Science.gov

Sample records for guanosine monophosphate pathway

  1. Inhibition of the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway limited the cardioprotective effect of post-conditioning in hearts with apical myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Correa, Francisco; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Chagoya, Victoria; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Vigueras, Rosa María; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; García-Niño, Wylly Ramsés; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; León-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Zazueta, Cecilia

    2015-10-15

    Reperfusion damage involves opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) and loss of ATP synthesis. Several cardioprotective pathways are activated by ischemic or pharmacological post-conditioning (PC). The mechanisms that are activated by PC in no co-morbidity murine models include: activation of rescue kinases, oxidative stress reduction, glycolytic flux regulation and preservation of ATP synthesis. However, relatively scarce efforts have been made to define whether the efficacy of PC signaling is blunted by risk factors or systemic diseases associated with ischemic heart pathology. Experimental evidence has shown that the nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling is a main mechanism activated by PC in hearts without pathological history. In this work we evaluated the participation of the NO pathway, through downstream kinase activation and inhibition of mPTP in hearts with previous infarct. Myocardial infarction was induced with a single dose of isoproterenol (85 mg/kg i.p.) to male Wistar rats. After 24 h, the hearts were mounted into the Langendorff system and subjected to 30 min of ischemia and 60 min of reperfusion. PC consisted of 5 cycles of 30 s of reperfusion/30 s of ischemia, then the hearts were reperfused with or without inhibitors of the NO/cGMP pathway. PC activates the NO/cGMP pathway, as increased cGMP and NO levels were detected in isoproterenol-treated hearts. The cardioprotective effect of PC was abolished with both L-NAME (inhibitor of constitutive NO synthase) and ODQ (inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase), whereas the NO donor (DETA-NO) restored cardioprotection even in the presence of L-NAME or ODQ. We also found that mitochondrial structure and function was preserved in PC hearts. We conclude that PC exerts cardioprotection in hearts with previous infarct by maintaining mitochondrial structure and function through NO-dependent pathway. PMID:26387613

  2. Elevated intracranial dopamine impairs the glutamate‑nitric oxide‑cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in cortical astrocytes in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Saidan; Huang, Weilong; Ye, Yiru; Yang, Jianjing; Hu, Jiangnan; Wang, Xiaobin; Liu, Leping; Lu, Qin; Lin, Yuanshao

    2014-09-01

    In a previous study by our group memory impairment in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) was associated with the inhibition of the glutamate‑nitric oxide‑cyclic guanosine monophosphate (Glu‑NO‑cGMP) pathway due to elevated dopamine (DA). However, the effects of DA on the Glu‑NO‑cGMP pathway localized in primary cortical astrocytes (PCAs) had not been elucidated in rats with MHE. In the present study, it was identified that when the levels of DA in the cerebral cortex of rats with MHE and high‑dose DA (3 mg/kg)‑treated rats were increased, the co‑localization of N‑methyl‑d‑aspartate receptors subunit 1 (NMDAR1), calmodulin (CaM), nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cyclic guanine monophosphate (cGMP) with the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker protein of astrocytes, all significantly decreased, in both the MHE and high‑dose DA‑treated rats (P<0.01). Furthermore, NMDA‑induced augmentation of the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP localized in PCAs was decreased in MHE and DA‑treated rats, as compared with the controls. Chronic exposure of cultured cerebral cortex PCAs to DA treatment induced a dose‑dependent decrease in the concentration of intracellular calcium, nitrites and nitrates, the formation of cGMP and the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS and sGC/cGMP. High doses of DA (50 µM) significantly reduced NMDA‑induced augmentation of the formation of cGMP and the contents of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP (P<0.01). These results suggest that the suppression of DA on the Glu‑NO‑cGMP pathway localized in PCAs contributes to memory impairment in rats with MHE. PMID:25059564

  3. Elevated intracranial dopamine impairs the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in cortical astrocytes in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    DING, SAIDAN; HUANG, WEILONG; YE, YIRU; YANG, JIANJING; HU, JIANGNAN; WANG, XIAOBIN; LIU, LEPING; LU, QIN; LIN, YUANSHAO

    2014-01-01

    In a previous study by our group memory impairment in rats with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) was associated with the inhibition of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (Glu-NO-cGMP) pathway due to elevated dopamine (DA). However, the effects of DA on the Glu-NO-cGMP pathway localized in primary cortical astrocytes (PCAs) had not been elucidated in rats with MHE. In the present study, it was identified that when the levels of DA in the cerebral cortex of rats with MHE and high-dose DA (3 mg/kg)-treated rats were increased, the co-localization of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors subunit 1 (NMDAR1), calmodulin (CaM), nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cyclic guanine monophosphate (cGMP) with the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), a marker protein of astrocytes, all significantly decreased, in both the MHE and high-dose DA-treated rats (P<0.01). Furthermore, NMDA-induced augmentation of the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP localized in PCAs was decreased in MHE and DA-treated rats, as compared with the controls. Chronic exposure of cultured cerebral cortex PCAs to DA treatment induced a dose-dependent decrease in the concentration of intracellular calcium, nitrites and nitrates, the formation of cGMP and the expression of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS and sGC/cGMP. High doses of DA (50 μM) significantly reduced NMDA-induced augmentation of the formation of cGMP and the contents of NMDAR1, CaM, nNOS, sGC and cGMP (P<0.01). These results suggest that the suppression of DA on the Glu-NO-cGMP pathway localized in PCAs contributes to memory impairment in rats with MHE. PMID:25059564

  4. Involvement of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron in mice forced swimming test and tail suspension test.

    PubMed

    Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Kordjazy, Nastaran; Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arvin; Amini-Khoei, Hossien; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Dehpour, AhmadReza

    2016-06-01

    Antidepressant-like effects of 5-hydroxytryptamine subtype 3 (5-HT3) antagonists including tropisetron and ondansetron have been previously demonstrated in the literature. It was reported that stimulation of 5-HT3 receptors activate the nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) pathway, which is involved in regulation of behavioral and emotional functions. In our study, treating animals with tropisetron (5, 10, and 30mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.01 and 0.1µg/kg) significantly decreased the immobility time in forced swimming test (FST) and tail-suspension test (TST). Co-administration of subeffective doses of tropisetron (1mg/kg) and ondansetron (0.001µg/kg) with subeffective dose of l-NAME (10mg/kg, nonselective NO synthase (NOS) inhibitor) and 7-nitroindazole (25mg/kg, neural NOS inhibitor) exerted antidepressant-like effect in FST and TST, while aminoguanidine (50mg/kg, inducible NOS inhibitor) did not enhance the antidepressant-like effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. Besides, l-arginine (750mg/kg, NO precursor) and sildenafil (5mg/kg, phosphodiesterase inhibitor) suppressed the anti-immobility effect of 5-HT3 antagonists. None of the treatments altered the locomotor behavior of mice in open-field test. Also, hippocampal (but not cortical) nitrite level was significantly lower in tropisetron and ondansetron-treated mice compared with saline-injected mice. Also, co-administration of 7-nitroindazole with tropisetron or ondansetron caused a significant decrease in hippocampal nitrite levels. In conclusion, we suggest that antidepressant-like effect of tropisetron and ondansetron are partially mediated by modulation of NO-cGMP pathway. PMID:27001377

  5. Nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in the eye.

    PubMed

    Murad, Ferid

    2008-06-01

    This brief review describes the components and pathways utilized in nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling. Since the discovery of the effects of NO and cGMP on smooth muscle relaxation about 30 years ago, the field has expanded in many directions such that many, but not all, biochemical and biological effects seem to be regulated by these unique signaling molecules. While many of the effects of NO are due to activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that can be considered the receptor for NO, cGMP, in turn, can activate a cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) to phosphorylate an array of proteins. Some of the effects of cGMP can be independent of PKG and are due to effects on ion channels or cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases. Also, some of the effects of NO can be independent of sGC activation. The isoenzymes and macromolecules that participate in these signaling pathways can serve as molecular targets to identify compounds that increase or decrease their activation and thus serve as chemical leads for discovering novel drugs for a variety of diseases. Some examples are given. However, with about 90,000 publications in the field since our first reports in 1977, this brief review can only give the readers a sample of the excitement and opportunities we have found in this cell signaling system. PMID:18443613

  6. PRODUCTION OF EXTRACELLULAR GUANOSINE-5'-MONOPHOSPHATE BY BACILLUS SUBTILIS

    PubMed Central

    Demain, A. L.; Miller, I. M.; Hendlin, D.

    1964-01-01

    Demain, A. L. (Merck Sharp & Dohme Research Laboratories, Rahway, N.J.), I. M. Miller, and D. Hendlin. Production of extracellular guanosine-5'-monophosphate by Bacillus subtilis. J. Bacteriol. 88:991–995. 1964.—Wild-type Bacillus subtilis colonies were found to feed purineless mutants. A strain with high feeding capacity was selected for study, with a guanineless mutant of B. subtilis used as the assay organism. The factor was excreted during its growth phase in a complex medium containing starch and soybean meal extract. Nutritional studies led to the development of a defined medium to be used for biochemical studies and to aid in the isolation of the factor. Starch was replaced by maltose and the soybean meal extract by Mn++. Production of the factor was sensitive to the pH of the medium during growth. Practically its entire extracellular accumulation occurred before visible lysis. The factor was identified as guanosine-5'-monophosphate derived by extracellular enzymatic hydrolysis of excreted ribonucleic acid. PMID:14219064

  7. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway.

    PubMed

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with N(W)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It's effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  8. Antinociceptive Effect of Vardenafil on Carrageenan-Induced Hyperalgesia in Rat: involvement of Nitric Oxide/Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate/Calcium Channels Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gediz, Ezgi İkiz; Nacitarhan, Cahit; Minareci, Edibe; Sadan, Gulay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the peripheral antinociception effects of specific phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE-5) inhibitor vardenafil on carrageenan-induced nociception in rats, and the role of calcium besides the L-arginine- nitric oxide (NO)- cyclic guanosine monophophate (cGMP) pathway in these effects. Hyperalgesia was induced by the intraplantar injection of 0.1 mL fresh carrageenan solution to right hind-paw whereas, saline as a vehicle of carrageenan was injected to the left paw. This procedure was used for measuring mechanic nociception pressure via an analgesimeter. Pressure which produced nociception was measured before (0 minute) and after(15, 30, 60 and 120 minutes) carrageenan injection. Local administration of vardenafil produced a dose-dependent antinociceptive effect. Pretreatment with NW-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), oxadiazolo (4, 3, a) quinoxalin -1-one (ODQ, inhibitor of guanylyl cyclase) or A23187 (calcium ionophore) decreased the effect of vardenafil. In contrast, L-arginine (nitric oxide donor) seemed to potentiate the vardenafil-induced antinociception. Our results suggest that phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor vardenafil may offer a new therapeutic tool to treat pain. It’s effect was probably result from L-arginine/NO-cGMP pathway activation and Ca + 2 channels are also involved. PMID:26664380

  9. Ag(+)-mediated assembly of 5'-guanosine monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Loo, Kristine; Degtyareva, Natalya; Park, Jihae; Sengupta, Bidisha; Reddish, Michaeal; Rogers, Christopher C; Bryant, Andrea; Petty, Jeffrey T

    2010-04-01

    Polymorphic forms of nucleic acids provide platforms for new nanomaterials, and transition metal cations give access to alternative arrangements of nucleobases by coordinating with electron-rich functional groups. Interaction of Ag(+) with 5'-guanosine monophosphate (5'-GMP) is considered in this work. Ag(+) promotes nucleotide stacking and aggregation, as indicated by the increased viscosity of 5'-GMP solutions with Ag(+), magnification of the circular dichroism response of guanine by Ag(+), and exothermic reactions between Ag(+) and guanine derivatives. Isothermal titration calorimetry studies show that the reaction is favored starting at 10 microM 5'-GMP. Utilizing the exothermic heat change associated with reaction of Ag(+) with 5'-GMP, local structure within the aggregate was assessed. On the basis of the salt dependence of the reaction and comparison with the corresponding nucleoside, the dianionic phosphate of 5'-GMP is one binding site for Ag(+), although this electrostatic interaction is not a dominant contribution to the overall heat change. Another binding site is the N7 on the nucleobase, as determined via studies with 7-deazaguanosine. Besides this binding site, Ag(+) also associates with the O6, as earlier studies deduced from the shift in the carbonyl stretching frequency associated with adduct formation. With these two binding sites on the nucleobase, the empirical stoichiometry of approximately 1 Ag(+):nucleobase derived from the calorimetry studies indicates that Ag(+) coordinates two nucleobases. The proposed structural model is a Ag(+)-mediated guanine dimer within a base stacked aggregate. PMID:20205377

  10. Novel Characteristics of Trypanosoma brucei Guanosine 5'-monophosphate Reductase Distinct from Host Animals

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Chihiro; Shinohara, Takahiro; Tomiyama, Ai; Imamura, Akira; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Nishimura, Kazuhiko; Fujimori, Ko; Shuto, Satoshi; Ishibashi, Osamu; Kubata, Bruno Kilunga; Inui, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    The metabolic pathway of purine nucleotides in parasitic protozoa is a potent drug target for treatment of parasitemia. Guanosine 5’-monophosphate reductase (GMPR), which catalyzes the deamination of guanosine 5’-monophosphate (GMP) to inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP), plays an important role in the interconversion of purine nucleotides to maintain the intracellular balance of their concentration. However, only a few studies on protozoan GMPR have been reported at present. Herein, we identified the GMPR in Trypanosoma brucei, a causative protozoan parasite of African trypanosomiasis, and found that the GMPR proteins were consistently localized to glycosomes in T. brucei bloodstream forms. We characterized its recombinant protein to investigate the enzymatic differences between GMPRs of T. brucei and its host animals. T. brucei GMPR was distinct in having an insertion of a tandem repeat of the cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) domain, which was absent in mammalian and bacterial GMPRs. The recombinant protein of T. brucei GMPR catalyzed the conversion of GMP to IMP in the presence of NADPH, and showed apparent affinities for both GMP and NADPH different from those of its mammalian counterparts. Interestingly, the addition of monovalent cations such as K+ and NH4+ to the enzymatic reaction increased the GMPR activity of T. brucei, whereas none of the mammalian GMPR’s was affected by these cations. The monophosphate form of the purine nucleoside analog ribavirin inhibited T. brucei GMPR activity, though mammalian GMPRs showed no or only a little inhibition by it. These results suggest that the mechanism of the GMPR reaction in T. brucei is distinct from that in the host organisms. Finally, we demonstrated the inhibitory effect of ribavirin on the proliferation of trypanosomes in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting the availability of ribavirin to develop a new therapeutic agent against African trypanosomiasis. PMID:26731263

  11. Increasing the function of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway increases the ability to learn a Y-maze task.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Hernandez-Viadel, Mariluz; Erceg, Slaven; Montoliu, Carmina; Felipo, Vicente

    2009-08-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors play a crucial role in learning. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NMDA receptors contribute to learning processes are not known in detail. Activation of NMDA receptors leads to increased calcium in the postsynaptic neuron. Calcium binds to calmodulin and activates neuronal nitric oxide synthase, increasing nitric oxide (NO), which activates soluble guanylate cyclase, increasing cGMP. Part of this cGMP is released to the extracellular space. Several reports indicate that impairment of this glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway reduces the ability to learn a Y-maze conditional discrimination task by rats. The aim of this work was to assess whether enhancing the function of this pathway increases the ability to learn this task. Prenatal exposure to the polybrominated diphenylether PBDE-99 during embryonic days 2-9 or 11-19 enhances the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway in cerebellum in vivo as assessed by microdialysis in freely moving rats. This was associated with an increase in the ability to learn the Y-maze task. Rats prenatally exposed to PBDE need fewer trials than control rats to learn the Y-maze task. These results show that the function of the glutamate-NO-cGMP modulates the ability of rats to learn the Y-maze task, that the function of the pathway under physiological conditions is not optimal for learning, and that performance in the Y-maze task may be improved by enhancing slightly the function of the pathway and cGMP formation. PMID:19326454

  12. In Search of Enzymes with a Role in 3′, 5′-Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Metabolism in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Inonge; Durner, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    In plants, nitric oxide (NO)-mediated 3′, 5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) synthesis plays an important role during pathogenic stress response, stomata closure upon osmotic stress, the development of adventitious roots and transcript regulation. The NO-cGMP dependent pathway is well characterized in mammals. The binding of NO to soluble guanylate cyclase enzymes (GCs) initiates the synthesis of cGMP from guanosine triphosphate. The produced cGMP alters various cellular responses, such as the function of protein kinase activity, cyclic nucleotide gated ion channels and cGMP-regulated phosphodiesterases. The signal generated by the second messenger is terminated by 3′, 5′-cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDEs) enzymes that hydrolyze cGMP to a non-cyclic 5′-guanosine monophosphate. To date, no homologues of mammalian cGMP-synthesizing and degrading enzymes have been found in higher plants. In the last decade, six receptor proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana have been reported to have guanylate cyclase activity in vitro. Of the six receptors, one was shown to be a NO dependent guanylate cyclase enzyme (NOGC1). However, the role of these proteins in planta remains to be elucidated. Enzymes involved in the degradation of cGMP remain elusive, albeit, PDE activity has been detected in crude protein extracts from various plants. Additionally, several research groups have partially purified and characterized PDE enzymatic activity from crude protein extracts. In this review, we focus on presenting advances toward the identification of enzymes involved in the cGMP metabolism pathway in higher plants. PMID:27200049

  13. Fluorescent Sensing of Guanine and Guanosine Monophosphate with Conjugated Receptors Incorporating Aniline and Naphthyridine Moieties.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shao-Hung; Phang, Riping; Fang, Jim-Min

    2016-04-15

    Ethyne-linked naphthyridine-aniline conjugated molecules are selective sensors of decylguanine in dichloromethane and guanosine monophosphate in water (Kass = 16 000 M(-1)). The 2-acetamido-1,8-naphthyridine moiety binds with guanine in a DAA-ADD triply hydrogen-bonded motif. The aniline moiety enhances an electron-donating effect, and the substituent is tuned to attain extra hydrogen bonds, π-π stacking, and electrostatic interactions. The proposed binding modes are supported by a Job plot, ESI-MS, (1)H NMR, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectral analyses. PMID:27018895

  14. [Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate as a Mediator in Processes of Stress Signaling Transduction in Higher Plants].

    PubMed

    Dubovskaya, L V; Bakakina, Y S; Volotovski, I D

    2015-01-01

    Currently, biophysical mechanisms of stress signaling transduction became an object of consideration of researchers in connection with the urgent necessity to develop new techniques to enhance the sustainability and productivity of agricultural crops. The development of sensitive methods for the determination of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and comparative analysis of cGMP-dependent events in biological systems has contributed to progress in the understanding of the functioning of cGMP in plant cells. Currently, it is shown that cGMP as a secondary mediator is involved in such vital processes of growth and development of plants as seed germination, cell division, development of chloroplasts, flowering and regulation of stomatal movements. This review summarizes the available data in the literature about the role of cGMP in the responses of plant organisms to the action of stress factors of abiotic and biotic nature and its interaction with other intracellular mediators. With the use of existing ideas about the biophysical mechanisms of stress in plants, the basic elements of cGMP-dependent signal transduction system in a plant cell are considered. PMID:26394467

  15. Involvement of Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate-Dependent Protein Kinase I in Renal Antifibrotic Effects of Serelaxin

    PubMed Central

    Wetzl, Veronika; Schinner, Elisabeth; Kees, Frieder; Hofmann, Franz; Faerber, Lothar; Schlossmann, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Kidney fibrosis has shown to be ameliorated through the involvement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and its dependent protein kinase I (cGKI). Serelaxin, the recombinant form of human relaxin-II, increases cGMP levels and has shown beneficial effects on kidney function in acute heart failure patients. Antifibrotic properties of serelaxin are supposed to be mediated via relaxin family peptide receptor 1 and subsequently enhanced nitric oxide/cGMP to inhibit transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling. This study examines the involvement of cGKI in the antifibrotic signaling of serelaxin. Methods and Results: Kidney fibrosis was induced by unilateral ureteral obstruction in wildtype (WT) and cGKI knock-out (KO) mice. After 7 days, renal antifibrotic effects of serelaxin were assessed. Serelaxin treatment for 7 days significantly increased cGMP in the kidney of WT and cGKI-KO. In WT, renal fibrosis was reduced through decreased accumulation of collagen1A1, total collagen, and fibronectin. The profibrotic connective tissue growth factor as well as myofibroblast differentiation were reduced and matrix metalloproteinases-2 and -9 were positively modulated after treatment. Moreover, Smad2 as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) phosphorylation were decreased, whereas phosphodiesterase (PDE) 5a phosphorylation was increased. However, these effects were not observed in cGKI-KO. Conclusion: Antifibrotic renal effects of serelaxin are mediated via cGMP/cGKI to inhibit Smad2- and ERK1-dependent TGF-β signaling and increased PDE5a phosphorylation. PMID:27462268

  16. Human monocyte killing of Staphylococcus aureus: modulation by agonists of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    O'Dorisio, M S; Vandenbark, G R; LoBuglio, A F

    1979-01-01

    This study was designed to test whether cyclic nucleotides play a role in the regulation of bacterial killing by human monocytes. Agents were tested for their ability to activate monocyte adenylate or guanylate cyclase in cell-free preparations, to increase cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) or cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) in intact human monocytes, and to modulate monocyte-induced killing of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. Prostaglandin E1 and cholera toxin activated monocyte adenylate cyclase and inhibited monocyte killing of S. aureus. An adenylate cyclase inhibitor, RMI 12330A, reversed the prostaglandin E1-mediated inhibition of bacterial killing, thus implicating cAMP as the intracellular mediator of this inhibition. In contrast, monocyte cGMP levels were increased 5- and 17-fold by 5-hydroxytryptamine and N-methyl-N' -nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, respectively, but neither agent was effective in modulating monocyte bactericidal activity. Thus, modulation of bactericidal activity in human monocytes did not conform to the yin/yang theory of opposing actions by cAMP and cGMP, for although monocyte-mediated killing of S. aureus was inhibited by cAMP agonists, it was not enhanced by cGMP agonists. PMID:44704

  17. Adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate-dependent protein kinases: Possible homologous proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lincoln, Thomas M.; Corbin, Jackie D.

    1977-01-01

    The properties of purified mammalian adenosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP)- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinases were compared. Several physical characteristics of the two enzymes were similar, including size, shape, affinity for cyclic nucleotide binding, and Km for ATP. In addition, the amino acid composition of the two proteins indicated a close composition homology (70-90%). Both cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases catalyzed phosphorylation of rat liver pyruvate kinase (EC 2.7.1.40) and fructose 1,6-diphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11), rabbit skeletal muscle glycogen synthase (EC 2.4.1.11) and phosphorylase b kinase (EC 2.7.1.38), and calf thymus histone H2b. The phosphorylation of several synthetic peptides and of trypsin-sensitive and trypsin-insensitive sites in glycogen synthase suggested similar recognition sites on the protein substrates for the two kinases. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase was the better catalyst with each protein or peptides substrate. The results suggest that the two enzymes evolved from a common ancestral protein. Images PMID:198777

  18. Sum-frequency generation spectroscopy of self-assembled structures of Guanosine 5‧-monophosphate on mica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunstelj, Klemen; Spindler, Lea; Federiconi, Francesco; Bonn, Mischa; Drevenšek-Olenik, Irena; Čopič, Martin

    2008-12-01

    The structure and ordering of Guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP) films self-assembled on mica from GMP salt solutions were studied by infrared-visible sum-frequency generation spectroscopy (IR-VIS SFG) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). We find that the surface self-assembly of GMP can be tuned through the concentration of the GMP solution as well as the nature of the counter ion. At low concentrations of the ammonium and the sodium GMP salt solutions, the self-assembled films are very similar, while at higher concentrations the SFG signal of ammonium GMP samples is dominated by a contribution not originating from azimuthally symmetric layers, which signifies that a helical bulk structure might be present.

  19. Human taste and umami receptor responses to chemosensorica generated by Maillard-type N²-alkyl- and N²-arylthiomethylation of guanosine 5'-monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Suess, Barbara; Brockhoff, Anne; Degenhardt, Andreas; Billmayer, Sylvia; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-11-26

    Structural modification of the exocyclic amino function of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) by Maillard-type reactions with reducing carbohydrates was recently found to increase the umami-enhancing activity of the nucleotide upon S-N(2)-1-carboxyalkylation and S-N(2)-(1-alkylamino)carbonylalkylation, respectively. Since the presence of sulfur atoms in synthetic N(2)-alkylated nucleotides was reported to be beneficial for sensory activity, a versatile Maillard-type modification of 5'-GMP upon reaction with glycine's Strecker aldehyde formaldehyde and organic thiols was performed in the present study. A series of N(2)-(alkylthiomethyl)guanosine and N(2)-(arylthiomethyl)guanosine 5'-monophosphates was generated and the compounds were evaluated to what extent they enhance the umami response to monosodium L-glutamate in vivo by a paired-choice comparison test using trained human volunteers and in vitro by means of cell-based umami taste receptor assay. Associated with a high umami-enhancing activity (β-value 5.1), N(2)-(propylthiomethyl)guanosine 5'-monophosphate could be generated when 5'-GMP reacted with glucose, glycine, and the onion-derived odorant 1-propanethiol, thus opening a valuable avenue to produce high-potency umami-enhancing chemosensorica from food-derived natural products by kitchen-type chemistry. PMID:25375264

  20. Structural Basis of Differential Ligand Recognition by Two Classes of bis-(3-5)-cyclic Dimeric Guanosine Monophosphate-binding Riboswitches

    SciTech Connect

    K Smith; C Shanahan; E Moore; A Simon; S Strobel

    2011-12-31

    The bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) signaling pathway regulates biofilm formation, virulence, and other processes in many bacterial species and is critical for their survival. Two classes of c-di-GMP-binding riboswitches have been discovered that bind this second messenger with high affinity and regulate diverse downstream genes, underscoring the importance of RNA receptors in this pathway. We have solved the structure of a c-di-GMP-II riboswitch, which reveals that the ligand is bound as part of a triplex formed with a pseudoknot. The structure also shows that the guanine bases of c-di-GMP are recognized through noncanonical pairings and that the phosphodiester backbone is not contacted by the RNA. Recognition is quite different from that observed in the c-di-GMP-I riboswitch, demonstrating that at least two independent solutions for RNA second messenger binding have evolved. We exploited these differences to design a c-di-GMP analog that selectively binds the c-di-GMP-II aptamer over the c-di-GMP-I RNA. There are several bacterial species that contain both types of riboswitches, and this approach holds promise as an important tool for targeting one riboswitch, and thus one gene, over another in a selective fashion.

  1. Lanthanum inhibition of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli enterotoxin-induced enterosorption and its effects on intestinal mucosa cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels.

    PubMed Central

    Leitch, G J; Amer, M S

    1975-01-01

    Several trivalent cations, including lanthanum (La3+), inhibited the secretion (enterosorption) induced by the enterotoxins of Vibrio cholerae and Escherichia coli in the rabbit ileum in vivo. High concentrations (greater than 10 mM) of La3+ were required to inhibit cholera enterotoxin (CE)-induced enterosorption, probably because of the adsorption of the La3+ often potentiated the CE-induced enterosorption. If luminal La3+ exposure followed CE exposure, some recovery of the enterosorptive response was observed. The longer the lag between the CE exposure and the La3+ exposure, the greater was the recovery of the enterosorptive response. Lanthanum inhibited HCO3- secretion more than Cl- secretion. By altering the luminal fluid pH at the time of La3+ exposure, it was found that La3+ was adsorbed to negatively charged luminal sites, having an apparent pK between 2.5 and 3.0. Although La3+ antagonized the enterosorptive response to CE, it mimicked rather than antagonized the cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate elevation and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate depression induced by the toxin. It is therefore concluded that the La3+ inhibition of the CE-induced enterosorption must have occurred at a site following the generation of the cyclic nucleotides. Cholera enterotoxin caused complex time-dependent changes in the mucosal cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels, as revealed by studying tissue cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate/cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate ratios. The possible roles these two cyclic nucleotides may play in the pathogenesis of the cholera diarrhea are discussed. PMID:164410

  2. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia).

    PubMed

    Bishop, Cory D; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L; Hadfield, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  3. Alterations in the Cerebellar (Phospho)Proteome of a Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent Protein Kinase Knockout Mouse*

    PubMed Central

    Corradini, Eleonora; Vallur, Raghavan; Raaijmakers, Linsey M.; Feil, Susanne; Feil, Robert; Heck, Albert J. R.; Scholten, Arjen

    2014-01-01

    The cyclic nucleotide cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) plays an important role in learning and memory, but its signaling mechanisms in the mammalian brain are not fully understood. Using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics, we evaluated how the cerebellum adapts its (phospho)proteome in a knockout mouse model of cGMP-dependent protein kinase type I (cGKI). Our data reveal that a small subset of proteins in the cerebellum (∼3% of the quantified proteins) became substantially differentially expressed in the absence of cGKI. More changes were observed at the phosphoproteome level, with hundreds of sites being differentially phosphorylated between wild-type and knockout cerebellum. Most of these phosphorylated sites do not represent known cGKI substrates. An integrative computational network analysis of the data indicated that the differentially expressed proteins and proteins harboring differentially phosphorylated sites largely belong to a tight network in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum involving important cGMP/cAMP signaling nodes (e.g. PDE5 and PKARIIβ) and Ca2+ signaling (e.g. SERCA3). In this way, removal of cGKI could be linked to impaired cerebellar long-term depression at Purkinje cell synapses. In addition, we were able to identify a set of novel putative (phospho)proteins to be considered in this network. Overall, our data improve our understanding of cerebellar cGKI signaling and suggest novel players in cGKI-regulated synaptic plasticity. PMID:24925903

  4. Influence of salt additives on phase transformation of guanosine 5-monophosphate disodium in anti-solvent crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Anh-Tuan; Kang, Jeongki; Kim, Woo-Sik

    2013-06-01

    The influence of sodium chloride (NaCl) as an additive on the anti-solvent crystallization of guanosine 5-monophosphate disodium (GMP-2Na) was investigated in continuous Couette-Taylor (CT) and batch mixing tank (MT) crystallizers. The anti-solvent crystallization initially precipitated amorphous solids of GMP-2Na, which then slowly transformed into hydrate crystals in the solution. However, the phase transformation of GMP-2Na was markedly promoted by the sodium chloride additive due to the common ion effect. While the normal phase transformation in the batch MT crystallizer required over 120 min of crystallization time without using the sodium chloride additive, the process was completed within 60 min when a small amount of the salt additive was added. The phase transformation was also significantly accelerated in the continuous CT crystallizer. Without using the sodium chloride additive, 7 min of the mean residence time was required for the production of 100% hydrate GMP crystals. However, when using the sodium chloride additive, a mean residence time of only 2 min was sufficient to completely transform the amorphous solids of GMP-2Na into hydrate crystals due to the common ion effect combined with the effective fluid motion of the Taylor vortex for the mass transfer.

  5. Indolyl-3-butyric acid-induced Arabidopsis stomatal opening mediated by 3',5'-cyclic guanosine-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Cousson, A

    2010-12-01

    It has been pharmacologically suggested that 3',5'-cyclic guanosine-monophosphate (cGMP) mediates indolyl-3-butyric acid (IBA)-induced stomatal opening. In Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh., such investigations compared the wild type (Columbia and Ws ecotypes) to mutants knockout for either GTP-binding protein (G protein) α subunit 1 (gpa1-4), putative G protein-coupled receptor 1 (gcr1-5), calcineurin B-like isoform 1 (cbl1) or 9 (cbl9), or the NADPH oxidases AtrbohD and AtrbohF (atrbohD/F). Stomatal opening to IBA or the permeant cGMP analogue, 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP) was abolished in the atrbohD/F mutant. The IBA response was fully or partially suppressed, respectively, in the gcr1-5 mutant, or the gpa1-4 and cbl1 mutants. In the cbl9 mutant, the response to IBA or 8-Br-cGMP, respectively, was partially or fully suppressed. Phenylarsine oxide (PAO) affected the IBA response, which the cbl1 mutant overlapped or the gpa1-4 and cbl9 mutants increased up to 100% inhibition. 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione, mas17, the (Rp)-diastereomer of 8-bromo-3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphorothioate (Rp-8-Br-cGMPS), nicotinamide, ruthenium red (RRed), 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA), cyclosporine A (CsA) and FK506 converged to affect the IBA response, which the gpa1-4 and cbl9 mutants overlapped or the cbl1 mutant and PAO increased up to 100% inhibition. Rp-8-Br-cGMPS, nicotinamide, RRed, BAPTA, CsA or FK506 paralled the cbl9 and atrbohD/F mutants to abolish the 8-Br-cGMP response. Based on so far revealed features of these mutants and pharmacological compounds, these results confirmed cGMP as a Ca(2+)-mobilizing second messenger for apoplastic auxin whose perception and transduction would implicate a seven-transmembrane receptor - G protein - guanylyl cyclase unit at the guard cell plasma membrane. PMID:20951600

  6. Xenopus oocyte resting potential, muscarinic responses and the role of calcium and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Dascal, N; Landau, E M; Lass, Y

    1984-01-01

    Resting potential (r.p.) and muscarinic response mechanisms were studied in Xenopus laevis oocytes using the voltage-clamp technique. Insertion of micro-electrodes into the oocyte produced a 'shunt' membrane conductance which partially sealed after a few minutes. The oocyte resting potential (measured with a single intracellular electrode) ranged from -40 to -60 mV. Ouabain and low K+ solution depolarized both follicles and denuded oocytes. The electrogenic Na+-K+ pump was more active in the latter. In the presence of ouabain, the r.p. agreed with the constant field theory. alpha (PNa+/PK+) was 0.12 in follicles and 0.24 in denuded oocytes. beta (PCl-/PK+) was 0.4 in both. At [Na+]o lower than 70 mM, the r.p. deviated considerably from the constant field predictions. The relatively large value of alpha indicated the major role of Na+ in oocyte r.p. determination. The oocyte muscarinic response was separated into four distinct components: the fast depolarizing Cl- current, 'D1'; the slow depolarizing Cl- current, 'D2'; the slow hyperpolarizing K+ current, 'H'; and the large membrane Cl- current fluctuation, 'F'. The H response reversal potential showed a Nernst relationship to [K+] and was selectively blocked by intracellular injection of tetraethylammonium (TEA). The D1 and D2 reversal potential showed a Nernst relationship to [Cl-]. In Ca2+-deficient, EGTA-containing medium, D2 and F were abolished and D1 and H were reduced. Verapamil inhibited all responses. Increasing [Ca2+]o caused a significant increase in D1, D2 and F response amplitudes. Intracellular injection of 0.6-10 pmol guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate, induced a large outward K+ current, similar to the muscarinic H response. PMID:6086916

  7. Analysis of nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia)

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Cory D.; Pires, Anthony; Norby, Shong-Wan; Boudko, Dmitri; Moroz, Leonid L.; Hadfield, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The gas nitric oxide (NO), and in some cases its downstream second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) function in different taxa to regulate the timing of life-history transitions. Increased taxonomic sampling is required to foster conclusions about the evolution and function of NO/cGMP signaling during life-history transitions. We report on the function and localization of NO and cGMP signaling during metamorphosis of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae. Pharmacological manipulation of NO or cGMP production in larvae modulated responses to a natural settlement cue from the coral Porites compressa in a manner that suggest inhibitory function for NO/cGMP signaling. However, these treatments were not sufficient to induce metamorphosis in the absence of cue, a result unique to this animal. We show that induction of metamorphosis in response to the settlement cue is associated with a reduction in NO production. We documented the expression of putative NO synthase (NOS) and the production of cGMP during larval development and observed no larval cells in which NOS and cGMP were both detected. The production of cGMP in a bilaterally symmetrical group of cells fated to occupy the distal tip of rhinophores is correlated with competence to respond to the coral settlement cue. These results suggest that endogenous NO and cGMP are involved in modulating responses of P. sibogae to a natural settlement cue. We discuss these results with respect to habitat selection and larval ecology. PMID:18460091

  8. Kinetic dissection of individual steps in the poly(C)-directed oligoguanylate synthesis from guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Alberas, D. J.; Baird, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    A kinetic study of oligoguanylate synthesis on a polycytidylate template, poly(C), as a function of the concentration of the activated monomer, guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, is reported. Reactions were run with 0.005-0.045 M 2-MeImpG in the presence of 0.05 M poly(C) at 23 degrees C. The kinetic results are consistent with a reaction scheme (eq 1) that consists of a series of consecutive steps, each step representing the addition of one molecule of 2-MeImpG to the growing oligomer. This scheme allows the calculation of second-order rate constants for every step by analyzing the time-dependent growth of each oligomer. Computer simulations of the course of reaction based on the determined rate constants and eq 1 are in excellent agreement with the product distributions seen in the HPLC profiles. In accord with an earlier study (Fakhrai, H.; Inoue, T.; Orgel, L. E. Tetrahedron 1984, 40, 39), rate constants, ki, for the formation of the tetramer and longer oligomers up to the 16-mer were found to be independent of length and somewhat higher than k3 (formation of trimer), which in turn is much higher than k2 (formation of dimer). The ki (i > or = 4), k3, and k2 values are not true second-order rate constants but vary with monomer concentration. Mechanistic models for the dimerization (Scheme I) and elongation reactions (Scheme II) are proposed that are consistent with our results. These models take into account that the monomer associates with the template in a cooperative manner. Our kinetic analysis allowed the determination of rate constants for the elementary processes of covalent bond formation between two monomers (dimerization) and between an oligomer and a monomer (elongation) on the template. A major conclusion from our study is that bond formation between two monomer units or between a primer and a monomer is assisted by the presence of additional next-neighbor monomer units. This is consistent with recent findings with hairpin

  9. A Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate–Dependent Pathway Can Regulate Net Hepatic Glucose Uptake in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    An, Zhibo; Winnick, Jason J.; Moore, Mary C.; Farmer, Ben; Smith, Marta; Irimia, Jose M.; Roach, Peter J.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2012-01-01

    We previously showed that hepatic nitric oxide regulates net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU), an effect that can be eliminated by inhibiting hepatic soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), suggesting that the sGC pathway is involved in the regulation of NHGU. The aim of the current study was to determine whether hepatic cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) reduces NHGU. Studies were performed on conscious dogs with transhepatic catheters. A hyperglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp was established in the presence of portal vein glucose infusion. 8-Br-cGMP (50 µg/kg/min) was delivered intraportally, and either the glucose load to the liver (CGMP/GLC; n = 5) or the glucose concentration entering the liver (CGMP/GCC; n = 5) was clamped at 2× basal. In the control group, saline was given intraportally (SAL; n = 10), and the hepatic glucose concentration and load were doubled. 8-Br-cGMP increased portal blood flow, necessitating the two approaches to glucose clamping in the cGMP groups. NHGU (mg/kg/min) was 5.8 ± 0.5, 2.7 ± 0.5, and 4.8 ± 0.3, whereas the fractional extraction of glucose was 11.0 ± 1, 5.5 ± 1, and 8.5 ± 1% during the last hour of the study in SAL, CGMP/GLC, and CGMP/GCC, respectively. The reduction of NHGU in response to 8-Br-cGMP was associated with increased AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation. These data indicate that changes in liver cGMP can regulate NHGU under postprandial conditions. PMID:22688328

  10. The cystathionine-β-synthase domains on the guanosine 5''-monophosphate reductase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase enzymes from Leishmania regulate enzymatic activity in response to guanylate and adenylate nucleotide levels.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sabrina; Boitz, Jan; Chidambaram, Ehzilan Subramanian; Chatterjee, Abhishek; Ait-Tihyaty, Maria; Ullman, Buddy; Jardim, Armando

    2016-06-01

    The Leishmania guanosine 5'-monophosphate reductase (GMPR) and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) are purine metabolic enzymes that function maintaining the cellular adenylate and guanylate nucleotide. Interestingly, both enzymes contain a cystathionine-β-synthase domain (CBS). To investigate this metabolic regulation, the Leishmania GMPR was cloned and shown to be sufficient to complement the guaC (GMPR), but not the guaB (IMPDH), mutation in Escherichia coli. Kinetic studies confirmed that the Leishmania GMPR catalyzed a strict NADPH-dependent reductive deamination of GMP to produce IMP. Addition of GTP or high levels of GMP induced a marked increase in activity without altering the Km values for the substrates. In contrast, the binding of ATP decreased the GMPR activity and increased the GMP Km value 10-fold. These kinetic changes were correlated with changes in the GMPR quaternary structure, induced by the binding of GMP, GTP, or ATP to the GMPR CBS domain. The capacity of these CBS domains to mediate the catalytic activity of the IMPDH and GMPR provides a regulatory mechanism for balancing the intracellular adenylate and guanylate pools. PMID:26853689

  11. Selective blockade of phosphodiesterase types 2, 5 and 9 results in cyclic 3′5′ guanosine monophosphate accumulation in retinal pigment epithelium cells

    PubMed Central

    Diederen, R M H; Heij, E C La; Ittersum, M Markerink‐van; Kijlstra, A; Hendrikse, F; de Vente, J

    2007-01-01

    Aim To investigate which phosphodiesterase (PDE) is involved in regulating cyclic 3′5′ guanosine monophosphate breakdown in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells. Methods cGMP content in the cultured RPE cells (D407 cell line) was evaluated by immunocytochemistry in the presence of non‐selective or isoform‐selective PDE inhibitors in combination with the particulate guanylyl cyclase stimulator atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) or the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator sodium nitroprusside (SNP). mRNA expression of PDE2, PDE5 and PDE9 was studied in cultured human RPE cells and rat RPE cell layers using non‐radioactive in situ hybridisation. Results In the absence of PDE inhibitors, cGMP levels in cultured RPE cells are very low. cGMP accumulation was readily detected in cultured human RPE cells after incubation with Bay60–7550 as a selective PDE2 inhibitor, sildenafil as a selective PDE5 inhibitor or Sch51866 as a selective PDE9 inhibitor. In the presence of PDE inhibition, cGMP content increased markedly after stimulation of the particulate guanylyl cyclase. mRNA of PDE2,PDE5 and PDE9 was detected in all cultured human RPE cells and also in rat RPE cell layers. Conclusions PDE2, PDE5 and PDE9 have a role in cGMP metabolism in RPE cells. PMID:16943225

  12. Modulating the Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Substrate Selectivity of the Phosphodiesterase 3 Inhibitors by Pyridine, Pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidine Derivatives and Their Effects upon the Growth of HT-29 Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Abadi, Ashraf Hassan; Hany, Marwa Saeed; Elsharif, Shimaa Awadain; Eissa, Amal Abdel Haleem; Gary, Bernard DeWayne; Tinsley, Heather Nicole; Piazza, Gary Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Analogues with the scaffolds of 3-cyano-4-alkoxyphenyl-6-bromoaryl-2-pyridone and 2-amino-3-cyano-4-alkoxyphenyl-6-bromoarylpyridine were synthesized. Cyclization of the 2-amino derivatives with formic acid and formamide gave the corresponding pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one and the pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-amine derivatives, respectively. Active phosphodiesterase 3 (PDE3) inhibitors were identified from each of the four aforementioned scaffolds. This is the first report that pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4-amine derivatives can inhibit PDE3. The analogues with the pyridone and pyrido[2,3-d]pyrimidin-4(3H)-one scaffolds inhibited both cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) hydrolysis by PDE3, while the amine containing scaffolds were more selective for cGMP hydrolysis. This observation may set the base for substrate-selective pharmacological modulation of this important class of drug targets and with less side effects, particularly tachcardia. The dual inhibitors of PDE3 were more potent inhibitor towards the growth of HT-29 cancer cell lines. PMID:23546000

  13. Affinity of guanosine derivatives for polycytidylate revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Hurley, T. B.; Baird, E. E.

    1995-01-01

    Evidence is presented for complexation of guanosine 5'-monophosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) with polycytidylate (poly(C)) at pH 8.0 and 23 degrees C in the presence of 1.0 M NaCl2 and 0.2 M MgCl2 in water. The association of 2-MeImpG with poly(C) was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy as well as by monitoring the kinetics of the nucleophilic substitution reaction of the imidazole moiety by amines. The results of both methods are consistent with moderately strong poly(C) 2-MeImpG complexation and the spectrophotometric measurements allowed the construction of a binding isotherm with a concentration of 2-MeImpG equal to 5.55 +/- 0.15 mM at half occupancy. UV spectroscopy was employed to establish the binding of other guanosine derivatives on poly(C). These derivatives are guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'GMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate imidazolide (ImpG), and guanosine 5'-monophosphate morpholidate (morpG). Within experimental error these guanosine derivatives exhibit the same affinity for poly(C) as 2-MeImpG.

  14. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5'-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  15. Guanosine controls inflammatory pathways to afford neuroprotection of hippocampal slices under oxygen and glucose deprivation conditions.

    PubMed

    Dal-Cim, Tharine; Ludka, Fabiana K; Martins, Wagner C; Reginato, Charlise; Parada, Esther; Egea, Javier; López, Manuela G; Tasca, Carla I

    2013-08-01

    Guanosine (GUO) is an endogenous modulator of glutamatergic excitotoxicity and has been shown to promote neuroprotection in in vivo and in vitro models of neurotoxicity. This study was designed to understand the neuroprotective mechanism of GUO against oxidative damage promoted by oxygen/glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD). GUO (100 μM) reduced reactive oxygen species production and prevented mitochondrial membrane depolarization induced by OGD. GUO also exhibited anti-inflammatory actions as inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B activation and reduction of inducible nitric oxide synthase induction induced by OGD. These GUO neuroprotective effects were mediated by adenosine A1 receptor, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase and MAPK/ERK. Furthermore, GUO recovered the impairment of glutamate uptake caused by OGD, an effect that occurred via a Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled signaling, blockade of adenosine A2A receptors (A2A R), but not via A1 receptor. The modulation of glutamate uptake by GUO also involved MAPK/ERK activation. In conclusion, GUO, by modulating adenosine receptor function and activating MAPK/ERK, affords neuroprotection of hippocampal slices subjected to OGD by a mechanism that implicates the following: (i) prevention of mitochondrial membrane depolarization, (ii) reduction of oxidative stress, (iii) regulation of inflammation by inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B and inducible nitric oxide synthase, and (iv) promoting glutamate uptake. PMID:23713463

  16. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  17. The role of surface energy in guanosine nucleotide alignment: an intriguing scenario.

    PubMed

    Tone, Caterina M; De Santo, Maria P; Ciuchi, Federica

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we report how the confining surfaces and the ionic effects of different concentration of guanosine solution can be used to vary the alignment of liquid crystal phases of guanosine nucleotides. Liquid crystal phases of guanosine 5'-monophosphate ammonium salt and guanosine 5'-monophosphate free acid in pure water, with and without silver sulphate, were studied by polarized optical microscope. A periodic modulation of the texture was observed. This modulation depends on both on the concentration and on the presence of silver ions in the liquid crystal phase. We demonstrate that, according to the surface energy of the alignment layers, it is possible to homeotropically align the guanosine chromonic phase without applying any external magnetic field. Finally, we report the formation of spherical, vesicle-like guanosine 5'-monophosphate aggregates, when the solution was confined between two hydrophobic surfaces containing exposed Si groups. PMID:24832053

  18. Activation of Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Pathway Increases the Sensitivity of Cancer Cells to the Oncolytic Virus M1.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Zhang, Haipeng; Qiu, Jianguang; Lin, Yuan; Liang, Jiankai; Xiao, Xiao; Fu, Liwu; Wang, Fang; Cai, Jing; Tan, Yaqian; Zhu, Wenbo; Yin, Wei; Lu, Bingzheng; Xing, Fan; Tang, Lipeng; Yan, Min; Mai, Jialuo; Li, Yuan; Chen, Wenli; Qiu, Pengxin; Su, Xingwen; Gao, Guangping; Tai, Phillip W L; Hu, Jun; Yan, Guangmei

    2016-02-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a novel and emerging treatment modality that uses replication-competent viruses to destroy cancer cells. Although diverse cancer cell types are sensitive to oncolytic viruses, one of the major challenges of oncolytic virotherapy is that the sensitivity to oncolysis ranges among different cancer cell types. Furthermore, the underlying mechanism of action is not fully understood. Here, we report that activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling significantly sensitizes refractory cancer cells to alphavirus M1 in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo. We find that activation of the cAMP signaling pathway inhibits M1-induced expression of antiviral factors in refractory cancer cells, leading to prolonged and severe endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and cell apoptosis. We also demonstrate that M1-mediated oncolysis, which is enhanced by cAMP signaling, involves the factor, exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1 (Epac1), but not the classical cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA). Taken together, cAMP/Epac1 signaling pathway activation inhibits antiviral factors and improves responsiveness of refractory cancer cells to M1-mediated virotherapy. PMID:26373347

  19. Involvement of NMDA receptors and L-arginine/nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate pathway in the antidepressant-like effects of topiramate in mice forced swimming test.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Khan, Muhammad Imran; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Chamanara, Mohsen; Jazaeri, Farahnaz; Zolfaghari, Samira; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-04-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is an agent primarily used in the treatment of epilepsy. Using mice model of forced swimming test (FST) the current study was basically aimed to investigate the influence of TPM on depression by inhibiting NMDA receptor and nitric oxide-cGMP production. When TPM was administered in a dose of 20 and 30 mg/kg by i.p. route it reduced the immobility time during FST. However this effect of TPM (30 mg/kg, i.p.) in the FST was abolished when the mice were pretreated either with NMDA (75 mg/kg, i.p.), or l-arginine (750 mg/kg, i.p. NO precursor), or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The immobility time in the FST was reduced after administration of L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p, a non-specific NOS inhibitor), 7-nitoinidazol (30 mg/kg, i.p. a nNOS inhibitor) or MK-801 (0.05 mg/kg, i.p, a NMDA receptor antagonist) in combination with a subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.) as compared with single use of either drug. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01 mg/kg) or L-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time. However, simultaneous administration of these two agents in the same doses with subeffective dose of TPM (10mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time during FST. None of these drugs were found to have a profound effect on the locomotor activity per se during the open field test. Taken together, our data demonstrates that TPM exhibit antidepressant-like effect which is accomplished either due to inhibition of NMDA receptors or NO-cGMP production. PMID:26988103

  20. Analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities of Citrus aurantium L. blossoms essential oil (neroli): involvement of the nitric oxide/cyclic-guanosine monophosphate pathway.

    PubMed

    Khodabakhsh, Pariya; Shafaroodi, Hamed; Asgarpanah, Jinous

    2015-07-01

    The analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties of Citrus aurantium L. blossoms essential oil (neroli) were investigated in mice and rats. The analgesic activity of neroli was assessed by acetic acid-induced writhing and Eddy's hot plate methods, while acute and chronic anti-inflammatory effects were investigated by inflammatory paw edema in rat and the cotton pellet-induced granuloma tissue model, respectively. Mechanistic studies were conducted using L-nitro arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NO synthase. Neroli significantly decreased the number of acetic acid-induced writhes in mice compared to animals that received vehicle only. Also, it exhibited a central analgesic effect, as evidenced by a significant increase in reaction time in the hot plate method. The oil also significantly reduced carrageenan-induced paw edema in rats. The inhibitory activity of neroli (especially at 40 mg/kg) was found to be very close to the standard drug, diclofenac sodium (50 mg/kg). In cotton pellet-induced granuloma, neroli was effective regarding the transudate and granuloma formation amount. Neroli was analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and twenty-three constituents, representing 91.0 % of the oil, were identified. The major components of neroli were characterized as linalool (28.5 %), linalyl acetate (19.6 %), nerolidol (9.1 %), E,E-farnesol (9.1 %), α-terpineol (4.9 %), and limonene (4.6 %), which might be responsible for these observed activities. The results suggest that neroli possesses biologically active constituent(s) that have significant activity against acute and especially chronic inflammation, and have central and peripheral antinociceptive effects which support the ethnomedicinal claims of the use of the plant in the management of pain and inflammation. PMID:25762161

  1. Plant Purine Nucleoside Catabolism Employs a Guanosine Deaminase Required for the Generation of Xanthosine in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Dahncke, Kathleen; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Purine nucleotide catabolism is common to most organisms and involves a guanine deaminase to convert guanine to xanthine in animals, invertebrates, and microorganisms. Using metabolomic analysis of mutants, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana uses an alternative catabolic route employing a highly specific guanosine deaminase (GSDA) not reported from any organism so far. The enzyme is ubiquitously expressed and deaminates exclusively guanosine and 2’-deoxyguanosine but no other aminated purines, pyrimidines, or pterines. GSDA belongs to the cytidine/deoxycytidylate deaminase family of proteins together with a deaminase involved in riboflavin biosynthesis, the chloroplastic tRNA adenosine deaminase Arg and a predicted tRNA-specific adenosine deaminase 2 in A. thaliana. GSDA is conserved in plants, including the moss Physcomitrella patens, but is absent in the algae and outside the plant kingdom. Our data show that xanthosine is exclusively generated through the deamination of guanosine by GSDA in A. thaliana, excluding other possible sources like the dephosphorylation of xanthosine monophosphate. Like the nucleoside hydrolases NUCLEOSIDE HYDROLASE1 (NSH1) and NSH2, GSDA is located in the cytosol, indicating that GMP catabolism to xanthine proceeds in a mostly cytosolic pathway via guanosine and xanthosine. Possible implications for the biosynthetic route of purine alkaloids (caffeine and theobromine) and ureides in other plants are discussed. PMID:24130159

  2. Mitogenic signaling pathways of growth factors can be distinguished by the involvement of pertussis toxin-sensitive guanosine triphosphate-binding protein and of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, N; Okano, Y; Chatani, Y; Amano, F; Tanaka, E; Nomoto, H; Nozawa, Y; Kohno, M

    1990-01-01

    We have examined the possible involvements of pertussis toxin (PT)-sensitive guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding protein (Gp) and protein kinase C (PKC) in the mitogenic signaling pathways of various growth factors by the use of PT-pretreated and/or 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-pretreated mouse fibroblasts. Effects of PT pretreatment (inactivation of PT-sensitive Gp) and TPA pretreatment (depletion of PKC) on mitogen-induced DNA synthesis varied significantly and systematically in response to growth factors: mitogenic responses of cells to thrombin, bombesin, and bradykinin were almost completely abolished both in PT- and TPA-pretreated cells; responses to epidermal growth factor (EGF), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vanadate were reduced to approximately 50% both in PT- and TPA-pretreated cells compared with native cells; response to basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) was not affected in PT-pretreated cells but was inhibited to some extent in TPA-pretreated cells. Thus, growth factors examined have been classified into three groups with regard to the involvements of PT-sensitive Gp and PKC in their signal transduction pathways. Binding of each growth factor to its receptor was not affected significantly by pretreatment of cells with PT or TPA. Inhibitory effects of PT and TPA pretreatment on each mitogen-induced DNA synthesis were not additive, suggesting that the functions of PT-sensitive Gp and PKC lie on an identical signal transduction pathway. Although all three groups of mitogens activated PKC, signaling of each growth factor depends to a varying extent on the function of PKC. Our results indicate that a single peptide growth factor such as EGF, PDGF, or bFGF acts through multiple signaling pathways to induce cell proliferation. Images PMID:2129194

  3. Transforming growth factor-β inhibits IQ motif containing guanosine triphosphatase activating protein 1 expression in lung fibroblasts via the nuclear factor-κB signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zong, Chuanyue; Zhang, Xianlong; Xie, Ying; Cheng, Jiawen

    2015-07-01

    IQ motif containing guanosine triphosphatase activating protein 1 (IQGAP1) is associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrogenesis (IPF); however, characterization of the expression of IQGAP1 in lung fibroblasts has remained elusive. The present study therefore evaluated IQGAP1 expression in mouse and human lung fibroblasts under fibrotic conditions via western blot analysis. It was revealed that IQGAP1 expression levels were significantly decreased in lung fibroblasts isolated from bleomycin-challenged mice than in those of control mice. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) induced differentiation, as well as decreased expression of IQGAP1 in WI-38 cells human lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, inhibition of nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation restored the TGF-β-induced inhibition of IQGAP1 expression in WI-38 cells. In lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-challenged WI-38 cells, the expression of IQGAP1 was also decreased, while neutralized anti-TGF-β antibody treatment restored the LPA-induced inhibition of IQGAP1 expression. These data indicated that TGF-β inhibited IQGAP1 expression in lung fibroblasts via the NF-κB signaling pathway, presenting a potential novel therapeutic target for the treatment of IPF. PMID:25684348

  4. Roles of insulin, guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in signalling pathways of GLUT4 translocation.

    PubMed Central

    Todaka, M; Hayashi, H; Imanaka, T; Mitani, Y; Kamohara, S; Kishi, K; Tamaoka, K; Kanai, F; Shichiri, M; Morii, N; Narumiya, S; Ebina, Y

    1996-01-01

    Insulin, guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S] and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) trigger the translocation of Gl UT4 (type 4 glucose transporter; insulin-sensitive glucose transporter) from an intracellular pool to the cell surface. We have developed a highly sensitive and quantitative method to detect GLUT4 immunologically on the surface of intact 3T3-L1 adipocytes and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, using c-myc epitope-tagged GLUT4 (GLUT4myc). We examined the roles of insulin, GTP[S] and PMA in the signalling pathways of GLUT4 translocation in the CHO cell system. Among small molecular GTP-binding proteins, ras, rab3D, rad and rho seem to be candidates as signal transmitters of insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. Overexpression of wild-type H-ras and the dominant negative mutant H-rass17N in our cell system respectively enhanced and blocked insulin-stimulated activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase, but did not affect insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation. Overexpression of rab3D or rad in the cells did not affect GLUT4 translocation triggered by insulin, GTP[S] or PMA. Treatment with Botulinum C3 exoenzyme, a specific inhibitor of rho, had no effect on GLUT4 translocation induced by insulin, GTP[S] or PMA. Therefore these small molecular GTP-binding proteins are not likely to be involved in GLUT4 translocation. In addition, insulin, GTP[S] and PMA apparently stimulate GLUT4 translocation through independent pathways. PMID:8645171

  5. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate compartmentation in rat cardiac myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Liliana R.V.; Verde, Ignacio; Cooper, Dermot M.; Fischmeister, Rodolphe

    2006-01-01

    Background Cyclic GMP is the common second messenger for the cardiovascular effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides, such as ANP or BNP, which activate, respectively, the soluble and particulate form of guanylyl cyclase. Yet, natriuretic peptides and NO-donors exert different effects on cardiac and vascular smooth muscle function. We therefore tested whether these differences are due to an intracellular compartmentation of cGMP, and evaluated the role of phosphodiesterase (PDE) subtypes in this process. Methods and Results Subsarcolemmal cGMP signals were monitored in adult rat cardiomyocytes by expression of the rat olfactory CNG channel α subunit and recording of the associated cGMP-gated current (ICNG). ANP (10 nM) or BNP (10 nM) induced a clear activation of ICNG while NO-donors (SNAP, SNP, DEANO, SIN-1, spermine NO, all at 100 μM) had little effect. The ICNG current was strongly potentiated by non-selective PDE inhibition with IBMX (100 μM) and by the PDE2 inhibitors EHNA (10 μM) and Bay 60–7550 (50 nM). Surprisingly, sildenafil, a PDE5 inhibitor, produced a dose-dependent increase of ICNG activated by NO-donors but had no effect (at 100 nM) on the current elicited by ANP. Conclusions These results indicate that, in rat cardiomyocytes: i) the ‘particulate’ cGMP pool is readily accessible at the plasma membrane, while the ‘soluble’ pool is not; ii) PDE5 controls the ‘soluble’ but not the ‘particulate’ pool, whereas the latter is under the exclusive control of PDE2. Differential spatiotemporal distributions of cGMP may therefore contribute to the specific effects of natriuretic peptides and NO-donors on cardiac function. PMID:16651469

  6. Does cyclic guanosine monophosphate induce autophagy in thyroid malignant carcinoma through down-regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase?

    PubMed

    Spoto, G; Esposito, A; Santoleri, F; Rubini, C; Rutjes, A W S; Fioroni, M; Ferrante, M; Petrini, M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether or not the expression of cGMP- phosphodiesterases (cGMP-PDE) varies in different thyroid pathologies and to elucidate the relationship between the expression of cGMP-PDE, cGMP, and autophagy. Fifty-four thyroid biopsy samples, excised to perform the biopsy, were split into two parts and randomly assigned: one part was microscopically examined and histological classified, and the other was frozen and analysed in order to evaluate the cGMP-PDE activity. Intracellular cGMP was also measured. A strong expression of intracellular cGMP and cGMP-PDE activity was observed in carcinoma in respect to controls and benign pathologies. The level of cGMP-PDE in papillary carcinoma without lymph node involvement (N-) was approximately four-fold higher compared to those with lymph node invasion (N±). On the contrary, the cGMP was one and a half times higher in N± than N-. Our results are promising, although further epigenetical studies are needed to confirm this association. A correlation between the cGMP-degrading activity and the severity of thyroid pathology has been shown. The decrease of cGMP-PDE and the increase of cGMP in N± papillar carcinoma could be an autophagic stimulus, a defence mechanism of the body, against the cancer that is expanding and invading other tissues and organs. PMID:27358155

  7. p210 Bcr-Abl confers overexpression of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase : an intrinsic pathway to drug resistance mediated by oncogene.

    SciTech Connect

    Gharehbaghi, K.; Burgess, G. S.; Collart, F. R.; Litz-Jackson, S.; Huberman, E.; Jayaram, H. N.; Boswell, H. S.; Center for Mechanistic Biology and Biotechnology; Lab. for Experimental Oncology; Indiana Univ. School of Medicine

    1994-01-01

    The p210 bcr-abl fusion protein tyrosine kinase oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). Specific intracellular functions performed by p210 bcr-abl have recently been delineated. We considered the possibility that p210 bcr-abl may also regulate the abundance of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) which is a rate-limiting enzyme for de novo guanylate synthesis. We performed studies of the inhibition of IMPDH by tiazofurin, which acts as a competitive inhibitor through its active species that mimics nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), i.e. thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD). The mean inhibitory concentration (IC50) of tiazofurin for cellular proliferation inhibition was 2.3-2.8-fold greater in cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their corresponding parent cells proliferating under the influence of growth factors or in growth factor-independent derivative cells not expressing detectable p210 bcr-abl. IMPDH activity was 1.5-2.3-fold greater within cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their parent cells. This increase in enzyme activity was a result of 2-fold increased IMPDH protein as determined by immunoblotting. In addition, an increase in the Km value for NAD utilization by IMPDH was observed in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells, but this increase was within the range of resident NAD concentrations observed in the cells. Increased IMPDH protein in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells was traced to an increased level of IMP dehydrogenase II messenger RNA. Thus, regulation of IMPDH gene expression is mediated at least in part by the bcr-abl gene product and may therefore be indicative of a specific mechanism of intrinsic resistance to tiazofurin.

  8. p210 bcr-abl confers overexpression of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase: an intrinsic pathway to drug resistance mediated by oncogene.

    PubMed

    Gharehbaghi, K; Burgess, G S; Collart, F R; Litz-Jackson, S; Huberman, E; Jayaram, H N; Boswell, H S

    1994-08-01

    The p210 bcr-abl fusion protein tyrosine kinase oncogene has been implicated in the pathogenesis of chronic granulocytic leukemia (CGL). Specific intracellular functions performed by p210 bcr-abl have recently been delineated. We considered the possibility that p210 bcr-abl may also regulate the abundance of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) which is a rate-limiting enzyme for de novo guanylate synthesis. We performed studies of the inhibition of IMPDH by tiazofurin, which acts as a competitive inhibitor through its active species that mimics nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), i.e. thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (TAD). The mean inhibitory concentration (IC50) of tiazofurin for cellular proliferation inhibition was 2.3-2.8-fold greater in cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their corresponding parent cells proliferating under the influence of growth factors or in growth factor-independent derivative cells not expressing detectable p210 bcr-abl. IMPDH activity was 1.5-2.3-fold greater within cells expressing p210 bcr-abl than in their parent cells. This increase in enzyme activity was a result of 2-fold increased IMPDH protein as determined by immunoblotting. In addition, an increase in the Km value for NAD utilization by IMPDH was observed in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells, but this increase was within the range of resident NAD concentrations observed in the cells. Increased IMPDH protein in p210 bcr-abl transformed cells was traced to an increased level of IMP dehydrogenase II messenger RNA. Thus, regulation of IMPDH gene expression is mediated at least in part by the bcr-abl gene product and may therefore be indicative of a specific mechanism of intrinsic resistance to tiazofurin. PMID:7520100

  9. Kinetics of the template-directed oligomerization of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide: Effect of temperature on individual steps of reactionion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Bernasconi, C. F.; Alberas, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    Non-enzymatic, template-directed reactions have been proposed as models for prebiological polynucleotide synthesis. Chemically activated mononucleotides react in the presence of a polynucleotide, acting as the template in a Watson-Crick base-pairing fashing, and form the complementary daughter polynucleotide. Phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleotides have been used successfully as substrates in these reactions. The kinetics of the guanosine 5'-monophosphate-2-methylimidazolide (2-MelmpG) reaction in aqueous pH 8.0 solutions in the presence and in the absence of polycytidylate (poly(C)) were studied, acting as the template at 6, 23, and 37 C. In the absence of the template, the major reaction pathway of 2-MelmpG is hydrolysis of the P-N bond to form the unreactive guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) and 2-methylimidazole. Concentrated solution of 2-MelmpG (greater than 0.02 M) in the absence of the template form only a small amount dinucleotide, (pG)2, but in the presence of poly(C), oligoguanylates, (pG)n with 2 less than or = n less than or = 40, can be detected. We were able to determine the rate constants for individual steps of this reaction. A summary of the conclusions is presented.

  10. Glycolytic pathway (GP), kreb's cycle (KC), and hexose monophosphate shunt (HMS) activity in myocardial subcellular fractions exposed to cannabinoids

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.T.; Manno, B.R.; King, J.W.; Fowler, M.R.; Dempsey, C.A.; Manno, J.E.

    1986-03-05

    Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (..delta../sup 9/-THC), the primary psychoactive component of marihuana, and its active metabolite 11-hydroxy-..delta../sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC) have been reported to produce a direct cardiac depressant effect. Studies in isolated perfused rat hearts have indicated a decreased force of contraction (inotropic response) when ..delta../sup 9/-THC or 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC was administered in microgram amounts. The mechanism and site of action have not been explained or correlated with associated metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of cannabinoids on major myocardial energy producing pathways, GP and KC, and a non-energy producing pathway, HMS. Cardiac ventricular tissue from male Sprague-Dawley rats (250-300 g) was excised and homogenized for subcellular fractionation. KC, GP and HMS activity was assayed in the appropriate fractions by measuring /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ generation from /sup 14/C-2-pyruvate, /sup 14/C-6-glucose and /sup 14/C-1-glucose respectively. Duplicate assays (n=8) were performed on tissue exposed to saline (control), empty liposomes (vehicle) and four doses each of ..delta../sup 9/-THC and 11-OH-..delta../sup 9/-THC. Changes in metabolic activity and decreases in cardiac contractile performance may be associated.

  11. Adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase regulates IL-10-mediated anti-inflammatory signaling pathways in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yanfang Peipei; Brown, Jonathan R; Sag, Duygu; Zhang, Lihua; Suttles, Jill

    2015-01-15

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase with a critical function in the regulation of metabolic pathways in eukaryotic cells. Recently, AMPK has been shown to play an additional role as a regulator of inflammatory activity in leukocytes. Treatment of macrophages with chemical AMPK activators, or forced expression of a constitutively active form of AMPK, results in polarization to an anti-inflammatory phenotype. In addition, we reported previously that stimulation of macrophages with anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10, IL-4, and TGF-β results in rapid activation of AMPK, suggesting that AMPK contributes to the suppressive function of these cytokines. In this study, we investigated the role of AMPK in IL-10-induced gene expression and anti-inflammatory function. IL-10-stimulated wild-type macrophages displayed rapid activation of PI3K and its downstream targets Akt and mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC1), an effect that was not seen in macrophages generated from AMPKα1-deficient mice. AMPK activation was not impacted by treatment with either the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 or the JAK inhibitor CP-690550, suggesting that IL-10-mediated activation of AMPK is independent of PI3K and JAK activity. IL-10 induced phosphorylation of both Tyr(705) and Ser(727) residues of STAT3 in an AMPKα1-dependent manner, and these phosphorylation events were blocked by inhibition of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β, an upstream activator of AMPK, and by the mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin, respectively. The impaired STAT3 phosphorylation in response to IL-10 observed in AMPKα1-deficient macrophages was accompanied by reduced suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 expression and an inadequacy of IL-10 to suppress LPS-induced proinflammatory cytokine production. Overall, our data demonstrate that AMPKα1 is required for IL-10 activation of the PI3K/Akt/mTORC1 and STAT3-mediated anti-inflammatory pathways regulating macrophage

  12. Targeting energy metabolic and oncogenic signaling pathways in triple-negative breast cancer by a novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kuen-Haur; Hsu, En-Chi; Guh, Jih-Hwa; Yang, Hsiao-Ching; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K; Shapiro, Charles L; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2011-11-11

    The antitumor activities of the novel adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, OSU-53, were assessed in in vitro and in vivo models of triple-negative breast cancer. OSU-53 directly stimulated recombinant AMPK kinase activity (EC(50), 0.3 μM) and inhibited the viability and clonogenic growth of MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells with equal potency (IC(50), 5 and 2 μM, respectively) despite lack of LKB1 expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Nonmalignant MCF-10A cells, however, were unaffected. Beyond AMPK-mediated effects on mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and lipogenesis, OSU-53 also targeted multiple AMPK downstream pathways. Among these, the protein phosphatase 2A-dependent dephosphorylation of Akt is noteworthy because it circumvents the feedback activation of Akt that results from mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition. OSU-53 also modulated energy homeostasis by suppressing fatty acid biosynthesis and shifting the metabolism to oxidation by up-regulating the expression of key regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, such as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α and the transcription factor nuclear respiratory factor 1. Moreover, OSU-53 suppressed LPS-induced IL-6 production, thereby blocking subsequent Stat3 activation, and inhibited hypoxia-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in association with the silencing of hypoxia-inducible factor 1a and the E-cadherin repressor Snail. In MDA-MB-231 tumor-bearing mice, daily oral administration of OSU-53 (50 and 100 mg/kg) suppressed tumor growth by 47-49% and modulated relevant intratumoral biomarkers of drug activity. However, OSU-53 also induced protective autophagy that attenuated its antiproliferative potency. Accordingly, cotreatment with the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine increased the in vivo tumor-suppressive activity of OSU-53. OSU-53 is a potent, orally bioavailable AMPK activator that acts through a broad spectrum of antitumor activities. PMID

  13. Pathways of Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Alana; Finch, Lloyd R.

    1977-01-01

    By measuring the specific activity of nucleotides isolated from ribonucleic acid after the incorporation of 14C-labeled precursors under various conditions of growth, we have defined the major pathways of ribonucleotide synthesis in Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides. M. mycoides did not possess pathways for the de novo synthesis of nucleotides but was capable of interconversion of nucleotides. Thus, uracil provided the requirement for both pyrimidine ribonucleotides. Thymine is also required, suggesting that the methylation step is unavailable. No use was made of cytosine. Uridine was rapidly degraded to uracil. Cytidine competed effectively with uracil to provide most of the cytidine nucleotide and also provided an appreciable proportion of uridine nucleotide. In keeping with these results, there was a slow deamination of cytidine to uridine with further degradation to uracil in cultures of M. mycoides. Guanine was capable of meeting the full requirement of the organism for purine nucleotide, presumably by conversion of guanosine 5′-monophosphate to adenosine 5′-monophosphate via the intermediate inosine 5′-monophosphate. When available with guanine, adenine effectively gave a complete provision of adenine nucleotide, whereas hypoxanthine gave a partial provision. Neither adenine nor hypoxanthine was able to act as a precursor for the synthesis of guanine nucleotide. Exogenous guanosine, inosine, and adenosine underwent rapid cleavage to the corresponding bases and so show a pattern of utilization similar to that of the latter. PMID:324972

  14. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang; Lu, Weiqiang; Huang, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Human inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC50 values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. PMID:27378425

  15. Trichomonas vaginalis NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase hydrolyze guanine nucleotides and increase extracellular guanosine levels under serum restriction.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Camila Braz; Durgante, Juliano; de Oliveira, Rafael Rodrigues; Dos Santos, Victor Hugo Jacks Mendes; Rodrigues, Luiz Frederico; Garcia, Solange Cristina; Dos Santos, Odelta; Tasca, Tiana

    2016-05-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the aethiologic agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease in the world. The purinergic signaling pathway is mediated by extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides that are involved in many biological effects as neurotransmission, immunomodulation and inflammation. Extracellular nucleotides can be hydrolyzed by a family of enzymes known as ectonucleotidases including the ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) family which hydrolyses nucleosides triphosphate and diphosphate as preferential substrates and ecto-5'-nucleotidase which catalyzes the conversion of monophosphates into nucleosides. In T. vaginalis the E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities upon adenine nucleotides have already been characterized in intact trophozoites but little is known concerning guanine nucleotides and nucleoside. These enzymes may exert a crucial role on nucleoside generation, providing the purine sources for the synthesis de novo of these essential nutrients, sustaining parasite growth and survival. In this study, we investigated the hydrolysis profile of guanine-related nucleotides and nucleoside in intact trophozoites from long-term-grown and fresh clinical isolates of T. vaginalis. Knowing that guanine nucleotides are also substrates for T. vaginalis ectoenzymes, we evaluated the profile of nucleotides consumption and guanosine uptake in trophozoites submitted to a serum limitation condition. Results show that guanine nucleotides (GTP, GDP, GMP) were substrates for T. vaginalis ectonucleotidases, with expected kinetic parameters for this enzyme family. Different T. vaginalis isolates (two from the ATCC and nine fresh clinical isolates) presented a heterogeneous hydrolysis profile. The serum culture condition increased E-NTPDase and ecto-5'-nucleotidase activities with high consumption of extracellular GTP generating enhanced GDP, GMP and guanosine levels as demonstrated by HPLC, with final

  16. The deazapurine biosynthetic pathway revealed: In vitro enzymatic synthesis of preQ0 from guanosine-5′-triphosphate in four steps†

    PubMed Central

    McCarty, Reid M.; Somogyi, Árpád; Lin, Guangxin; Jacobsen, Neil E.; Bandarian, Vahe

    2009-01-01

    Deazapurine-containing secondary metabolites comprise a broad range of structurally diverse nucleoside analogs found throughout biology including various antibiotics produced by species of Streptomyces bacteria and the hypermodified tRNA bases queuosine and archaeosine. Despite early interest in deazapurines as antibiotic, antiviral, and antineoplastic agents, the biosynthetic route toward deazapurine production has remained largely elusive for more than 40 years. Here we present the first in vitro preparation of the deazapurine nucleoside, preQ0, by the successive action of four enzymes. The pathway includes the conversion of the recently identified biosynthetic intermediate, 6-carboxy-5,6,7,8-tetrahydropterin, to a novel intermediate, 7-carboxy-7-deazaguanine (CDG), by an unusual transformation catalyzed by B. subtilis QueE, a member of the radical SAM enzyme superfamily. The carboxylate moiety on CDG is converted subsequently to a nitrile to yield preQ0 by either B. subtilis QueC or S. rimosus ToyM in an ATP-dependent reaction, in which ammonia serves as the nitrogen source. The results presented here are consistent with early radiotracer studies on deazapurine biosynthesis and provide a unified pathway for the production of deazapurines in nature. PMID:19354300

  17. Extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Dongmei; Jackson, Travis C.; Verrier, Jonathan D.; Gillespie, Delbert G.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to test the hypothesis that extracellular guanosine regulates extracellular adenosine levels. Rat preglomerular vascular smooth muscle cells were incubated with adenosine, guanosine, or both. Guanosine (30 μmol/l) per se had little effect on extracellular adenosine levels. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) were 0.125 ± 0.020 μmol/l, indicating rapid disposition of extracellular adenosine. Extracellular adenosine levels 1 h after addition of adenosine (3 μmol/l) plus guanosine (30 μmol/l) were 1.173 ± 0.061 μmol/l, indicating slow disposition of extracellular adenosine. Cell injury increased extracellular levels of endogenous adenosine and guanosine, and the effects of cell injury on endogenous extracellular adenosine were modulated by altering the levels of endogenous extracellular guanosine with exogenous purine nucleoside phosphorylase (converts guanosine to guanine) or 8-aminoguanosine (inhibits purine nucleoside phosphorylase). Extracellular guanosine also slowed the disposition of extracellular adenosine in rat preglomerular vascular endothelial cells, mesangial cells, cardiac fibroblasts, and kidney epithelial cells and in human aortic and coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells and coronary artery endothelial cells. The effects of guanosine on adenosine levels were not mimicked or attenuated by 5-iodotubericidin (adenosine kinase inhibitor), erythro-9-(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl)-adenine (adenosine deaminase inhibitor), 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide (guanine deaminase inhibitor), aristeromycin (S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase inhibitor), low sodium (inhibits concentrative nucleoside transporters), S-(4-nitrobenzyl)−6-thioinosine [inhibits equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) type 1], zidovudine (inhibits ENT type 2), or acadesine (known modulator of adenosine levels). Guanosine also increases extracellular inosine, uridine, thymidine, and cytidine, yet decreases

  18. Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase of Escherichia coli. Purification by affinity chromatography, subunit structure and inhibition by guanosine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, H J; Lowe, C R; Drabble, W T

    1979-01-01

    Escherichia coli IMP dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.14) was purified by affinity chromatography on immobilized nucleotides. The enzyme binds to agarose-bound 8-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP, N6-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP and 8-(8-amino-octyl)-IMP but not to immobilized NAD+ or Cibacron Blue F3G-A. AMP proved to be an effective eluent. A large-scale purification scheme in which 8-(6-aminohexyl)-AMP-agarose was used resulted in a homogeneous preparation of IMP dehydrogenase. The enzyme was also purified by immunoprecipitation with monospecific antisera. Sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis, N-terminal amino acid analysis and tryptic 'finger-printing' demonstrated that IMP dehydrogenase comprises identical subunits of mol.wt. 58000. Trypsin and Pronase cleave the 58000-mol.wt. subunit into peptides of mol.wts. 42000 and 14000, with a concomitant decrease in enzyme activity. These observations rationalize much of the contradictory data on the subunit composition of the enzyme found in the literature. GMP appears to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to IMP, with no evidence for regulatory behaviour being found. The two purification procedures were also used to purify inactive mutant enzymes from guaB mutant strains of E. coli. PMID:44191

  19. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    PubMed Central

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  20. Human gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor gene transcription: up-regulation by 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate/protein kinase A pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, K W; Leung, P C

    2001-07-01

    Transient transfection of mouse gonadotrope-derived (alphaT3-1) cells with a 2297 bp human GnRHR promoter-luciferase construct (p2300-LucF) showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in the human gonodotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) promoter activity after forskolin treatment. An average of 4.8-fold increase in promoter activity was observed after 12 h of 10 microM forskolin treatment. This effect was mimicked by administration of cholera toxin, cAMP analog or pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide 38 (PACAP). A specific adenylate cyclase (AC) inhibitor (ACI) or protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor (PKAI) pretreatment reversed the forskolin- and PACAP-induced increase in the human GnRHR promoter activity. These results not only confirm the stimulatory effect of Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in human GnRHR promoter activation, but also suggest that hormones or neurotransmitters that activate adenylate cyclase in pituitary gonadotropes may increase the expression of human GnRHR gene in transcriptional level. Progressive 5' deletion assays identified a 412 bp fragment (-577 to 167) in the human GnRHR 5'-flanking region that is essential in maintaining the basal responsiveness to cAMP. Mutagenesis coupled with functional studies have identified two putative AP-1/CREB binding sites, namely hGR-AP/CRE-1 and hGR-AP/CRE-2 that participated in mediating the cAMP-stimulatory effect. Mutation of the putative hGR-AP/CRE-1 and hGR-CRE-2 resulted in a 38 and 32% decrease in the forskolin-induced stimulation. However, mutation of both binding sites did not completely abolish the cAMP-stimulatory effect, suggesting that multiple transcription factor binding sites were involved in full response in cAMP stimulation. The binding of CREB to these motifs was confirmed by gel mobility shift assay and antibody supershift assay. PMID:11476937

  1. Vasoactive intestinal peptide attenuates liver ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice via the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase a pathway.

    PubMed

    Ji, Haofeng; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Yuanxing; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Nguyen, Terry T; Busuttil, Ronald W; Waschek, James A; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2013-09-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI), an exogenous, antigen-independent, local inflammation response, occurs in multiple clinical settings, including liver transplantation, hepatic resection, trauma, and shock. The nervous system maintains extensive crosstalk with the immune system through neuropeptide and peptide hormone networks. This study examined the function and therapeutic potential of the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) neuropeptide in a murine model of liver warm ischemia (90 minutes) followed by reperfusion. Liver ischemia/reperfusion (IR) triggered an induction of gene expression of intrinsic VIP; this peaked at 24 hours of reperfusion and coincided with a hepatic self-healing phase. Treatment with the VIP neuropeptide protected livers from IRI; this was evidenced by diminished serum alanine aminotransferase levels and well-preserved tissue architecture and was associated with elevated intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-protein kinase A (PKA) signaling. The hepatocellular protection rendered by VIP was accompanied by diminished neutrophil/macrophage infiltration and activation, reduced hepatocyte necrosis/apoptosis, and increased hepatic interleukin-10 (IL-10) expression. Strikingly, PKA inhibition restored liver damage in otherwise IR-resistant VIP-treated mice. In vitro, VIP not only diminished macrophage tumor necrosis factor α/IL-6/IL-12 expression in a PKA-dependent manner but also prevented necrosis/apoptosis in primary mouse hepatocyte cultures. In conclusion, our findings document the importance of VIP neuropeptide-mediated cAMP-PKA signaling in hepatic homeostasis and cytoprotection in vivo. Because the enhancement of neural modulation differentially regulates local inflammation and prevents hepatocyte death, these results provide the rationale for novel approaches to managing liver IRI in transplant patients. PMID:23744729

  2. Regulation of Phospholipid Synthesis in Escherichia coli by Guanosine Tetraphosphate

    PubMed Central

    Merlie, John P.; Pizer, Lewis I.

    1973-01-01

    Phospholipid synthesis has been reported to be subject to stringent control in Escherichia coli. We present evidence that demonstrates a strict correlation between guanosine tetraphosphate accumulation and inhibition of phospholipid synthesis. In vivo experiments designed to examine the pattern of phospholipid labeling with 32P-inorganic phosphate and 32P-sn-glycerol-3-phosphate suggest that regulation must occur at the glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase step. Assay of phospholipid synthesis by cell-free extracts and semipurified preparations revealed that guanosine tetraphosphate inhibits at least two enzymes specific for the biosynthetic pathway, sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase as well as sn-glycerol-3-phosphate phosphatidyl transferase. These findings provide a biochemical basis for the stringent control of lipid synthesis as well as regulation of steady-state levels of phospholipid in growing cells. Images PMID:4583220

  3. Nucleotides as nucleophiles: reactions of nucleotides with phosphoimidazolide activated guanosine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Rosenbach, M. T.; Hurley, T. B.

    1991-01-01

    An earlier study of the reaction of phosphoimidazolide activated nucleosides (ImpN) in aqueous phosphate buffers indicated two modes of reaction of the phosphate monoanion and dianion. The first mode is catalysis of the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in ImpN's which leads to imidazole and nucleoside 5'-monophosphate. The second represents a nucleophilic substitution of the imidazole to yield the nucleoside 5'-diphosphate. This earlier study thus served as a model for the reaction of ImpN with nucleoside monophosphates (pN) because the latter can be regarded as phosphate derivatives. In the present study we investigated the reaction of guanosine 5'-phosphate-2-methylimidazolide, 2-MeImpG, in the presence of pN (N = guanosine, adenosine and uridine) in the range 6.9 less than or equal to pH less than or equal to 7.7. We observed that pN's do act as nucleophiles to form NppG, and as general base to enhance the hydrolysis of the P-N bond in 2-MeImpG, i.e. pN show the same behavior as inorganic phosphate. The kinetic analysis yields the following rate constants for the dianion pN2-: knpN = 0.17 +/- 0.02 M-1 h-1 for nucleophilic attack and khpN = 0.11 +/- 0.07 M-1 h-1 for general base catalysis of the hydrolysis. These rate constants which are independent of the nucleobase compare with kp.2 = 0.415 M-1 h-1 and khp2. = 0.217 M-1 h-1 for the reactions of HPO4(2-). In addition, this study shows that under conditions where pN presumably form stacks, the reaction mechanism remains unchanged although in quantitative terms stacked pN are somewhat less reactive. Attack by the 2'-OH and 3'-OH groups of the ribose moiety in amounts greater than or equal to 1% is not observed; this is attributed to the large difference in nucleophilicity in the neutral pH range between the phosphate group and the ribose hydroxyls. This nucleophilicity rank is not altered by stacking.

  4. Conservation and divergence of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate-protein kinase A (cAMP–PKA) pathway in two plant-pathogenic fungi: Fusarium graminearum and F. verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-PKA pathway is a central signaling cascade that transmits extracellular stimuli and governs cell responses through the second messenger cAMP. The importance of cAMP signaling in fungal biology has been well documented. Two key conserved components, adenylate cyclase (AC) and ca...

  5. Regulation by guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate of phospholipid methylation during chemotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed Central

    Alemany, S; García Gil, M; Mato, J M

    1980-01-01

    In Dictyostelium discoideum, the chemoattractant cyclic AMP activates the enzyme guanylate cyclase, giving a brief up to 10-fold increase in the intracellular cyclic GMP content. The addition of physiological cyclic GMP concentrations to a homogenate of D. discoideum cells markedly increased the incorporation of the 3H-labeled methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-[methyl-3H]methionine into mono- and dimethylated phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Lipid methylation was inhibited by S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine, which inhibits transmethylation. When whole cells prelabeled with L-[methyl-3H]methionine were exposed to cyclic AMP, a rapid transient increase in the amount of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine was observed. The time course of [methyl-3H]phosphatidylcholine formation agrees with its being mediated by the intracellular increase in cyclic GMP originating during chemotactic stimulation. Addition of the 8-Br derivative of cyclic GMP to whole cells also increased the levels of labeled phosphatidylcholine. It is therefore likely that cyclic GMP contributes to chemotaxis by regulating membrane function via phospholipid methylation. PMID:6261233

  6. Tissue distribution and metabolism of guanosine in rats following intraperitoneal injection.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, P; Ballerini, P; Ciccarelli, R; Buccella, S; Romano, S; D'Alimonte, I; D' Alimonte, I; Poli, A; Beraudi, A; Peña, E; Jiang, S; Rathbone, M P; Caciagli, F; Di Iorio, P

    2012-01-01

    Guanosine has long been known as an endogenous purine nucleoside deeply involved in the modulation of several intracellular processes, especially G-protein activity. More recently, it has been reported to act as an extracellular signaling molecule released from neurons and, more markedly, from astrocytes either in basal conditions or after different kinds of stimulation including hypoxia. Moreover, in vivo studies have shown that guanosine plays an important role as both a neuroprotective and neurotrophic agent in the central nervous system. Specific high-affinity binding sites for this nucleoside have been found on membrane preparations from rat brain. The present study was undertaken to investigate the distribution and metabolic profiles of guanosine after administering the nucleoside to gain a better understanding of the biological effects of this potential drug candidate. Rats were given an intraperitonal (i.p.) injection of 2, 4, 8 or 16 mg/kg of guanosine combined with 0.05% of [3H]guanosine. Plasma samples were collected 7.5, 15, 30, 60 and 90 min after the guanosine-mixture administration and analyzed by either a liquid scintillation counter or by HPLC connected to a UV and to an on-line radiochemical detector to measure the levels of guanosine and its metabolic products guanine, xanthine and uric acid. The levels of guanosine, guanine and xanthine were also measured in brain, lung, heart, kidney and liver tissue homogenates at the defined time points after the injection of 8 mg/kg of the guanosine-mixture. We found that the levels of radioactivity in plasma increased linearly in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Guanosine was widely distributed in all tissues examined in the present study, at almost twice its usual levels. In addition, guanine levels dramatically increased in all the organs. Interestingly, enzymatic analysis of the plasma samples showed the presence of a soluble purine nucleoside phosphorylase, a key enzyme in the purine salvage pathway

  7. Guanosine nucleotide precursor for flavinogenesis of Eremothecium Ashbyii.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, H; Nakajima, K

    1975-01-01

    The purine precursor in the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Eremothecium ashbyii was examined using a guanine analogue, 8-azaguanine, with non-growing cell systems. 1. Riboflavin formation in the culture filtrate was determined at 0, 5, 10 and 20 hr after start of the incubation of the non-growing cells in the presence of xanthine or 8-azaguanine (1 mM, respectively). At 20 hr of incubation, the addition of xanthine stimulated riboflavin formation by 36% and the addition of 8-azaguanine inhibited the formation by 57%. 2. Acid soluble nucleotide pools in the cells were followed at 0, 5, 10 and 20 hr of the incubation period in the presence of xanthine or 8-azaguanine by means of anion exchange column chromatography. The result showed that the GTP pool changed markedly despite the fact that the adenosine nucleotide pool was almost constant irrespective of the presence or absence of these purines till 10 hr of incubation. But, the decrease of the former was overcome in part by the addition of flavinogenic xanthine. Furthermore, the total amounts of GTP and guanosine accumulated in cells in the presence of 8-azaguanine reached the maximum already at 5 hr, attaining a level twice as much as the GTP contents of the control. 3. The role of guanosine nucleotide pool in riboflavin formation was further examined using 8-azaguanine. In this experiment the drug was added to the suspension of non-growing cells at 3 hr or 6 hr after the incubation was started and the reaction was continued till the 12th hr. A more clear-cut correlationship between riboflavin formation and guanosine nucleotide pool was oberved by this experiment. The guanosine nucleotide pool (consisting of GMP, GDP and GTP) increased simultaneously with the inhibition of riboflavin formation. Of the guanosine nucleotides pools, the GMP pool increased 2.7 times above normal upon the addition of 8-azaguanine during the incubation for 6 hr and 5.3 fold for 9 hr. While, the GTP pool increased 1.9 fold above

  8. A long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist increases the expression of muscarine cholinergic subtype-3 receptors by activating the β2-adrenoceptor cyclic adenosine monophosphate signaling pathway in airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LIU, YUAN-HUA; WU, SONG-ZE; WANG, GANG; HUANG, NI-WEN; LIU, CHUN-TAO

    2015-01-01

    The persistent administration of β2-adrenergic (β2AR) agonists has been demonstrated to increase the risk of severe asthma, partly due to the induction of tolerance to bronchoprotection via undefined mechanisms. The present study investigated the potential effect of the long-acting β2-adrenergic agonist, formoterol, on the expression of muscarinic M3 receptor (M3R) in rat airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). Primary rat ASMCs were isolated and characterized following immunostaining with anti-α-smooth muscle actin antibodies. The protein expression levels of M3R and phospholipase C-β1 (PLCβ1) were characterized by western blot analysis and the production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Formoterol increased the protein expression of M3R in rat ASMCs in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which was significantly inhibited by the β2AR antagonist, ICI118,551 and the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) inhibitor, SQ22,536. The increased protein expression of M3R was positively correlated with increased production of PLCβ1 and IP3. Furthermore, treatment with the glucocorticoid, budesonide, and the PLC inhibitor, U73,122, significantly suppressed the formoterol-induced upregulated protein expression levels of M3R and PLCβ1 and production of IP3. The present study demonstrated that formoterol mediated the upregulation of M3R in the rat ASMCs by activating the β2AR-cAMP signaling pathway, resulting in increased expression levels of PLCβ1 and IP3, which are key to inducing bronchoprotection tolerance. Administration of glucocorticoids or a PLC antagonist prevented formoterol-induced bronchoprotection tolerance by suppressing the protein expression of M3R. PMID:25672589

  9. Analysis of Nucleotide 5'-Monophosphates in Infant Formulas by HPLC-UV: Collaborative Study, Final Action 2011.20.

    PubMed

    Gill, Brendon D; Indyk, Harvey E

    2015-01-01

    A collaborative study was conducted on AOAC First Action Method 2011.20: 5'-Mononucleotides in Infant Formula and Adult/Pediatric Nutritional Formula. After the successful analysis of National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 1849a Standard Reference Material (SRM) as a practice sample, 12 laboratories participated in the analysis of duplicate samples of six different infant formula products. The samples were dissolved in high-salt solution to inhibit protein and fat interactions, with the nucleotides [uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), guanosine 5'-monophosphate (GMP), and cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP)] separated from the sample matrix by strong-anion exchange SPE, followed by chromatographic analysis using a C18 stationary phase with gradient elution, UV detection, and quantitation by an internal standard technique using thymidine 5'-monophosphate. For nucleotide-supplemented products, precision is within the Standard Method Performance RequirementsSM (SMPR) 2011.008 target reproducibility limit of ≤11%, with the reproducibility RSD (RSDR) estimated at 7.1-8.7% for CMP, 7.9-9.0% for UMP, 2.8-7.7% for GMP, 5.5-10.3% for IMP, and 2.7-6.2% for AMP, and Horwitz ratio (HorRat) values of 0.9-1.0 for CMP, 0.9-1.0 for UMP, 0.3-0.7 for GMP, 0.6-1.0 for IMP, and 0.3-0.7 for AMP. PMID:26268980

  10. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  11. A positive entropy change for guanosine binding and for the chemical step in the Tetrahymena ribozyme reaction.

    PubMed

    McConnell, T S; Cech, T R

    1995-03-28

    The ribozyme derived from the group I intron of Tetrahymena thermophila binds an exogenous guanosine nucleotide, which acts as the nucleophile in the sequence-specific cleavage of oligonucleotides. By examining the temperature dependence of the reaction under conditions where Km = Kd, we conclude the following: (1) Guanosine 5'-monophosphate (pG) binds to the closed ribozyme-oligonucleotide substrate complex with a positive entropy change (delta S degree' = +23 eu) and an enthalpy change (delta H degree') close to zero. This is contrary to the expectation that binding would cause increased order (negative delta S degree) and be driven by a negative delta H degree. (2) Inosine and 2-aminopurine riboside, each lacking two hydrogen-bonding moieties relative to guanosine, also bind with a positive entropy value and an unfavorable (positive) delta H degree'. From this result, we suggest that the hydrogen-bonding moieties make an enthalpic contribution to guanosine binding overcoming an intrinsic unfavorable delta H. (3) At 0 degree C, there is equally tight binding of pG in the presence and absence of oligonucleotide substrate bound to the ribozyme. Thus, energetic interactions responsible for the thermodynamic coupling between pG and oligonucleotide substrate binding seen at higher temperatures are indirect. (4) The activation barrier of the chemical step is stabilized by a positive delta S++ (+31 to 39 eu). This stabilization is seen in four reactions using substrates with two different leaving groups in the presence and absence of pG, suggesting that the entropic contribution is inherent to the active site. The positive delta S values for the chemical step and for the binding of pG can be explained by a conformational change or release of water. Thus, although hydrogen bonding contributes to binding of nucleotides to this RNA enzyme as previously thought, it is these other events which produce a positive delta S that provide the energetic driving force for binding

  12. Genetics Home Reference: adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency adenosine ...

  13. Inhibitory effects of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng on [Ca2+]i mobilization through phosphorylation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jung-Hae; Kwon, Hyuk-Woo; Cho, Hyun-Jeong; Rhee, Man Hee; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Background Intracellular Ca2+([Ca2+]i) is a platelet aggregation-inducing molecule. Therefore, understanding the inhibitory mechanism of [Ca2+]i mobilization is very important to evaluate the antiplatelet effect of a substance. This study was carried out to understand the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of total saponin from Korean Red Ginseng (KRG-TS). Methods We investigated the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of KRG-TS on cyclic nucleotides-associated phosphorylation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type I (IP3RI) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKA) in thrombin (0.05 U/mL)-stimulated human platelet aggregation. Results The inhibition of [Ca2+]i mobilization by KRG-TS was increased by a PKA inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cAMPS), which was more stronger than the inhibition by a cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitor (Rp-8-Br-cGMPS). In addition, Rp-8-Br-cAMPS inhibited phosphorylation of PKA catalytic subunit (PKAc) (Thr197) by KRG-TS. The phosphorylation of IP3RI (Ser1756) by KRG-TS was very strongly inhibited by Rp-8-Br-cAMPS compared with that by Rp-8-Br-cGMPS. These results suggest that the inhibitory effect of [Ca2+]i mobilization by KRG-TS is more strongly dependent on a cAMP/PKA pathway than a cGMP/PKG pathway. KRG-TS also inhibited the release of adenosine triphosphate and serotonin. In addition, only G-Rg3 of protopanaxadiol in KRG-TS inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion These results strongly indicate that KRG-TS is a potent beneficial compound that inhibits [Ca2+]i mobilization in thrombin–platelet interactions, which may result in the prevention of platelet aggregation-mediated thrombotic disease. PMID:26869828

  14. cGMP/cGMP-dependent protein kinase pathway modulates nicotine-induced currents through the activation of α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptors from insect neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Mannai, Safa; Bitri, Lofti; Thany, Steeve H

    2016-06-01

    Insect neurosecretory cells, called dorsal unpaired median neurons, are known to express two α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subtypes, nAChR1 and nAChR2. It was demonstrated that nAChR1 was sensitive to cAMP/cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) regulation, resulting in a modulation of nicotine currents. In this study, we show that cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) pathway modulates nicotine-induced currents, as increased cGMP affects the second compound of the biphasic current-voltage curve, corresponding to the nAChR2 receptors. Indeed, maintaining the guanosine triphosphate level with 100 μM guanosine triphosphate-γ-S increased nicotine currents through nAChR2. We also demonstrated that inhibition of PKG activity with 0.2 μM (8R,9S,11S)-(-)-9-methoxy-carbamyl-8-methyl-2,3,9,10-tetrahydro-8,11-epoxy-1H,8H,11H-2,7b,11a-trizadibenzo-(a,g)-cycloocta-(c,d,e)-trinden-1-one (KT5823), a PKG specific inhibitor, reduced nicotine-induced current amplitudes. KT5823 effect on nicotine currents is associated with calcium (Ca(2+) ) activity because inhibition of Ca(2+) concentration with cadmium chloride (CdCl2 ) abolished KT5823-induced inhibition mediated by nAChR2. However, specific inhibition of nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase (GC) complex by 10 μM 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) significantly increased nicotine-induced current amplitudes on both nAChR1 and nAChR2. These results suggest that nicotine-induced currents mediated by both α-bungarotoxin-insensitive nAChR1 and nAChR2 are coupled to the cGMP/PKG pathway. We propose that nicotinic acetylcholine receptor activation induces an increase in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+) ) concentration. Elevation of intracellular Ca(2+) results in the formation of Ca(2+) -calmodulin (CaM) complex, which activates guanylyl cyclase (GC) and/or adenylyl cyclase (AC). Ca(2+) -CaM complex could activate Ca(2+) calmodulin kinase II which

  15. Guanosine effect on cholesterol efflux and apolipoprotein E expression in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, Patrizia; Ciccarelli, Renata; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Giuliani, Patricia; Masciulli, Arianna; Nargi, Eleonora; Beraudi, Alina; Rathbone, Michel P; Caciagli, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    The main source of cholesterol in the central nervous system (CNS) is represented by glial cells, mainly astrocytes, which also synthesise and secrete apolipoproteins, in particular apolipoprotein E (ApoE), the major apolipoprotein in the brain, thus generating cholesterol-rich high density lipoproteins (HDLs). This cholesterol trafficking, even though still poorly known, is considered to play a key role in different aspects of neuronal plasticity and in the stabilisation of synaptic transmission. Moreover, cell cholesterol depletion has recently been linked to a reduction in amyloid beta formation. Here we demonstrate that guanosine, which we previously reported to exert several neuroprotective effects, was able to increase cholesterol efflux from astrocytes and C6 rat glioma cells in the absence of exogenously added acceptors. In this effect the phosphoinositide 3 kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (PI3K/ERK1/2) pathway seems to play a pivotal role. Guanosine was also able to increase the expression of ApoE in astrocytes, whereas it did not modify the levels of ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1), considered the main cholesterol transporter in the CNS. Given the emerging role of cholesterol balance in neuronal repair, these effects provide evidence for a role of guanosine as a potential pharmacological tool in the modulation of cholesterol homeostasis in the brain. PMID:18404467

  16. 2'-Modified Guanosine Analogs for the Treatment of HCV.

    PubMed

    Girijavallabhan, Vinay; Arasappan, Ashok; Bennett, Frank; Chen, Kevin; Dang, Qun; Huang, Ying; Kerekes, Angela; Nair, Latha; Pissarnitski, Dmitri; Verma, Vishal; Alvarez, Carmen; Chen, Ping; Cole, David; Esposite, Sara; Huang, Yuhua; Hong, Qingmei; Liu, Zhidan; Pan, Weidong; Pu, Haiyan; Rossman, Randall; Truong, Quang; Vibulbhan, Bancha; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Zhiqiang; Olsen, David; Stamford, Andrew; Bogen, Stephane; Njoroge, F George

    2016-06-01

    Novel 2'-modified guanosine nucleosides were synthesized from inexpensive starting materials in 7-10 steps via hydroazidation or hydrocyanation reactions of the corresponding 2'-olefin. The antiviral effectiveness of the guanosine nucleosides was evaluated by converting them to the corresponding 5'-O-triphosphates (compounds 38-44) and testing their biochemical inhibitory activity against the wild-type NS5B polymerase. PMID:27104963

  17. Discovery of Inhibitors of Leishmania β-1,2-Mannosyltransferases Using a Click-Chemistry-Derived Guanosine Monophosphate Library

    PubMed Central

    van der Peet, Phillip; Ralton, Julie E.; McConville, Malcolm J.; Williams, Spencer J.

    2012-01-01

    Leishmania spp. are a medically important group of protozoan parasites that synthesize a novel intracellular carbohydrate reserve polymer termed mannogen. Mannogen is a soluble homopolymer of β-1,2-linked mannose residues that accumulates in the major pathogenic stages in the sandfly vector and mammalian host. While several steps in mannogen biosynthesis have been defined, none of the enzymes have been isolated or characterized. We report the development of a simple assay for the GDP-mannose–dependent β-1,2-mannosyltransferases involved in mannogen synthesis. This assay utilizes octyl α-d-mannopyranoside to prime the formation of short mannogen oligomers up to 5 mannose residues. This assay was used to screen a focussed library of 44 GMP-triazole adducts for inhibitors. Several compounds provided effective inhibition of mannogen β-1,2-mannosyltransferases in a cell-free membrane preparation. This assay and inhibitor compounds will be useful for dissecting the role of different mannosyltransferases in regulating de novo biosynthesis and elongation reactions in mannogen metabolism. PMID:22393429

  18. Early glycogen synthase kinase-3β and protein phosphatase 2A independent tau dephosphorylation during global brain ischaemia and reperfusion following cardiac arrest and the role of the adenosine monophosphate kinase pathway.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H T; Koblar, Simon A; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2016-08-01

    Abnormal tau phosphorylation (p-tau) has been shown after hypoxic damage to the brain associated with traumatic brain injury and stroke. As the level of p-tau is controlled by Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK)-3β, Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Adenosine Monophosphate Kinase (AMPK), different activity levels of these enzymes could be involved in tau phosphorylation following ischaemia. This study assessed the effects of global brain ischaemia/reperfusion on the immediate status of p-tau in a rat model of cardiac arrest (CA) followed by cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). We reported an early dephosphorylation of tau at its AMPK sensitive residues, Ser(396) and Ser(262) after 2 min of ischaemia, which did not recover during the first two hours of reperfusion, while the tau phosphorylation at GSK-3β sensitive but AMPK insensitive residues, Ser(202) /Thr(205) (AT8), as well as the total amount of tau remained unchanged. Our data showed no alteration in the activities of GSK-3β and PP2A during similar episodes of ischaemia of up to 8 min and reperfusion of up to 2 h, and 4 weeks recovery. Dephosphorylation of AMPK followed the same pattern as tau dephosphorylation during ischaemia/reperfusion. Catalase, another AMPK downstream substrate also showed a similar pattern of decline to p-AMPK, in ischaemic/reperfusion groups. This suggests the involvement of AMPK in changing the p-tau levels, indicating that tau dephosphorylation following ischaemia is not dependent on GSK-3β or PP2A activity, but is associated with AMPK dephosphorylation. We propose that a reduction in AMPK activity is a possible early mechanism responsible for tau dephosphorylation. PMID:27177932

  19. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P.; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5′-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5′-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of HAT. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  20. GMP synthase is essential for viability and infectivity of Trypanosoma brucei despite a redundant purine salvage pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiong; Leija, Christopher; Rijo-Ferreira, Filipa; Chen, Jun; Cestari, Igor; Stuart, Kenneth; Tu, Benjamin P; Phillips, Margaret A

    2015-09-01

    The causative agent of human African trypanosomiasis, Trypanosoma brucei, lacks de novo purine biosynthesis and depends on purine salvage from the host. The purine salvage pathway is redundant and contains two routes to guanosine-5'-monophosphate (GMP) formation: conversion from xanthosine-5'-monophosphate (XMP) by GMP synthase (GMPS) or direct salvage of guanine by hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT). We show recombinant T. brucei GMPS efficiently catalyzes GMP formation. Genetic knockout of GMPS in bloodstream parasites led to depletion of guanine nucleotide pools and was lethal. Growth of gmps null cells was only rescued by supraphysiological guanine concentrations (100 μM) or by expression of an extrachromosomal copy of GMPS. Hypoxanthine was a competitive inhibitor of guanine rescue, consistent with a common uptake/metabolic conversion mechanism. In mice, gmps null parasites were unable to establish an infection demonstrating that GMPS is essential for virulence and that plasma guanine is insufficient to support parasite purine requirements. These data validate GMPS as a potential therapeutic target for treatment of human African trypanosomiasis. The ability to strategically inhibit key metabolic enzymes in the purine pathway unexpectedly bypasses its functional redundancy by exploiting both the nature of pathway flux and the limited nutrient environment of the parasite's extracellular niche. PMID:26043892

  1. Guanosine protects glial cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Patricia; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Ciccarelli, Renata; Rathbone, Michel P; Romano, Silvia; D'Alimonte, Iolanda; Caciagli, Francesco; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Pokorski, Mieczyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Increasing body of evidence indicates that neuron-neuroglia interaction may play a key role in determining the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic pathological condition characterized by selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra. We have previously reported that guanosine (GUO) antagonizes MPP(+)-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells and exerts neuroprotective effects against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and beta-amyloid-induced apoptosis of SH-SY5Y cells. In the present study we demonstrate that GUO protected C6 glioma cells, taken as a model system for astrocytes, from 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity. We show that GUO, either alone or in combination with 6-OHDA activated the cell survival pathways ERK and PI3K/Akt. The involvement of these signaling systems in the mechanism of the nucleoside action was strengthened by a reduction of the protective effect when glial cells were pretreated with U0126 or LY294002, the specific inhibitors of MEK1/2 and PI3K, respectively. Since the protective effect on glial cell death of GUO was not affected by pretreatment with a cocktail of nucleoside transporter blockers, GUO transport and its intracellular accumulation were not at play in our in vitro model of PD. This fits well with our data which pointed to the presence of specific binding sites for GUO on rat brain membranes. On the whole, the results described in the present study, along with our recent evidence showing that GUO when administered to rats via intraperitoneal injection is able to reach the brain and with previous data indicating that it stimulates the release of neurotrophic factors, suggest that GUO, a natural compound, by acting at the glial level could be a promising agent to be tested against neurodegeneration. PMID:25310956

  2. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    PubMed

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  3. Recognition of guanosine by dissimilar tRNA methyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Reiko; Giessing, Anders; Dai, Qing; Lahoud, Georges; Liutkeviciute, Zita; Klimasauskas, Saulius; Piccirilli, Joseph; Kirpekar, Finn; Hou, Ya-Ming

    2012-09-01

    Guanosines are important for biological activities through their specific functional groups that are recognized for RNA or protein interactions. One example is recognition of N(1) of G37 in tRNA by S-adenosyl-methionine (AdoMet)-dependent tRNA methyltransferases to synthesize m(1)G37-tRNA, which is essential for translational fidelity in all biological domains. Synthesis of m(1)G37-tRNA is catalyzed by TrmD in bacteria and by Trm5 in eukarya and archaea, using unrelated and dissimilar structural folds. This raises the question of how dissimilar proteins recognize the same guanosine. Here we probe the mechanism of discrimination among functional groups of guanosine by TrmD and Trm5. Guanosine analogs were systematically introduced into tRNA through a combination of chemical and enzymatic synthesis. Single turnover kinetic assays and thermodynamic analysis of the effect of each analog on m(1)G37-tRNA synthesis reveal that TrmD and Trm5 discriminate functional groups differently. While both recognize N(1) and O(6) of G37, TrmD places a much stronger emphasis on these functional groups than Trm5. While the exocyclic 2-amino group of G37 is important for TrmD, it is dispensable for Trm5. In addition, while an adjacent G36 is obligatory for TrmD, it is nonessential for Trm5. These results depict a more rigid requirement of guanosine functional groups for TrmD than for Trm5. However, the sensitivity of both enzymes to analog substitutions, together with an experimental revelation of their low cellular concentrations relative to tRNA substrates, suggests a model in which these enzymes rapidly screen tRNA by direct recognition of G37 in order to monitor the global state of m(1)G37-tRNA. PMID:22847817

  4. Guanosine Protects Against Cortical Focal Ischemia. Involvement of Inflammatory Response.

    PubMed

    Hansel, Gisele; Tonon, André Comiran; Guella, Felipe Lhywinskh; Pettenuzzo, Letícia Ferreira; Duarte, Thiago; Duarte, Marta Maria Medeiros Frescura; Oses, Jean Pierre; Achaval, Matilde; Souza, Diogo Onofre

    2015-12-01

    Stroke is the major cause of death and the most frequent cause of disability in the adult population worldwide. Guanosine plays an important neuroprotective role in several cerebral ischemic models and is involved in the modulation of oxidative responses and glutamatergic parameters. Because the excessive reactive oxygen species produced during an ischemic event can trigger an inflammatory response, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that guanosine is neuroprotective against focal cerebral ischemia, inhibits microglia/macrophages activation, and mediates an inflammatory response ameliorating the neural damage. Permanent focal cerebral ischemia was induced in adult rats, and guanosine was administered immediately, 1, 3, and 6 h after surgery. Twenty-four hours after ischemia, the asymmetry scores were evaluated by the cylinder test; neuronal damage was evaluated by Fluoro-Jade C (FJC) staining and propidium iodide (PI) incorporation; microglia and immune cells were evaluated by anti-Iba-1 antibody; and inflammatory parameters such as interleukins (IL): IL-1, IL-6, IL-10; tumor necrosis factors alpha (TNF-α); and interferon-gamma (INF-γ) were evaluated in the brain tissue and cerebrospinal fluid. The ischemic event increased the levels of Iba-1-positive cells and pro-inflammatory cytokines and decreased IL-10 levels (an anti-inflammatory cytokine) in the lesion periphery. The guanosine treatment attenuated the changes in these inflammatory parameters and also reduced the infarct volume, PI incorporation, and number of FJC-positive cells, improving the functional recovery. Thus, guanosine may have been a promising therapeutic agent for the treatment of ischemic brain injury by reduction of inflammatory process triggered in an ischemic event. PMID:25394382

  5. Measurement of intercolumnar forces between parallel guanosine four-stranded helices.

    PubMed Central

    Mariani, P; Saturni, L

    1996-01-01

    The deoxyguanosine-5'-monophosphate in aqueous solution self-associates into stable structures, which include hexagonal and cholesteric columnar phases. The structural unit is a four-stranded helix, composed of a stacked array of Hoogsteen-bonded guanosine quartets. We have measured by osmotic stress method the force per unit length versus interaxial distance between helices in the hexagonal phase under various ionic conditions. Two contributions have been recognized: the first one is purely electrostatic, is effective at large distances, and shows a strong dependence on the salt concentration of the solution. The second contribution is short range, dominates at interaxial separations smaller than about 30-32 A, and rises steeply as the columns approach each other, preventing the coalescence of the helices. This repulsion has an exponential nature and shows a magnitude and a decay length insensitive to the ionic strength of the medium. Because these features are distinctive of the hydration force detected between phospholipid bilayers or between several linear macromolecules (DNA, polysaccharides, collagen), we conclude that the dominant force experienced by deoxyguanosine helices approaching contact is hydration repulsion. The observed decay length of about 0.7 A has been rationalized to emerge from the coupling between the 3-A decay length of water solvent and the helically ordered structure of the hydrophilic groups on the opposing surfaces. The present results agree with recent measurements, also showing the dependence of the hydration force decay on the structure of interacting surfaces and confirm the correlations between force and structure. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8744324

  6. P2Y2 receptor up-regulation induced by guanosine or UTP in rat brain cultured astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ballerini, P; Di Iorio, P; Caciagli, F; Rathbone, M P; Jiang, S; Nargi, E; Buccella, S; Giuliani, P; D'Alimonte, I; Fischione, G; Masciulli, A; Romano, S; Ciccarelli, R

    2006-01-01

    Among P2 metabotropic ATP receptors, P2Y2 subtype seems to be peculiar as its upregulation triggers important biological events in different cells types. In non-stimulated cells including astrocytes, P2Y2 receptors are usually expressed at levels lower than P2Y1 sites, however the promoter region of the P2Y2 receptors has not yet been studied and little is known about the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the expression of this ATP receptor. We showed that not only UTP and ATP are the most potent and naturally occurring agonist for P2Y2 sites, but also guanosine induced an up-regulation of astrocyte P2Y2 receptor mRNA evaluated by Northern blot analysis. We also focused our attention on this nucleoside since in our previous studies it was reported to be released by cultured astrocytes and to exert different neuroprotective effects. UTP and guanosine-evoked P2Y2 receptor up-regulation in rat brain cultured astrocytes was linked to an increased P2Y2-mediated intracellular calcium response, thus suggesting an increased P2Y2 activity. Actinomycin D, a RNA polymerase inhibitor, abrogated both UTP and guanosine-mediated P2Y2 up-regulation, thus indicating that de novo transcription was required. The effect of UTP and guanosine was also evaluated in astrocytes pretreated with different inhibitors of signal transduction pathways including ERK, PKC and PKA reported to be involved in the regulation of other cell surface receptor mRNAs. The results show that ERK1-2/MAPK pathway play a key role in the P2Y2 receptor up-regulation mediated by either UTP or guanosine. Moreover, our data suggest that PKA is also involved in guanosine-induced transcriptional activation of P2Y2 mRNA and that increased intracellular calcium levels and PKC activation may also mediate P2Y2 receptor up-regulation triggered by UTP. The extracellular release of ATP under physiological and pathological conditions has been widely studied. On the contrary, little is known about the release of

  7. Partial 13C isotopic enrichment of nucleoside monophosphates: useful reporters for NMR structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Anita I.; Mayer, Michael R.; Prestegard, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the 13C isotopic labeling patterns of nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) extracted from Escherichia coli grown in a mixture of C-1 and C-2 glucose is presented. By comparing our results to previous observations on amino acids grown in similar media, we have been able to rationalize the labeling pattern based on the well-known biochemistry of nucleotide biosynthesis. Except for a few notable absences of label (C4 in purines and C3′ in ribose) and one highly enriched site (C1′ in ribose), most carbons are randomly enriched at a low level (an average of 13%). These sparsely labeled NMPs give less complex NMR spectra than their fully isotopically labeled analogs due to the elimination of most 13C–13C scalar couplings. The spectral simplicity is particularly advantageous when working in ordered systems, as illustrated with guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) aligned in a liquid crystalline medium. In this system, the absence of scalar couplings and additional long-range dipolar couplings significantly enhances signal to noise and resolution. PMID:16254075

  8. Phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate is involved in toxoplasma apicoplast biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Montcourrier, Philippe; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Merezegue, Fabrice; Richard, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Meissner, Markus; Vial, Henri J; Roy, Christian; Wengelnik, Kai; Lebrun, Maryse

    2011-02-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause devastating diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. They harbour a plastid-like, non-photosynthetic organelle of algal origin, the apicoplast, which fulfils critical functions for parasite survival. Because of its essential and original metabolic pathways, the apicoplast has become a target for the development of new anti-apicomplexan drugs. Here we show that the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI3P) is involved in apicoplast biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii. In yeast and mammalian cells, PI3P is concentrated on early endosomes and regulates trafficking of endosomal compartments. Imaging of PI3P in T. gondii showed that the lipid was associated with the apicoplast and apicoplast protein-shuttling vesicles. Interference with regular PI3P function by over-expression of a PI3P specific binding module in the parasite led to the accumulation of vesicles containing apicoplast peripheral membrane proteins around the apicoplast and, ultimately, to the loss of the organelle. Accordingly, inhibition of the PI3P-synthesising kinase interfered with apicoplast biogenesis. These findings point to an unexpected implication for this ubiquitous lipid and open new perspectives on how nuclear encoded proteins traffic to the apicoplast. This study also highlights the possibility of developing specific pharmacological inhibitors of the parasite PI3-kinase as novel anti-apicomplexan drugs. PMID:21379336

  9. Phosphatidylinositol 3-Monophosphate Is Involved in Toxoplasma Apicoplast Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Tawk, Lina; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Montcourrier, Philippe; Chicanne, Gaëtan; Merezegue, Fabrice; Richard, Véronique; Payrastre, Bernard; Meissner, Markus; Vial, Henri J.; Roy, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause devastating diseases including malaria and toxoplasmosis. They harbour a plastid-like, non-photosynthetic organelle of algal origin, the apicoplast, which fulfils critical functions for parasite survival. Because of its essential and original metabolic pathways, the apicoplast has become a target for the development of new anti-apicomplexan drugs. Here we show that the lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-monophosphate (PI3P) is involved in apicoplast biogenesis in Toxoplasma gondii. In yeast and mammalian cells, PI3P is concentrated on early endosomes and regulates trafficking of endosomal compartments. Imaging of PI3P in T. gondii showed that the lipid was associated with the apicoplast and apicoplast protein-shuttling vesicles. Interference with regular PI3P function by over-expression of a PI3P specific binding module in the parasite led to the accumulation of vesicles containing apicoplast peripheral membrane proteins around the apicoplast and, ultimately, to the loss of the organelle. Accordingly, inhibition of the PI3P-synthesising kinase interfered with apicoplast biogenesis. These findings point to an unexpected implication for this ubiquitous lipid and open new perspectives on how nuclear encoded proteins traffic to the apicoplast. This study also highlights the possibility of developing specific pharmacological inhibitors of the parasite PI3-kinase as novel anti-apicomplexan drugs. PMID:21379336

  10. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa)

    PubMed Central

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P.

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5′-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts. PMID:26283971

  11. Regulatory role for the arginine-nitric oxide pathway in metabolism of energy substrates.

    PubMed

    Jobgen, Wenjuan Shi; Fried, Susan K; Fu, Wenjiang J; Meininger, Cynthia J; Wu, Guoyao

    2006-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthesized from L-arginine by NO synthase in virtually all cell types. Emerging evidence shows that NO regulates the metabolism of glucose, fatty acids and amino acids in mammals. As an oxidant, pathological levels of NO inhibit nearly all enzyme-catalyzed reactions through protein oxidation. However, as a signaling molecule, physiological levels of NO stimulate glucose uptake as well as glucose and fatty acid oxidation in skeletal muscle, heart, liver and adipose tissue; inhibit the synthesis of glucose, glycogen, and fat in target tissues (e.g., liver and adipose); and enhance lipolysis in adipocytes. Thus, an inhibition of NO synthesis causes hyperlipidemia and fat accretion in rats, whereas dietary arginine supplementation reduces fat mass in diabetic fatty rats. The putative underlying mechanisms may involve multiple cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate-dependent pathways. First, NO stimulates the phosphorylation of adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase, resulting in (1) a decreased level of malonyl-CoA via inhibition of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and activation of malonyl-CoA decarboxylase and (2) a decreased expression of genes related to lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis (glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase). Second, NO increases the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase and perilipins, leading to the translocation of the lipase to the neutral lipid droplets and, hence, the stimulation of lipolysis. Third, NO activates expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, thereby enhancing mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative phosphorylation. Fourth, NO increases blood flow to insulin-sensitive tissues, promoting substrate uptake and product removal via the circulation. Modulation of the arginine-NO pathway through dietary supplementation with L-arginine or L-citrulline may aid in the prevention and

  12. Nucleotides as nucleophiles - Reactions of nucleotides with phosphoimidazolide activated guanosine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia; Rosenbach, Morgan T.; Hurley, T. B.

    1992-01-01

    On the basis of recently discovered RNAs with catalytic capabilities resembling those of enzymes, it is postulated that an 'RNA world' may have played a determining role in prebiotic chemistry and led evolution from prebiological to biological systems. The advent of the RNA world thus postulated, however, entails the preexistence of ribomononucleotides, and presumes that their reactions resulted in templatelike oligonucleotides. Attention is presently given to the reaction of nucleoside monophosphates with the phosphoimidazolide-activated nucleosides that (1) have successfully been used in place of the natural nucleoside triphosphates and (2) for whose prebiotic existence there is now some evidence.

  13. Mechanisms involved in the antinociception induced by systemic administration of guanosine in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, AP; Böhmer, AE; Schallenberger, C; Antunes, C; Tavares, RG; Wofchuk, ST; Elisabetsky, E; Souza, DO

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: It is well known that adenine-based purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. However, less attention has been given to the potential effects of guanine-based purines on pain transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral (p.o.) administration of guanosine on mice pain models. Additionally, investigation into the mechanisms of action of guanosine, its potential toxicity and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) purine levels were also assessed. Experimental approach: Mice received an i.p. or p.o. administration of vehicle (0.1 mM NaOH) or guanosine (up to 240 mg·kg−1) and were evaluated in several pain models. Key results: Guanosine produced dose-dependent antinociceptive effects in the hot-plate, glutamate, capsaicin, formalin and acetic acid models, but it was ineffective in the tail-flick test. Additionally, guanosine produced a significant inhibition of biting behaviour induced by i.t. injection of glutamate, AMPA, kainate and trans-ACPD, but not against NMDA, substance P or capsaicin. The antinociceptive effects of guanosine were prevented by selective and non-selective adenosine receptor antagonists. Systemic administration of guanosine (120 mg·kg−1) induced an approximately sevenfold increase on CSF guanosine levels. Guanosine prevented the increase on spinal cord glutamate uptake induced by intraplantar capsaicin. Conclusions and implications: This study provides new evidence on the mechanism of action of the antinociceptive effects after systemic administration of guanosine. These effects seem to be related to the modulation of adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. PMID:20132210

  14. DNAzyme-mediated catalysis with only guanosine and cytidine nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Schlosser, Kenny; Li, Yingfu

    2009-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules have the capacity to adopt catalytically active structures known as DNAzymes, although the fundamental limits of this ability have not been determined. Starting with a parent DNAzyme composed of all four types of standard nucleotides, we conducted a search of the surrounding sequence space to identify functional derivatives with catalytic cores composed of only three, and subsequently only two types of nucleotides. We provide the first report of a DNAzyme that contains only guanosine and cytidine deoxyribonucleotides in its catalytic domain, which consists of just 13 nucleotides. This DNAzyme catalyzes the Mn2+-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphodiester bond ∼5300-fold faster than the corresponding uncatalyzed reaction, but ∼10 000-fold slower than the parent. The demonstration of a catalytic DNA molecule made from a binary nucleotide alphabet broadens our understanding of the fundamental limits of nucleic-acid-mediated catalysis. PMID:19050014

  15. Kinetics of the hydrolysis of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    1986-01-01

    The hydrolysis kinetics of guanosine 5'-phospho-2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG) in aqueous buffered solutions of various pH's was studied at 75 and 37 C, using spectrophotometric and HPLC techniques. The hydrolysis was found to be very slow even at low pH. At 75 C and pH at or below l.0, two kinetic processes were observed: the more rapid one was attributed to the hydrolysis of the phosphoimidazolide P-N bond; the second, much slower one, was attributed to the cleavage of the glycosidic bond. It is noted that the P-N hydrolysis in phosphoimidazolides is very slow compared to other phosphoramidates, and that this might be one of the reasons why the phosphoimidazolides showed an extraordinary ability to form long oligomers under template-directed conditions.

  16. Mycophenolic acid inhibits inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase and suppresses production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nitric oxide, and LDH in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Charlotte A; Carlsten, Hans

    2002-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid (MPA) inhibits reversibly inosine 5(')-monophosphate dehydrogenase, an enzyme involved in the de novo synthesis of guanine nucleotides. Previously, mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), the pro-drug of MPA, was shown to exert beneficial effects on the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like disease in MRLlpr/lpr mice. In this study MPA's immunomodulating effects in vitro on the murine macrophage cell line IC-21 were investigated. The cells were exposed to MPA together with lipopolysaccharide and IFN-gamma. Cytokine, NO(2)(-), and lactate dehydrogenase levels in supernatants and cell lysates were analysed as well as the proliferation of IC-21 cells. MPA exposure reduced the total levels of all molecules investigated and suppressed the proliferation. All MPA-induced effects were reversed by the addition of guanosine to the cultures. Since macrophages play a role in lupus nephritis, our results indicate that modulation of macrophages may be involved in the ameliorating effects of MMF in SLE. PMID:12381354

  17. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate phosphodiesterase in brain: effect on anxiety.

    PubMed

    Beer, B; Chasin, M; Clody, D E; Vogel, J R

    1972-04-28

    Drugs that reduce anxiety may be mediated by cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the brain because (i) potent anxiety-reducing drugs are also potent inhibitors of brain phosphodiesterase activity; (ii) dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate has the ability to reduce anxiety; (iii) the methylxanthines show significant anxiety-reducing effects; (iv) theophylline and chlordiazepoxide produce additive anxiety-reducing activity; and (v) there is a significant correlation between the anxiety-reducing property of drugs and their ability to inhibit phosphodiesterase activity in the brain. PMID:4402069

  18. A short review on structure and role of cyclic-3’,5’-adenosine monophosphate-specific phosphodiesterase 4 as a treatment tool

    PubMed Central

    Eskandari, Nahid; Mirmosayyeb, Omid; Bordbari, Gazaleh; Bastan, Reza; Yousefi, Zahra; Andalib, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are known as a super-family of enzymes which catalyze the metabolism of the intracellular cyclic nucleotides, cyclic-3’,5’-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), and cyclic-3’,5’-guanosine monophosphate that are expressed in a variety of cell types that can exert various functions based on their cells distribution. The PDE4 family has been the focus of vast research efforts over recent years because this family is considered as a prime target for therapeutic intervention in a number of inflammatory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and rheumatoid arthritis, and it should be used and researched by pharmacists. This is because the major isoform of PDE that regulates inflammatory cell activity is the cAMP-specific PDE, PDE4. This review discusses the relationship between PDE4 and its inhibitor drugs based on structures, cells distribution, and pharmacological properties of PDE4 which can be informative for all pharmacy specialists. PMID:26645022

  19. Biochemical characterization of recombinant guaA-encoded guanosine monophosphate synthetase (EC 6.3.5.2) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv strain.

    PubMed

    Franco, Tathyana Mar A; Rostirolla, Diana C; Ducati, Rodrigo G; Lorenzini, Daniel M; Basso, Luiz A; Santos, Diógenes S

    2012-01-01

    Administration of the current tuberculosis (TB) vaccine to newborns is not a reliable route for preventing TB in adults. The conversion of XMP to GMP is catalyzed by guaA-encoded GMP synthetase (GMPS), and deletions in the Shiguella flexneri guaBA operon led to an attenuated auxotrophic strain. Here we present the cloning, expression, and purification of recombinant guaA-encoded GMPS from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtGMPS). Mass spectrometry data, oligomeric state determination, steady-state kinetics, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and multiple sequence alignment are also presented. The homodimeric MtGMPS catalyzes the conversion of XMP, MgATP, and glutamine into GMP, ADP, PP(i), and glutamate. XMP, NH(4)(+), and Mg(2+) displayed positive homotropic cooperativity, whereas ATP and glutamine displayed hyperbolic saturation curves. The activity of ATP pyrophosphatase domain is independent of glutamine amidotransferase domain, whereas the latter cannot catalyze hydrolysis of glutamine to NH(3) and glutamate in the absence of substrates. ITC data suggest random order of binding of substrates, and PP(i) is the last product released. Sequence comparison analysis showed conservation of both Cys-His-Glu catalytic triad of N-terminal Class I amidotransferase and of amino acid residues of the P-loop of the N-type ATP pyrophosphatase family. PMID:22119138

  20. 3'-5' cyclic-guanosine monophosphate increase in rat brain hippocampus after gamma-hydroxybutyrate administration. Prevention by valproate and naloxone

    SciTech Connect

    Vayer, P.; Gobaille, S.; Mandel, P.; Maitre, M.

    1987-08-03

    An increase (123%) of cyclic GMP (cGMP) was observed in the hippocampus of the rat killed by microwave irradiation 45 min after administration of 500 mg/kg el-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) IP. This increase is time and dose dependent. No modification in cyclic nucleotide content was observed in striatum and in cerebellum. As the role of GHB has been implicated in neurotransmission, the fact that this compound increases cyclic GMP accumulation in hippocampus in vivo may represent a mechanism by which the actions of GHB are mediated at the cellular level. Valproate (400 mg/kg) or naloxone (10 mg/kg) pretreatment completely abolish the cGMP increase due to GHB. A GABAergic and/or opiate phenomenon may be involved in the mechanism of GHB induced increase of cGMP. 34 references, 4 figures.

  1. Dual specificity and novel structural folding of yeast phosphodiesterase-1 for hydrolysis of second messengers cyclic adenosine and guanosine 3',5'-Monophosphate

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tian, Yuanyuan; Cui, Wenjun; Huang, Manna; Robinson, Howard; Wan, Yiqian; Wang, Yousheng; Ke, Hengming

    2014-08-05

    Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) decompose second messengers cAMP and cGMP that play critical roles in many physiological processes. PDE1 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant yPDE1 has a KM of 110 μM and a kcat of 16.9 s⁻¹ for cAMP and a KM of 105 μM and a kcat of 11.8 s₅⁻¹ for cGMP. Thus, the specificity constant (kcat/KMcAMP)/(kcat/KMcGMP) of 1.4 indicates a dual specificity of yPDE1 for hydrolysis of both cAMP and cGMP. The crystal structures of unliganded yPDE1 and its complex with GMP at 1.31 Å resolution reveal a new structural foldingmore » that is different from those of human PDEs but is partially similar to that of some other metalloenzymes such as metallo-β-lactamase. In spite of their different structures and divalent metals, yPDE1 and human PDEs may share a common mechanism for hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP.« less

  2. Human UMP-CMP kinase 2, a novel nucleoside monophosphate kinase localized in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yunjian; Johansson, Magnus; Karlsson, Anna

    2008-01-18

    Enzyme deficiency in the salvage pathway of deoxyribonucleotide synthesis in mitochondria can cause mtDNA depletion syndromes. We have identified a human mitochondrial UMP-CMP kinase (UMP-CMPK, cytidylate kinase; EC 2.7.4.14), designated as UMP-CMP kinase 2 (UMP-CMPK2). The C-terminal domain of this 449-amino acid protein contains all consensus motifs of a nucleoside monophosphate kinase. Phylogenetic analysis showed that UMP-CMPK2 belonged to a novel nucleoside monophosphate kinase family, which was closer to thymidylate kinase than to cytosolic UMP-CMP kinase. Subcellular localization with green fluorescent protein fusion proteins illustrated that UMP-CMPK2 was localized in the mitochondria of HeLa cells and that the mitochondrial targeting signal was included in the N-terminal 22 amino acids. The enzyme was able to phosphorylate dUMP, dCMP, CMP, and UMP with ATP as phosphate donor, but the kinetic properties were different compared with the cytosolic UMP-CMPK. Its efficacy to convert dUMP was highest, followed by dCMP, whereas CMP and UMP were the poorest substrates. It also phosphorylated the monophosphate forms of the nucleoside analogs ddC, dFdC, araC, BVDU, and FdUrd, which suggests that UMP-CMPK2 may be involved in mtDNA depletion caused by long term treatment with ddC or other pyrimidine analogs. UMP-CMPK2 mRNA expression was exclusively detected in chronic myelogenous leukemia K-562 and lymphoblastic leukemia MOLT-4 among eight studied cancer cell lines. Particular high expression in leukemia cells, dominant expression in bone marrow, and tight correlation with macrophage activation and inflammatory response suggest that UMP-CMPK2 may have other functions in addition to the supply of substrates for mtDNA synthesis. PMID:17999954

  3. Increased riboflavin production by manipulation of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase in Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Buey, Rubén M; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Balsera, Mónica; de Pereda, José María; Revuelta, José Luis

    2015-11-01

    Guanine nucleotides are the precursors of essential biomolecules including nucleic acids and vitamins such as riboflavin. The enzyme inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the ratelimiting step in the guanine nucleotide de novo biosynthetic pathway and plays a key role in controlling the cellular nucleotide pools. Thus, IMPDH is an important metabolic bottleneck in the guanine nucleotide synthesis, susceptible of manipulation by means of metabolic engineering approaches. Herein, we report the functional and structural characterization of the IMPDH enzyme from the industrial fungus Ashbya gossypii. Our data show that the overexpression of the IMPDH gene increases the metabolic flux through the guanine pathway and ultimately enhances 40 % riboflavin production with respect to the wild type. Also, IMPDH disruption results in a 100-fold increase of inosine excretion to the culture media. Our results contribute to the developing metabolic engineering toolbox aiming at improving the production of metabolites with biotechnological interest in A. gossypii. PMID:26150243

  4. Alkylation of guanosine and 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)-pyridine by styrene oxide analogues in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Heinonen, T; Vainio, H

    1981-11-01

    In vitro alkylation activity of styrene oxide (SO) and three of its analogues, 4-vinyltoluene oxide (VTO), 3,5-dimethylstyrene oxide (DMSO), and 4-nitrostyrene oxide (NSO) was assayed using 4-(p-nitrobenzyl)pyridine (NBP) and guanosine as nucleophiles. Hydrolysis rates were also determined. The half-lives of VTO, DMSO, SO, and NSO were 8, 11, 40, and 60 h, respectively in aqueous solution. The rate of NBP alkylation correlated with the rate of hydrolysis. By contrast, the rates of guanosine alkylation were quite different: SO greater than VTO greater than DMSO. NSO did not react with guanosine. Fluorescence an ultraviolet spectroscopic data on the guanosine adducts indicated that SO, VTO, and DMSO formed main alkyl products at N-7. PMID:7325798

  5. Guanosine potentiates the antiproliferative effect of cytosine-beta-D-arabinofuranoside in melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sidi, Y; Panet, C; Cyjon, A; Fenig, E; Beery, E; Nordenberg, J

    1993-01-01

    Guanosine is shown to potentiate markedly the antiproliferative effect of cytosine-beta-D-arabinoside (ara-C) on B16 F10 mouse and SKMEL-28 human melanoma cell lines. Several metabolic consequences of the synergistic interaction between ara-C and guanosine on cell growth were determined in B16 F10 mouse melanoma cells. Treatment of the cells with guanosine for 24 hr resulted in an increase in the percentage of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle, a threefold increase in intracellular GTP concentration, and an increase in the incorporation of ara-C into acid-insoluble material and phosphorylated metabolites. These findings suggest that guanosine potentiates the growth-inhibitory effect of ara-C in B16 F10 melanoma cells by increasing the intracellular concentration of its active metabolites. PMID:8402221

  6. Differences in responsiveness of intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid: mechanism of arterial relaxation involves cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Harbison, R.G.; Wood, K.S.; Wolin, M.S.; McNamara, D.B.; Hyman, A.L.; Kadowitz, P.J.

    1985-06-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the relationship between responses of bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein to arachidonic acid and cyclic nucleotide levels in order to better understand the mechanism of relaxation elicited by arachidonic acid and acetylcholine. Arachidonic acid relaxed phenylephrine-precontracted arterial rings and elevated both cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP levels in arteries with intact endothelium. In contrast, endothelium-damaged arterial rings contracted to arachidonic acid without demonstrating significant changes in cyclic nucleotide levels. Indomethacin partially inhibited endothelium-dependent relaxation and abolished cyclic AMP accumulation whereas methylene blue, a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, partially inhibited relaxation and abolished cyclic GMP accumulation in response to arachidonic acid. All vessel responses were blocked by a combination of the two inhibitors. Prostaglandin (PG) I2 relaxed arterial rings and elevated cyclic AMP levels whereas PGE2 and PGF2 alpha caused contraction, suggesting that the indomethacin-sensitive component of arachidonic acid-elicited relaxation is due to PGI2 formation and cyclic AMP accumulation. The methylene blue-sensitive component is attributed to an endothelium-dependent but cyclooxygenase-independent generation of a substance causing cyclic GMP accumulation. Intrapulmonary veins contracted to arachidonic acid with no changes in cyclic nucleotide levels and PGI2 was without effect. Homogenates of intrapulmonary artery and vein formed 6-keto-PGF1 alpha, PGF2 alpha and PGE2 from (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid, which was inhibited by indomethacin. Thus, bovine intrapulmonary vein may not possess receptors for PGI2.

  7. Cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation induced by Schisandrol A via the NO-cGMP signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Choi, B R; Bak, Y O; Zhang, L T; Zhou, L X; Huang, Y R; Zhao, C; Park, J K

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of Schisandrol A on rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle and elucidate the potential mechanism. Penises were obtained from healthy male New Zealand White rabbits (2.5-3.0 kg). The pre-contracted penis with phenylephrine (Phe, 10 µM) was treated with accumulative concentrations of Schisandrol A (10-7, 10-6, 10-5 and 10-4 M). The change in intracavernosum pressure (ICP) and tension was recorded, cyclic nucleotides in the cavernosum tissue were measured by radioimmunoassay, mRNA level and expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NOS (nNOS) were measured by real time PCR and western blot respectively. The corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation induced by Schisandrol A was in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with NOS inhibitor (Nω nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester, L-NAME) or guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one, ODQ) significantly diminished the relaxation. The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level was significantly increased in the cavernosum tissue. Real time PCR and western blot showed the mRNA level and expression of eNOS and nNOS was also upregulated. Schisandrol A relaxes the cavernosum smooth muscle by activating NO-cGMP signaling pathway. It may be a new promising treatment for erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. PMID:27064883

  8. The nitric oxide pathway and possible therapeutic options in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Johal, Tamanrit; Lees, Christoph C; Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious multisystem disorder with diverse clinical manifestations. Although not causal, endothelial dysfunction and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability are likely to play an important role in the maternal and fetal pathophysiology of this condition. Lack of treatment modalities that can target the underlying pathophysiological changes and reverse the endothelial dysfunction frequently leads to iatrogenic preterm delivery of the fetus, causing neonatal morbidity and mortality, and the condition itself is associated with short- and longer term maternal morbidity and mortality. Drugs that target various components of the nitric oxide–soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway can help to increase NO bioavailability. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of clinical research involving these therapeutic modalities in the context of pre-eclampsia, with the focus being on the following: nitric oxide donors, including organic nitrates and S-nitrosothiols; l-arginine, the endogenous precursor of NO; inhibitors of cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate breakdown, including sildenafil; and other novel inhibitors of NO donor metabolism. The advantages and limitations of each modality are outlined, and scope for development into established therapeutic options for pre-eclampsia is explored. PMID:24313856

  9. The Endothelium-Dependent Nitric Oxide-cGMP Pathway.

    PubMed

    Mónica, F Z; Bian, K; Murad, F

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic 3'-5' guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signaling plays a critical role on smooth muscle tone, platelet activity, cardiac contractility, renal function and fluid balance, and cell growth. Studies of the 1990s established endothelium dysfunction as one of the major causes of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic strategies that benefit NO bioavailability have been applied in clinical medicine extensively. Basic and clinical studies of cGMP regulation through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or inhibition of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) have resulted in effective therapies for pulmonary hypertension, erectile dysfunction, and more recently benign prostatic hyperplasia. This section reviews (1) how endothelial dysfunction and NO deficiency lead to cardiovascular diseases, (2) how soluble cGMP regulation leads to beneficial effects on disorders of the circulation system, and (3) the epigenetic regulation of NO-sGC pathway components in the cardiovascular system. In conclusion, the discovery of the NO-cGMP pathway revolutionized the comprehension of pathophysiological mechanisms involved in cardiovascular and other diseases. However, considering the expression "from bench to bedside" the therapeutic alternatives targeting NO-cGMP did not immediately follow the marked biochemical and pathophysiological revolution. Some therapeutic options have been effective and released on the market for pulmonary hypertension and erectile dysfunction such as inhaled NO, PDE5 inhibitors, and recently sGC stimulators. The therapeutic armamentarium for many other disorders is expected in the near future. There are currently numerous active basic and clinical research programs in universities and industries attempting to develop novel therapies for many diseases and medical applications. PMID:27451093

  10. Phosphodiesterase-2 inhibitor reverses corticosterone-induced neurotoxicity and related behavioural changes via cGMP/PKG dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Pan, Jianchun; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Chong; Sun, Jiao; Li, Jianxin; Nguyen, Linda; Nair, Neetu; Zhang, Hanting; O'Donnell, James M

    2013-05-01

    Phosphodiesterase 2 (PDE2) is an enzyme responsible for hydrolysis of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) to restrict intracellular signalling of these second messenger molecules. This study investigated how PDE2 inhibitor Bay 60-7550 affects the dysregulated glucocorticoid signalling in neuronal cells and regulates depressive behaviours after chronic stress in mice. We found that exposure of hippocampal neurons to corticosterone resulted in time- and concentration-dependent increases in PDE2 expression. These intriguing findings were confirmed in the hippocampal cell line HT-22. After corticosterone exposure for 24 h, HT-22 cells showed a concentration-dependent increase in mRNA levels for PDE2 subtypes, PDE2A1 and 2A3, as well as for the total PDE2A protein expression. Bay 60-7550 was found to reverse the cell lesion induced by corticosterone (50 μm). This neuroprotective effect was blocked by pretreatment with protein kinase G inhibitor KT5823, but not protein kinase A inhibitor H89, suggesting the involvement of cGMP-dependent signalling. Although Bay 60-7550 treatment for 24 h did not change the levels of phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2 (pERK) and phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB), it down-regulated pERK at 2 h and up-regulated a CREB co-activator, CREB-binding protein, at 24 h. Both of these effects were blocked by KT 5823. Furthermore, Bay 60-7550 reversed corticosterone-induced down-regulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor protein levels 24 h after corticosterone exposure. In behavioural testing, Bay 60-7550 produced antidepressant-like effects and reduced corticosterone levels in stressed mice, further supporting the involvement of a PDE2-dependent pathway in mediating Bay 60-7550's effect during stress hormone insults. PMID:22850435

  11. Differential effects of chronic hyperammonemia on modulation of the glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP pathway by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and low and high affinity AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Llansola, Marta; Reznikov, Vitaliy; Boix, Jordi; Felipo, Vicente

    2012-07-01

    Previous studies show that chronic hyperammonemia impairs learning ability of rats by impairing the glutamate-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine mono-phosphate (cGMP) pathway in cerebellum. Three types of glutamate receptors cooperate in modulating the NO-cGMP pathway: metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), (RS)-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors. The aim of this work was to assess whether hyperammonemia alters the modulation of this pathway by mGluR5 and AMPA receptors in cerebellum in vivo. The results support that in control rats: (1) low AMPA concentrations (0.1mM) activate nearly completely Ca(2+)-permeable (glutamate receptor subunit 2 (GluR2)-lacking) AMPA receptors and the NO-cGMP pathway; (2) higher AMPA concentrations (0.3 mM) also activate Ca(2+)-impermeable (GluR2-containing) AMPA receptors, leading to activation of NMDA receptors and of NO-cGMP pathway. Moreover, the data support that chronic hyperammonemia: (1) reduces glutamate release and activation of the glutamate-NO-cGMP pathway by activation of mGluR5; (2) strongly reduces the direct activation by AMPA receptors of the NO-cGMP pathway, likely due to reduced entry of Ca(2+) through GluR2-lacking, high affinity AMPA receptors; (3) strongly increases the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by high affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to increased entry of Na(+) through GluR2-lacking AMPA receptors and NMDA receptors activation; (4) reduces the indirect activation of the NO-cGMP pathway by low affinity AMPA receptors, likely due to reduced activation of NMDA receptors. PMID:22521775

  12. Systems Pharmacology and Rational Polypharmacy: Nitric Oxide−Cyclic GMP Signaling Pathway as an Illustrative Example and Derivation of the General Case

    PubMed Central

    Garmaroudi, Farshid S.; Handy, Diane E.; Liu, Yang-Yu; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Impaired nitric oxide (NO˙)-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) signaling has been observed in many cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure and pulmonary arterial hypertension. There are several enzymatic determinants of cGMP levels in this pathway, including soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) itself, the NO˙-activated form of sGC, and phosphodiesterase(s) (PDE). Therapies for some of these disorders with PDE inhibitors have been successful at increasing cGMP levels in both cardiac and vascular tissues. However, at the systems level, it is not clear whether perturbation of PDE alone, under oxidative stress, is the best approach for increasing cGMP levels as compared with perturbation of other potential pathway targets, either alone or in combination. Here, we develop a model-based approach to perturbing this pathway, focusing on single reactions, pairs of reactions, or trios of reactions as targets, then monitoring the theoretical effects of these interventions on cGMP levels. Single perturbations of all reaction steps within this pathway demonstrated that three reaction steps, including the oxidation of sGC, NO˙ dissociation from sGC, and cGMP degradation by PDE, exerted a dominant influence on cGMP accumulation relative to other reaction steps. Furthermore, among all possible single, paired, and triple perturbations of this pathway, the combined perturbations of these three reaction steps had the greatest impact on cGMP accumulation. These computational findings were confirmed in cell-based experiments. We conclude that a combined perturbation of the oxidatively-impaired NO˙-cGMP signaling pathway is a better approach to the restoration of cGMP levels as compared with corresponding individual perturbations. This approach may also yield improved therapeutic responses in other complex pharmacologically amenable pathways. PMID:26985825

  13. The crystal structure and mechanism of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase.

    PubMed

    Appleby, T C; Kinsland, C; Begley, T P; Ealick, S E

    2000-02-29

    The crystal structure of Bacillus subtilis orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase with bound uridine 5'-monophosphate has been determined by multiple wavelength anomalous diffraction phasing techniques and refined to an R-factor of 19.3% at 2.4 A resolution. OMP decarboxylase is a dimer of two identical subunits. Each monomer consists of a triosephosphate isomerase barrel and contains an active site that is located across one end of the barrel and near the dimer interface. For each active site, most of the residues are contributed by one monomer with a few residues contributed from the adjacent monomer. The most highly conserved residues are located in the active site and suggest a novel catalytic mechanism for decarboxylation that is different from any previously proposed OMP decarboxylase mechanism. The uridine 5'-monophosphate molecule is bound to the active site such that the phosphate group is most exposed and the C5-C6 edge of the pyrimidine base is most buried. In the proposed catalytic mechanism, the ground state of the substrate is destabilized by electrostatic repulsion between the carboxylate of the substrate and the carboxylate of Asp60. This repulsion is reduced in the transition state by shifting negative charge from the carboxylate to C6 of the pyrimidine, which is close to the protonated amine of Lys62. We propose that the decarboxylation of OMP proceeds by an electrophilic substitution mechanism in which decarboxylation and carbon-carbon bond protonation by Lys62 occur in a concerted reaction. PMID:10681442

  14. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  15. Liraglutide prevents and reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing ET-1 and enhancing eNOS/sGC/PKG pathways.

    PubMed

    Lee, Mei-Yueh; Tsai, Kun-Bow; Hsu, Jong-Hau; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wu, Jiunn-Ren; Yeh, Jwu-Lai

    2016-01-01

    Liraglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is widely used to treat diabetes. However, its effect on pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is unknown. In this study, we investigated its effects on rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PAH and mechanisms on rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Liraglutide was investigated for both prevention and treatment of MCT-induced PAH. The hemodynamic and body weight changes, right heart hypertrophy, lung morphology, immune-reactivity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), endothelin-1 and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels, protein expressions of eNOS, soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGCα), protein kinase G (PKG) and Rho kinase (ROCK) II pathway were measured in both in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration and cell cycle were also determined. Liraglutide both prevented and reversed MCT-induced PAH, right ventricle hypertrophy and pulmonary vascular wall remodeling. Protein expression of ROCK II was increased while eNOS, sGC and PKG were decreased. Pretreatment with liraglutide inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB stimulated PASMCs migration, which were associated with cell-cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Liraglutide may have both preventive and therapeutic effects on MCT-induced PAH, through the eNOS/sGC/PKG and Rho kinase pathways. Thus, liraglutide may have a therapeutic role in pulmonary vascular remodelling. PMID:27581840

  16. Mutation of Archaeal Isopentenyl Phosphate Kinase Highlights Mechanism and Guides Phosphorylation of Additional Isoprenoid Monophosphates

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The biosynthesis of isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) from either the mevalonate (MVA) or the 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway provides the key metabolite for primary and secondary isoprenoid biosynthesis. Isoprenoid metabolism plays crucial roles in membrane stability, steroid biosynthesis, vitamin production, protein localization, defense and communication, photoprotection, sugar transport, and glycoprotein biosynthesis. Recently, an alternative branch of the MVA pathway was discovered in the archaeon Methanocaldococcus jannaschii involving a small molecule kinase, isopentenyl phosphate kinase (IPK). IPK belongs to the amino acid kinase (AAK) superfamily. In vitro, IPK phosphorylates isopentenyl monophosphate (IP) in an ATP and Mg2+-dependent reaction producing IPP. Here, we describe crystal structures of IPK from M. jannaschii refined to nominal resolutions of 2.0−2.8 Å. Notably, an active site histidine residue (His60) forms a hydrogen bond with the terminal phosphate of both substrate and product. This His residue serves as a marker for a subset of the AAK family that catalyzes phosphorylation of phosphate or phosphonate functional groups; the larger family includes carboxyl-directed kinases, which lack this active site residue. Using steady-state kinetic analysis of H60A, H60N, and H60Q mutants, the protonated form of the Nε2 nitrogen of His60 was shown to be essential for catalysis, most likely through hydrogen bond stabilization of the transition state accompanying transphosphorylation. Moreover, the structures served as the starting point for the engineering of IPK mutants capable of the chemoenzymatic synthesis of longer chain isoprenoid diphosphates from monophosphate precursors. PMID:20392112

  17. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Lange, Bernd M.

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  18. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (NG-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  19. Procyanidin C1 causes vasorelaxation through activation of the endothelial NO/cGMP pathway in thoracic aortic rings.

    PubMed

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecific potassium channel blocker (tetraethylammonium chloride [TEA]), an endothelial NO synthase inhibitor (N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine [L-NMMA]), and a store-operated calcium entry inhibitor (2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate [2-APB]). Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation was also completely abolished by an inhibitor of soluble guanyl cyclase, which suggests that the Pro C1 effects observed involved cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production. Interestingly, Pro C1 significantly enhanced basal cGMP levels. Taken together, these results indicate that Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation is associated with the activation of the calcium-dependent NO/cGMP pathway, involving potassium channel activation. Thus, Pro C1 may represent a novel and potentially therapeutically relevant compound for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:24971771

  20. A putative role for inosine 5' monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) in Leishmania amazonensis programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Pitaluga, A N; Moreira, M E C; Traub-Csekö, Y M

    2015-02-01

    Leishmania amazonensis undergoes apoptosis-like programmed cell death (PCD) under heat shock conditions. We identified a potential role for inosine 5' monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) in L. amazonensis PCD. Trypanosomatids do not have a "de novo" purine synthesis pathway, relying on the salvage pathway for survival. IMPDH, a key enzyme in the purine nucleotide pathway, is related to cell growth and apoptosis. Since guanine nucleotide depletion triggers cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in several organisms we analyzed the correlation between IMPDH and apoptosis-like death in L. amazonensis. The L. amazonensis IMPDH inhibition effect on PCD was evaluated through gene expression analysis, mitochondrial depolarization and detection of Annexin-V labeled parasites. We demonstrated a down-regulation of impdh expression under heat shock treatment, which mimics the natural mammalian host infection. Also, IMPDH inhibitors ribavirin and mycophenolic acid (MPA) prevented cell growth and generated an apoptosis-like phenotype in sub-populations of L. amazonensis promastigotes. Our results are in accordance with previous results showing that a subpopulation of parasites undergoes apoptosis-like cell death in the nutrient poor environment of the vector gut. Here, we suggest the involvement of purine metabolism in previously observed apoptosis-like cell death during Leishmania infection. PMID:25499513

  1. Nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis on hairpin oligonucleotides. II - Templates containing cytidine and guanosine residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Taifeng; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1992-01-01

    Hairpin oligonucleotides were prepared with 5-prime-terminal single-stranded sequments containing cytidylate (C) and guanylate (G) residues. It was found that incubation of these hairpin oligonucleotides with a mixutre of cytidine and guanosine 5-prime-phosphoro (2-methyl)imidazolides results in sequence-specific addition of C and G residues to the 3-prime terminus of the hairpin.

  2. An improved method for the enzymatic transformation of nucleosides into 5'-monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Barai, Vladimir N; Kvach, Sergei V; Zinchenko, Anatoli I; Mikhailopulo, Igor A

    2004-12-01

    An improved method to transform nucleosides into 5'-monophosphates using nucleoside phosphotransferase from Erwinia herbicola is reported. The method is based on the shift in the equilibrium state of the reaction to the formation of desired product due to its precipitation by Zn2+. Under optimal conditions, the extent of nucleoside transformations into nucleoside-5'-monophosphates were 41-91% (mol). PMID:15672226

  3. The vasodilatory effect of sulfur dioxide via SGC/cGMP/PKG pathway in association with sulfhydryl-dependent dimerization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuyu; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Angie Dong; Zhu, Mingzhu; Liu, Jia; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Qingyou; Geng, Bin; Gao, Yuansheng; Du, Shuxu; Huang, Pan; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to explore the role of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/PKG pathway in sulfur dioxide (SO2)-induced vasodilation. We showed that SO2 induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of phenylephrine (PE)-precontracted rat aortic rings in association with an increase in cGMP concentration, whereas l-aspartic acid β-hydroxamate (HDX), an inhibitor of SO2 synthase, contracted rings in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of aortic rings with the sGC inhibitor ODQ (30 μM) attenuated the vasodilatory effects of SO2, suggesting the involvement of cGMP pathway in SO2-induced vasodilation. Mechanistically, SO2 upregulated the protein levels of sGC and PKG dimers, while HDX inhibited it, indicating SO2 could promote cGMP synthesis through sGC activation. Furthermore, the dimerization of sGC and PKG and vasodilation induced by SO2 in precontracted rings were significantly prevented by thiol reductants dithiothreitol (DTT). In addition, SO2 reduced the activity of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), a cGMP-specific hydrolytic enzyme, implying that SO2 elevated cGMP concentration by inhibiting its hydrolysis. Hence, SO2 exerted its vasodilatory effects at least partly by promoting disulfide-dependent dimerization of sGC and PKG, resulting in an activated sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway in blood vessels. These findings revealed a new mode of action and mechanisms by which SO2 regulated the vascular tone. PMID:27009048

  4. Suppression of spreading depression-like events in locusts by inhibition of the NO/cGMP/PKG pathway.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gary A B; Rodgers, Corinne I; Money, Tomas G A; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2009-06-24

    Despite considerable research attention focused on mechanisms underlying neural spreading depression (SD), because of its association with important human CNS pathologies, such as stroke and migraine, little attention has been given to explaining its occurrence and regulation in invertebrates. In the locust metathoracic ganglion (MTG), an SD-like event occurs during heat and anoxia stress, which results in cessation of neuronal output for the duration of the applied stress. SD-like events were characterized by an abrupt rise in extracellular potassium ion concentration ([K(+)](o)) from a baseline concentration of approximately 8 to >30 mm, which returned to near baseline concentrations after removal of the applied stress. After return to baseline [K(+)](o), neuronal output (ventilatory motor pattern activity) from the MTG recovered. Unlike mammalian neurons, which depolarize almost completely during SD, locust neurons only partially depolarized. SD-like events in the locust CNS were suppressed by pharmacological inhibition of the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate/protein kinase G (NO/cGMP/PKG) pathway and were exacerbated by its activation. Also, environmental stressors such as heat and anoxia increased production of nitric oxide in the locust CNS. Finally, for the intact animal, manipulation of the pathway affected the speed of recovery from suffocation by immersion under water. We propose that SD-like events in locusts provide an adaptive mechanism for surviving extreme environmental conditions. The highly conserved nature of the NO/cGMP/PKG signaling pathway suggests that it may be involved in modulating SD in other organisms, including mammals. PMID:19553462

  5. Icariin Inhibits Pulmonary Hypertension Induced by Monocrotaline through Enhancement of NO/cGMP Signaling Pathway in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-sheng; Luo, Yun-mei; Liu, Juan; Zhang, Yu; Fu, Xiao-xia; Yang, Dan-li

    2016-01-01

    It has been reported that icariin (ICA) increased contents of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) by improving expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5). In addition, dysfunction of the NO/cGMP pathway may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, the potential protective effects of ICA on PH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 50 mg/kg) singly subcutaneous injection were investigated and the possible mechanisms involved in NO/cGMP pathway were explored in male Sprague Dawley rats. The results showed that ICA (20, 40, and 80 mg/kg/d) treatment by intragastric administration could significantly ameliorate PH and upregulate the expression of eNOS gene and downregulate the expression of PDE5 gene in MCT-treated rats. Both ICA (40 mg/kg/d) and L-arginine (200 mg/kg/d), a precursor of NO as positive control, notably increased the contents of NO and cGMP in lung tissue homogenate, which were inversed by treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine-methyl ester (L-NAME), a NOS inhibitor, and L-NAME-treatment could also inhibit the protective effects of ICA (40 mg/kg/d) on mean pulmonary artery pressure and artery remodeling and tends to inhibit right ventricle hypertrophy index. In summary, ICA is effective in protecting against MCT-induced PH in rats through enhancement of NO/cGMP signaling pathway in rats. PMID:27366192

  6. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  7. Isolation and characterization of the orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase domain of the multifunctional protein uridine 5'-monophosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Floyd, E E; Jones, M E

    1985-08-01

    The multifunctional protein uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) synthase catalyzes the final two reactions of the de novo biosynthesis of UMP in mammalian cells by the sequential action of orotate phosphoribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.10) and orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.23). This protein is composed of one or two identical subunits; the monomer weighs of 51,500 daltons. UMP synthase from mouse Ehrlich ascites cells can exist as three distinct species as determined by sucrose density gradient centrifugation: a 3.6 S monomer, a 5.1 S dimer, and a 5.6 S conformationally altered dimer. Limited digestion of each of these three species with trypsin produced a 28,500-dalton peptide that was relatively resistant to further proteolysis. The peptide appears to be one of the two enzyme domains of UMP synthase for it retained only OMP decarboxylase activity. Similar results were obtained when UMP synthase was digested with elastase. OMP decarboxylase activity was less stable for the domain than for UMP synthase; the domain can rapidly lose activity upon storage or upon dilution. The size of the mammalian OMP decarboxylase domain is similar to that of yeast OMP decarboxylase. If the polypeptides which are cleaved from UMP synthase by trypsin are derived exclusively from either the amino or the carboxyl end of UMP synthase, then the size of a fragment possessing the orotate phosphoribosyltransferase domain could be as large as 23,000 daltons which is similar in size to the orotate phosphoribosyltransferase of yeast and of Escherichia coli. PMID:3839509

  8. Voltammetric determination of adenosine and guanosine using fullerene-C(60)-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Rajendra N; Gupta, Vinod K; Oyama, Munetaka; Bachheti, Neeta

    2007-02-28

    A fullerene-C(60)-modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is used for the simultaneous determination of adenosine and guanosine by differential pulse voltammetry. Compared to a bare glassy carbon electrode, the modified electrode exhibits an apparent shift of the oxidation potentials in the cathodic direction and a marked enhancement in the voltammetric peak current response for both the biomolecules. Linear calibration curves are obtained over the concentration range 0.5muM-1.0mM in 0.1M phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.2 with a detection limit of 3.02x10(-7)M and 1.45x10(-7)M for individual determination of adenosine and guanosine, respectively. The interference studies showed that the fullerene-C(60)-modified glassy carbon electrode exhibited excellent selectivity in the presence of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and ascorbic acid. The proposed procedure was successfully applied to detect adenosine and guanosine in human blood plasma and urine, without any preliminary pre-treatment. PMID:19071420

  9. Novel bimodular DNA aptamers with guanosine quadruplexes inhibit phylogenetically diverse HIV-1 reverse transcriptases

    PubMed Central

    Michalowski, Daniel; Chitima-Matsiga, Rebecca; Held, Daniel M.; Burke, Donald H.

    2008-01-01

    DNA aptamers RT5, RT6 and RT47 form a group of related sequences that inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). The essential inhibitory structure is identified here as bimodular, with a 5′ stem–loop module physically connected to a 3′-guanosine quadruplex module. The stem–loop tolerates considerable sequence plasticity. Connections between the guanosine triplets in the quadruplex could be simplified to a single nucleotide or a nonnucleic acid linker, such as hexaethylene glycol. All 12 quadruplex guanosines are required in an aptamer retaining most of the original loop sequence from RT6; only 11 are required for aptamer R1T (single T residue in intra-quadruplex loops). Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy gave ellipticity minima and maxima at 240 nm and 264 nm, indicating a parallel arrangement of the quadruplex strands. The simplified aptamers displayed increased overall stability. An aptamer carrying the original intra-quadruplex loops from RT6 inhibited RT in K+ buffers but not in Na+ buffers and displayed significant CD spectral broadening in Na+ buffers, while R1T inhibited RT in both buffers and displayed less broadening in Na+ buffers. The bimodular ssDNA aptamers inhibited RT from diverse primate lentiviruses with low nM IC50 values. These data provide insight into the requirements for broad-spectrum RT inhibition by nucleic acid aptamers. PMID:18996899

  10. Remyelination after chronic spinal cord injury is associated with proliferation of endogenous adult progenitor cells after systemic administration of guanosine.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shucui; Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Giuliani, Patricia; Jiang, Cai; Huang, Xinjie; Rathbone, Michel P

    2008-03-01

    Axonal demyelination is a consistent pathological sequel to chronic brain and spinal cord injuries and disorders that slows or disrupts impulse conduction, causing further functional loss. Since oligodendroglial progenitors are present in the demyelinated areas, failure of remyelination may be due to lack of sufficient proliferation and differentiation of oligodendroglial progenitors. Guanosine stimulates proliferation and differentiation of many types of cells in vitro and exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system (CNS). Five weeks after chronic traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), when there is no ongoing recovery of function, intraperitoneal administration of guanosine daily for 2 weeks enhanced functional improvement correlated with the increase in myelination in the injured cord. Emphasis was placed on analysis of oligodendrocytes and NG2-positive (NG2+) cells, an endogenous cell population that may be involved in oligodendrocyte replacement. There was an increase in cell proliferation (measured by bromodeoxyuridine staining) that was attributable to an intensification in progenitor cells (NG2+ cells) associated with an increase in mature oligodendrocytes (determined by Rip+ staining). The numbers of astroglia increased at all test times after administration of guanosine whereas microglia only increased in the later stages (14 days). Injected guanosine and its breakdown product guanine accumulated in the spinal cords; there was more guanine than guanosine detected. We conclude that functional improvement and remyelination after systemic administration of guanosine is due to the effect of guanosine/guanine on the proliferation of adult progenitor cells and their maturation into myelin-forming cells. This raises the possibility that administration of guanosine may be useful in the treatment of spinal cord injury or demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis where quiescent oligodendroglial progenitors exist in demyelinated plaques. PMID

  11. Remyelination after chronic spinal cord injury is associated with proliferation of endogenous adult progenitor cells after systemic administration of guanosine

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Patrizia; Buccella, Silvana; Giuliani, Patricia; Jiang, Cai; Huang, Xinjie; Rathbone, Michel P.

    2008-01-01

    Axonal demyelination is a consistent pathological sequel to chronic brain and spinal cord injuries and disorders that slows or disrupts impulse conduction, causing further functional loss. Since oligodendroglial progenitors are present in the demyelinated areas, failure of remyelination may be due to lack of sufficient proliferation and differentiation of oligodendroglial progenitors. Guanosine stimulates proliferation and differentiation of many types of cells in vitro and exerts neuroprotective effects in the central nervous system (CNS). Five weeks after chronic traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), when there is no ongoing recovery of function, intraperitoneal administration of guanosine daily for 2 weeks enhanced functional improvement correlated with the increase in myelination in the injured cord. Emphasis was placed on analysis of oligodendrocytes and NG2-positive (NG2+) cells, an endogenous cell population that may be involved in oligodendrocyte replacement. There was an increase in cell proliferation (measured by bromodeoxyuridine staining) that was attributable to an intensification in progenitor cells (NG2+ cells) associated with an increase in mature oligodendrocytes (determined by Rip+ staining). The numbers of astroglia increased at all test times after administration of guanosine whereas microglia only increased in the later stages (14 days). Injected guanosine and its breakdown product guanine accumulated in the spinal cords; there was more guanine than guanosine detected. We conclude that functional improvement and remyelination after systemic administration of guanosine is due to the effect of guanosine/guanine on the proliferation of adult progenitor cells and their maturation into myelin-forming cells. This raises the possibility that administration of guanosine may be useful in the treatment of spinal cord injury or demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis where quiescent oligodendroglial progenitors exist in demyelinated plaques

  12. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  13. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  14. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase expression: transcriptional regulation of the type I and type II genes.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, A; Gu, J J; Spychala, J; Mitchell, B S

    1996-01-01

    Inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is an essential rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo guanine nucleotide synthetic pathway that catalyzes the conversion of IMP to XMP. Enzyme activity is accounted for by the expression of two distinct but closely related genes termed IMPDH I and II. Increased IMPDH activity has been linked to both cellular proliferation and neoplastic transformation and generally ascribed to an increase in the expression of the type II gene. We have characterized the type I and type II genes and identified elements important in the transcriptional regulation of both genes. The type II IMPDH gene contains a 466 bp 5' flanking region spanning the translation start site that contains several transcription factor binding sites and mediates increased transcription of a CAT reporter gene in peripheral blood T lymphocytes when these cells are induced to proliferate. The single functional IMPDH type I gene contains exon-intron boundaries and exon structures that are nearly identical to those in the type II gene. In contrast to the type II gene, however, it contains two putative promoter sites, each with the potential for transcriptional regulation. We conclude that these two genes most probably arose from an early gene duplication event and that their highly conserved structures and differential regulation at the transcriptional level argue strongly for a significant role for each gene in cellular metabolism, growth, and differentiation. PMID:8869741

  15. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD+ utilization pathway by dephosphorylating NMN to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases, which are nonspecific 5′-, 3′-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with NMN, 5′-AMP, 3′-AMP, and 2′-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, which explains the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, which is consistent with observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5′- and 3′-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme’s direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5′ substrates in an anti conformation and 3′ substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B and C acid phosphatases share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition. PMID:20934434

  16. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on voltage-dependent K+ currents in human cardiac fibroblasts through protein kinase pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyemi; Lee, Donghee; Kim, Young-Won; Choi, Jeongyoon; Lee, Hong Jun; Kim, Sang-Wook; Kim, Taeho; Noh, Yun-Hee; Ko, Jae-Hong; Bang, Hyoweon

    2016-01-01

    Human cardiac fibroblasts (HCFs) have various voltage-dependent K+ channels (VDKCs) that can induce apoptosis. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) modulates VDKCs and induces oxidative stress, which is the main contributor to cardiac injury and cardiac remodeling. We investigated whether H2O2 could modulate VDKCs in HCFs and induce cell injury through this process. In whole-cell mode patch-clamp recordings, application of H2O2 stimulated Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) currents but not delayed rectifier K+ or transient outward K+ currents, all of which are VDKCs. H2O2-stimulated KCa currents were blocked by iberiotoxin (IbTX, a large conductance KCa blocker). The H2O2-stimulating effect on large-conductance KCa (BKCa) currents was also blocked by KT5823 (a protein kinase G inhibitor) and 1 H-[1, 2, 4] oxadiazolo-[4, 3-a] quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor). In addition, 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP) stimulated BKCa currents. In contrast, KT5720 and H-89 (protein kinase A inhibitors) did not block the H2O2-stimulating effect on BKCa currents. Using RT-PCR and western blot analysis, three subtypes of KCa channels were detected in HCFs: BKCa channels, small-conductance KCa (SKCa) channels, and intermediate-conductance KCa (IKCa) channels. In the annexin V/propidium iodide assay, apoptotic changes in HCFs increased in response to H2O2, but IbTX decreased H2O2-induced apoptosis. These data suggest that among the VDKCs of HCFs, H2O2 only enhances BKCa currents through the protein kinase G pathway but not the protein kinase A pathway, and is involved in cell injury through BKCa channels. PMID:27162486

  17. Effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the L-arginine-nitric oxide pathway and oxidative status in platelets.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, Mariana Alves de Sá; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães; Pereira, Natália Rodrigues; Martins, Marcela Anjos; Moss, Monique Bandeira; Mendes-Ribeiro, Antônio Cláudio; Figueredo, Carlos Marcelo da Silva; Brunini, Tatiana Marlowe Cunha

    2013-06-01

    Several studies have suggested an increase of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk on periodontitis patients. An enhancement has been demonstrated on both platelet activation and oxidative stress on periodontitis patients, which may contribute for this association. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal treatment on the l-arginine-nitric oxide (NO)-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway and oxidative status in platelets. A total of eight periodontitis patients and eight controls were included in this study. Clinical, laboratory and experimental evaluations were performed on baseline and 90 days after periodontal treatment (except for western blot analysis). The clinical periodontal evaluation included measurements of probing pocket depth (PPD), clinical attachment loss (CAL), % of sites with plaque and % of sites with bleeding on probing. We evaluated: l-[(3)H]arginine influx; nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and arginase enzymes activity and expression; expression of guanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase-5 enzymes; cGMP levels; platelet aggregation; oxidative status through superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase activities, and measurement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. The initial results showed an activation of both l-arginine influx and via system y (+ )L associated with reduced intraplatelet cGMP levels in periodontitis patients and increased systemic levels of CRP. After periodontal treatment, there was a significant reduction of the % of sites with PPD 4-5mm, % of sites with CAL 4-5 mm, and an enhancement in cGMP levels and SOD activity. Moreover, CRP levels were reduced after treatment. Therefore, alterations in the intraplatelet l-arginine-NO-cGMP pathway and oxidant-antioxidant balance associated with a systemic inflammatory response may lead to platelet dysfunction, which may contribute to a higher risk of CVD in periodontitis. PMID:23918883

  18. Gastrointestinal pain: unraveling a novel endogenous pathway through uroguanylin/guanylate cyclase-C/cGMP activation.

    PubMed

    Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Hannig, Gerhard; Eutamene, Helene; Ustinova, Elena E; Bernier, Sylvie G; Ge, Pei; Graul, Christopher; Jacobson, Sarah; Jin, Hong; Liong, Elaine; Kessler, Marco M; Reza, Tammi; Rivers, Samuel; Shea, Courtney; Tchernychev, Boris; Bryant, Alexander P; Kurtz, Caroline B; Bueno, Lionel; Pezzone, Michael A; Currie, Mark G

    2013-09-01

    The natural hormone uroguanylin regulates intestinal fluid homeostasis and bowel function through activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), resulting in increased intracellular cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP). We report the effects of uroguanylin-mediated activation of the GC-C/cGMP pathway in vitro on extracellular cGMP transport and in vivo in rat models of inflammation- and stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In vitro exposure of intestinal Caco-2 cells to uroguanylin stimulated bidirectional, active extracellular transport of cGMP into luminal and basolateral spaces. cGMP transport was significantly and concentration dependently decreased by probenecid, an inhibitor of cGMP efflux pumps. In ex vivo Ussing chamber assays, uroguanylin stimulated cGMP secretion from the basolateral side of rat colonic epithelium into the submucosal space. In a rat model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, orally administered uroguanylin increased colonic thresholds required to elicit abdominal contractions in response to colorectal distension (CRD). Oral administration of cGMP mimicked the antihyperalgesic effects of uroguanylin, significantly decreasing TNBS- and restraint stress-induced visceromotor response to graded CRD in rats. The antihyperalgesic effects of cGMP were not associated with increased colonic spasmolytic activity, but were linked to significantly decreased firing rates of TNBS-sensitized colonic afferents in rats in response to mechanical stimuli. In conclusion, these data suggest that the continuous activation of the GC-C/cGMP pathway along the intestinal tract by the endogenous hormones guanylin and uroguanylin results in significant reduction of gastrointestinal pain. Extracellular cGMP produced on activation of GC-C is the primary mediator in this process via modulation of sensory afferent activity. PMID:23748116

  19. Bacillus anthracis Inosine 5′-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase in Action: The First Bacterial Series of Structures of Phosphate Ion-, Substrate-, and Product-Bound Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Wu, Ruiying; Wilton, Rosemarie; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Wang, Ximi K.; Zhang, Rongguang; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Mack, Jamey C.; Maltseva, Natalia; Mulligan, Rory; Binkowski, T. Andrew; Gornicki, Piotr; Kuhn, Misty L.; Anderson, Wayne F.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2013-01-01

    Inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) catalyzes the first unique step of the GMP branch of the purine nucleotide biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme is found in organisms of all three kingdoms. IMPDH inhibitors have broad clinical applications in cancer treatment, as antiviral drugs and as immunosuppressants, and have also displayed antibiotic activity. We have determined three crystal structures of Bacillus anthracis IMPDH, in a phosphate ion-bound (termed “apo”) form and in complex with its substrate, inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP), and product, xanthosine 5′-monophosphate (XMP). This is the first example of a bacterial IMPDH in more than one state from the same organism. Furthermore, for the first time for a prokaryotic enzyme, the entire active site flap, containing the conserved Arg-Tyr dyad, is clearly visible in the structure of the apoenzyme. Kinetic parameters for the enzymatic reaction were also determined, and the inhibitory effect of XMP and mycophenolic acid (MPA) has been studied. In addition, the inhibitory potential of two known Cryptosporidium parvum IMPDH inhibitors was examined for the B. anthracis enzyme and compared with those of three bacterial IMPDHs from Campylobacter jejuni, Clostridium perfringens, and Vibrio cholerae. The structures contribute to the characterization of the active site and design of inhibitors that specifically target B. anthracis and other microbial IMPDH enzymes. PMID:22788966

  20. Bioconjugation of zirconium uridine monophosphate: application to myoglobin direct electrochemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuanbiao; Jian, Fangfang; Bai, Qian

    2008-03-14

    Porous nano-granule of zirconium uridine monophosphate, Zr(UMP)2.H2O is, for the first time, synthesized under mild experimental conditions and applied to the bioconjugation of myoglobin (Mb) to realize its direct electron transfer. UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopies prove that Mb in the Zr(UMP)2.H2O film maintains its secondary structure similar to the native state. The conjugation film of the Mb-Zr(UMP)2.H2O on the glassy carbon (GC) electrode gives a well-defined and quasi-reversible cyclic voltammogram, which reflects the direct electron transfer of the heme Fe III/Fe II couple of Mb. On the basis of the satisfying bioelectrocatalysis of the nano-conjugation of Mb and genetic substrate, a kind of mediator-free biosensor for H2O2 is developed. The linear range for H2O2 detection is estimated to be 3.92-180.14 microM. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) and the detection limit based on the signal-to-noise ratio of 3 are found to be 196.1 microM and 1.52 microM, respectively. Both the apparent Michaelis-Menten constant and the detection limit herein are much lower than currently reported values from other Mb films. This kind of sensor possesses excellent stability, long-term life (more than 20 days) and good reproducibility. PMID:18180152

  1. Deoxypyrimidine monophosphate bypass therapy for thymidine kinase 2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Garone, Caterina; Garcia-Diaz, Beatriz; Emmanuele, Valentina; Lopez, Luis C; Tadesse, Saba; Akman, Hasan O; Tanji, Kurenai; Quinzii, Catarina M; Hirano, Michio

    2014-01-01

    Autosomal recessive mutations in the thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) cause mitochondrial DNA depletion, multiple deletions, or both due to loss of TK2 enzyme activity and ensuing unbalanced deoxynucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) pools. To bypass Tk2 deficiency, we administered deoxycytidine and deoxythymidine monophosphates (dCMP+dTMP) to the Tk2 H126N (Tk2−/−) knock-in mouse model from postnatal day 4, when mutant mice are phenotypically normal, but biochemically affected. Assessment of 13-day-old Tk2−/− mice treated with dCMP+dTMP 200 mg/kg/day each (Tk2−/−200dCMP/dTMP) demonstrated that in mutant animals, the compounds raise dTTP concentrations, increase levels of mtDNA, ameliorate defects of mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes, and significantly prolong their lifespan (34 days with treatment versus 13 days untreated). A second trial of dCMP+dTMP each at 400 mg/kg/day showed even greater phenotypic and biochemical improvements. In conclusion, dCMP/dTMP supplementation is the first effective pharmacologic treatment for Tk2 deficiency. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy & Genetic Disease; Metabolism PMID:24968719

  2. In Silico Design for Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Agonist from Traditional Chinese Medicine for Treatment of Metabolic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hsin-Chieh

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) acts as a master mediator of metabolic homeostasis. It is considered as a significant millstone to treat metabolic syndromes including obesity, diabetes, and fatty liver. It can sense cellular energy or nutrient status by switching on the catabolic pathways. Investigation of AMPK has new findings recently. AMPK can inhibit cell growth by the way of autophagy. Thus AMPK has become a hot target for small molecular drug design of tumor inhibition. Activation of AMPK must undergo certain extent change of the structure. Through the methods of structure-based virtual screening and molecular dynamics simulation, we attempted to find out appropriate small compounds from the world's largest TCM Database@Taiwan that had the ability to activate the function of AMPK. Finally, we found that two TCM compounds, eugenyl_beta-D-glucopyranoside and 6-O-cinnamoyl-D-glucopyranose, had the qualification to be AMPK agonist. PMID:24899913

  3. Disruption of Nucleotide Homeostasis by the Antiproliferative Drug 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribofuranoside Monophosphate (AICAR).

    PubMed

    Ceschin, Johanna; Hürlimann, Hans Caspar; Saint-Marc, Christelle; Albrecht, Delphine; Violo, Typhaine; Moenner, Michel; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand; Pinson, Benoît

    2015-09-25

    5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-D-ribofuranoside monophosphate (AICAR) is a natural metabolite with potent anti-proliferative and low energy mimetic properties. At high concentration, AICAR is toxic for yeast and mammalian cells, but the molecular basis of this toxicity is poorly understood. Here, we report the identification of yeast purine salvage pathway mutants that are synthetically lethal with AICAR accumulation. Genetic suppression revealed that this synthetic lethality is in part due to low expression of adenine phosphoribosyl transferase under high AICAR conditions. In addition, metabolite profiling points to the AICAR/NTP balance as crucial for optimal utilization of glucose as a carbon source. Indeed, we found that AICAR toxicity in yeast and human cells is alleviated when glucose is replaced by an alternative carbon source. Together, our metabolic analyses unveil the AICAR/NTP balance as a major factor of AICAR antiproliferative effects. PMID:26283791

  4. Mitochondrial Oxidative Stress Corrupts Coronary Collateral Growth by Activating Adenosine Monophosphate Activated Kinase-α Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Pung, Yuh Fen; Sam, Wai Johnn; Stevanov, Kelly; Enrick, Molly; Chen, Chwen-Lih; Kolz, Christopher; Thakker, Prashanth; Hardwick, James P.; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Dyck, Jason R.B.; Yin, Liya; Chilian, William M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to determine the mechanism by which mitochondrial oxidative stress impairs collateral growth in the heart. Approach and Results Rats were treated with rotenone (mitochondrial complex I inhibitor that increases reactive oxygen species production) or sham-treated with vehicle and subjected to repetitive ischemia protocol for 10 days to induce coronary collateral growth. In control rats, repetitive ischemia increased flow to the collateral-dependent zone; however, rotenone treatment prevented this increase suggesting that mitochondrial oxidative stress compromises coronary collateral growth. In addition, rotenone also attenuated mitochondrial complex I activity and led to excessive mitochondrial aggregation. To further understand the mechanistic pathway(s) involved, human coronary artery endothelial cells were treated with 50 ng/ mL vascular endothelial growth factor, 1 µmol/L rotenone, and rotenone/vascular endothelial growth factor for 48 hours. Vascular endothelial growth factor induced robust tube formation; however, rotenone completely inhibited this effect (P<0.05 rotenone versus vascular endothelial growth factor treatment). Inhibition of tube formation by rotenone was also associated with significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation. Immunoblot analyses of human coronary artery endothelial cells with rotenone treatment showed significant activation of adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK)-α and inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase. Activation of AMPK-α suggested impairments in energy production, which was reflected by decrease in O2 consumption and bioenergetic reserve capacity of cultured cells. Knockdown of AMPK-α (siRNA) also preserved tube formation during rotenone, suggesting the negative effects were mediated by the activation of AMPK-α. Conversely, expression of a constitutively active AMPK-α blocked tube formation. Conclusions We conclude that activation of AMPK

  5. Relationship between antitumor effect and metabolites of 5-fluorouracil in combination treatment with 5-fluorouracil and guanosine in ascites Sarcoma 180 tumor system

    SciTech Connect

    Iigo, M.; Kuretani, K.; Hoshi, A.

    1983-12-01

    The antitumor activity of (6-14C)5-fluorouracil ((6-14C)FUra) against ascites Sarcoma 180 was significantly enhanced by coadministration of guanosine, and slightly by adenosine, but not by cytidine or uridine. In advanced ascites Sarcoma 180, guanosine also enhanced the action of FUra, but adenosine, uridine, and cytidine did not. The potentiation of antitumor activity by guanosine was reversed by addition of cytidine. The antitumor activity of FUra was significantly potentiated when guanosine was administered either 0 to 15 min before or 5 min after FUra. Changes in metabolites of FUra after potentiation by guanosine were investigated. The potentiation of antitumor activity of FUra by guanosine was considered to be due to an increase in incorporation of FUra into FUra-nucleotides and RNA in the tumor cells.

  6. Use of phosphoimidazolide-activated guanosine to investigate the nucleophilicity of spermine and spermidine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kanavarioti, A.; Baird, E. E.; Smith, P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Guanosine 5'-phosphate 2-methylimidazolide (2-MeImpG), a labile phosphoimidazolide analog of guanosine triphosphate, was used to test the reactivity of the natural polyamines (PAs), spermine (spm) and spermidine (spd). The products are the guanosine 5'-phosphate-polyamine derivatives (PA-pG: spd-pG and spm-pG) which are quite stable in the range 4 < pH < 11. Our study is the first of which we are aware that reports on the nucleophilicity of these amines. The main findings are as follows. (i) HPLC analysis of the products indicates the formation of only two of the three possible spd products and only one of the two possible spm products. These results can be explained if only the primary amino groups of the two polyamines are reactive, while the secondary amino groups are rendered unreactive by a steric effect. The reactions of 2-MeImpG and other phosphoimidazolide derivatives of nucleosides (ImpNs) with primary and secondary monoamines support this interpretation (Kanavarioti et al. J. Org. Chem. 1995, 60, 632). (ii) The product ratio of the two spd-pG adducts derived from the primary amino groups varies between 2.40 and 0.71 in the range 6.1 < or equal to pH < or equal to 11.9. Such small variation in the product ratio can only be rationalized by the similar, but not identical, basicity of the two primary amino groups and provides strong support for a previously reported model for polyamine ionization (Onasch et. al. Biophys. Chem. 1984, 19, 245). (iii) On the basis of our kinetic determinations conditions at which the nucleophilicity of these amines is at a minimum and at which other interactions with ImpNs could be tested can be chosen.

  7. Guanosine reduces apoptosis and inflammation associated with restoration of function in rats with acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Bendjelloul, Farid; Ballerini, Patrizia; D’Alimonte, Iolanda; Nargi, Elenora; Jiang, Cai; Huang, Xinjie; Rathbone, Michel P.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord injury results in progressive waves of secondary injuries, cascades of noxious pathological mechanisms that substantially exacerbate the primary injury and the resultant permanent functional deficits. Secondary injuries are associated with inflammation, excessive cytokine release, and cell apoptosis. The purine nucleoside guanosine has significant trophic effects and is neuroprotective, antiapoptotic in vitro, and stimulates nerve regeneration. Therefore, we determined whether systemic administration of guanosine could protect rats from some of the secondary effects of spinal cord injury, thereby reducing neurological deficits. Systemic administration of guanosine (8 mg/kg per day, i.p.) for 14 consecutive days, starting 4 h after moderate spinal cord injury in rats, significantly improved not only motor and sensory functions, but also recovery of bladder function. These improvements were associated with reduction in the inflammatory response to injury, reduction of apoptotic cell death, increased sparing of axons, and preservation of myelin. Our data indicate that the therapeutic action of guanosine probably results from reducing inflammation resulting in the protection of axons, oligodendrocytes, and neurons and from inhibiting apoptotic cell death. These data raise the intriguing possibility that guanosine may also be able to reduce secondary pathological events and thus improve functional outcome after traumatic spinal cord injury in humans. PMID:18404454

  8. The combination of organoselenium compounds and guanosine prevents glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains.

    PubMed

    Dalla Corte, Cristiane L; Bastos, Luíza L; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Rocha, João B T; Soares, Félix A A

    2012-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the protective effects of the combination of guanosine and 2 organoselenium compounds (ebselen and diphenyl diselenide) against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in different regions of rat brains. Glutamate caused an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a decrease in [(3)H]-glutamate uptake in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Guanosine, ebselen, and diphenyl diselenide prevented glutamate-induced ROS production in striatal, cortical and hippocampal slices. The combination of guanosine with organoselenium compounds was more effective against glutamate-induced ROS production than the individual compounds alone. Guanosine prevented [(3)H]-glutamate uptake inhibition in striatal, cortical, and hippocampal slices. Thus, protection against the harmful effects of glutamate is possibly due to the combination of the antioxidant properties of organoselenium compounds and the stimulatory effect of guanosine on glutamate uptake. In conclusion, the combination of antioxidants and glutamatergic system modulators could be considered a potential therapy against the prooxidant effects of glutamate. PMID:22133308

  9. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody to thymidine glycol monophosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B.X.; Hubbard, K.; Ide, H.; Wallace, S.S.; Erlanger, B.F. )

    1990-11-01

    A monoclonal antibody specific for thymine glycol (TG) in irradiated or OsO4-treated DNA was obtained by immunizing with thymidine glycol monophosphate (TMP-glycol) conjugated to bovine serum albumin by a carbodiimide procedure. Screening by dot-immunobinding and enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) procedures gave eight clones that bound OsO4- treated DNA. One of them, 2.6F.6B.6C, an IgG2a kappa, was characterized further. Hapten inhibition studies with OsO4-treated DNA showed that the antibody was specific for TMP-glycol. Among the various inhibitors tested, inhibition was in the order TMP-glycol greater than 5,6-dihydrothymidine phosphate greater than TMP greater than thymidine glycol greater than TG. Inhibition by 5,6-dihydrothymidine, thymidine, thymine, AMP, and CMP was negligible. In OsO4-treated DNA, as few as 0.5 TG per 10,000 bp were detectable by direct ELISA. Inhibition assays could detect as few as 1.5 TG per 10,000 bp. The antibody was equally reactive with native or denatured DNA containing TG. Among the X-irradiated homopolymers dC, dA, dG, and dT, only dT reacted with the antibody. Using an ELISA, the antibody could detect damage in irradiated DNA at the level of 20 Gy. Thus the antibody is of potential use in assays for DNA damage caused by X rays or other agents that damage DNA by free radical interactions.

  10. The Synthesis of Guanosine 5′-Diphosphate l-Fucose from Guanosine 5′-Diphosphate 3,5-d-[3H]Mannose Catalyzed by an Enzyme Extract from Fruits of the Flax

    PubMed Central

    Barber, George A.

    1980-01-01

    An enzyme system from fruits of the flax plant is described that catalyzes the synthesis of the sugar nucleotide guanosine 5′-diphosphate l-fucose from guanosine 5′-diphosphate d-mannose with the intermediate formation of guanosine 5′-diphosphate 4-keto-6-deoxy-d-mannose. Tritium from-[3H]H2O was incorporated into the l-fucose portion of the sugar nucleotide in the course of the reaction, and tritium at the 3,5-carbons of the d-mannose moiety of GDP-d-mannose was exchanged with protons in the medium. These results support a mechanism of synthesis analogous to that proposed for the formation of l-rhamnose and other 6-deoxy sugars. PMID:16661431

  11. The roles of initiation factor 2 and guanosine triphosphate in initiation of protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Antoun, Ayman; Pavlov, Michael Y.; Andersson, Kerstin; Tenson, Tanel; Ehrenberg, Måns

    2003-01-01

    The role of IF2 from Escherichia coli was studied in vitro using a system for protein synthesis with purified components. Stopped flow experiments with light scattering show that IF2 in complex with guanosine triphosphate (GTP) or a non-cleavable GTP analogue (GDPNP), but not with guanosine diphosphate (GDP), promotes fast association of ribosomal subunits during initiation. Biochemical experiments show that IF2 promotes fast formation of the first peptide bond in the presence of GTP, but not GDPNP or GDP, and that IF2–GDPNP binds strongly to post-initiation ribosomes. We conclude that the GTP form of IF2 accelerates formation of the 70S ribosome from subunits and that GTP hydrolysis accelerates release of IF2 from the 70S ribosome. The results of a recent report, suggesting that GTP and GDP promote initiation equally fast, have been addressed. Our data, indicating that eIF5B and IF2 have similar functions, are used to rationalize the phenotypes of GTPase-deficient mutants of eIF5B and IF2. PMID:14532131

  12. Structural Basis for Recognition of Guanosine by a Synthetic Tricyclic Cytosine Analogue: Guanidinium G-Clamp

    SciTech Connect

    Wilds, C.J.; Maier, M.A.; Manoharan, M.; Egli, M.

    2010-03-08

    An oligonucleotide analogue containing a novel heterocyclic analogue, the guanidinium G-clamp, was designed to allow formation of five H-bonds to guanosine. The guanidinium group was introduced postsynthetically by treatment of the deprotected oligonucleotide containing a free amino group with a solution of 1H-pyrazole-1-carboxamidine and purified by a combination of size-exclusion chromatography and reversed-phase HPLC. A single incorporation of this modification into an oligodeoxynucleotide sequence was found to increase duplex stability by 13{sup o} and 16{sup o} per modification to RNA and DNA, respectively. Crystals of a self-complementary decamer sequence containing this modification were grown and diffracted to 1-{angstrom} resolution. The structure was solved by molecular replacement and revealed that the modification forms additional H-bonds to O(6) and N(7) of guanosine through the amino and imino N-atoms, respectively. The origins of enhanced duplex stability are also attributed to increased stacking interactions mediated by the phenoxazine moiety of the G-clamp and formation of H-bond networks between the positively charged guanidinium group, H{sub 2}O molecules, and negatively charged O-atoms from phosphates on the adjacent strand.

  13. Kinetics and mechanism of the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Golankiewicz, B; Zielonacka-Lis, E; Folkman, W

    1985-01-01

    The rates of acid-catalyzed hydrolysis of a hypermodified nucleoside, wyosine and its 5'-monophosphate were determined at various pH, temperature and buffer concentrations. The results show that despite distinct differences in structure and the glycosyl bond stability, the hydrolysis of wyosine proceeds via cleavage of the C-N bond by A-1 mechanism, analogously to simple nucleosides. Unlike majority of other monophosphates studied so far, wyosine 5'-monophosphate is not more stable than respective nucleoside. PMID:4000960

  14. Deciphering the photochemical mechanisms describing the UV-induced processes occurring in solvated guanine monophosphate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altavilla, Salvatore; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Conti, Irene; Rivalta, Ivan; Garavelli, Marco

    2015-04-01

    The photophysics and photochemistry of water-solvated guanine monophosphate (GMP) are here characterized by means of a multireference quantum-chemical/molecular mechanics theoretical approach (CASPT2//CASSCF/AMBER) in order to elucidate the main photo-processes occurring upon UV-light irradiation. The effect of the solvent and of the phosphate group on the energetics and structural features of this system are evaluated for the first time employing high-level ab initio methods and thoroughly compared to those in vacuo previously reported in the literature and to the experimental evidence to assess to which extent they influence the photoinduced mechanisms. Solvated electronic excitation energies of solvated GMP at the Franck-Condon (FC) region show a red shift for the ππ* La and Lb states, whereas the energy of the oxygen lone-pair nπ* state is blue-shifted. The main photoinduced decay route is promoted through a ring-puckering motion along the bright lowest-lying La state towards a conical intersection (CI) with the ground state, involving a very shallow stationary point along the minimum energy pathway in contrast to the barrierless profile found in gas-phase, the point being placed at the end of the minimum energy path (MEP) thus endorsing its ultrafast deactivation in accordance with time-resolved transient and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments. The role of the nπ* state in the solvated system is severely diminished as the crossings with the initially populated La state and also with the Lb state are placed too high energetically to partake prominently in the deactivation photo-process. The proposed mechanism present in solvated and in vacuo DNA/RNA chromophores validates the intrinsic photostability mechanism through CI-mediated non-radiative processes accompanying the bright excited-state population towards the ground state and subsequent relaxation back to the FC region.

  15. Cinnamyl alcohol attenuates vasoconstriction by activation of K+ channels via NO-cGMP-protein kinase G pathway and inhibition of Rho-kinase

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun Hwan; Yang, In Jun; Morgan, Kathleen G.

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamyl alcohol (CAL) is known as an antipyretic, and a recent study showed its vasodilatory activity without explaining the mechanism. Here we demonstrate the vasodilatory effect and the mechanism of action of CAL in rat thoracic aorta. The change of tension in aortic strips treated with CAL was measured in an organ bath system. In addition, vascular strips or human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were used for biochemical experiments such as Western blot and nitrite and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) measurements. CAL attenuated the vasoconstriction of phenylephrine (PE, 1 µM)-precontracted aortic strips in an endothelium-dependent manner. CAL-induced vasorelaxation was inhibited by pretreatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 10-4 M), methylene blue (MB; 10-5 M) and 1 H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolole-[4,3-a] quinoxalin-10one, (ODQ; 10-6 or 10-7 M) in the endothelium-intact aortic strips. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 10-8 or 10-9 M) did not affect the vasodilatory effect of CAL. The phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and generation of nitric oxide (NO) were stimulated by CAL treatment in HUVECs and inhibited by treatment with L-NAME. In addition, cGMP and PKG1 activation in aortic strips treated with CAL were also significantly inhibited by L-NAME. Furthermore, CAL relaxed Rho-kinase activator calpeptin-precontracted aortic strips, and the vasodilatory effect of CAL was inhibited by the ATP-sensitive K+ channel inhibitor glibenclamide (Gli; 10-5 M) and the voltage-dependent K+ channel inhibitor 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 2 × 10-4 M). These results suggest that CAL induces vasorelaxation by activating K+ channels via the NO-cGMP-PKG pathway and the inhibition of Rho-kinase. PMID:23178275

  16. Nitroxyl inhibits overt pain-like behavior in mice: role of cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Staurengo-Ferrari, Larissa; Zarpelon, Ana C.; Longhi-Balbinot, Daniela T.; Marchesi, Mario; Cunha, Thiago M.; Alves-Filho, José C.; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Ferreira, Sergio H.; Casagrande, Rubia; Miranda, Katrina M.; Verri, Waldiceu A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Several lines of evidence have indicated that nitric oxide (NO) plays complex and diverse roles in modulation of pain/analgesia. However, the roles of charged and uncharged congeners of NO are less well understood. In the present study, the antinociceptive effect of the nitroxyl (HNO) donor, Angeli’s salt (Na2N2O3; AS) was investigated in models of overt pain-like behavior. Moreover, whether the antinociceptive effect of nitroxyl was dependent on the activation of cGMP (cyclic guanosine monophosphate)/PKG (protein kinase G)/ATP-sensitive potassium channels was addressed. Methods The antinociceptive effect of AS was evaluated on phenyl-p-benzoquinone (PBQ)- and acetic acid-induced writhings and via the formalin test. In addition, pharmacological treatments targeting guanylate cyclase (ODQ), PKG (KT5923) and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (glybenclamide) were used. Results PBQ and acetic acid induced significant writhing responses over 20 min. The nociceptive response in these models were significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by subcutaneous pre-treatment with AS. Furthermore, AS also inhibited both phases of the formalin test. Subsequently, the inhibitory effect of AS in writhing and flinching responses were prevented by ODQ, KT5823 and glybenclamide, although these inhibitors alone did not alter the writhing score. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-cysteine, an HNO scavenger, confirmed that the antinociceptive effect of AS depends on HNO. Conclusion The present study demonstrates the efficacy of a nitroxyl donor and its analgesic mechanisms in overt pain-like behavior by activating the cGMP/PKG/ATP-sensitive potassium channel (K+) signaling pathway. PMID:24948073

  17. The involvement of NMDA receptor/NO/cGMP pathway in the antidepressant like effects of baclofen in mouse force swimming test.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muhammad Imran; Ostadhadi, Sattar; Zolfaghari, Samira; Ejtemaei Mehr, Shahram; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-01-26

    In the current study, the involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and nitric oxide (NO)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) system in the antidepressant-like effects of baclofen was evaluated by using animal model in forced swimming test. Followed by an open field test for the evaluation of locomotor activity, the immobility time for mice in force swimming test was recorded. Only the last four min was analyzed. Administration of Baclofen (0.5 and 1mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility interval in the FST. Prior administration of l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p.,) a nitric oxide synthase substrate or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p.) a phosphodiesterase 5 into mice suppressed the antidepressant-like activity of baclofen (1mg/kg, i.p.).Co-treatment of 7-nitroindazole (50mg/kg, i.p.,) an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase, L-NAME (10mg/kg, i.p.,) a non-specific inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase or MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p.) an NMDA receptor antagonist with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), reduced the immobility time in the FST as compared to the drugs when used alone. Co-administrated of lower doses of MK-801 (0.01mg/kg) or l-NAME (1mg/kg) failed to effect immobility time however, simultaneous administration of these two agents in same dose with subeffective dose of baclofen (0.1mg/kg, i.p.), minimized the immobility time in the FST. Thus, our results support the role of NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant-like action of baclofen. PMID:26679225

  18. Lack of nitric oxide- and guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate-dependent regulation of α-thrombin-induced calcium transient in endothelial cells of spontaneously hypertensive rat hearts

    PubMed Central

    Failli, Paola; Fazzini, Alessandro; Ruocco, Carlo; Mazzetti, Luca; Cecchi, Enrica; Giovannelli, Lisa; Marra, Fabio; Milani, Stefano; Giotti, Alberto

    2000-01-01

    While the expression and/or activity of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) has been characterized in spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rat (WKY) hearts, in coronary endothelial cells (ECs) from both strains, the effect of NO on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) is still unknown. Coronary microvascular ECs were isolated from SHR and WKY and characterized. Immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis showed that eNOS was similarly expressed in ECs from both strains. Measuring [Ca2+]i by imaging analysis of fura-2-loaded cells, we demonstrated that α-thrombin (3−180 U l−1) induced a superimposable dose-dependent calcium transient in ECs from both strains. In WKY ECs, S-nitroso-N-acetyl-DL-penicillamine (SNAP) dose-dependently (10–100 μM) and 0.1 μM atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) reduced the maximum and the decay time of α-thrombin-induced calcium transient. The inhibitory effects of SNAP and ANF were prevented by blocking cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase. Non selective eNOS inhibitors prolonged the decay time of α-thrombin-induced calcium transient, while the selective inducible NOS inhibitor 1400 W was ineffective. SNAP (100 μM) and 0.1 μM ANF increased cyclic GMP content up to 22.9 and 42.3 fold respectively. In SHR ECs, α-thrombin-induced calcium transient was not modified by SNAP, ANF or eNOS inhibition. SNAP (100 μM) and 0.1 μM ANF increased cyclic GMP content up to 9.3 and 51 fold respectively. In WKY ECs, SNAP dose-dependently (10–100 μM) reduced also bradykinin-induced calcium transient, while in SHR ECs was ineffective. We concluded that in SHR ECs, the cyclic GMP-dependent regulation of calcium transient is lost. PMID:10928946

  19. DNA 3' pp 5' G de-capping activity of aprataxin: effect of cap nucleoside analogs and structural basis for guanosine recognition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-05-24

    DNA3' pp 5'G caps synthesized by the 3'-PO4/5'-OH ligase RtcB have a strong impact on enzymatic reactions at DNA 3'-OH ends. Aprataxin, an enzyme that repairs A5'pp5'DNA ends formed during abortive ligation by classic 3'-OH/5'-PO4 ligases, is also a DNA 3' de-capping enzyme, converting DNAppG to DNA3'p and GMP. By taking advantage of RtcB's ability to utilize certain GTP analogs to synthesize DNAppN caps, we show that aprataxin hydrolyzes inosine and 6-O-methylguanosine caps, but is not adept at removing a deoxyguanosine cap. We report a 1.5 Å crystal structure of aprataxin in a complex with GMP, which reveals that: (i)more » GMP binds at the same position and in the same anti nucleoside conformation as AMP; and (ii) aprataxin makes more extensive nucleobase contacts with guanine than with adenine, via a hydrogen bonding network to the guanine O6, N1, N2 base edge. Alanine mutations of catalytic residues His147 and His149 abolish DNAppG de-capping activity, suggesting that the 3' de-guanylylation and 5' de-adenylylation reactions follow the same pathway of nucleotidyl transfer through a covalent aprataxin-(His147)–NMP intermediate. Alanine mutation of Asp63, which coordinates the guanosine ribose hydroxyls, impairs DNAppG de-capping.« less

  20. Oligomerization of activated D- and L-guanosine mononucleotides on templates containing D- and L-deoxycytidylate residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Pitsch, S.; Orgel, L. E.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The oligomerization of activated D- and L- and racemic guanosine-5'-phosphoro-2-methylimidazole on short templates containing D- and L-deoxycytidylate has been studied. Results obtained with D-oligo(dC)s as templates are similar to those previously reported for experiments with a poly(C) template. When one L-dC or two consecutive L-dCs are introduced into a D-template, regiospecific synthesis of 3'-5' oligo(G)s proceeds to the end of the template, but three consecutive L-dCs block synthesis. Alternating D-,L-oligomers do not facilitate oligomerization of the D-, L-, and racemic 2-guanosine-5'-phosphoro-2-methylimidazole. We suggest that once a "predominately D-metabolism" existed, occasional L-residues in a template would not have led to the termination of self-replication.

  1. Nonenzymatic template-directed synthesis on hairpin oligonucleotides. 2. Templates containing cytidine and guanosine residues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, T.; Orgel, L. E.

    1992-01-01

    We have prepared hairpin oligonucleotides in which a 5'-terminal single-stranded segment contains cytidylate (C) and guanylate (G) residues. When these hairpin substrates are incubated with a mixture of cytidine 5'-phosphoro(2-methly)imidazolide (2-MeImpC) and guanosine 5'-phosphoro(2-methyl)imidazolide (2-MeImpG), the 5'-terminal segment acts as a template to facilitate sequence-specific addition of G and C residues to the 3'-terminus of the hairpin. If an isolated G residue is present at the 3'-end of the template strand, it is copied regiospecifically in the presence of 2-MeImpC and 2-MeImpG to give a product containing an isolated C residue linked to its G neighbors by 3'-5'-internucleotide bonds. However, if only 2-MeImpC is present in the reaction mixture, very little reaction occurs. Thus, the presence of 2-MeImpG catalyzes the incorporation of C. If the template strand contains a short sequence of G residues, it is copied in the presence of a mixture of 2-MeImpC and 2-MeImpG. If only 2-MeImpC is present in the reaction mixture, efficient synthesis occurs to give a final product containing one fewer C residue than the number of G residues in the template.

  2. Phosphonylated Acyclic Guanosine Analogues with the 1,2,3-Triazole Linker.

    PubMed

    Głowacka, Iwona E; Andrei, Graciela; Schols, Dominique; Snoeck, Robert; Piotrowska, Dorota G

    2015-01-01

    A novel series of {4-[(2-amino-6-chloro-9H-purin-9-yl)methyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl}alkylphosphonates and {4-[(2-amino-6-oxo-1,6-dihydro-9H-purin-9-yl)methyl]-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl}alkylphosphonates as acyclic analogues of guanosine were synthesized and assessed for antiviral activity against a broad range of DNA and RNA viruses and for their cytostatic activity toward three cancerous cell lines (HeLa, L1210 and CEM). They were devoid of antiviral activity; however, several phosphonates were found slightly cytostatic against HeLa cells at an IC50 in the 80-210 µM range. Compounds (1R,2S)-17k and (1S,2S)-17k showed the highest inhibitory effects (IC50=15-30 µM) against the proliferation of murine leukemia (L1210) and human T-lymphocyte (CEM) cell lines. PMID:26501246

  3. Triiodothyronine causes rapid reversal of alpha 1/cyclic adenosine monophosphate synergism on brown adipocyte respiration and type II deiodinase activity.

    PubMed

    Noronha, M; Raasmaja, A; Moolten, N; Larsen, P R

    1991-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that thyroid status affects the response of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to the sympathetic nervous system. For example, hypothyroidism is associated with the development of a marked synergism between alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic pathways to stimulate type II iodothyronine 5'-deiodinase activity. Hypothyroidism also attenuates the respiratory response (thermogenesis) of isolated brown adipocytes to norepinephrine. To explore the interactions of the sympathetic nervous system and thyroid status in these cells, we compared the thermogenic and 5'-deiodinase responses to adrenergic agonists in isolated brown adipocytes from hypothyroid rats during treatment with 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). The fivefold synergism of alpha 1- and beta-adrenergic catecholamines to increase the deiodinase activity was progressively reduced, reaching a control euthyroid value of unity after 5 days of T3 treatment. Hypothyroidism reduced both the O2max (twofold to threefold) and increased the concentration of agonist required for 50% stimulation (10-fold) for both norepinephrine and forskolin. In hypothyroid cells, there was a twofold synergism between the alpha 1-agonist cirazoline and forskolin to increase respiration, which was blocked by prazosin and reproduced by the calcium ionophore, A23187. This synergistic effect of the alpha 1-agonist was lost within 2 days of T3 administration. These studies identify a second Ca(2+)-dependent intra-adrenergic synergism, which functions to ameliorate the reduced cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) responsiveness of the hypothyroid brown adipocyte. PMID:1683679

  4. Codelivery of VEGF siRNA and Gemcitabine Monophosphate in a Single Nanoparticle Formulation for Effective Treatment of NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Schwerbrock, Nicole MJ; Rogers, Arlin B; Kim, William Y; Huang, Leaf

    2013-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new therapeutics for the treatment of aggressive and metastatic refractory human non-small–cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Antiangiogenesis therapy and chemotherapy are the two major treatment options. Unfortunately, both types of therapies when used individually have their disadvantages. Integrating antiangiogenesis therapy with chemotherapy is expected to target the tumor's vascular endothelial cells and the tumor cells simultaneously. In this study, we coformulated Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) siRNA targeting VEGFs and gemcitabine monophosphate (GMP) into a single cell-specific, targeted lipid/calcium/phosphate (LCP) nanoparticle formulation. Antitumor effect of the combination therapy using LCP loaded with both VEGF siRNA and GMP was evaluated in both subcutaneous and orthotopic xenograft models of NSCLC with systemic administration. The improved therapeutic response, as compared with either VEGF siRNA or GMP therapy alone, was supported by the observation of 30–40% induction of tumor cell apoptosis, eightfold reduction of tumor cell proliferation and significant decrease of tumor microvessel density (MVD). The combination therapy led to dramatic inhibition of tumor growth, with little in vivo toxicity. In addition, the current studies demonstrated the possibility of incorporating multiple nucleic acid molecules and phosphorylated small-molecule drugs, targeting to different pathways, into a single nanoparticle formulation for profound therapeutic effect. PMID:23774791

  5. Probing the interplay between the two steps of group I intron splicing: competition of exogenous guanosine with omega G.

    PubMed

    Zarrinkar, P P; Sullenger, B A

    1998-12-22

    One largely unexplored question about group I intron splicing is how the cleavage and ligation steps of the reaction are coordinated. We describe a simple in vitro trans-splicing model system in which both steps take place, including the exchange of ligands in the guanosine-binding site that must occur between the two steps. Using this model system, we show that the switch is accomplished by modulating the relative affinity of the binding site for the two ligands. While the terminal guanosine of the intron (omegaG) and exogenous guanosine compete for binding during the first step of splicing, no competition is apparent during the second step, when omegaG is bound tightly. These results help explain how the ribozyme orchestrates progression through the splicing reaction. In addition to providing a new tool to ask basic questions about RNA catalysis, the trans-splicing model system will also facilitate the development of therapeutically useful group I ribozymes that can repair mutant mRNAs. PMID:9922174

  6. L-theanine elicits an umami taste with inosine 5'-monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Narukawa, Masataka; Morita, Kanako; Hayashi, Yukako

    2008-11-01

    We investigated the taste synergy between L-theanine and the flavour enhancer, inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), by using a human sensory evaluation. When L-theanine was added to IMP, only the umami taste was enhanced. We then investigated this synergistic effect of L-theanine in mice by gustatory nerve recording. We confirmed the synergism between L-theanine and IMP for the umami taste. PMID:18997398

  7. Avirulent uracil auxotrophs based on disruption of orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase elicit protective immunity to Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2010-09-01

    The orotidine-5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) gene, encoding the final enzyme of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway, was deleted using Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts to develop an avirulent nonreverting pyrimidine auxotroph strain. Additionally, to functionally address the role of the pyrimidine salvage pathway, the uridine phosphorylase (UP) salvage activity was knocked out and a double knockout of UP and OMPDC was also constructed. The nonreverting DeltaOMPDC, DeltaUP, and DeltaOMPDC DeltaUP knockout strains were evaluated for pyrimidine auxotrophy, for attenuation of virulence, and for their ability to elicit potent immunity to reinfection. The DeltaUP knockout strain was replication competent and virulent. In contrast, the DeltaOMPDC and DeltaOMPDC DeltaUP strains were uracil auxotrophs that rapidly lost their viability during pyrimidine starvation. Replication of the DeltaOMPDC strain but not the DeltaOMPDC DeltaUP strain was also partially rescued in vitro with uridine or cytidine supplementation. Compared to their hypervirulent parental type I strain, the DeltaOMPDC and DeltaOMPDC DeltaUP knockout strains exhibited extreme attenuation in murine virulence (approximately 8 logs). Genetic complementation of the DeltaOMPDC strain using a functional OMPDC allele restored normal replication and type I parental strain virulence phenotypes. A single immunization of mice with either the live critically attenuated DeltaOMPDC strain or the DeltaOMPDC DeltaUP knockout strain effectively induced potent protective immunity to lethal challenge infection. The avirulent nonreverting DeltaOMPDC and DeltaOMPDC DeltaUP strains provide new tools for the dissection of the host response to infection and are promising candidates for safe and effective Th1 vaccine platforms that can be easily genetically engineered. PMID:20605980

  8. Injection of guanosine and adenosine nucleotides into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells

    PubMed Central

    Bolsover, S. R.; Brown, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    1. Several nucleotide and nucleotide analogues had striking effects when pressure-injected into Limulus ventral photoreceptor cells. The poorly hydrolysable GTP analogues guanosine 5′-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTPγS), guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp[NH]p) and guanylyl (β, γ methylene) diphosphonate (Gpp[CH2]p) produced large increases in the frequency of `discrete events' that were recorded from photoreceptors in darkness. This effect was only observed after the injected cell was exposed to light. Injection of the ATP analogue ATPγS had effects similar to those of the GTP analogues. 2. We conclude that GTPγS, Gpp[NH]p, Gpp[CH2]p and ATPγS act at a common site to cause a light-dependent, long-term activation of the excitation mechanism of the photoreceptor. 3. Injection of GTP or GDP at pH 4.8 was followed by a smooth, transient depolarization that was observed neither when GTP at pH 7.5 was injected nor when ATP, 5′GMP or 2-[N-morpholino] ethane sulphonic acid (MES) were injected at pH 4.8. The reversal potential of the current induced by GTP injection was significantly more positive than the reversal potential of the light-induced current. 4. We conclude that GTP injection induces changes of membrane conductance either in addition to, or different from, the light-induced change of membrane conductance. 5. Injection of the ATP analogue adenylyl imidodiphosphate (App[NH]p), and the pyrophosphate analogue imidodiphosphate (p[NH]p) produced a drastic decrease in the sensitivity of photoreceptors to light. This decrease in sensitivity was partially reversed when the concentration of calcium ions in the bathing medium was reduced. 6. We suggest that App[NH]p and p[NH]p injections act by increasing the cytoplasmic concentration of calcium ions. PMID:7153930

  9. Role of Increased Guanosine Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase-1 Expression and Tetrahydrobiopterin Levels upon T Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Li; Brod, Torben; Saeed, Omar; Thabet, Salim; Jansen, Thomas; Dikalov, Sergey; Weyand, Cornelia; Goronzy, Jorg; Harrison, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is an essential co-factor for the nitric-oxide (NO) synthases, and in its absence these enzymes produce superoxide (O2˙̄) rather than NO. The rate-limiting enzyme for BH4 production is guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase-1 (GTPCH-1). Because endogenously produced NO affects T cell function, we sought to determine whether antigen stimulation affected T cell GTPCH-1 expression and ultimately BH4 levels. Resting T cells had minimal expression of inducible NOS (NOS2), endothelial NOS (NOS3), and GTPCH-1 protein and nearly undetectable levels of BH4. Anti-CD3 stimulation of T cells robustly stimulated the coordinated expression of NOS2, NOS3, and GTPCH-1 and markedly increased both GTPCH-1 activity and T cell BH4 levels. The newly expressed GTPCH-1 was phosphorylated on serine 72 and pharmacological inhibition of casein kinase II reduced GTPCH-1 phosphorylation and blunted the increase in T cell BH4. Inhibition of GTPCH-1 with diaminohydroxypyrimidine (1 mmol/liter) prevented T cell BH4 accumulation, reduced NO production, and increased T cell O2˙̄ production, due to both NOS2 and NOS3 uncoupling. GTPCH-1 inhibition also promoted TH2 polarization in memory CD4 cells. Ovalbumin immunization of mice transgenic for an ovalbumin receptor (OT-II mice) confirmed a marked increase in T cell BH4 in vivo. These studies identify a previously unidentified consequence of T cell activation, promoting BH4 levels, NO production, and modulating T cell cytokine production. PMID:21343293

  10. Positive control of lac operon expression in vitro by guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate.

    PubMed

    Primakoff, P; Artz, S W

    1979-04-01

    Maximal expression of the Escherichia coli lactose operon in a coupled in vitro transcription-translation system from a Salmonella typhimurium relA mutant was strongly dependent upon addition of guanosine 5'-diphosphate 3'-diphosphate (ppGpp). Without added ppGpp, at saturating 3',5'-cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentrations, synthesis of beta-galactosidase (beta-D-galactoside galactohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.23) was reproducibly only 5-7% of that which can be obtained with 0.5-0.8 mM ppGpp. Experiments in which transcription was uncoupled from translation indicated that this 14- to 20-fold stimulation by ppGpp occurred at the level of transcription. When coupled beta-galactosidase synthesis was primed with a template containing a well-characterized mutant lac promoter (lacP(r)L8UV5), the dependence on ppGpp was greatly reduced. This result provides an important experimental control previously unavailable for verifying the significance of ppGpp effects on gene regulation in vitro; it indicates that activation of lacP(+) expression by ppGpp is specifically an effect of increased transcription initiations. Furthermore, the large ppGpp stimulation of lacP(+) DNA enabled the level of expression of this template to approach that of lacP(r)L8UV5 DNA, an observation expected from results in vivo but not obtained with other transcription-translation systems in vitro. The importance of these results is considered with respect to previous ideas on the physiological role of ppGpp as a supercontrol molecule in bacterial regulation. PMID:109832

  11. Regulation of Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamylase synthesis by guanosine tetraphosphate and pyrimidine ribonucleoside triphosphates.

    PubMed

    Turnbough, C L

    1983-02-01

    The effects of guanosine tetraphosphate (ppGpp) and pyrimidine ribonucleoside triphosphates on Escherichia coli aspartate transcarbamylase (ATCase) synthesis were examined. To determine the effect of ppGpp, a stringent (relA+) and relaxed (relA) isogenic pair of E. coli K-12 strains was starved for isoleucine, and the residual rate of synthesis of this enzyme was measured. It was necessary to starve the strains for uracil before the isoleucine limitation to maintain similar, low levels of UTP, the putative pyrimidine effector of ATCase synthesis. The isoleucine starvation of the stringent strain caused an immediate 10-fold increase in the intracellular concentration of ppGpp, which was coincident with the cessation of the synthesis of the enzyme. The elevated level of ppGpp then decayed until it reached an intracellular concentration similar to that found in unstarved cells. Enzyme synthesis resumed at this time. In the relaxed strain, the intracellular concentration of ppGpp did not increase upon isoleucine starvation and synthesis of the enzyme was not repressed. These experiments strongly indicated that ppGpp acts as a negative effector of ATCase synthesis. The repression of ATCase synthesis by ppGpp was demonstrated directly by using a Salmonella typhimurium (relA) in vitro coupled transcription-translation system with a lambda specialized transducing phage carrying the E. coli K-12 operon encoding the subunits of this enzyme (pyrBI) as a source of DNA. This in vitro system was also used to measure the effects of UTP and CTP on ATCase synthesis. Increasing the concentration of UTP in the in vitro reaction mixture resulted in strong repression of this synthesis, whereas increasing the CTP concentration did not affect synthesis significantly. Possible mechanisms for the regulation of pyr gene expression, including attenuation control, are discussed. PMID:6337130

  12. Hydrogen Sulfide Regulates Ca2+ Homeostasis Mediated by Concomitantly Produced Nitric Oxide via a Novel Synergistic Pathway in Exocrine Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Amira

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim: The present study was designed to explore the effects of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on Ca2+ homeostasis in rat pancreatic acini. Results: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS; an H2S donor) induced a biphasic increase in the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner. The NaHS-induced [Ca2+]i elevation persisted with an EC50 of 73.3 μM in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ but was abolished by thapsigargin, indicating that both Ca2+ entry and Ca2+ release contributed to the increase. The [Ca2+]i increase was markedly inhibited in the presence of NG-monomethyl L-arginine or 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (cPTIO), and diaminofluorescein-2/diaminofluorescein-2 triazole (DAF-2/DAF-2T) fluorometry demonstrated that nitric oxide (NO) was also produced by H2S in a dose-dependent manner with an EC50 of 64.8 μM, indicating that NO was involved in the H2S effect. The H2S-induced [Ca2+]i increase was inhibited by pretreatment with U73122, xestospongin C, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, KT5823, and GP2A, indicating that phospholipase C (PLC), the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), protein kinase G (PKG), and Gq-protein play roles as intermediate components in the H2S-triggered intracellular signaling. Innovation: To our knowledge, our study is the first one highlighting the effect of H2S on intracellular Ca2+ dynamics in pancreatic acinar cells. Moreover, a novel cascade was presumed to function via the synergistic interaction between H2S and NO. Conclusion: We conclude that H2S affects [Ca2+]i homeostasis that is mediated by H2S-evoked NO production via an endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-NO-sGC-cyclic guanosine monophosphate-PKG-Gq-protein-PLC-IP3 pathway to induce Ca2+ release, and this pathway is identical to the one we recently proposed for a sole effect of NO and the two gaseous molecules synergistically function to regulate Ca2+ homeostasis

  13. Effect of DDAH/ADMA/NOS regulation pathway on cavernae corporum cavernosorum rat penis of different age.

    PubMed

    Wang, J-H; Chen, D; Zhang, K-Q; Zhang, H; Fu, Q

    2016-04-01

    The effect of DDAH/ADMA/NOS pathway in penile tissue of rats of different age was investigated to better understand the mechanism of age-related erectile dysfunction (ED). The Sprague Dawley male rats were assigned as the young group (3 month old, n = 10) and the old group (18 month old, n = 10) respectively. Intracavernous pressure (ICP) was measured before and after papaverine intracavernous injection. Pathology structure of penile tissue was evaluated under transmission electron microscope. The expression amounts of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in penile tissue were detected by ELISA; the expression levels of isoform-specific DDAH and NOS were assessed via Western blot. Compared with the young group, the ICP in the old group rat decreased significantly (33.46 ± 5.37 versus 39.71 ± 3.67 mmHg, P = 0.02) after papaverine injection. Diffused fibrosis and impairment of endothelial cell were observed in corpus cavernosum in the old group rats. Higher level of ADMA (10.83 ± 0.96 versus 7.51 ± 1.39 μmol per gpro, P = 3.14 × 10(-4) ) and lower level of cGMP (29.42 ± 3.84 versus 47.09 ± 6.07 nmol per gpro, P = 1.57 × 10(-6) ) were detected in penile tissue of the old group compared with those of the young group. Expression of DDAH1, DDAH2, endothelial NOS (eNOS) and neuronal NOS(nNOS) all decreased significantly in penile tissue of the old group rat. The DDAH/ADMA/NOS regulation pathway changes dramatically accompanying with lower ICP in old group rat compared with those of the young group. Such findings in rats are suggestive in understanding the mechanism of age-related ED in humans. PMID:26011316

  14. Gas-Phase Conformations and Energetics of Protonated 2^'-DEOXYADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE and ADENOSINE-5^'-MONOPHOSPHATE: Irmpd Action Spectroscopy and Theoretical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ranran; Nei, Y.-W.; He, Chenchen; Hamlow, Lucas; Berden, Giel; Oomens, J.; Rodgers, M. T.

    2015-06-01

    Nature uses protonation to alter the structures and reactivities of molecules to facilitate various biological functions and chemical transformations. For example, in nucleobase repair and salvage processes, protonation facilitates nucleobase removal by lowering the activation barrier for glycosidic bond cleavage. Systematic studies of the structures of protonated 2'-deoxyribonucleotides and ribonucleotides may provide insight into the roles protonation plays in altering the nucleobase orientation relative to the glycosidic bond and sugar puckering. In this study, infrared multiple photon dissociation (IRMPD) action spectroscopy experiments in conjunction with electronic structure calculations are performed to probe the effects of protonation on the structures and stabilities of 2^'-deoxyadenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pdAdo) and adenosine-5^'-monophosphate (pAdo). Photodissociation as a function of IR wavelength is measured to generate the IRMPD action spectra. Geometry optimizations and frequency analyses performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p) level of theory are used to characterize the stable low-energy structures and to generate their linear IR spectra. Single point energy calculations performed at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2d,2p) and MP2(full)/6-311+G(2d,2p) levels of theory provide relative stabilities of the optimized conformations. The structures accessed in the experiments are determined by comparing the calculated linear IR spectra for the stable low-energy conformers computed to the measured IRMPD action spectra. The effects of the 2^'-hydroxyl moiety are elucidated by comparing the structures and IRMPD spectra of [pAdo+H]+ to those of its DNA analogue. Comparisons are also made to the deprotonated forms of these nucleotides and the protonated forms of the analogous nucleosides to elucidate the effects of protonation and the phosphate group on the structures.

  15. N-H stretching vibrations of guanosine-cytidine base pairs in solution: ultrafast dynamics, couplings, and line shapes.

    PubMed

    Fidder, Henk; Yang, Ming; Nibbering, Erik T J; Elsaesser, Thomas; Röttger, Katharina; Temps, Friedrich

    2013-02-01

    Dynamics and couplings of N-H stretching vibrations of chemically modified guanosine-cytidine (G·C) base pairs in chloroform are investigated with linear infrared spectroscopy and ultrafast two-dimensional infrared (2D-IR) spectroscopy. Comparison of G·C absorption spectra before and after H/D exchange reveals significant N-H stretching absorption in the region from 2500 up to 3300 cm(-1). Both of the local stretching modes ν(C)(NH(2))(b) of the hydrogen-bonded N-H moiety of the cytidine NH(2) group and ν(G)(NH) of the guanosine N-H group contribute to this broad absorption band. Its complex line shape is attributed to Fermi resonances of the N-H stretching modes with combination and overtones of fingerprint vibrations and anharmonic couplings to low-frequency modes. Cross-peaks in the nonlinear 2D spectra between the 3491 cm(-1) free N-H oscillator band and the bands centered at 3145 and 3303 cm(-1) imply N-H···O═C hydrogen bond character for both of these transitions. Time evolution illustrates that the 3303 cm(-1) band is composed of a nearly homogeneous band absorbing at 3301 cm(-1), ascribed to ν(G)(NH(2))(b), and a broad inhomogeneous band peaking at 3380 cm(-1) with mainly guanosine carbonyl overtone character. Kinetics and signal strengths indicate a <0.2 ps virtually complete population transfer from the excited ν(G)(NH(2))(b) mode to the ν(G)(NH) mode at 3145 cm(-1), suggesting lifetime broadening as the dominant source for the homogeneous line shape of the 3301 cm(-1) transition. For the 3145 cm(-1) band, a 0.3 ps population lifetime was obtained. PMID:23317104

  16. Guanosine and its modified derivatives are endogenous ligands for TLR7.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Takuma; Ohto, Umeharu; Nomura, Shosaku; Kibata, Kayoko; Motoi, Yuji; Zhang, Yan; Murakami, Yusuke; Fukui, Ryutaro; Ishimoto, Tatsushi; Sano, Shigetoshi; Ito, Tomoki; Shimizu, Toshiyuki; Miyake, Kensuke

    2016-05-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) 7and 8 were considered to recognize single-strand RNA (ssRNA) from viruses. Although these receptors also respond to synthetic small chemical ligands, such as CL075 and R848, it remains to be determined whether these receptors sense natural small molecules or not. In the structure of human TLR8 (huTLR8) with ssRNA, there are two ligand-binding sites: one binds a uridine and the other binds an oligoribonucleotide (ORN). This finding demonstrates that huTLR8 recognizes degradation products of ssRNA, suggesting the presence of natural small ligands. We here show that TLR7 works as the sensor for guanosine (G)/2'-deoxyguanosine (dG) in the presence of ORN where ORN strengthens TLR7 interaction with G/dG. In addition, modified nucleosides such as 7-methylguanosine, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OHG) and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) activated TLR7 with ORNs. Importantly, 8-OHdG-a well-known oxidative DNA damage marker with unknown function-induced strong cytokine production comparable to G and dG both in mouse and human immune cells. Although 8-OHdG bound TLR7/ORN with lower affinity than dG did in isothermal titration calorimetry, administered 8-OHdG was metabolically more stable than dG in the serum, indicating that 8-OHdG acts on TLR7 as an endogenous ligand in vivo To address a role of G analogs in the disease state, we also examined macrophages from Unc93b1 (D34A/D34A) mice, which suffer from TLR7-dependent systemic inflammation, and found that Unc93b1 (D34A/D34A) macrophages showed significantly enhanced response to G alone or 8-OHdG with ORN. In conclusion, our results provide evidence that G, dG, 8-OHG and 8-OHdG are novel endogenous ligands for TLR7. PMID:26489884

  17. DNA 3' pp 5' G de-capping activity of aprataxin: effect of cap nucleoside analogs and structural basis for guanosine recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Chauleau, Mathieu; Jacewicz, Agata; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-05-24

    DNA3' pp 5'G caps synthesized by the 3'-PO4/5'-OH ligase RtcB have a strong impact on enzymatic reactions at DNA 3'-OH ends. Aprataxin, an enzyme that repairs A5'pp5'DNA ends formed during abortive ligation by classic 3'-OH/5'-PO4 ligases, is also a DNA 3' de-capping enzyme, converting DNAppG to DNA3'p and GMP. By taking advantage of RtcB's ability to utilize certain GTP analogs to synthesize DNAppN caps, we show that aprataxin hydrolyzes inosine and 6-O-methylguanosine caps, but is not adept at removing a deoxyguanosine cap. We report a 1.5 Å crystal structure of aprataxin in a complex with GMP, which reveals that: (i) GMP binds at the same position and in the same anti nucleoside conformation as AMP; and (ii) aprataxin makes more extensive nucleobase contacts with guanine than with adenine, via a hydrogen bonding network to the guanine O6, N1, N2 base edge. Alanine mutations of catalytic residues His147 and His149 abolish DNAppG de-capping activity, suggesting that the 3' de-guanylylation and 5' de-adenylylation reactions follow the same pathway of nucleotidyl transfer through a covalent aprataxin-(His147)–NMP intermediate. Alanine mutation of Asp63, which coordinates the guanosine ribose hydroxyls, impairs DNAppG de-capping.

  18. Histone deacetylases 6 increases the cyclic adenosine monophosphate level and promotes renal cyst growth.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ming; Mei, Changlin

    2016-07-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by abnormal enhanced cell proliferation and fluid secretion, which are triggered by increased levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Cebotaru et al. showed that a HDAC6 inhibitor reduced the cAMP level and inhibited cyst formation in Pkd1 knockout mice, which may become a new potential therapeutic agent for ADPKD. This study also raised several intriguing questions that might advance our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of ADPKD. PMID:27312442

  19. Postirradiation administration of adenosine monophosphate combined with dipyridamole reduces early cellular damage in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Bohacek, J.; Hosek, B.; Pospisil, M. )

    1993-01-01

    The administration of dipyridamole and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) to mice 5 to 25 min after 1 Gy of total-body gamma irradiation was found to decrease cellular damage, as indicated by the thymidine level in plasma and the amount of saline soluble polynucleotides in the thymus. The drug combination used did not influence similar cytotoxic effects of hydrocortisone. Furthermore, it was shown that the addition of dipyridamole and AMP to in vitro irradiated suspensions of thymocytes enhanced the rejoining processes of DNA strand breaks. Receptor-mediated action of extracellular adenosine may be responsible for the therapeutic effects observed.

  20. Investigations of structural, dielectric and optical properties on silicon ion irradiated glycine monophosphate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanagasekaran, T.; Mythili, P.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Kanjilal, D.; Gopalakrishnan, R.

    2009-08-01

    The 50 MeV silicon ion irradiation induced modifications on structural, optical and dielectric properties of solution grown glycine monophosphate (GMP) crystals were studied. The high-resolution X-ray diffraction study shows the unaltered value of integrated intensity on irradiation. The dielectric constant as a function of frequency and temperature was studied. UV-visible studies reveal the decrease in bandgap values on irradiation and presence of F-centers. The fluorescence spectrum shows the existence of some energy levels, which remains unaffected after irradiation. The scanning electron micrographs reveal the defects formed on irradiation.

  1. Determination of the lowest-energy oxidation site in nucleotides: 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate anion.

    PubMed

    Rubio, Mercedes; Roca-Sanjuan, Daniel; Merchan, Manuela; Serrano-Andrés, Luis

    2006-06-01

    High level ab initio computations anticipate nucleobases as the most favorable sites for oxidation in nucleotides. At the CASPT2 level, the lowest ionization channel for the 2'-deoxythymidine 5'-monophosphate anion is related to a pi-orbital of the thymine base. The present findings lead to revision of the recent assignments of the photodetachment photoelectron spectra of mononucleotide anions in the gas phase and support the classical view of the nucleobase being the main actor in the oxidation process of both nucleosides and nucleotides. PMID:16722723

  2. Hydrolysis of Guanosine Triphosphate (GTP) by the Ras·GAP Protein Complex: Reaction Mechanism and Kinetic Scheme.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2015-10-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the hydrolysis of guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosine diphosphate (GDP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) by the Ras·GAP protein complex are fully investigated by using modern modeling tools. The previously hypothesized stages of the cleavage of the phosphorus-oxygen bond in GTP and the formation of the imide form of catalytic Gln61 from Ras upon creation of Pi are confirmed by using the higher-level quantum-based calculations. The steps of the enzyme regeneration are modeled for the first time, providing a comprehensive description of the catalytic cycle. It is found that for the reaction Ras·GAP·GTP·H2O → Ras·GAP·GDP·Pi, the highest barriers correspond to the process of regeneration of the active site but not to the process of substrate cleavage. The specific shape of the energy profile is responsible for an interesting kinetic mechanism of the GTP hydrolysis. The analysis of the process using the first-passage approach and consideration of kinetic equations suggest that the overall reaction rate is a result of the balance between relatively fast transitions and low probability of states from which these transitions are taking place. Our theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with available experimental observations on GTP hydrolysis rates. PMID:26374425

  3. Light-driven artificial enzymes for selective oxidation of guanosine triphosphate using water-soluble POSS network polymers.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jong-Hwan; Tanaka, Kazuo; Chujo, Yoshiki

    2014-09-01

    The light-driven artificial enzymes were constructed to realize unnatural reactions concerning bio-significant molecules. In this manuscript, the guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-selective oxidation is reported using the network polymers composed of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). We synthesized the water-soluble POSS network polymer containing the naphthyridine ligands to capture GTP inside the networks and the ruthenium complexes to oxidize the captured GTP under light irradiation. Initially, the binding affinities of the guanosine nucleosides to the naphthyridine ligand inside the POSS network polymer were evaluated from the emission quenching experiments. Accordingly, it was observed that the naphthyridine ligand can form the stable complex only with GTP (K(a) = 5.5 × 10(6) M(-1)). These results indicate that only GTP can be captured by the network polymer. Next, the photo-catalytic activity of the ruthenium complex-modified POSS network polymer was investigated. Finally, it was revealed that the network polymer can decompose GTP efficiently under light irradiation. This is the first example, to the best of our knowledge, to offer not only the GTP-selective host polymers but also the light-driven artificial enzyme for GTP oxidation. PMID:25026217

  4. An industrial process for selective synthesis of 7-methyl guanosine 5'-diphosphate: versatile synthon for synthesis of mRNA cap analogues.

    PubMed

    Kore, Anilkumar R; Parmar, Gaurang

    2006-03-01

    We report an industrial scale facile synthesis of 7-methyl guanosine 5'-diphosphate, which plays an important role in synthesis of various mRNA cap analogs. An efficient and selective methylation at position 7 of guanosine 5'-diphosphate was achieved by dissolving guanosine 5'-diphosphate in water and drops wise addition of dimethyl sulfate over a period of 1 h at room temperature. The reaction was completed within 2 h and resulted in more than a 96% yield. The desired product, 7-methyl GDP was purified by using BPG column on AKTA Purifier 100. Certainly, this method has advantages over the known methylation method, in terms of yield, economy, safety, and environmental concerns. PMID:16629126

  5. [Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension].

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Gámez, Miguel E; Sandoval-Zárate, Julio; Pulido, Tomás

    2015-01-01

    In experimental and clinical cardiology, phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5) inhibitors have brought scientific interest as a therapeutic tool in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) management in recent years. Phosphodiesterases are a superfamily of enzymes that inactivate cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate, the second messengers of prostacyclin and nitric oxide. The rationale for the use of PDE-5 inhibitors in PAH is based on their capacity to overexpresss the nitric oxide pathway pursued inhibition of cyclic guanosine monophosphate hydrolysis. By increasing cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels it promotes vasodilation, antiproliferative and pro-apoptotic effects that may reverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. There is also evidence that these drugs may directly enhance right ventricular contractility through an increase in cyclic adenosine monophosphate mediated by the inhibition of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate -sensitive PDE-3. Sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil are 3 specific PDE-5 inhibitors in current clinical use, which share similar mechanisms of action but present some significant differences regarding potency, selectivity for PDE-5 and pharmacokinetic properties. Sildenafil received approval in 2005 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency and tadalafil in 2009 by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of PAH in patients classified as NYHA/WHO functional class II and III. In Mexico, sildenafil and tadalafil were approved by Comisión Federal de Protección contra Riesgos Sanitarios for this indication in 2010 and 2011, respectively. PMID:26047999

  6. THE EFFECT OF CHLORINATION OF NUCLEOTIDE BASES ON THE CONFORMATIONAL PROPERTIES OF THYMIDINE MONOPHOSPHATE.

    PubMed

    Mukhina, T M; Nikolaienko, T Yu

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on Escherichia coli bacteria cultivation, in which DNA thymine was replaced with 5-chlorouracil have refreshed the problem of understanding the changes to physical properties of DNA monomers resultant from chemical modifications. These studies have shown that the replacement did not affect the normal activities and division of the bacteria, but has significantly reduced its life span. In this paper a comparative analysis was carried out by the methods of computational experiment of a set of 687 possible conformers of natural monomeric DNA unit (2'-deoxyribonucleotide thymidine monophosphate) and 660 conformers of 5-chloro-2'-deoxyuridine monophosphate - a similar molecules in which the natural nitrogenous base thymine is substituted with 5-chlorouracil. Structures of stable conformers of the modified deoxyribonucleotide have been obtained and physical factors, which determine their variation from the conformers of the unmodified molecule have been analyzed. A comparative analysis of the elastic properties of conformers of investigated molecules and non-covalent interactions present in them was conducted. The results can be usedfor planning experiments on synthesis of artficial DNA suitable for incorporation into living organisms. PMID:26255348

  7. Structural Studies of Thiamin Monophosphate Kinase in Complex with Substrates and Products.

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloch, K.M.; Kinsland, C.; Begley, T.P.; Ealick, S E.

    2008-06-03

    Thiamin monophosphate kinase (ThiL) catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of thiamin monophosphate (TMP) to form thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP), the active form of vitamin B1. ThiL is a member of a small ATP binding superfamily that also includes the purine biosynthetic enzymes, PurM and PurL, NiFe hydrogenase maturation protein, HypE, and selenophosphate synthase, SelD. The latter four enzymes are believed to utilize phosphorylated intermediates during catalysis. To understand the mechanism of ThiL and its relationship to the other superfamily members, we determined the structure of Aquifex aeolicus ThiL (AaThiL) with nonhydrolyzable AMP-PCP and TMP, and also with the products of the reaction, ADP and TPP. The results suggest that AaThiL utilizes a direct, inline transfer of the {gamma}-phosphate of ATP to TMP rather than a phosphorylated enzyme intermediate. The structure of ThiL is compared to those of PurM, PurL, and HypE, and the ATP binding site is compared to that of PurL, for which nucleotide complexes are available.

  8. Lipid peroxides as endogenous oxidants forming 8-oxo-guanosine and lipid-soluble antioxidants as suppressing agents

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Miku; Kanazawa, Ko; Ishigaki, Yoriko; Aihara, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Mizuno, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    The oxidation of guanosine to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA is closely associated with induction of various diseases, but the endogenous oxidant species involved remains unclear. Hydrogen peroxides (H2O2) have been considered to be the oxidant, while lipid peroxides are another possible oxidant because generated easily in bio-membranes surrounding DNA. The oxidant potency was compared between lipid peroxides and H2O2. Linoleic acid hydroperoxides (LOOH) formed 8-oxo-dG at a higher level than H2O2 in guanosine or double-stranded DNA. In the presence of a physiological concentration of Fe2+ to produce hydroxyl radicals, LOOH was also a stronger oxidant. In a lipid micelle, LOOH markedly produced 8-oxo-dG at a concentration one-tenth of that of H2O2. Upon adding to rat hepatic mitochondria, phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides produced 8-oxo-dG abundantly. Employing HepG2 cells after pretreated with glutathione peroxidase inhibitor, LOOH formed 8-oxo-dG more abundantly than H2O2. Then, antioxidants to suppress the 8-oxo-dG formation were examined, when the nuclei of pre-incubated HepG2 with antioxidants were exposed to LOOH. Water-soluble ascorbic acid, trolox, and N-acetyl cysteine showed no or weak antioxidant potency, while lipid-soluble 2,6-dipalmitoyl ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, and lipid-soluble phytochemicals exhibited stronger potency. The present study shows preferential formation of 8-oxo-dG upon LOOH and the inhibition by lipid-soluble antioxidants. PMID:27499574

  9. Lipid peroxides as endogenous oxidants forming 8-oxo-guanosine and lipid-soluble antioxidants as suppressing agents.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Kazuki; Sakamoto, Miku; Kanazawa, Ko; Ishigaki, Yoriko; Aihara, Yoshiko; Hashimoto, Takashi; Mizuno, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    The oxidation of guanosine to 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxo-dG) in DNA is closely associated with induction of various diseases, but the endogenous oxidant species involved remains unclear. Hydrogen peroxides (H2O2) have been considered to be the oxidant, while lipid peroxides are another possible oxidant because generated easily in bio-membranes surrounding DNA. The oxidant potency was compared between lipid peroxides and H2O2. Linoleic acid hydroperoxides (LOOH) formed 8-oxo-dG at a higher level than H2O2 in guanosine or double-stranded DNA. In the presence of a physiological concentration of Fe(2+) to produce hydroxyl radicals, LOOH was also a stronger oxidant. In a lipid micelle, LOOH markedly produced 8-oxo-dG at a concentration one-tenth of that of H2O2. Upon adding to rat hepatic mitochondria, phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides produced 8-oxo-dG abundantly. Employing HepG2 cells after pretreated with glutathione peroxidase inhibitor, LOOH formed 8-oxo-dG more abundantly than H2O2. Then, antioxidants to suppress the 8-oxo-dG formation were examined, when the nuclei of pre-incubated HepG2 with antioxidants were exposed to LOOH. Water-soluble ascorbic acid, trolox, and N-acetyl cysteine showed no or weak antioxidant potency, while lipid-soluble 2,6-dipalmitoyl ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, and lipid-soluble phytochemicals exhibited stronger potency. The present study shows preferential formation of 8-oxo-dG upon LOOH and the inhibition by lipid-soluble antioxidants. PMID:27499574

  10. Neomycin inhibits the phosphatidylinositol monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate stimulation of plasma membrane ATPase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Qiuyun; Boss, W.F. )

    1991-05-01

    The inositol phospholipids, phosphatidylinositol monophosphate (PIP) and phosphatidylinositol bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}), have been shown to increase the vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity of plant plasma membranes. In this paper, the authors show the effect of various concentrations of phosphatidyinositol, PIP, and PIP{sub 2} on the plasma membrane vanadate-sensitive ATPase activity. PIP and PIP{sub 2} at concentrations at 10 nanomoles per 30 microgram membrane protein per milliliter of reaction mixture caused a twofold and 1.8-fold increase in the ATPase activity, respectively. The effect of these negatively charged phospholipids on the ATPase activity was inhibited by adding the positively charged aminoglycoside, neomycin. Neomycin did not affect the endogenous plasma membrane ATPase activity in the absence of exogenous lipids.

  11. Structural determinants for the inhibitory ligands of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    SciTech Connect

    Meza-Avina, Maria Elena; Wei, Lianhu; Liu, Yan; Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M.; Mishra, Ram K.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2010-06-14

    In recent years, orotidine-5{prime}-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) has gained renewed attention as a drug target. As a part of continuing efforts to design novel inhibitors of ODCase, we undertook a comprehensive study of potent, structurally diverse ligands of ODCase and analyzed their structural interactions in the active site of ODCase. These ligands comprise of pyrazole or pyrimidine nucleotides including the mononucleotide derivatives of pyrazofurin, barbiturate ribonucleoside, and 5-cyanouridine, as well as, in a computational approach, 1,4-dihydropyridine-based non-nucleoside inhibitors such as nifedipine and nimodipine. All these ligands bind in the active site of ODCase exhibiting distinct interactions paving the way to design novel inhibitors against this interesting enzyme. We propose an empirical model for the ligand structure for rational modifications in new drug design and potentially new lead structures.

  12. TAOK3 Phosphorylates the Methylenecyclopropane Nucleoside MBX 2168 to its Monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Komazin-Meredith, Gloria; Cardinale, Steven C.; Comeau, Katelyn; Magalhaes, Kevin J.; Hartline, Caroll B.; Williams, John D.; Opperman, Timothy J.; Prichard, Mark N.; Bowlin, Terry L.

    2015-01-01

    Monohydroxymethyl methylenecyclopropane nucleosides (MCPNs) with ether or thioether substituents at the 6-position show promise as broad-spectrum herpes virus inhibitors. Their proposed mechanism of action involves sequential phosphorylation to a triphosphate, which can then inhibit viral DNA polymerase. The inhibition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) by these compounds is not dependent on the viral thymidine kinase (TK), which is known to phosphorylate acyclovir (ACV), a standard treatment for HSV infections. Previous studies on the mechanism of action of these compounds against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) implicated a host kinase in addition to HCMV UL97 kinase in performing the initial phosphorylation. After first eliminating other candidate HSV-1 encoded kinases (UL13 and US3) as well as potential host nucleoside kinases, using activity-based fractionation, we have now identified the host serine-threonine protein kinase TAOK3 as the kinase responsible for transforming the representative monohydroxymethyl MCPN analog MBX 2168 to its monophosphate. PMID:25857706

  13. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate waves in dictyostelium discoideum: a demonstration by isotope dilution-fluorography

    SciTech Connect

    Tomchik, K.J.; Devreotes, P.N.

    1981-04-24

    The distribution of adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in fields of aggregating amoebae of Dictyostelium discoidenum was examined by a novel isotope dilution-fluorographic technique. Cellular cyclic AMP was visualized by its competition with exogenous /sup 3/H-labeled cyclic AMP for high-affinity binding sites on protein kinase immobilized on a Millipore filter used to blot the monolayer. The cyclic AMP was distributed in spiral or concentric circular wave patterns which centered on the foci of the aggregations. These patterns were correlated with those of cell shape change that propagate through the monolayers. These observations support the hypothesis that the aggregation process in Dictyostelium is mediated by the periodic relay of cyclic AMP signals and suggest a simple scheme for the dynamics of the aggregation process.

  14. Corticosteroid-Responsive Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Fludarabine Monophosphate: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rudzianskiene, Milda; Griniute, Rasa; Juozaityte, Elona; Inciura, Arturas; Rudzianskas, Viktoras; Emilia Kiavialaitis, Greta

    2012-01-01

    Fludarabine monophosphate is an effective drug for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. Myelosuppression, opportunistic infections, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are the most common side effects of fludarabine. Herein we report a 55-year-old female that presented with fever and dyspnea after completing her third cycle of FMD (fludarabine, mitoxantrone, and dexamethasone) chemotherapy for stage IV non-Hodgkin follicular lymphoma. Chest X-ray revealed bilateral pneumofibrotic changes and chest CT showed bilateral diffuse interstitial changes with fibrotic alterations. No evidence of infectious agents was noted. The patient had a reduced carbon monoxide transfer factor (45%). Her symptoms and radiographic findings resolved following treatment with prednisolone. The literature contains several cases of fludarabine-associated interstitial pulmonary toxicity that responded to steroid therapy. Fludarabine-induced pulmonary toxicity is reversible with cessation of the drug and administration of glucocorticosteroids. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:24385727

  15. Structural Determinants for Inhibitory Ligands of Orotidine-5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Avina, Maria Elena; Wei, Lianhu; Liu, Yan; Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M.; Mishra, Ram K.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) has gained renewed attention as a drug target. As a part of continuing efforts to design novel inhibitors of ODCase, we undertook a comprehensive study of potent, structurally diverse ligands of ODCase and analyzed their structural interactions in the active site of ODCase. These ligands comprise of pyrazole or pyrimidine nucleotides including the mononucleotide derivatives of pyrazofurin, barbiturate ribonucleoside, and 5-cyanouridine, as well as, in a computational approach, 1,4-dihydropyridine-based non-nucleoside inhibitors such as nifedipine and nimodipine. All these ligands bind in the active site of ODCase exhibiting distinct interactions paving the way to design novel inhibitors against this interesting enzyme. We propose an empirical model for the ligand structure for rational modifications in new drug design and potentially new lead structures. PMID:20452222

  16. Adenosine monophosphate deaminase 3 activation shortens erythrocyte half-life and provides malaria resistance in mice.

    PubMed

    Hortle, Elinor; Nijagal, Brunda; Bauer, Denis C; Jensen, Lora M; Ahn, Seong Beom; Cockburn, Ian A; Lampkin, Shelley; Tull, Dedreia; McConville, Malcolm J; McMorran, Brendan J; Foote, Simon J; Burgio, Gaetan

    2016-09-01

    The factors that determine red blood cell (RBC) lifespan and the rate of RBC aging have not been fully elucidated. In several genetic conditions, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and G6PD deficiency, erythrocyte lifespan is significantly shortened. Many of these diseases are also associated with protection from severe malaria, suggesting a role for accelerated RBC senescence and clearance in malaria resistance. Here, we report a novel, N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea-induced mutation that causes a gain of function in adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD3). Mice carrying the mutation exhibit rapid RBC turnover, with increased erythropoiesis, dramatically shortened RBC lifespan, and signs of increased RBC senescence/eryptosis, suggesting a key role for AMPD3 in determining RBC half-life. Mice were also found to be resistant to infection with the rodent malaria Plasmodium chabaudi. We propose that resistance to P. chabaudi is mediated by increased RBC turnover and higher rates of erythropoiesis during infection. PMID:27465915

  17. TAOK3 phosphorylates the methylenecyclopropane nucleoside MBX 2168 to its monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Komazin-Meredith, Gloria; Cardinale, Steven C; Comeau, Katelyn; Magalhaes, Kevin J; Hartline, Caroll B; Williams, John D; Opperman, Timothy J; Prichard, Mark N; Bowlin, Terry L

    2015-07-01

    Monohydroxymethyl methylenecyclopropane nucleosides (MCPNs) with ether or thioether substituents at the 6-position show promise as broad-spectrum herpes virus inhibitors. Their proposed mechanism of action involves sequential phosphorylation to a triphosphate, which can then inhibit viral DNA polymerase. The inhibition of herpes simplex virus (HSV) by these compounds is not dependent on the viral thymidine kinase (TK), which is known to phosphorylate acyclovir (ACV), a standard treatment for HSV infections. Previous studies on the mechanism of action of these compounds against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) implicated a host kinase in addition to HCMV UL97 kinase in performing the initial phosphorylation. After first eliminating other candidate HSV-1 encoded kinases (UL13 and US3) as well as potential host nucleoside kinases, using activity-based fractionation, we have now identified the host serine-threonine protein kinase TAOK3 as the kinase responsible for transforming the representative monohydroxymethyl MCPN analog MBX 2168 to its monophosphate. PMID:25857706

  18. Site-selective DNA hydrolysis by Ce(IV)-EDTA with the use of one oligonucleotide additive bearing two monophosphates.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wen; Komiyama, Makoto

    2005-10-01

    Two deoxyuridine derivatives each bearing a monophosphate group at the 5-position with a C3 linker, were incorporated into an oligonucleotide. By using this modified oligonucleotide, a bulge was formed at a predetermined position in a DNA substrate, and two monophosphate groups were placed at both junctions of the bulge. Upon treatment of the mixture with Ce(IV)-EDTA at pH 7.0, the phosphodiester linkages at the bulge site were selectively and efficiently hydrolyzed. The monophosphate groups introduced into the bulge site greatly accelerated site-selective DNA scission. Compared with the previously reported two-additive system, which combines two oligonucleotide additives each with a monophosphate at their termini, the present one-additive system is simpler and more convenient. Furthermore, site-selective DNA hydrolysis by using this one-additive system is successful even at high reaction temperatures (e.g., 55 degrees C). This reflects the thermodynamic stability of the duplexes formed between the substrate and the additive DNA. PMID:16196014

  19. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  20. Involvement of nitric oxide pathway in the PAF-induced relaxation of rat thoracic aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Moritoki, H.; Hisayama, T.; Takeuchi, S.; Miyano, H.; Kondoh, W.

    1992-01-01

    1. The mechanism of the vasorelaxant effect of platelet activating factor (PAF) on rat thoracic aorta and the effect of aging on the PAF-induced relaxation were investigated. 2. PAF at concentrations causing relaxation induced marked increases in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) production, but did not induce an increase in adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP). 3. Removal of the endothelium by mechanical rubbing, and treatment with the PAF antagonists CV-3988, CV-6209 and FR-900452, the nitric oxide biosynthesis inhibitor, NG-nitro L-arginine, the radical scavenger, haemoglobin, and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, methylene blue, inhibited PAF-induced relaxation and abolished or attenuated PAF-stimulated cyclic GMP production. 4. The relaxation was greatest in arteries from rats aged 4 weeks. With an increase in age, the response of the arteries to PAF was attenuated. 5. Endothelium-dependent cyclic GMP production also decreased with increase in age of the rats. 6. These results suggest that PAF stimulates production of nitric oxide from L-arginine by acting on the PAF receptors in the endothelium, which in turn stimulates soluble guanylate cyclase in the smooth muscle cells, and so increases production of cyclic GMP, thus relaxing the arteries. Age-associated decrease in PAF-induced relaxation may result from a reduction of cyclic GMP formation. PMID:1358382

  1. Oxidatively damaged guanosine in white blood cells and in urine of welders: associations with exposure to welding fumes and body iron stores.

    PubMed

    Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Koch, Holger M; Marczynski, Boleslaw; Casjens, Swaantje; Käfferlein, Heiko U; Welge, Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Behrens, Thomas; Raulf, Monika; Hartwig, Andrea; Weiss, Tobias; Brüning, Thomas

    2015-08-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer considers the carcinogenicity of welding fume of priority for re-evaluation. Genotoxic effects in experimental animals are still inconclusive. Here, we investigated the association of personal exposure to metals in respirable welding fumes during a working shift with oxidatively damaged guanosine in DNA of white blood cells (WBC) and in postshift urine samples from 238 welders. Medians of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodGuo) were 2.35/10(6) dGuo in DNA of WBC and 4.33 µg/g creatinine in urine. The median of 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanosine (8-oxoGuo) was 7.03 µg/g creatinine in urine. The extent of both urinary parameters was higher in welders applying techniques with high particle emission rates to stainless steel than in tungsten inert gas welders (8-oxodGuo: 9.96 vs. 4.49 µg/L, 8-oxoGuo: 15.7 vs. 7.7 µg/L), but this apparent difference diminished after creatinine adjustment. We applied random intercept models to estimate the influence of airborne and systemic exposure to metals on oxidatively damaged guanosine in WBC and urine together with covariates. We observed a highly significant nonlinear association of urinary 8-oxoGuo with serum ferritin (P < 0.0001) and higher 8-oxoGuo concentrations for respirable iron >1,000 µg/m(3) compared to ≤57 µg/m(3). Similar effects were found for manganese. Airborne chromium but not nickel was associated with all oxidatively modified guanosine measures, whereas urinary chromium as well as nickel showed associations with urinary modified guanosines. In summary, oxidatively damaged urinary guanosine was associated with airborne and systemic exposure to metals in welders and showed a strong relation to body iron stores. PMID:25107450

  2. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-01-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  3. Enhanced Production of Adenosine Triphosphate by Pharmacological Activation of Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Ameliorates Acetaminophen-Induced Liver Injury.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jung Hwan; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Noh, Jung-Ran; Choi, Dong-Hee; Kim, Kyoung-Shim; Lee, Chul-Ho

    2015-10-01

    The hepatic cell death induced by acetaminophen (APAP) is closely related to cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) depletion, which is mainly caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key sensor of low energy status. AMPK regulates metabolic homeostasis by stimulating catabolic metabolism and suppressing anabolic pathways to increase cellular energy levels. We found that the decrease in active phosphorylation of AMPK in response to APAP correlates with decreased ATP levels, in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesized that the enhanced production of ATP via AMPK stimulation can lead to amelioration of APAP-induced liver failure. A769662, an allosteric activator of AMPK, produced a strong synergistic effect on AMPK Thr172 phosphorylation with APAP in primary hepatocytes and liver tissue. Interestingly, activation of AMPK by A769662 ameliorated the APAP-induced hepatotoxicity in C57BL/6N mice treated with APAP at a dose of 400 mg/kg intraperitoneally. However, mice treated with APAP alone developed massive centrilobular necrosis, and APAP increased their serum alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase levels. Furthermore, A769662 administration prevented the loss of intracellular ATP without interfering with the APAP-mediated reduction of mitochondrial dysfunction. In contrast, inhibition of glycolysis by 2-deoxy-glucose eliminated the beneficial effects of A769662 on APAP-mediated liver injury. In conclusion, A769662 can effectively protect mice against APAP-induced liver injury through ATP synthesis by anaerobic glycolysis. Furthermore, stimulation of AMPK may have potential therapeutic application for APAP overdose. PMID:26434492

  4. Comparative Structural Dynamics of tRNA(Phe) with Respect to Hinge Region Methylated Guanosine: A Computational Approach.

    PubMed

    Sonawane, Kailas D; Bavi, Rohit S; Sambhare, Susmit B; Fandilolu, Prayagraj M

    2016-06-01

    Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) contain various uniquely modified nucleosides thought to be useful for maintaining the structural stability of tRNAs. However, their significance for upholding the tRNA structure has not been investigated in detail at the atomic level. In this study, molecular dynamic simulations have been performed to assess the effects of methylated nucleic acid bases, N (2)-methylguanosine (m(2)G) and N (2)-N (2)-dimethylguanosine (m 2 (2) G) at position 26, i.e., the hinge region of E. coli tRNA(Phe) on its structure and dynamics. The results revealed that tRNA(Phe) having unmodified guanosine in the hinge region (G26) shows structural rearrangement in the core of the molecule, resulting in lack of base stacking interactions, U-turn feature of the anticodon loop, and TΨC loop. We show that in the presence of the unmodified guanosine, the overall fold of tRNA(Phe) is essentially not the same as that of m(2)G26 and m 2 (2) G26 containing tRNA(Phe). This structural rearrangement arises due to intrinsic factors associated with the weak hydrogen-bonding patterns observed in the base triples of the tRNA(Phe) molecule. The m(2)G26 and m 2 (2) G26 containing tRNA(Phe) retain proper three-dimensional fold through tertiary interactions. Single-point energy and molecular electrostatics potential calculation studies confirmed the structural significance of tRNAs containing m(2)G26 and m 2 (2) G26 compared to tRNA with normal G26, showing that the mono-methylated (m(2)G26) and dimethylated (m 2 (2) G26) modifications are required to provide structural stability not only in the hinge region but also in the other parts of tRNA(Phe). Thus, the present study allows us to better understand the effects of modified nucleosides and ionic environment on tRNA folding. PMID:27216172

  5. Guanosine may increase absence epileptic activity by means of A2A adenosine receptors in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    PubMed

    Lakatos, Renáta Krisztina; Dobolyi, Árpád; Todorov, Mihail Ivilinov; Kékesi, Katalin A; Juhász, Gábor; Aleksza, Magdolna; Kovács, Zsolt

    2016-06-01

    The non-adenosine nucleoside guanosine (Guo) was demonstrated to decrease quinolinic acid(QA)-induced seizures, spontaneously emerged absence epileptic seizures and lipopolysaccharide(LPS)-evoked induction of absence epileptic seizures suggesting its antiepileptic potential. It was also described previously that intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 20 and 50mg/kg Guo decreased the number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) in a well investigated model of human absence epilepsy, the Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats during 4th (20mg/kg Guo) and 3rd as well as 4th (50mg/kg Guo) measuring hours. Guanosine can potentially decrease SWD number by means of its putative receptors but absence epileptic activity changing effects of Guo by means of increased extracellular adenosine (Ado) cannot be excluded. An increase in the dose of i.p. injected Guo is limited by its low solubility in saline, therefore, we addressed in the present study whether higher doses of Guo, diluted in sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution, have more potent antiepileptic effect in WAG/Rij rats. We confirmed that i.p. 50mg/kg Guo decreased but, surprisingly, i.p. 100mg/kg Guo enhanced the number of SWDs in WAG/Rij rats. Combined i.p. injection of a non-selective Ado receptor antagonist theophylline (5mg/kg) or a selective Ado A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonist SCH 58261 (7-(2-phenylethyl)-5-amino-2-(2-furyl)-pyrazolo-[4,3-e]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine) (1mg/kg) and a cyclooxygenase 1 and 2/COX-1 and COX-2 inhibitor indomethacin (10mg/kg) with 100mg/kg Guo decreased the SWD number compared to i.p. 100mg/kg Guo alone. The results suggest that i.p. 100mg/kg Guo can increase SWD number by means of the adenosinergic system. PMID:27154620

  6. Antidepressant effect of pramipexole in mice forced swimming test: A cross talk between dopamine receptor and NMDA/nitric oxide/cGMP pathway.

    PubMed

    Ostadhadi, Sattar; Imran Khan, Muhammad; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Dehpour, Ahmad-Reza

    2016-07-01

    Pramipexole is a dopamine D2 receptor agonist indicated for treating Parkinson disorder. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of pramipexole in forced swimming test (FST) in mice and the possible involvement of activation of D2 receptors and inhibition of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors and nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (NO-cGMP) on this effect. Intraperitoneal administration of pramipexole (1-3mg/kg) reduced the immobility time in the FST similar to fluoxetine (20mg/kg, i.p.). This effect of pramipexole (1mg/kg, i.p.) was ceased when mice were pretreated with haloperidol (0.15mg/kg, i.p,) and sulpiride (5mg/kg, i.p) as D2 receptor antagonists, NMDA (75mg/kg,i.p.), l-arginine (750mg/kg, i.p., a substrate for nitric oxide synthase) or sildenafil (5mg/kg, i.p., a phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor). The administration of MK-801 (0.05mg/kg, i.p., a NMDA receptor antagonist) l-NG-Nitro arginine methyl ester (l-NAME, 10mg/kg, i.p., a non-specific nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor), 7-nitroindazole (30mg/kg, i.p., a neuronal NOS inhibitor) and methylene blue (10mg/kg, i.p.), an inhibitor of both NOS and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) in combination with the sub-effective dose of pramipexole (0.3mg/kg, i.p.) reduced the immobility. Altogether, our data suggest that the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole is dependent on the activation of D2 receptor and inhibition of either NMDA receptors and/or NO-cGMP synthesis. These results contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant-like effect of pramipexole and reinforce the role of D2 receptors, NMDA receptors and l-arginine-NO-GMP pathway in the antidepressant mechanism of this agent. PMID:27261607

  7. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP.

    PubMed

    Khrenova, Maria G; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted. PMID:27214270

  8. Theoretical vibrational spectroscopy of intermediates and the reaction mechanism of the guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis by the protein complex Ras-GAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khrenova, Maria G.; Grigorenko, Bella L.; Nemukhin, Alexander V.

    2016-09-01

    The structures and vibrational spectra of the reacting species upon guanosine triphosphate (GTP) hydrolysis to guanosine diphosphate and inorganic phosphate (Pi) trapped inside the protein complex Ras-GAP were analyzed following the results of QM/MM simulations. The frequencies of the phosphate vibrations referring to the reactants and to Pi were compared to those observed in the experimental FTIR studies. A good correlation between the theoretical and experimental vibrational data provides a strong support to the reaction mechanism of GTP hydrolysis by the Ras-GAP enzyme system revealed by the recent QM/MM modeling. Evolution of the vibrational bands associated with the inorganic phosphate Pi during the elementary stages of GTP hydrolysis is predicted.

  9. Syntheses of 5'-Nucleoside Monophosphate Derivatives with Unique Aminal, Hemiaminal, and Hemithioaminal Functionalities: A New Class of 5'-Peptidyl Nucleotides.

    PubMed

    De, Swarup; Groaz, Elisabetta; Margamuljana, Lia; Herdewijn, Piet

    2016-06-01

    A number of synthetically useful transformations have been developed to generate novel 5'-peptidyl nucleoside monophosphate analogues that incorporate sensitive phosphoaminal, -hemiaminal or -hemithioaminal functionalities. The strategies adopted entailed the coupling between dipeptides, which enclose a reactive Cα-functionalized glycine residue and phosphate or phosphorothioate moieties. These developments led to potentially powerful and general methodologies for the preparation of α-phosphorylated pseudopeptides as well as nucleoside monophosphate mimics. The resulting conjugates are of interest for a variety of important applications, which range from drug development to synthetic biology, as pronucleotides or artificial building blocks for the enzymatic synthesis of xenobiotic information systems. The potential of all dipeptide-TMP conjugates as pyrophosphate mimics in the DNA polymerization reaction was tested, and the influence of the nature of the linker was evaluated by in vitro chain elongation assay in the presence of wild-type microbial DNA polymerases. PMID:27136602

  10. Peroxynitrite-Dependent Zinc Release and Inactivation of Guanosine 5′-Triphosphate Cyclohydrolase 1 Instigate Its Ubiquitination in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yu; Wu, Jiliang; Zhu, Huaiping; Song, Ping; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant degradation of guanosine 5′-triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GTPCH1) with consequent deficiency of tetrahydrobiopterin is considered the primary cause for endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. How GTPCH1 becomes susceptible to the degradation remains unknown. We hypothesized that oxidation and release of the zinc ion by peroxynitrite (ONOO−), a potent oxidant generated by nitric oxide and superoxide anions, instigates GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation. Zinc contents, GTPCH1 ubiquitination, and GTPCH1 activity were assayed in purified GTPCH1, endothelial cells, and hearts from diabetic mice. Exogenous ONOO− dose-dependently released zinc, inhibited its activity, and increased the ubiquitin binding affinity of GTPCH1 in vitro and in endothelial cells. Consistently, high glucose (30 mmol/L) inhibited GTPCH1 activity with increased ubiquitination, which was inhibited by antioxidants. Furthermore, mutation of the zinc-binding cysteine (141) (C141R or C141A) significantly reduced GTPCH1 activity and reduced its half-life but increased GTPCH1 ubiquitination, indicating an essential role of the zinc ion in maintaining the catalytic activity and stability of GTPCH1. Finally, GTPCH1 ubiquitination and degradation markedly increased in parallel with decreased GTPCH1 activity in the aortas and hearts of diabetic mice, both of which were attenuated by the inhibitors of ONOO− in mice in vivo. Taken together, we conclude that ONOO− releases zinc and inhibits GTPCH1, resulting in its ubiquitination and degradation of the enzyme. PMID:23974923

  11. Length of guanosine homopolymeric repeats modulates promoter activity of subfamily II tpr genes of Treponema pallidum ssp. pallidum.

    PubMed

    Giacani, Lorenzo; Lukehart, Sheila; Centurion-Lara, Arturo

    2007-11-01

    In Treponema pallidum, homopolymeric guanosine repeats of varying length are present upstream of both Subfamily I (tprC, D, F and I) and II (tprE, G and J) tpr genes, a group of potential virulence factors, immediately upstream of the +1 nucleotide. To investigate the influence of these poly-G sequences on promoter activity, tprE, G, J, F and I promoter regions containing homopolymeric tracts with different numbers of Gs, the ribosomal binding site and start codon were cloned in frame with the green fluorescent protein reporter gene (GFP), and promoter activity was measured both as fluorescence emission from Escherichia coli cultures transformed with the different plasmid constructs and using quantitative RT-PCR. For tprJ, G and E-derived clones, fluorescence was significantly higher with constructs containing eight Gs or fewer, while plasmids containing the same promoters with none or more Gs gave modest or no signal above the background. In contrast, tprF/I-derived clones induced similar levels of fluorescence regardless of the number of Gs within the promoter. GFP mRNA quantification showed that all of the promoters induced measurable transcription of the GFP gene; however, only for Subfamily II promoters was message synthesis inversely correlated to the number of Gs in the construct. PMID:17683506

  12. Synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose, guanosine diphosphate glucose, and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine under primitive Earth conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mar, A.; Oro, J.

    1991-01-01

    The nonenzymatic synthesis of the coenzymes adenosine diphosphate glucose (ADPG), guanosine diphosphate glucose (GDPG), and cytidine diphosphoethanolamine (CDP-ethanolamine) has been carried out under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the early Earth. The production of these compounds was performed by allowing simple precursor molecules to react under aqueous solutions, at moderate temperatures and short periods of time, with mediation by cyanamide or urea. These two condensing agents are considered to have been present in significant amounts on the primitive Earth and have been previously used in the nonenzymatic synthesis of several other important biochemical compounds. In our experiments, ADPG was obtained by heating glucose-1-phosphate (G1P) and ATP in the presence of cyanamide for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The reaction of G1P and GTP under the same conditions yielded GDPG. The cyanamide-mediated production of CDP-ethanolamine was carried out by reacting a mixture of ethanolamine phosphate and CTP for 24 h at 70 degrees C. The separation and identification of the reaction products was carried out by paper chromatography, thin-layer chromatography, high performance thin-layer chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, both normal and reverse-phase, UV spectroscopy, enzymatic assays, and acid hydrolysis. Due to the mild conditions employed, and to the relative ease of these reactions, these studies offer a simple attractive system for the nonenzymatic synthesis of phosphorylated high-energy metabolic intermediates under conditions considered to have been prevalent on the ancient Earth.

  13. Non-adenosine nucleoside inosine, guanosine and uridine as promising antiepileptic drugs: a summary of current literature.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, Zsolt; Kekesi, Katalin A; Juhasz, Gabor; Barna, Janos; Heja, Laszlo; Lakatos, Renata; Dobolyi, Arpad

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine (Ado) and some non-adenosine (non-Ado) nucleosides including inosine (Ino), guanosine (Guo) and uridine (Urd) are modulatory molecules in the central nervous system (CNS), regulating different physiological and pathophysiological processes in the brain such as sleep and epilepsy. Indeed, different drugs effective on adenosinergic system (e.g., Ado metabolism inhibitors, agonists and antagonists of Ado receptors) are being used in drug development for the treatment of epileptic disorders. Although (i) endogenous Ino, Guo and Urd showed anticonvulsant/antiepileptic effects (e.g., in quinolinic acid - induced seizures and in different epilepsy models such as hippocampal kindling models), and (ii) there is a need to generate new and more effective antiepileptic drugs for the treatment of drug-resistant epilepsies, our knowledge about antiepileptic influence of non-Ado nucleosides is far from complete. Thus, in this review article, we give a short summary of anticonvulsant/antiepileptic effects and mechanisms evoked by Ino, Guo, and Urd. Finally, we discuss some non-Ado nucleoside derivatives and their structures, which may be candidates as potential antiepileptic agents. PMID:25382017

  14. Intranasal guanosine administration presents a wide therapeutic time window to reduce brain damage induced by permanent ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Denise Barbosa; Muller, Gabriel Cardozo; Rocha, Guilherme Botter Maio; Dellavia, Gustavo Hirata; Almeida, Roberto Farina; Pettenuzzo, Leticia Ferreira; Loureiro, Samanta Oliveira; Hansel, Gisele; Horn, Ângelo Cássio Magalhães; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Ganzella, Marcelo

    2016-03-01

    In addition to its intracellular roles, the nucleoside guanosine (GUO) also has extracellular effects that identify it as a putative neuromodulator signaling molecule in the central nervous system. Indeed, GUO can modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission, and it can promote neuroprotective effects in animal models involving glutamate neurotoxicity, which is the case in brain ischemia. In the present study, we aimed to investigate a new in vivo GUO administration route (intranasal, IN) to determine putative improvement of GUO neuroprotective effects against an experimental model of permanent focal cerebral ischemia. Initially, we demonstrated that IN [(3)H] GUO administration reached the brain in a dose-dependent and saturable pattern in as few as 5 min, presenting a higher cerebrospinal GUO level compared with systemic administration. IN GUO treatment started immediately or even 3 h after ischemia onset prevented behavior impairment. The behavior recovery was not correlated to decreased brain infarct volume, but it was correlated to reduced mitochondrial dysfunction in the penumbra area. Therefore, we showed that the IN route is an efficient way to promptly deliver GUO to the CNS and that IN GUO treatment prevented behavioral and brain impairment caused by ischemia in a therapeutically wide time window. PMID:26695181

  15. Novel interactions of fluorinated nucleotide derivatives targeting orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melissa; Avina, Maria Elena Meza; Wei, Lianhu; Crandall, Ian E.; Bello, Angelica Mara; Poduch, Ewa; Liu, Yan; Paige, Christopher J.; Kain, Kevin C.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorinated nucleosides and nucleotides are of considerable interest to medicinal chemists due to their antiviral, anticancer, and other biological activities. However, their direct interactions at target binding sites are not well understood. A new class of 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-C6-substituted uridine and UMP derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase). These compounds were synthesized from the key intermediate, fully-protected 2′-deoxy-2′-fluorouridine. Among the synthesized compounds, 2′-deoxy-2′-fluoro-6-iodo-UMP covalently inhibited human ODCase with a second-order rate constant of 0.62 ± 0.02 M−1sec−1. Interestingly, the 6-cyano-2′-fluoro derivative covalently interacted with ODCase defying the conventional thinking, where its ribosyl derivative undergoes transformation into BMP by ODCase. This confirms that the 2′-fluoro moiety influences the chemistry at the C6 position of the nucleotides, thus interactions in the active site of ODCase. Molecular interactions of the 2′-fluorinated nucleotides are compared to those with the 3′-fluorinated nucleotides bound to the corresponding target enzyme, and the carbohydrate moieties were shown to bind in different conformations. PMID:21417464

  16. Selective and potent urea inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′ monophosphate dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Liu, Xiaoping; Sharling, Lisa; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Striepen, Boris; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and related species are zoonotic intracellular parasites of the intestine. Cryptosporidium is a leading cause of diarrhea in small children around the world. Infection can cause severe pathology in children and immunocompromised patients. This waterborne parasite is resistant to common methods of water treatment and therefore a prominent threat to drinking and recreation water even in countries with strong water safety systems. The drugs currently used to combat these organisms are ineffective. Genomic analysis revealed that the parasite relies solely on inosine-5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for the biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides. Herein, we report a selective urea-based inhibitor of C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) identified by high throughput screening. We performed a SAR study of these inhibitors with some analogues exhibiting high potency (IC50 < 2 nM) against CpIMPDH, excellent selectivity > 1000-fold versus human IMPDH type 2 and good stability in mouse liver microsomes. A subset of inhibitors also displayed potent antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii model. PMID:22950983

  17. Radiolysis in aqueous solution of dinucleoside monophosphates by high-energy electrons and fission neutrons.

    PubMed

    Vaishnav, Y N; Swenberg, C E

    1993-01-01

    The radiation chemistry in aqueous solution of the dinucleoside monophosphate d-[CpT] and its sequence isomer d-[TpC] in air or nitrogen was examined using different qualities and quantities of radiations. High-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to analyze the high-energy electron (13.2 MeV) exposure products or fission-neutron exposure products of d-[CpT] and d-[TpC]. A comparison of product profiles obtained from irradiated d-[CpT] and d-[TpC] suggests that, at relatively low radiation doses (50-250 Gy), products are formed by N-glycosidic or phosphodiester bond-cleavage, while at higher doses (500-1000 Gy) additional products were detected as a consequence of ring-modification mechanisms. The plots of radiation dose-yield and corresponding calculated G values of the released undamaged bases and nucleosides from d-[CpT] and d-[TpC] suggest a base-sequence dependence and a quality- and quantity-dependent response to ionizing radiation. Although the product quantities formed from sequence isomers were slightly different, we found no qualitative differences in the product formed at the lowest doses examined. PMID:8434108

  18. Coordinating properties of uridine 5'-monophosphate with selected Ln(3+) ions in ionic micellar media.

    PubMed

    Sudhiranjan Singh, M; Homendra, Naorem; Lonibala, R K

    2012-12-01

    Coordinating properties of uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) towards trivalent La, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu and Gd ions in presence of cationic and anionic micelles have been investigated by potentiometric pH-titration and spectroscopic methods. Stability constants of the 2:1 complexes have been determined and the change in free energy, enthalpy and entropy associated with the complexation are also calculated. Nd(III) complexes isolated from aqueous and aqueous-micellar media do not show any significant structural difference. Formation of Ln(III) complexes in all cases completes below pH 7.5 showing that UMP best interacts with Ln(3+) ions at the physiological pH range 7.3-7.5. The nucleobase is not involved in the complexation and the metal ion coordination of UMP is through the phosphate moiety only. Coordinating tendency of UMP with lanthanides, Nd(III) ion in particular, at different pH is also discussed. Luminescent properties of Eu(III) complex and its decay lifetime are also presented. This information may prove helpful regarding the use of lanthanides as biological probes for calcium/magnesium ions. PMID:23001701

  19. A Screening Pipeline for Antiparasitic Agents Targeting Cryptosporidium Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase

    PubMed Central

    Sharling, Lisa; Liu, Xiaoping; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Maurya, Sushil K.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Striepen, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Background The protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum is responsible for significant disease burden among children in developing countries. In addition Cryptosporidiosis can result in chronic and life-threatening enteritis in AIDS patients, and the currently available drugs lack efficacy in treating these severe conditions. The discovery and development of novel anti-cryptosporidial therapeutics has been hampered by the poor experimental tractability of this pathogen. While the genome sequencing effort has identified several intriguing new targets including a unique inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), pursuing these targets and testing inhibitors has been frustratingly difficult. Methodology and Principal Findings Here we have developed a pipeline of tools to accelerate the in vivo screening of inhibitors of C. parvum IMPDH. We have genetically engineered the related parasite Toxoplasma gondii to serve as a model of C. parvum infection as the first screen. This assay provides crucial target validation and a large signal window that is currently not possible in assays involving C. parvum. To further develop compounds that pass this first filter, we established a fluorescence-based assay of host cell proliferation, and a C. parvum growth assay that utilizes automated high-content imaging analysis for enhanced throughput. Conclusions and Significance We have used these assays to evaluate C. parvum IMPDH inhibitors emerging from our ongoing medicinal chemistry effort and have identified a subset of 1,2,3-triazole ethers that exhibit excellent in vivo selectivity in the T. gondii model and improved anti-cryptosporidial activity. PMID:20706578

  20. Structural and functional characterization of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis uridine monophosphate kinase: insights into the allosteric regulation†

    PubMed Central

    Labesse, Gilles; Benkali, Khaled; Salard-Arnaud, Isabelle; Gilles, Anne-Marie; Munier-Lehmann, Hélène

    2011-01-01

    Nucleoside Monophosphate Kinases (NMPKs) family are key enzymes in nucleotide metabolism. Bacterial UMPKs depart from the main superfamily of NMPKs. Having no eukaryotic counterparts they represent attractive therapeutic targets. They are regulated by GTP and UTP, while showing different mechanisms in Gram(+), Gram(–) and archaeal bacteria. In this work, we have characterized the mycobacterial UMPK (UMPKmt) combining enzymatic and structural investigations with site-directed mutagenesis. UMPKmt exhibits cooperativity toward ATP and an allosteric regulation by GTP and UTP. The crystal structure of the complex of UMPKmt with GTP solved at 2.5 Å, was merely identical to the modelled apo-form, in agreement with SAXS experiments. Only a small stretch of residues was affected upon nucleotide binding, pointing out the role of macromolecular dynamics rather than major structural changes in the allosteric regulation of bacterial UMPKs. We further probe allosteric regulation by site-directed mutagenesis. In particular, a key residue involved in the allosteric regulation of this enzyme was identified. PMID:21149268

  1. Cyclic diguanylate monophosphate directly binds to human siderocalin and inhibits its antibacterial activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weihui; Cui, Tao; Hu, Lihua; Wang, Ziqing; Li, Zongqiang; He, Zheng-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is a well-conserved second messenger in bacteria. During infection, the innate immune system can also sense c-di-GMP; however, whether bacterial pathogens utilize c-di-GMP as a weapon to fight against host defense for survival and possible mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. Siderocalin (LCN2) is a key antibacterial component of the innate immune system and sequesters bacterial siderophores to prevent acquisition of iron. Here we show that c-di-GMP can directly target the human LCN2 protein to inhibit its antibacterial activity. We demonstrate that c-di-GMP specifically binds to LCN2. In addition, c-di-GMP can compete with bacterial ferric siderophores to bind LCN2. Furthermore, c-di-GMP can significantly reduce LCN2-mediated inhibition on the in vitro growth of Escherichia coli. Thus, LCN2 acts as a c-di-GMP receptor. Our findings provide insight into the mechanism by which bacteria utilize c-di-GMP to interfere with the innate immune system for survival. PMID:26390966

  2. The effect of polystyrene beads on cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate concentration in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Manganiello, V; Evans, W H; Stossel, T P; Mason, R J; Vaughan, M

    1971-12-01

    After incubation with polystyrene latex beads for 5 min. the cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cyclic AMP) content of human peripheral blood leukocyte suspensions was increased severalfold. Preparations enriched in mononuclear cells and containing only 0-20% polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and no visible platelets exhibited a quantitatively similar response. Purified fractions of cells containing 85-90% PMN responded to polystyrene beads with a much smaller increase in cyclic AMP content. Phagocytosis of paraffin oil emulsion in the unfractionated mixed human leukocyte preparation was associated with little or no change in cyclic AMP levels. There was no change in cyclic AMP content of rabbit alveolar macrophages or guinea pig PMN during phagocytosis of polystyrene beads. All of these observations are consistent with the view that particle uptake per se does not increase cyclic AMP levels in phagocytic cells. It seems probable that the increase in cyclic AMP concentration that results when unfractionated human blood leukocytes are incubated with polystyrene beads occurs in cells other than PMN. PMID:4331596

  3. A Mixed-Valent Molybdenum Monophosphate with a Layer Structure: KMo 3P 2O 14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guesdon, A.; Borel, M. M.; Leclaire, A.; Grandin, A.; Raveau, B.

    1994-03-01

    A new mixed-valent molybdenum monophosphate with a layer structure KMo 3P 2O 14 has been isolated. It crystallizes in the space group P2 1/ m with a = 8.599(2) Å, b = 6.392(2) Å, c = 10.602(1) Å, and β = 111.65(2)°. The layers [Mo 3P 2O 14] ∞ are parallel to (100) and consist of [MoPO 8] ∞ chains running along limitb→ , in which one MoO 6 octahedron alternates with one PO 4 tetrahedron. In fact, four [MoPO 8] ∞ chains share the corners of their polyhedra and the edges of their octahedra, forming [Mo 4P 4O 24] ∞ columns which are linked through MoO 5 bipyramids along limitc→. The K + ions interleaved between these layers are surrounded by eight oxygens, forming bicapped trigonal prisms KO 8. Besides the unusual trigonal bipyramids MoO 5, this structure is also characterized by a tendency to the localization of the electrons, since one octahedral site is occupied by Mo(V), whereas the other octahedral site and the trigonal bipyramid are occupied by Mo(VI). The similarity of this structure with pure octahedral layer structures suggests the possibility of generating various derivatives, and of ion exchange properties.

  4. Stacking-unstacking of the dinucleoside monophosphate guanylyl-3',5'-uridine studied with molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Norberg, J; Nilsson, L

    1994-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on two conformations of the dinucleoside monophosphate guanylyl-3',5'-uridine (GpU) in aqueous solution with one sodium counterion. One stacked conformation and one with the C3'-O3'-P-O5' backbone torsion angle twisted 180 degrees to create an unstacked conformation. We observed a relatively stable behavior of the stacked conformation, which remained stacked throughout the simulation, whereas the unstacked conformation showed major changes in the backbone torsion and glycosidic angles. During the simulation the unstacked conformation transformed into a more stacked form and then back again to an unstacked one. The calculated correlation times for rotational diffusion from the molecular dynamics simulations are in agreement with fluorescence anisotropy and nuclear magnetic resonance data. As expected, the correlation times for rotational diffusion of the unstacked conformation were observed to be longer than for the stacked conformation. The 2'OH group may contribute in stabilizing the stacked conformation, where the O2'-H...O4' hydrogen bond occurred in 82.7% of the simulation. PMID:7948694

  5. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  6. Stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation causes breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier.

    PubMed

    Sen, H A; Campochiaro, P A

    1991-06-01

    Pigmented rabbits were given an intravitreous injection of 0.1 ml of various concentrations of test drug, and vitreous fluorophotometry was done 6 and 24 hr after injection. Dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and 8-bromo-cyclic AMP caused reversible intravitreous fluorescein leakage only at relatively high concentrations. Adrenergic agents that are effective stimulators of adenylate cyclase (epinephrine, isoproterenol, and norepinephrine) caused transient intravitreous fluorescein leakage (2.3-3.1-fold above baseline) that was significantly greater than that caused by phenylephrine (1.1-fold above baseline), an adrenergic agent that is a poor stimulator of adenylate cyclase. Prostaglandins E1 and E2, which are good stimulators of adenylate cyclase, caused striking disruption of the blood-ocular barriers, and prostaglandins that are not good stimulators of adenylate cyclase had little or no effect on these barriers. The magnitude of the prostaglandin E1 effect (9.3-fold above baseline) was similar to that of N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (NECA), the most potent adenosine agonist, and was greater than one would predict based on its effect on adenylate cyclase in vitro. Prostaglandin E1, like NECA, also caused retinal vasodilation and hemorrhages. These data suggest that stimulation of intracellular cyclic AMP accumulation may be a common feature of mediators that cause breakdown of the blood-retinal barrier, but there may be another as yet unexplained feature shared by PGE1 and NECA that makes them particularly effective and capable of causing retinal vasodilation and hemorrhages. PMID:1647374

  7. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of Tritrichomonas foetus inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Whitby, F G; Huete-Perez, J; Luecke, H; Wang, C C

    1995-12-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) from the protozoan parasite Tritrichomonas foetus has been expressed in E. coli and crystallized. Crystals were grown to 0.1 mm in each dimension in 18 to 72 h using ammonium sulfate and low-molecular-weight polyethylene glycols. The crystals belong to the cubic space group P432 with unit cell edge = 157.25 A. The enzyme is a homotetramer with each monomer having a molecular weight of 55,534 Da. There is one monomer per asymmetric unit, based on a volume/mass ratio of 2.7 A3/Da and self-rotation analysis. The crystals are adequately stable to allow a complete data set to be collected from a single crystal. Complete native data sets have been collected to 2.3 A resolution at 4 degrees C using synchrotron radiation. High-quality complete data extending to 3.0 A resolution have been collected from crystals of four putative derivatives, and the data appear to be isomorphous with that of the native crystals in each case. Efforts to solve the derivatives for use in MIR phasing are underway. PMID:8749858

  8. Control of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate levels by depolarizing agents in fungi.

    PubMed Central

    Trevillyan, J M; Pall, M L

    1979-01-01

    It has been reported that diverse treatments which depolarize the plasma membrane of Neurospora crassa produce rapid increases in cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) levels. In the current study, membrane active antibiotics, which are known or putative depolarizing agents, were found to produce similar cyclic AMP increases, not only in N. crassa, but also in the distantly related fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mucor racemosus. Uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation, which have been found to depolarize Neurospora, also produced cyclic AMP increases in all three fungi. The time course of the cyclic AMP response to these various treatments was similar in all three fungi. The fungal studies and studies on depolarized central nervous tissue suggest that cyclic AMP increases may be produced in response to plasma membrane depolarization in diverse eucaryotic cells. A model is proposed for eucaryotic microorganisms in which membrane depolarization serves as a signal of breakdown of the plasma membrane integrity. The subsequent cyclic AMP increase, in turn, may mediate cellular response to help protect the plasma membrane from chemical and mechanical threats to its integrity. PMID:220213

  9. A Fluorometric Activity Assay for Light-Regulated Cyclic-Nucleotide-Monophosphate Actuators.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Charlotte Helene; Körschen, Heinz G; Nicol, Christopher; Gasser, Carlos; Seifert, Reinhard; Schwärzel, Martin; Möglich, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    As a transformative approach in neuroscience and cell biology, optogenetics grants control over manifold cellular events with unprecedented spatiotemporal definition, reversibility, and noninvasiveness. Sensory photoreceptors serve as genetically encoded, light-regulated actuators and hence embody the cornerstone of optogenetics. To expand the scope of optogenetics, ever more naturally occurring photoreceptors are being characterized, and synthetic photoreceptors with customized, light-regulated function are being engineered. Perturbational control over intracellular cyclic-nucleotide-monophosphate (cNMP) levels is achieved via sensory photoreceptors that catalyze the making and breaking of these second messengers in response to light. To facilitate discovery, engineering and quantitative characterization of such light-regulated cNMP actuators, we have developed an efficient fluorometric assay. Both the formation and the hydrolysis of cNMPs are accompanied by proton release which can be quantified with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). This assay equally applies to nucleotide cyclases, e.g., blue-light-activated bPAC, and to cNMP phosphodiesterases, e.g., red-light-activated LAPD. Key benefits include potential for parallelization and automation, as well as suitability for both purified enzymes and crude cell lysates. The BCECF assay hence stands to accelerate discovery and characterization of light-regulated actuators of cNMP metabolism. PMID:26965118

  10. Attempts to detect cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in higher plants by three assay methods.

    PubMed

    Bressan, R A; Ross, C W

    1976-01-01

    Endogenous levels of cyclic adenosine-3':5'-monophosphate in coleoptile first leaf segments of oat (Avena sativa L.), potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) callus, and germinating seeds of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) were measured with a modified Gilman binding assay and a protein kinase activation assay. The incorporation of adenosine-8-(14)C into compounds with properties similar to those of cyclic AMP was also measured in studies with germinating lettuce seeds. The binding assay proved reliable for mouse and rat liver analyses, but was nonspecific for plant tissues. It responded to various components from lettuce and potato tissues chromatographically similar to but not identical with cyclic AMP. The protein kinase activation assay was much more specific, but it also exhibited positive responses in the presence of compounds not chromatographically identical to cyclic AMP. The concentrations of cyclic AMP in the plant tissues tested were at the lower limits of detection and characterization obtainable with these assays. The estimates of maximal levels were much lower than reported in many previous studies. PMID:16659419

  11. A Facile and Sensitive Method for Quantification of Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates in Mammalian Organs: Basal Levels of Eight cNMPs and Identification of 2',3'-cIMP

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Xin; Fontaine, Benjamin M.; Strobel, Fred; Weinert, Emily E.

    2014-01-01

    A sensitive, versatile and economical method to extract and quantify cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs) using LC-MS/MS, including both 3',5'-cNMPs and 2',3'-cNMPs, in mammalian tissues and cellular systems has been developed. Problems, such as matrix effects from complex biological samples, are addressed and have been optimized. This protocol allows for comparison of multiple cNMPs in the same system and was used to examine the relationship between tissue levels of cNMPs in a panel of rat organs. In addition, the study reports the first identification and quantification of 2',3'-cIMP. The developed method will allow for quantification of cNMPs levels in cells and tissues with varying disease states, which will provide insight into the role(s) and interplay of cNMP signalling pathways. PMID:25513747

  12. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase from the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Krungkrai, Sudaratana R.; Tokuoka, Keiji; Kusakari, Yukiko; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Adachi, Hiroaki; Matsumura, Hiroyoshi; Takano, Kazufumi; Murakami, Satoshi; Mori, Yusuke; Kai, Yasushi; Krungkrai, Jerapan; Horii, Toshihiro

    2006-06-01

    Orotidine 5′-monophosphate decarboxylase of human malaria parasite P. falciparum was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation. Orotidine 5′-monophosphate (OMP) decarboxylase (OMPDC; EC 4.1.1.23) catalyzes the final step in the de novo synthesis of uridine 5′-monophosphate (UMP) and defects in the enzyme are lethal in the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. Active recombinant P. falciparum OMPDC (PfOMPDC) was crystallized by the seeding method in a hanging drop using PEG 3000 as a precipitant. A complete set of diffraction data from a native crystal was collected to 2.7 Å resolution at 100 K using synchrotron radiation at the Swiss Light Source. The crystal exhibits trigonal symmetry (space group R3), with hexagonal unit-cell parameters a = b = 201.81, c = 44.03 Å. With a dimer in the asymmetric unit, the solvent content is 46% (V{sub M} = 2.3 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1})

  13. Avirulent Uracil Auxotrophs Based on Disruption of Orotidine-5′-Monophosphate Decarboxylase Elicit Protective Immunity to Toxoplasma gondii ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) gene, encoding the final enzyme of the de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis pathway, was deleted using Toxoplasma gondii KU80 knockouts to develop an avirulent nonreverting pyrimidine auxotroph strain. Additionally, to functionally address the role of the pyrimidine salvage pathway, the uridine phosphorylase (UP) salvage activity was knocked out and a double knockout of UP and OMPDC was also constructed. The nonreverting ΔOMPDC, ΔUP, and ΔOMPDC ΔUP knockout strains were evaluated for pyrimidine auxotrophy, for attenuation of virulence, and for their ability to elicit potent immunity to reinfection. The ΔUP knockout strain was replication competent and virulent. In contrast, the ΔOMPDC and ΔOMPDC ΔUP strains were uracil auxotrophs that rapidly lost their viability during pyrimidine starvation. Replication of the ΔOMPDC strain but not the ΔOMPDC ΔUP strain was also partially rescued in vitro with uridine or cytidine supplementation. Compared to their hypervirulent parental type I strain, the ΔOMPDC and ΔOMPDC ΔUP knockout strains exhibited extreme attenuation in murine virulence (∼8 logs). Genetic complementation of the ΔOMPDC strain using a functional OMPDC allele restored normal replication and type I parental strain virulence phenotypes. A single immunization of mice with either the live critically attenuated ΔOMPDC strain or the ΔOMPDC ΔUP knockout strain effectively induced potent protective immunity to lethal challenge infection. The avirulent nonreverting ΔOMPDC and ΔOMPDC ΔUP strains provide new tools for the dissection of the host response to infection and are promising candidates for safe and effective Th1 vaccine platforms that can be easily genetically engineered. PMID:20605980

  14. A guanosine quadruplex and two stable hairpins flank a major cleavage site in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, J; Kofod, M; Nielsen, F C

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are cleaved by an endonucleolytic event in a conserved part of their 3' untranslated region that is predicted to exhibit a complex higher-order RNA structure. In the present study, we have examined the putative secondary structures of in vitro transcripts from the conserved part of human and rat mRNAs by enzymatic and chemical probing. The results show that the cleavage site is situated between two highly structured domains. The upstream domain consists of two large hairpins, whereas the downstream domain is guanosine-rich. The guanosine-rich domain adopts a compact unimolecular conformation in Na+ or K+ but not in Li+, and it completely arrests reverse transcription in K+ but only partially in Na+, indicating the presence of an intramolecular guanosine quadruplex. The flanking higher-order structures may ensure that the cleavage site is not sequestered in stable RNA structures, thus allowing interactions with RNA or proteins at posttranscriptional stages of IGF-II expression. Images PMID:7838726

  15. Autophagy as a Regulated Pathway of Cellular Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Klionsky, Daniel J.; Emr, Scott D.

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a dynamic process involving the rearrangement of subcellular membranes to sequester cytoplasm and organelles for delivery to the lysosome or vacuole where the sequestered cargo is degraded and recycled. This process takes place in all eukaryotic cells. It is highly regulated through the action of various kinases, phosphatases, and guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases). The core protein machinery that is necessary to drive formation and consumption of intermediates in the macroautophagy pathway includes a ubiquitin-like protein conjugation system and a protein complex that directs membrane docking and fusion at the lysosome or vacuole. Macroautophagy plays an important role in developmental processes, human disease, and cellular response to nutrient deprivation. PMID:11099404

  16. Surface complexation modeling of uranium(VI) sorbed onto lanthanum monophosphate.

    PubMed

    Ordoñez-Regil, E; Drot, R; Simoni, E

    2003-07-15

    Sorption/desorption are basic processes in the field of contaminant transport. In order to develop mechanistically accurate thermodynamic sorption models, the simulation of retention data has to take into account molecular scale informations provided by structural investigations. In this way, the uranyl sorption constants onto lanthanum monophosphate (LaPO(4)) were determined on the basis of a previously published structural investigation. The surface complexation modeling of U(VI) retention onto LaPO(4) has been performed using the constant capacitance model included in the FITEQLv3.2 program. The electrical behavior of the solid surface was investigated using electrophoretic measurements and potentiometric titration experiments. The point of zero charge was found to be 3.5 and surface complexation modeling has made it possible to calculate the surface acidity constants. The fitting procedure was done with respect to the spectroscopic results, which have shown that LaPO(4) presents two kinds of reactive surface sites (lanthanum atoms and phosphate groups). The uranyl sorption edges were determined for two surface coverages: 40 and 20% of the surface sites that are occupied, assuming complete sorption. The modeling of these experimental data was realized by considering two uranyl species ("free" uranyl and uranyl nitrate complex) sorbed only onto phosphate surface groups according to the previously published structural investigation. The obtained sorption constants present similar values for both surface complexes and make it possible to fit both sorption edges: logK(U)=9.4 for z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)+UO(2)(2+)<-->z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)UO(2)(2+) and logK(UN)=9.7 for z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)+UO(2)NO(3)(+)<-->z.tbnd;P(OH)(2)UO(2)NO(3)(+). PMID:12909028

  17. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  18. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed Central

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-01-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  19. The effects of cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and other adenine nucleotides on body temperature.

    PubMed

    Dascombe, M J; Milton, A S

    1975-08-01

    1. Adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP), its dibutyryl derivative (Db-cAMP) and other adenine nucleotides have been micro-injected into the hypothalamic region of the unanaesthetized cat and the effects on body temperature, and on behavioural and autonomic thermoregulatory activities observed. 2. Db-cAMP and cAMP both produced hypothermia when applied to the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. With Db-cAMP the hypothermia was shown to be dose dependent between 50 and 500 mug (0-096-0-96 mumole). 3. AMP, ADP and ATP also produced hypothermia when injected into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus. 4. The order of relative potencies of the adenine nucleotides with respect both to the hypothermia produced and to the autonomic thermoregulatory effects observed were similar. Db-cAMP was most potent and cAMP least. 5. Micro-injection into the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus of many substances including saline produced in most cats a non-specific rise in body temperature apparently the result of tissue damage. Intraperitoneal injection of 4-acetamidophenol (paracetamol 50 mg/kg) reduced or abolished this febrile response. 6. The hypothermic effect of the adenine nucleotides has been compared with the effects produced in these same cats by micro-injections of noradrenaline, 5-hydroxytryptamine, a mixture of acetylcholine and physostigmine (1:1), EDTA and excess Ca2+ ions. 7. It is concluded that as Db-cAMP and cAMP both produce hypothermia, it is unlikely that endogenous cAMP in the pre-optic anterior hypothalamus mediates the hyperthermic responses to pyrogens and prostaglandins. PMID:170396

  20. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: Nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-01-01

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~69%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (p<0.05~0.005) of A-LCP NPs, suggests excellent in vivo efficacy. Whereas, two free drugs (ACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug. PMID:23791977

  1. Triazole-containing monophosphate mRNA cap analogs as effective translation inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Piecyk, Karolina; Lukaszewicz, Maciej; Darzynkiewicz, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic analogs of the 5′ end of mRNA (cap structure) are widely used in molecular studies on mechanisms of cellular processes such as translation, intracellular transport, splicing, and turnover. The best-characterized cap binding protein is translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). Recognition of the mRNA cap by eIF4E is a critical, rate-limiting step for efficient translation initiation and is considered a major target for anticancer therapy. Here, we report a facile methodology for the preparation of N2-triazole-containing monophosphate cap analogs and present their biological evaluation as inhibitors of protein synthesis. Five analogs possessing this unique hetero-cyclic ring spaced from the m7-guanine of the cap structure at a distance of one or three carbon atoms and/or additionally substituted by various groups containing the benzene ring were synthesized. All obtained compounds turned out to be effective translation inhibitors with IC50 similar to dinucleotide triphosphate m7GpppG. As these compounds possess a reduced number of phosphate groups and, thereby, a negative charge, which may support their cell penetration, this type of cap analog might be promising in terms of designing new potential therapeutic molecules. In addition, an exemplary dinucleotide from a corresponding mononucleotide containing benzyl substituted 1,2,3-triazole was prepared and examined. The superior inhibitory properties of this analog (10-fold vs. m7GpppG) suggest the usefulness of such compounds for the preparation of mRNA transcripts with high translational activity. PMID:25150228

  2. Inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase variability in renal transplant patients on long-term mycophenolate mofetil therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chiarelli, Laurent R; Molinaro, Mariadelfina; Libetta, Carmelo; Tinelli, Carmine; Cosmai, Laura; Valentini, Giovanna; Canton, Antonio Dal; Regazzi, Mario

    2010-01-01

    AIMS Long-term mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) therapy may induce inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), thus decreasing MMF immunosuppressive properties. Pharmacodynamic monitoring was used to investigate whether biological activity is altered after long-term therapy. METHODS IMPDH activity was measured in PBMC samples from 54 stable kidney transplant patients, already on MMF (for at least 3 months), before (t0) and 2 h after (t2) MMF morning dose administration; levels were monitored for up to 15 months, together with total mycophenolic acid (MPA) and free MPA concentrations. RESULTS During the 15 months' monitoring, t0 IMPDH activity in transplant recipients increased from 5.9 ± 3.7 nmol h−1 mg−1[95% confidence interval (CI) 4.9, 6.9] to 9.0 ± 3.9 nmol h−1 mg−1 (95% CI 7.2, 10.8), with an intra- and interpatient variability of 28% and 42%. Five patients experienced acute rejection during the follow-up: t0 IMPDH activity was increased during rejection vs. nonrejection, and the trend was significantly higher in rejecting than in nonrejecting subjects for the whole monitoring period. CONCLUSIONS Even though a correlation has been found between IMPDH activity and rejection, its efficacy as a predictive tool in long-term transplant outcomes may be affected by high interpatient variability; on the other hand, continuous monitoring of the IMPDH trend could make an effective prognostic parameter of rejection. Other trials also including pre-transplant data on both IMPDH expression and activity are warranted to better assess their role as biomarkers for MPA effect in clinical practice. PMID:20078611

  3. Repetitive mechanical strain suppresses macrophage uptake of immunoglobulin G complexes and enhances cyclic adenosine monophosphate synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Mattana, J.; Sankaran, R. T.; Singhal, P. C.

    1995-01-01

    Uptake of immunoglobulin G (IgG) complexes by macrophages (M phi) may play an important role in disease states characterized by increased levels of circulating immune complexes. In sites such as the glomerular mesangium M phi may be subjected to repetitive mechanical strain, although in vitro studies of M phi endocytosis are typically carried out with cells grown on rigid surfaces. We undertook the present study to determine whether repetitive mechanical strain could modulate M phi endocytosis of IgG complexes. IgG complex uptake was significantly diminished in M phi that were subjected to repetitive mechanical strain using parameters corresponding to peak and minimal intraglomerular pressures compared with control, and uptake varied according to the amount of mechanical strain applied. There was no significant difference in surface binding of IgG between M phi subjected to strain and those not. Mechanical strain did not significantly influence the rate of IgG complex degradation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase and guanylate cyclase activity did not alter the effect of mechanical strain, although this effect was potentiated by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Angiotensin II, which has been shown to reduce adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production in M phi, significantly attenuated the suppressive effect of mechanical strain on IgG complex uptake as well as another inhibitor of cAMP generation, indomethacin. Enzyme immunoassay demonstrated significantly enhanced levels of cAMP in M phi that were subjected to mechanical strain compared with control, an effect that was potentiated by IBMX and attenuated by angiotensin II and indomethacin. These results demonstrate that repetitive mechanical strain significantly reduces IgG complex uptake by M phi, most likely by enhancing cAMP synthesis. Such an effect might play a significant role in macromolecule handling by M phi in sites in which they are subjected to repetitive mechanical deformation such as

  4. Novel adenosine 3 prime ,5 prime -cyclic monophosphate dependent protein kinases in a marine diatom

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, P.P.C.; Volcani, B.E. )

    1989-08-08

    Two novel adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinases have been isolated from the diatom Cylindrotheca fusiformis. The kinases, designated I and II, are eluted from DEAE-Sephacel at 0.10 and 0.15 M NaCl. They have a high affinity for cAMP and are activated by micromolar cAMP. They exhibit maximal activity at 5 mM Mg{sup 2+} and pH 8 with the preferred phosphate donor ATP and phosphate acceptor histone H1. They phosphorylate sea urchin sperm histone H1 on a single serine site in the sequence Arg-Lys-Gly-Ser({sup 32}P)-Ser-Asn-Ala-Arg and have an apparent M{sub r} of 75,000 as determined by gel filtration and sucrose density sedimentation. In the kinase I preparation a single protein band with an apparent M{sub r} of about 78,000 is photolabeled with 8-azido({sup 32}P)cAMP and is also phosphorylated with ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in a cAMP-dependent manner, after autoradiography following sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis. The rate of phosphorylation of the 78,000-dalton band is independent of the enzyme concentration. The results indicate that (i) these diatom cAMP-dependent protein kinases are monomeric proteins, possessing both the cAMP-binding regulatory and catalytic domains on the same polypeptide chain, (ii) the enzymes do not dissociate into smaller species upon activation by binding cAMP, and (iii) self-phosphorylation of the enzymes by an intrapeptide reaction is cAMP dependent. The two diatom cAMP kinases are refractory to the heat-stable protein kinase modulator from rabbit muscle, but they respond differently to proteolytic degradation and to inhibition by arachidonic acid and several microbial alkaloids.

  5. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP).

    PubMed

    Choimet, Maëla; Tourrette, Audrey; Drouet, Christophe

    2015-10-15

    The chemical interaction between DNA macromolecules and hard tissues in vertebrate is of foremost importance in paleogenetics, as bones and teeth represent a major substrate for the genetic material after cell death. Recently, the empirical hypothesis of DNA "protection" over time thanks to its adsorption on hard tissues was revisited from a physico-chemical viewpoint. In particular, the existence of a strong interaction between phosphate groups of DNA backbone and the surface of apatite nanocrystals (mimicking bone/dentin mineral) was evidenced on an experimental basis. In the field of nanomedicine, DNA or RNA can be used for gene transport into cells, and apatite nanocarriers then appear promising. In order to shed some more light on interactions between DNA molecules and apatite, the present study focuses on the adsorption of a "model" nucleotide, cytidine 5' monophosphate (CMP), on a carbonated biomimetic apatite sample. The follow-up of CMP kinetics of adsorption pointed out the rapidity of interaction with stabilization reached within few minutes. The adsorption isotherm could be realistically fitted to the Sips model (Langmuir-Freundlich) suggesting the influence of surface heterogeneities and adsorption cooperativity in the adsorption process. The desorption study pointed out the reversible character of CMP adsorption on biomimetic apatite. This contribution is intended to prove helpful in view of better apprehending the molecular interaction of DNA fragments and apatite compounds, independently of the application domain, such as bone diagenesis or nanomedicine. This study may also appear informative for researchers interested in the origins of life on Earth and the occurrence and behavior of primitive biomolecules. PMID:26117294

  6. Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate levels in Thermomonospora curvata during cellulase biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Neubauer, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1983-01-01

    The enzymatic degradation of cellulose requires the synergistic activity of at least three enzymes: exo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.91), endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (EC3.2.1.4), and beta-glucosidase (EC3.2.1.21). Despite extensive studies on a variety of cellulolytic bacteria and fungi, the mechanism(s) regulating the biosynthesis of this inducible catabolic enzyme complex remains unknown. The intracellular concentrations of cyclic nucleotides such as adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) have been shown to play a major role in mediating catabolite repression of enzyme biosynthesis. The cAMP acts through a cAMP receptor protein (termed CRP or CAP) which is a dimer having two identical subunits each capable of binding one molecule of cAMP. The N-terminal domain of the CRP binds the cAMP while the C-terminal domain binds to DNA at the promotor region of a cAMP-dependent operon and stimulates transcription by promoting the formation of a preinitiation complex between RNA polymerase and the DNA. Intracellular cAMP levels in E. coli (the prototype organism for such studies) are influenced by the type and availability of carbon source used for growth. High intracellular cAMP levels should lead to higher concentrations of cAMP-CRP complexes which should increase the transcription rates for cAMP-dependent operons (such as the lac operon of beta-galactosidase) and indeed the differential rate of beta-galactosidase biosynthesis correlates to intracellular cAMP levels. In the case of cellulase, catabolite repression by glucose or other readily metabolizable compounds closely controls production in an apparently similar manner and therefore a correlation may exist between enzyme biosynthesis and intracellular cAMP levels. This communication describes the fluctuation in cAMP levels during cellulase induction and repression in the thermophilic actinomycete, Thermomonospora curvata.

  7. Mast cell degranulation is negatively regulated by the Munc13-4-binding small-guanosine triphosphatase Rab37

    PubMed Central

    Higashio, Hironori; Satoh, Yoh-ichi; Saino, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Mast cell degranulation is regulated by the small guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) Rab27a and Rab27b, which have distinct and opposing roles: Rab27b acts as a positive regulator through its effector protein Munc13-4, a non-neuronal isoform of the vesicle-priming Munc13 family of proteins, whereas Rab27a acts as a negative regulator through its effector protein melanophilin, by maintaining integrity of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin), a barrier to degranulation. Here we investigated the role of Rab37, one of the Rab GTPases assumed to be implicated in regulated secretion during mast cell degranulation. Using the RBL-2H3 mast cell line, we detected Rab37 on the secretory granules and found that antigen-induced degranulation was extensively increased by either knockdown of Rab37 or overexpression of a dominant-active Rab37 mutant. This hypersecretion phenotype in the Rab37-knockdown cells was suppressed by simultaneous knockdown of Rab27a and Rab27b or of Munc13-4, but not by disruption of cortical F-actin. We further found that Rab37 interacted with Munc13-4 in a GTP-independent manner and formed a Rab27-Munc13-4-Rab37 complex. These results suggest that Rab37 is a Munc13-4-binding protein that inhibits mast cell degranulation through its effector protein, by counteracting the vesicle-priming activity of the Rab27-Munc13-4 system. PMID:26931073

  8. Dynamics and couplings of N-H stretching excitations of guanosine-cytidine base pairs in solution.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ming; Szyc, Łukasz; Röttger, Katharina; Fidder, Henk; Nibbering, Erik T J; Elsaesser, Thomas; Temps, Friedrich

    2011-05-12

    N-H stretching vibrations of hydrogen-bonded guanosine-cytidine (G·C) base pairs in chloroform solution are studied with linear and ultrafast nonlinear infrared (IR) spectroscopy. Assignment of the IR-active bands in the linear spectrum is made possible by combining structural information on the hydrogen bonds in G·C base pairs with literature results of density functional theory calculations, and empirical relations connecting frequency shifts and intensity of the IR-active vibrations. A local mode representation of N-H stretching vibrations is adopted, consisting of ν(G)(NH(2))(f) and ν(C)(NH(2))(f) modes for free NH groups of G and C, and of ν(G)(NH(2))(b), ν(G)(NH), and ν(C)(NH(2))(b) modes associated with N-H stretching motions of hydrogen-bonded NH groups. The couplings and relaxation dynamics of the N-H stretching excitations are studied with femtosecond mid-infrared two-dimensional (2D) and pump-probe spectroscopy. The N-H stretching vibrations of the free NH groups of G and C have an average population lifetime of 2.4 ps. Besides a vibrational population lifetime shortening to subpicosecond values observed for the hydrogen-bonded N-H stretching vibrations, the 2D spectra reveal vibrational excitation transfer from the ν(G)(NH(2))(b) mode to the ν(G)(NH) and/or ν(C)(NH(2))(b) modes. The underlying intermode vibrational couplings are on the order of 10 cm(-1). PMID:21244064

  9. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2014-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Overexpression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A-Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316

  10. Semaphorin 3A activates the guanosine triphosphatase Rab5 to promote growth cone collapse and organize callosal axon projections

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kong-Yan; He, Miao; Hou, Qiong-Qiong; Sheng, Ai-Li; Yuan, Lei; Liu, Fei; Liu, Wen-Wen; Li, Guangpu; Jiang, Xing-Yu; Luo, Zhen-Ge

    2015-01-01

    Axon guidance (pathfinding) wires the brain during development and is regulated by various attractive and repulsive cues. Semaphorin 3A (Sema3A) is a repulsive cue, inducing the collapse of axon growth cones. In the mammalian forebrain, the corpus callosum is the major commissure that transmits information flow between the two hemispheres, and contralateral axons assemble into well-defined tracts. We found that the patterning of callosal axon projections in rodent layer II and III (L2/3) cortical neurons in response to Sema3A was mediated by the activation of Rab5, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that mediates endocytosis, through the membrane fusion protein Rabaptin-5 and the Rab5 guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Rabex-5. Rabaptin-5 bound directly to Plexin-A1 in the Sema3A receptor complex [an obligate heterodimer formed by Plexin-A1 and neuropilin 1 (NP1)]; Sema3A enhanced this interaction in cultured neurons. Rabaptin-5 bridged the interaction between Rab5 and Plexin-A1. Sema3A stimulated endocytosis from the cell surface of callosal axon growth cones. In utero electroporation to reduce Rab5 or Rabaptin-5 impaired axon fasciculation or caused mistargeting of L2/3 callosal projections in rats. Over-expression of Rabaptin-5 or Rab5 rescued the defective callosal axon fasciculation or mistargeting of callosal axons caused by the loss of Sema3A–Plexin-A1 signaling in rats expressing dominant-negative Plexin-A1 or in NP1-deficient mice. Thus, our findings suggest that Rab5, its effector Rabaptin-5, and its regulator Rabex-5 mediate Sema3A-induced axon guidance during brain development. PMID:25161316