first to demonstrate the importance of CdGAP in embryonic vascular development and VEGF-induced signaling, and highlight CdGAP as a potential therapeutic target to treat pathological angiogenesis and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27270835

  9. A barley ROP GTPase ACTIVATING PROTEIN associates with microtubules and regulates entry of the barley powdery mildew fungus into leaf epidermal cells.

    PubMed

    Hoefle, Caroline; Huesmann, Christina; Schultheiss, Holger; Börnke, Frederik; Hensel, Götz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2011-06-01

    Little is known about the function of host factors involved in disease susceptibility. The barley (Hordeum vulgare) ROP (RHO of plants) G-protein RACB is required for full susceptibility of the leaf epidermis to invasion by the biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp hordei. Stable transgenic knockdown of RACB reduced the ability of barley to accommodate haustoria of B. graminis in intact epidermal leaf cells and to form hairs on the root epidermis, suggesting that RACB is a common element of root hair outgrowth and ingrowth of haustoria in leaf epidermal cells. We further identified a barley MICROTUBULE-ASSOCIATED ROP-GTPASE ACTIVATING PROTEIN (MAGAP1) interacting with RACB in yeast and in planta. Fluorescent MAGAP1 decorated cortical microtubules and was recruited by activated RACB to the cell periphery. Under fungal attack, MAGAP1-labeled microtubules built a polarized network at sites of successful defense. By contrast, microtubules loosened where the fungus succeeded in penetration. Genetic evidence suggests a function of MAGAP1 in limiting susceptibility to penetration by B. graminis. Additionally, MAGAP1 influenced the polar organization of cortical microtubules. These results add to our understanding of how intact plant cells accommodate fungal infection structures and suggest that RACB and MAGAP1 might be antagonistic players in cytoskeleton organization for fungal entry. PMID:21685259

  10. CdGAP/ARHGAP31, a Cdc42/Rac1 GTPase regulator, is critical for vascular development and VEGF-mediated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Christine; DeGeer, Jonathan; Fournier, Patrick; Duquette, Philippe M.; Luangrath, Vilayphone; Ishii, Hidetaka; Karimzadeh, Fereshteh; Lamarche-Vane, Nathalie; Royal, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the CdGAP/ARHGAP31 gene, which encodes a GTPase-activating protein for Rac1 and Cdc42, have been reported causative in the Adams-Oliver developmental syndrome often associated with vascular defects. However, despite its abundant expression in endothelial cells, CdGAP function in the vasculature remains unknown. Here, we show that vascular development is impaired in CdGAP-deficient mouse embryos at E15.5. This is associated with superficial vessel defects and subcutaneous edema, resulting in 44% embryonic/perinatal lethality. VEGF-driven angiogenesis is defective in CdGAP−/− mice, showing reduced capillary sprouting from aortic ring explants. Similarly, VEGF-dependent endothelial cell migration and capillary formation are inhibited upon CdGAP knockdown. Mechanistically, CdGAP associates with VEGF receptor-2 and controls VEGF-dependent signaling. Consequently, CdGAP depletion results in impaired VEGF-mediated Rac1 activation and reduced phosphorylation of critical intracellular mediators including Gab1, Akt, PLCγ and SHP2. These findings are the first to demonstrate the importance of CdGAP in embryonic vascular development and VEGF-induced signaling, and highlight CdGAP as a potential therapeutic target to treat pathological angiogenesis and vascular dysfunction. PMID:27270835

  11. Expression of Ndufb11 encoding the neuronal protein 15.6 during neurite outgrowth and development.

    PubMed

    Gurok, Ulf; Bork, Kaya; Nuber, Ulrike; Spörle, Ralf; Nöhring, Sabine; Horstkorte, Rüdiger

    2007-01-01

    Neurite outgrowth (e.g. axonal or dendrite outgrowth) of neurons is necessary for the development and functioning of the central nervous system. It is well accepted that the differentiation of neurons and neurite outgrowth involve alterations in gene expression. Furthermore, mitochondria play a role in different aspects of neurite outgrowth. Here we show that the expression of Ndufb11, a gene encoding the mitochondrial protein NP15.6 is decreased in the course of neuronal differentiation. NP15.6 is homologous to the bovine protein ESSS, a component of the mitochondrial complex 1. The homologous human NDUFB11 gene is localized to Xp11.3-Xp11.23, a region associated with neurogenetic disorders. The down-regulation of NP15.6 correlates with neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells induced by nerve growth factor. Furthermore, we analyzed the expression of Ndufb11 in the embryonic and adult mouse. PMID:16962385

  12. Semi-automatic quantification of neurite fasciculation in high-density neurite images by the Neurite Directional Distribution Analysis (NDDA)

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Amy M; Wheeler, Brandon; Staii, Cristian; Kaplan, David L.; Atherton, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bundling of neurite extensions occur during nerve development and regeneration. Understanding the factors that drive neurite bundling is important for designing biomaterials for nerve regeneration toward the innervation target and preventing nociceptive collateral sprouting. High-density neuron cultures including dorsal root ganglia explants are employed for in vitro screening of biomaterials designed to control directional outgrowth. Although some semiautomated image processing methods exist for quantification of neurite outgrowth, methods to quantify axonal fasciculation in terms of direction of neurite outgrowth are lacking. New Method This work presents a semi-automated program to analyze micrographs of high-density neurites; the program aims to quantify axonal fasciculation by determining the orientational distribution function of the tangent vectors of the neurites and calculating its Fourier series coefficients (‘c’ values). Results We found that neurite directional distribution analysis (NDDA) of fasciculated neurites yielded ‘c’ values of ≥ ~0.25 whereas branched outgrowth led to statistically significant lesser values of <~0.2. The ‘c’ values correlated directly to the width of neurite bundles and indirectly to the number of branching points. Comparison with Existing Methods Information about the directional distribution of outgrowth is lost in simple counting methods or achieved laboriously through manual analysis. The NDDA supplements previous quantitative analyses of axonal bundling using a vector-based approach that captures new information about the directionality of outgrowth. Conclusion The NDDA is a valuable addition to open source image processing tools available to biomedical researchers offering a robust, precise approach to quantification of imaged features important in tissue development, disease, and repair. PMID:24680908

  13. Dynamin, a membrane remodelling GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Shawn M.; De Camilli, Pietro

    2012-01-01

    Dynamin, the founding member of a family of dynamin-like GTPases (DLPs) implicated in membrane remodelling, has a critical role in endocytic membrane fission events. The use of complementary approaches, including live cell imaging, cell free-studies, X-ray crystallography and genetic studies in mice has greatly advanced our understanding of the mechanisms by which dynamin acts, its essential roles in cell physiology and the specific function of different dynamin isoforms. In addition, several connections between dynamin and human disease have also emerged that highlight specific contributions of this GTPase to the physiology of different tissues. PMID:22233676

  14. SOCS3 induces neurite differentiation and promotes neuronal cell survival.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Kanchan Kumar; Gupta, Sakshi; Banerjee, Kakoli

    2016-06-01

    Cytokines and growth factors play an important role in neuronal survival as well as cell death. The family of suppressors of cytokine signalling (SOCS) proteins, which includes SOCS1-7 and cytokine-induced suppressor (CIS), has been shown to act as negative regulators of cytokine-induced signalling. In this report, we highlight the role of SOCS3 in regulating neuronal differentiation and survival. We observed increased SOCS3 expression upon differentiation of PC12 cells as well as neural stem cells. SOCS3 overexpression upregulated differentiation of both neural stem cells and PC12 cells even in the absence of NGF, as evidenced by enhanced neurite outgrowth and upregulation of GAP43, marker associated with neurite outgrowth. siRNA-mediated silencing of SOCS3 confirmed the potential role of SOCS3 in neuritogenesis. We observed that, SOCS3-induced neurite differentiation was mediated via the PI3 kinase pathway. Another interesting observation was that SOCS3 overexpression promoted neuronal cell survival under H2 O2 -mediated stress indicating its fundamental role in cell survival. In conclusion, our results indicate that SOCS3 promotes differentiation and survival of neural cells and could be potentially useful in future therapy for treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):468-476, 2016. PMID:27118613

  15. Rational design of small molecule inhibitors targeting RhoA subfamily Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Xun; Marchioni, Fillipo; Sipes, Nisha; Evelyn, Chris R.; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Duhr, Stefan; Seibel, William; Wortman, Matthew; Zheng, Yi

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Rho GTPases have been implicated in diverse cellular functions and are potential therapeutic targets. By virtual screening, we have identified a Rho specific inhibitor, Rhosin. Rhosin contains two-aromatic rings tethered by a linker, and it binds to the surface area sandwiching Trp58 of RhoA with a submicromolar Kd and effectively inhibits GEF-catalyzed RhoA activation. In cells Rhosin specifically inhibited RhoA activity and RhoA-mediated cellular function without affecting Cdc42 or Rac1 signaling activities. By suppressing RhoA or RhoC activity Rhosin could inhibit mammary sphere formation by breast cancer cells, suppress invasion of mammary epithelial cells, and induce neurite outgrowth of PC12 cells in synergy with NGF. Thus, the rational designed RhoA subfamily specific small molecule inhibitor is useful for studying the physiological and pathologic roles of Rho GTPase. PMID:22726684

  16. “Spatial Mapping of the Neurite and Soma Proteomes Reveals a Functional Cdc42/Rac Regulatory Network”

    SciTech Connect

    Pertz, Olivier C.; Wang, Yingchun; Yang, Feng; Wang, Wei; gay, laurie J.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Anderson, David J.; Liu, Tao; Auberry, Kenneth J.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Klemke, Richard L.

    2008-02-12

    Neurite extension and growth cone navigation are guided by extracellular cues that control cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, understanding the complex signaling mechanisms that mediate neuritogenesis has been limited by the inability to biochemically separate the neurite and soma for spatial proteomic and bioinformatic analyses. Here, we apply global proteome profiling in combination with a novel neurite purification methodology for comparative analysis of the soma and neurite proteomes of neuroblastoma cells. The spatial relationship of 4855 proteins were mapped revealing networks of signaling proteins that control integrins, the actin cytoskeleton, and axonal guidance in the extending neurite. Bioinformatics and functional analyses revealed a spatially compartmentalized Rac/Cdc42 signaling network that operates in conjunction with multiple GEFs and GAPs to control neurite formation. Interestingly, RNA interference experiments revealed that the different GEFs and GAPs regulate specialized functions during neurite formation including neurite growth and retraction kinetics, cytoskeletal organization, and cell polarity. Our findings provide insight into the spatial organization of signaling networks that enable neuritogenesis and provide a comprehensive system-wide profile of proteins that mediate this process including those that control Rac and Cdc42 signaling.

  17. Small GTPase Rho signaling is involved in {beta}1 integrin-mediated up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand on osteoblasts and osteoclast maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, Fumihiko; Nakayamada, Shingo; Okada, Yosuke; Saito, Kazuyoshi; Kurose, Hitoshi; Mogami, Akira; Tanaka, Yoshiya . E-mail: tanaka@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp

    2007-04-27

    We assessed the characteristics of human osteoblasts, focusing on small GTPase Rho signaling. {beta}1 Integrin were highly expressed on osteoblasts. Engagement of {beta}1 integrins by type I collagen augmented expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) on osteoblasts. Rho was activated by {beta}1 stimulation in osteoblasts. {beta}1 Integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL was inhibited by transfection with adenoviruses encoding C3 transferase or pretreated with Y-27632, specific Rho and Rho-kinase inhibitors. Engagement of {beta}1 integrin on osteoblasts induced formation of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cells (MNC) in a coculture system of osteoblasts and peripheral monocytes, but this action was completely abrogated by transfection of C3 transferase. Our results indicate the direct involvement of Rho-mediated signaling in {beta}1 integrin-induced up-regulation of ICAM-1 and RANKL and RANKL-dependent osteoclast maturation. Thus, Rho-mediated signaling in osteoblasts seems to introduce major biases to bone resorption.

  18. A novel interaction between the SH2 domain of signaling adaptor protein Nck-1 and the upstream regulator of the Rho family GTPase Rac1 engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1) promotes Rac1 activation and cell motility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo; Chen, Xia; Qiu, Fanghua; Zhu, Fengxin; Lei, Wenjing; Nie, Jing

    2014-08-15

    Nck family proteins function as adaptors to couple tyrosine phosphorylation signals to actin cytoskeleton reorganization. Several lines of evidence indicate that Nck family proteins involve in regulating the activity of Rho family GTPases. In the present study, we characterized a novel interaction between Nck-1 with engulfment and cell motility 1 (ELMO1). GST pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction is mediated by the SH2 domain of Nck-1 and the phosphotyrosine residues at position 18, 216, 395, and 511 of ELMO1. A R308K mutant of Nck-1 (in which the SH2 domain was inactive), or a 4YF mutant of ELMO1 lacking these four phosphotyrosine residues, diminished Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction. Conversely, tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor treatment and overexpression of Src family kinase Hck significantly enhanced Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction. Moreover, wild type Nck-1, but not R308K mutant, significantly augmented the interaction between ELMO1 and constitutively active RhoG (RhoG(V12A)), thus promoted Rac1 activation and cell motility. Taken together, the present study characterized a novel Nck-1-ELMO1 interaction and defined a new role for Nck-1 in regulating Rac1 activity. PMID:24928514

  19. Early infantile epileptic encephalopathy associated with the disrupted gene encoding Slit-Robo Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2).

    PubMed

    Saitsu, Hirotomo; Osaka, Hitoshi; Sugiyama, Shirou; Kurosawa, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Nishimura, Akira; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Harada, Naoki; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-01-01

    We report on a female patient with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy and severe psychomotor disability possessing a de novo balanced translocation t(1;9)(q32;q13). The patient showed clonic convulsions of extremities 2 days after birth. Electroencephalogram (EEG) transiently showed atypical suppression-burst pattern. The seizures evolved to brief tonic spasms, and hypsarrhythmia on EEG was noticed at age of 5 months, indicating the transition to West syndrome. By using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), southern hybridization, and inverse PCR, the translocation breakpoints were successfully determined at the nucleotide level. The 1q32.1 breakpoint was located within a segmental duplication and disrupted the gene encoding Slit-Robo Rho GTPase activating protein 2 (SRGAP2). The 9q13 breakpoint was suggested to reside in the heterochromatin region. Srgap2 has been shown to be specifically expressed in developing brain of rodents, negatively regulate neuronal migration and induce neurite outgrowth and branching. Thus, SRGAP2 is very likely to play a role in the developing human brain. This is a first report of the SRGAP2 abnormality associated with early infantile epileptic encephalopathy. PMID:22106086

  20. Oxytocin Increases Neurite Length and Expression of Cytoskeletal Proteins Associated with Neuronal Growth.

    PubMed

    Lestanova, Z; Bacova, Z; Kiss, A; Havranek, T; Strbak, V; Bakos, J

    2016-06-01

    Neuropeptide oxytocin acts as a growth and differentiation factor; however, its effects on neurite growth are poorly understood. The aims of the present study were (1) to evaluate time effects of oxytocin on expression of nestin and MAP2; (2) to measure the effect of oxytocin on gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, cofilin, and drebrin; and (3) to measure changes in neurite length and number in response to oxytocin/oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Exposure of SH-SY5Y cells to 1 μM oxytocin resulted in a significant increase in gene expression and protein levels of nestin after 12, 24, and 48 h. Oxytocin treatment induced no changes in gene expression of MAP2; however, a decrease of protein levels was observed in all time intervals. Gene expression of β-actin, vimentin, and drebrin increased in response to oxytocin. Oxytocin induced significant elongation of neurites after 12, 24, and 48 h. No change in neurite length was observed in the presence of the combination of retinoic acid and oxytocin receptor antagonist L-371,257. Oxytocin treatment for 12 h increased the number of neurites. Overall, the present data suggest that oxytocin contributes to the regulation of expression of cytoskeletal proteins associated with growth of neuronal cones and induces neurite elongation mediated by oxytocin receptors at least in certain types of neuronal cells. PMID:26474566

  1. Epithelial junctions and Rho family GTPases: the zonular signalosome

    PubMed Central

    Citi, Sandra; Guerrera, Diego; Spadaro, Domenica; Shah, Jimit

    2014-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of epithelial cell-cell junctions is crucially important to regulate adhesion, apico-basal polarity and motility of epithelial cells, and ultimately controls the architecture and physiology of epithelial organs. Junctions are supported, shaped and regulated by cytoskeletal filaments, whose dynamic organization and contractility are finely tuned by GTPases of the Rho family, primarily RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42. Recent research has identified new molecular mechanisms underlying the cross-talk between these GTPases and epithelial junctions. Here we briefly summarize the current knowledge about the organization, molecular evolution and cytoskeletal anchoring of cell-cell junctions, and we comment on the most recent advances in the characterization of the interactions between Rho GTPases and junctional proteins, and their consequences with regards to junction assembly and regulation of cell behavior in vertebrate model systems. The concept of “zonular signalosome” is proposed, which highlights the close functional relationship between proteins of zonular junctions (zonulae occludentes and adhaerentes) and the control of cytoskeletal organization and signaling through Rho GTPases, transcription factors, and their effectors. PMID:25483301

  2. High Throughput Flow Cytometry Bead-based Multiplex Assay for Identification of Rho GTPase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Surviladze, Zurab; Young, Susan M; Sklar, Larry A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Rho family GTPases and their effector proteins regulate a wide range of cell signaling pathways. In normal physiological conditions their activity is tightly controlled and it is not surprising that their aberrant activation contributes to tumorigenesis or other diseases. For this reason, the identification of small, cell permeable molecules capable of inhibition of Rho GTPases can be extraordinarily useful, particularly if they are specific and act reversibly. Herein we describe a flow cytometric assay, which allows us to measure the activity of six small GTPases simultaneously. GST-tagged small GTPases are bound to six glutathione bead sets each set having a different intensity of red fluorescence at a fixed wavelength. The coated bead sets were washed, combined, and dispensed into 384-well plates with test compounds, and fluorescent-GTP binding was used as the read-out. This multiplex bead-based assay was successfully used for to identify both general and selective inhibitors of Rho family GTPases. PMID:22144280

  3. Stimulation of neuronal neurite outgrowth using functionalized carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, K.; Sato, C.; Naka, Y.; Whitby, R.; Shimizu, N.

    2010-03-01

    Low concentrations (0.11-1.7 µg ml - 1) of functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which are multi-walled CNTs modified by amino groups, when added with nerve growth factor (NGF), promoted outgrowth of neuronal neurites in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons and rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12h cells in culture media. The quantity of active extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was higher after the addition of both 0.85 µg ml - 1 CNTs and NGF than that with NGF alone. CNTs increased the number of cells with neurite outgrowth in DRG neurons and PC12h cells after the inhibition of the ERK signaling pathway using a mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/ERK kinase (MEK) inhibitor. Active ERK proteins were detected in MEK inhibitor-treated neurons after the addition of CNTs to the culture medium. These results demonstrate that CNTs may stimulate neurite outgrowth by activation of the ERK signaling pathway. Thus, CNTs are biocompatible and are promising candidates for biological applications and devices.

  4. TBC-Domain GAPs for Rab GTPases Accelerate GTP Hydrolysis by a Dual-Finger Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Pan,X.; Eathiraj, S.; Lambright, D.

    2006-01-01

    Rab GTPases regulate membrane trafficking by cycling between inactive (GDP-bound) and active (GTP-bound) conformations. The duration of the active state is limited by GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), which accelerate the slow intrinsic rate of GTP hydrolysis. Proteins containing TBC (Tre-2, Bub2 and Cdc16) domains are broadly conserved in eukaryotic organisms and function as GAPs for Rab GTPases as well as GTPases that control cytokinesis. An exposed arginine residue is a critical determinant of GAP activity in vitro and in vivo. It has been expected that the catalytic mechanism of TBC domains would parallel that of Ras and Rho family GAPs. Here we report crystallographic, mutational and functional analyses of complexes between Rab GTPases and the TBC domain of Gyp1p. In the crystal structure of a TBC-domain-Rab-GTPase-aluminium fluoride complex, which approximates the transition-state intermediate for GTP hydrolysis, the TBC domain supplies two catalytic residues in trans, an arginine finger analogous to Ras/Rho family GAPs and a glutamine finger that substitutes for the glutamine in the DxxGQ motif of the GTPase. The glutamine from the Rab GTPase does not stabilize the transition state as expected but instead interacts with the TBC domain. Strong conservation of both catalytic fingers indicates that most TBC-domain GAPs may accelerate GTP hydrolysis by a similar dual-finger mechanism.

  5. Differential Intensity-dependent Effects of Magnetic Stimulation on the Longest Neurites and Shorter Dendrites in Neuroscreen-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Huang, Whitney J.; Li, Kevin; Swanson, Roy; Cheung, Brian; Lin, Vernon W.; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Magnetic stimulation (MS) is a potential treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether MS-regulated neuronal activity can translate to specific changes in neuronal arborization and thus regulate synaptic activity and function. APPROACH To test our hypotheses, we examined the effects of MS on neurite growth of Neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cells over pulse frequencies of 1, 5 and 10 Hz at field intensities controlled by machine output (MO). Cells were treated with either 30% or 40% MO and received either maximal or minimal MS-induced current-density. Due to the nature of circular MS coils, the center region of the gridded coverslip (zone 1) received minimal (~5%) electromagnetic current density while the remaining area (zone 2) received maximal (~95%) current density. Plated NS-1 cells were exposed to MS twice per day for 3 days and then evaluated for length and number of neurites and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). MAIN RESULTS We show that MS dramatically affects the growth of the longest neurites (axon-like) but does not significantly affect the growth of shorter neurites (dendrite-like). Also, MS-induced changes in the longest neurite growth were most evident in zone 1, but not in zone 2. MS effects were intensity-dependent and were most evident in the bolstering of the longest neurite outgrowth, mainly seen in the 10 Hz MS group. Furthermore, we found that MS-increased BDNF expression and secretion was also frequency-dependent. Taken together, our results show that MS exerts distinct effects when different frequencies and intensities are applied to the neuritic compartments (longest neurite versus shorter dendrite(s)) of NS-1 cells. SIGNIFICANCE These findings support the concept that MS increases BDNF expression and signaling, which sculpts longest neurite arborization and connectivity by which neuronal activity is regulated. Understanding the mechanisms underlying MS is crucial for efficiently incorporating

  6. Differential intensity-dependent effects of magnetic stimulation on the longest neurites and shorter dendrites in neuroscreen-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Huang, Whitney J.; Li, Kevin; Swanson, Roy; Cheung, Brian; Lin, Vernon W.; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2015-04-01

    Objective. Magnetic stimulation (MS) is a potential treatment for neuropsychiatric disorders. This study investigates whether MS-regulated neuronal activity can translate to specific changes in neuronal arborization and thus regulate synaptic activity and function. Approach. To test our hypotheses, we examined the effects of MS on neurite growth of neuroscreen-1 (NS-1) cells over the pulse frequencies of 1, 5 and 10 Hz at field intensities controlled via machine output (MO). Cells were treated with either 30% or 40% MO. Due to the nature of circular MS coils, the center region of the gridded coverslip (zone 1) received minimal (∼5%) electromagnetic current density while the remaining area (zone 2) received maximal (∼95%) current density. Plated NS-1 cells were exposed to MS twice per day for three days and then evaluated for length and number of neurites and expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Main results. We show that MS dramatically affects the growth of the longest neurites (axon-like) but does not significantly affect the growth of shorter neurites (dendrite-like). Also, MS-induced changes in the longest neurite growth were most evident in zone 1, but not in zone 2. MS effects were intensity-dependent and were most evident in bolstering longest neurite outgrowth, best seen in the 10 Hz MS group. Furthermore, we found that MS-increased BDNF expression and secretion was also frequency-dependent. Taken together, our results show that MS exerts distinct effects when different frequencies and intensities are applied to the neuritic compartments (longest neurite versus shorter dendrite(s)) of NS-1 cells. Significance. These findings support the concept that MS increases BDNF expression and signaling, which sculpts longest neurite arborization and connectivity by which neuronal activity is regulated. Understanding the mechanisms underlying MS is crucial for efficiently incorporating its use into potential therapeutic strategies.

  7. The interdependence of the Rho GTPases and apicobasal cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Mack, Natalie Ann; Georgiou, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via the Rho GTPases provides crucial regulation of numerous cell polarization events, including apicobasal (AB) polarity, polarized cell migration, polarized cell division and neuronal polarity. Here we review the relationships between the Rho family GTPases and epithelial AB polarization events, focusing on the 3 best-characterized members: Rho, Rac and Cdc42. We discuss a multitude of processes that are important for AB polarization, including lumen formation, apical membrane specification, cell-cell junction assembly and maintenance, as well as tissue polarity. Our discussions aim to highlight the immensely complex regulatory mechanisms that encompass Rho GTPase signaling during AB polarization. More specifically, in this review we discuss several emerging common themes, that include: 1) the need for Rho GTPase activities to be carefully balanced in both a spatial and temporal manner through a multitude of mechanisms; 2) the existence of signaling feedback loops and crosstalk to create robust cellular responses; and 3) the frequent multifunctionality that exists among AB polarity regulators. Regarding this latter theme, we provide further discussion of the potential plasticity of the cell polarity machinery and as a result the possible implications for human disease. PMID:25469537

  8. RhoGAPs and Rho GTPases in platelets.

    PubMed

    Elvers, Margitta

    2016-08-01

    Platelet cytoskeletal reorganization is essential for platelet adhesion and thrombus formation in hemostasis and thrombosis. The Rho GTPases RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 are the main players in cytoskeletal dynamics of platelets responsible for the formation of filopodia and lamellipodia to strongly increase the platelet surface upon activation. They are involved in platelet activation and aggregate formation including platelet secretion, integrin activation and arterial thrombus formation. The activity of Rho GTPases is tightly controlled by different proteins such as GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs). GAPs stimulate GTP hydrolysis to terminate Rho signaling. The role and impact of GAPs in platelets is not well-defined and many of the RhoGAPs identified are not known to be present in platelets or to have any function in platelets. The recently identified RhoGAPs Oligophrenin1 (OPHN1) and Nadrin regulate the activity of RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 and subsequent platelet cytoskeletal reorganization, platelet activation and thrombus formation. In the last years, the analysis of genetically modified mice helped to gain the understanding of Rho GTPases and their regulators in cytoskeletal rearrangements and other Rho mediated cellular processes in platelets. PMID:25639730

  9. Control of T lymphocyte morphology by the GTPase Rho

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodside, Darren G.; Wooten, David K.; Teague, T. Kent; Miyamoto, Yuko J.; Caudell, Eva G.; Udagawa, Taturo; Andruss, Bernard F.; McIntyre, Bradley W.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rho family GTPase regulation of the actin cytoskeleton governs a variety of cell responses. In this report, we have analyzed the role of the GTPase Rho in maintenance of the T lymphocyte actin cytoskeleton. RESULTS: Inactivation of the GTPase Rho in the human T lymphocytic cell line HPB-ALL does not inhibit constitutively high adhesion to the integrin beta1 substrate fibronectin. It did however result in the aberrant extension of finger-like dendritic processes on the substrates VCAM-1, Fn, and mAb specific to beta1 integrins. Time-lapse video microscopy demonstrated that C3 induced extensions were primarily the result of an altered pseudopod elongation rather than retraction. Once the stellate pseudopodia extended, none retracted, and cells became completely immobile. Filipodial structures were absent and the dendritic-like processes in C3 treated cells were rich in filamentous actin. Immunolocalization of RhoA in untreated HPB-ALL cells spreading on fibronectin demonstrated a diffuse staining pattern within the pseudopodia. In C3 treated cells, clusters of RhoA were pronounced and localized within the altered extensions. CONCLUSIONS: GTPase Rho is actively involved in the regulation of T lymphocyte morphology and motility.

  10. The interdependence of the Rho GTPases and apicobasal cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Mack, Natalie Ann; Georgiou, Marios

    2014-01-01

    Signaling via the Rho GTPases provides crucial regulation of numerous cell polarization events, including apicobasal (AB) polarity, polarized cell migration, polarized cell division and neuronal polarity. Here we review the relationships between the Rho family GTPases and epithelial AB polarization events, focusing on the 3 best-characterized members: Rho, Rac and Cdc42. We discuss a multitude of processes that are important for AB polarization, including lumen formation, apical membrane specification, cell-cell junction assembly and maintenance, as well as tissue polarity. Our discussions aim to highlight the immensely complex regulatory mechanisms that encompass Rho GTPase signaling during AB polarization. More specifically, in this review we discuss several emerging common themes, that include: 1) the need for Rho GTPase activities to be carefully balanced in both a spatial and temporal manner through a multitude of mechanisms; 2) the existence of signaling feedback loops and crosstalk to create robust cellular responses; and 3) the frequent multifunctionality that exists among AB polarity regulators. Regarding this latter theme, we provide further discussion of the potential plasticity of the cell polarity machinery and as a result the possible implications for human disease. PMID:25469537

  11. MIRO GTPases in Mitochondrial Transport, Homeostasis and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionarily-conserved mitochondrial Rho (MIRO) small GTPase is a Ras superfamily member with three unique features. It has two GTPase domains instead of the one found in other small GTPases, and it also has two EF hand calcium binding domains, which allow Ca2+-dependent modulation of its activity and functions. Importantly, it is specifically associated with the mitochondria and via a hydrophobic transmembrane domain, rather than a lipid-based anchor more commonly found in other small GTPases. At the mitochondria, MIRO regulates mitochondrial homeostasis and turnover. In metazoans, MIRO regulates mitochondrial transport and organization at cellular extensions, such as axons, and, in some cases, intercellular transport of the organelle through tunneling nanotubes. Recent findings have revealed a myriad of molecules that are associated with MIRO, particularly the kinesin adaptor Milton/TRAK, mitofusin, PINK1 and Parkin, as well as the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) complex. The mechanistic aspects of the roles of MIRO and its interactors in mitochondrial homeostasis and transport are gradually being revealed. On the other hand, MIRO is also increasingly associated with neurodegenerative diseases that have roots in mitochondrial dysfunction. In this review, I discuss what is currently known about the cellular physiology and pathophysiology of MIRO functions. PMID:26729171

  12. Emerging nexus between RAB GTPases, autophagy and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Jain, Navodita; Ganesh, Subramaniam

    2016-05-01

    The RAB class of small GTPases includes the major regulators of intracellular communication, which are involved in vesicle generation through fusion and fission, and vesicular trafficking. RAB proteins also play an imperative role in neuronal maintenance and survival. Recent studies in the field of neurodegeneration have also highlighted the process of autophagy as being essential for neuronal maintenance. Here we review the emerging roles of RAB proteins in regulating macroautophagy and its impact in the context of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26985808

  13. Olfactory ensheathing cell-neurite alignment enhances neurite outgrowth in scar-like cultures

    PubMed Central

    Khankan, Rana R.; Wanner, Ina B.; Phelps, Patricia E.

    2015-01-01

    The regenerative capacity of the adult CNS neurons after injury is strongly inhibited by the spinal cord lesion site environment that is composed primarily of the reactive astroglial scar and invading meningeal fibroblasts. Olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) transplantation facilitates neuronal survival and functional recovery after a complete spinal cord transection, yet the mechanisms by which this recovery occurs remain unclear. We used a unique multicellular scar-like culture model to test if OECs promote neurite outgrowth in growth inhibitory areas. Astrocytes were mechanically injured and challenged by meningeal fibroblasts to produce key inhibitory elements of a spinal cord lesion. Neurite outgrowth of postnatal cerebral cortical neurons was assessed on three substrates: quiescent astrocyte control cultures, reactive astrocyte scar-like cultures, and scar-like cultures with OECs. Initial results showed that OECs enhanced total neurite outgrowth of cortical neurons in a scar-like environment by 60%. We then asked if the neurite growth-promoting properties of OECs depended on direct alignment between neuronal and OEC processes. Neurites that aligned with OECs were nearly three times longer when they grew on inhibitory meningeal fibroblast areas and twice as long on reactive astrocyte zones compared to neurites not associated with OECs. Our results show that OECs can independently enhance neurite elongation and that direct OEC-neurite cell contact can provide a permissive substrate that overcomes the inhibitory nature of the reactive astrocyte scar border and the fibroblast-rich spinal cord lesion core. PMID:25863021

  14. Weight Loss Upregulates the Small GTPase DIRAS3 in Human White Adipose Progenitor Cells, Which Negatively Regulates Adipogenesis and Activates Autophagy via Akt–mTOR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Ejaz, Asim; Mitterberger, Maria C.; Lu, Zhen; Mattesich, Monika; Zwierzina, Marit E.; Hörl, Susanne; Kaiser, Andreas; Viertler, Hans-Peter; Rostek, Ursula; Meryk, Andreas; Khalid, Sana; Pierer, Gerhard; Bast, Robert C.; Zwerschke, Werner

    2016-01-01

    Long-term weight-loss (WL) interventions reduce insulin serum levels, protect from obesity, and postpone age-associated diseases. The impact of long-term WL on adipose-derived stromal/progenitor cells (ASCs) is unknown. We identified DIRAS3 and IGF-1 as long-term WL target genes up-regulated in ASCs in subcutaneous white adipose tissue of formerly obese donors (WLDs). We show that DIRAS3 negatively regulates Akt, mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling in ASCs undergoing adipogenesis and acts as a negative regulator of this pathway and an activator of autophagy. Studying the IGF-1–DIRAS3 interaction in ASCs of WLDs, we demonstrate that IGF-1, although strongly up-regulated in these cells, hardly activates Akt, while ERK1/2 and S6K1 phosphorylation is activated by IGF-1. Overexpression of DIRAS3 in WLD ASCs completely inhibits Akt phosphorylation also in the presence of IGF-1. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6K1 is lesser reduced under these conditions. In conclusion, our key findings are that DIRAS3 down-regulates Akt–mTOR signaling in ASCs of WLDs. Moreover, DIRAS3 inhibits adipogenesis and activates autophagy in these cells. PMID:27211557

  15. Weight Loss Upregulates the Small GTPase DIRAS3 in Human White Adipose Progenitor Cells, Which Negatively Regulates Adipogenesis and Activates Autophagy via Akt-mTOR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Ejaz, Asim; Mitterberger, Maria C; Lu, Zhen; Mattesich, Monika; Zwierzina, Marit E; Hörl, Susanne; Kaiser, Andreas; Viertler, Hans-Peter; Rostek, Ursula; Meryk, Andreas; Khalid, Sana; Pierer, Gerhard; Bast, Robert C; Zwerschke, Werner

    2016-04-01

    Long-term weight-loss (WL) interventions reduce insulin serum levels, protect from obesity, and postpone age-associated diseases. The impact of long-term WL on adipose-derived stromal/progenitor cells (ASCs) is unknown. We identified DIRAS3 and IGF-1 as long-term WL target genes up-regulated in ASCs in subcutaneous white adipose tissue of formerly obese donors (WLDs). We show that DIRAS3 negatively regulates Akt, mTOR and ERK1/2 signaling in ASCs undergoing adipogenesis and acts as a negative regulator of this pathway and an activator of autophagy. Studying the IGF-1-DIRAS3 interaction in ASCs of WLDs, we demonstrate that IGF-1, although strongly up-regulated in these cells, hardly activates Akt, while ERK1/2 and S6K1 phosphorylation is activated by IGF-1. Overexpression of DIRAS3 in WLD ASCs completely inhibits Akt phosphorylation also in the presence of IGF-1. Phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and S6K1 is lesser reduced under these conditions. In conclusion, our key findings are that DIRAS3 down-regulates Akt-mTOR signaling in ASCs of WLDs. Moreover, DIRAS3 inhibits adipogenesis and activates autophagy in these cells. PMID:27211557

  16. Immunosuppressant FK506 promotes neurite outgrowth in cultures of PC12 cells and sensory ganglia.

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, W E; George, E B; Dawson, T M; Steiner, J P; Snyder, S H

    1994-01-01

    The immunosuppressant drug FK506 acts by binding to receptor proteins, FK506-binding proteins (FKBPs), which in turn can bind to and regulate a Ca(2+)-dependent phosphatase, calcineurin, and a Ca2+ release channel, the ryanodine receptor. Based on our findings in regeneration models that levels of FKBPs during neural regeneration parallel those of growth-associated protein GAP43, a calcineurin substrate that regulates neurite extension, we examined effects of FK506 in PC12 rat pheochromocytoma cells and in rat sensory ganglia. FK506 enhances neurite outgrowth in both systems by increasing sensitivity to nerve growth factor. Blockade of FK506 actions in sensory ganglia by rapamycin, an FK506 antagonist, establishes that these effects involve FKBPs. Rapamycin itself stimulates neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells. These drug effects are detected at subnanomolar concentrations, suggesting therapeutic application in diseases involving neural degeneration. Images PMID:7512727

  17. RAC/ROP GTPases and auxin signaling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hen-ming; Hazak, Ora; Cheung, Alice Y; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-04-01

    Auxin functions as a key morphogen in regulating plant growth and development. Studies on auxin-regulated gene expression and on the mechanism of polar auxin transport and its asymmetric distribution within tissues have provided the basis for realizing the molecular mechanisms underlying auxin function. In eukaryotes, members of the Ras and Rho subfamilies of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases function as molecular switches in many signaling cascades that regulate growth and development. Plants do not have Ras proteins, but they contain Rho-like small G proteins called RACs or ROPs that, like fungal and metazoan Rhos, are regulators of cell polarity and may also undertake some Ras functions. Here, we discuss the advances made over the last decade that implicate RAC/ROPs as mediators for auxin-regulated gene expression, rapid cell surface-located auxin signaling, and directional auxin transport. We also describe experimental data indicating that auxin-RAC/ROP crosstalk may form regulatory feedback loops and theoretical modeling that attempts to connect local auxin gradients with RAC/ROP regulation of cell polarity. We hope that by discussing these experimental and modeling studies, this perspective will stimulate efforts to further refine our understanding of auxin signaling via the RAC/ROP molecular switch. PMID:21478442

  18. Specificity of prenatal cocaine on inhibition of locus coeruleus neurite outgrowth.

    PubMed

    Dey, S; Mactutus, C F; Booze, R M; Snow, D M

    2006-01-01

    Prenatal cocaine exposure induces alterations in attentional function that presumably involve locus coeruleus noradrenergic neurons and their projections. Previous reports indicate that embryonic rat locus coeruleus neurons exposed to cocaine, both in vitro and in vivo, showed in decreased cell survival and inhibition of neurite outgrowth, and that the effects were most deleterious during early gestation. The present study performed in vitro addressed the specificity of the inhibitory effects of cocaine by comparing locus coeruleus neurite formation and extension to that of dopaminergic substantia nigra neurons following exposure to a physiologically-relevant dose of cocaine (500 ng/ml, two times a day, for four days) during peak neuritogenesis. Following cocaine treatment, immunocytochemistry (anti-norepinephrine antibody to locus coeruleus; anti-tyrosine hydroxylase antibody to substantia nigra) and image analysis were performed to measure a variety of neurite outgrowth parameters. For locus coeruleus neurons, cocaine treatment decreased the 1) number of cells initiating neurites [P<0.001], 2) mean number [P<0.05] and length of neurites [P<0.0001], 3) mean number [P<0.0016] and length of branched neurites [P<0.0006], and 4) mean length of the longest neurites [P<0.0001]. In comparison, substantia nigra neurons were not significantly affected by cocaine for any of the parameters examined. More importantly, a significant interaction between cocaine treatment and brain region was observed [P<0.0002] indicating greater vulnerability of locus coeruleus, relative to substantia nigra neurons, to cocaine exposure. These data support our hypothesis that cocaine targets the noradrenergic system by negatively regulating locus coeruleus neuronal outgrowth, which likely affects pathfinding, synaptic connectivity, and ultimately attentional behavior in cocaine-exposed offspring. PMID:16483722

  19. Structural Mechanisms and Drug Discovery Prospects of Rho GTPases

    PubMed Central

    Smithers, Cameron C.; Overduin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate cellular morphology and dynamics, and some are key drivers of cancer progression. This superfamily offers attractive potential targets for therapeutic intervention, with RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 being prime examples. The challenges in developing agents that act on these signaling enzymes include the lack of obvious druggable pockets and their membrane-bound activities. However, progress in targeting the similar Ras protein is illuminating new strategies for specifically inhibiting oncogenic GTPases. The structures of multiple signaling and regulatory states of Rho proteins have been determined, and the post-translational modifications including acylation and phosphorylation points have been mapped and their functional effects examined. The development of inhibitors to probe the significance of overexpression and mutational hyperactivation of these GTPases underscores their importance in cancer progression. The ability to integrate in silico, in vitro, and in vivo investigations of drug-like molecules indicates the growing tractability of GTPase systems for lead optimization. Although no Rho-targeted drug molecules have yet been clinically approved, this family is clearly showing increasing promise for the development of precision medicine and combination cancer therapies. PMID:27304967

  20. Structural Mechanisms and Drug Discovery Prospects of Rho GTPases.

    PubMed

    Smithers, Cameron C; Overduin, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Rho GTPases regulate cellular morphology and dynamics, and some are key drivers of cancer progression. This superfamily offers attractive potential targets for therapeutic intervention, with RhoA, Rac1 and Cdc42 being prime examples. The challenges in developing agents that act on these signaling enzymes include the lack of obvious druggable pockets and their membrane-bound activities. However, progress in targeting the similar Ras protein is illuminating new strategies for specifically inhibiting oncogenic GTPases. The structures of multiple signaling and regulatory states of Rho proteins have been determined, and the post-translational modifications including acylation and phosphorylation points have been mapped and their functional effects examined. The development of inhibitors to probe the significance of overexpression and mutational hyperactivation of these GTPases underscores their importance in cancer progression. The ability to integrate in silico, in vitro, and in vivo investigations of drug-like molecules indicates the growing tractability of GTPase systems for lead optimization. Although no Rho-targeted drug molecules have yet been clinically approved, this family is clearly showing increasing promise for the development of precision medicine and combination cancer therapies. PMID:27304967

  1. Interaction between a Domain of the Negative Regulator of the Ras-ERK Pathway, SPRED1 Protein, and the GTPase-activating Protein-related Domain of Neurofibromin Is Implicated in Legius Syndrome and Neurofibromatosis Type 1.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Yasuko; Brems, Hilde; Suzuki, Mayu; Kanamori, Mitsuhiro; Okada, Masahiro; Morita, Rimpei; Llano-Rivas, Isabel; Ose, Toyoyuki; Messiaen, Ludwine; Legius, Eric; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2016-02-12

    Constitutional heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the SPRED1 gene cause a phenotype known as Legius syndrome, which consists of symptoms of multiple café-au-lait macules, axillary freckling, learning disabilities, and macrocephaly. Legius syndrome resembles a mild neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) phenotype. It has been demonstrated that SPRED1 functions as a negative regulator of the Ras-ERK pathway and interacts with neurofibromin, the NF1 gene product. However, the molecular details of this interaction and the effects of the mutations identified in Legius syndrome and NF1 on this interaction have not yet been investigated. In this study, using a yeast two-hybrid system and an immunoprecipitation assay in HEK293 cells, we found that the SPRED1 EVH1 domain interacts with the N-terminal 16 amino acids and the C-terminal 20 amino acids of the GTPase-activating protein (GAP)-related domain (GRD) of neurofibromin, which form two crossing α-helix coils outside the GAP domain. These regions have been shown to be dispensable for GAP activity and are not present in p120(GAP). Several mutations in these N- and C-terminal regions of the GRD in NF1 patients and pathogenic missense mutations in the EVH1 domain of SPRED1 in Legius syndrome reduced the binding affinity between the EVH1 domain and the GRD. EVH1 domain mutations with reduced binding to the GRD also disrupted the ERK suppression activity of SPRED1. These data clearly demonstrate that SPRED1 inhibits the Ras-ERK pathway by recruiting neurofibromin to Ras through the EVH1-GRD interaction, and this study also provides molecular basis for the pathogenic mutations of NF1 and Legius syndrome. PMID:26635368

  2. RhoC GTPase Is a Potent Regulator of Glutamine Metabolism and N-Acetylaspartate Production in Inflammatory Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Michelle L; Yates, Joel A; Evans, Charles R; Van Wassenhove, Lauren D; Wu, Zhi Fen; Bridges, Sydney; Bao, Liwei; Fournier, Chelsea; Ashrafzadeh, Sepideh; Merrins, Matthew J; Satin, Leslie S; Schnell, Santiago; Burant, Charles F; Merajver, Sofia D

    2016-06-24

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is an extremely lethal cancer that rapidly metastasizes. Although the molecular attributes of IBC have been described, little is known about the underlying metabolic features of the disease. Using a variety of metabolic assays, including (13)C tracer experiments, we found that SUM149 cells, the primary in vitro model of IBC, exhibit metabolic abnormalities that distinguish them from other breast cancer cells, including elevated levels of N-acetylaspartate, a metabolite primarily associated with neuronal disorders and gliomas. Here we provide the first evidence of N-acetylaspartate in breast cancer. We also report that the oncogene RhoC, a driver of metastatic potential, modulates glutamine and N-acetylaspartate metabolism in IBC cells in vitro, revealing a novel role for RhoC as a regulator of tumor cell metabolism that extends beyond its well known role in cytoskeletal rearrangement. PMID:27129239

  3. Pure neuritic leprosy: Current status and relevance.

    PubMed

    Rao, P Narasimha; Suneetha, Sujai

    2016-01-01

    Pure neuritic leprosy has always been an enigma due to its clinical and management ambiguities. Although only the Indian Association of Leprologist's classification recognizes 'pure neuritic leprosy' as a distinct sub group of leprosy, cases nonetheless are reported from various countries of Asia, Africa, South America and Europe, indicating its global relevance. It is important to maintain pure neuritic leprosy as a subgroup as it constitutes a good percentage of leprosy cases reported from India, which contributes to more than half of global leprosy numbers. Unfortunately, a high proportion of these patients present with Grade 2 disability at the time of initial reporting itself due to the early nerve involvement. Although skin lesions are absent by definition, when skin biopsies were performed from the skin along the distribution of the affected nerve, a proportion of patients demonstrated leprosy pathology, revealing sub-clinical skin involvement. In addition on follow-up, skin lesions are noted to develop in up to 20% of pure neuritic leprosy cases, indicating its progression to manifest cutaneous disease. Over the decades, the confirmation of diagnosis of pure neuritic leprosy has been subjective, however, with the arrival and use of high-resolution ultrasonography (HRUS) for nerve imaging, we have a tool not only to objectively measure and record the nerve thickening but also to assess the morphological alterations in the nerve including echo texture, fascicular pattern and vascularity. Management of pure neuritic leprosy requires multidrug therapy along with appropriate dose of systemic corticosteroids, for both acute and silent neuritis. Measures for pain relief, self-care of limbs and physiotherapy are important to prevent as well as manage disabilities in this group of patients. PMID:27088926

  4. A novel Ras GTPase (Ras3) regulates conidiation, multi-stress tolerance and virulence by acting upstream of Hog1 signaling pathway in Beauveria bassiana.

    PubMed

    Guan, Yi; Wang, Ding-Yi; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2015-09-01

    Two Ras ATPases (Ras1 and Ras2) are well known to regulate antagonistically or cooperatively various cellular events in many fungi. Here we show the significance of a novel Ras homolog (Ras3) for Beauveria bassiana. Ras3 possesses five domains and two GTP/GDP switches typical for Ras family and was proven to localize to plasma membrane despite the position change of a membrane-targeting cysteine in C-terminal CAAX motif. Deletion of ras3 altered temporal transcription pattern of ras1 instead of ras2. Compared with wild-type, Δras3 grew significantly faster in a rich medium but slower in some minimal media, and produced far fewer conidia with impaired quality, which was evident with slower germination, attenuated virulence, reduced thermotolerance and decreased UV-B resistance. Moreover, Δras3 was much more sensitive to the oxidative stress of menadione than of H2O2 and to the stress of high osmolarity than of cell wall perturbation during growth. The high sensitivity of Δras3 to menadione was concurrent with reductions in both gene transcripts and total activity of superoxide dismutases. Intriguingly, the high osmosensitivity was concurrent with not only reduced transcripts of a critical transcription factor (Msn2) and most signaling proteins in the high-osmolarity-glycerol pathway of Δras3 but nearly undetectable phosphorylation signal of Hog1 hallmarking the pathway. All the changes were restored by ras3 complementation. Taken together, Ras3 is involved in the Hog1 pathway required for osmoregulation and hence can positively regulate conidiation, germination, multi-stress tolerance and virulence linked to the biological control potential of the filamentous insect pathogen. PMID:26162967

  5. Essential role of NKCC1 in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth

    SciTech Connect

    Nakajima, Ken-ichi; Miyazaki, Hiroaki; Niisato, Naomi; Marunaka, Yoshinori . E-mail: marunaka@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp

    2007-08-03

    The Na{sup +}/K{sup +}/2Cl{sup -} cotransporter (NKCC) mediates electroneutral transport of 2Cl{sup -} coupled with Na{sup +} and K{sup +} across the plasma membrane, and plays crucial roles in Cl{sup -} uptake into the cells, homeostasis of cellular Cl{sup -}, and cell volume regulation. However, we have very limited information on the roles of ion transporters in neurite outgrowth in neuronal cells. In the present study, we report the role of NKCC1 (an isoform of NKCC) in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma PC12D cells. The expression level of NKCC1 protein was increased by NGF treatment. Knock-down of NKCC1 by RNA interference (RNAi) drastically diminished the NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Transfection of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged rat NKCC1 into cells for clarification of intracellular localization of NKCC1 revealed that the EGFP-rNKCC1 was mainly localized in the plasma membrane at growth cone during neurite outgrowth. These observations suggest that NKCC1 plays a fundamental role in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth of PC12D cells.

  6. Neurite outgrowth enhancement by jiadifenolide: possible targets.

    PubMed

    Shenvi, R A

    2016-04-01

    Covering: 1860-2016A mechanistic link may exist between convulsant plant substances typified by picrotoxinin, and 'neurotrophic' sesquiterpenes like jiadifenolide. Picrotoxinin elicits convulsion by anion blockade of the Cys-loop family of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels. These same receptors mediate neuronal development and neurite outgrowth prior to synapse formation. Due to its structural homology with picrotoxin and anisatin, it is possible that jiadifenolide enhances NGF-stimulated neurite outgrowth by modulation of the Cys-loop family of receptors. PMID:26891462

  7. Isoform-specific roles of the GTPase activating protein Nadrin in cytoskeletal reorganization of platelets.

    PubMed

    Beck, S; Fotinos, A; Lang, F; Gawaz, M; Elvers, M

    2013-01-01

    Cytoskeletal reorganization of activated platelets plays a crucial role in hemostasis and thrombosis and implies activation of Rho GTPases. Rho GTPases are important regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics and function as molecular switches that cycle between an inactive and an active state. They are regulated by GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) that stimulate GTP hydrolysis to terminate Rho signaling. The regulation of Rho GTPases in platelets is not explored. A detailed characterization of Rho regulation is necessary to understand activation and inactivation of Rho GTPases critical for platelet activation and aggregation. Nadrin is a RhoGAP regulating cytoplasmic protein explored in the central nervous system. Five Nadrin isoforms are known that share a unique GAP domain, a serine/threonine/proline-rich domain, a SH3-binding motif and an N-terminal BAR domain but differ in their C-terminus. Here we identified Nadrin in platelets where it co-localizes to actin-rich regions and Rho GTPases. Different Nadrin isoforms selectively regulate Rho GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1) and cytoskeletal reorganization suggesting that - beside the GAP domain - the C-terminus of Nadrin determines Rho specificity and influences cell physiology. Furthermore, Nadrin controls RhoA-mediated stress fibre and focal adhesion formation. Spreading experiments on fibrinogen revealed strongly reduced cell adhesion upon Nadrin overexpression. Unexpectedly, the Nadrin BAR domain controls Nadrin-GAP activity and acts as a guidance domain to direct this GAP to its substrate at the plasma membrane. Our results suggest a critical role for Nadrin in the regulation of RhoA, Cdc42 and Rac1 in platelets and thus for platelet adhesion and aggregation. PMID:22975681

  8. LRRK2 autophosphorylation enhances its GTPase activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhiyong; Mobley, James A; DeLucas, Lawrence J; Kahn, Richard A; West, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    The leucine-rich repeat kinase (LRRK)-2 protein contains nonoverlapping GTPase and kinase domains, and mutation in either domain can cause Parkinson disease. GTPase proteins are critical upstream modulators of many effector protein kinases. In LRRK2, this paradigm may be reversed, as the kinase domain phosphorylates its own GTPase domain. In this study, we found that the ameba LRRK2 ortholog ROCO4 phosphorylates the GTPase domain [termed Ras-of-complex (ROC) domain in this family] of human LRRK2 on the same residues as the human LRRK2 kinase. Phosphorylation of ROC enhances its rate of GTP hydrolysis [from kcat (catalytic constant) 0.007 to 0.016 min(-1)], without affecting GTP or GDP dissociation kinetics [koff = 0.093 and 0.148 min(-1) for GTP and GDP, respectively). Phosphorylation also promotes the formation of ROC dimers, although GTPase activity appears to be equivalent between purified dimers and monomers. Modeling experiments show that phosphorylation induces conformational changes at the critical p-loop structure. Finally, ROC appears to be one of many GTPases phosphorylated in p-loop residues, as revealed by alignment of LRRK2 autophosphorylation sites with GTPases annotated in the phosphoproteome database. These results provide an example of a novel mechanism for kinase-mediated control of GTPase activity. PMID:26396237

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine 1A and 2B serotonin receptors in neurite outgrowth: involvement of early growth response protein 1.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Tonino; Cardarelli, Silvia; Ori, Michela; Nardi, Irma; Biagioni, Stefano; Poiana, Giancarlo

    2013-01-01

    Neurotransmitters play important roles in neurogenesis; in particular, acetylcholine and serotonin may regulate neurite elongation. Acetylcholine may also activate transcription factors such as early growth response protein 1 (EGR-1), which plays a role in neurite extension. N18TG2 neuroblastoma cells (which do not produce neurotransmitters and constitutively express muscarinic acetylcholine receptors) were transfected with constructs containing the cDNA for choline acetyltransferase, 5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT1A) and 5-HT2B serotonin receptors to study acetylcholine and serotonin interplay in neurite outgrowth. 5-HT1A receptor stimulation causes a decrease in EGR-1 levels and inhibition of neurite outgrowth; 5-HT2B stimulation, however, has no effect. Muscarinic cholinergic stimulation, on the other end, increases EGR-1 levels and fiber outgrowth. Inhibition of EGR-1 binding reduces fiber outgrowth activity. When both cholinergic and 5-HT1A receptors are stimulated, fiber outgrowth is restored; therefore, acetylcholine counterbalances the inhibitory effect of serotonin on neurite outgrowth. These results suggest that EGR-1 plays a role in the interplay of acetylcholine and serotonin in the regulation of neurite extension during development. PMID:24158140

  10. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants

    PubMed Central

    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Sato, Ken; Takeuchi, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar) and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf), act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 protein strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf proteins contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants. PMID:25191334