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Sample records for guanylate cyclase sgc

  1. A new small molecule inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Mota, Filipa; Gane, Paul; Hampden-Smith, Kathryn; Allerston, Charles K.; Garthwaite, John; Selwood, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a haem containing enzyme that regulates cardiovascular homeostasis and multiple mechanisms in the central and peripheral nervous system. Commonly used inhibitors of sGC activity act through oxidation of the haem moiety, however they also bind haemoglobin and this limits their bioavailability for in vivo studies. We have discovered a new class of small molecule inhibitors of sGC and have characterised a compound designated D12 (compound 10) which binds to the catalytic domain of the enzyme with a KD of 11 μM in a SPR assay. PMID:26264842

  2. Heme deficiency of soluble guanylate cyclase induces gastroparesis

    PubMed Central

    COSYNS, S. M. R.; DHAESE, I.; THOONEN, R.; BUYS, E. S.; VRAL, A.; BROUCKAERT, P.; LEFEBVRE, R. A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the principal target of nitric oxide (NO) to control gastrointestinal motility. The consequence on nitrergic signaling and gut motility of inducing a heme-free status of sGC, as induced by oxidative stress, was investigated. Methods sGCβ1H105F knock-in (apo-sGC) mice, which express heme-free sGC that has basal activity, but cannot be stimulated by NO, were generated. Key Results Diethylenetriamine NONOate did not increase sGC activity in gastrointestinal tissue of apo-sGC mice. Exogenous NO did not induce relaxation in fundic, jejunal and colonic strips, and pyloric rings of apo-sGC mice. The stomach was enlarged in apo-sGC mice with hypertrophy of the muscularis externa of the fundus and pylorus. In addition, gastric emptying and intestinal transit were delayed and whole-gut transit time was increased in the apo-sGC mice, while distal colonic transit time was maintained. The nitrergic relaxant responses to electrical field stimulation at 1–4 Hz were abolished in fundic and jejunal strips from apo-sGC mice, but in pyloric rings and colonic strips, only the response at 1 Hz was abolished, indicating the contribution of other transmitters than NO. Conclusions & Inferences The results indicate that the gastrointestinal consequences of switching from a native sGC to a heme-free sGC, which cannot be stimulated by NO, are most pronounced at the level of the stomach establishing a pivotal role of the activation of sGC by NO in normal gastric functioning. In addition, delayed intestinal transit was observed, indicating that nitrergic activation of sGC also plays a role in the lower gastrointestinal tract. PMID:23551931

  3. Quaternary Structure Controls Ligand Dynamics in Soluble Guanylate Cyclase*

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Negrerie, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the mammalian endogenous nitric oxide (NO) receptor. The mechanisms of activation and deactivation of this heterodimeric enzyme are unknown. For deciphering them, functional domains can be overexpressed. We have probed the dynamics of the diatomic ligands NO and CO within the isolated heme domain β1(190) of human sGC by piconanosecond absorption spectroscopy. After photo-excitation of nitrosylated sGC, only NO geminate rebinding occurs in 7.5 ps. In β1(190), both photo-dissociation of 5c-NO and photo-oxidation occur, contrary to sGC, followed by NO rebinding (7 ps) and back-reduction (230 ps and 2 ns). In full-length sGC, CO geminate rebinding to the heme does not occur. In contrast, CO geminately rebinds to β1(190) with fast multiphasic process (35, 171, and 18 ns). We measured the bimolecular association rates kon = 0.075 ± 0.01 × 106 m−1·s−1 for sGC and 0.83 ± 0.1 × 106 m−1·s−1 for β1(190). These different dynamics reflect conformational changes and less proximal constraints in the isolated heme domain with respect to the dimeric native sGC. We concluded that the α-subunit and the β1(191–619) domain exert structural strains on the heme domain. These strains are likely involved in the transmission of the energy and relaxation toward the activated state after Fe2+-His bond breaking. This also reveals the heme domain plasticity modulated by the associated domains and subunit. PMID:22223482

  4. Tetrahydrobiopterin protects soluble guanylate cyclase against oxidative inactivation.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Kurt; Neubauer, Andrea; Kolesnik, Bernd; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Werner, Ernst R; Gorren, Antonius C F; Mayer, Bernd

    2012-09-01

    Tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is a major endogenous vasoprotective agent that improves endothelial function by increasing nitric oxide (NO) synthesis and scavenging of superoxide and peroxynitrite. Therefore, administration of BH4 is considered a promising therapy for cardiovascular diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Here we report on a novel function of BH4 that might contribute to the beneficial vascular effects of the pteridine. Treatment of cultured porcine aortic endothelial cells with nitroglycerin (GTN) or 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ) resulted in heme oxidation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), as evident from diminished NO-induced cGMP accumulation that was paralleled by increased cGMP response to a heme- and NO-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase [4-([(4-carboxybutyl)[2-(5-fluoro-2-([4'-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy)phenyl)ethyl]amino]methyl)benzoic acid (BAY 60-2770)]. Whereas scavenging of superoxide and/or peroxynitrite with superoxide dismutase, tiron, Mn(III)tetrakis(4-benzoic acid)porphyrin, and urate had no protective effects, supplementation of the cells with BH4, either by application of BH4 directly or of its precursors dihydrobiopterin or sepiapterin, completely prevented the inhibition of NO-induced cGMP accumulation by GTN and ODQ. Tetrahydroneopterin had the same effect, and virtually identical results were obtained with RFL-6 fibroblasts, suggesting that our observation reflects a general feature of tetrahydropteridines that is unrelated to NO synthase function and not limited to endothelial cells. Protection of sGC against oxidative inactivation may contribute to the known beneficial effects of BH4 in cardiovascular disorders associated with oxidative stress. PMID:22648973

  5. Guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum with the topology of mammalian adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, J; Snippe, H; Kleineidam, R G; Van Haastert, P J

    2001-01-01

    The core of adenylate and guanylate cyclases is formed by an intramolecular or intermolecular dimer of two cyclase domains arranged in an antiparallel fashion. Metazoan membrane-bound adenylate cyclases are composed of 12 transmembrane spanning regions, and two cyclase domains which function as a heterodimer and are activated by G-proteins. In contrast, membrane-bound guanylate cyclases have only one transmembrane spanning region and one cyclase domain, and are activated by extracellular ligands to form a homodimer. In the cellular slime mould, Dictyostelium discoideum, membrane-bound guanylate cyclase activity is induced after cAMP stimulation; a G-protein-coupled cAMP receptor and G-proteins are essential for this activation. We have cloned a Dictyostelium gene, DdGCA, encoding a protein with 12 transmembrane spanning regions and two cyclase domains. Sequence alignment demonstrates that the two cyclase domains are transposed, relative to these domains in adenylate cyclases. DdGCA expressed in Dictyostelium exhibits high guanylate cyclase activity and no detectable adenylate cyclase activity. Deletion of the gene indicates that DdGCA is not essential for chemotaxis or osmo-regulation. The knock-out strain still exhibits substantial guanylate cyclase activity, demonstrating that Dictyostelium contains at least one other guanylate cyclase. PMID:11237875

  6. NO-independent stimulators and activators of soluble guanylate cyclase: discovery and therapeutic potential

    PubMed Central

    Evgenov, Oleg V.; Pacher, Pál; Schmidt, Peter M.; Haskó, György; Schmidt, Harald H. H. W.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a key signal-transduction enzyme activated by nitric oxide (NO). Impaired bioavailability and/or responsiveness to endogenous NO has been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular and other diseases. Current therapies that involve the use of organic nitrates and other NO donors have limitations, including non-specific interactions of NO with various biomolecules, lack of response and the development of tolerance following prolonged administration. Compounds that activate sGC in an NO-independent manner might therefore provide considerable therapeutic advantages. Here we review the discovery, biochemistry, pharmacology and clinical potential of haem-dependent sGC stimulators (including YC-1, BAY 41-2272, BAY 41-8543, CFM-1571 and A-350619) and haem-independent sGC activators (including BAY 58-2667 and HMR-1766). PMID:16955067

  7. Immunohistochemical Localization of Guanylate Cyclase within Neurons of Rat Brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariano, Marjorie A.; Lewicki, John A.; Brandwein, Harvey J.; Murad, Ferid

    1982-02-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of guanylate cyclase [GTP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.2] has been examined in rat neocortex, caudate-putamen, and cerebellum by using specific monoclonal antibodies. Immunofluorescence could be seen within somata and proximal dendrites of neurons in these regions. A nuclear immunofluorescence reaction to guanylate cyclase was characteristically absent. The staining pattern for guanylate cyclase was coincident with previously described localizations of cyclic GMP immunofluorescence within medium spiny neurons of the caudate-putamen and pyramidal cells of the neocortex. Cerebellar guanylate cyclase immunoreactivity was primarily confined to Purkinje cells and their primary dendrites, similar to the pattern reported for cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase localization. Guanylate cyclase immunofluorescence was abolished when the monoclonal antibodies were exposed to purified enzyme prior to incubation of the tissue slices or when control antibody was substituted for the primary antibody. Immunohistochemical localization of cyclic AMP in these same tissues was readily distinguished from that of guanylate cyclase or cyclic GMP, showing uniform fluorescence throughout the cell bodies of neurons and glial elements.

  8. Carnosine as a regulator of soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Severina, I S; Bussygina, O G; Pyatakova, N V

    2000-07-01

    The molecular mechanism of the participation of carnosine in the functioning of soluble guanylate cyclase is discussed. It is shown that carnosine inhibits the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by sodium nitroprusside and a derivative of furoxan--1,2,5-oxadiazolo-trioxide (an NO donor). However, carnosine has no effect on stimulation of the enzyme by a structural analog of the latter compound, a furazan derivative (1,2,5-oxadiazolo-dioxide) that is not an NO donor; nor was carnosine involved in the enzyme activation by protoporphyrin IX, whose stimulatory effect is not associated with the guanylate cyclase heme. The inhibition by carnosine of guanylate cyclase activation by an NO donor is due to the interaction of carnosine with heme iron with subsequent formation of a chelate complex. It was first demonstrated that carnosine is a selective inhibitor of NO-dependent activation of guanylate cyclase and may be used for suppression of activity of the intracellular signaling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP, whose sharp increase is observed in malignant tumors, sepsis, septic shock, asthma, and migraine. PMID:10951096

  9. Human soluble guanylate cyclase: functional expression and revised isoenzyme family.

    PubMed Central

    Zabel, U; Weeger, M; La, M; Schmidt, H H

    1998-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a heterodimeric (alpha/beta) haem protein that converts GTP to the second messenger cGMP, functions as the receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and nitrovasodilator drugs. Three distinct cDNA species of each subunit (alpha1-alpha3, beta1-beta3) have been reported from various species. From human sources, none of these have been expressed as functionally active enzyme. Here we describe the expression of human alpha/beta heterodimeric sGC in Sf9 cells yielding active recombinant enzyme that was stimulated by the nitrovasodilator sodium nitroprusside or the NO-independent activator 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzylindazole (YC-1). At the protein level, both alpha and beta subunits were detected in human tissues, suggesting co-expression also in vivo. Moreover, resequencing of the human cDNA clones [originally termed alpha3 and beta3; Giuili, Scholl, Bulle and Guellaen (1992) FEBS Lett. 304, 83-88] revealed several sequencing errors in human alpha3; correction of these eliminated major regions of divergence from rat and bovine alpha1. As human beta3 also displays more than 98% similarity to rat and bovine beta1 at the amino acid level, alpha3 and beta3 represent the human homologues of rat and bovine alpha1 and beta1, and the isoenzyme family is decreased to two isoforms for each subunit (alpha1, alpha2; beta1, beta2). Having access to the human key enzyme of NO signalling will now permit the study of novel sGC-modulating compounds with therapeutic potential. PMID:9742212

  10. The molecular mechanism of heme loss from oxidized soluble guanylate cyclase induced by conformational change.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoxue; Yuan, Hong; Xu, Qiming; Zhang, Huijuan; Zhou, Yajun; Huang, Zhong-Xian; Tan, Xiangshi

    2016-05-01

    Heme oxidation and loss of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is thought to be an important contributor to the development of cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless, it remains unknown why the heme loses readily in oxidized sGC. In the current study, the conformational change of sGC upon heme oxidation by ODQ was studied based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the heme and a fluorophore fluorescein arsenical helix binder (FlAsH-EDT2) labeled at different domains of sGC β1. This study provides an opportunity to monitor the domain movement of sGC relative to the heme. The results indicated that heme oxidation by ODQ in truncated sCC induced the heme-associated αF helix moving away from the heme, the Per/Arnt/Sim domain (PAS) domain moving closer to the heme, but led the helical domain going further from the heme. We proposed that the synergistic effect of these conformational changes of the discrete region upon heme oxidation forces the heme pocket open, and subsequent heme loss readily. Furthermore, the kinetic studies suggested that the heme oxidation was a fast process and the conformational change was a relatively slow process. The kinetics of heme loss from oxidized sGC was monitored by a new method based on the heme group de-quenching the fluorescence of FlAsH-EDT2. PMID:26876536

  11. The Influence of Nitric Oxide on Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Regulation by Nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Sürmeli, Nur Başak; Müskens, Frederike M.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by the signaling molecule nitric oxide (NO) leads to formation of the second messenger cGMP, which mediates numerous physiological processes. NO activates sGC by binding to the ferrous heme cofactor; the relative amount of NO with respect to sGC heme affects the enzyme activity. ATP can also influence the activity by binding to an allosteric site, most likely the pseudosymmetric site located in the catalytic domain. Here, the role of the pseudosymmetric site on nucleotide regulation was investigated by point mutations at this site. ATP inhibition kinetics of wild type and a pseudosymmetric site (α1-C594A/β1-D477A) variant of sGC was determined at various levels of NO. Results obtained show that in the presence of less than 1 eq of NO, there appears to be less than complete activation and little change in the nucleotide binding parameters. The most dramatic effects are observed for the addition of excess NO, which results in an increase in the affinity of GTP at the catalytic site and full activation of sGC. The pseudosymmetric site mutation only affected nucleotide affinities in the presence of excess NO; there was a decrease in the affinity for ATP in both the allosteric and catalytic sites. These observations led to a new kinetic model for sGC activity in the presence of excess NO. This model revealed that the active and allosteric sites show cooperativity. This new comprehensive model gives a more accurate description of sGC regulation by NO and nucleotides in vivo. PMID:25907555

  12. Cardiovascular and pharmacological implications of haem-deficient NO-unresponsive soluble guanylate cyclase knock-in mice

    PubMed Central

    Thoonen, Robrecht; Cauwels, Anje; Decaluwe, Kelly; Geschka, Sandra; Tainsh, Robert E.; Delanghe, Joris; Hochepied, Tino; De Cauwer, Lode; Rogge, Elke; Voet, Sofie; Sips, Patrick; Karas, Richard H.; Bloch, Kenneth D.; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Van de Voorde, Johan; Buys, Emmanuel S.; Brouckaert, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress, a central mediator of cardiovascular disease, results in loss of the prosthetic haem group of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), preventing its activation by nitric oxide (NO). Here we introduce Apo-sGC mice expressing haem-free sGC. Apo-sGC mice are viable and develop hypertension. The haemodynamic effects of NO are abolished, but those of the sGC activator cinaciguat are enhanced in apo-sGC mice, suggesting that the effects of NO on smooth muscle relaxation, blood pressure regulation and inhibition of platelet aggregation require sGC activation by NO. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-induced hypotension and mortality are preserved in apo-sGC mice, indicating that pathways other than sGC signalling mediate the cardiovascular collapse in shock. Apo-sGC mice allow for differentiation between sGC-dependent and -independent NO effects and between haem-dependent and -independent sGC effects. Apo-sGC mice represent a unique experimental platform to study the in vivo consequences of sGC oxidation and the therapeutic potential of sGC activators. PMID:26442659

  13. Dephosphorylation of sperm guanylate cyclase during sea urchin fertilization

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    When intact Arbacia punctulata spermatozoa are exposed to solubilized egg jelly, the electrophoretic mobility of an abundant sperm flagellar membrane protein changes from an apparent molecular mass of 160 kDa to 150 kDa. A. punctulata spermatozoa can be labeled in vivo with /sup 32/P-labeled cells it was demonstrated that the mobility shift of the 160-kDa protein is due to dephosphorylation. The peptide resact (Cys-Val-Thr-Gly-Ala-Pro-Gly-Cys-Val-Gly-Gly-Gly-Arg-Leu-NH/sub 2/) is the component of egg jelly which is responsible for inducing the dephosphorylation. The 160/150-kdal sperm membrane protein has been purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on concanavalin A-agarose, and identified as sperm guanylate cyclase. The enzymatic activity of the guanylate cyclase is tightly coupled to its phosphorylation state. Resact has been shown to act as a potent chemoattractant for A. punctulata spermatozoa. The chemotactic response is concentration-dependent, is abolished by pretreatment of the spermatozoa with resact, and shows an absolute requirement for external calcium. This work represents the first demonstration of animal sperm chemotaxis in response to a precisely-defined molecule of egg origin. The results established a new, biologically meaningful function for resact, and may implicate sperm guanylate cyclase and cGMP in flagellar function and the chemotactic response.

  14. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators: a Novel Treatment Option for Heart Failure Associated with Cardiorenal Syndromes?

    PubMed

    Dubin, Ruth F; Shah, Sanjiv J

    2016-06-01

    Heart failure in the setting of chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an increasingly common scenario and carries a poor prognosis. Clinicians lack tools for primary or secondary heart failure prevention in patients with cardiorenal syndromes. In patients without CKD, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) and statins mitigate cardiovascular risk in large part due to salutary effects on the endothelium. In the setting of CKD, use of these therapies is limited by adverse effects of hyperkalemia in pre-dialysis CKD (ACE-I/ARB), or potential increased risk of stroke in end-stage renal disease (statins). The soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulators are a novel class of medications that promote endothelial and myocardial function with no known risk of hyperkalemia or stroke. In this review, we discuss the evidence emerging from recent clinical trials of sGC stimulators in pulmonary hypertension and heart failure, the diseased pathways involved in cardiorenal syndromes likely to be restored by sGC stimulators, and several strategies for designing future clinical trials of cardiorenal syndromes that might shorten the timeline for discovery and approval of effective cardiovascular therapies in these high-risk patients. PMID:27118234

  15. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linda S.; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  16. Chronic Activation of Heme Free Guanylate Cyclase Leads to Renal Protection in Dahl Salt-Sensitive Rats.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Linda S; Kretschmer, Axel; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2015-01-01

    The nitric oxide (NO)/soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophasphate (cGMP)-signalling pathway is impaired under oxidative stress conditions due to oxidation and subsequent loss of the prosthetic sGC heme group as observed in particular in chronic renal failure. Thus, the pool of heme free sGC is increased under pathological conditions. sGC activators such as cinaciguat selectively activate the heme free form of sGC and target the disease associated enzyme. In this study, a therapeutic effect of long-term activation of heme free sGC by the sGC activator cinaciguat was investigated in an experimental model of salt-sensitive hypertension, a condition that is associated with increased oxidative stress, heme loss from sGC and development of chronic renal failure. For that purpose Dahl/ss rats, which develop severe hypertension upon high salt intake, were fed a high salt diet (8% NaCl) containing either placebo or cinaciguat for 21 weeks. Cinaciguat markedly improved survival and ameliorated the salt-induced increase in blood pressure upon treatment with cinaciguat compared to placebo. Renal function was significantly improved in the cinaciguat group compared to the placebo group as indicated by a significantly improved glomerular filtration rate and reduced urinary protein excretion. This was due to anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects of the cinaciguat treatment. Taken together, this is the first study showing that long-term activation of heme free sGC leads to renal protection in an experimental model of hypertension and chronic kidney disease. These results underline the promising potential of cinaciguat to treat renal diseases by targeting the disease associated heme free form of sGC. PMID:26717150

  17. Elevation of Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Suppresses Proliferation and Survival of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chen-Yu; Shiah, Shine-Gwo; Kung, Hsing-Jien; King, Kuang-Liang; Su, Liang-Chen; Chang, Shi-Chuan; Chang, Chung-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an essential signaling molecule in biological systems. Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), composing of α1 and β1 subunit, is the receptor for NO. Using radioimmunoassay, we discovered that activation of sGC by treatment with bradykinin or sodium nitroprusside (SNP) is impaired in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells as compared to normal breast epithelial 184A1 cells. The 184A1 cells expressed both sGC α1 and sGCβ1 mRNAs. However, levels of sGCβ1 mRNAs were relatively lower in MCF-7 cells while both mRNA of sGC subunits were absent in MDA-MB-231 cells. Treatment with DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) increased mRNA levels of both sGCα1 and sGCβ1 in MDA-MB-231 cells but only sGCβ1 mRNAs in MCF-7 cells. The 5-aza-dC treatment increased the SNP-induced cGMP production in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231, but not in 184A1 cells. Bisulfite sequencing revealed that the promoter of sGCα1 in MDA-MB-231 cells and promoter of sGCβ1 in MCF-7 cells were methylated. Promoter hypermethylation of sGCα1 and sGCβ1 was found in 1 out of 10 breast cancer patients. Over-expression of both sGC subunits in MDA-MB-231 cells induced apoptosis and growth inhibition in vitro as well as reduced tumor incidence and tumor growth rate of MDA-MB-231 xenografts in nude mice. Elevation of sGC reduced protein abundance of Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, Cdc2, Cdc25A, Cyclin B1, Cyclin D1, Cdk6, c-Myc, and Skp2 while increased protein expression of p53. Our study demonstrated that down-regulation of sGC, partially due to promoter methylation, provides growth and survival advantage in human breast cancer cells. PMID:25928539

  18. A Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activator Inhibits the Progression of Diabetic Nephropathy in the ZSF1 Rat.

    PubMed

    Boustany-Kari, Carine M; Harrison, Paul C; Chen, Hongxing; Lincoln, Kathleen A; Qian, Hu Sheng; Clifford, Holly; Wang, Hong; Zhang, Xiaomei; Gueneva-Boucheva, Kristina; Bosanac, Todd; Wong, Diane; Fryer, Ryan M; Richman, Jeremy G; Sarko, Chris; Pullen, Steven S

    2016-03-01

    Therapies that restore renal cGMP levels are hypothesized to slow the progression of diabetic nephropathy. We investigated the effect of BI 703704, a soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activator, on disease progression in obese ZSF1 rats. BI 703704 was administered at doses of 0.3, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg/d to male ZSF1 rats for 15 weeks, during which mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and urinary protein excretion (UPE) were determined. Histologic assessment of glomerular and interstitial lesions was also performed. Renal cGMP levels were quantified as an indicator of target modulation. BI 703704 resulted in sGC activation, as evidenced by dose-dependent increases in renal cGMP levels. After 15 weeks of treatment, sGC activation resulted in dose-dependent decreases in UPE (from 463 ± 58 mg/d in vehicle controls to 328 ± 55, 348 ± 23, 283 ± 45, and 108 ± 23 mg/d in BI 703704-treated rats at 0.3, 1, 3, and 10 mg/kg, respectively). These effects were accompanied by a significant reduction in the incidence of glomerulosclerosis and interstitial lesions. Decreases in MAP and increases in HR were only observed at the high dose of BI 703704. These results are the first demonstration of renal protection with sGC activation in a nephropathy model induced by type 2 diabetes. Importantly, beneficial effects were observed at doses that did not significantly alter MAP and HR. PMID:26729306

  19. The Function of Guanylate Cyclase 1 and Guanylate Cyclase 2 in Rod and Cone Photoreceptors*S

    PubMed Central

    Baehr, Wolfgang; Karan, Sukanya; Maeda, Tadao; Luo, Dong-Gen; Li, Sha; Darin Bronson, J.; Watt, Carl B.; Yau, King-Wai; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2007-01-01

    Retinal guanylate cyclases 1 and 2 (GC1 and GC2) are responsible for synthesis of cyclic GMP in rods and cones, but their individual contributions to phototransduction are unknown. We report here that the deletion of both GC1 and GC2 rendered rod and cone photoreceptors nonfunctional and unstable. In the rod outer segments of GC double knock-out mice, guanylate cyclase-activating proteins 1 and 2, and cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase were undetectable, although rhodopsin and transducin α-subunit were mostly unaffected. Outer segment membranes of GC1−/− and GC double knock-out cones were destabilized and devoid of cone transducin (α- and γ-subunits), cone phosphodiesterase, and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 1, whereas cone pigments were present at reduced levels. Real time reverse transcription-PCR analyses demonstrated normal RNA transcript levels for the down-regulated proteins, indicating that down-regulation is posttranslational. We interpret these results to demonstrate an intrinsic requirement of GCs for stability and/or transport of a set of membrane-associated phototransduction proteins. PMID:17255100

  20. Potential role of mitochondrial superoxide decreasing ferrochelatase and heme in coronary artery soluble guanylate cyclase depletion by angiotensin II.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dhara; Alhawaj, Raed; Kelly, Melissa R; Accarino, John J O; Lakhkar, Anand; Gupte, Sachin A; Sun, Dong; Wolin, Michael S

    2016-06-01

    Oxidation of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) heme promotes loss of regulation by nitric oxide (NO) and depletion of sGC. We hypothesized that angiotensin II (ANG II) stimulation of mitochondrial superoxide by its type 1 receptor could function as a potential inhibitor of heme biosynthesis by ferrochelatase, and this could decrease vascular responsiveness to NO by depleting sGC. These processes were investigated in a 24-h organoid culture model of bovine coronary arteries (BCA) with 0.1 μM ANG II. Treatment of BCA with ANG II increased mitochondrial superoxide, depleted mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2), ferrochelatase, and cytochrome oxidase subunit 4, and sGC, associated with impairment of relaxation to NO. These processes were attenuated by organoid culture with 8-bromo-cGMP and/or δ-aminolevulinic acid (a stimulator of sGC by protoporphyrin IX generation and heme biosynthesis). Organoid culture with Mito-TEMPOL, a scavenger of mitochondrial matrix superoxide, also attenuated ANG II-elicited ferrochelatase depletion and loss of relaxation to NO, whereas organoid culture with Tempol, an extramitochondrial scavenger of superoxide, attenuated the loss of relaxation to NO by ANG II, but not ferrochelatase depletion, suggesting cytosolic superoxide could be an initiating factor in the loss of sGC regulation by NO. The depletion of cytochrome oxidase subunit 4 and sGC (but not catalase) suggests that sGC expression may be very sensitive to depletion of heme caused by ANG II disrupting ferrochelatase activity by increasing mitochondrial superoxide. In addition, cGMP-dependent activation of protein kinase G appears to attenuate these ANG II-stimulated processes through both preventing SOD2 depletion and increases in mitochondrial and extramitochondrial superoxide. PMID:27037373

  1. Alternative splicing for the alpha1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, D; Taylor, J F; Hoffmann, J W; Carnaghi, L; Giddings, S J; Zakeri, H; Kwok, P Y

    2000-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), the receptor for nitric oxide, is a heterodimer consisting of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated the mRNA species for the alpha(1) subunit in human brain, heart, artery and immortalized B-lymphocytes. Three mRNA species were identified in these tissues. The major mRNA species contained the full expression sequence of the alpha(1) subunit. Two other types of mRNA were detected in which 5' sequences were deleted by splicing (506-590 and 412-590). Each of these deletions included the predicted translation start site, indicating that translation of these two alternatively spliced RNA species does not result in the production of full-length alpha(1) subunits. The relative amounts of the two mRNA species with deletions of the translation start site differed significantly between cell lines of immortalized B-lymphocytes from different individuals. sGC enzymic activity was significantly decreased in cellular extracts from cell lines with high proportions of mRNA species containing the deletion 506-590 when compared with extracts from cell lines that contained mostly mRNA without this deletion. PMID:10698711

  2. Neurons detect increases and decreases in oxygen levels using distinct guanylate cyclases.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Manuel; Gray, Jesse M; Pokala, Navin; Chang, Andy J; Karow, David S; Marletta, Michael A; Hudson, Martin L; Morton, David B; Chronis, Nikos; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2009-03-26

    Homeostatic sensory systems detect small deviations in temperature, water balance, pH, and energy needs to regulate adaptive behavior and physiology. In C. elegans, a homeostatic preference for intermediate oxygen (O2) levels requires cGMP signaling through soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs), proteins that bind gases through an associated heme group. Here we use behavioral analysis, functional imaging, and genetics to show that reciprocal changes in O2 levels are encoded by sensory neurons that express alternative sets of sGCs. URX sensory neurons are activated by increases in O2 levels, and require the sGCs gcy-35 and gcy-36. BAG sensory neurons are activated by decreases in O2 levels, and require the sGCs gcy-31 and gcy-33. The sGCs are instructive O2 sensors, as forced expression of URX sGC genes causes BAG neurons to detect O2 increases. Both sGC expression and cell-intrinsic dynamics contribute to the differential roles of URX and BAG in O2-dependent behaviors. PMID:19323996

  3. Control of nitric oxide dynamics by guanylate cyclase in its activated state.

    PubMed

    Négrerie, M; Bouzhir, L; Martin, J L; Liebl, U

    2001-12-14

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the target of nitric oxide (NO) released by nitric-oxide synthase in endothelial cells, inducing an increase of cGMP synthesis in response. This heterodimeric protein possesses a regulatory subunit carrying a heme where NO binding occurs, while the second subunit harbors the catalytic site. The binding of NO and the subsequent breaking of the bond between the proximal histidine and the heme-Fe(2+) are assumed to induce conformational changes, which are the origin of the catalytic activation. At the molecular level, the activation and deactivation mechanisms are unknown, as is the dynamics of NO once in the heme pocket. Using ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy, we measured the kinetics of NO rebinding to sGC after photodissociation. The main spectral transient in the Soret band does not match the equilibrium difference spectrum of NO-liganded minus unliganded sGC, and the geminate rebinding was found to be monoexponential and ultrafast (tau = 7.5 ps), with a relative amplitude close to unity (0.97). These characteristics, so far not observed in other hemoproteins, indicate that NO encounters a high energy barrier for escaping from the heme pocket once the His-Fe(2+) bond has been cleaved; this bond does not reform before NO recombination. The deactivation of isolated sGC cannot occur by only simple diffusion of NO from the heme; therefore, several allosteric states may be inferred, including a desensitized one, to induce NO release. Thus, besides the structural change leading to activation, a consequence of the decoupling of the proximal histidine may also be to induce a change of the heme pocket distal geometry, which raises the energy barrier for NO escape, optimizing the efficiency of NO trapping. The non-single exponential character of the NO picosecond rebinding coexists only with the presence of the protein structure surrounding the heme, and the single exponential rate observed in sGC is very likely to be due to

  4. Targeting soluble guanylate cyclase for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Lasker, George F; Maley, Jason H; Pankey, Edward A; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a disease characterized by a sustained increase in pulmonary arterial pressure leading to right heart failure. Current treatments focus on endothelial dysfunction and an aberrant regulatory pathway for vascular tone. Unfortunately, a large proportion of patients are unresponsive to conventional vasodilator therapy. Investigations are ongoing into the effects of experimental therapies targeting the signal transduction pathway that mediates vasodilation. Here, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension and endothelial dysfunction, along with current treatments. We then present a focused review of recent animal studies and human trials examining the use of activators and stimulators of soluble guanylate cyclase for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:21510726

  5. Motion of proximal histidine and structural allosteric transition in soluble guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Rappaport, Fabrice; Negrerie, Michel

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the changes of heme coordination in purified soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) by time-resolved spectroscopy in a time range encompassing 11 orders of magnitude (from 1 ps to 0.2 s). After dissociation, NO either recombines geminately to the 4-coordinate (4c) heme (τG1 = 7.5 ps; 97 ± 1% of the population) or exits the heme pocket (3 ± 1%). The proximal His rebinds to the 4c heme with a 70-ps time constant. Then, NO is distributed in two approximately equal populations (1.5%). One geminately rebinds to the 5c heme (τG2 = 6.5 ns), whereas the other diffuses out to the solution, from where it rebinds bimolecularly (τ = 50 μs with [NO] = 200 μM) forming a 6c heme with a diffusion-limited rate constant of 2 × 108 M−1⋅s−1. In both cases, the rebinding of NO induces the cleavage of the Fe-His bond that can be observed as an individual reaction step. Saliently, the time constant of bond cleavage differs depending on whether NO binds geminately or from solution (τ5C1 = 0.66 μs and τ5C2 = 10 ms, respectively). Because the same event occurs with rates separated by four orders of magnitude, this measurement implies that sGC is in different structural states in both cases, having different strain exerted on the Fe-His bond. We show here that this structural allosteric transition takes place in the range 1–50 μs. In this context, the detection of NO binding to the proximal side of sGC heme is discussed. PMID:25831539

  6. [Soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the therapeutic action of drugs].

    PubMed

    Piatakova, N V; Severina, I S

    2012-01-01

    The influence of ambroxol--a mucolytic drug--on the activity of human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase and activation of both enzymes by NO-donors (sodium nitroprusside and Sin-1) were investigated. Ambroxol in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 microM had no effect on the basal activity of both enzymes. Ambroxol inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase and rat lung soluble guanylate cyclase with the IC50 values 3.9 and 2.1 microM, respectively. Ambroxol did not influence the stimulation of both enzymes by protoporphyrin IX. The influence of artemisinin--an antimalarial drug--on human platelet soluble guanylate cyclase activity and the enzyme activation by NO-donors were investigated. Artemisinin (0.1-100 microM) had no effect on the basal activity of the enzyme. Artemisinin inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner the sodium nitroprusside-induced activation of human platelet guanylate cyclase with an IC50 value 5.6 microM. Artemisinin (10 microM) also inhibited (by 71 +/- 4.0%) the activation of the enzyme by thiol-dependent NO-donor the derivative of furoxan, 3,4-dicyano-1,2,5-oxadiazolo-2-oxide (10 microM), but did not influence the stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase by protoporphyrin IX. It was concluded that the sygnalling system NO-soluble guanylate cyclase-cGMP is involved in the molecular mechanism of the therapeutic action of ambroxol and artemisinin. PMID:22642150

  7. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulation Prevents Fibrotic Tissue Remodeling and Improves Survival in Salt-Sensitive Dahl Rats

    PubMed Central

    Geschka, Sandra; Kretschmer, Axel; Sharkovska, Yuliya; Evgenov, Oleg V.; Lawrenz, Bettina; Hucke, Andreas; Hocher, Berthold; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background A direct pharmacological stimulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is an emerging therapeutic approach to the management of various cardiovascular disorders associated with endothelial dysfunction. Novel sGC stimulators, including riociguat (BAY 63-2521), have a dual mode of action: They sensitize sGC to endogenously produced nitric oxide (NO) and also directly stimulate sGC independently of NO. Little is known about their effects on tissue remodeling and degeneration and survival in experimental malignant hypertension. Methods and Results Mortality, hemodynamics and biomarkers of tissue remodeling and degeneration were assessed in Dahl salt-sensitive rats maintained on a high salt diet and treated with riociguat (3 or 10 mg/kg/d) for 14 weeks. Riociguat markedly attenuated systemic hypertension, improved systolic heart function and increased survival from 33% to 85%. Histological examination of the heart and kidneys revealed that riociguat significantly ameliorated fibrotic tissue remodeling and degeneration. Correspondingly, mRNA expression of the pro-fibrotic biomarkers osteopontin (OPN), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) in the myocardium and the renal cortex was attenuated by riociguat. In addition, riociguat reduced plasma and urinary levels of OPN, TIMP-1, and PAI-1. Conclusions Stimulation of sGC by riociguat markedly improves survival and attenuates systemic hypertension and systolic dysfunction, as well as fibrotic tissue remodeling in the myocardium and the renal cortex in a rodent model of pressure and volume overload. These findings suggest a therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in diseases associated with impaired cardiovascular and renal functions. PMID:21789188

  8. Downregulation of vascular soluble guanylate cyclase induced by high salt intake in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Kagota, Satomi; Tamashiro, Akiko; Yamaguchi, Yu; Sugiura, Reiko; Kuno, Takayoshi; Nakamura, Kazuki; Kunitomo, Masaru

    2001-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cyclic GMP)-mediated mechanism plays an important role in vasodilatation and blood pressure regulation. We investigated the effects of high salt intake on the nitric oxide (NO) – cyclic GMP signal transduction pathway regulating relaxation in aortas of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR).Four-week-old SHR and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY) received a normal salt diet (0.3% NaCl) or a high salt diet (8% NaCl) for 4 weeks.In aortic rings from SHR, endothelium-dependent relaxations in response to acetylcholine (ACh), adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and calcium ionophore A23187 were significantly impaired by the high salt intake. The endothelium-independent relaxations in response to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and nitroglycerin were also impaired, but that to 8-bromo-cyclic GMP remained unchanged. On the other hand, high salt diet had no significant effects on the relaxations of aortic rings from WKY.In aortas from SHR, the release of NO stimulated by ACh was significantly enhanced, whereas the production of cyclic GMP induced by either ACh or SNP was decreased by the high salt intake.Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) was slightly increased, whereas that of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) was dramatically reduced by the high salt intake.These results indicate that in SHR, excessive dietary salt can result in downregulation of sGC followed by decreased cyclic GMP production, which leads to impairment of vascular relaxation in responses to NO. It is notable that chronic high salt intake impairs the sGC/cyclic GMP pathway but not the eNOS/NO pathway. PMID:11606313

  9. Role of soluble guanylate cyclase in the molecular mechanism underlying the physiological effects of nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Severina, I S

    1998-07-01

    In this review the molecular mechanisms underlying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide (NO) are discussed. It has been shown that these effects are directly connected with the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and the accumulation of cyclic 3;,5;-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). The mechanism of guanylate cyclase activation by NO is analyzed, especially the role and biological significance of the nitrosyl--heme complex formed as a result of interaction of guanylate cyclase heme with NO and the role of sulfhydryl groups of the enzyme in this process. Using new approaches for studying the antihypertensive and antiaggregatory actions of nitric oxide in combination with the newly obtained data on the regulatory role of guanylate cyclase in the platelet aggregation process, the most important results were obtained regarding the molecular bases providing for a directed search for and creation of new effective antihypertensive and antiaggregatory preparations. In studying the molecular mechanism for directed activation of soluble guanylate cyclase by new NO donors, a series of hitherto unknown enzyme activators generating NO and involved in the regulation of hemostasis and vascular tone were revealed. PMID:9721331

  10. Purification and physiological evaluation of a guanylate cyclase activating protein from retinal rods.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczyca, W A; Gray-Keller, M P; Detwiler, P B; Palczewski, K

    1994-01-01

    In retinal rods light triggers a cascade of enzymatic reactions that increases cGMP hydrolysis and generates an electrical signal by causing closure of cGMP-gated ion channels in the photoreceptor outer segment. This leads to a decrease in internal Ca, which activates guanylate cyclase and promotes photoresponse recovery by stimulating the resynthesis of cGMP. We report here that the activation of guanylate cyclase by low Ca is mediated by an approximately 20-kDa protein purified from bovine rod outer segments by using DEAE-Sepharose, hydroxylapatite, and reverse-phase chromatographies. In a reconstituted system, this protein restores the Ca-sensitive regulation of guanylate cyclase and when dialyzed into functionally intact lizard rod outer segment decreases the sensitivity, time to peak, and recovery time of the flash response. Images PMID:7909609

  11. Heme-Dependent and Independent Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Activators and Vasodilation

    PubMed Central

    Priviero, Fernanda B. M.; Webb, R. Clinton

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of nitric oxide (NO), which is released from endothelial cells as the main mediator of vasodilation, its target, the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), has become a focus of interest for the treatment of diseases associated with endothelial dysfunction. NO donors were developed to suppress NO deficiency; however, tolerance to organic nitrates was reported. Non-NO-based drugs targeting sGC were developed to overcome the problem of tolerance. In this review, we briefly describe the process of sGC activation by its main physiological activator NO and the advances in the development of drugs capable of activating sGC in a NO-independent manner. sGC stimulators, as some of these drugs are called, require the integrity of the reduced heme moiety of the prosthetic group within the sGC and therefore are called heme-dependent stimulators. Other drugs are able to activate sGC independent of heme moiety and are hence called heme-independent activators. Because pathologic conditions modulate sGC and oxidize the heme moiety, the heme-independent sGC activators could potentially become drugs of choice because of their higher affinity to the oxidized enzyme. However, these drugs are still undergoing clinical trials and are not available for clinical use. PMID:20571429

  12. Preconditioning with soluble guanylate cyclase activation prevents postischemic inflammation and reduces nitrate tolerance in heme oxygenase-1 knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Walter Z; Jones, Allan W; Wang, Meifang; Durante, William; Korthuis, Ronald J

    2013-08-15

    Previously we have shown that, unlike wild-type mice (WT), heme oxygenase-1 knockout (HO-1-/-) mice developed nitrate tolerance and were not protected from inflammation caused by ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) when preconditioned with a H2S donor. We hypothesized that stimulation (with BAY 41-2272) or activation (with BAY 60-2770) of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) would precondition HO-1-/- mice against an inflammatory effect of I/R and increase arterial nitrate responses. Intravital fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize leukocyte rolling and adhesion to postcapillary venules of the small intestine in anesthetized mice. Relaxation to ACh and BAY compounds was measured on superior mesenteric arteries isolated after I/R protocols. Preconditioning with either BAY compound 10 min (early phase) or 24 h (late phase) before I/R reduced postischemic leukocyte rolling and adhesion to sham control levels and increased superior mesenteric artery responses to ACh, sodium nitroprusside, and BAY 41-2272 in WT and HO-1-/- mice. Late-phase preconditioning with BAY 60-2770 was maintained in HO-1-/- and endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice pretreated with an inhibitor (dl-propargylglycine) of enzymatically produced H2S. Pretreatment with BAY compounds also prevented the I/R increase in small intestinal TNF-α. We speculate that increasing sGC activity and related PKG acts downstream to H2S and disrupts signaling processes triggered by I/R in part by maintaining low cellular Ca²⁺. In addition, BAY preconditioning did not increase sGC levels, yet increased the response to agents that act on reduced heme-containing sGC. Collectively these actions would contribute to increased nitrate sensitivity and vascular function. PMID:23771693

  13. Biological activity of designed photolabile metal nitrosyls: light-dependent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and vasorelaxant properties in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Madhani, Melanie; Patra, Apurba K; Miller, Thomas W; Eroy-Reveles, Aura A; Hobbs, Adrian J; Fukuto, Jon M; Mascharak, Pradip K

    2006-12-14

    The biological and pharmacological utility of nitric oxide (NO) has led to the development of many classes of NO-donor compounds as both research tools and therapeutic agents. Many donors currently in use rely on thermal decomposition or bioactivation for the release of NO. We have developed several photolabile metal-nitrosyl donors that release NO when exposed to either visible or UV light. Herein, we show that these donors are capable of activating the primary "NO receptor", soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), in a light-dependent fashion leading to increases in cGMP. Moreover, we demonstrate that these donors are capable of eliciting light-dependent increases of cGMP in smooth muscle cells and vasorelaxation of rat aortic smooth muscle tissue, all effects that are attributed to activation of sGC. The potential utility of these compounds as drugs and/or research tools is discussed. PMID:17149862

  14. Soluble guanylate cyclase is activated differently by excess NO and by YC-1: Resonance Raman spectroscopic evidence†

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Derbyshire, Emily R.; Soldatova, Alexandra V.; Marletta, Michael A.; Spiro, Thomas G.

    2010-01-01

    Modulation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) activity by nitric oxide (NO) involves two distinct steps. Low level activation of sGC is achieved by the stoichiometric binding of NO (1-NO) to the heme cofactor, while much higher activation is achieved by the binding of additional NO (xsNO) at a non-heme site. Addition of the allosteric activator YC-1 to the 1-NO form leads to activity comparable to xsNO state. In this study the mechanisms of sGC activation were investigated using electronic absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopic methods. RR spectroscopy confirmed that the 1-NO form contains 5-coordinate NO-heme and showed that the addition of NO to the 1-NO form has no significant effect on the spectrum. In contrast, addition of YC-1 to either the 1-NO or xsNO forms alters the RR spectrum significantly, indicating a protein-induced change in the heme geometry. This change in the heme geometry was also observed when BAY 41-2272 was added to the xsNO form. Bands assigned to bending and stretching motions of the vinyl and propionate substituents change intensity in a pattern suggesting altered tilting of the pyrrole rings to which they are attached. In addition, the N-O stretching frequency increases, with no change in the Fe-NO frequency, an effect modeled via DFT calculations as resulting from a small opening of the Fe-N-O angle. These spectral differences demonstrate different mechanisms of activation by synthetic activators, such as YC-1 and BAY 41-2272, and excess NO. PMID:20459051

  15. Revisiting the kinetics of nitric oxide (NO) binding to soluble guanylate cyclase: The simple NO-binding model is incorrect

    PubMed Central

    Ballou, David P.; Zhao, Yunde; Brandish, Philip E.; Marletta, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a ferrous iron hemoprotein receptor for nitric oxide (NO). NO binding to the heme activates the enzyme 300-fold. sGC as isolated is five-coordinate, ferrous with histidine as the axial ligand. The NO-activated enzyme is a five-coordinate nitrosyl complex where the axial histidine bond is broken. Past studies using rapid-reaction kinetics demonstrated that both the formation of a six-coordinate intermediate and the conversion of the intermediate to the activated five-coordinate nitrosyl complex depended on the concentration of NO. A model invoking a second NO molecule as a catalyst for the conversion of the six-coordinate intermediate to the five-coordinate sGC–NO complex was proposed to explain the observed kinetic data. A recent study [Bellamy, T. C., Wood, J. & Garthwaite, J. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 507–510] concluded that a simple two-step binding model explains the results. Here we show through further analysis and simulations of previous data that the simple two-step binding model cannot be used to describe our results. Instead we show that a slightly more complex two-step binding model, where NO is used as a ligand in the first step and a catalyst in the second step, can describe our results quite satisfactorily. These new simulations combined with the previous activation data lead to the conclusion that the intermediate six-coordinate sGC–NO complex has substantial activity. The model derived from our simulations also can account for the slow deactivation of sGC that has been observed in vitro. PMID:12209005

  16. Receptor-type guanylate cyclase is required for carbon dioxide sensation by Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hallem, Elissa A; Spencer, W Clay; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Zeller, Georg; Henz, Stefan R; Rätsch, Gunnar; Miller, David M; Horvitz, H Robert; Sternberg, Paul W; Ringstad, Niels

    2011-01-01

    CO(2) is both a critical regulator of animal physiology and an important sensory cue for many animals for host detection, food location, and mate finding. The free-living soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans shows CO(2) avoidance behavior, which requires a pair of ciliated sensory neurons, the BAG neurons. Using in vivo calcium imaging, we show that CO(2) specifically activates the BAG neurons and that the CO(2)-sensing function of BAG neurons requires TAX-2/TAX-4 cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels and the receptor-type guanylate cyclase GCY-9. Our results delineate a molecular pathway for CO(2) sensing and suggest that activation of a receptor-type guanylate cyclase is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism by which animals detect environmental CO(2). PMID:21173231

  17. Involvement of H1 and H2 receptors and soluble guanylate cyclase in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Kristine H.; Moor, Andrea N.; Souza-Smith, Flavia M.; Breslin, Jerome W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study investigated the roles of the H1 and H2 histamine receptors, nitric oxide (NO) synthase, and soluble guanylate (sGC) cyclase in histamine-induced modulation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic pumping. Methods Isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics were treated with 1–100 μM histamine. Histamine receptors were blocked with either the H1 antagonist mepyramine or the H2 antagonist cimetidine. The role of NO/sGC signaling was tested using the arginine analog L-NAME, the sGC inhibitor ODQ, and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) as a positive control. Results Histamine applied at 100 μM decreased tone and contraction frequency (CF) of isolated rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. Pharmacologic blockade of either H1 or H2 histamine receptors significantly inhibited the response to histamine. Pretreatment with ODQ, but not L-NAME, completely inhibited the histamine-induced decrease in tone. ODQ pretreatment also significantly inhibited SNP-induced lymphatic relaxation. Conclusions H1 and H2 histamine receptors are both involved in histamine-induced relaxation of rat mesenteric collecting lymphatics. NO synthesis does not appear to contribute to the histamine-induced response. However, sGC is critical for the histamine-induced decrease in tone and contributes to the drop in CF. PMID:24702851

  18. α1 Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase (sGC) Splice Forms as Potential Regulators of Human sGC Activity*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Jelen, Filip; Bogatenkova, Elena P.; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a key protein in the NO/cGMP signaling pathway, is an obligatory heterodimeric protein composed of one α- and one β-subunit. The α1/β1 sGC heterodimer is the predominant form expressed in various tissues and is regarded as the major isoform mediating NO-dependent effects such as vasodilation. We have identified three new α1 sGC protein variants generated by alternative splicing. The 363 residue N1-α1 sGC splice variant contains the regulatory domain, but lacks the catalytic domain. The shorter N2-α1 sGC maintains 126 N-terminal residues and gains an additional 17 unique residues. The C-α1 sGC variant lacks 240 N-terminal amino acids, but maintains a part of the regulatory domain and the entire catalytic domain. Q-PCR of N1-α1, N2-α1 sGC mRNA levels together with RT-PCR analysis for C-α1 sGC demonstrated that the expression of the α1 sGC splice forms vary in different human tissues indicative of tissue-specific regulation. Functional analysis of the N1-α1 sGC demonstrated that this protein has a dominant-negative effect on the activity of sGC when coexpressed with the α1/β1 heterodimer. The C-α1 sGC variant heterodimerizes with the β1 subunit and produces a fully functional NO- and BAY41-2272-sensitive enzyme. We also found that despite identical susceptibility to inhibition by ODQ, intracellular levels of the 54-kDa C-α1 band did not change in response to ODQ treatments, while the level of 83 kDa α1 band was significantly affected by ODQ. These studies suggest that modulation of the level and diversity of splice forms may represent novel mechanisms modulating the function of sGC in different human tissues. PMID:18381288

  19. Regulation of Neuronal Oxygen Responses in C. elegans Is Mediated through Interactions between Globin 5 and the H-NOX Domains of Soluble Guanylate Cyclases.

    PubMed

    Abergel, Zohar; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Zuckerman, Binyamin; Gross, Einav

    2016-01-20

    Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) are gas-binding proteins that control diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and synaptic plasticity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex of sGCs, GCY-35 and GCY-36, functions in oxygen (O2) sensing. Previous studies suggested that the neuroglobin GLB-5 genetically interacts with GCY-35, and that the inhibitory effect of GLB-5 on GCY-35 function is necessary for fast recovery from prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we identified mutations in gcy-35 and gcy-36 that impact fast recovery and other phenotypes associated with GLB-5, without undermining sGC activity. These mutations, heb1 and heb3, change conserved amino acid residues in the regulatory H-NOX domains of GCY-35 and GCY-36, respectively, and appear to suppress GLB-5 activity by different mechanisms. Moreover, we observed that short exposure to 35% O2 desensitized the neurons responsible for ambient O2 sensing and that this phenomenon does not occur in heb1 animals. These observations may implicate sGCs in neuronal desensitization mechanisms far beyond the specific case of O2 sensing in nematodes. The conservation of functionally important regions of sGCs is supported by examining site-directed mutants of GCY-35, which suggested that similar regions in the H-NOX domains of O2 and NO-sensing sGCs are important for heme/gas interactions. Overall, our studies provide novel insights into sGC activity and regulation, and implicate similar structural determinants in the control of both O2 and NO sensors. Significance statement: Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) control essential and diverse physiological processes, including memory processing. We used Caenorhabditis elegans to explore how a neuroglobin inhibits a complex of oxygen-sensing sGCs, identifying sGC mutants that resist inhibition. Resistance appears to arise by two different mechanisms: increased basal sGC activity or disruption of an interaction with neuroglobin. Our

  20. Regulation of Neuronal Oxygen Responses in C. elegans Is Mediated through Interactions between Globin 5 and the H-NOX Domains of Soluble Guanylate Cyclases

    PubMed Central

    Abergel, Zohar; Chatterjee, Arijit Kumar; Zuckerman, Binyamin

    2016-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) are gas-binding proteins that control diverse physiological processes such as vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and synaptic plasticity. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a complex of sGCs, GCY-35 and GCY-36, functions in oxygen (O2) sensing. Previous studies suggested that the neuroglobin GLB-5 genetically interacts with GCY-35, and that the inhibitory effect of GLB-5 on GCY-35 function is necessary for fast recovery from prolonged hypoxia. In this study, we identified mutations in gcy-35 and gcy-36 that impact fast recovery and other phenotypes associated with GLB-5, without undermining sGC activity. These mutations, heb1 and heb3, change conserved amino acid residues in the regulatory H-NOX domains of GCY-35 and GCY-36, respectively, and appear to suppress GLB-5 activity by different mechanisms. Moreover, we observed that short exposure to 35% O2 desensitized the neurons responsible for ambient O2 sensing and that this phenomenon does not occur in heb1 animals. These observations may implicate sGCs in neuronal desensitization mechanisms far beyond the specific case of O2 sensing in nematodes. The conservation of functionally important regions of sGCs is supported by examining site-directed mutants of GCY-35, which suggested that similar regions in the H-NOX domains of O2 and NO-sensing sGCs are important for heme/gas interactions. Overall, our studies provide novel insights into sGC activity and regulation, and implicate similar structural determinants in the control of both O2 and NO sensors. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Soluble guanylate cyclases (sGCs) control essential and diverse physiological processes, including memory processing. We used Caenorhabditis elegans to explore how a neuroglobin inhibits a complex of oxygen-sensing sGCs, identifying sGC mutants that resist inhibition. Resistance appears to arise by two different mechanisms: increased basal sGC activity or disruption of an interaction with neuroglobin. Our

  1. Role of guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs) in setting the flash sensitivity of rod photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Ana; Burns, Marie E.; Sokal, Izabela; Dizhoor, Alexander M.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Baylor, Denis A.; Chen, Jeannie

    2001-01-01

    The retina's photoreceptor cells adjust their sensitivity to allow photons to be transduced over a wide range of light intensities. One mechanism thought to participate in sensitivity adjustments is Ca2+ regulation of guanylate cyclase (GC) by guanylate cyclase-activating proteins (GCAPs). We evaluated the contribution of GCAPs to sensitivity regulation in rods by disrupting their expression in transgenic mice. The GC activity from GCAPs−/− retinas showed no Ca2+ dependence, indicating that Ca2+ regulation of GCs had indeed been abolished. Flash responses from dark-adapted GCAPs−/− rods were larger and slower than responses from wild-type rods. In addition, the incremental flash sensitivity of GCAPs−/− rods failed to be maintained at wild-type levels in bright steady light. GCAP2 expressed in GCAPs−/− rods restored maximal light-induced GC activity but did not restore normal flash response kinetics. We conclude that GCAPs strongly regulate GC activity in mouse rods, decreasing the flash sensitivity in darkness and increasing the incremental flash sensitivity in bright steady light, thereby extending the rod's operating range. PMID:11493703

  2. Oxygen sensation and social feeding mediated by a C. elegans guanylate cyclase homologue.

    PubMed

    Gray, Jesse M; Karow, David S; Lu, Hang; Chang, Andy J; Chang, Jennifer S; Ellis, Ronald E; Marletta, Michael A; Bargmann, Cornelia I

    2004-07-15

    Specialized oxygen-sensing cells in the nervous system generate rapid behavioural responses to oxygen. We show here that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans exhibits a strong behavioural preference for 5-12% oxygen, avoiding higher and lower oxygen levels. 3',5'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is a common second messenger in sensory transduction and is implicated in oxygen sensation. Avoidance of high oxygen levels by C. elegans requires the sensory cGMP-gated channel tax-2/tax-4 and a specific soluble guanylate cyclase homologue, gcy-35. The GCY-35 haem domain binds molecular oxygen, unlike the haem domains of classical nitric-oxide-regulated guanylate cyclases. GCY-35 and TAX-4 mediate oxygen sensation in four sensory neurons that control a naturally polymorphic social feeding behaviour in C. elegans. Social feeding and related behaviours occur only when oxygen exceeds C. elegans' preferred level, and require gcy-35 activity. Our results suggest that GCY-35 is regulated by molecular oxygen, and that social feeding can be a behavioural strategy for responding to hyperoxic environments. PMID:15220933

  3. Cinaciguat, a novel activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, protects against ischemia/reperfusion injury: role of hydrogen sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Salloum, Fadi N.; Das, Anindita; Samidurai, Arun; Hoke, Nicholas N.; Chau, Vinh Q.; Ockaili, Ramzi A.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2012-01-01

    Cinaciguat (BAY 58–2667) is a novel nitric oxide (NO)-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), which induces cGMP-generation and vasodilation in diseased vessels. We tested the hypothesis that cinaciguat might trigger protection against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in the heart and adult cardiomyocytes through cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG)-dependent generation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S). Adult New Zealand White rabbits were pretreated with 1 or 10 μg/kg cinaciguat (iv) or 10% DMSO (vehicle) 15 min before I/R or with 10 μg/kg cinaciguat (iv) at reperfusion. Additionally, adult male ICR mice were treated with either cinaciguat (10 μg/kg ip) or vehicle 30 min before I/R or at the onset of reperfusion (10 μg/kg iv). The PKG inhibitor KT5283 (KT; 1 mg/kg ip) or dl-propargylglycine (PAG; 50 mg/kg ip) the inhibitor of the H2S-producing enzyme cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) were given 10 and 30 min before cinaciguat. Cardiac function and infarct size were assessed by echocardiography and tetrazolium staining, respectively. Primary adult mouse cardiomyocytes were isolated and treated with cinaciguat before simulated ischemia/reoxygenation. Cinaciguat caused 63 and 41% reduction of infarct size when given before I/R and at reperfusion in rabbits, respectively. In mice, cinaciguat pretreatment caused a more robust 80% reduction in infarct size vs. 63% reduction when given at reperfusion and preserved cardiac function following I/R, which were blocked by KT and PAG. Cinaciguat also caused an increase in myocardial PKG activity and CSE expression. In cardiomyocytes, cinaciguat (50 nM) reduced necrosis and apoptosis and increased H2S levels, which was abrogated by KT. Cinaciguat is a novel molecule to induce H2S generation and a powerful protection against I/R injury in heart. PMID:22268103

  4. Heat Shock Protein 90 Associates with the Per-Arnt-Sim Domain of Heme-free Soluble Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Anindya; Dai, Yue; Haque, Mohammad Mahfuzul; Seeger, Franziska; Ghosh, Arnab; Garcin, Elsa D.; Montfort, William R.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Misra, Saurav; Stuehr, Dennis J.

    2015-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (hsp90) drives heme insertion into the β1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) β1, which enables it to associate with a partner sGCα1 subunit and mature into a nitric oxide (NO)-responsive active form. We utilized fluorescence polarization measurements and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry to define molecular interactions between the specific human isoforms hsp90β and apo-sGCβ1. hsp90β and its isolated M domain, but not its isolated N and C domains, bind with low micromolar affinity to a heme-free, truncated version of sGCβ1 (sGCβ1(1–359)-H105F). Surprisingly, hsp90β and its M domain bound to the Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain of apo-sGC-β1(1–359), which lies adjacent to its heme-binding (H-NOX) domain. The interaction specifically involved solvent-exposed regions in the hsp90β M domain that are largely distinct from sites utilized by other hsp90 clients. The interaction strongly protected two regions of the sGCβ1 PAS domain and caused local structural relaxation in other regions, including a PAS dimerization interface and a segment in the H-NOX domain. Our results suggest a means by which the hsp90β interaction could prevent apo-sGCβ1 from associating with its partner sGCα1 subunit while enabling structural changes to assist heme insertion into the H-NOX domain. This mechanism would parallel that in other clients like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor and HIF1α, which also interact with hsp90 through their PAS domains to control protein partner and small ligand binding interactions. PMID:26134567

  5. The Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator Riociguat Ameliorates Pulmonary Hypertension Induced by Hypoxia and SU5416 in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xia; Kalymbetov, Anuar; Weissmann, Norbert; Grimminger, Friedrich; Kretschmer, Axel; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Seeger, Werner; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Schermuly, Ralph Theo

    2012-01-01

    Background The nitric oxide (NO)–soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)–cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) signal-transduction pathway is impaired in many cardiovascular diseases, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Riociguat (BAY 63–2521) is a stimulator of sGC that works both in synergy with and independently of NO to increase levels of cGMP. The aims of this study were to investigate the role of NO–sGC–cGMP signaling in a model of severe PAH and to evaluate the effects of sGC stimulation by riociguat and PDE5 inhibition by sildenafil on pulmonary hemodynamics and vascular remodeling in severe experimental PAH. Methods and Results Severe angioproliferative PAH was induced in rats by combined exposure to the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor antagonist SU5416 and hypoxia (SUHx). Twenty-one days thereafter rats were randomized to receive either riociguat (10 mg/kg/day), sildenafil (50 mg/kg/day) or vehicle by oral gavage, for 14 days until the day of the terminal hemodynamic measurements. Administration of riociguat or sildenafil significantly decreased right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP). Riociguat significantly decreased RV hypertrophy (RVH) (0.55±0.02, p<0.05), increased cardiac output (60.8±.8 mL/minute, p<0.05) and decreased total pulmonary resistance (4.03±0.3 mmHg min−1 ml−1 100 g BW, p<0.05), compared with sildenafil and vehicle. Both compounds significantly decreased the RV collagen content and improved RV function, but the effects of riociguat on tricuspid annular plane systolic excursion and RV myocardial performance were significantly better than those of sildenafil (p<0.05). The proportion of occluded arteries was significantly lower in animals receiving riociguat than in those receiving vehicle (p<0.05); furthermore, the neointima/media ratio was significantly lower in those receiving riociguat than in those receiving sildenafil or vehicle (p<0.05). Conclusion Riociguat and sildenafil significantly reduced

  6. Vasodilator responses to acetylcholine are not mediated by the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase or TRPV4 channels in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A.; Kassan, Modar; Choi, Soo-Kyoung; Matrougui, Khalid; Nossaman, Bobby D.; Hyman, Albert L.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3-]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of the activation of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) on responses to NO donors acetylcholine (ACh) and bradykinin (BK) were investigated in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds of the rat. In these studies the administration of ODQ in a dose of 5 mg/kg iv attenuated vasodilator responses to five different NO donors without inhibiting responses to ACh and BK in the systemic and pulmonary vascular beds of the rat. Vasodilator responses to ACh were not inhibited by l-NAME or the transient receptor vanilloid type 4 (TRPV4) antagonist GSK-2193874, which attenuated vasodilator responses to the TRPV4 agonist GSK-1016790A. ODQ did not inhibit vasodilator responses to agents reported to act in an NO-independent manner or to vasoconstrictor agents, and ODQ did not increase blood methemoglobin levels, suggesting that off target effects were minimal. These results show that ODQ in a dose that inhibited NO donor-mediated responses did not alter vasodilator responses to ACh in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds and did not alter systemic vasodilator responses to BK. The present results indicate that decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in response to ACh are not mediated by the activation of sGC or TRPV4 channels and that ODQ can be used to study the role of the activation of sGC in mediating vasodilator responses in the rat. PMID:24658016

  7. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators and Activators: Novel Therapies for Pulmonary Vascular Disease or a Different Method of Increasing cGMP?

    PubMed

    Koress, Cody; Swan, Kevin; Kadowitz, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressively worsening disorder characterized by increased pulmonary vascular resistance leading to increased afterload, right ventricular hypertrophy, and ultimately right heart failure and death. Current pharmacologic treatments primarily act to reduce pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and provide some benefit but do not cure PAH. Canonical vasodilator therapy involving the nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cGMP pathway has demonstrated efficacy, but in pathologic states, endothelial dysfunction within the pulmonary vasculature leads to the reduced synthesis and bioavailability of NO. Acting downstream of NO, sGC stimulators and activators restore the endogenous functions of NO and exploit the positive effects of sGC stimulation on various organ systems, including the heart. Riociguat (BAY 63-2521) is the first agent in a class of sGC stimulators to receive FDA approval for the treatment of PAH and chronic thromboembolic hypertension (CTEPH). Riociguat has demonstrated significant benefit as assessed by 6MWD, PVR, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, time to clinical worsening, World Health Organization (WHO) functional class, and other quality of life measures in clinical trials as a monotherapy and in combination with endothelin receptor antagonists or non-intravenous prostanoids. Riociguat is the first FDA-approved treatment option for inoperable or persistent CTEPH and adds a new effective drug to available treatment options for pulmonary hypertension (PH). The question of whether riociguat is superior to other available treatment options is unanswered at the present time and requires further study. PMID:27118316

  8. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel pyrazoles and indazoles as activators of the nitric oxide receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Selwood, D L; Brummell, D G; Budworth, J; Burtin, G E; Campbell, R O; Chana, S S; Charles, I G; Fernandez, P A; Glen, R C; Goggin, M C; Hobbs, A J; Kling, M R; Liu, Q; Madge, D J; Meillerais, S; Powell, K L; Reynolds, K; Spacey, G D; Stables, J N; Tatlock, M A; Wheeler, K A; Wishart, G; Woo, C K

    2001-01-01

    Database searching and compound screening identified 1-benzyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyloxy)indazole (benzydamine, 3) as a potent activator of the nitric oxide receptor, soluble guanylate cyclase. A comprehensive structure-activity relationship study surrounding 3 clearly showed that the indazole C-3 dimethylaminopropyloxy substituent was critical for enzyme activity. However replacement of the indazole ring of 3 by appropriately substituted pyrazoles maintained enzyme activity. Compounds were evaluated for inhibition of platelet aggregation and showed a general lipophilicity requirement. Aryl-substituted pyrazoles 32, 34, and 43 demonstrated potent activation of soluble guanylate cyclase and potent inhibition of platelet aggregation. Pharmacokinetic studies in rats showed that compound 32 exhibits modest oral bioavailability (12%). Furthermore 32 has an excellent selectivity profile notably showing no significant inhibition of phosphodiesterases or nitric oxide synthases. PMID:11141091

  9. Identification of guanylate cyclases and related signaling proteins in sperm tail from sea stars by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nakachi, Mia; Matsumoto, Midori; Terry, Philip M; Cerny, Ronald L; Moriyama, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    Marine invertebrates employ external fertilization to take the advantages of sexual reproduction as one of excellent survival strategies. To prevent mismatching, successful fertilization can be made only after going though strictly defined steps in the fertilization. In sea stars, the fertilization process starts with the chemotaxis of sperm followed by hyperactivation of sperm upon arriving onto the egg coat, and then sperm penetrate to the egg coat before achieving the fusion. To investigate whether the initiation of chemotaxis and the following signaling has species specificity, we conducted comparative studies in the protein level among sea stars, Asterias amurensis, A. forbesi, and Asterina pectinifera. Since transcription of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) has been suppressed in gamete, the roles of sperm proteins during the fertilization cannot be investigated by examining the mRNA profile. Therefore, proteomics analysis by mass spectrometry was used in this study. In sea stars, upon receiving asteroidal sperm-activating peptide (asterosap), the receptor membrane-bound guanylate cyclases in the sperm tail trigger sperm chemotaxis. We confirmed the presence of membrane-bound guanylate cyclases in the three sea star species, and they all had the same structural domains including the extracellular domain, kinase-like domain, and guanylate cyclase domain. The majority of peptides recovered were from alpha-helices distributed on the solvent side of the protein. More peptides were recovered from the intracellular domains. The transmembrane domain has not been recovered. The functions of the receptors seemed to be conserved among the species. Furthermore, we identified proteins that may be involved in the guanylate cyclase-triggered signaling pathway. PMID:18461395

  10. Effect of cyanide on nitrovasodilator-induced relaxation, cyclic GMP accumulation and guanylate cyclase activation in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, R M; Murad, F

    1984-09-01

    The effects of sodium cyanide on relaxation, increases in cyclic GMP accumulation and guanylate cyclase activation induced by sodium nitroprusside and other nitrovasodilators were examined in rat thoracic aorta. Cyanide abolished nitroprusside-induced relaxation and the associated increase in cyclic GMP levels. Basal levels of cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP were also depressed. Reversal of nitroprusside-induced relaxation by cyanide was independent of the tissue level of cyclic GMP prior to addition of cyanide. Incubation of nitroprusside with cyanide prior to addition to aortic strips did not alter the relaxant effect of nitroprusside. Sodium azide-, hydroxylamine-, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanide-, nitroglycerin- and acetylcholine-induced relaxations and increased levels of cyclic GMP were also inhibited by cyanide. Relaxations induced by nitric oxide were also inhibited by cyanide, although the relaxation with the low concentration of nitric oxide employed was not accompanied by detectable increases in cyclic GMP. Relaxation to 8-bromo-cyclic GMP was essentially unaltered by cyanide; however, isoproterenol-induced relaxation was inhibited. Guanylate cyclase in soluble and particulate fractions of aorta homogenates was activated by nitroprusside and the activation was prevented by cyanide. The present results suggest that cyanide inhibits nitrovasodilator-induced relaxation through inhibition of guanylate cyclase activation; however, cyanide may also have nonspecific effects which inhibit relaxation. PMID:6149944

  11. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of natriuretic peptide receptor-guanylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Misono, Kunio S.; Philo, John S.; Arakawa, Tsutomu; Ogata, Craig M.; Qiu, Yue; Ogawa, Haruo; Young, Howard S.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and homologous B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and BNP counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by the A-type natriuretic peptide receptor (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylate cyclase (GC) linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation, and signaling mechanism of the NPRA and other receptor-GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacter GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylate cyclase catalytic domain consisting of C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. AC is activated by binding of Gsα to C2 and ensuing 7° rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer into a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in the NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity. PMID:21375693

  12. Genetic modifiers of hypertension in soluble guanylate cyclase α1–deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Emmanuel S.; Raher, Michael J.; Kirby, Andrew; Mohd, Shahid; Baron, David M.; Hayton, Sarah R.; Tainsh, Laurel T.; Sips, Patrick Y.; Rauwerdink, Kristen M.; Yan, Qingshang; Tainsh, Robert E.T.; Shakartzi, Hannah R.; Stevens, Christine; Decaluwé, Kelly; Rodrigues-Machado, Maria da Gloria; Malhotra, Rajeev; Van de Voorde, Johan; Wang, Tong; Brouckaert, Peter; Daly, Mark J.; Bloch, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays an essential role in regulating hypertension and blood flow by inducing relaxation of vascular smooth muscle. Male mice deficient in a NO receptor component, the α1 subunit of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGCα1), are prone to hypertension in some, but not all, mouse strains, suggesting that additional genetic factors contribute to the onset of hypertension. Using linkage analyses, we discovered a quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 1 that was linked to mean arterial pressure (MAP) in the context of sGCα1 deficiency. This region is syntenic with previously identified blood pressure–related QTLs in the human and rat genome and contains the genes coding for renin. Hypertension was associated with increased activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). Further, we found that RAAS inhibition normalized MAP and improved endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in sGCα1-deficient mice. These data identify the RAAS as a blood pressure–modifying mechanism in a setting of impaired NO/cGMP signaling. PMID:22565307

  13. Regulation of intraocular pressure by soluble and membrane guanylate cyclases and their role in glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Buys, Emmanuel S.; Potter, Lincoln R.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Ksander, Bruce R.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is a progressive optic neuropathy characterized by visual field defects that ultimately lead to irreversible blindness (Alward, 2000; Anderson et al., 2006). By the year 2020, an estimated 80 million people will have glaucoma, 11 million of which will be bilaterally blind. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common type of glaucoma. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is currently the only risk factor amenable to treatment. How IOP is regulated and can be modulated remains a topic of active investigation. Available therapies, mostly geared toward lowering IOP, offer incomplete protection, and POAG often goes undetected until irreparable damage has been done, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches, drug targets, and biomarkers (Heijl et al., 2002; Quigley, 2011). In this review, the role of soluble (nitric oxide (NO)-activated) and membrane-bound, natriuretic peptide (NP)-activated guanylate cyclases that generate the secondary signaling molecule cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in the regulation of IOP and in the pathophysiology of POAG will be discussed. PMID:24904270

  14. A Bacterial Hemerythrin Domain Regulates Activity of a Vibrio cholerae Di-Guanylate Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Ruth A.; Ali, Syed Khalid; Klose, Karl E.; Kurtz, Donald M.

    2012-01-01

    The first demonstrated example of a regulatory function for a bacterial hemerythrin (Bhr) domain is reported. Bhrs have a characteristic sequence motif providing ligand residues for a type of non-heme diiron site that is known to bind O2 and undergo autoxidation. The amino acid sequence encoded by the gene, VC1216, from Vibrio cholerae O1 biovar El Tor str. N16961 contains an N-terminal Bhr domain connected to a C-terminal domain characteristic of bacterial di-guanylate cyclases (DGCs) that catalyze formation of cyclic di-(3′,5′)-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) from GTP. This protein, Vc Bhr-DGC, was found to contain two tightly bound non-heme iron atoms per protein monomer. The as-isolated protein showed the spectroscopic signatures of oxo/dicarboxylato-bridged non-heme diferric sites of previously characterized Bhr domains. The diiron site was capable of cycling between diferric and diferrous forms, the latter of which was stable only under anaerobic conditions, undergoing rapid autoxidation upon exposure to air. Vc Bhr-DGC showed approximately 10-times higher DGC activity in the diferrous relative to the diferric form. The level of intracellular c-di-GMP is known to regulate biofilm formation in Vibrio cholerae. The higher DGC activity of the diferrous Vc Bhr-DGC is consistent with induction of biofilm formation in low dioxygen environments. The non-heme diiron cofactor in the Bhr domain thus represents an alternative to heme or flavin for redox and/or diatomic gas sensing and regulation of DGC activity. PMID:23057727

  15. Activation of guanylate cyclase-C attenuates stretch responses and sensitization of mouse colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Bin; Kiyatkin, Michael E.; La, Jun-Ho; Ge, Pei; Solinga, Robert; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Gebhart, G.F.

    2013-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by altered bowel habits, persistent pain and discomfort, and typically colorectal hypersensitivity. Linaclotide, a peripherally-restricted 14-amino acid peptide approved for the treatment of IBS with constipation, relieves constipation and reduces IBS-associated pain in these patients presumably by activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), which stimulates production and release of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) from intestinal epithelial cells. We investigated whether activation of GC-C by the endogenous agonist uroguanylin or the primary downstream effector of that activation, cGMP, directly modulates responses and sensitization of mechanosensitive colorectal primary afferents. The distal 2 cm of mouse colorectum with attached pelvic nerve was harvested, pinned flat mucosal side up for in vitro single-fiber recordings and the encoding properties of mechanosensitive afferents (serosal, mucosal, muscular and muscular-mucosal) to probing and circumferential stretch studied. Both cGMP (10–300μM) and uroguanylin (1–1000nM) applied directly to colorectal receptive endings significantly reduced responses of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents to stretch; serosal and mucosal afferents were not affected. Sensitized responses (i.e., increased responses to stretch) of muscular and muscular-mucosal afferents were reversed by cGMP, returning responses to stretch to control. Blocking the transport of cGMP from colorectal epithelia by probenecid, a mechanism validated by studies in cultured intestinal T84 cells, abolished the inhibitory effect of uroguanylin on muscular-mucosal afferents. These results suggest that GC-C agonists like linaclotide alleviate colorectal pain and hypersensitivity by dampening stretch-sensitive afferent mechanosensitivity and normalizing afferent sensitization. PMID:23739979

  16. Differential effects of stimulus termination on excitation and desensitization of folic acid receptors and guanylate cyclase in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    de Wit, R J; Bulgakov, R; Bominaar, T A; Rinke de Wit, T F

    1987-08-19

    The response of guanylate cyclase to addition of extracellular stimuli is well documented. Here we report for the first time the response of guanylate cyclase to removal of stimuli. Three methods were employed to terminate rapidly a stimulus of folic acid. (1) Addition of a highly active folate deaminase preparation, or (2) 12-fold dilution of the stimulated cell suspension, or (3) addition of an excess concentration of a non-agonistic derivative of folic acid, i.e., 2-deaminofolic acid, which chases the folate agonist from its cell-surface receptors. Accumulation of cGMP terminated instantaneously upon addition of deaminase, but degradation of the synthesized cGMP was not observed until 10-12 s after stimulation. Also in a cGMP phosphodiesterase-lacking 'streamer' mutant an instantaneous termination of further cGMP accumulation was observed upon stimulus removal. This suggests that the termination of cGMP accumulation is due to inactivation of guanylate cyclase instead of a steady state of cGMP synthesis and degradation. Further accumulation of cGMP was approx. 75% reduced upon dilution of a cell suspension after stimulation with both agonists. Stimulation by 300 nM folic acid or by 30 nM N10-methylfolic acid (a more potent agonist) yielded identical results. However, upon addition of deaminofolic acid the accumulation of cGMP continued normally if the cells had been stimulated with N10-methylfolic acid, but only slightly in the case of a folic acid stimulus. The effect of stimulus duration on desensitization was monitored; it was observed that 50% desensitization was induced by stimulation for 1 s, while 4 s was sufficient for maximal desensitization. Short stimuli were observed to elicit high levels of desensitization without much excitation of guanylate cyclase. A desensitization-like process was observed at the level of the folate-binding chemotactic receptors as well. Relationships between the cGMP response data and folic acid receptor kinetics are discussed

  17. Effects of hydroxyl radical scavengers KCN and CO on ultraviolet light-induced activation of crude soluble guanylate cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Karlsson, J.O.; Axelsson, K.L.; Andersson, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The crude soluble guanylate cyclase (GC) from bovine mesenteric artery was stimulated by ultraviolet (UV) light (366 nm). Addition of free radical scavengers, dimethylsulfoxide or superoxide dismutase and/or catalase to the GC assay did not abolish the stimulatory effect of UV light. On the contrary, the UV light-induced activation was enhanced in the presence of these scavengers. KCN (1 mM) did not affect the UV light-induced activation, while 0.1 mM of CO potentiated the activation. These results may indicate that UV light is operating through a direct interaction with the ferrous form of the GC-heme.

  18. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric alphabeta soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the beta subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type alphabeta enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant alphabetaCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrim idin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the beta subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer.

  19. A constitutively activated mutant of human soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC): Implication for the mechanism of sGC activation

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida; Kots, Alexander; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Heterodimeric αβ soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a recognized receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and mediates many of its physiological functions. Although it has been clear that the heme moiety coordinated by His-105 of the β subunit is crucial for mediating the activation of the enzyme by NO, it is not understood whether the heme moiety plays any role in the function of the enzyme in the absence of NO. Here we analyze the effects of biochemical and genetic removal of heme and its reconstitution on the activity of the enzyme. Detergent-induced loss of heme from the wild-type αβ enzyme resulted in several-fold activation of the enzyme. This activation was inhibited after hemin reconstitution. A heme-deficient mutant αβCys-105 with Cys substituted for His-105 was constitutively active with specific activity approaching the activity of the wild-type enzyme activated by NO. However, reconstitution of mutant enzyme with heme and/or DTT treatment significantly inhibited the enzyme. Mutant enzyme reconstituted with ferrous heme was activated by NO and CO alone and showed additive effects between gaseous effectors and the allosteric activator 5-cyclopropyl-2-[1-(2-fluoro-benzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl]-pyrimidin-4-ylamine. We propose that the heme moiety through its coordination with His-105 of the β subunit acts as an endogenous inhibitor of sGC. Disruption of the heme-coordinating bond induced by binding of NO releases the restrictions imposed by this bond and allows the formation of an optimally organized catalytic center in the heterodimer. PMID:12883009

  20. NO-independent regulatory site of direct sGC stimulators like YC-1 and BAY 41-2272

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Eva Maria; Alonso-Alija, Cristina; Apeler, Heiner; Gerzer, Rupert; Minuth, Torsten; Pleiβ, Ulrich; Schmidt, Peter; Schramm, Matthias; Schröder, Henning; Schroeder, Werner; Steinke, Wolfram; Straub, Alexander; Stasch, Johannes-Peter

    2001-01-01

    Background The most important receptor for nitic oxide is the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a heme containing heterodimer. Recently, a pyrazolopyridine derivative BAY 41-2272, structurally related to YC-1, was identified stimulating soluble guanylate cyclase in an NO-independent manner, which results in vasodilatation and antiplatelet activity. The study described here addresses the identification of the NO-independent site on soluble guanylate cyclase. Results We developed a photoaffinity label (3H-meta-PAL) for the direct and NO-independent soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulator BAY 41-2272 by introducing an azido-group into the tritium labeled compound. The synthesized photoaffinitylabel directly stimulates the purified sGC and shows in combination with NO a synergistic effect on sGC activity. Irradiation with UV light of 3H-meta-PAL together with the highly purified sGC leads to a covalent binding to the α1-subunit of the enzyme. This binding is blocked by unlabeled meta-PAL, YC-1 and BAY 41-2272. For further identification of the NO-independent regulatory site the 3H-meta-PAL labeled sGC was fragmented by CNBr digest. The 3H-meta-PAL binds to a CNBr fragment, consisting of the amino acids 236–290 of the α1-subunit. Determination of radioactivity of the single PTH-cycles from the sequencing of this CNBr fragment detected the cysteines 238 and 243 as binding residues of the 3H-meta-PAL. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that the region surrounding the cysteines 238 and 243 in the α1-subunit of the sGC could play an important role in regulation of sGC activity and could be the target of this new type of sGC stimulators. PMID:11801189

  1. Guanylate cyclase C limits systemic dissemination of a murine enteric pathogen

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Guanylate Cyclase C (GC-C) is an apically-oriented transmembrane receptor that is expressed on epithelial cells of the intestine. Activation of GC-C by the endogenous ligands guanylin or uroguanylin elevates intracellular cGMP and is implicated in intestinal ion secretion, cell proliferation, apoptosis, intestinal barrier function, as well as the susceptibility of the intestine to inflammation. Our aim was to determine if GC-C is required for host defense during infection by the murine enteric pathogen Citrobacter rodentium of the family Enterobacteriacea. Methods GC-C+/+ control mice or those having GC-C genetically ablated (GC-C−/−) were administered C. rodentium by orogastric gavage and analyzed at multiple time points up to post-infection day 20. Commensal bacteria were characterized in uninfected GC-C+/+ and GC-C−/− mice using 16S rRNA PCR analysis. Results GC-C−/− mice had an increase in C. rodentium bacterial load in stool relative to GC-C+/+. C. rodentium infection strongly decreased guanylin expression in GC-C+/+ mice and, to an even greater degree, in GC-C−/− animals. Fluorescent tracer studies indicated that mice lacking GC-C, unlike GC-C+/+ animals, had a substantial loss of intestinal barrier function early in the course of infection. Epithelial cell apoptosis was significantly increased in GC-C−/− mice following 10 days of infection and this was associated with increased frequency and numbers of C. rodentium translocation out of the intestine. Infection led to significant liver histopathology in GC-C−/− mice as well as lymphocyte infiltration and elevated cytokine and chemokine expression. Relative to naïve GC-C+/+ mice, the commensal microflora load in uninfected GC-C−/− mice was decreased and bacterial composition was imbalanced and included outgrowth of the Enterobacteriacea family. Conclusions This work demonstrates the novel finding that GC-C signaling is an essential component of host defense during

  2. Pharmacokinetic interaction profile of riociguat, a new soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rickert, Verena; Haefeli, Walter Emil; Weiss, Johanna

    2014-08-01

    Riociguat is a new soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator under development for pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. So far, the interaction potential of riociguat with other drugs is nearly unknown. Therefore, we assessed in vitro the potency of riociguat to inhibit important drug metabolising enzymes (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4, CYP2C19, and CYP2D6) and drug transporters (P-glycoprotein (P-gp/ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP/ABCG2), and organic anion transporting polypeptides (OATP) 1B1 and 1B3). In addition we evaluated its substrate characteristics for P-gp, BCRP, and the multidrug resistance-associated protein 1 (MRP1/ABCC1). We also assessed riociguat's inducing properties on important drug metabolising enzymes and transporters and investigated its ability to activate the pregnane-X-receptor (PXR). Riociguat was identified as a weak to moderate inhibitor of P-gp (f2-value: 11.7 ± 4.8 μM), BCRP (IC50 = 46.2 ± 20.3 μM), OATP1B1 (IC50 = 34.1 ± 3.15 μM), OATP1B3 (IC50 = 50.3 ± 7.5 μM), CYP2D6 (IC50 = 12.4 ± 0.74 μM), and CYP2C19 (IC50 = 46.1 ± 7.14 μM). Furthermore, it induced mRNA expression of BCRP/ABCG2 (3-fold at 20 μM) and to a lesser extent of CYP3A4 (2.3-fold at 20 μM), UGT1A4, and ABCB11. The only weak inducing properties were confirmed by weak activation of PXR. Considering its systemic concentrations its interaction potential as a perpetrator drug seems to be low. In contrast, our data suggest that riociguat is a P-gp substrate and might therefore act as a victim drug when co-administered with strong P-gp inductors or inhibitors. PMID:24657506

  3. Nitric oxide and guanylate cyclase signalling are differentially involved in gonadotrophin (LH) release responses to two endogenous GnRHs from goldfish pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Meints, A N; Pemberton, J G; Chang, J P

    2012-08-01

    Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) immunoreactivity is present in goldfish gonadotrophs. The present study investigated whether two native goldfish gonadotrophin-releasing hormones (GnRHs), salmon (s)GnRH and chicken (c)GnRH-II, use NOS/nitric oxide (NO) and soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic (c)GMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signalling to stimulate maturational gonadotrophin [teleost gonadotrophin-II, luteinising hormone (LH)] release. In cell column perifusion experiments with dispersed goldfish pituitary cells, the application of three NOS inhibitors (aminoguanidine hemisulphate, 1400W and 7-nitroindazole) and two NO scavengers [2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO) and rutin hydrate] reduced sGnRH-elicited, but not cGnRH-II-induced, LH increases. The NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) increased NO production in goldfish pituitary cells in static incubation. SNP-stimulated LH release in column perifusion was attenuated by PTIO and the sGC inhibitor 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-oneon (ODQ), and additive to responses elicited by cGnRH-II, but not sGnRH. ODQ and the PKG inhibitor KT5823 decreased sGnRH- and cGnRH-II-stimulated LH release. Similarly, the LH response to dibutyryl cGMP was reduced by KT5823. These results indicate that, although only sGnRH uses the NOS/NO pathway to stimulate LH release, both GnRHs utilise sGC/PKG to increase LH secretion. PMID:22487215

  4. Digital Holographic Tomography and Fluorescence Used to Localize sGC in HEK293 Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheldrake, Eric; Mann, Christopher; Gage, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Digital Holographic Tomography (DHT) is used to analyze and localize the intracellular protein soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293) cells. DHT is a non-invasive phase microscopy technique that provides three dimensional quantitative information of HEK293 cells including variance of index of refraction or physical thickness. A fluorescence component will be added to the microscope to further studies of sGC localization. The signaling pathway including nitric oxide (NO) and sGC is studied and has been linked to various cardiovascular diseases, platelet aggregation, and variations in blood pressure via vasodilation. sGC will be labeled using a fluorescent antibody and analyzed using the DHT microscope. DHT will be used to analyze changes in sGC localization in its natural environment and when stimulated by NO. An understanding of how sGC interacts with its surroundings is vital to further research in cardiovascular disease.

  5. Mutations in a guanylate cyclase GCY-35/GCY-36 modify Bardet-Biedl syndrome-associated phenotypes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Mok, Calvin A; Healey, Michael P; Shekhar, Tanvi; Leroux, Michel R; Héon, Elise; Zhen, Mei

    2011-10-01

    Ciliopathies are pleiotropic and genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by defective development and function of the primary cilium. Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) proteins localize to the base of cilia and undergo intraflagellar transport, and the loss of their functions leads to a multisystemic ciliopathy. Here we report the identification of mutations in guanylate cyclases (GCYs) as modifiers of Caenorhabditis elegans bbs endophenotypes. The loss of GCY-35 or GCY-36 results in suppression of the small body size, developmental delay, and exploration defects exhibited by multiple bbs mutants. Moreover, an effector of cGMP signalling, a cGMP-dependent protein kinase, EGL-4, also modifies bbs mutant defects. We propose that a misregulation of cGMP signalling, which underlies developmental and some behavioural defects of C. elegans bbs mutants, may also contribute to some BBS features in other organisms. PMID:22022287

  6. Nicorandil stimulates a Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger by activating guanylate cyclase in guinea pig cardiac myocytes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jiazhang; Watanabe, Yasuhide; Takeuchi, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Kanna; Tashiro, Miyuki; Kita, Satomi; Iwamoto, Takahiro; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Kimura, Junko

    2016-04-01

    Nicorandil, a hybrid of an ATP-sensitive K(+) (KATP) channel opener and a nitrate generator, is used clinically for the treatment of angina pectoris. This agent has been reported to exert antiarrhythmic actions by abolishing both triggered activity and spontaneous automaticity in an in vitro study. It is well known that delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs) are caused by the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange current (I NCX). In this study, we investigated the effect of nicorandil on the cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1). We used the whole-cell patch clamp technique and the Fura-2/AM (Ca(2+) indicator) method to investigate the effect of nicorandil on I NCX in isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes and CCL39 fibroblast cells transfected with dog heart NCX1. Nicorandil enhanced I NCX in a concentration-dependent manner. The EC50 (half-maximum concentration for enhancement of the drug) values were 15.0 and 8.7 μM for the outward and inward components of I NCX, respectively. 8-Bromoguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), a membrane-permeable analog of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), enhanced I NCX. 1H-[1,2,4]Oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a guanylate cyclase inhibitor (10 μM), completely abolished the nicorandil-induced I NCX increase. Nicorandil increased I NCX in CCL39 cells expressing wild-type NCX1 but did not affect mutant NCX1 without a long intracellular loop between transmembrane segments (TMSs) 5 and 6. Nicorandil at 100 μM abolished DADs induced by electrical stimulation with ouabain. Nicorandil enhanced the function of NCX1 via guanylate cyclase and thus may accelerate Ca(2+) exit via NCX1. This may partially contribute to the cardioprotection by nicorandil in addition to shortening action potential duration (APD) by activating KATP channels. PMID:26631169

  7. Overexpression of Guanylate Cyclase Activating Protein 2 in Rod Photoreceptors In Vivo Leads to Morphological Changes at the Synaptic Ribbon

    PubMed Central

    López-Begines, Santiago; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Cuenca, Nicolás; Llorens, Jordi; de la Villa, Pedro; Méndez, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Guanylate cyclase activating proteins are EF-hand containing proteins that confer calcium sensitivity to retinal guanylate cyclase at the outer segment discs of photoreceptor cells. By making the rate of cGMP synthesis dependent on the free intracellular calcium levels set by illumination, GCAPs play a fundamental role in the recovery of the light response and light adaptation. The main isoforms GCAP1 and GCAP2 also localize to the synaptic terminal, where their function is not known. Based on the reported interaction of GCAP2 with Ribeye, the major component of synaptic ribbons, it was proposed that GCAP2 could mediate the synaptic ribbon dynamic changes that happen in response to light. We here present a thorough ultrastructural analysis of rod synaptic terminals in loss-of-function (GCAP1/GCAP2 double knockout) and gain-of-function (transgenic overexpression) mouse models of GCAP2. Rod synaptic ribbons in GCAPs−/− mice did not differ from wildtype ribbons when mice were raised in constant darkness, indicating that GCAPs are not required for ribbon early assembly or maturation. Transgenic overexpression of GCAP2 in rods led to a shortening of synaptic ribbons, and to a higher than normal percentage of club-shaped and spherical ribbon morphologies. Restoration of GCAP2 expression in the GCAPs−/− background (GCAP2 expression in the absence of endogenous GCAP1) had the striking result of shortening ribbon length to a much higher degree than overexpression of GCAP2 in the wildtype background, as well as reducing the thickness of the outer plexiform layer without affecting the number of rod photoreceptor cells. These results indicate that preservation of the GCAP1 to GCAP2 relative levels is relevant for maintaining the integrity of the synaptic terminal. Our demonstration of GCAP2 immunolocalization at synaptic ribbons at the ultrastructural level would support a role of GCAPs at mediating the effect of light on morphological remodeling changes of synaptic

  8. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  9. Structural and functional characterization of the rod outer segment membrane guanylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Goraczniak, R M; Duda, T; Sitaramayya, A; Sharma, R K

    1994-01-01

    In the vertebrate photoreceptor cell, rod outer segment (ROS) is the site of visual signal-transduction process, and a pivotal molecule that regulates this process is cyclic GMP. Cyclic GMP controls the cationic conductance into the ROS, and light causes a decrease in the conductance by activating hydrolysis of the cyclic nucleotide. The identity of the granylate cyclase (ROS-GC) that synthesizes this pool of cyclic GMP is unknown. We now report the cloning, expression and functional characterization of a DNA from bovine retina that encodes ROS-GC. Images Figure 2 Figure 5 PMID:7916565

  10. Expression of guanylate cyclase-C, guanylin, and uroguanylin is downregulated proportionally to the ulcerative colitis disease activity index

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Danfeng; Niu, Junkun; Miao, Jiarong; Dong, Xiangqian; Wang, Hong; Yang, Gang; Wang, Kunhua; Miao, Yinglei

    2016-01-01

    The transmembrane receptor guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C) signaling pathway has been implicated in several gastrointestinal disorders. Activation of GC-C via guanylin (Gn) and uroguanylin (Ugn) regulates intestinal fluid and electrolyte homeostasis. However, how it regulates the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is still unclear. Here, we investigated the activation of GC-C signaling in ulcerative colitis (UC) of different clinical severities. A total of 60 UC patients and 20 normal controls were recruited. Evaluation of the UC disease activity index (DAI) was performed using a modified Mayo scoring system. The expression of GC-C, Gn and Ugn in the colonic mucosa was measured by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blot. We found that the UC patients had significantly lower expression of GC-C, Gn and Ugn than the controls. Furthermore, there were significant differences for GC-C, Gn and Ugn expression for the UC groups of Grade 1, 2 and 3, and their expression levels were reduced with increases in their DAI. Taken together, our results demonstrate that GC-C, Gn and Ugn are downregulated in UC, and this downregulation is more significant with aggravation of the clinical condition. Therefore, the GC-C signaling pathway may be implicated in the progression of UC. PMID:27125248

  11. Vascular natriuretic peptide receptor-linked particulate guanylate cyclases are modulated by nitric oxide–cyclic GMP signalling

    PubMed Central

    Madhani, Melanie; Scotland, Ramona S; MacAllister, Raymond J; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2003-01-01

    The sensitivity of the particulate guanylate cyclase–cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP) system to atrial (ANP) and C-type (CNP) natriuretic peptides was investigated in aortae and mesenteric small arteries from wild-type (WT) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knockout (KO) mice. ANP and CNP produced concentration-dependent relaxations of mouse aorta that were significantly attenuated by the natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A/B antagonist HS-142-1 (10−5 M). Both ANP and CNP were more potent in aortae from eNOS KO mice compared to WT. The potency of ANP and CNP in aortae from WT animals was increased in the presence of the NOS inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (3 × 10−4 M) and the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolol[4,3,a]quinoxalin-1-one (5 × 10−6 M). In contrast, the potency of ANP and CNP in aortae from eNOS KO animals was reduced following pretreatment of tissues with supramaximal concentrations of the NO-donor, glyceryl trinitrate (3 × 10−5 M, 30 min) or ANP (10−7 M, 30 min). Responses to acetylcholine in aortae from WT mice (dependent on the release of endothelium-derived NO) were significantly reduced following pretreatment of tissues with GTN (3 × 10−5 M, 30 min) and ANP (10−7 M, 30 min). CNP and the NO-donor, spermine-NONOate caused concentration-dependent relaxations of mesenteric small arteries from WT animals that were significantly increased in eNOS KO mice compared to WT. ANP was unable to significantly relax mesenteric arteries from WT or eNOS KO animals. In conclusion, both NPR-A- and NPR-B-linked pGC pathways are modulated by NO–cGMP in murine aorta and mesenteric small arteries and crossdesensitisation occurs between NPR subtypes. The biological activity of endothelium-derived NO is also influenced by the ambient concentration of NO and natriuretic peptides. Such an autoregulatory pathway may represent an important physiological homeostatic mechanism and link the paracrine activity

  12. A Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Mediates Negative Signaling by Ammonium on Expression of Nitrate Reductase in Chlamydomonas[W

    PubMed Central

    de Montaigu, Amaury; Sanz-Luque, Emanuel; Galván, Aurora; Fernández, Emilio

    2010-01-01

    Nitrate assimilation in plants and related organisms is a highly regulated and conserved pathway in which the enzyme nitrate reductase (NR) occupies a central position. Although some progress has been made in understanding the regulation of the protein, transcriptional regulation of the NR gene (NIA1) is poorly understood. This work describes a mechanism for the ammonium-mediated repression of NIA1. We report the characterization of a mutant defective in the repression of NIA1 and NR in response to ammonium and show that a gene (CYG56) coding for a nitric oxide (NO)-dependent guanylate cyclase (GC) was interrupted in this mutant. NO donors, cGMP analogs, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor isobutylmethylxanthine (IBMX), and a calcium ionophore (A23187) repress the expression of NIA1 in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii wild-type cells and also repress the expression of other ammonium-sensitive genes. In addition, the GC inhibitors LY83,583 (6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione) and ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one) release cells from ammonium repression. Intracellular NO and cGMP levels were increased in the presence of ammonium in wild-type cells. In the cyg56 mutant, NIA1 transcription was less sensitive to NO donors and A23187, but responded like the wild type to IBMX. Results presented here suggest that CYG56 participates in ammonium-mediated NIA1 repression through a pathway that involves NO, cGMP, and calcium and that similar mechanisms might be occurring in plants. PMID:20442374

  13. Promoter activity of the 5'-flanking regions of medaka fish soluble guanylate cyclase alpha1 and beta1 subunit genes.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Takehiro; Suzuki, Norio

    2002-01-01

    We examined the spatial expression pattern of medaka fish (Oryzias latipes) soluble guanylate cyclase alpha(1) and beta(1) subunit genes, OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1), and characterized the 5'-flanking region required for expression of both genes by introducing various promoter-luciferase fusion-gene constructs into COS-1 cells and medaka fish embryos. The OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) gene transcripts were detected in whole brain and kidney in 7-day and 9-day embryos. Primer-extension analysis demonstrated that there were no differences among various adult organs (brain, eye, kidney, ovary and testis) in the transcription start site of the OlGCS-alpha(1) and OlGCS-beta(1) genes. Neither gene contained the functional TATA box within its 5'-flanking region, and the basal promoter activity was found between nucleotides +33 and +42 in the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene and between nucleotides +146 and +155 in the OlGCS-beta(1) gene. In the assay of medaka fish embryos, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene exhibited lower promoter activity than that of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene. In the experiments on dual-luciferase fusion-gene constructs, the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-alpha(1) gene connected to the 5'-flanking region of the OlGCS-beta(1) gene was introduced into medaka fish embryos, and the 5'-flanking regions of both subunit genes were shown to mutually influence each other's promoter activity. PMID:11772405

  14. Androgen-sensitive hypertension associated with soluble guanylate cyclase-α1 deficiency is mediated by 20-HETE.

    PubMed

    Dordea, Ana C; Vandenwijngaert, Sara; Garcia, Victor; Tainsh, Robert E T; Nathan, Daniel I; Allen, Kaitlin; Raher, Michael J; Tainsh, Laurel T; Zhang, Fan; Lieb, Wolfgang S; Mikelman, Sarah; Kirby, Andrew; Stevens, Christine; Thoonen, Robrecht; Hindle, Allyson G; Sips, Patrick Y; Falck, John R; Daly, Mark J; Brouckaert, Peter; Bloch, Kenneth D; Bloch, Donald B; Malhotra, Rajeev; Schwartzman, Michal L; Buys, Emmanuel S

    2016-06-01

    Dysregulated nitric oxide (NO) signaling contributes to the pathogenesis of hypertension, a prevalent and often sex-specific risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We previously reported that mice deficient in the α1-subunit of the NO receptor soluble guanylate cyclase (sGCα1 (-/-) mice) display sex- and strain-specific hypertension: male but not female sGCα1 (-/-) mice are hypertensive on an 129S6 (S6) but not a C57BL6/J (B6) background. We aimed to uncover the genetic and molecular basis of the observed sex- and strain-specific blood pressure phenotype. Via linkage analysis, we identified a suggestive quantitative trait locus associated with elevated blood pressure in male sGCα1 (-/-)S6 mice. This locus encompasses Cyp4a12a, encoding the predominant murine synthase of the vasoconstrictor 20-hydroxy-5,8,11,14-eicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE). Renal expression of Cyp4a12a in mice was associated with genetic background, sex, and testosterone levels. In addition, 20-HETE levels were higher in renal preglomerular microvessels of male sGCα1 (-/-)S6 than of male sGCα1 (-/-)B6 mice. Furthermore, treating male sGCα1 (-/-)S6 mice with the 20-HETE antagonist 20-hydroxyeicosa-6(Z),15(Z)-dienoic acid (20-HEDE) lowered blood pressure. Finally, 20-HEDE rescued the genetic background- and testosterone-dependent impairment of acetylcholine-induced relaxation in renal interlobar arteries associated with sGCα1 deficiency. Elevated Cyp4a12a expression and 20-HETE levels render mice susceptible to hypertension and vascular dysfunction in a setting of sGCα1 deficiency. Our data identify Cyp4a12a as a candidate sex-specific blood pressure-modifying gene in the context of deficient NO-sGC signaling. PMID:27199131

  15. Effects of age and sex on the pharmacokinetics of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat (BAY 63-2521)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat is a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the pharmacokinetics of riociguat and its metabolite M1 in young (18–45 years) and elderly (64.5–80 years) healthy volunteers of both sexes to assist planning of the dose regimens for clinical trials. The data were also used to draw comparisons with the effects of age and sex on riociguat pharmacokinetics in patients with PAH and CTEPH from the riociguat phase 3 trials, PATENT and CHEST. Volunteers received an oral dose of either riociguat 2.5 mg or placebo, and the concentrations of riociguat and M1 in blood and urine samples were determined using mass spectrometry. In elderly healthy volunteers, overall riociguat and M1 exposure tended to be higher than in young healthy volunteers (P > 0.05), partly because of reduced renal clearance (approximately 28% reduction) and differences in body weight. Although the mean maximum concentrations of riociguat and M1 were significantly higher in women than in men (35% and 50% higher, respectively), total exposure was similar. Despite differences in riociguat and M1 pharmacokinetics, riociguat was well tolerated with a comparable safety profile across all subgroups, suggesting that differences in drug exposure due to age or sex were not sufficient to warrant a dose adjustment in clinical trials. Furthermore, similar pharmacokinetics were observed in patients with PAH and CTEPH. However, particular care should be exercised during individual dose titration of riociguat in elderly patients. PMID:27162629

  16. Gastrointestinal pain: unraveling a novel endogenous pathway through uroguanylin/guanylate cyclase-C/cGMP activation.

    PubMed

    Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada; Hannig, Gerhard; Eutamene, Helene; Ustinova, Elena E; Bernier, Sylvie G; Ge, Pei; Graul, Christopher; Jacobson, Sarah; Jin, Hong; Liong, Elaine; Kessler, Marco M; Reza, Tammi; Rivers, Samuel; Shea, Courtney; Tchernychev, Boris; Bryant, Alexander P; Kurtz, Caroline B; Bueno, Lionel; Pezzone, Michael A; Currie, Mark G

    2013-09-01

    The natural hormone uroguanylin regulates intestinal fluid homeostasis and bowel function through activation of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C), resulting in increased intracellular cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP). We report the effects of uroguanylin-mediated activation of the GC-C/cGMP pathway in vitro on extracellular cGMP transport and in vivo in rat models of inflammation- and stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. In vitro exposure of intestinal Caco-2 cells to uroguanylin stimulated bidirectional, active extracellular transport of cGMP into luminal and basolateral spaces. cGMP transport was significantly and concentration dependently decreased by probenecid, an inhibitor of cGMP efflux pumps. In ex vivo Ussing chamber assays, uroguanylin stimulated cGMP secretion from the basolateral side of rat colonic epithelium into the submucosal space. In a rat model of trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, orally administered uroguanylin increased colonic thresholds required to elicit abdominal contractions in response to colorectal distension (CRD). Oral administration of cGMP mimicked the antihyperalgesic effects of uroguanylin, significantly decreasing TNBS- and restraint stress-induced visceromotor response to graded CRD in rats. The antihyperalgesic effects of cGMP were not associated with increased colonic spasmolytic activity, but were linked to significantly decreased firing rates of TNBS-sensitized colonic afferents in rats in response to mechanical stimuli. In conclusion, these data suggest that the continuous activation of the GC-C/cGMP pathway along the intestinal tract by the endogenous hormones guanylin and uroguanylin results in significant reduction of gastrointestinal pain. Extracellular cGMP produced on activation of GC-C is the primary mediator in this process via modulation of sensory afferent activity. PMID:23748116

  17. Vasorelaxant and antiplatelet activity of 4,7-dimethyl-1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide: role of soluble guanylate cyclase, nitric oxide and thiols

    PubMed Central

    Kots, Alexander Ya; Grafov, Mikhail A; Khropov, Yuri V; Betin, Vasily L; Belushkina, Natalya N; Busygina, Olga G; Yazykova, Marina Yu; Ovchinnikov, Igor V; Kulikov, Alexander S; Makhova, Nina N; Medvedeva, Natalya A; Bulargina, Tamara V; Severina, Irina S

    2000-01-01

    Certain heterocyclic N-oxides are vasodilators and inhibitors of platelet aggregation. The pharmacological activity of the furoxan derivative condensed with pyridazine di-N-oxide 4,7-dimethyl-1,2,5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide (FPTO) and the corresponding furazan (FPDO) was studied. FPTO reacted with thiols generating nitrite (NO), S-nitrosoglutathione and hydroxylamine (nitroxyl) and converted oxyHb to metHb. FPDO did not generate detectable amounts of NO-like species but reacted with thiols and oxyHb. FPTO and FPDO haem-dependently stimulated the activity of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and this stimulation was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and by 0.1 mM dithiothreitol. FPTO relaxed noradrenaline-precontracted aortic rings and its concentration-response curve was biphasic (pIC50=9.03±0.13 and 5.85±0.06). FPDO was significantly less potent vasodilator (pIC50=5.19±0.14). The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO was inhibited by ODQ. oxyHb significantly inhibited only FPTO-dependent relaxation. FPTO and FPDO were equipotent inhibitors of ADP-induced platelet aggregation (IC50=0.63±0.15 and 0.49±0.05 μM, respectively). The antiplatelet activity of FPTO (but not FPDO) was partially suppressed by oxyHb. The antiaggregatory effects of FPTO and FPDO were only partially blocked by sGC inhibitors. FPTO and FPDO (10–20 μM) significantly increased cyclic GMP levels in aortic rings and platelets and this increase was blocked by ODQ. Thus, FPTO can generate NO and, like FPDO, reacts with thiols and haem. The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO is sGC-dependent and a predominant role is played by NO at FPTO concentrations below 1 μM. On the contrary, inhibition of platelet aggregation is only partially related to sGC activation. PMID:10725265

  18. Vasorelaxant and antiplatelet activity of 4,7-dimethyl-1,2, 5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide: role of soluble guanylate cyclase, nitric oxide and thiols.

    PubMed

    Kots, A Y; Grafov, M A; Khropov, Y V; Betin, V L; Belushkina, N N; Busygina, O G; Yazykova, M Y; Ovchinnikov, I V; Kulikov, A S; Makhova, N N; Medvedeva, N A; Bulargina, T V; Severina, I S

    2000-03-01

    1. Certain heterocyclic N-oxides are vasodilators and inhibitors of platelet aggregation. The pharmacological activity of the furoxan derivative condensed with pyridazine di-N-oxide 4,7-dimethyl-1,2, 5-oxadiazolo[3,4-d]pyridazine 1,5,6-trioxide (FPTO) and the corresponding furazan (FPDO) was studied. 2. FPTO reacted with thiols generating nitrite (NO), S-nitrosoglutathione and hydroxylamine (nitroxyl) and converted oxyHb to metHb. FPDO did not generate detectable amounts of NO-like species but reacted with thiols and oxyHb. 3. FPTO and FPDO haem-dependently stimulated the activity of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and this stimulation was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ) and by 0.1 mM dithiothreitol. 4. FPTO relaxed noradrenaline-precontracted aortic rings and its concentration-response curve was biphasic (pIC(50)=9. 03+/-0.13 and 5.85+/-0.06). FPDO was significantly less potent vasodilator (pIC(50)=5.19+/-0.14). The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO was inhibited by ODQ. oxyHb significantly inhibited only FPTO-dependent relaxation. 5. FPTO and FPDO were equipotent inhibitors of ADP-induced platelet aggregation (IC(50)=0.63+/-0.15 and 0.49+/-0. 05 microM, respectively). The antiplatelet activity of FPTO (but not FPDO) was partially suppressed by oxyHb. The antiaggregatory effects of FPTO and FPDO were only partially blocked by sGC inhibitors. 6. FPTO and FPDO (10 - 20 microM) significantly increased cyclic GMP levels in aortic rings and platelets and this increase was blocked by ODQ. 7. Thus, FPTO can generate NO and, like FPDO, reacts with thiols and haem. The vasorelaxant activity of FPTO and FPDO is sGC-dependent and a predominant role is played by NO at FPTO concentrations below 1 microM. On the contrary, inhibition of platelet aggregation is only partially related to sGC activation. PMID:10725265

  19. The process of S-nitrosation in sGC β1(1-194) revealed by infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Wang, Dandan; Xu, Haoran; Mi, Mengdan; Li, Zhengqiang

    2015-06-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is the most important receptor for the signaling molecule NO. NO activates sGC by binding to its heme cofactor and reacts with free thiols in the protein itself. The S-nitrosation of cysteine thiols affects the activity of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC). In this study, infrared (IR) spectroscopy and site-directed mutagenesis were used to investigate S-H vibration and the process of S-nitrosation in the β1 subunit (amino acids 1-194) of sGC. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed that wild-type and mutants (C78S and C122S) of sGC β1(1-194) exhibited S-H peaks around 2560 cm-1. The signals were attenuated in the IR spectra of S-nitrosoglutathione-treated mutants, demonstrating that S-nitrosation in sGC β1(1-194) occured at residues C78 and C122, and the process of the reaction was GSNO concentration-dependent.

  20. Plecanatide and dolcanatide, novel guanylate cyclase-C agonists, ameliorate gastrointestinal inflammation in experimental models of murine colitis

    PubMed Central

    Shailubhai, Kunwar; Palejwala, Vaseem; Arjunan, Krishna Priya; Saykhedkar, Sayali; Nefsky, Bradley; Foss, John A; Comiskey, Stephen; Jacob, Gary S; Plevy, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of orally administered plecanatide or dolcanatide, analogs of uroguanylin, on amelioration of colitis in murine models. METHODS: The cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) stimulatory potency of plecanatide and dolcanatide was measured using a human colon carcinoma T84 cell-based assay. For animal studies all test agents were formulated in phosphate buffered saline. Sulfasalazine or 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA) served as positive controls. Effect of oral treatment with test agents on amelioration of acute colitis induced either by dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in drinking water or by rectal instillation of trinitrobenzene sulfonic (TNBS) acid, was examined in BALB/c and/or BDF1 mice. Additionally, the effect of orally administered plecanatide on the spontaneous colitis in T-cell receptor alpha knockout (TCRα-/-) mice was also examined. Amelioration of colitis was assessed by monitoring severity of colitis, disease activity index and by histopathology. Frozen colon tissues were used to measure myeloperoxidase activity. RESULTS: Plecanatide and dolcanatide are structurally related analogs of uroguanylin, which is an endogenous ligand of guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C). As expected from the agonists of GC-C, both plecanatide and dolcanatide exhibited potent cGMP-stimulatory activity in T84 cells. Once-daily treatment by oral gavage with either of these analogs (0.05-0.5 mg/kg) ameliorated colitis in both DSS and TNBS-induced models of acute colitis, as assessed by body weight, reduction in colitis severity (P < 0.05) and disease activity index (P < 0.05). Amelioration of colitis by either of the drug candidates was comparable to that achieved by orally administered sulfasalazine or 5-ASA. Plecanatide also effectively ameliorated colitis in TCRα-/- mice, a model of spontaneous colitis. As dolcanatide exhibited higher resistance to proteolysis in simulated gastric and intestinal juices, it was selected for further studies. CONCLUSION: This is

  1. Discovery of IWP-051, a Novel Orally Bioavailable sGC Stimulator with Once-Daily Dosing Potential in Humans.

    PubMed

    Nakai, Takashi; Perl, Nicholas R; Barden, Timothy C; Carvalho, Andrew; Fretzen, Angelika; Germano, Peter; Im, G-Yoon J; Jin, Hong; Kim, Charles; Lee, Thomas W-H; Long, Kimberly; Moore, Joel; Rohde, Jason M; Sarno, Renee; Segal, Chrissie; Solberg, Erik O; Tobin, Jenny; Zimmer, Daniel P; Currie, Mark G

    2016-05-12

    In recent years, soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, EC 4.6.1.2) has emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for treating cardiovascular diseases and diseases associated with fibrosis and end-organ failure. Herein, we describe our design and synthesis of a series of 4-hydroxypyrimidine sGC stimulators starting with an internally discovered lead. Our efforts have led to the discovery of IWP-051, a molecule that achieves good alignment of potency, stability, selectivity, and pharmacodynamic effects while maintaining favorable pharmacokinetic properties with once-daily dosing potential in humans. PMID:27190594

  2. AAV-Mediated Gene Therapy in the Guanylate Cyclase (RetGC1/RetGC2) Double Knockout Mouse Model of Leber Congenital Amaurosis

    PubMed Central

    Boye, Sanford L.; Peshenko, Igor V.; Huang, Wei Chieh; Min, Seok Hong; McDoom, Issam; Kay, Christine N.; Liu, Xuan; Dyka, Frank M.; Foster, Thomas C.; Umino, Yumiko; Karan, Sukanya; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Baehr, Wolfgang; Dizhoor, Alexander; Hauswirth, William W.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in GUCY2D are associated with recessive Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1). GUCY2D encodes photoreceptor-specific, retinal guanylate cyclase-1 (RetGC1). Reports of retinal degeneration in LCA1 are conflicting; some describe no obvious degeneration and others report loss of both rods and cones. Proof of concept studies in models representing the spectrum of phenotypes is warranted. We have previously demonstrated adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated RetGC1 is therapeutic in GC1ko mice, a model exhibiting loss of cones only. The purpose of this study was to characterize AAV-mediated gene therapy in the RetGC1/RetGC2 double knockout (GCdko) mouse, a model lacking rod and cone function and exhibiting progressive loss of both photoreceptor subclasses. Use of this model also allowed for the evaluation of the functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 isozyme. Subretinal delivery of AAV8(Y733F) vector containing the human rhodopsin kinase (hGRK1) promoter driving murine Gucy2e was performed in GCdko mice at various postnatal time points. Treatment resulted in restoration of rod and cone function at all treatment ages and preservation of retinal structure in GCdko mice treated as late as 7 weeks of age. Functional gains and structural preservation were stable for at least 1 year. Treatment also conferred cortical- and subcortical-based visually-guided behavior. Functional efficiency of transgenic RetGC1 was indistinguishable from that of endogenous isozyme in congenic wild-type (WT) mice. This study clearly demonstrates AAV-mediated RetGC1 expression restores function to and preserves structure of rod and cone photoreceptors in a degenerative model of retinal guanylate cyclase deficiency, further supporting development of an AAV-based vector for treatment of LCA1. PMID:23210611

  3. GLOBIN-5-Dependent O2 Responses Are Regulated by PDL-1/PrBP That Targets Prenylated Soluble Guanylate Cyclases to Dendritic Endings

    PubMed Central

    Soltesz, Zoltan; Oda, Shigekazu; Zelmanovich, Veronica; Abergel, Zohar

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic animals constantly monitor and adapt to changes in O2 levels. The molecular mechanisms involved in sensing O2 are, however, incompletely understood. Previous studies showed that a hexacoordinated globin called GLB-5 tunes the dynamic range of O2-sensing neurons in natural C. elegans isolates, but is defective in the N2 lab reference strain (McGrath et al., 2009; Persson et al., 2009). GLB-5 enables a sharp behavioral switch when O2 changes between 21 and 17%. Here, we show that GLB-5 also confers rapid behavioral and cellular recovery from exposure to hypoxia. Hypoxia reconfigures O2-evoked Ca2+ responses in the URX O2 sensors, and GLB-5 enables rapid recovery of these responses upon re-oxygenation. Forward genetic screens indicate that GLB-5's effects on O2 sensing require PDL-1, the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian PrBP/PDE6δ protein. In mammals, PDE6δ regulates the traffic and activity of prenylated proteins (Zhang et al., 2004; Norton et al., 2005). PDL-1 promotes localization of GCY-33 and GCY-35, atypical soluble guanylate cyclases that act as O2 sensors, to the dendritic endings of URX and BAG neurons, where they colocalize with GLB-5. Both GCY-33 and GCY-35 are predicted to be prenylated. Dendritic localization is not essential for GCY-35 to function as an O2 sensor, but disrupting pdl-1 alters the URX neuron's O2 response properties. Functional GLB-5 can restore dendritic localization of GCY-33 in pdl-1 mutants, suggesting GCY-33 and GLB-5 are in a complex. Our data suggest GLB-5 and the soluble guanylate cyclases operate in close proximity to sculpt O2 responses. PMID:25505325

  4. A Novel Mutation (I143NT) in Guanylate Cyclase-Activating Protein 1 (GCAP1) Associated with Autosomal Dominant Cone Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Koji M.; Sokal, Izabela; Yang, Lili; Roychowdhury, Nirmalya; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Berson, Eliot L.; Dryja, Thaddeus P.; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE. To identify pathogenic mutations in the guanylate cyclase-activating protein 1 (GCAP1) and GCAP2 genes and to characterize the biochemical effect of mutation on guanylate cyclase (GC) stimulation. METHODS. The GCAP1 and GCAP2 genes were screened by direct sequencing for mutations in 216 patients and 421 patients, respectively, with various hereditary retinal diseases. A mutation in GCAP1 segregating with autosomal dominant cone degeneration was further evaluated biochemically by employing recombinant proteins, immunoblotting, Ca2+-dependent stimulation of GC, fluorescence emission spectra, and limited proteolysis in the absence and presence of Ca2+. RESULTS. A novel GCAP1 mutation, I143NT (substitution of Ile at codon 143 by Asn and Thr), affecting the EF4 Ca2+-binding loop, was identified in a heterozygote father and son with autosomal dominant cone degeneration. Both patients had much greater loss of cone function versus rod function; previous histopathologic evaluation of the father's eyes at autopsy (age 75 years) showed no foveal cones but a few, scattered cones remaining in the peripheral retina. Biochemical analysis showed that the GCAP1-I143NT mutant adopted a conformation susceptible to proteolysis, and the mutant inhibited GC only partially at high Ca2+ concentrations. Individual patients with atypical or recessive retinitis pigmentosa (RP) had additional heterozygous GCAP1-T114I and GCAP2 gene changes (V85M and F150C) of unknown pathogenicity. CONCLUSIONS. A novel GCAP1 mutation, I143NT, caused a form of autosomal dominant cone degeneration that destroys foveal cones by mid-life but spares some cones in the peripheral retina up to 75 years. Properties of the GCAP1-I143NT mutant protein suggested that it is incompletely inactivated by high Ca2+ concentrations as should occur with dark adaptation. The continued activity of the mutant GCAP1 likely results in higher-than-normal scotopic cGMP levels which may, in turn, account for the progressive

  5. The opposing effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5 prime -triphosphate, and pertussis toxin on phorbol ester induced inhibition of atrial natriuretic factor stimulated guanylate cyclase in SK-NEP-1 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sekiya, M.; Frohlich, E.D.; Cole, F.E. )

    1991-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effects of calmodulin, adenosine 5{prime}-triphosphate (ATP) and pertussis toxin (PT) on phorbol ester (PMA) induced inhibition of ANF-stimulated cyclic GMP formation in cells from the human renal cell line, SK-NEP-1. PMA inhibited ANF-stimulated guanylate cyclase activity in particulate membranes by about 65%. Calmodulin reversed this inhibition in a dose dependent manner. ATP potentiated Mg++ but not Mn++ supported guanylate cyclase activity. In PMA treated membranes, ATP potentiating effects were abolished. PMA also inhibited ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation, but pretreatment with PT prevented this PMA inhibition. PT did not affect basal or ANF-stimulated cGMP accumulation. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that PMA inhibited ANF stimulation of particulate guanylate cyclase in opposition to the activating effects of calmodulin or ATP in SK-NEP-1 cells. The protein kinase C inhibitory effects appeared to be mediated via a PT-sensitive G protein.

  6. Internalization and trafficking of guanylyl (guanylate) cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor A is regulated by an acidic tyrosine-based cytoplasmic motif GDAY

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.; Nguyen, Huong T.; Garg, Renu; Khurana, Madan L.; Fink, Jude

    2004-01-01

    We have identified a GDAY motif in the C-terminal domain of guanylyl cyclase (guanylate cyclase)/NPRA (natriuretic peptide receptor A) sequence, which serves a dual role as an internalization signal and a recycling signal. To delineate the role of the GDAY motif in receptor internalization and sequestration, we mutated Gly920, Asp921 and Tyr923 to alanine residues (GDAY/AAAA) in the NPRA cDNA sequence. The cDNAs encoding wild-type and mutant receptors were transfected in HEK-293 cells (human embryonic kidney 293 cells). The internalization studies of ligand–receptor complexes revealed that endocytosis of 125I-ANP by HEK-293 cells expressing G920A, Y923A or GDAY/AAAA mutant receptor was decreased by almost 50% (P<0.001) when compared with cells expressing the wild-type receptor. However, the effect of D921A mutation on receptor internalization was minimal. Ligand-mediated down-regulation of G920A, Y923A and GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors was decreased by 35–40% when compared with wild-type NPRA. Subsequently, the recycling of internalized D921A and GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors from the intracellular pool was decreased by more than 40±4% when compared with wild-type NPRA. Recycling of G920A and Y923A mutant receptors was also decreased, but to a significantly lesser extent compared with the D921A or GDAY/AAAA mutant receptors. We conclude that the Gly920 and Tyr923 residues within the GDAY consensus motif are necessary for internalization, and that residue Asp921 is important for recycling of NPRA. The current results provide new evidence for a dual role of the GDAY sequence motif in ligand-mediated internalization, recycling and down-regulation of a single-transmembrane receptor protein NPRA. PMID:15574117

  7. Anti-Cdc25 antibodies inhibit guanyl nucleotide-dependent adenylyl cyclase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and cross-react with a 150-kilodalton mammalian protein.

    PubMed Central

    Gross, E; Marbach, I; Engelberg, D; Segal, M; Simchen, G; Levitzki, A

    1992-01-01

    The CDC25 gene product of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been shown to be a positive regulator of the Ras protein. The high degree of homology between yeast RAS and the mammalian proto-oncogene ras suggests a possible resemblance between the mammalian regulator of Ras and the regulator of the yeast Ras (Cdc25). On the basis of this assumption, we have raised antibodies against the conserved C-terminal domain of the Cdc25 protein in order to identify its mammalian homologs. Anti-Cdc25 antibodies raised against a beta-galactosidase-Cdc25 fusion protein were purified by immunoaffinity chromatography and were shown by immunoblotting to specifically recognize the Cdc25 portion of the antigen and a truncated Cdc25 protein, also expressed in bacteria. These antibodies were shown both by immunoblotting and by immunoprecipitation to recognize the CDC25 gene product in wild-type strains and in strains overexpressing Cdc25. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies potently inhibited the guanyl nucleotide-dependent and, approximately 3-fold less potently, the Mn(2+)-dependent adenylyl cyclase activity in S. cerevisiae. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies do not inhibit cyclase activity in a strain harboring RAS2Val-19 and lacking the CDC25 gene product. These results support the view that Cdc25, Ras2, and Cdc35/Cyr1 proteins are associated in a complex. Using these antibodies, we were able to define the conditions to completely solubilize the Cdc25 protein. The results suggest that the Cdc25 protein is tightly associated with the membrane but is not an intrinsic membrane protein, since only EDTA at pH 12 can solubilize the protein. The anti-Cdc25 antibodies strongly cross-reacted with the C-terminal domain of the Cdc25 yeast homolog, Sdc25. Most interestingly, these antibodies also cross-reacted with mammalian proteins of approximately 150 kDa from various tissues of several species of animals. These interactions were specifically blocked by the beta-galactosidase-Cdc25 fusion protein. Images

  8. Trpc2-expressing sensory neurons in the mouse main olfactory epithelium of type B express the soluble guanylate cyclase Gucy1b2.

    PubMed

    Omura, Masayo; Mombaerts, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Chemoreception in the mouse olfactory system occurs primarily at two chemosensory epithelia in the nasal cavity: the main olfactory epithelium (MOE) and the vomeronasal epithelium. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the MOE, the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), express the odorant receptor (OR) gene repertoire, and depend on Adcy3 and Cnga2 for chemosensory signal transduction. The canonical chemosensory neurons in the vomeronasal epithelium, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs), express two unrelated vomeronasal receptor (VR) gene repertoires, and involve Trpc2 for chemosensory signal transduction. Recently we reported the discovery of two types of neurons in the mouse MOE that express Trcp2 in addition to Cnga2. These cell types can be distinguished at the single-cell level by expression of Adcy3: positive, type A and negative, type B. Some type A cells express OR genes. Thus far there is no specific gene or marker for type B cells, hampering further analyses such as physiological recordings. Here, we show that among MOE cells, type B cells are unique in their expression of the soluble guanylate cyclase Gucy1b2. We came across Gucy1b2 in an explorative approach based on Long Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (LongSAGE) that we applied to single red-fluorescent cells isolated from whole olfactory mucosa and vomeronasal organ of mice of a novel Trcp2-IRES-taumCherry gene-targeted strain. The generation of a novel Gucy1b2-IRES-tauGFP gene-targeted strain enabled us to visualize coalescence of axons of type B cells into glomeruli in the main olfactory bulb. Our molecular and anatomical analyses define Gucy1b2 as a marker for type B cells within the MOE. The Gucy1b2-IRES-tauGFP strain will be useful for physiological, molecular, cellular, and anatomical studies of this newly described chemosensory subsystem. PMID:25701815

  9. Assessment of the effects of hepatic impairment and smoking on the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat (BAY 63-2521)

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Corina; Unger, Sigrun; Schmidt, Anja; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Riociguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator developed for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension, is metabolized in part by the liver. Expression of one of the metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1, is induced by aromatic hydrocarbons in tobacco smoke. Two nonrandomized, nonblinded studies were conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics of riociguat in individuals with mild (Child-Pugh A) or moderate (Child-Pugh B) hepatic impairment associated with liver cirrhosis compared with that in age-, weight-, and sex-matched healthy controls: study 1 included smokers and nonsmokers, and study 2 included nonsmokers only. Data from these studies were integrated for analysis. All participants (N = 64) received a single oral dose of riociguat 1.0 mg. Riociguat exposure was significantly higher in individuals with Child-Pugh B hepatic impairment than in healthy controls (ratio: 153% [90% confidence interval: 103%–228%]) but was similar in those with Child-Pugh A hepatic impairment and controls. The half-life of the riociguat metabolite M1 was prolonged in patients with Child-Pugh B or A hepatic impairment compared with that in controls by approximately 43% and 24%, respectively. Impaired hepatic function was associated with higher riociguat exposure in nonsmokers compared with the population of smokers and nonsmokers combined. Riociguat’s safety profile was similar in individuals with impaired or normal liver function. In conclusion, moderate hepatic impairment was associated with increased riociguat exposure compared with that in controls, probably as a result of reduced clearance of the metabolite M1. This suggests that dose titration of riociguat should be administered with particular care in patients with moderate hepatic impairment. PMID:27162628

  10. Assessment of the effects of renal impairment and smoking on the pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of the soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator riociguat (BAY 63-2521)

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Corina; Unger, Sigrun; Schmidt, Anja; Wensing, Georg; Mück, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Renal impairment is a common comborbidity in patients with pulmonary hypertension. The breakdown of riociguat, an oral soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator used to treat pulmonary hypertension, may be affected by smoking because polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in tobacco smoke induce expression of one of the metabolizing enzymes, CYP1A1. Two nonrandomized, nonblinded studies were therefore performed to investigate the pharmacokinetics and safety of a single oral dose of riociguat 1.0 mg in individuals with mild, moderate, or severe renal impairment compared with age-, weight-, and sex-matched healthy controls, including either smokers and nonsmokers (study I) or nonsmokers alone (study II). Pharmacokinetic analyses focused on the integrated per-protocol data set of both studies (N = 63). In patients with renal impairment, the renal clearance of riociguat was reduced and its terminal half-life prolonged compared with those in healthy controls. There was a monotonic relationship between creatinine clearance on treatment day and riociguat renal clearance (R2 = 0.62). However, increased riociguat exposure with decreasing renal function was not strictly proportional. Riociguat exposure appeared to be greater in nonsmokers than in the combined population of smokers and nonsmokers, irrespective of renal function. Adverse events were mild to moderate and in line with the mode of action of riociguat. No serious adverse events occurred. In conclusion, renal impairment was associated with reduced riociguat clearance compared with that in controls; however, riociguat exposure in patients with renal impairment was highly variable, and ranges overlapped with those observed in healthy controls. PMID:27162624

  11. MRP4 Modulation of the Guanylate Cyclase-C/cGMP Pathway: Effects on Linaclotide-Induced Electrolyte Secretion and cGMP Efflux.

    PubMed

    Tchernychev, Boris; Ge, Pei; Kessler, Marco M; Solinga, Robert M; Wachtel, Derek; Tobin, Jenny V; Thomas, Sara R; Lunte, Craig E; Fretzen, Angelika; Hannig, Gerhard; Bryant, Alexander P; Kurtz, Caroline B; Currie, Mark G; Silos-Santiago, Inmaculada

    2015-10-01

    MRP4 mediates the efflux of cGMP and cAMP and acts as an important regulator of these secondary messengers, thereby affecting signaling events mediated by cGMP and cAMP. Immunofluorescence staining showed high MRP4 expression localized predominantly in the apical membrane of rat colonic epithelium. In vitro studies were performed using a rat colonic mucosal layer mounted in an Ussing chamber. Linaclotide activation of the guanylate cyclase-C (GC-C)/cGMP pathway induced a concentration-dependent increase in transepithelial ion current [short-circuit current (Isc)] across rat colonic mucosa (EC50: 9.2 nM). Pretreatment of colonic mucosa with the specific MRP4 inhibitor MK571 potentiated linaclotide-induced electrolyte secretion and augmented linaclotide-stimulated intracellular cGMP accumulation. Notably, pretreatment with the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil increased basal Isc, but had no amplifying effect on linaclotide-induced Isc. MRP4 inhibition selectively affected the activation phase, but not the deactivation phase, of linaclotide. In contrast, incubation with a GC-C/Fc chimera binding to linaclotide abrogated linaclotide-induced Isc, returning to baseline. Furthermore, linaclotide activation of GC-C induced cGMP secretion from the apical and basolateral membranes of colonic epithelium. MRP4 inhibition blocked cGMP efflux from the apical membrane, but not the basolateral membrane. These data reveal a novel, previously unrecognized mechanism that functionally couples GC-C-induced luminal electrolyte transport and cGMP secretion to spatially restricted, compartmentalized regulation by MRP4 at the apical membrane of intestinal epithelium. These findings have important implications for gastrointestinal disorders with symptoms associated with dysregulated fluid homeostasis, such as irritable bowel syndrome with constipation, chronic idiopathic constipation, and secretory diarrhea. PMID:26216942

  12. Allostery in Recombinant Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase from Manduca sexta*

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaohui; Murata, Lauren B.; Weichsel, Andrzej; Brailey, Jacqueline L.; Roberts, Sue A.; Nighorn, Alan; Montfort, William R.

    2008-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl/guanylate cyclase (sGC), the primary biological receptor for nitric oxide, is required for proper development and health in all animals. We have expressed heterodimeric full-length and N-terminal fragments of Manduca sexta sGC in Escherichia coli, the first time this has been accomplished for any sGC, and have performed the first functional analyses of an insect sGC. Manduca sGC behaves much like its mammalian counterparts, displaying a 170-fold stimulation by NO and sensitivity to compound YC-1. YC-1 reduces the NO and CO off-rates for the ∼100-kDa N-terminal heterodimeric fragment and increases the CO affinity by ∼50-fold to 1.7 μm. Binding of NO leads to a transient six-coordinate intermediate, followed by release of the proximal histidine to yield a five-coordinate nitrosyl complex (k6-5 = 12.8 s-1). The conversion rate is insensitive to nucleotides, YC-1, and changes in NO concentration up to ∼30 μm. NO release is biphasic in the absence of YC-1 (koff1 = 0.10 s-1 and koff2 = 0.0015 s-1); binding of YC-1 eliminates the fast phase but has little effect on the slower phase. Our data are consistent with a model for allosteric activation in which sGC undergoes a simple switch between two conformations, with an open or a closed heme pocket, integrating the influence of numerous effectors to give the final catalytic rate. Importantly, YC-1 binding occurs in the N-terminal two-thirds of the protein. Homology modeling and mutagenesis experiments suggest the presence of an H-NOX domain in the α subunit with importance for heme binding. PMID:18515359

  13. Direct sGC Activation Bypasses NO Scavenging Reactions of Intravascular Free Oxy-Hemoglobin and Limits Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    Tabima, D. Marcela; Specht, Patricia A.C.; Tejero, Jesús; Champion, Hunter C.; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B.; Baust, Jeff; Mik, Egbert G.; Hildesheim, Mariana; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Becker, Eva-Maria; Truebel, Hubert

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) provide a potential alternative to red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. Their clinical application has been limited by adverse effects, in large part thought to be mediated by the intravascular scavenging of the vasodilator nitric oxide (NO) by cell-free plasma oxy-hemoglobin. Free hemoglobin may also cause endothelial dysfunction and platelet activation in hemolytic diseases and after transfusion of aged stored RBCs. The new soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) stimulator Bay 41-8543 and sGC activator Bay 60-2770 directly modulate sGC, independent of NO bioavailability, providing a potential therapeutic mechanism to bypass hemoglobin-mediated NO inactivation. Results: Infusions of human hemoglobin solutions and the HBOC Oxyglobin into rats produced a severe hypertensive response, even at low plasma heme concentrations approaching 10 μM. These reactions were only observed for ferrous oxy-hemoglobin and not analogs that do not rapidly scavenge NO. Infusions of L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a competitive NO synthase inhibitor, after hemoglobin infusion did not produce additive vasoconstriction, suggesting that vasoconstriction is related to scavenging of vascular NO. Open-chest hemodynamic studies confirmed that hypertension occurred secondary to direct effects on increasing vascular resistance, with limited negative cardiac inotropic effects. Intravascular hemoglobin reduced the vasodilatory potency of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and sildenafil, but had no effect on vasodilatation by direct NO-independent activation of sGC by BAY 41-8543 and BAY 60-2770. Innovation and Conclusion: These data suggest that both sGC stimulators and sGC activators could be used to restore cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent vasodilation in conditions where cell-free plasma hemoglobin is sufficient to inhibit endogenous NO signaling. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 2232–2243. PMID:23697678

  14. The regulation of sGC on the rat model of neuropathic pain is mediated by 5-HT1ARs and NO/cGMP pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zifeng; Yang, Bin; Zhang, Jianhai; Zheng, Jijian

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate management of neuropathic pain results in poor clinical outcomes and reduces quality of life for the patient all over the world, but intricate interplay between wide variety of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development and progression of neuropathic pain makes it difficult to design effective therapeutic strategies. The present study aims to elucidate the interaction of 5-HT1A receptors (5-HT1ARs), soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) and NO/cGMP signaling pathway in the development of neuropathic pain. The results showed that after sciatic nerve crush procedure, the protein level of sGC in the spinal cord was greatly increased. The mechanical threshold in rats was significantly enhanced by the sGC inhibitor ODQ and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) inhibitor SMTC, indicating the role of sGC and nNOS in the process of neuropathic pain. The treatment of NO donors (SNP and SIN-1) and cGMP-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor (Zaprinast) all significantly decreased the mechanical threshold in rats, but the 5-HT1ARs inhibitor WAY100635 significantly increased the mechanical threshold in rats, demonstrating the role of NO/cGMP pathway and 5-HT1ARs in the development of neuropathic pain. Finally, the protein levels of sGC was greatly increased by SNP and Zaprinast but decreased by WAY100635 and SMTC, showing the regulation of NO/cGMP pathway and 5-HT1ARs on the protein expression of sGC. Taken together, it is suggested that sGC in the spinal cord regulates the neuropathic pain, which is mediated by 5-HT1ARs and NO/cGMP pathway. PMID:27158388

  15. The vasodilatory effect of sulfur dioxide via SGC/cGMP/PKG pathway in association with sulfhydryl-dependent dimerization.

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiuyu; Huang, Yaqian; Liu, Angie Dong; Zhu, Mingzhu; Liu, Jia; Yan, Hui; Zhang, Qingyou; Geng, Bin; Gao, Yuansheng; Du, Shuxu; Huang, Pan; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2016-06-01

    The present study was designed to explore the role of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)/PKG pathway in sulfur dioxide (SO2)-induced vasodilation. We showed that SO2 induced a concentration-dependent relaxation of phenylephrine (PE)-precontracted rat aortic rings in association with an increase in cGMP concentration, whereas l-aspartic acid β-hydroxamate (HDX), an inhibitor of SO2 synthase, contracted rings in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment of aortic rings with the sGC inhibitor ODQ (30 μM) attenuated the vasodilatory effects of SO2, suggesting the involvement of cGMP pathway in SO2-induced vasodilation. Mechanistically, SO2 upregulated the protein levels of sGC and PKG dimers, while HDX inhibited it, indicating SO2 could promote cGMP synthesis through sGC activation. Furthermore, the dimerization of sGC and PKG and vasodilation induced by SO2 in precontracted rings were significantly prevented by thiol reductants dithiothreitol (DTT). In addition, SO2 reduced the activity of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5), a cGMP-specific hydrolytic enzyme, implying that SO2 elevated cGMP concentration by inhibiting its hydrolysis. Hence, SO2 exerted its vasodilatory effects at least partly by promoting disulfide-dependent dimerization of sGC and PKG, resulting in an activated sGC/cGMP/PKG pathway in blood vessels. These findings revealed a new mode of action and mechanisms by which SO2 regulated the vascular tone. PMID:27009048

  16. YC-1 BINDING TO THE BETA SUBUNIT OF SOLUBLE GUANYLYL CYCLASE OVERCOMES ALLOSTERIC INHIBITION BY THE ALPHA SUBUNIT

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, Rahul; Fritz, Bradley G.; The, Juliana; Issaian, Aaron; Weichsel, Andrzej; David, Cynthia L.; Campbell, Eric; Hausrath, Andrew C.; Rassouli-Taylor, Leida; Garcin, Elsa D.; Gage, Matthew J.; Montfort, William R.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric heme protein and the primary nitric oxide receptor. NO binding stimulates cyclase activity, leading to regulation of cardiovascular physiology and making sGC an attractive target for drug discovery. YC-1 and related compounds stimulate sGC both independently and synergistically with NO and CO binding; however, where the compounds bind and how they work remains unknown. Using linked-equilibria binding measurements, surface plasmon resonance, and domain truncations in Manduca sexta and bovine sGC, we demonstrate that YC-1 binds near or directly to the heme-containing domain of the beta subunit. In the absence of CO, YC-1 binds with Kd = 9–21 μM, depending on construct. In the presence of CO, these values decrease to 0.6–1.1 μM. Pfizer compound 25 bound ~10-fold weaker than YC-1 in the absence of CO whereas compound BAY 41–2272 bound particularly tightly in the presence of CO (Kd = 30–90 nM). Additionally, we found that CO binding is much weaker to heterodimeric sGC proteins (Kd = 50–100 μM) than to the isolated heme domain (Kd = 0.2 μM for Manduca beta H-NOX/PAS). YC-1 greatly enhanced CO binding to heterodimeric sGC, as expected (Kd = ~1 μM). These data indicate the alpha subunit induces a heme pocket conformation with lower affinity for CO and NO. YC-1 family compounds bind near the heme domain, overcoming the alpha subunit effect and inducing a heme pocket conformation with high affinity. We propose this high-affinity conformation is required for the full-length protein to achieve high catalytic activity. PMID:24328155

  17. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: Expression, purification, and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu-Chen; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2000-01-01

    The α1- and β1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein. PMID:10995472

  18. Human recombinant soluble guanylyl cyclase: expression, purification, and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. C.; Martin, E.; Murad, F.

    2000-01-01

    The alpha1- and beta1-subunits of human soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) were coexpressed in the Sf9 cells/baculovirus system. In addition to the native enzyme, constructs with hexahistidine tag at the amino and carboxyl termini of each subunit were coexpressed. This permitted the rapid and efficient purification of active recombinant enzyme on a nickel-affinity column. The enzyme has one heme per heterodimer and was readily activated with the NO donor sodium nitroprusside or 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl-indazole (YC-1). Sodium nitroprusside and YC-1 treatment potentiated each other in combination and demonstrated a remarkable 2,200-fold stimulation of the human recombinant sGC. The effects were inhibited with 1H-(1,2, 4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1one (ODQ). The kinetics of the recombinant enzyme with respect to GTP was examined. The products of the reaction, cGMP and pyrophosphate, inhibited the enzyme. The extent of inhibition by cGMP depended on the activation state of the enzyme, whereas inhibition by pyrophosphate was not affected by the enzyme state. Both reaction products displayed independent binding and cooperativity with respect to enzyme inhibition. The expression of large quantities of active enzyme will facilitate structural characterization of the protein.

  19. Endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli: Target identification and genetic regulation.

    PubMed

    Tsutsuki, Hiroyasu; Jung, Minkyung; Zhang, Tianli; Ono, Katsuhiko; Ida, Tomoaki; Kunieda, Kohei; Ihara, Hideshi; Akaike, Takaaki; Sawa, Tomohiro

    2016-09-01

    8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) is a nitrated cGMP derivative formed in response to nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS). It can cause a post-translational modification (PTM) of protein thiols through cGMP adduction (protein S-guanylation). Accumulating evidence has suggested that, in mammals, S-guanylation of redox-sensor proteins may implicate in regulation of adaptive responses against ROS-associated oxidative stress. Occurrence as well as protein targets of S-guanylation in bacteria remained unknown, however. Here we demonstrated, for the first time, the endogenous occurrence of protein S-guanylation in Escherichia coli (E. coli). Western blotting using anti-S-guanylation antibody clearly showed that multiple proteins were S-guanylated in E. coli. Interestingly, some of those proteins were more intensely S-guanylated when bacteria were cultured under static culture condition than shaking culture condition. It has been known that E. coli is deficient of guanylate cyclase, an enzyme indispensable for 8-nitro-cGMP formation in mammals. We found that adenylate cyclase from E. coli potentially catalyzed 8-nitro-cGMP formation from its precursor 8-nitroguanosine 5'-triphosphate. More importantly, E. coli lacking adenylate cyclase showed significantly reduced formation of S-guanylated proteins. Our S-guanylation proteomics successfully identified S-guanylation protein targets in E. coli, including chaperons, ribosomal proteins, and enzymes which associate with protein synthesis, redox regulation and metabolism. Understanding of functional impacts for protein S-guanylation in bacterial signal transduction is necessary basis for development of potential chemotherapy and new diagnostic strategy for control of pathogenic bacterial infections. PMID:27473654

  20. Guanylyl cyclase structure, function and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Lincoln R.

    2016-01-01

    Nitric oxide, bicarbonate, natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), guanylins, uroguanylins and guanylyl cyclase activating proteins (GCAPs) activate a family of enzymes variously called guanyl, guanylyl or guanylate cyclases that catalyze the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and pyrophosphate. Intracellular cyclic GMP is a second messenger that modulates: platelet aggregation, neurotransmission, sexual arousal, gut peristalsis, blood pressure, long bone growth, intestinal fluid secretion, lipolysis, phototransduction, cardiac hypertrophy and oocyte maturation. This review briefly discusses the discovery of cGMP and guanylyl cyclases, then nitric oxide, nitric oxide synthase and soluble guanylyl cyclase are described in slightly greater detail. Finally, the structure, function, and regulation of the individual mammalian single membrane-spanning guanylyl cyclases GC-A, GC-B, GC-C, GC-D, GC-E, GC-F and GC-G are described in greatest detail as determined by biochemical, cell biological and gene-deletion studies. PMID:21914472

  1. Proatherosclerotic Effect of the α1-Subunit of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase by Promoting Smooth Muscle Phenotypic Switching.

    PubMed

    Segura-Puimedon, Maria; Mergia, Evanthia; Al-Hasani, Jaafar; Aherrahrou, Redouane; Stoelting, Stephanie; Kremer, Felix; Freyer, Jennifer; Koesling, Doris; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; de Wit, Cor; Aherrahrou, Zouhair

    2016-08-01

    Soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), a key enzyme of the nitric oxide signaling pathway, is formed as a heterodimer by various isoforms of its α and β subunit. GUCY1A3, encoding the α1 subunit, was identified as a risk gene for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, but its specific contribution to atherosclerosis remains unclear. This study sought to decipher the role of Gucy1a3 in atherosclerosis in mice. At age 32 weeks and after 20 weeks of standard or high-fat diet, Gucy1a3(-/-)/Ldlr(-/-) mice exhibited a significant reduction of the atherosclerotic plaque size at the aortic root and the aorta for high-fat diet animals as compared with Ldlr(-/-) control mice. Collagen content in plaques in the aortic root was reduced, suggesting an alteration of smooth muscle cell function. Proliferation and migration were reduced in Gucy1a3(-/-) primary aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs), and proliferation was also reduced in human AoSMCs after inhibition of sGC by 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a] quinoxalin-1-one. Gucy1a3 deficiency in AoSMCs prevents their phenotypic switching, as indicated by the differential expression of marker proteins. The inherited Gucy1a3(-/-) loss exerts an atheroprotective effect. We suggest that sGC activity promotes the phenotypic switching of smooth muscle cells from a contractile to a synthetic state, fostering the formation of atherosclerosis. Preventing this switch by sGC inhibition may provide a novel target in atherosclerotic disease. PMID:27315776

  2. Mapping Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Protein Disulfide Isomerase Regions of Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Mohit; Liu, Tong; Li, Hong; Beuve, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric nitric oxide (NO) receptor that produces cyclic GMP. This signaling mechanism is a key component in the cardiovascular system. NO binds to heme in the β subunit and stimulates the catalytic conversion of GTP to cGMP several hundred fold. Several endogenous factors have been identified that modulate sGC function in vitro and in vivo. In previous work, we determined that protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) interacts with sGC in a redox-dependent manner in vitro and that PDI inhibited NO-stimulated activity in cells. To our knowledge, this was the first report of a physical interaction between sGC and a thiol-redox protein. To characterize this interaction between sGC and PDI, we first identified peptide linkages between sGC and PDI, using a lysine cross-linking reagent and recently developed mass spectrometry analysis. Together with Flag-immunoprecipitation using sGC domain deletions, wild-type (WT) and mutated PDI, regions of sGC involved in this interaction were identified. The observed data were further explored with computational modeling to gain insight into the interaction mechanism between sGC and oxidized PDI. Our results indicate that PDI interacts preferentially with the catalytic domain of sGC, thus providing a mechanism for PDI inhibition of sGC. A model in which PDI interacts with either the α or the β catalytic domain is proposed. PMID:26618351

  3. Nitric Oxide Receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Undergoes Splicing Regulation in Differentiating Human Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sharin, Vladislav G.; Mujoo, Kalpana; Kots, Alexander Y.; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), an important mediator molecule in mammalian physiology, initiates a number of signaling mechanisms by activating the enzyme soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Recently, a new role for NO/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling in embryonic development and cell differentiation has emerged. The changes in expression of NO synthase isoforms and various sGC subunits has been demonstrated during human and mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiation. Previously, our laboratory demonstrated that nascent α1 sGC transcript undergoes alternative splicing and that expression of α1 sGC splice forms directly affects sGC activity. Expression of sGC splice variants in the process of human ES (hES) cells differentiation has not been investigated. In this report, we demonstrate that α1 sGC undergoes alternative splicing during random hES differentiation for the first time. Our results indicate that C-α1 sGC splice form is expressed at high levels in differentiating cells and its intracellular distribution varies from canonical α1 sGC subunit. Together, our data suggest that alternative splicing of sGC subunits is associated with differentiation of hES cells. PMID:20964618

  4. RNA splicing in regulation of Nitric Oxide receptor Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Cote, Gilbert J.; Martin, Emil; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a key protein in the nitric oxide (NO)/-cGMP signaling pathway. sGC activity is involved in a number of important physiological processes including smooth muscle relaxation, neurotransmission and platelet aggregation and adhesion. Regulation of sGC expression and activity emerges as a crucial factor in control of sGC function in normal and pathological conditions. Recently accumulated evidence strongly indicates that the regulation of sGC expression is a complex process modulated on several levels including transcription, post-transcriptional regulation, translation and protein stability. Presently our understanding of mechanisms governing regulation of sGC expression remains very limited and awaits systematic investigation. Among other ways, the expression of sGC subunits is modulated at the levels of mRNA abundance and transcript diversity. In this review we summarize available information on different mechanisms (including transcriptional activation, mRNA stability and alternative splicing) involved in the modulation of mRNA levels of sGC subunits in response to various environmental clues. We also summarize and cross-reference the information on human sGC splice forms available in the literature and in genomic databases. This review highlights the fact that the study of the biological role and regulation of sGC splicing will bring new insights to our understanding of NO/cGMP biology. PMID:21867767

  5. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    PubMed Central

    Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Hyder, Salman M.; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17β-estradiol (E2) regulates the α1 and β1 subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC α1 10% and sGC β1 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression. PMID:11209068

  6. Estradiol rapidly inhibits soluble guanylyl cyclase expression in rat uterus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krumenacker, J. S.; Hyder, S. M.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    Previous reports that investigated the regulation of the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway by estrogenic compounds have focused primarily on the levels of NO, NO-producing enzymes, and cGMP in various tissues. In this study, we demonstrate that 17beta-estradiol (E2) regulates the alpha(1) and beta(1) subunits of the NO receptor, sGC, at the mRNA and protein levels in rat uterus. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we found that within 1 h of in vivo E2 administration to rats, sGC mRNA levels begin to diminish. After 3 h, there is a maximal diminution of sGC mRNA expression (sGC alpha(1) 10% and sGC beta(1) 33% of untreated). This effect was blocked by the estrogen receptor antagonist, ICI 182,780, indicating that estrogen receptor is required. The effect of E2 also was observed in vitro with incubations of uterine tissue, indicating that the response does not depend on the secondary release of other hormones or factors from other tissues. Puromycin did not block the effect, suggesting the effects occur because of preexisting factors in uterine tissues and do not require new protein synthesis. Using immunoblot analysis, we found that sGC protein levels also were reduced by E2 over a similar time course as the sGC mRNA. We conclude that sGC plays a vital role in the NO/sGC/cGMP regulatory pathway during conditions of elevated estrogen levels in the rat uterus as a result of the reduction of sGC expression.

  7. Identification of novel S-nitrosation sites in soluble guanylyl cyclase, the nitric oxide receptor.

    PubMed

    Beuve, Annie; Wu, Changgong; Cui, Chuanlong; Liu, Tong; Jain, Mohit Raja; Huang, Can; Yan, Lin; Kholodovych, Vladyslav; Li, Hong

    2016-04-14

    Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase (sGC) is the main receptor for nitric oxide (NO). NO activates sGC to synthesize cGMP, triggering a plethora of signals. Recently, we discovered that NO covalently modifies select sGC cysteines via a post-translational modification termed S-nitrosation or S-nitrosylation. Earlier characterization was conducted on a purified sGC treated with S-nitrosoglutathione, and identified three S-nitrosated cysteines (SNO-Cys). Here we describe a more biologically relevant mapping of sGC SNO-Cys in cells to better understand the multi-faceted interactions between SNO and sGC. Since SNO-Cys are labile during LC/MS/MS, MS analysis of nitrosation typically occurs after a biotin switch reaction, in which a SNO-Cys is converted to a biotin-Cys. Here we report the identification of ten sGC SNO-Cys in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes using an Orbitrap MS. A majority of the SNO-Cys identified is located at the solvent-exposed surface of the sGC, and half of them in the conserved catalytic domain, suggesting biological significance. These findings provide a solid basis for future studies of the regulations and functions of diverse sGC S-nitrosation events in cells. PMID:26917471

  8. Stimulation of soluble guanylyl cyclase protects against obesity by recruiting brown adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Linda S; Etzrodt, Jennifer; Willkomm, Lena; Sanyal, Abhishek; Scheja, Ludger; Fischer, Alexander W C; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Friebe, Andreas; Heeren, Joerg; Pfeifer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by a positive energy balance and expansion of white adipose tissue (WAT). In contrast, brown adipose tissue (BAT) combusts energy to produce heat. Here we show that a small molecule stimulator (BAY 41-8543) of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), which produces the second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP), protects against diet-induced weight gain, induces weight loss in established obesity, and also improves the diabetic phenotype. Mechanistically, the haeme-dependent sGC stimulator BAY 41-8543 enhances lipid uptake into BAT and increases whole-body energy expenditure, whereas ablation of the haeme-containing β1-subunit of sGC severely impairs BAT function. Notably, the sGC stimulator enhances differentiation of human brown adipocytes as well as induces 'browning' of primary white adipocytes. Taken together, our data suggest that sGC is a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:26011238

  9. Conventional and Unconventional Mechanisms for Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Signaling.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuansheng

    2016-05-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the principal enzyme in mediating the biological actions of nitric oxide. On activation, sGC converts guanosine triphosphate to guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), which mediates diverse physiological processes including vasodilation, platelet aggregation, and myocardial functions predominantly by acting on cGMP-dependent protein kinases. Cyclic GMP has long been considered as the sole second messenger for sGC action. However, emerging evidence suggests that, in addition to cGMP, other nucleoside 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates (cNMPs) are synthesized by sGC in response to nitric oxide stimulation, and some of these nucleoside 3',5'-cyclic monophosphates are involved in various physiological activities. For example, inosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate synthesized by sGC may play a critical role in hypoxic augmentation of vasoconstriction. The involvement of cytidine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate and uridine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in certain cardiovascular activities is also implicated. PMID:26452163

  10. NO and CO Differentially Activate Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase via a Heme Pivot-bend Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Ma,X.; Sayed, N.; Beuve, A.; van den Akker, F.

    2007-01-01

    Diatomic ligand discrimination by soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is paramount to cardiovascular homeostasis and neuronal signaling. Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates sGC activity 200-fold compared with only four-fold by carbon monoxide (CO). The molecular details of ligand discrimination and differential response to NO and CO are not well understood. These ligands are sensed by the heme domain of sGC, which belongs to the heme nitric oxide oxygen (H-NOX) domain family, also evolutionarily conserved in prokaryotes. Here we report crystal structures of the free, NO-bound, and CO-bound H-NOX domains of a cyanobacterial homolog. These structures and complementary mutational analysis in sGC reveal a molecular ruler mechanism that allows sGC to favor NO over CO while excluding oxygen, concomitant to signaling that exploits differential heme pivoting and heme bending. The heme thereby serves as a flexing wedge, allowing the N-terminal subdomain of H-NOX to shift concurrent with the transition of the six- to five-coordinated NO-bound state upon sGC activation. This transition can be modulated by mutations at sGC residues 74 and 145 and corresponding residues in the cyanobacterial H-NOX homolog.

  11. CCAAT-binding factor regulates expression of the beta1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase gene in the BE2 human neuroblastoma cell line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Martin, Emil; Thomas, Anthony; Uray, Karen L.; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a cytosolic enzyme producing the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) on activation with nitric oxide (NO). sGC is an obligatory heterodimer composed of alpha and beta subunits. We investigated human beta1 sGC transcriptional regulation in BE2 human neuroblastoma cells. The 5' upstream region of the beta1 sGC gene was isolated and analyzed for promoter activity by using luciferase reporter constructs. The transcriptional start site of the beta1 sGC gene in BE2 cells was identified. The functional significance of consensus transcriptional factor binding sites proximal to the transcriptional start site was investigated by site deletions in the 800-bp promoter fragment. The elimination of CCAAT-binding factor (CBF) and growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) binding cores significantly diminished whereas deletion of the NF1 core elevated the transcription. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and Western analysis of proteins bound to biotinated EMSA probes confirmed the interaction of GFI1, CBF, and NF1 factors with the beta1 sGC promoter. Treatment of BE2 cells with genistein, known to inhibit the CBF binding to DNA, significantly reduced protein levels of beta1 sGC by inhibiting transcription. In summary, our study represents an analysis of the human beta1 sGC promoter regulation in human neuroblastoma BE2 cells and identifies CBF as a critically important factor in beta1 sGC expression.

  12. CCAAT-binding factor regulates expression of the β1 subunit of soluble guanylyl cyclase gene in the BE2 human neuroblastoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida G.; Martin, Emil; Thomas, Anthony; Uray, Karen L.; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a cytosolic enzyme producing the intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) on activation with nitric oxide (NO). sGC is an obligatory heterodimer composed of α and β subunits. We investigated human β1 sGC transcriptional regulation in BE2 human neuroblastoma cells. The 5′ upstream region of the β1 sGC gene was isolated and analyzed for promoter activity by using luciferase reporter constructs. The transcriptional start site of the β1 sGC gene in BE2 cells was identified. The functional significance of consensus transcriptional factor binding sites proximal to the transcriptional start site was investigated by site deletions in the 800-bp promoter fragment. The elimination of CCAAT-binding factor (CBF) and growth factor independence 1 (GFI1) binding cores significantly diminished whereas deletion of the NF1 core elevated the transcription. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) and Western analysis of proteins bound to biotinated EMSA probes confirmed the interaction of GFI1, CBF, and NF1 factors with the β1 sGC promoter. Treatment of BE2 cells with genistein, known to inhibit the CBF binding to DNA, significantly reduced protein levels of β1 sGC by inhibiting transcription. In summary, our study represents an analysis of the human β1 sGC promoter regulation in human neuroblastoma BE2 cells and identifies CBF as a critically important factor in β1 sGC expression. PMID:14504408

  13. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, E.; Lee, Y. C.; Murad, F.

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme.

  14. YC-1 activation of human soluble guanylyl cyclase has both heme-dependent and heme-independent components

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Emil; Lee, Yu-Chen; Murad, Ferid

    2001-01-01

    YC-1 [3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′furyl)-1-benzyl indazole] is an allosteric activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). YC-1 increases the catalytic rate of the enzyme and sensitizes the enzyme toward its gaseous activators nitric oxide or carbon monoxide. In other studies the administration of YC-1 to experimental animals resulted in the inhibition of the platelet-rich thrombosis and a decrease of the mean arterial pressure, which correlated with increased cGMP levels. However, details of YC-1 interaction with sGC and enzyme activation are incomplete. Although evidence in the literature indicates that YC-1 activation of sGC is strictly heme-dependent, this report presents evidence for both heme-dependent and heme-independent activation of sGC by YC-1. The oxidation of the sGC heme by 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazole(4,3-a)quinoxalin-1-one completely inhibited the response to NO, but only partially attenuated activation by YC-1. We also observed activation by YC-1 of a mutant sGC, which lacks heme. These findings indicate that YC-1 activation of sGC can occur independently of heme, but that activation is substantially increased when the heme moiety is present in the enzyme. PMID:11687640

  15. Activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase by the nitrovasodilator 3-morpholinosydnonimine involves formation of S-nitrosoglutathione.

    PubMed

    Schrammel, A; Pfeiffer, S; Schmidt, K; Koesling, D; Mayer, B

    1998-07-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the major physiological target of sydnonimine-based vasodilators such as molsidomine. Decomposition of sydnonimines results in the stoichiometric formation of nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2-), which rapidly react to form peroxynitrite. Inasmuch as sGC is activated by NO but not by peroxynitrite, we investigated the mechanisms underlying sGC activation by 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1). Stimulation of purified bovine lung sGC by SIN-1 was found to be strongly dependent on glutathione (GSH). By contrast, GSH did not affect sGC activation by NO released from 2,2-diethyl-1-nitroso-oxyhydrazine, indicating that NO/O2- released from SIN-1 converted GSH to an activator of sGC. High performance liquid chromatography identified this product as the thionitrite S-nitrosoglutathione. Further, the reaction product decomposed to release NO upon addition of Cu(NO3)2 in the presence of GSH. Activation of sGC was antagonized by the Cu(I)-specific chelator neocuproine, whereas the Cu(II)-selective drug cuprizone was less potent. Carbon dioxide (delivered as NaHCO3) antagonized S-nitrosation by peroxynitrite but not by SIN-1. Thus, NO/O2- released from SIN-1 mediates a CO2-insensitive conversion of GSH to S-nitrosoglutathione, a thionitrite that activates sGC via trace metal-catalyzed release of NO. These results may provide novel insights into the molecular mechanism underlying the nitrovasodilator action of SIN-1. PMID:9658207

  16. Restoring Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Expression and Function Blocks the Aggressive Course of GliomaS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haifeng; Li, Jessica Tao; Zheng, Fang; Martin, Emil; Kots, Alexander Y.; Krumenacker, Joshua S.; Choi, Byung-Kwon; McCutcheon, Ian E.; Weisbrodt, Norman; Bögler, Oliver; Murad, Ferid

    2011-01-01

    The NO and cGMP signaling pathways are of broad physiological and pathological significance. We compared the NO/soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway in human glioma tissues and cell lines with that of healthy control samples and demonstrated that sGC expression is significantly lower in glioma preparations. Our analysis of GEO databases (National Cancer Institute) further revealed a statistically significant reduction of sGC transcript levels in human glioma specimens. On the other hand, the expression levels of particulate (membrane) guanylyl cyclases (pGC) and cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE) were intact in the glioma cells that we have tested. Pharmacologically manipulating endogenous cGMP generation in glioma cells through either stimulating pGC by ANP/BNP, or blocking PDE by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine/zaprinast caused significant inhibition of proliferation and colony formation of glioma cells. Genetically restoring sGC expression also correlated inversely with glioma cells growth. Orthotopic implantation of glioma cells transfected with an active mutant form of sGC (sGCα1β1Cys105) in athymic mice increased the survival time by 4-fold over the control. Histological analysis of xenografts overexpressing α1β1Cys105 sGC revealed changes in cellular architecture that resemble the morphology of normal cells. In addition, a decrease in angiogenesis contributed to glioma inhibition by sGC/cGMP therapy. Our study proposes the new concept that suppressed expression of sGC, a key enzyme in the NO/cGMP pathway, may be associated with an aggressive course of glioma. The sGC/cGMP signaling-targeted therapy may be a favorable alternative to chemotherapy and radiotherapy for glioma and perhaps other tumors. PMID:21908708

  17. Multiple lineage specific expansions within the guanylyl cyclase gene family

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, David A; O'Halloran, Damien M; Burnell, Ann M

    2006-01-01

    Background Guanylyl cyclases (GCs) are responsible for the production of the secondary messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate, which plays important roles in a variety of physiological responses such as vision, olfaction, muscle contraction, homeostatic regulation, cardiovascular and nervous function. There are two types of GCs in animals, soluble (sGCs) which are found ubiquitously in cell cytoplasm, and receptor (rGC) forms which span cell membranes. The complete genomes of several vertebrate and invertebrate species are now available. These data provide a platform to investigate the evolution of GCs across a diverse range of animal phyla. Results In this analysis we located GC genes from a broad spectrum of vertebrate and invertebrate animals and reconstructed molecular phylogenies for both sGC and rGC proteins. The most notable features of the resulting phylogenies are the number of lineage specific rGC and sGC expansions that have occurred during metazoan evolution. Among these expansions is a large nematode specific rGC clade comprising 21 genes in C. elegans alone; a vertebrate specific expansion in the natriuretic receptors GC-A and GC-B; a vertebrate specific expansion in the guanylyl GC-C receptors, an echinoderm specific expansion in the sperm rGC genes and a nematode specific sGC clade. Our phylogenetic reconstruction also shows the existence of a basal group of nitric oxide (NO) insensitive insect and nematode sGCs which are regulated by O2. This suggests that the primordial eukaryotes probably utilized sGC as an O2 sensor, with the ligand specificity of sGC later switching to NO which provides a very effective local cell-to-cell signalling system. Phylogenetic analysis of the sGC and bacterial heme nitric oxide/oxygen binding protein domain supports the hypothesis that this domain originated from a cyanobacterial source. Conclusion The most salient feature of our phylogenies is the number of lineage specific expansions, which have occurred within

  18. Cobinamides Are Novel Coactivators of Nitric Oxide Receptor That Target Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase Catalytic Domain

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, Iraida; Sobolevsky, Michael; Doursout, Marie-Francoise; Gryko, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), a ubiquitously expressed heme-containing receptor for nitric oxide (NO), is a key mediator of NO-dependent processes. In addition to NO, a number of synthetic compounds that target the heme-binding region of sGC and activate it in a NO-independent fashion have been described. We report here that dicyanocobinamide (CN2-Cbi), a naturally occurring intermediate of vitamin B12 synthesis, acts as a sGC coactivator both in vitro and in intact cells. Heme depletion or heme oxidation does not affect CN2-Cbi-dependent activation. Deletion mutagenesis demonstrates that CN2-Cbi targets a new regulatory site and functions though a novel mechanism of sGC activation. Unlike all known sGC regulators that target the N-terminal regulatory regions, CN2-Cbi directly targets the catalytic domain of sGC, resembling the effect of forskolin on adenylyl cyclases. CN2-Cbi synergistically enhances sGC activation by NO-independent regulators 3-(4-amino-5-cyclopropylpyrimidine-2-yl)-1-(2-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine (BAY41-2272), 4-[((4-carboxybutyl){2-[(4-phenethylbenzyl)oxy]phenethyl}amino) methyl [benzoic]-acid (cinaciguat or BAY58-2667), and 5-chloro-2-(5-chloro-thiophene-2-sulfonylamino-N-(4-(morpholine-4-sulfonyl)-phenyl)-benzamide sodium salt (ataciguat or HMR-1766). BAY41-2272 and CN2-Cbi act reciprocally by decreasing the EC50 values. CN2-Cbi increases intracellular cGMP levels and displays vasorelaxing activity in phenylephrine-constricted rat aortic rings in an endothelium-independent manner. Both effects are synergistically potentiated by BAY41-2272. These studies uncover a new mode of sGC regulation and provide a new tool for understanding the mechanism of sGC activation and function. CN2-Cbi also offers new possibilities for its therapeutic applications in augmenting the effect of other sGC-targeting drugs. PMID:22171090

  19. Polymerization of serine guanylate in the presence of montmorillonite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1981-01-01

    Serine guanylate was prepared and its polymerization studied in the presence of montmorillonite and in its absence. In water, without clay, serine guanylate polymerizes in the same way as does serine adenylate. In the presence of montmorillonite, serine guanylate polymerizes to a lesser extent and produces also lower degrees of polymerization than does serine adenylate. It is postulated that the reason for this difference in behavior might lie in the fact that guanylic acid is much more acidic than adenylic acid; hence would bind much more strongly to the edges of montmorillonite and thus, by blocking these sites, would inhibit the catalytic activity of the clay.

  20. The fibrate gemfibrozil is a NO- and haem-independent activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase: in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharina, I G; Sobolevsky, M; Papakyriakou, A; Rukoyatkina, N; Spyroulias, G A; Gambaryan, S; Martin, E

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Fibrates are a class of drugs widely used to treat dyslipidaemias. They regulate lipid metabolism and act as PPARα agonists. Clinical trials demonstrate that besides changes in lipid profiles, fibrates decrease the incidence of cardiovascular events, with gemfibrozil exhibiting the most pronounced benefit. This study aims to characterize the effect of gemfibrozil on the activity and function of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), the key mediator of NO signalling. Experimental Approach High-throughput screening of a drug library identified gemfibrozil as a direct sGC activator. Activation of sGC is unique to gemfibrozil and is not shared by other fibrates. Key Results Gemfibrozil activated purified sGC, induced endothelium-independent relaxation of aortic rings and inhibited platelet aggregation. Gemfibrozil-dependent activation was absent when the sGC haem domain was deleted, but was significantly enhanced when sGC haem was lacking or oxidized. Oxidation of sGC haem enhanced the vasoactive and anti-platelet effects of gemfibrozil. Gemfibrozil competed with the haem-independent sGC activators ataciguat and cinaciguat. Computational modelling predicted that gemfibrozil occupies the space of the haem group and interacts with residues crucial for haem stabilization. This is consistent with structure-activity data which revealed an absolute requirement for gemfibrozil's carboxyl group. Conclusions and Implications These data suggest that in addition to altered lipid and lipoprotein state, the cardiovascular preventive benefits of gemfibrozil may derive from direct activation and protection of sGC function. A sGC-directed action may explain the more pronounced cardiovascular benefit of gemfibrozil observed over other fibrates and some of the described side effects of gemfibrozil. PMID:25536881

  1. Stimulation of soluble guanylyl cyclase protects against obesity by recruiting brown adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Linda S.; Etzrodt, Jennifer; Willkomm, Lena; Sanyal, Abhishek; Scheja, Ludger; Fischer, Alexander W.C.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Bloch, Wilhelm; Friebe, Andreas; Heeren, Joerg; Pfeifer, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by a positive energy balance and expansion of white adipose tissue (WAT). In contrast, brown adipose tissue (BAT) combusts energy to produce heat. Here we show that a small molecule stimulator (BAY 41-8543) of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), which produces the second messenger cyclic GMP (cGMP), protects against diet-induced weight gain, induces weight loss in established obesity, and also improves the diabetic phenotype. Mechanistically, the haeme-dependent sGC stimulator BAY 41–8543 enhances lipid uptake into BAT and increases whole-body energy expenditure, whereas ablation of the haeme-containing β1-subunit of sGC severely impairs BAT function. Notably, the sGC stimulator enhances differentiation of human brown adipocytes as well as induces ‘browning' of primary white adipocytes. Taken together, our data suggest that sGC is a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of obesity and its comorbidities. PMID:26011238

  2. Evidence for a dissociable protein subunit required for calmodulin stimulation of brain adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Toscano, W A; Westcott, K R; LaPorte, D C; Storm, D R

    1979-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphatelyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] preparation that is not stimulated by NaF,5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate, or Ca2+.calmodulin has been isolated from bovine cerebral cortex by Affi-Gel Blue chromatography and calmodulin-Sepharose chromatography. Sensitivity to these effectors was restored by incubation of the adenylate cyclase preparation with detergent-solubilized protein from bovine cerebral cortex. Reconstitution of of Ca2+.calmodulin activation required the presence of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate. The factor required for restoration of Ca2+.calmodulin stimulation was sensitive to heat, trypsin digestion, and N-ethylmaleimide. These observations suggest that this adenylate cyclase activity requires the presence of one or more guanyl nucleotide binding subunits for calmodulin sensitivity. PMID:293663

  3. Role of soluble guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP signaling in tumor cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mujoo, Kalpana; Sharin, Vladislav G.; Martin, Emil; Choi, Byung-Kwon; Sloan, Courtney; Nikonoff, Lubov E.; Kots, Alexander Y; Murad, Ferid

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies demonstrate a differential expression of nitric oxide (NO) signaling components in ES cells and our recent study demonstrated an enhanced differentiation of ES cells into myocardial cells with NO donors and soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activators. Since NO-cGMP pathway exhibits a diverse role in cancer, we were interested in evaluating the role of the NO receptor sGC and other components of the pathway in regulation of the tumor cell proliferation. Our results demonstrate a differential expression of the sGC subunits, NOS-1 and PKG mRNA and protein levels in various human cancer models. In contrast to sGCα1, robust levels of sGC β1 were observed in OVCAR-3 (ovarian) and MDA-MB-468 (breast) cancer cells which correlated well with the sGC activity and a marked increase in cGMP levels upon exposure to the combination of a NO donor and a sGC activator. NOC-18 (DETA NONOate; NO donor), BAY41-2272 (3-(4-Amino-5-cyclopropylpyrimidin-2-yl)-1-(2-fluorobenzyl)-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridine); sGC activator), NOC-18+BAY41-2272, IBMX (3-Isobutyl-1-methylxanthine; phosphodiesterase inhibitor) and 8-bromo-cGMP (cGMP analog) caused growth inhibition and apoptosis in various cancer cell lines. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms involved in growth inhibition, we evaluated the effect of activators/inhibitors on ERK phosphorylation. Our studies indicate that BAY41-2272 or the combination NOC18+BAY41-2272 caused inhibition of the basal ERK1/2 phosphorylation in OVCAR-3 (high sGC activity), SK-OV-3 and SK-Br-3 (low sGC activity) cell lines and in some cases the inhibition was rescued by the sGC inhibitor ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one). These studies suggest that the effects of activators/inhibitors of NO-sGC-cGMP in tumor cell proliferation is mediated by both cGMP-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:19948239

  4. Enhancement of choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activities by guanyl nucleotides and a 19-kDa membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Noda, M; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1987-01-01

    Choleragen activates adenylate cyclase by catalyzing, in the presence of NAD, the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha, the stimulatory guanyl nucleotide-binding protein of the cyclase system. Kahn and Gilman [Kahn, R. A. & Gilman, A. G. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7906-7911] identified another guanyl nucleotide-binding protein termed ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) that stimulated this reaction. It was proposed that the toxin substrate is an ARF-Gs alpha complex and that ARF may have a physiological role in regulation of Gs alpha activity. We have found that purified ARF from bovine brain enhances not only the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha but also Gs alpha-independent choleragen-catalyzed reactions. These are (i) ADP-ribosylation of agmatine, a low molecular weight guanidino compound; (ii) ADP-ribosylation of several proteins unrelated to Gs alpha; and (iii) auto-ADP-ribosylation of the toxin A1 peptide. These reactions, as well as the ADP-ribosylation of ARF itself, were stimulated by GTP or stable GTP analogues such as guanyl-5'-yl imido-beta gamma-diphosphate and guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate; GDP and guanosine 5'-O-[beta-thio]diphosphate were inactive. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that ARF interacts directly with the A subunit of choleragen in a GTP-dependent fashion thereby enhancing catalytic activity manifest as transfer of ADP-ribose to Gs alpha and other proteins, to the toxin A1 peptide, or to agmatine. It is tempting to speculate that ARF may be involved in regulating one or another of the ADP-ribosyltransferases found in animal cells. Images PMID:3110784

  5. Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase: promising functional insights from rare coding atherosclerosis-related GUCY1A3 variants.

    PubMed

    Wobst, Jana; von Ameln, Simon; Wolf, Bernhard; Wierer, Michael; Dang, Tan An; Sager, Hendrik B; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Hengstenberg, Christian; Koesling, Doris; Friebe, Andreas; Braun, Siegmund L; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Kessler, Thorsten

    2016-07-01

    Stimulators of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) are emerging therapeutic agents in cardiovascular diseases. Genetic alterations of the GUCY1A3 gene, which encodes the α1 subunit of the sGC, are associated with coronary artery disease. Studies investigating sGC stimulators in subjects with CAD and carrying risk-related variants in sGC are, however, lacking. Here, we functionally investigate the impact of coding GUCY1A3 variants on sGC activity and the therapeutic potential of sGC stimulators in vitro. In addition to a known loss-of-function variant, eight coding variants in GUCY1A3 were cloned and expressed in HEK 293 cells. Protein levels and dimerization capability with the β1 subunit were analysed by immunoblotting and co-immunoprecipitation, respectively. All α1 variants found in MI patients dimerized with the β1 subunit. Protein levels were reduced by 72 % in one variant (p < 0.01). Enzymatic activity was analysed using cGMP radioimmunoassay after stimulation with a nitric oxide (NO) donor. Five variants displayed decreased cGMP production upon NO stimulation (p < 0.001). The addition of the sGC stimulator BAY 41-2272 increased cGMP formation in all of these variants (p < 0.01). Except for the variant leading to decreased protein level, cGMP amounts reached the wildtype NO-induced level after addition of BAY 41-2272. In conclusion, rare coding variants in GUCY1A3 lead to reduced cGMP formation which can be rescued by a sGC stimulator in vitro. These results might therefore represent the starting point for discovery of novel treatment strategies for patients at risk with coding GUCY1A3 variants. PMID:27342234

  6. Bacterial terpene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Dickschat, Jeroen S

    2016-01-01

    Covering: up to 2015. This review summarises the accumulated knowledge about characterised bacterial terpene cyclases. The structures of identified products and of crystallised enzymes are included, and the obtained insights into enzyme mechanisms are discussed. After a summary of mono-, sesqui- and diterpene cyclases the special cases of the geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol synthases that are both particularly widespread in bacteria will be presented. A total number of 63 enzymes that have been characterised so far is presented, with 132 cited references. PMID:26563452

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide Alters Splicing of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Selectively Modulates Expression of Splicing Regulators in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Gilbert J.; Zhu, Wen; Thomas, Anthony; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid; Sharina, Iraida G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) plays a central role in nitric oxide (NO)-mediated signal transduction in the cardiovascular, nervous and gastrointestinal systems. Alternative RNA splicing has emerged as a potential mechanism to modulate sGC expression and activity. C-α1 sGC is an alternative splice form that is resistant to oxidation-induced protein degradation and demonstrates preferential subcellular distribution to the oxidized environment of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that splicing of C-α1 sGC can be modulated by H2O2 treatment in BE2 neuroblastoma and MDA-MD-468 adenocarcinoma human cells. In addition, we show that the H2O2 treatment of MDA-MD-468 cells selectively decreases protein levels of PTBP1 and hnRNP A2/B1 splice factors identified as potential α1 gene splicing regulators by in silico analysis. We further demonstrate that down-regulation of PTBP1 by H2O2 occurs at the protein level with variable regulation observed in different breast cancer cells. Conclusions/Significance Our data demonstrate that H2O2 regulates RNA splicing to induce expression of the oxidation-resistant C-α1 sGC subunit. We also report that H2O2 treatment selectively alters the expression of key splicing regulators. This process might play an important role in regulation of cellular adaptation to conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:22911749

  8. Ligand selectivity of soluble guanylyl cyclase: effect of the hydrogen-bonding tyrosine in the distal heme pocket on binding of oxygen, nitric oxide, and carbon monoxide.

    PubMed

    Martin, Emil; Berka, Vladimir; Bogatenkova, Elena; Murad, Ferid; Tsai, Ah-Lim

    2006-09-22

    Although soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) functions in an environment in which O(2), NO, and CO are potential ligands for its heme moiety, the enzyme displays a high affinity for only its physiological ligand, NO, but has a limited affinity for CO and no affinity for O(2). Recent studies of a truncated version of the sGC beta(1)-subunit containing the heme-binding domain (Boon, E. M., Huang, S H., and Marletta, M. A. (2005) Nat. Chem. Biol., 1, 53-59) showed that introduction of the hydrogen-bonding tyrosine into the distal heme pocket changes the ligand specificity of the heme moiety and results in an oxygen-binding sGC. The hypothesis that the absence of hydrogen-bonding residues in the distal heme pocket is sufficient to provide oxygen discrimination by sGC was put forward. We tested this hypothesis in a context of a complete sGC heterodimer containing both the intact alpha(1)- and beta(1)-subunits. We found that the I145Y substitution in the full-length beta-subunit of the sGC heterodimer did not produce an oxygen-binding enzyme. However, this substitution impeded the association of NO and destabilized the NO.heme complex. The tyrosine in the distal heme pocket also impeded both the binding and dissociation of the CO ligand. We propose that the mechanism of oxygen exclusion by sGC not only involves the lack of hydrogen bonding in the distal heme pocket, but also depends on structural elements from other domains of sGC. PMID:16864588

  9. Effect of soluble guanylyl cyclase activator and stimulator therapy on nitroglycerin-induced nitrate tolerance in rats.

    PubMed

    Jabs, A; Oelze, M; Mikhed, Y; Stamm, P; Kröller-Schön, S; Welschof, P; Jansen, T; Hausding, M; Kopp, M; Steven, S; Schulz, E; Stasch, J-P; Münzel, T; Daiber, A

    2015-08-01

    Chronic nitroglycerin (GTN) anti-ischemic therapy induces side effects such as nitrate tolerance and endothelial dysfunction. Both phenomena could be based on a desensitization/oxidation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Therefore, the present study aims at investigating the effects of the therapy with the sGC activator BAY 60-2770 and the sGC stimulator BAY 41-8543 on side effects induced by chronic nitroglycerin treatment. Male Wistar rats were treated with nitroglycerin (100mg/kg/d for 3.5days, s.c. in ethanol) and BAY 60-2770 (0.5 or 2.5mg/kg/d) or BAY 41-8543 (1 and 5mg/kg/d) for 6days. Therapy with BAY 60-2770 but not with BAY 41-8543 improved nitroglycerin-triggered endothelial dysfunction and nitrate tolerance, corrected the decrease in aortic nitric oxide levels, improved the cGMP dependent activation of protein kinase I in aortic tissue and reduced vascular, cardiac and whole blood oxidative stress (fluorescence and chemiluminescence assays; 3-nitrotyrosine staining). In contrast to BAY 41-8543, the vasodilator potency of BAY 60-2770 was not impaired in isolated aortic ring segments from nitrate tolerant rats. sGC activator therapy improves partially the adverse effects of nitroglycerin therapy whereas sGC stimulation has only minor beneficial effects pointing to a nitroglycerin-dependent sGC oxidation/inactivation mechanism contributing to nitrate tolerance. PMID:25869522

  10. Insights into BAY 60-2770 activation and S-nitrosylation-dependent desensitization of soluble guanylyl cyclase via crystal structures of homologous Nostoc H-NOX domain complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Martin, Faye; Hahn, Michael G.; Schaefer, Martina; Stamler, Jonathan S.; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; van den Akker, Focco

    2013-01-01

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is an important receptor for nitric oxide (NO). Nitric oxide activates sGC several hundred fold to generate cGMP from GTP. Because of sGC’s salutary roles in cardiovascular physiology, it has received substantial attention as a drug target. The heme domain of sGC is key to its regulation as it not only contains the NO activation site but also harbors sites for NO-independent sGC activators as well an S-nitrosylation site (β1 C122) involved in desensitization. Here we report the crystal structure of the activator BAY 60-2770 bound to the Nostoc H-NOX domain that is homologous to sGC. The structure reveals that BAY 60-2770 has displaced the heme and acts as a heme mimetic via carboxylate-mediated interactions with the conserved YxSxR motif as well as hydrophobic interactions. Comparisons with the previously determined BAY 58-2667 bound structure reveals that BAY 60-2770 is more ordered in its hydrophobic tail region. sGC activity assays demonstrate that BAY 60-2770 has about 10% higher fold maximal stimulation compared to BAY 58-2667. S-nitrosylation of the BAY 60-2770 substituted Nostoc H-NOX domain causes subtle changes in the vicinity of the S-nitrosylated C122 residue. These shifts could impact the adjacent YxSxR motif and αF helix and as such potentially inhibit either heme incorporation or NO-activation of sGC and thus provide a structural basis for desensitization. PMID:23614626

  11. Prolonged exposure of chromaffin cells to nitric oxide down-regulates the activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase and corresponding mRNA and protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Ferrero, Rut; Torres, Magdalena

    2002-01-01

    Background Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the main receptor for nitric oxide (NO) when the latter is produced at low concentrations. This enzyme exists mainly as a heterodimer consisting of one α and one β subunit and converts GTP to the second intracellular messenger cGMP. In turn, cGMP plays a key role in regulating several physiological processes in the nervous system. The aim of the present study was to explore the effects of a NO donor on sGC activity and its protein and subunit mRNA levels in a neural cell model. Results Continuous exposure of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture to the nitric oxide donor, diethylenetriamine NONOate (DETA/NO), resulted in a lower capacity of the cells to synthesize cGMP in response to a subsequent NO stimulus. This effect was not prevented by an increase of intracellular reduced glutathione level. DETA/NO treatment decreased sGC subunit mRNA and β1 subunit protein levels. Both sGC activity and β1 subunit levels decreased more rapidly in chromaffin cells exposed to NO than in cells exposed to the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, suggesting that NO decreases β1 subunit stability. The presence of cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) inhibitors effectively prevented the DETA/NO-induced down regulation of sGC subunit mRNA and partially inhibited the reduction in β1 subunits. Conclusions These results suggest that activation of PKG mediates the drop in sGC subunit mRNA levels, and that NO down-regulates sGC activity by decreasing subunit mRNA levels through a cGMP-dependent mechanism, and by reducing β1 subunit stability. PMID:12350235

  12. Crystal Structure of the Signaling Helix Coiled-coil Domain of the b1 Subunit of the Soluble guanylyl Cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, X.; Beuve, A; van den Akker, F

    2010-01-01

    The soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is a heterodimeric enzyme that, upon activation by nitric oxide, stimulates the production of the second messenger cGMP. Each sGC subunit harbor four domains three of which are used for heterodimerization: H-NOXA/H-NOBA domain, coiled-coil domain (CC), and catalytic guanylyl cyclase domain. The CC domain has previously been postulated to be part of a larger CC family termed the signaling helix (S-helix) family. Homodimers of sGC have also been observed but are not functionally active yet are likely transient awaiting their intended heterodimeric partner. To investigate the structure of the CC S-helix region, we crystallized and determined the structure of the CC domain of the sGC{beta}1 subunit comprising residues 348-409. The crystal structure was refined to 2.15 {angstrom} resolution. The CC structure of sGC{beta}1 revealed a tetrameric arrangement comprised of a dimer of CC dimers. Each monomer is comprised of a long a-helix, a turn near residue P399, and a short second a-helix. The CC structure also offers insights as to how sGC homodimers are not as stable as (functionally) active heterodimers via a possible role for inter-helix salt-bridge formation. The structure also yielded insights into the residues involved in dimerization. In addition, the CC region is also known to harbor a number of congenital and man-made mutations in both membrane and soluble guanylyl cyclases and those function-affecting mutations have been mapped onto the CC structure. This mutant analysis indicated an importance for not only certain dimerization residue positions, but also an important role for other faces of the CC dimer which might perhaps interact with adjacent domains. Our results also extend beyond guanylyl cyclases as the CC structure is, to our knowledge, the first S-helix structure and serves as a model for all S-helix containing family members.

  13. Activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase by BAY 58-2667 improves bladder function in cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis in mice.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Mariana G; Calmasini, Fabiano B; Alexandre, Eduardo C; De Nucci, Gilberto; Mónica, Fabíola Z; Antunes, Edson

    2016-07-01

    Activators of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) interact directly with its prosthetic heme group, enhancing the enzyme responsiveness in pathological conditions. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the sGC activator BAY 58-2667 on voiding dysfunction, protein expressions of α1 and β1 sGC subunits and cGMP levels in the bladder tissues after cyclophosphamide (CYP) exposure. Female C57BL/6 mice (20-25 g) were injected with CYP (300 mg/kg ip) to induce cystitis. Mice were pretreated or not with BAY 58-2667 (1 mg/kg, gavage), given 1 h before CYP injection. The micturition patterns and in vitro bladder contractions were evaluated at 24 h. In freely moving mice, the CYP injection produced reduced the micturition volume and increased the number of urine spots. Cystometric recordings in CYP-injected mice revealed significant increases in basal pressure, voiding frequency, and nonvoiding contractions (NVCs), along with decreases in bladder capacity, intercontraction interval, and compliance. BAY 58-2667 significantly prevented the micturition alterations observed in both freely moving mice and cystometry and normalized the reduced in vitro carbachol-induced contractions in the CYP group. Reduced protein expressions of α1 and β1 sGC subunits and of cGMP levels were observed in the CYP group, all of which were prevented by BAY 58-2667. CYP exposure significantly increased reactive-oxygen species (ROS) generation in both detrusor and urothelium, and this was normalized by BAY 58-2667. The increased myeloperoxidase and cyclooxygenase-2 activities in the bladders of the CYP group remained unchanged by BAY 58-2667. Activators of sGC may constitute a novel and promising therapeutic approach for management of interstitial cystitis. PMID:27122537

  14. The adenylate cyclase receptor complex and aqueous humor formation.

    PubMed Central

    Caprioli, J.; Sears, M.

    1984-01-01

    The secretory tissue of the eye, the ciliary processes, contains an enzyme receptor complex, composed of membrane proteins, the catalytic moiety of the enzyme adenylate cyclase, a guanyl nucleotide regulatory protein (or N protein), and other features. The enzyme can be activated by well-known neurohumoral or humoral agents, catecholamines, glycoprotein hormones produced by the hypothalamic pituitary axis, and other related compounds, including placental gonadotropin, organic fluorides, and forskolin, a diterpene. These compounds cause the ciliary epithelia to produce cyclic AMP at an accelerated rate. Cyclic AMP, as a second messenger, causes, either directly or indirectly, a decrease in the net rate of aqueous humor inflow that may be modulated by cofactors. Clinical syndromes fit the experimental data so that an integrated explanation can be given for the reduced intraocular pressure witnessed under certain central nervous system and adrenergic influences. The molecular biology of this concept provides important leads for future investigations that bear directly both upon the regulation of intraocular pressure and upon glaucoma. Images FIG. 11 PMID:6093393

  15. Apoptosis of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells induced by podophyllotoxin

    PubMed Central

    JI, CHEN-FENG; JI, YU-BIN

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that podophyllotoxin and its derivatives exhibit antitumor effects. The aim of the present study was to investigate SGC-7901 cell apoptosis and the underlying mechanism induced by podophyllotoxin. SGC-7901 cells were treated with varying concentrations of podophyllotoxin. MTT assays and flow cytometry were used to evaluate the effects of podophyllotoxin on the proliferation and apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells, while fluorescence inverted microscopy was used to observe the morphology of SGC-7901 cells that had been dyed with Hoechst 33258. In addition, laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to analyze the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) of SGC-7901 cells dyed with Rhodamine 123. Western blotting was performed to analyze the expression levels of cytochrome c (cyt-c), caspase-9 and caspase-3 in the SGC-7901 cells. The results indicated that podophyllotoxin was capable of inhibiting growth and inducing the apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner, causing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase. After 48 h of treatment, the apoptotic morphology of SGC-7901 cells was clear, exhibiting cell protuberance, concentrated cytoplasms and apoptotic bodies. Following 24 h of treatment, the MMP of the SGC-7901 cells decreased. In addition, after 48 h, the expression of cyt-c was shown to be upregulated, while the expression levels of pro-caspase-9 and pro-caspase-3 in the SGC-7901 cells were shown to be downregulated. In conclusion, apoptosis can be induced in SGC-7901 cells by podophyllotoxin, potentially via a mitochondrial pathway, indicating that podophyllotoxin may be a potent agent for cancer treatment. PMID:24940431

  16. Lessons from ten years of crystallization experiments at the SGC

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jia Tsing; Dekker, Carien; Reardon, Paul; von Delft, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Although protein crystallization is generally considered more art than science and remains significantly trial-and-error, large-scale data sets hold the promise of providing general learning. Observations are presented here from retrospective analyses of the strategies actively deployed for the extensive crystallization experiments at the Oxford site of the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), where comprehensive annotations by SGC scientists were recorded on a customized database infrastructure. The results point to the importance of using redundancy in crystallizing conditions, specifically by varying the mixing ratios of protein sample and precipitant, as well as incubation temperatures. No meaningful difference in performance could be identified between the four most widely used sparse-matrix screens, judged by the yield of crystals leading to deposited structures; this suggests that in general any comparison of screens will be meaningless without extensive cross-testing. Where protein sample is limiting, exploring more conditions has a higher likelihood of being informative by yielding hits than does redundancy of either mixing ratio or temperature. Finally, on the logistical question of how long experiments should be stored, 98% of all crystals that led to deposited structures appeared within 30 days. Overall, these analyses serve as practical guidelines for the design of initial screening experiments for new crystallization targets. PMID:26894670

  17. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase from pigeon erythrocytes under the action of the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Popov, K.M.; Bulargina, T.V.; Severin, E.S.

    1985-09-20

    Preincubation of the plasma membranes from pigeon erythrocytes with the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase leads to desensitization of adenylate cyclase of the erythrocytes. The adenylate cyclase activity, measured in the presence of 10 ..mu..M isoproterenol and 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S, is decreased by 40% in 10 min of incubation, while the activity in the presence of 50 ..mu..M GTP-..gamma..-S is decreased by 35% in 20 min. The decrease in the adenylate cyclase activity is due to an increase in the lag phase of activation of the enzyme in the presence of a GTP analog stable to hydrolysis and a decrease in the activity in the steady-state phase of activation. Heterologous desensitization of adenylate cyclase under the action of cAMP-dependent protein kinase is coupled with a decrease in the number of ..beta..-adrenoreceptors capable of passing into a state of high affinity for antagonists in the absence of guanylic nucleotides. The influence of the catalytic subunit on adenylate cyclase entirely models the process of desensitization of the enzyme absorbed in the influence of isoproterenol or cAMP on erythrocytes.

  18. Functional properties of a naturally occurring isoform of soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Russwurm, M; Behrends, S; Harteneck, C; Koesling, D

    1998-01-01

    Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), the target enzyme of the signalling molecule NO, contains one prosthetic haem group and consists of an alpha and a beta subunit. So far, only the alpha1beta1 heterodimer has been shown to exist in different cells and tissues, and most biochemical studies of sGC have been performed with the alpha1 beta1 heterodimer. Here we demonstrate for the first time the natural occurrence of the alpha2 subunit on the protein level. The alpha2 subunit co-precipitated with the beta1 subunit from human placenta, showing the existence of the alpha2 beta1 isoform in vivo. The new enzyme was expressed in and purified from cells from the Spodoptera frugiperda ovary cell line Sf 9. Spectral analysis showed that the alpha2 beta1 heterodimer contains a prosthetic haem group revealing the same characteristics as the haem in the alpha1 beta1 form. The kinetic properties of both isoforms and sensitivity towards NO were indistinguishable. 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a selective inhibitor of sGC, abolished NO-stimulated activity of both heterodimers. The new NO-independent activator, 3-(5'-hydroxymethyl-2'-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole (YC-1), increased the maximal NO-stimulated activity of the new isoform, caused a leftward-shift in the NO concentration-response curve and turned CO into an effective activator, as it did for the alpha1 beta1 heterodimer (200-fold activation). In summary, the differences in primary structure of both alpha subunits are contrasted by their functional similarity. Further studies will be needed to elucidate the physiological purpose of the new isoform. PMID:9742221

  19. Effects of the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator, YC-1, on vascular tone, cyclic GMP levels and phosphodiesterase activity

    PubMed Central

    Galle, Jan; Zabel, Ulrike; Hübner, Ulrich; Hatzelmann, Armin; Wagner, Birgit; Wanner, Christoph; Schmidt, Harald H H W

    1999-01-01

    The vasomotor and cyclic GMP-elevating activity of YC-1, a novel NO-independent activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC), was studied in isolated rabbit aortic rings and compared to that of the NO donor compounds sodium nitroprusside (SNP) and NOC 18.Similarly to SNP and NOC 18, YC-1 (0.3–300 μM) caused a concentration-dependent, endothelium-independent relaxation that was greatly reduced by the sGC inhibitor 1-H-[1,2,4]oxadiazole[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ 10 μM; 59% inhibition of dilation induced by 100 μM YC-1) suggesting the activation of sGC as one mechanism of action.Preincubation with YC-1 (3 and 30 μM) significantly increased the maximal dilator responses mediated by endogenous NO in aortic rings that was released upon exposure to acetylcholine, and enhanced the dilator response to the exogenous NO-donors, SNP and NOC 18, by almost two orders of magnitude.Vasoactivity induced by SNP and YC-1 displayed different kinetics as evidenced by a long-lasting inhibition by YC-1 (300 μM) on the phenylephrine (PE)-induced contractile response, which was not fully reversible even after extensive washout (150 min) of YC-1, and was accompanied by a long-lasting elevation of intracellular cyclic GMP content. In contrast, SNP (30 μM) had no effect on the vasoconstrictor potency of PE, and increases in intravascular cyclic GMP levels were readily reversed after washout of this NO donor compound.Surprisingly, YC-1 not only activated sGC, but also affected cyclic GMP metabolism, as it inhibited both cyclic GMP break down in aortic extracts and the activity of phosphodiesterase isoforms 1–5 in vitro.In conclusion, YC-1 caused persistent elevation of intravascular cyclic GMP levels in vivo by activating sGC and inhibiting cyclic GMP break down. Thus, YC-1 is a highly effective vasodilator compound with a prolonged duration of action, and mechanisms that are unprecedented for any previously known sGC activator. PMID:10369473

  20. Mechano-chemistry of the enzyme Guanylate Kinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, C.-Y.; Wang, A.; Zocchi, G.

    2010-07-01

    We address the coupling of mechanics and chemistry in an enzyme through equilibrium experiments where we mechanically deform the enzyme and measure the effect on the chemical reaction it catalyzes. We use the DNA molecular spring method to exert stresses at three different specific locations on the enzyme Guanylate Kinase, and for each case determine the changes in substrates binding affinities and catalytic rate. We find that the enzyme kinetics parameters can be affected separately, depending on where the mechanical stress is applied. For one configuration the applied stress mainly affects the catalytic rate kcat, for another it mainly affects the binding affinity of the substrate GMP. These experiments show that a stress applied by pulling two residues on the surface of the protein generally results in a strain propagating into the structure.

  1. Regiospecific chlorination of (S)-beta-tyrosyl-S-carrier protein catalyzed by SgcC3 in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuangjun; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2007-10-17

    C-1027 is a potent antitumor antibiotic composed of an apo-protein and a reactive enediyne chromophore. The chromophore consists of four different chemical subunits including an (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety, the biosynthesis of which from l-alpha-tyrosine is catalyzed by six proteins, SgcC, SgcC1, SgcC2, SgcC3, SgcC4, and SgcC5. Biochemical characterization of SgcC3 unveiled the following: (i) SgcC3 is a flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent halogenase; (ii) SgcC3 acts only on the SgcC2 peptidyl carrier protein-tethered substrates; (iii) SgcC3-catalyzed halogenation requires O2 and reduced FAD and either the C-1027 pathway-specific flavin reductase SgcE6 or E. coli flavin reductase (Fre) can support the SgcC3 activity; (iv) SgcC3 also efficiently catalyzes bromination but not fluorination or iodination; (v) SgcC3 can utilize both (S)- and (R)-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 but not 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as a substrate. These results establish that SgcC3 catalyzes the third enzymatic transformation during the biosynthesis of the (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety of C-1027 from l-alpha-tyrosine. SgcC3 now represents the second biochemically characterized flavin-dependent halogenase that acts on a carrier protein-tethered substrate. These findings will facilitate the engineering of new C-1027 analogs by combinatorial biosynthesis methods. PMID:17887753

  2. Pathophysiological role of guanylate-binding proteins in gastrointestinal diseases

    PubMed Central

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Herrmann, Christian; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-stimulated factors involved in the defense against cellular pathogens and inflammation. These proteins, particularly GBP-1, the most prominent member of the family, have been established as reliable markers of interferon-γ-activated cells in various diseases, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In CRC, GBP-1 expression is associated with a Th1-dominated angiostatic micromilieu and is correlated with a better outcome. Inhibition of tumor growth by GBP-1 is the result of its strong anti-angiogenic activity as well as its direct anti-tumorigenic effect on tumor cells. In IBD, GBP-1 mediates the anti-proliferative effects of interferon-γ on intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it plays a protective role on the mucosa by preventing cell apoptosis, by inhibiting angiogenesis and by regulating the T-cell receptor signaling. These functions rely to a large extent on the ability of GBP-1 to interact with and remodel the actin cytoskeleton.

  3. Pathophysiological role of guanylate-binding proteins in gastrointestinal diseases.

    PubMed

    Britzen-Laurent, Nathalie; Herrmann, Christian; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Croner, Roland S; Stürzl, Michael

    2016-07-28

    Guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs) are interferon-stimulated factors involved in the defense against cellular pathogens and inflammation. These proteins, particularly GBP-1, the most prominent member of the family, have been established as reliable markers of interferon-γ-activated cells in various diseases, including colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). In CRC, GBP-1 expression is associated with a Th1-dominated angiostatic micromilieu and is correlated with a better outcome. Inhibition of tumor growth by GBP-1 is the result of its strong anti-angiogenic activity as well as its direct anti-tumorigenic effect on tumor cells. In IBD, GBP-1 mediates the anti-proliferative effects of interferon-γ on intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, it plays a protective role on the mucosa by preventing cell apoptosis, by inhibiting angiogenesis and by regulating the T-cell receptor signaling. These functions rely to a large extent on the ability of GBP-1 to interact with and remodel the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:27605879

  4. Vasorelaxing effects of the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator BAY 60-2770 in nitrate-tolerant monkey and canine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Tawa, Masashi; Shimosato, Takashi; Iwasaki, Hirotaka; Imamura, Takeshi; Okamura, Tomio

    2015-03-01

    Nitrate tolerance is an important problem in the treatment of ischemic heart diseases. The present study investigated whether or not a soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) activator can be used as a coronary vasodilator under nitrate-tolerant conditions. Helically cut strips of endothelium-denuded monkey and canine coronary arteries were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording. Nitrate tolerance was induced by a 1-h treatment with nitroglycerin (0.1 mM) followed by 1-h washout of the agent. Control strips were not exposed previously to nitroglycerin, but otherwise were treated identically. The relaxant response to nitroglycerin was dramatically impaired by previous exposure to the drug for 1 h in either monkey or canine coronary arteries, indicating the development of nitrate tolerance. In contrast, development of nitrate tolerance did not affect the relaxant potency and efficacy of the sGC activator BAY 60-2770 in either the monkey or canine coronary arteries. These findings suggest that it may be possible to use sGC activators as substitute drugs for nitroglycerin if tolerance is developed during the treatment of ischemic heart diseases. PMID:25582420

  5. BUGLE-96 validation with MORSE-SGC/S using water and iron experiments from SINBAD 97

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-12-03

    This document summarizes the validation of MORSE-SGC/S with the BUGLE-96 cross section library. SINBAD Benchmark Experiment 2.004, Winfrith Water Benchmark Experiment and SBE 6.001, Karlsruhe Iron Sphere Benchmark Experiment were utilized for this validation. The MORESE-SGC/S code with the BUGLE-96 cross-section library was used to model the experimental configurations as given in SINDBAD 97. SINDBAD is a shielding integral benchmark archive and database developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). For means of comparison, the experimental models were also executed with MORSE-SGC/S using the BUGLE-80 cross-section library. BUGLE-96 cross section will be used for shielding applications only as recommended by ORNL.

  6. SGC tests for influence of material composition on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qun; Li, Yuzhi

    2013-01-01

    Compaction characteristic of the surface layer asphalt mixture (13-type gradation mixture) was studied using Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) simulative compaction tests. Based on analysis of densification curve of gyratory compaction, influence rules of the contents of mineral aggregates of all sizes and asphalt on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures were obtained. SGC Tests show that, for the mixture with a bigger content of asphalt, its density increases faster, that there is an optimal amount of fine aggregates for optimal compaction and that an appropriate amount of mineral powder will improve workability of mixtures, but overmuch mineral powder will make mixtures dry and hard. Conclusions based on SGC tests can provide basis for how to adjust material composition for improving compaction performance of asphalt mixtures, and for the designed asphalt mixture, its compaction performance can be predicted through these conclusions, which also contributes to the choice of compaction schemes. PMID:23818830

  7. SGC Tests for Influence of Material Composition on Compaction Characteristic of Asphalt Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qun

    2013-01-01

    Compaction characteristic of the surface layer asphalt mixture (13-type gradation mixture) was studied using Superpave gyratory compactor (SGC) simulative compaction tests. Based on analysis of densification curve of gyratory compaction, influence rules of the contents of mineral aggregates of all sizes and asphalt on compaction characteristic of asphalt mixtures were obtained. SGC Tests show that, for the mixture with a bigger content of asphalt, its density increases faster, that there is an optimal amount of fine aggregates for optimal compaction and that an appropriate amount of mineral powder will improve workability of mixtures, but overmuch mineral powder will make mixtures dry and hard. Conclusions based on SGC tests can provide basis for how to adjust material composition for improving compaction performance of asphalt mixtures, and for the designed asphalt mixture, its compaction performance can be predicted through these conclusions, which also contributes to the choice of compaction schemes. PMID:23818830

  8. Oridonin induces apoptosis through the mitochondrial pathway in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shiyong; Tan, Huixin; Zhu, Nan; Gao, Haiyu; Lv, Chunyu; Gang, Jian; Ji, Yubin

    2016-06-01

    Oridonin is one of the most important antitumor active ingredients of Rabdosia rubescens. Recently published studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that oridonin was able to arrest human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells at G2/M phase. However, little is known about inducing apoptosis in gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oridonin on antineoplastic capability of SGC-7901 cells and the detailed molecular mechanism of oridonin-mediated intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Cell proliferation was assessed by MTT assay while apoptosis induced by oridonin was determined by Hoechst 33342 staining assay and Annexin V/PI double staining assay. Early apoptotic rate was stained by Annexin V/PI and detected by flow cytometry. Apoptosis pathway was analyzed by western blot analysis of Bcl-2, Bax, cytochrome c and caspase-3 expression. The results showed that oridonin was able to inhibit the SGC-7901 cell proliferation, the 50% growth inhibition (IC50) was 22.74 µM. Oridonin could induce cell apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells and the early apoptotic rates induced by 0, 20, 40, 80 µmol/l oridonin were 1.53±0.67, 3.33±0.29, 84.80±0.82 and 96.43±0.51%, respectively. Western blot analysis revealed that oridonin downregulated Bcl-2 protein (the anti-apoptotic factor) and upregulated Bax protein (pro-apoptotic factor), eventually leading to a reduction in the ratio of Bcl-2/Bax proteins. Furthermore, oridonin induced the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria to the cytosol and the activation of caspase-3. Taken together, the current study suggested that oridonin induced apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells via the mitochondrial signal pathway, which may represent one of the major mechanisms of oridonin-mediated apoptosis in SGC-7901 cells. PMID:27082253

  9. Nitric oxide sets off an antioxidant response in adrenal cells: involvement of sGC and Nrf2 in HO-1 induction.

    PubMed

    Astort, F; Mercau, M; Giordanino, E; Degese, M S; Caldareri, L; Coso, O; Cymeryng, C B

    2014-02-15

    Induction of microsomal heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) activity is considered a cytoprotective mechanism in different cell types. In adrenal cells, HO-1 induction by ACTH exerts a modulatory effect on steroid production as well. As nitric oxide (NO) has been also regarded as an autocrine/paracrine modulator of adrenal steroidogenesis we sought to study the effects of NO on the induction of HO-1 and the mechanism involved. We hereby analyzed the time and dose-dependent effect of a NO-donor (DETA/NO) on HO-1 induction in a murine adrenocortical cell line. We showed that this effect is mainly exerted at a transcriptional level as it is inhibited by actinomycin D and HO-1 mRNA degradation rates were not affected by DETA/NO treatment. HO-1 induction by NO does not appear to involve the generation of oxidative stress as it was not affected by antioxidant treatment. We also demonstrated that NO-treatment results in the nuclear translocation of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), an effect that is attenuated by transfecting the cells with a dominant negative isoform of Nrf2. We finally show that the effects of the NO-donor are reproduced by a permeable analog of cGMP and that a soluble guanylate cyclase specific inhibitor blocked both the induction of HO-1 by NO and the nuclear translocation of Nrf2. PMID:24361900

  10. [Adeno-associated virus mediated T-bet gene transfer into SGC-7901 cell to regulate IFN-gamma production].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Gufeng; Wang, Suoying; Wang, Shengjun; Shao, Qixiang; Ma, Jie; Yang, Ming; Xu, Xiaopeng; Mao, Chaoming; Su, Zhaoliang; Huang, Xinxiang; Xu, Huaxi

    2009-06-01

    In order to investigate the effect of T-bet on malignant cells, we selected SGC-7901, a kind of human gastric carcinoma cell line, and used gene clone technique and adeno-associated virus (AAV) packing technology, thus obtaining a recombinant rAAV-eGFP-T-bet and T-bet gene-transfected SGC-7901 cells. Then the function of T-bet gene-infected SGC-7901 cells was researched by detecting the levels of IFN-gamma and T-bet production. The results showed: (1) It was verified that rAAV-T-bet's packing was completed; (2) After SGC-7901 cells was transfected by rAAV-eGFP-T-bet, a green fluorescence was found in about 30%-40% SGC-7901s, and the gene of 1670 bp (T-bet) and 388 bp (IFN-gamma) were generated from SGC-7901s cells; (3) The proteins of IFN-gamma and T-bet secreted by SGC-7901 cells were also detected. These reveal that SGC-7901 cell is efficiently infected by rAAV encoding T-bet, which can induce transfected cells to secret IFN-gamma. It may be useful in the researches on cancer immune therapy of transfecting T-bet gene. PMID:19634682

  11. Cytokine-Induced S-Nitrosylation of Soluble Guanylyl Cyclase and Expression of Phosphodiesterase 1A Contribute to Dysfunction of Longitudinal Smooth Muscle Relaxation

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopal, Senthilkumar; Nalli, Ancy D.; Kumar, Divya P.; Bhattacharya, Sayak; Hu, Wenhui; Mahavadi, Sunila; Grider, John R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of proinflammatory cytokines on the expression and activity of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) and cGMP–phosphodiesterases (PDEs) was determined in intestinal longitudinal smooth muscle. In control muscle cells, cGMP levels are regulated via activation of sGC and PDE5; the activity of the latter is regulated via feedback phosphorylation by cGMP-dependent protein kinase. In muscle cells isolated from muscle strips cultured with interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) or obtained from the colon of TNBS (2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid)-treated mice, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was induced and sGC was S-nitrosylated, resulting in attenuation of nitric oxide (NO)–induced sGC activity and cGMP formation. The effect of cytokines on sGC S-nitrosylation and activity was blocked by the iNOS inhibitor 1400W [N-([3-(aminomethyl)phenyl]methyl)ethanimidamide dihydrochloride]. The effect of cytokines on cGMP levels measured in the absence of IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine), however, was partly reversed by 1400W or PDE1 inhibitor vinpocetine and completely reversed by a combination of 1400W and vinpocetine. Expression of PDE1A was induced and was accompanied by an increase in PDE1A activity in muscle cells isolated from muscle strips cultured with IL-1β or TNF-α or obtained from the colon of TNBS-treated mice; the effect of cytokines on PDE1 expression and activity was blocked by MG132 (benzyl N-[(2S)-4-methyl-1-[[(2S)-4-methyl-1-[[(2S)-4-methyl-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]-1-oxopentan-2-yl]amino]-1-oxopentan-2-yl]carbamate), an inhibitor of nuclear factor κB activity. NO-induced muscle relaxation was inhibited in longitudinal muscle cells isolated from muscle strips cultured with IL-1β or TNF-α or obtained from the colon of TNBS-treated mice, and this inhibition was completely reversed by the combination of both 1400W and vinpocetine. Inhibition of smooth muscle relaxation during inflammation reflects the

  12. Pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator, BAY 60–2770, are not dependent on endogenous nitric oxide or reduced heme

    PubMed Central

    Pankey, Edward A.; Bhartiya, Manish; Badejo, Adeleke M.; Haider, Umair; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.

    2011-01-01

    4-({(4-Carboxybutyl)[2-(5-fluoro-2-{[4′-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy}phenyl)ethyl]amino}methyl)benzoic acid (BAY 60–2770) is a nitric oxide (NO)-independent activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that increases the catalytic activity of the heme-oxidized or heme-free form of the enzyme. In this study, responses to intravenous injections of the sGC activator BAY 60–2770 were investigated under baseline and elevated tone conditions induced by the thromboxane mimic U-46619 when NO synthesis was inhibited by Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME), when sGC activity was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), an agent that oxidizes sGC, and in animals with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The intravenous injections of BAY 60–2770 under baseline conditions caused small decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, larger decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and no change or small increases in cardiac output. Under elevated tone conditions during infusion of U-46619, intravenous injections of BAY 60–2770 caused larger decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, smaller decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and increases in cardiac output. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to BAY 60–2770 were enhanced by l-NAME or by ODQ in a dose that attenuated responses to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. ODQ had no significant effect on baseline pressures and attenuated pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator BAY 41–8543 2-{1-[2-(fluorophenyl)methyl]-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl}-5(4-morpholinyl)-4,6-pyrimidinediamine. BAY 60–2770 and sodium nitroprusside decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in monocrotaline-treated rats in a nonselective manner. The present data show that BAY 60–2770 has vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds that is enhanced by ODQ and NOS inhibition, suggesting that the heme-oxidized form of sGC can be

  13. Pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the soluble guanylyl cyclase activator, BAY 60-2770, are not dependent on endogenous nitric oxide or reduced heme.

    PubMed

    Pankey, Edward A; Bhartiya, Manish; Badejo, Adeleke M; Haider, Umair; Stasch, Johannes-Peter; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2011-03-01

    4-({(4-Carboxybutyl)[2-(5-fluoro-2-{[4'-(trifluoromethyl)biphenyl-4-yl]methoxy}phenyl)ethyl]amino}methyl)benzoic acid (BAY 60-2770) is a nitric oxide (NO)-independent activator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) that increases the catalytic activity of the heme-oxidized or heme-free form of the enzyme. In this study, responses to intravenous injections of the sGC activator BAY 60-2770 were investigated under baseline and elevated tone conditions induced by the thromboxane mimic U-46619 when NO synthesis was inhibited by N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME), when sGC activity was inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]-oxadizaolo[4,3]quinoxaline-1-one (ODQ), an agent that oxidizes sGC, and in animals with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension. The intravenous injections of BAY 60-2770 under baseline conditions caused small decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, larger decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and no change or small increases in cardiac output. Under elevated tone conditions during infusion of U-46619, intravenous injections of BAY 60-2770 caused larger decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, smaller decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and increases in cardiac output. Pulmonary vasodilator responses to BAY 60-2770 were enhanced by L-NAME or by ODQ in a dose that attenuated responses to the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. ODQ had no significant effect on baseline pressures and attenuated pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator BAY 41-8543 2-{1-[2-(fluorophenyl)methyl]-1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridin-3-yl}-5(4-morpholinyl)-4,6-pyrimidinediamine. BAY 60-2770 and sodium nitroprusside decreased pulmonary and systemic arterial pressures in monocrotaline-treated rats in a nonselective manner. The present data show that BAY 60-2770 has vasodilator activity in the pulmonary and systemic vascular beds that is enhanced by ODQ and NOS inhibition, suggesting that the heme-oxidized form of sGC can be activated in vivo in an

  14. Effects of taxol resistance gene 1 expression on the chemosensitivity of SGC-7901 cells to oxaliplatin

    PubMed Central

    LIU, LIANCHENG; BAI, ZHIGANG; MA, XUEMEI; WANG, TINGTING; YANG, YAO; ZHANG, ZHONGTAO

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the role of taxol resistance gene 1 (Txr1) in the development of oxaliplatin (L-OHP) resistance in gastric cancer (GC). Using SGC-7901 cells as a model, Txr1 was exogenously expressed or knocked down using small interfering RNA. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and western blotting were performed to establish whether the Txr1 gene is involved in chemoresistance, and cell proliferation was assessed using an MTS assay. To this end, the mRNA and protein levels of Txr1, thrombospondin-1 and excision repair cross-complementing 1 protein were measured using qPCR and western blotting, respectively. Txr1-knockdown significantly increased the sensitivity of the SGC-7901 cells to L-OHP, whereas Txr1 overexpression promoted the resistance of the SGC-7901 cells to L-OHP. Exogenous Txr1 expression in the SGC-7901 cells induced L-OHP resistance, and the siRNA knockdown of Txr1 sensitized the human GC cells to L-OHP. Txr1 is, therefore, likely to play a role in L-OHP resistance, acting via TSP1, and should be investigated as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of GC. PMID:26998002

  15. The effects of aspirin plus cisplatin on SGC7901/CDDP cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hanzhang; Liu, Gaogao; Jiang, Biao; Guo, Jiubing; Tao, Guoquan; Yiu, Wei; Zhou, Jingsong; Li, Guoxin

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aspirin plus cisplatin (CDDP) in the chemotherapy of gastric cancer. We cultured SGC7901/CDDP cells by long-term exposure of SGC7901 cells to small doses of CDDP in vitro. The cells were treated with aspirin, CDDP or aspirin plus CDDP for 24 h and cell growth was assessed by the MTT assay, the apoptotic rate by flow cytometry, the survivin mRNA expression by RT-PCR and the survivin protein expression by western blotting. The results revealed that the cell growth in the aspirin plus CDDP group was significantly inhibited. The apoptotic rate in the aspirin plus CDDP was significantly higher compared to that in the other groups. The survivin mRNA and protein expression were also significantly reduced in the aspirin plus CDDP group. Our data suggest that the combination of aspirin and CDDP exhibited a higher degree of toxicity against SGC7901/CDDP cells compared to that of aspirin or CDDP alone. Thus, the combination of aspirin plus CDDP may reduce the expression of survivin and induce the apoptosis of SGC7901/CDDP cells. PMID:24748972

  16. Pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator, BAY 41-8543, are modulated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adeleke M; Nossaman, Vaughn E; Pankey, Edward A; Bhartiya, Manish; Kannadka, Chandrika B; Murthy, Subramanyam N; Nossaman, Bobby D; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2010-10-01

    BAY 41-8543 is a nitric oxide (NO)-independent stimulator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Responses to intravenous injections of BAY 41-8543 were investigated under baseline and elevated tone conditions and when NO synthase (NOS) was inhibited with N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Under baseline conditions, intravenous injections of BAY 41-8543 caused small decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, larger decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and increases in cardiac output. When pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to ∼30 mmHg with an intravenous infusion of U-46619, intravenous injections of BAY 41-8543 produced larger dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, and the relative decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to the sGC stimulator were similar. Treatment with L-NAME markedly decreased responses to BAY 41-8543 when pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to similar values (∼30 mmHg) in U-46619-infused and in U-46619-infused plus L-NAME-treated animals. The intravenous injection of a small dose of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) when combined with BAY 41-8543 enhanced pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator in L-NAME-treated animals. The present results indicate that BAY 41-8543 has similar vasodilator activity in the systemic and pulmonary vascular beds when pulmonary vasoconstrictor tone is increased with U-46619. These results demonstrate that pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to BAY 41-8543 are significantly attenuated when NOS is inhibited by L-NAME and show that vasodilator responses to BAY 41-8543 are enhanced when combined with a small dose of SNP in L-NAME-treated animals. The present results are consistent with the concept that pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator are NO-independent; however, the vasodilator activity of the compound is greatly diminished when endogenous NO production is inhibited with L-NAME. These

  17. Pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the soluble guanylyl cyclase stimulator, BAY 41-8543, are modulated by nitric oxide

    PubMed Central

    Badejo, Adeleke M.; Nossaman, Vaughn E.; Pankey, Edward A.; Bhartiya, Manish; Kannadka, Chandrika B.; Murthy, Subramanyam N.; Nossaman, Bobby D.

    2010-01-01

    BAY 41-8543 is a nitric oxide (NO)-independent stimulator of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC). Responses to intravenous injections of BAY 41-8543 were investigated under baseline and elevated tone conditions and when NO synthase (NOS) was inhibited with Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME). Under baseline conditions, intravenous injections of BAY 41-8543 caused small decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, larger decreases in systemic arterial pressure, and increases in cardiac output. When pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to ∼30 mmHg with an intravenous infusion of U-46619, intravenous injections of BAY 41-8543 produced larger dose-dependent decreases in pulmonary arterial pressure, and the relative decreases in pulmonary and systemic arterial pressure in response to the sGC stimulator were similar. Treatment with l-NAME markedly decreased responses to BAY 41-8543 when pulmonary arterial pressure was increased to similar values (∼30 mmHg) in U-46619-infused and in U-46619-infused plus l-NAME-treated animals. The intravenous injection of a small dose of sodium nitroprusside (SNP) when combined with BAY 41-8543 enhanced pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator in l-NAME-treated animals. The present results indicate that BAY 41-8543 has similar vasodilator activity in the systemic and pulmonary vascular beds when pulmonary vasoconstrictor tone is increased with U-46619. These results demonstrate that pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to BAY 41-8543 are significantly attenuated when NOS is inhibited by l-NAME and show that vasodilator responses to BAY 41-8543 are enhanced when combined with a small dose of SNP in l-NAME-treated animals. The present results are consistent with the concept that pulmonary and systemic vasodilator responses to the sGC stimulator are NO-independent; however, the vasodilator activity of the compound is greatly diminished when endogenous NO production is inhibited with l-NAME. These

  18. Hypoxia induces downregulation of soluble guanylyl cyclase β1 by miR-34c-5p

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojian; Wang, Shumin; Liu, Juan; Dou, Dou; Liu, Limei; Chen, Zhengju; Ye, Liping; Liu, Huixia; He, Qiong; Raj, J. Usha; Gao, Yuansheng

    2012-01-01

    Summary Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) is the principal receptor for nitric oxide (NO) and crucial for the control of various physiological functions. The β1 subunit of sGC is obligatory for the biological stability and activity of the sGC heterodimer. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of gene expression and exert great influences on diverse biological activities. The aim of the present study was to determine whether or not the expression of sGCβ1 is specifically regulated by miRNAs. We report that miR-34c-5p directly targets sGCβ1 under hypoxia. Bioinformatics analysis of the sGCβ1 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) revealed a putative binding site for miR-34b-5p and miR-34c-5p, but only miR-34c-5p inhibited luciferase activity through interaction with sGCβ1 3′-UTR in HEK293T cells. Site-directed mutagenesis of the putative miR-34c-5p binding site abolished the negative regulation of luciferase expression. Overexpression of miR-34c-5p repressed the expression of sGCβ1 in stable cell lines, which was reversed by miR-34c-5p-specific sponge. Inoculation of mouse lung tissues in vitro with lentivirus bearing miR-34c-5p significantly decreased both the expression of sGCβ1 and NO-stimulated sGC activity, which was also rescued by miR-34c-5p-specific sponge. Furthermore, we identified the putative Sp1-binding site in the promoter region of miR-34c-5p. Luciferase reporter constructs revealed that Sp1 directly binds to the wild-type promoter of miR-34c-5p, which was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation. In summary, these findings reveal that miR-34c-5p directly regulates sGCβ1 expression, and they identify the key transcription factor Sp1 that governs miR-34c-5p expression during hypoxia. PMID:23038777

  19. Structure reactivity relationship in the reaction of DNA guanyl radicals with hydroxybenzoates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Trinh T.; Tang, Vicky J.; Aguilera, Joseph A.; Milligan, Jamie R.

    2010-11-01

    In DNA, guanine bases are the sites from which electrons are most easily removed. As a result of hole migration to this stable location on guanine, guanyl radicals are major intermediates in DNA damage produced by the direct effect of ionizing radiation (ionization of the DNA itself and not through the intermediacy of water radicals). We have modeled this process by employing gamma irradiation in the presence of thiocyanate ions, a method which also produces single electron oxidized guanyl radicals in plasmid DNA in aqueous solution. The stable products formed in DNA from these radicals are detected as strand breaks after incubation with the FPG protein. When a phenolic compound is present in the solution during gamma irradiation, the formation of guanyl radical species is decreased by electron donation from the phenol to the guanyl radical. We have quantified the rate of this reaction for four different phenolic compounds bearing carboxylate substituents as proton acceptors. A comparison of the rates of these reactions with the redox strengths of the phenolic compounds reveals that salicylate reacts ca. 10-fold faster than its structural analogs. This observation is consistent with a reaction mechanism involving a proton coupled electron transfer, because intra-molecular transfer of a proton from the phenolic hydroxyl group to the carboxylate group is possible only in salicylate, and is favored by the strong 6-membered ring intra-molecular hydrogen bond in this compound.

  20. Guanylic nucleotide starvation affects Saccharomyces cerevisiae mother-daughter separation and may be a signal for entry into quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Sagot, Isabelle; Schaeffer, Jacques; Daignan-Fornier, Bertrand

    2005-01-01

    Background Guanylic nucleotides are both macromolecules constituents and crucial regulators for a variety of cellular processes. Therefore, their intracellular concentration must be strictly controlled. Consistently both yeast and mammalian cells tightly correlate the transcription of genes encoding enzymes critical for guanylic nucleotides biosynthesis with the proliferation state of the cell population. Results To gain insight into the molecular relationships connecting intracellular guanylic nucleotide levels and cellular proliferation, we have studied the consequences of guanylic nucleotide limitation on Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle progression. We first utilized mycophenolic acid, an immunosuppressive drug that specifically inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, the enzyme catalyzing the first committed step in de novo GMP biosynthesis. To approach this system physiologically, we next developed yeast mutants for which the intracellular guanylic nucleotide pools can be modulated through changes of growth conditions. In both the pharmacological and genetic approaches, we found that guanylic nucleotide limitation generated a mother-daughter separation defect, characterized by cells with two unseparated daughters. We then showed that this separation defect resulted from cell wall perturbations but not from impaired cytokinesis. Importantly, cells with similar separation defects were found in a wild type untreated yeast population entering quiescence upon nutrient limitation. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that guanylic nucleotide limitation slows budding yeast cell cycle progression, with a severe pause in telophase. At the cellular level, guanylic nucleotide limitation causes the emergence of cells with two unseparated daughters. By fluorescence and electron microscopy, we demonstrate that this phenotype arises from defects in cell wall partition between mother and daughter cells. Because cells with two unseparated daughters are also observed in

  1. Characterization of the two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase SgcC that requires carrier protein-tethered substrates for the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuangjun; Van Lanen, Steven G; Shen, Ben

    2008-05-21

    C-1027 is a potent antitumor antibiotic composed of an apoprotein (CagA) and a reactive enediyne chromophore. The chromophore has four distinct chemical moieties, including an ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety, the biosynthesis of which from l-alpha-tyrosine requires five proteins: SgcC, SgcC1, SgcC2, SgcC3, and SgcC4; a sixth protein, SgcC5, catalyzes the incorporation of this beta-amino acid moiety into C-1027. Biochemical characterization of SgcC has now revealed that (i) SgcC is a two-component, flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD)-dependent monooxygenase, (ii) SgcC is only active with SgcC2 (peptidyl carrier protein)-tethered substrates, (iii) SgcC-catalyzed hydroxylation requires O 2 and FADH 2, the latter supplied by the C-1027 pathway-specific flavin reductase SgcE6 or Escherichia coli flavin reductase Fre, and (iv) SgcC efficiently catalyzes regioselective hydroxylation of 3-substituted beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 analogues, including the chloro-, bromo-, iodo-, fluoro-, and methyl-substituted analogues, but does not accept 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as a substrate. Together with the in vitro data for SgcC4, SgcC1, and SgcC3, the results establish that SgcC catalyzes the hydroxylation of ( S)-3-chloro-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 as the final step in the biosynthesis of the ( S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine moiety prior to incorporation into C-1027. SgcC now represents the first biochemically characterized two-component, FAD-dependent monooxygenase that acts on a carrier-protein-tethered aromatic substrate. PMID:18426211

  2. Diterpene Cyclases and the Nature of the Isoprene Fold

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Rong; Zhang, Yonghui; Mann, Francis M.; Huang, Cancan; Mukkamala, Dushyant; Hudock, Michael P.; Mead, Matthew; Prisic, Sladjana; Wang, Ke; Lin, Fu-Yang; Chang, Ting-Kai; Peters, Reuben; Oldfield, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The structures and mechanism of action of many terpene cyclases are known, but there are no structures of diterpene cyclases. Here, we propose structural models based on bioinformatics, site-directed mutagenesis, domain swapping, enzyme inhibition and spectroscopy that help explain the nature of diterpene cyclase structure, function, and evolution. Bacterial diterpene cyclases contain ∼20 α-helices and the same conserved “QW” and DxDD motifs as in triterpene cyclases, indicating the presence of a βγ barrel structure. Plant diterpene cyclases have a similar catalytic motif and βγ-domain structure together with a third, α-domain, forming an αβγ structure, and in H+-initiated cyclases, there is an EDxxD-like Mg2+/diphosphate binding motif located in the γ-domain. The results support a new view of terpene cyclase structure and function and suggest evolution from ancient (βγ) bacterial triterpene cyclases to (βγ) bacterial and thence to (αβγ) plant diterpene cyclases. PMID:20602361

  3. Effects of ophiopogonin B on the proliferation and apoptosis of SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, WEIYUE; ZHANG, QIAOYAN; JIANG, YIPING; LI, FENG; XIN, HAILIANG

    2016-01-01

    Ophiopogonin B (OP-B) is a bioactive component of Radix Ophiopogon japonicus, which is often used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the antitumor activity of OP-B in gastric cancer. Cell Counting kit-8, flow cytometry with Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate, Hoechst staining, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) detection, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) assay were used to detect the biological function of SGC-7901 gastric cancer cells. The results demonstrated that high concentrations of OP-B (5, 10 and 20 μmol/l) exerted potent antiproliferative effects on SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, apoptotic rates were increased and cell morphology was altered following treatment with OP-B. In addition, OP-B-induced apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells was associated with loss of MMP and increased ROS generation. Western blotting indicated that treatment with OP-B increased the protein expression levels of caspase-3 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein, whereas the expression levels of Bcl-2 and the phosphorylation levels of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases 1/2 were decreased. These results suggest that OP-B may be considered a potential inhibitor of gastric cancer progression, and may be used as an alternative compound for its treatment. PMID:27121658

  4. Soluble Adenylyl Cyclase in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas; Meili, Dimirela; Salathe, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    The second messenger cAMP is integral for many physiological processes. Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) was recently identified as a widely expressed intracellular source of cAMP in mammalian cells. sAC is evolutionary, structurally, and biochemically distinct from the G-protein-responsive transmembranous adenylyl cyclases (tmAC). The structure of the catalytic unit of sAC is similar to tmAC, but sAC does not contain transmembranous domains, allowing localizations independent of the membranous compartment. sAC activity is stimulated by HCO3-, Ca2+ and is sensitive to physiologically relevant ATP fluctuations. sAC functions as a physiological sensor for carbon dioxide and bicarbonate, and therefore indirectly for pH. Here we review the physiological role of sAC in different human tissues with a major focus on the lung. PMID:25064591

  5. Membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors: an update

    PubMed Central

    Garbers, David L.; Chrisman, Ted D.; Wiegn, Phi; Katafuchi, Takeshi; Albanesi, Joseph P.; Bielinski, Vincent; Barylko, Barbara; Redfield, Margaret M.; Burnett, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated key roles for several membrane guanylyl cyclase receptors in the regulation of cell hyperplasia, hypertrophy, migration and extracellular matrix production, all of which having an impact on clinically relevant diseases, including tissue remodeling after injury. Additionally, cell differentiation, and even tumor progression, can be profoundly influenced by one or more of these receptors. Some of these receptors also mediate important communication between the heart and intestine, and the kidney to regulate blood volume and Na+ balance. PMID:16815030

  6. Chelidonine induces mitotic slippage and apoptotic-like death in SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhongyuan; Zou, Xiang; Zhang, Xiujuan; Sheng, Jiejing; Wang, Yumeng; Wang, Jiaqi; Wang, Chao; Ji, Yubin

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of chelidonine on mitotic slippage and apoptotic-like death in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells. The MTT assay was performed to detect the antiproliferative effect of chelidonine. Following treatment with chelidonine (10 µmol/l), the ultrastructure changes in SGC-7901, MCF-7 and HepG2 cells were observed by transmission electron microscopy. The effects of chelidonine on G2/M phase arrest and apoptosis of SGC-7901 cells were determined by flow cytometry. Indirect immunofluorescence assay and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) were used to detect the phosphorylation level of histone H3 (Ser10) and microtubule formation was detected using LSCM following immunofluorescent labeling. Subsequent to treatment with chelidonine (10 µmol/l), expression levels of mitotic slippage-associated proteins, including BUB1 mitotic checkpoint serine/threonine kinase B (BubR1), cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) and cyclin B1, and apoptosis-associated protein, caspase-3 were examined by western blotting at 24, 48 and 72 h. The half maximal inhibitory concentration of chelidonine was 23.13 µmol/l over 48 h and chelidonine induced G2/M phase arrest of cells. The phosphorylation of histone H3 at Ser10 was significantly increased following treatment with chelidonine for 24 h, indicating that chelidonine arrested the SGC-7901 cells in the M phase. Chelidonine inhibited microtubule polymerization, destroyed microtubule structures and induced cell cycle arrest in the M phase. Giant cells were observed with multiple micronuclei of varying sizes, which indicated that following a prolonged arrest in the M phase, the cells underwent mitotic catastrophe. Western blotting demonstrated that the protein expression levels of BubR1, cyclin B1 and Cdk1 decreased significantly between 48 and 72 h. Low expression levels of BubR1 and inactivation of the cyclin B1-Cdk1 complex results in the cells being arrested at mitosis and leads to

  7. Facilitation of corticostriatal transmission following pharmacological inhibition of striatal phosphodiesterase 10A: role of nitric oxide-soluble guanylyl cyclase-cGMP signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Padovan-Neto, Fernando E; Sammut, Stephen; Chakroborty, Shreaya; Dec, Alexander M; Threlfell, Sarah; Campbell, Peter W; Mudrakola, Vishnu; Harms, John F; Schmidt, Christopher J; West, Anthony R

    2015-04-01

    The striatum contains a rich variety of cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs), which play a critical role in the regulation of cAMP and cGMP signaling. The dual-substrate enzyme PDE10A is the most highly expressed PDE in striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) with low micromolar affinity for both cyclic nucleotides. Previously, we have shown that systemic and local administration of the selective PDE10A inhibitor TP-10 potently increased the responsiveness of MSNs to cortical stimulation. However, the signaling mechanisms underlying PDE10A inhibitor-induced changes in corticostriatal transmission are only partially understood. The current studies assessed the respective roles of cAMP and cGMP in the above effects using soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) or adenylate cyclase (AC) specific inhibitors. Cortically evoked spike activity was monitored in urethane-anesthetized rats using in vivo extracellular recordings performed proximal to a microdialysis probe during local infusion of vehicle, the selective sGC inhibitor ODQ, or the selective AC inhibitor SQ 22536. Systemic administration of TP-10 (3.2 mg/kg) robustly increased cortically evoked spike activity in a manner that was blocked following intrastriatal infusion of ODQ (50 μm). The effects of TP-10 on evoked activity were due to accumulation of cGMP, rather than cAMP, as the AC inhibitor SQ was without effect. Consistent with these observations, studies in neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) knock-out (KO) mice confirmed that PDE10A operates downstream of nNOS to limit cGMP production and excitatory corticostriatal transmission. Thus, stimulation of PDE10A acts to attenuate corticostriatal transmission in a manner largely dependent on effects directed at the NO-sGC-cGMP signaling cascade. PMID:25855188

  8. Carnosine Inhibits the Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells through Both of the Mitochondrial Respiration and Glycolysis Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yao; Yang, Jianbo; Li, Juan; Shi, Xiaojie; Ouyang, Li; Tian, Yueyang; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Carnosine, a naturally occurring dipeptide, has been recently demonstrated to possess anti-tumor activity. However, its underlying mechanism is unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect and mechanism of carnosine on the cell viability and proliferation of the cultured human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Carnosine treatment did not induce cell apoptosis or necrosis, but reduced the proliferative capacity of SGC-7901 cells. Seahorse analysis showed SGC-7901 cells cultured with pyruvate have active mitochondria, and depend on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation more than glycolysis pathway for generation of ATP. Carnosine markedly decreased the absolute value of mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration, and reduced the maximal oxygen consumption and spare respiratory capacity, which may reduce mitochondrial function correlated with proliferative potential. Simultaneously, carnosine also reduced the extracellular acidification rate and glycolysis of SGC-7901 cells. Our results suggested that carnosine is a potential regulator of energy metabolism of SGC-7901 cells both in the anaerobic and aerobic pathways, and provided a clue for preclinical and clinical evaluation of carnosine for gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25115854

  9. Antagonism of soluble guanylyl cyclase attenuates cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heat stress and local warming in humans.

    PubMed

    Kellogg, Dean L; Zhao, Joan L; Wu, Yubo; Johnson, John M

    2011-05-01

    We hypothesized that nitric oxide activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) participates in cutaneous vasodilation during whole body heat stress and local skin warming. We examined the effects of the sGC inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), on reflex skin blood flow responses to whole body heat stress and on nonreflex responses to increased local skin temperature. Blood flow was monitored by laser-Doppler flowmetry, and blood pressure by Finapres to calculate cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC). Intradermal microdialysis was used to treat one site with 1 mM ODQ in 2% DMSO and Ringer, a second site with 2% DMSO in Ringer, and a third site received Ringer. In protocol 1, after a period of normothermia, whole body heat stress was induced. In protocol 2, local heating units warmed local skin temperature from 34 to 41°C to cause local vasodilation. In protocol 1, in normothermia, CVC did not differ among sites [ODQ, 15 ± 3% maximum CVC (CVC(max)); DMSO, 14 ± 3% CVC(max); Ringer, 17 ± 6% CVC(max); P > 0.05]. During heat stress, ODQ attenuated CVC increases (ODQ, 54 ± 4% CVC(max); DMSO, 64 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 63 ± 4% CVC(max); P < 0.05, ODQ vs. DMSO or Ringer). In protocol 2, at 34°C local temperature, CVC did not differ among sites (ODQ, 17 ± 2% CVC(max); DMSO, 18 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 18 ± 3% CVC(max); P > 0.05). ODQ attenuated CVC increases at 41°C local temperature (ODQ, 54 ± 5% CVC(max); DMSO, 86 ± 4% CVC(max); Ringer, 90 ± 2% CVC(max); P < 0.05 ODQ vs. DMSO or Ringer). sGC participates in neurogenic active vasodilation during heat stress and in the local response to direct skin warming. PMID:21292837

  10. Adenylyl cyclases in the digestive system

    PubMed Central

    Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Gorelick, Fred; Glaser, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a group of widely distributed enzymes whose functions are very diverse. There are nine known transmembrane AC isoforms activated by Gαs. Each has its own pattern of expression in the digestive system and differential regulation of function by Ca2+ and other intracellular signals. In addition to the transmembrane isoforms, one AC is soluble and exhibits distinct regulation. In this review, the basic structure, regulation and physiological roles of ACs in the digestive system are discussed. PMID:24521753

  11. Adenylyl cyclases in the digestive system.

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Maria Eugenia; Gorelick, Fred; Glaser, Shannon

    2014-06-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (ACs) are a group of widely distributed enzymes whose functions are very diverse. There are nine known transmembrane AC isoforms activated by Gαs. Each has its own pattern of expression in the digestive system and differential regulation of function by Ca(2+) and other intracellular signals. In addition to the transmembrane isoforms, one AC is soluble and exhibits distinct regulation. In this review, the basic structure, regulation and physiological roles of ACs in the digestive system are discussed. PMID:24521753

  12. Comparative analysis of plant lycopene cyclases.

    PubMed

    Koc, Ibrahim; Filiz, Ertugrul; Tombuloglu, Huseyin

    2015-10-01

    Carotenoids are essential isoprenoid pigments produced by plants, algae, fungi and bacteria. Lycopene cyclase (LYC) commonly cyclize carotenoids, which is an important branching step in the carotenogenesis, at one or both end of the backbone. Plants have two types of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). In this study, plant LYCs were analyzed. Based on domain analysis, all LYCs accommodate lycopene cyclase domain (Pf05834). Furthermore, motif analysis indicated that motifs were conserved among the plants. On the basis of phylogenetic analysis, β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs were classified in β and ϵ groups. Monocot and dicot plants separated from each other in the phylogenetic tree. Subsequently, Oryza sativa Japonica Group and Zea mays of LYCs as monocot plants and Vitis vinifera and Solanum lycopersicum of LYCs as dicot plants were analyzed. According to nucleotide diversity analysis of β-LCY and ϵ-LCY genes, nucleotide diversities were found to be π: 0.30 and π: 0.25, respectively. The result highlighted β-LCY genes showed higher nucleotide diversity than ϵ-LCY genes. LYCs interacting genes and their co-expression partners were also predicted using String server. The obtained data suggested the importance of LYCs in carotenoid metabolism. 3D modeling revealed that depicted structures were similar in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs. Likewise, the predicted binding sites were highly similar between O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera LCYs. Most importantly, analysis elucidated the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif for both type of LYC (β-LCY and ϵ-LCY). This motif related to Rossmann fold domain and probably provides a flat platform for binding of FAD in O. sativa, Z mays, S. lycopersicum, and V. vinifera β-LCYs and ϵ-LCYs with conserved structure. In addition to lycopene cyclase domain, the V/IXGXGXXGXXXA motif can be used for exploring LYCs proteins and to annotate the function of unknown proteins containing lycopene cyclase

  13. Cooperative substrate binding by a diguanylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Maycon C; Teixeira, Raphael D; Andrade, Maxuel O; Pinheiro, Glaucia M S; Ramos, Carlos H I; Farah, Chuck S

    2015-01-30

    XAC0610, from Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, is a large multi-domain protein containing one GAF (cGMP-specific phosphodiesterases, adenylyl cyclases and FhlA) domain, four PAS (Per-Arnt-Sim) domains and one GGDEF domain. This protein has a demonstrable in vivo and in vitro diguanylate cyclase (DGC) activity that leads to the production of cyclic di-GMP (c-di-GMP), a ubiquitous bacterial signaling molecule. Analysis of a XacΔ0610 knockout strain revealed that XAC0610 plays a role in the regulation of Xac motility and resistance to H2O2. Site-directed mutagenesis of a conserved DGC lysine residue (Lys759 in XAC0610) resulted in a severe reduction in XAC0610 DGC activity. Furthermore, experimental and in silico analyses suggest that XAC0610 is not subject to allosteric product inhibition, a common regulatory mechanism for DGC activity control. Instead, steady-state kinetics of XAC0610 DGC activity revealed a positive cooperative effect of the GTP substrate with a dissociation constant for the binding of the first GTP molecule (K1) approximately 5× greater than the dissociation constant for the binding of the second GTP molecule (K2). We present a general kinetics scheme that should be used when analyzing DGC kinetics data and propose that cooperative GTP binding could be a common, though up to now overlooked, feature of these enzymes that may in some cases offer a physiologically relevant mechanism for regulation of DGC activity in vivo. PMID:25463434

  14. PEITC reverse multi-drug resistance of human gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line.

    PubMed

    Tang, Tao; Song, Xin; Liu, Yu-Fen; Wang, Wen-Yue

    2014-04-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death in the world and nearly all patients who respond initially to cisplatin later develop drug resistance, indicating multi-drug resistance is an essential aspect of the failure of treatment. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) has been implicated in inhibiting metastasis of several types of human cancer. However, the effect and potential mechanism of PEITC reversed multi-drug resistance of human gastric cancer is not fully clear. We have identified the role of PEITC in multi-drug resistance reversal of human gastric cancer SGC7901/DDP cell line. PEITC inhibited cisplatin-resistant human SGC7901/DDP cell growth in a dose-dependent manner, causing increased apoptosis, ROS generation, glutathione depletion, accumulation of Rhodamine-123, decreased expression of P-glycoprotein and cell cycle arrest. mRNA and protein expression of the multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1), multi-drug resistance-associated protein (MRP1), excision repair cross-complementing gene 1 (ERCC1), survivin, and Mad2 was decreased, and phosphorylation of Akt and transcriptional activation of NF-κB were suppressed. PEITC may be useful as the therapeutic strategy for overcoming multi-drug resistance through suppressing the PI3K-Akt pathway in human gastric cancer. PMID:23956061

  15. Adenylate cyclases involvement in pathogenicity, a minireview.

    PubMed

    Costache, Adriana; Bucurenci, Nadia; Onu, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP), one of the most important secondary messengers, is produced by adenylate cyclase (AC) from adenosine triphosphate (ATP). AC is a widespread enzyme, being present both in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Although they have the same enzymatic activity (ATP cyclization), the structure of these proteins varies, depending on their function and the producing organism. Some pathogenic bacteria utilize these enzymes as toxins which interact with calmodulin (or another eukaryote activator), causing intense cAMP synthesis and disruption of infected cell functions. In contrast, other pathogenic bacteria benefit of augmentation of AC activity for their own function. Based on sequence analysis ofAC catalytic domain from two pathogenic bacteria (Bacillus anthracis and Bordetellapertussis) with known three-dimensional structures, a possible secondary structure for 1-255 amino acid fragment from Pseudomonas aeruginosa AC (with 80TKGFSVKGKSS90 as the ATP binding site) is proposed. PMID:23947014

  16. Functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lelle, Marco; Hameed, Abdul; Ackermann, Lisa-Maria; Kaloyanova, Stefka; Wagner, Manfred; Berisha, Filip; Nikolaev, Viacheslav O; Peneva, Kalina

    2015-05-01

    In this study, we describe the synthesis of novel functional non-nucleoside adenylyl cyclase inhibitors, which can be easily modified with thiol containing biomolecules such as tumour targeting structures. The linkage between inhibitor and biomolecule contains cleavable bonds to enable efficient intracellular delivery in the reductive milieu of the cytosol as well as in the acidic environment within endosomes and lysosomes. The suitability of this synthetic approach was shown by the successful bioconjugation of a poor cell-permeable inhibitor with a cell-penetrating peptide. Additionally, we have demonstrated the excellent inhibitory effect of the compounds presented here in a live-cell Förster resonance energy transfer-based assay in human embryonic kidney cells. PMID:25319071

  17. Ethanolic extract of Tulipa edulis Bak induces apoptosis in SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells via the mitochondrial signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    LIN, RUHUI; LI, ZUANFANG; LIN, JIUMAO; YE, JINXIA; CAI, QIAOYAN; CHEN, LIDIAN; PENG, JUN

    2015-01-01

    Tulipa edulis Bak (TEB) is an active ingredient in various traditional Chinese medicine compounds and is commonly used to treat swelling and redness, remove toxicity and eliminate stagnation, as well as to prevent and treat certain cancer types. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of the anticancer activity of TEB remains unclear. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect and underlying mechanism of the ethanolic extract of TEB (EETEB) on SGC-7901 human gastric carcinoma cells. An MTT assay was performed to analyze cell viability. In addition, transmission electron microscopy, an Annexin V/fluorescein isothiocyanate assay, a JC-1 assay and laser scanning confocal microscopy with DAPI staining were used to determine the rate of apoptosis. Furthermore, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blot analysis were used to detect the expression levels of the apoptosis gene and protein. EETEB was identified to inhibit the growth of SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induce changes in cell morphology. At the molecular level, EETEB induced SGC-7901 cell DNA fragmentation, loss of plasma membrane and asymmetrical collapse of the mitochondrial membrane potential, while it increased the expression of pro-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-associated X protein and reduced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2. Thus, the results of the current study revealed that the application of EETEB may inhibit the growth of the SGC-7901 cells due to mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. PMID:26622854

  18. A study of the single SGC7901 and GES1 cell using synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Qi, Zeming; Wang, Shengyi; Hu, Meicong; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yangchao

    2011-05-01

    In order to obtain unique information of the single gastric cancer cell and investigate gastric cancer further at the cellular and subcellular level, synchrotron infrared (SR-IR) microspectroscopy and imaging was used to study human gastric adenocarcinoma cell line SGC7901 and normal gastric mucosal epithelial cell line GES1. When we compared the infrared micro-spectra of the SGC7901 cells with those of the GES1 cells, the peak height ratios of 1121 cm -1/1020 cm -1 (RNA/DNA) of the SGC7901 cells were significantly higher than those of the GES1 cells, which might be useful for distinguishing malignant cells from normal cells. Furthermore, chemical imaging reveals that the amide II/the amide I ratio of the SGC7901 cell is lower than that of the GES1 cell in the most intense absorption region of vPO2-. The result indicates the study of the single gastric cancer cell at subcellular level by synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and imaging can provide more detailed information which is very helpful for the research and diagnosis of gastric cancer.

  19. Guanyl nucleotide interactions with dopaminergic binding sites labeled by (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol in human caudate and putamen: guanyl nucleotides enhance ascorbate-induced lipid peroxidation and cause an apparent loss of high affinity binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Andorn, A.C.; Bacon, B.R.; Nguyen-Hunh, A.T.; Parlato, S.J.; Stitts, J.A.

    1988-02-01

    The human caudate and putamen contain two high affinity binding sites for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Both of these affinity states exhibit dopaminergic selectivity. Ascorbic acid, at 0.1 mM, induces a slow loss of the low affinity component of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding in these tissues. The addition of guanyl nucleotides to the ascorbate produces a more rapid loss of (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding which includes a loss of the highest affinity state for (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol. Ascorbate induces lipid peroxidation in human caudate and putamen, an effect that is further enhanced by guanyl and inosine nucleotides. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides have no effect on (/sup 3/H)spiroperidol binding but do decrease the affinity of dopamine at each affinity state greater than 60-fold. In the absence of ascorbate, guanyl nucleotides apparently decrease agonist affinity at human brain dopamine2-binding sites without causing an interconversion of agonist affinity states.

  20. Adenylate cyclase activity in a higher plant, alfalfa (Medicago sativa).

    PubMed Central

    Carricarte, V C; Bianchini, G M; Muschietti, J P; Téllez-Iñón, M T; Perticari, A; Torres, N; Flawiá, M M

    1988-01-01

    An adenylate cyclase activity in Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) roots was partially characterized. The enzyme activity remains in the supernatant fluid after centrifugation at 105,000 g and shows in crude extracts an apparent Mr of about 84,000. The enzyme is active with Mg2+ and Ca2+ as bivalent cations, and is inhibited by EGTA and by chlorpromazine. Calmodulin from bovine brain or spinach leaves activates this adenylate cyclase. PMID:3128270

  1. IFN-induced Guanylate Binding Proteins in Inflammasome Activation and Host Defense

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bae-Hoon; Chee, Jonathan D.; Bradfield, Clinton J.; Park, Eui-Soon; Kumar, Pradeep; MacMicking, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Traditional views of the inflammasome highlight pre-existing core components being assembled under basal conditions shortly after infection or tissue damage. Recent work, however, suggests the inflammasome machinery is also subject to tunable or inducible signals that may accelerate its autocatalytic properties and dictate where inflammasome assembly takes place in the cell. Many of these immune signals operate downstream of interferon (IFN) receptors to elicit inflammasome regulators, including a new family of IFN-induced GTPases termed guanylate binding proteins (GBPs). Here, we examine the critical roles for IFN-induced GBPs in directing inflammasome subtype-specific responses and their consequences for cell-autonomous immunity against a wide variety of microbial pathogens. We discuss emerging mechanisms of action and the potential impact of these GBPs on predisposition to sepsis and other infectious or inflammatory diseases. PMID:27092805

  2. Anisotropic mechanical response of the enzyme Guanylate Kinase perturbed by the DNA molecular spring.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Chiao-Yu; Wang, Andrew; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2010-03-01

    Protein molecules are semi-rigid objects with organized but fluctuating conformation. For Guanylate Kinase, which catalyzes phosphoryl transfer between ATP and GMP, a large conformational change upon substrate binding occurs which is essential for enzymatic activity. With a DNA molecular spring stretching the molecule in distinct ways, we demonstrate that the enzymatic functions of substrate binding and phosphoryl transfer can be separately controlled mechanically. Three different attachment points of the DNA spring on the surface of the protein were tested, corresponding to stretching the protein along three different directions. Using activity measurements with titration over substrate concentration, the kinetic parameters (i.e., binding affinity of substrates and catalytic rate constant) based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics were obtained in the presence and absence of the three different mechanical perturbations.

  3. Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane as an efficient catalyst in the guanylation reaction of amines.

    PubMed

    Antiñolo, Antonio; Carrillo-Hermosilla, Fernando; Fernández-Galán, Rafael; Martínez-Ferrer, Jaime; Alonso-Moreno, Carlos; Bravo, Iván; Moreno-Blázquez, Sonia; Salgado, Manuel; Villaseñor, Elena; Albaladejo, José

    2016-06-28

    Tris(pentafluorophenyl)borane, [B(C6F5)3], has been used as an efficient catalyst in the guanylation reaction of amines with carbodiimide under mild conditions. A combined approach involving NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations was employed to gain a better insight into the mechanistic features of this process. The results allowed us to propose a new Lewis acid-assisted Brønsted acidic pathway for the guanylation reaction. The process starts with the interaction of tris(pentafluorphenyl)borane and the amine to form the corresponding adduct, [(C6F5)3B-NRH2] , followed by a straightforward proton transfer to one of the nitrogen atoms of the carbodiimide, (i)PrN[double bond, length as m-dash]C[double bond, length as m-dash]N(i)Pr, to produce, in two consequent steps, a guanidine-borane adduct, [(C6F5)3B-NRC(N(i)PrH)2] . The rupture of this adduct liberates the guanidine product RNC(N(i)PrH)2 and interaction with additional amine restarts the catalytic cycle. DFT studies have been carried out in order to study the thermodynamic characteristics of the proposed pathway. Significant borane adducts with amines and guanidines have been isolated and characterized by multinuclear NMR in order to study the N-B interaction and to propose the existence of possible Frustrated Lewis Pairs. Additionally, the molecular structures of significant components of the catalytic cycle, namely 4-tert-butylaniline-[B(C6F5)3] adduct and both free and [B(C6F5)3]-bonded 1-(phenyl)-2,3-diisopropylguanidine, and respectively, have been established by X-ray diffraction. PMID:27278089

  4. Phylogenetic distribution of extracellular guanyl-preferring ribonucleases renews taxonomic status of two Bacillus strains.

    PubMed

    Ulyanova, Vera; Shah Mahmud, Raihan; Dudkina, Elena; Vershinina, Valentina; Domann, Eugen; Ilinskaya, Olga

    2016-09-12

    The potential of microbial ribonucleases as promising antitumor and antiviral agents, determines today's directions of their study. One direction is connected with biodiversity of RNases. We have analyzed completed and drafted Bacillus genomes deposited in GenBank for the presence of coding regions similar to the gene of an extracellular guanyl-preferring RNase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (barnase). Orthologues of the barnase gene were detected in 9 species out of 83. All of these belong to "B. subtilis" group within the genus. B. subtilis itself, as well as some other species within this group, lack such types of RNases. RNases similar to barnase were also found in species of "B. cereus" group as a part of plasmid-encoded S-layer toxins. It was also found that taxonomic states of culture collection strains, which were initially described based on a limited set of phenotypic characteristics, can be misleading and need to be confirmed. Using several approaches such as matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS), sequencing of genes for 16S ribosomal RNA and RNA polymerase subunit beta followed by reconstruction of phylogenetic trees, we have re-identified two RNase-secreting Bacillus strains: B. thuringiensis B-388 which should be assigned as B. altitudinis B388 and B. intermedius 7P which should be renamed as B. pumilus 7P. Therefore, small secreted guanyl-preferring RNases are the feature of "B. subtilis" group only, which is characterized by distinctive lifestyle and adaptation strategies to environment. PMID:27373509

  5. Novel hopanoid cyclases from the environment.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Ann; Flood Page, Sarah R; Jorgenson, Tyler L; Fischer, Woodward W; Higgins, Meytal B

    2007-09-01

    Hopanoids are ubiquitous isoprenoid lipids found in modern biota, in recent sediments and in low-maturity sedimentary rocks. Because these lipids primarily are derived from bacteria, they are used as proxies to help decipher geobiological communities. To date, much of the information about sources of hopanoids has come from surveys of culture collections, an approach that does not address the vast fraction of prokaryotic communities that remains uncharacterized. Here we investigated the phylogeny of hopanoid producers using culture-independent methods. We obtained 79 new sequences of squalene-hopene cyclase genes (sqhC) from marine and lacustrine bacterioplankton and analysed them along with all 31 sqhC fragments available from existing metagenomics libraries. The environmental sqhCs average only 60% translated amino acid identity to their closest relatives in public databases. The data imply that the sources of these important geologic biomarkers remain largely unknown. In particular, genes affiliated with known cyanobacterial sequences were not detected in the contemporary environments analysed here, yet the geologic record contains abundant hopanoids apparently of cyanobacterial origin. The data also suggest that hopanoid biosynthesis is uncommon: < 10% of bacterial species may be capable of producing hopanoids. A better understanding of the contemporary distribution of hopanoid biosynthesis may reveal fundamental insight about the function of these compounds, the organisms in which they are found, and the environmental signals preserved in the sedimentary record. PMID:17686016

  6. Neurohypophyseal Hormone-Responsive Adenylate Cyclase from Mammalian Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Douša, Thomas; Hechter, Oscar; Schwartz, Irving L.; Walter, Roderich

    1971-01-01

    The investigation was undertaken to evaluate the direct stimulatory effects of neurohypophyseal hormones upon adenylate cyclase activity in a cell-free, particulate fraction derived from the kidney medulla of various mammalian species. The relative affinity of neurohypophyseal hormones for the receptor component of the adenylate cyclase system (as defined by the concentration of hormone required for half-maximal stimulation) had the order [8-arginine]-vasopressin > [8-lysine]-vasopressin ≫ oxytocin (AVP > LVP ≫ OT) for rat, mouse, rabbit, and ox; in the pig, the order was LVP > AVP ≫ OT. The relative affinities of the three hormones in rat and pig cyclase systems were found to correspond with the relative antidiuretic potencies of these hormones in the intact rat and pig. These findings show that the renal receptor for neurohypophyseal hormones in a particular species exhibits the highest affinity for the specific antidiuretic hormone that occurs naturally in that species. Some of the molecular requirements for the stimulation of rabbit adenylate cyclase were defined by studies of several neurohypophyseal analogs possessing structural changes in positions 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, and 9. This investigation introduces the particulate preparation of renal medullary adenylate cyclase as a tool for the analysis of neurohypophyseal hormone-receptor interactions and indicates that this preparation can be adapted to serve as an in vitro bioassay system for antidiuretic hormonal activity. PMID:4331557

  7. Glucagon and adenylate cyclase: binding studies and requirements for activation.

    PubMed

    Levey, G S; Fletcher, M A; Klein, I

    1975-01-01

    Solubilization of myocardial adenylate cyclase abolished responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, two of the hormones which activate the membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase freed of detergent by DEAE-cellulose chromatography continues to remain unresponsive to hormone stimulation. However, adding purified bovine brain phospholipids--phosphotidylserine and monophosphatidylinositol--restored responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, respectively. 125-i-glucagon binding appeared to be independent of phospholipid, since equal binding was observed in the presence or absence of detergent and in the presence or absence of phospholipids. Chromatography of the solubilized preparation on Sephadex G-100 WAS CHARACTERIZED BY 125-I-glucagon binding and fluoride-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity appearing in the fractions consistent with the void volume, suggesting a molecular weight greater than 100,000 for the receptor-adenylate cyclase complex. Prior incubation of the binding peak with 125-I-glucagon and rechromatography of the bound glucagon on Sephadex G-100 shifted its elution to a later fraction consistent with a smaller-molecular-weight peak. The molecular weight of this material was 24,000 to 28,000, as determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The latter findings are consistent with a dissociable receptor site for glucagon on myocardial adenylate cyclase. PMID:165684

  8. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed

    Frings, S

    1993-02-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  9. Identification of sea urchin sperm adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) affinity chromatography of a detergent extract of sea urchin sperm yielded approximately 20 major proteins. One of these proteins, of Mr 190,000, was purified and used to immunize rabbits. After absorption with living sperm, the serum reacted monospecifically on one- and two-dimensional Western immunoblots with the Mr 190,000 protein. The anti-190-kD serum inhibited 94% of the adenylate cyclase (AC) activity of the CaM eluate. An immunoaffinity column removed 95% of the AC activity, and the purified (but inactive) Mr 190,000 protein was eluted from the column. The antiserum also inhibited 23% of the activity of bovine brain CaM-sensitive AC and 90% of the activity of horse sperm CaM-sensitive AC. These data support the hypothesis that the Mr 190,000 protein is sea urchin sperm AC. Although this AC bound to CaM, it was not possible to demonstrate directly a Ca2+ or CaM sensitivity. However, two CaM antagonists, calmidazolium and chlorpromazine, both inhibited AC activity, and the inhibition was released by added CaM, suggesting the possibility of regulation of this AC by CaM. Indirect immunofluorescence showed the Mr 190,000 protein to be highly concentrated on only the proximal half of the sea urchin sperm flagellum. This asymmetric localization of AC may be important to its function in flagellar motility. This is the first report of the identification of an AC from animal spermatozoa. PMID:2121742

  10. Molecular Physiology of Membrane Guanylyl Cyclase Receptors.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    cGMP controls many cellular functions ranging from growth, viability, and differentiation to contractility, secretion, and ion transport. The mammalian genome encodes seven transmembrane guanylyl cyclases (GCs), GC-A to GC-G, which mainly modulate submembrane cGMP microdomains. These GCs share a unique topology comprising an extracellular domain, a short transmembrane region, and an intracellular COOH-terminal catalytic (cGMP synthesizing) region. GC-A mediates the endocrine effects of atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides regulating arterial blood pressure/volume and energy balance. GC-B is activated by C-type natriuretic peptide, stimulating endochondral ossification in autocrine way. GC-C mediates the paracrine effects of guanylins on intestinal ion transport and epithelial turnover. GC-E and GC-F are expressed in photoreceptor cells of the retina, and their activation by intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated proteins is essential for vision. Finally, in the rodent system two olfactorial GCs, GC-D and GC-G, are activated by low concentrations of CO2and by peptidergic (guanylins) and nonpeptidergic odorants as well as by coolness, which has implications for social behaviors. In the past years advances in human and mouse genetics as well as the development of sensitive biosensors monitoring the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP in living cells have provided novel relevant information about this receptor family. This increased our understanding of the mechanisms of signal transduction, regulation, and (dys)function of the membrane GCs, clarified their relevance for genetic and acquired diseases and, importantly, has revealed novel targets for therapies. The present review aims to illustrate these different features of membrane GCs and the main open questions in this field. PMID:27030537

  11. Apoptosis induced by farrerol in human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells through the mitochondrial-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enli; Liang, Taigang; Wang, Xiaojian; Ban, Shurong; Han, Lingge; Li, Qingshan

    2015-09-01

    Farrerol, a typical flavanone isolated from the Chinese medicinal plant Rhododendron dauricum L., has been found to show various biological activities. However, to the best of our knowledge, its inhibitory actions against cancer cells have not been reported as yet. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of farrerol on human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Farrerol showed a 50% inhibition of SGC-7901 cell growth at a concentration of 40.4 μmol/l for 24 h according to MTT assays. The cell morphology results indicated that SGC-7901 cells treated with farrerol showed several features of apoptotic cell death, which was also confirmed by the Annexin-V FITC/PI double-staining assay. Further studies showed that farrerol treatment induced the attenuation of mitochondrial membrane potential, accompanied by the release of Cyt-c and the activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Furthermore, farrerol decreased the gene expression of Bcl-2, whereas the gene expression level of Bax was found to increase after farrerol treatment. These combined results indicated that farrerol can induce apoptosis through a mitochondrial-mediated pathway. PMID:26061993

  12. Suppressive effects on cell proliferation and motility in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells by introducing ulinastatin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junqing; Chen, Xuehua; Su, Liping; Zhu, Zhenggang; Wu, Weize; Zhou, Yunyun

    2016-08-01

    Ulinastatin (UTI) is a kind of urinary trypsin inhibitor regulating broad-spectrum proteases and is used widely in the treatment of inflammatory diseases. Some evidence has suggested that UTI has antitumor functions in human carcinomas, but its function in gastric cancer (GC) has not been discussed extensively. In this study, we investigated the effects of UTI on GC SGC-7901 cells in vitro by preincubating cells with the UTI. The expression of the related molecules, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), was investigated at both the mRNA and the protein stages. Activation of uPA was analyzed and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 downstream uPA was detected. According to the results, UTI downregulated uPA expression and significantly suppressed the activation of uPA and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Furthermore, the SGC-7901 cells treated by UTI showed a significant decrease in cell proliferation and impairment of invasion and migration. However, no significant influence was observed on cell apoptosis. By ectopically expressing uPA in SGC-7901 cells, suppression effects of UTI were rescued. We suggest that UTI suppresses GC cell proliferation, motility, and at least partly conducted through uPA. Although the effects of UTI in GC cells need to be validated further, UTI represents a strong therapeutic strategy that is worth following up in GC treatment. PMID:27187019

  13. Apoptosis initiation of β-ionone in SGC-7901 gastric carcinoma cancer cells via a PI3K-AKT pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qian; Dong, Hong-Wei; Sun, Wen-Guang; Liu, Ming; Ibla, Juan C; Liu, Lian-Xin; Parry, John W; Han, Xiao-Hui; Li, Ming-Song; Liu, Jia-Ren

    2013-03-01

    β-ionone has been shown to hold potent anti-proliferative and apoptosis induction properties in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the effects of β-ionone on apoptosis initiation and its possible mechanisms of action, we qualified cell apoptosis, proteins related to apoptosis and a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway in human gastric adenocarcinoma cancer SGC-7901 cells. The results demonstrated that β-ionone-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in SGC-7901 cells treated with β-ionone (25, 50, 100 and 200 μmol/L) for 24 h. β-ionone was also shown to induce the expression of cleaved-caspase-3 and inhibit bcl-2 expression in SGC-7901 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The significantly decreased levels of p-PI3K and p-AKT expression were observed in SGC-7901 cells after β-ionone treatments in a time- and dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01). Thus, the apoptosis induction in SGC-7901 cells by β-ionone may be regulated through a PI3K-AKT pathway. These results demonstrate a potential mechanism by which β-ionone to induce apoptosis initiation in SGC-7901 cells. PMID:23100158

  14. Regulation and organization of adenylyl cyclases and cAMP.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Dermot M F

    2003-01-01

    Adenylyl cyclases are a critically important family of multiply regulated signalling molecules. Their susceptibility to many modes of regulation allows them to integrate the activities of a variety of signalling pathways. However, this property brings with it the problem of imparting specificity and discrimination. Recent studies are revealing the range of strategies utilized by the cyclases to solve this problem. Microdomains are a consequence of these solutions, in which cAMP dynamics may differ from the broad cytosol. Currently evolving methodologies are beginning to reveal cAMP fluctuations in these various compartments. PMID:12940771

  15. Regulation of adenylyl cyclase from Blastocladiella emersonii by guanine nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Terenzi, H; Maia, J C

    1993-11-01

    GTP gamma S stimulates adenylyl cyclase in particulate fractions of Blastocladiella emersonii zoospores. Cholera toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of a membrane protein of a molecular weight (46,000) similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs found in vertebrate cells. A membrane protein of 46 kDa can also be recognized in Western blots by an antipeptide antiserum (RM/1) raised against the C-terminus of G alpha 2-subunits. These results suggest that a G-protein mediates the regulation of Blastocladiella adenylyl cyclase by guanine nucleotides. PMID:8224237

  16. Oxaliplatin triggers necrosis as well as apoptosis in gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Ping; Zhu, Xueping; Jin, Wei; Hao, Shumei; Liu, Qi; Zhang, Linjie

    2015-05-01

    Intrinsic apoptotic pathway is considered to be responsible for cell death induced by platinum anticancer drugs. While in this study, we found that, necrosis is an indispensable pathway besides apoptosis in oxaliplatin-treated gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells. Upon exposure to oxaliplatin, both apoptotic and necrotic features were observed. The majority of dead cells were double positive for Annexin V and propidium iodide (PI). Moreover, mitochondrial membrane potential collapsed and caspase cascades were activated. However, ultrastructural changes under transmission electron microscope, coupled with the release of cellular contents, demonstrated the rupture of the plasma membrane. Oxaliplatin administration did not stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and autophagy, but elevated the protein level of Bmf. In addition, receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1), but not receptor interacting protein 3 (RIP3) and its downstream components participated in this death process. Necrostatin-1 (Nec-1) blocked oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely, whereas z-VAD-fmk could partially suppress cell death. Oxaliplatin treatment resulted in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) overactivation, as indicated by the increase of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which led to NAD{sup +} and ATP depletion. PARP-1 inhibitor, olaparib, could significantly block oxaliplatin-induced cell death, thus confirming that PARP-1 activation is mainly responsible for the cytotoxicity of oxaliplatin. Phosphorylation of H2AX at Ser139 and translocalization of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) are critical for this death process. Taken together, these results indicate that oxaliplatin can bypass canonical cell death pathways to kill gastric cancer cells, which may be of therapeutic advantage in the treatment of gastric cancer. - Highlights: • Oxaliplatin induces apoptotic and necrotic cell death. • Nec-1 can inhibit oxaliplatin-induced cell death nearly completely. • RIP3 and its

  17. Guanylate Binding Protein (GBP) 5 Is an Interferon-Inducible Inhibitor of HIV-1 Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Krapp, Christian; Hotter, Dominik; Gawanbacht, Ali; McLaren, Paul J; Kluge, Silvia F; Stürzel, Christina M; Mack, Katharina; Reith, Elisabeth; Engelhart, Susanne; Ciuffi, Angela; Hornung, Veit; Sauter, Daniel; Telenti, Amalio; Kirchhoff, Frank

    2016-04-13

    Guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) are an interferon (IFN)-inducible subfamily of guanosine triphosphatases (GTPases) with well-established activity against intracellular bacteria and parasites. Here we show that GBP5 potently restricts HIV-1 and other retroviruses. GBP5 is expressed in the primary target cells of HIV-1, where it impairs viral infectivity by interfering with the processing and virion incorporation of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). GBP5 levels in macrophages determine and inversely correlate with infectious HIV-1 yield over several orders of magnitude, which may explain the high donor variability in macrophage susceptibility to HIV. Antiviral activity requires Golgi localization of GBP5, but not its GTPase activity. Start codon mutations in the accessory vpu gene from macrophage-tropic HIV-1 strains conferred partial resistance to GBP5 inhibition by increasing Env expression. Our results identify GBP5 as an antiviral effector of the IFN response and may explain the increased frequency of defective vpu genes in primary HIV-1 strains. PMID:26996307

  18. Guanylate-binding Protein 1 (Gbp1) Contributes to Cell-autonomous Immunity against Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Selleck, Elizabeth M.; Fentress, Sarah J.; Beatty, Wandy L.; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Virgin, Herbert W.; MacMicking, John D.; Sibley, L. David

    2013-01-01

    IFN-γ activates cells to restrict intracellular pathogens by upregulating cellular effectors including the p65 family of guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs). Here we test the role of Gbp1 in the IFN-γ-dependent control of T. gondii in the mouse model. Virulent strains of T. gondii avoided recruitment of Gbp1 to the parasitophorous vacuole in a strain-dependent manner that was mediated by the parasite virulence factors ROP18, an active serine/threonine kinase, and the pseudokinase ROP5. Increased recruitment of Gbp1 to Δrop18 or Δrop5 parasites was associated with clearance in IFN-γ-activated macrophages in vitro, a process dependent on the autophagy protein Atg5. The increased susceptibility of Δrop18 mutants in IFN-γ-activated macrophages was reverted in Gbp1−/− cells, and decreased virulence of this mutant was compensated in Gbp1−/− mice, which were also more susceptible to challenge with type II strain parasites of intermediate virulence. These findings demonstrate that Gbp1 plays an important role in the IFN-γ-dependent, cell-autonomous control of toxoplasmosis and predict a broader role for this protein in host defense. PMID:23633952

  19. Binding dynamics and energetic insight into the molecular forces driving nucleotide binding by guanylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium deoxyguanylate pathways are an attractive area of investigation for future metabolic and drug discovery studies due to their unique substrate specificities. We investigated the energetic contribution to guanylate kinase substrate binding and the forces underlying ligand recognition. In the range from 20 to 35°C, the thermodynamic profiles displayed marked decrease in binding enthalpy, while the free energy of binding showed little changes. GMP produced a large binding heat capacity change of -356 cal mol(-1) K(-1), indicating considerable conformational changes upon ligand binding. Interestingly, the calculated ΔCp was -32 cal mol(-1) K(-1), indicating that the accessible surface area is not the central change in substrate binding, and that other entropic forces, including conformational changes, are more predominant. The thermodynamic signature for GMP is inconsistent with rigid-body association, while dGMP showed more or less rigid-body association. These binding profiles explain the poor catalytic efficiency and low affinity for dGMP compared with GMP. At low temperature, the ligands bind to the receptor site under the effect of hydrophobic forces. Interestingly, by increasing the temperature, the entropic forces gradually vanish and proceed to a nonfavorable contribution, and the interaction occurs mainly through bonding, electrostatic forces, and van der Waals interactions. PMID:21360614

  20. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  1. Differential contribution of the guanylyl cyclase-cyclic GMP-protein kinase G pathway to the proliferation of neural stem cells stimulated by nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Bruno P; Morte, Maria Inês; Lourenço, Ana Sofia; Santos, Ana Isabel; Inácio, Angela; Ambrósio, António F; Carvalho, Caetana M; Araújo, Inês M

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an important inflammatory mediator involved in the initial boost in the proliferation of neural stem cells following brain injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the proliferative effect of NO are still unclear. The aim of this work was to investigate whether cyclic GMP (cGMP) and the cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG) are involved in the proliferative effect triggered by NO in neural stem cells. For this purpose, cultures of neural stem cells isolated from the mouse subventricular zone (SVZ) were used. We observed that long-term exposure to the NO donor (24 h), NOC-18, increased the proliferation of SVZ cells in a cGMP-dependent manner, since the guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ, prevented cell proliferation. Similarly to NOC-18, the cGMP analogue, 8-Br-cGMP, also increased cell proliferation. Interestingly, shorter exposures to NO (6 h) increased cell proliferation in a cGMP-independent manner via the ERK/MAP kinase pathway. The selective inhibitor of PKG, KT5823, prevented the proliferative effect induced by NO at 24 h but not at 6 h. In conclusion, the proliferative effect of NO is initially mediated by the ERK/MAPK pathway, and at later stages by the GC/cGMP/PKG pathway. Thus, our work shows that NO induces neural stem cell proliferation by targeting these two pathways in a biphasic manner. PMID:22378242

  2. Modification of adenylate cyclase by photoaffinity analogs of forskolin

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, L.T.; Nie, Z.M.; Mende, T.J.; Richardson, S.; Chavan, A.; Kolaczkowska, E.; Watt, D.S.; Haley, B.E.; Ho, R.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Photoaffinity labeling analogs of the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin (PF) have been synthesized, purified and tested for their effect on preparations of membrane-bound, Lubrol solubilized and forskolin affinity-purified adenylate cyclase (AC). All analogs of forskolin significantly activated AC. However, in the presence of 0.1 to 0.3 microM forskolin, the less active forskolin photoaffinity probes at 100 microM caused inhibition. This inhibition was dose-dependent for PF, suggesting that PF may complete with F for the same binding site(s). After cross-linking (125I)PF-M to either membrane or Lubrol-solubilized AC preparations by photolysis, a radiolabeled 100-110 kDa protein band was observed after autoradiography following SDS-PAGE. F at 100 microM blocked the photoradiolabeling of this protein. Radioiodination of forskolin-affinity purified AC showed several protein bands on autoradiogram, however, only one band (Mr = 100-110 kDa) was specifically labeled by (125I)PF-M following photolysis. The photoaffinity-labeled protein of 100-110 kDa of AC preparation of rat adipocyte may be the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase of rat adipocyte itself as supported by the facts that (a) no other AC-regulatory proteins are known to be of this size, (b) the catalytic unit of bovine brain enzyme is in the same range and (c) this PF specifically stimulates AC activity when assayed alone, and weekly inhibits forskolin-activation of cyclase. These studies indicate that radiolabeled PF probes may be useful for photolabeling and detecting the catalytic unit of adenylate cyclase.

  3. Effects of PDE5 Inhibitors and sGC Stimulators in a Rat Model of Artificial Ureteral Calculosis

    PubMed Central

    Sandner, Peter; Tinel, Hanna; Affaitati, Giannapia; Costantini, Raffaele; Giamberardino, Maria Adele

    2015-01-01

    Urinary colics from calculosis are frequent and intense forms of pain whose current pharmacological treatment remains unsatisfactory. New and more effective drugs are needed to control symptoms and improve stone expulsion. Recent evidence suggested that the Nitric Oxide (NO) / cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) / phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) system may contribute to ureteral motility influencing stone expulsion. We investigated if PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators influence ureteral contractility, pain behaviour and stone expulsion in a rat model of ureteral calculosis. We investigated: a)the sex-specific PDE5 distribution in the rat ureter; b)the functional in vitro effects of vardenafil and sildenafil (PDE5 inhibitors) and BAY41-2272 (sGC stimulator) on induced ureteral contractility in rats and c)the in vivo effectiveness of vardenafil and BAY41-2272, alone and combined with ketoprofen, vs hyoscine-N-butylbromide alone or combined with ketoprofen, on behavioural pain indicators and stone expulsion in rats with artificial calculosis in one ureter. PDE5 was abundantly expressed in male and female rats’ ureter. In vitro, both vardenafil and BAY41-2272 significantly relaxed pre-contracted ureteral strips. In vivo, all compounds significantly reduced number and global duration of “ureteral crises” and post-stone lumbar muscle hyperalgesia in calculosis rats. The highest level of reduction of the pain behaviour was observed with BAY41-2272 among all spasmolytics administered alone, and with the combination of ketoprofen with BAY41-2272. The percentage of stone expulsion was maximal in the ketoprofen+BAY41-2272 group. The NO/cGMP/PDE5 pathway is involved in the regulation of ureteral contractility and pain behaviour in urinary calculosis. PDE5 inhibitors and sGC stimulators could become a potent new option for treatment of urinary colic pain. PMID:26509272

  4. Characterization of the adenosine receptor in cultured embryonic chick atrial myocytes: Coupling to modulation of contractility and adenylate cyclase activity and identification by direct radioligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, B.T.

    1989-06-01

    Adenosine receptors in a spontaneously contracting atrial myocyte culture from 14-day chick embryos were characterized by radioligand binding studies and by examining the involvement of G-protein in coupling these receptors to a high-affinity state and to the adenylate cyclase and the myocyte contractility. Binding of the antagonist radioligand (3H)-8-cyclopentyl-1,3-diproylxanthine ((3H)CPX) was rapid, reversible and saturable and was to a homogeneous population of sites with a Kd value of 2.1 +/- 0.2 nM and an apparent maximum binding of 26.2 +/- 3 fmol/mg of protein (n = 10, +/- S.E.). Guanyl-5-yl-(beta, gamma-imido)diphosphate had no effect on either the Kd or the maximum binding and CPX reversed the N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine-induced inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity and contractility, indicating that (3H) CPX is an antagonist radioligand. Competition curves for (3H) CPX binding by a series of reference adenosine agonists were consistent with labeling of an A1 adenosine receptor and were better fit by a two-site model than by a one-site model. ADP-ribosylation of the G-protein by the endogenous NAD+ in the presence of pertussis toxin shifted the competition curves from bi to monophasic with Ki values similar to those of the KL observed in the absence of prior pertussis intoxication. The adenosine agonists were capable of inhibiting both the adenylate cyclase activity and myocyte contractility in either the absence or the presence of isoproterenol. The A1 adenosine receptor-selective antagonist CPX reversed these agonist effects. The order of ability of the reference adenosine receptor agonists in causing these inhibitory effects was similar to the order of potency of the same agonists in inhibiting the specific (3H)CPX binding (N6-R-phenyl-2-propyladenosine greater than N6-S-phenyl-2-propyladenosine or N-ethyladenosine-5'-uronic acid).

  5. Substrate specificity of the adenylation enzyme SgcC1 involved in the biosynthesis of the enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027.

    PubMed

    Van Lanen, Steven G; Lin, Shuangjun; Dorrestein, Pieter C; Kelleher, Neil L; Shen, Ben

    2006-10-01

    C-1027 is an enediyne antitumor antibiotic composed of a chromophore with four distinct chemical moieties, including an (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety that is derived from l-alpha-tyrosine. SgcC4, a novel aminomutase requiring no added co-factor that catalyzes the formation of the first intermediate (S)-beta-tyrosine and subsequently SgcC1 homologous to adenylation domains of nonribosomal peptide synthetases, was identified as specific for the SgcC4 product and did not recognize any alpha-amino acids. To definitively establish the substrate for SgcC1, a full kinetic characterization of the enzyme was performed using amino acid-dependent ATP-[(32)P]PP(i) exchange assay to monitor amino acid activation and electrospray ionization-Fourier transform mass spectroscopy to follow the loading of the activated beta-amino acid substrate to the peptidyl carrier protein SgcC2. The data establish (S)-beta-tyrosine as the preferred substrate, although SgcC1 shows promiscuous activity toward aromatic beta-amino acids such as beta-phenylalanine, 3-chloro-beta-tyrosine, and 3-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine, but all were <50-fold efficient. A putative active site mutant P571A adjacent to the invariant aspartic acid residue of all alpha-amino acid-specific adenylation domains known to date was prepared as a preliminary attempt to probe the substrate specificity of SgcC1; however the mutation resulted in a loss of activity with all substrates except (S)-beta-tyrosine, which was 142-fold less efficient relative to the wild-type enzyme. In total, SgcC1 is now confirmed to catalyze the second step in the biosynthesis of the (S)-3-chloro-4,5-dihydroxy-beta-phenylalanine moiety of C-1027, presenting downstream enzymes with an (S)-beta-tyrosyl-S-SgcC2 thioester substrate, and represents the first beta-amino acid-specific adenylation enzyme characterized biochemically. PMID:16887797

  6. Soluble guanylyl cyclase-activated cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase inhibits arterial smooth muscle cell migration independent of VASP-serine 239 phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Holt, Andrew W; Martin, Danielle N; Shaver, Patti R; Adderley, Shaquria P; Stone, Joshua D; Joshi, Chintamani N; Francisco, Jake T; Lust, Robert M; Weidner, Douglas A; Shewchuk, Brian M; Tulis, David A

    2016-09-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) accounts for over half of all cardiovascular disease-related deaths. Uncontrolled arterial smooth muscle (ASM) cell migration is a major component of CAD pathogenesis and efforts aimed at attenuating its progression are clinically essential. Cyclic nucleotide signaling has long been studied for its growth-mitigating properties in the setting of CAD and other vascular disorders. Heme-containing soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) synthesizes cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and maintains vascular homeostasis predominantly through cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) signaling. Considering that reactive oxygen species (ROS) can interfere with appropriate sGC signaling by oxidizing the cyclase heme moiety and so are associated with several CVD pathologies, the current study was designed to test the hypothesis that heme-independent sGC activation by BAY 60-2770 (BAY60) maintains cGMP levels despite heme oxidation and inhibits ASM cell migration through phosphorylation of the PKG target and actin-binding vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP). First, using the heme oxidant ODQ, cGMP content was potentiated in the presence of BAY60. Using a rat model of arterial growth, BAY60 significantly reduced neointima formation and luminal narrowing compared to vehicle (VEH)-treated controls. In rat ASM cells BAY60 significantly attenuated cell migration, reduced G:F actin, and increased PKG activity and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation (pVASP·S239) compared to VEH controls. Site-directed mutagenesis was then used to generate overexpressing full-length wild type VASP (FL-VASP/WT), VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-mimetic (FL-VASP/239D) and VASP Ser239 phosphorylation-resistant (FL-VASP/239A) ASM cell mutants. Surprisingly, FL-VASP/239D negated the inhibitory effects of FL-VASP/WT and FL-VASP/239A cells on migration. Furthermore, when FL-VASP mutants were treated with BAY60, only the FL-VASP/239D group showed reduced migration compared to its VEH controls

  7. Angiostatin up-regulation in gastric cancer cell SGC7901 inhibits tumorigenesis in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Shi, Yong-Quan; Wu, Kai-Chun; Zhang, De-Xin; Yang, Jing-Hua; Fan, Dai-Ming

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the influence of angiostatin up-regulation on the biologic behavior of gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo, and the potential of angiostatin gene therapy in the treatment of human gastric cancer. METHODS: Mouse angiostatin cDNA was subcloned into the eukaryotic expression vector pcDNA3.1(+) and identified by restriction endonucleases digestion and sequencing. The recombinant vector pcDNA3.1(+)-angio was transfected into human gastric cancer cells SGC7901 with liposome and paralleled with the vector control and the mock control. Angiostatin transcription and protein expression were examined by RT-PCR and Western blot in the stable cell lines selected by G418. Cell proliferation and growth in vitro of the three groups were observed respectively under microscope, cell number counting and FACS. The cells overexpressing angiostatin, vector transfected and untreated were respectively implanted subcutaneously into nude mice. After 30 days the size of tumors formed was measured, and microvessel density count (MVD) in the tumor tissues was assessed by immunohistochemistry with the primary anti-vWF antibody. RESULTS: The recombinant vector pcDNA3.1(+)-angio was confirmed with the correct sequence of mouse angiostatin under the promoter CMV. After 30 d of transfection and selection with G418, macroscopic resistant cell clones were formed in the experimental group transfected with pcDNA 3.1(+)-angio and the vector control. But no untreated cells survived in the mock control. Angiostatin mRNA transcription and protein expression were detected in the experimental group. No significant differences were observed among the three groups in cell morphology, cell growth curves and cell cycle phase distributions in vitro. However, in nude mice model, markedly inhibited tumorigenesis and slowed tumor expansion were observed in the experimental group as compared with the controls, which was paralleled with decreased microvessel density in and around tumor tissues (P

  8. Origin of the Heterogeneous Distribution of the Yield of Guanyl Radical in UV Laser Photolyzed DNA

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Dimitar; Beylot, Benedicte; Spassky, Annick

    2005-01-01

    Oxidative guanine lesions were analyzed, at the nucleotide level, within DNA exposed to nanosecond ultraviolet (266 nm) laser pulses of variable intensity (0.002–0.1 J/cm2). Experiments were carried out, at room temperature, in TE buffer (20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.5; 1 mM EDTA) containing 35 mM NaCl, on 5′-end radioactively labeled double-stranded and single-stranded oligomer DNA at a size of 33–37 nucleobases. Lesions were analyzed on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis by taking advantage of the specific removal of 8-oxodG from DNA by the formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (Fpg protein) and of the differential sensitivity of 8-oxodG and oxazolone to piperidine. The quantum yields of lesions at individual sites, determined from the normalized intensities of bands, were plotted against the irradiation energy levels. Simplified model fitting of the experimental data enabled to evaluate the spectroscopic parameters characterizing excitation and photoionization processes. Results show that the distribution of guanine residues, excited to the lowest triplet state or photoionized, is heterogeneous and depends on the primary and secondary DNA structure. These findings are generalized in terms of excitation energy and charge-migration mediated biphotonic ionization. On the basis of the changes in the yield of the guanyl radical resulting from local helical perturbations in the DNA π-stack, it can be assessed that the distance range of migration is <6–8 bp. PMID:15613625

  9. Hericium erinaceus polysaccharide-protein HEG-5 inhibits SGC-7901 cell growth via cell cycle arrest and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zan, Xinyi; Cui, Fengjie; Li, Yunhong; Yang, Yan; Wu, Di; Sun, Wenjing; Ping, Lifeng

    2015-05-01

    HEG-5 is a novel polysaccharide-protein purified from the fermented mycelia of Hericium erinaceus CZ-2. The present study aims to investigate the effects of HEG-5 on proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of human gastric cancer cells SGC-7901. Here, we first uncover that HEG-5 significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of SGC-7901 cells by promoting apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S phase. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis suggested that HEG-5 could decrease the expressions of Bcl2, PI3K and AKT1, while increase the expressions of Caspase-8, Caspase-3, p53, CDK4, Bax and Bad. These findings indicated that the Caspase-8/-3-dependent, p53-dependent mitochondrial-mediated and PI3k/Akt signaling pathways involved in the molecular events of HEG-5 induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Thus, our study provides in vitro evidence that HEG-5 may be taken as a potential candidate for treating gastric cancer. PMID:25703932

  10. Interaction of Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase with liver regulatory factors.

    PubMed Central

    Eisenschlos, C; Flawiá, M M; Torruella, M; Torres, H N

    1986-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi adenylate cyclase catalytic subunits may interact with regulatory factors from rat liver membranes, reconstituting heterologous systems which are catalytically active in assay mixtures containing MgATP. The systems show stimulatory responses to glucagon and guanosine 5'-[beta gamma-imido]triphosphate (p[NH]ppG) or fluoride. Reconstitution was obtained by three different methods: fusion of rat liver membranes (pretreated with N-ethylmaleimide) to T. cruzi membranes; interaction of detergent extracts of rat liver membranes with T. cruzi membranes; or interaction of purified preparations of T. cruzi adenylate cyclase and of liver membrane factors in phospholipid vesicles. The liver factors responsible for the guanine nucleotide effect were characterized as the NS protein. Data also indicate that reconstitution requires the presence of a membrane substrate. PMID:2947568

  11. Mechanism of activation of adenylate cyclase by Vibrio cholerae enterotoxin.

    PubMed

    Bennett, V; Cuatrecasas, P

    1975-06-01

    The kinetics and properties of the activation of adenylate cyclase by cholera enterotoxin have been examined primarily in toad erythrocytes, but also in avian erythrocytes, rat fat cells and cultured melanoma cells. When cholera toxin is incubated with intact cells it stimulates adenylate cyclase activity, as measured in the subsequently isolated plasma membranes, according to a triphasic time course. This consists of a true lag period of about 30 min, followed by a stage of exponentially increasing adenylate cyclase activity which continues for 110 to 130 min, and finally a period of slow activation which may extend as long as 30 hr in cultured melanoma cells. The progressive activation of adenylate cyclase activity by cholera toxin is interrupted by cell lysis; continued incubation of the isolated membranes under nearly identical conditions does not lead to further activation of the enzyme. The delay in the action of the toxin is not grossly dependent of the number of toxin-receptor (GM1 ganglioside) complexes, and is still seen upon adding a second dose of toxin to partially stimulated cells. Direct measurements indicate negligible intracellular levels of biologically active radioiodinated toxin in either a soluble or a nuclear-bound form. The effects are not prevented by Actinomycin D (20 mug/ml), uromycin (30 mug/ml), cycloheximide (30 mug/ml), sodium fluoride (10 mM) or sodium azide (1 mM); KCN, however, almost completely prevents the action of cholera toxin. The action of the toxin is temperature dependent, occurring at very slow or negligible rates below certain critical temperatures, the values of which depend on the specific animal species. Thetransition for toad erythrocytes occurs at 15 to 17 degrees C, while rat adipocytes and turkey erythrocytes demonstrate a discontinuity at 26 to 30 degrees C. The temperature effects are evident during the lag period as well as during the exponential phase of activation. The rate of decay of the stimulated adenylate

  12. High skeletal muscle adenylate cyclase in malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed Central

    Willner, J H; Cerri, C G; Wood, D S

    1981-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia occurs in humans with several congenital myopathies, usually in response to general anesthesia. Commonly, individuals who develop this syndrome lack symptoms of muscle disease, and their muscle lacks specific pathological changes. A biochemical marker for this myopathy has not previously been available; we found activity of adenylate cyclase and content of cyclic AMP to be abnormally high in skeletal muscle. Secondary modification of protein phosphorylation could explain observed abnormalities of phosphorylase activation and sarcoplasmic reticulum function. PMID:6271806

  13. Requirements for the adenylyl cyclases in the development of Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Anjard, C; Söderbom, F; Loomis, W F

    2001-09-01

    It has been suggested that all intracellular signaling by cAMP during development of Dictyostelium is mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, PKA, since cells carrying null mutations in the acaA gene that encodes adenylyl cyclase can develop so as to form fruiting bodies under some conditions if PKA is made constitutive by overexpressing the catalytic subunit. However, a second adenylyl cyclase encoded by acrA has recently been found that functions in a cell autonomous fashion during late development. We have found that expression of a modified acaA gene rescues acrA- mutant cells indicating that the only role played by ACR is to produce cAMP. To determine whether cells lacking both adenylyl cyclase genes can develop when PKA is constitutive we disrupted acrA in a acaA- PKA-C(over) strain. When developed at high cell densities, acrA- acaA- PKA-C(over) cells form mounds, express cell type-specific genes at reduced levels and secrete cellulose coats but do not form fruiting bodies or significant numbers of viable spores. Thus, it appears that synthesis of cAMP is required for spore differentiation in Dictyostelium even if PKA activity is high. PMID:11566867

  14. Yeast mating pheromone alpha factor inhibits adenylate cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, H; Thorner, J

    1980-01-01

    The pheromone alpha factor, secreted by Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells of the alpha mating type, serves to synchronize the opposite mating type (a cells) at G1 as a prelude to fusion of the two cell types. We found that, in vitro, alpha factor inhibited the membrane-bound adenylate cyclase of these cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, one class (ste5) of a cell mutants that grow normally at either 23 degrees or 34 degrees C but that are unable to respond to alpha factor or to mate at the higher temperature possessed an adenylate cyclase activity that was not inhibited by alpha factor at 34 degrees C but was fully sensitive to inhibition at 23 degrees C. Furthermore, addition of cyclic AMP to a cell culture medium shortened the period of pheromone-induced G1 arrest. We conclude that inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity by alpha factor may constitute, at least in part, the biochemical mode of action of the pheromone in vivo. PMID:6246513

  15. Adenylate cyclase mediates olfactory transduction for a wide variety of odorants.

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, G; Nakamura, T; Gold, G H

    1989-01-01

    An odor-stimulated adenylate cyclase [ATP pyrophosphate-lyase (cyclizing), EC 4.6.1.1] is thought to mediate olfactory transduction in vertebrates. However, it is not known whether the adenylate cyclase serves this function for all odorants or for only certain classes of odorants. To investigate this question, we have compared the abilities of 35 odorants to stimulate the adenylate cyclase and to elicit an electrophysiological response. We report a strong positive correlation between the magnitude of adenylate cyclase stimulation and the summated electrical response of the olfactory epithelium (electro-olfactogram) evoked by individual odorants. We also show that the adenylate cyclase stimulator forskolin equally attenuates the electro-olfactogram response for all odorants tested. These data provide evidence that the adenylate cyclase mediates transduction for a wide variety of odorants. PMID:2787513

  16. Involvement of nuclear receptor RZR/RORγ in melatonin-induced HIF-1α inactivation in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ri-Xiong; Liu, Hui; Xu, Li; Zhang, Hui; Zhou, Rui-Xiang

    2015-11-01

    The melatonin nuclear receptor is an orphan member of the nuclear receptor superfamily RZR/ROR, which consists of three subtypes (α, β and γ), suggesting that immunomodulatory and antitumor effects through the intracellular action of melatonin depend on nuclear signaling. In the present study, the biological mechanisms of melatonin were elucidated in association with the RZR/RORγ pathway in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells under hypoxia. Melatonin suppressed the activity of RZR/RORγ and SUMO-specific protease 1 (SENP1) signaling pathway, which is essential for stabilization of hypoxia‑inducible factor-1α (HIF‑1α) during hypoxia. Furthermore, melatonin inhibited the stability of HIF-1α in a time- and conce-ntration-dependent manner in SGC-7901 human gastric cancer cells during hypoxia. Consistently, siRNA-RZR/RORγ effectively blocked the expression of SENP1, HIF-1α and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) production in SGC-7901 cells under hypoxia, suggesting the role of nuclear receptor RZR/RORγ in melatonin-inhibited HIF-1α and VEGF accumulation. Moreover, siRNA RZR/RORγ obviously antagonized to inhibit the action of the gastric cancer cell proliferation by melatonin. Our findings suggest that melatonin suppresses HIF-1α accumulation and VEGF generation via inhibition of melatonin nuclear receptor RZR/RORγ in SGC-7901 cells under hypoxia. PMID:26330273

  17. Fangchinoline targets PI3K and suppresses PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in SGC7901 cells.

    PubMed

    Tian, Feng; Ding, Ding; Li, Dandan

    2015-01-01

    Fangchinoline, an important compound in Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancers cells except gastric cancer. To investigate whether fangchinoline affects gastric cancer cells, we detected the signaling pathway by which fangchinoline plays a role in different human gastric cancer cells lines. We found that fangchinoline effectively suppressed proliferation and invasion of SGC7901 cell lines, but not MKN45 cell lines by inhibiting the expression of PI3K and its downstream pathway. All of the Akt/MMP2/MMP9 pathway, Akt/Bad pathway, and Akt/Gsk3β/CDK2 pathway could be inhibited by fangchinoline through inhibition of PI3K. Taken together, these results suggest that fangchinoline targets PI3K in tumor cells that express PI3K abundantly and inhibits the growth and invasive ability of the tumor cells. PMID:25872479

  18. Fangchinoline targets PI3K and suppresses PI3K/AKT signaling pathway in SGC7901 cells

    PubMed Central

    TIAN, FENG; DING, DING; LI, DANDAN

    2015-01-01

    Fangchinoline, an important compound in Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, as a novel antitumor agent, has been implicated in several types of cancers cells except gastric cancer. To investigate whether fangchinoline affects gastric cancer cells, we detected the signaling pathway by which fangchinoline plays a role in different human gastric cancer cells lines. We found that fangchinoline effectively suppressed proliferation and invasion of SGC7901 cell lines, but not MKN45 cell lines by inhibiting the expression of PI3K and its downstream pathway. All of the Akt/MMP2/MMP9 pathway, Akt/Bad pathway, and Akt/Gsk3β/CDK2 pathway could be inhibited by fangchinoline through inhibition of PI3K. Taken together, these results suggest that fangchinoline targets PI3K in tumor cells that express PI3K abundantly and inhibits the growth and invasive ability of the tumor cells. PMID:25872479

  19. Characterization of the SgcF epoxide hydrolase supporting an (R)-vicinal diol intermediate for enediyne antitumor antibiotic C-1027 biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shuangjun; Horsman, Geoffrey P; Chen, Yihua; Li, Wenli; Shen, Ben

    2009-11-18

    C-1027 is a chromoprotein antitumor antibiotic consisting of an apoprotein and the C-1027 chromophore. The C-1027 chromophore possesses four distinct structural moieties-an enediyne core, a deoxy aminosugar, a benzoxazolinate, and an (S)-3-chloro-5-hydroxy-beta-tyrosine-the latter two of which are proposed to be appended to the enediyne core via a convergent biosynthetic strategy. Here we report the in vitro characterization of SgcF, an epoxide hydrolase from the C-1027 biosynthetic gene cluster that catalyzes regio- and stereospecific hydrolysis of styrene oxide, serving as an enediyne core epoxide intermediate mimic, to form a vicinal diol. Abolishment of C-1027 production in the DeltasgcF mutant strain Streptomyces globisporus SB1010 unambiguously establishes that sgcF plays an indispensable role in C-1027 biosynthesis. SgcF efficiently hydrolyzes (S)-styrene oxide, displaying an apparent K(m) of 0.6 +/- 0.1 mM and k(cat) of 48 +/- 1 min(-1), via attack at the alpha-position to exclusively generate the (R)-phenyl vicinal diol, consistent with the stereochemistry of the C-1027 chromophore. These findings support the role of SgcF in the proposed convergent pathway for C-1027 biosynthesis, unveiling an (R)-vicinal diol as a key intermediate. Interestingly, SgcF can also hydrolyze (R)-styrene oxide to afford preferentially the (R)-phenyl vicinal diol via attack at the beta-position, albeit with significantly reduced efficiency (apparent K(m) of 2.0 +/- 0.4 mM and k(cat) = 4.3 +/- 0.3 min(-1)). Although the latter activity unlikely contributes to C-1027 biosynthesis in vivo, such enantioconvergence arising from complementary regioselective hydrolysis of a racemic substrate could be exploited to engineer epoxide hydrolases with improved regio- and/or enantiospecificity. PMID:19856960

  20. Iron Trichloride and Air Mediated Guanylation of Acylthioureas. An Ecological Route to Acylguanidines: Scope and Mechanistic Insights.

    PubMed

    Pape, Simon; Wessig, Pablo; Brunner, Heiko

    2016-06-01

    Recently we introduced iron trichloride as an environmentally benign and cost-efficient reagent for the synthesis of N-benzoylguanidines. This highly attractive synthetic approach grants access to a broad spectrum of N-benzoylguanidines under mild conditions in short reaction times. In this work we present an extended scope of our methodology along with the results obtained from mechanistic studies via in situ IR spectroscopy in combination with LC (liquid chromatography)-MS analyses. On the basis of these new mechanistic insights we were able to optimize the synthetic protocol and to develop an alternative mechanistic proposal. In this context the symbiotic roles of iron trichloride and oxygen in the guanylation process are highlighted. PMID:27181741

  1. Guanylate-binding proteins promote AIM2 inflammasome activation during Francisella novicida infection by inducing cytosolic bacteriolysis and DNA release

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Roland F.; Costanzo, Stéphanie; Anton, Leonie; Rühl, Sebastian; Dussurgey, Sébastien; Dick, Mathias S.; Kistner, Anne; Rigard, Mélanie; Degrandi, Daniel; Pfeffer, Klaus; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Henry, Thomas; Broz, Petr

    2015-01-01

    The AIM2 inflammasome detects double-stranded DNA in the cytosol and induces caspase-1-dependent pyroptosis as well as release of the inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. AIM2 is critical for host defense against DNA viruses and bacteria that replicate in the cytosol, such as Francisella novicida. AIM2 activation by F. novicida requires bacteriolysis, yet whether this process is accidental or a host-driven immune mechanism remained unclear. Using siRNA screening for nearly 500 interferon-stimulated genes, we identified guanylate-binding proteins GBP2 and GBP5 as key AIM2 activators during F. novicida infection. Their prominent role was validated in vitro and in a mouse model of tularemia. Mechanistically, these two GBPs target cytosolic F. novicida and promote bacteriolysis. Thus, besides their role in host defense against vacuolar pathogens, GBPs also facilitate the presentation of ligands by directly attacking cytosolic bacteria. PMID:25774716

  2. Complete genomic organization of the human erythroid p55 gene (MPP1), a membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologue

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.C.; Metzenberg, A.B.; Sahr, K.E.

    1996-01-15

    Human p55 is an abundantly palmitoylated phosphoprotein of the erythroid membrane. It is the prototype of a newly discovered family of membrane-associated proteins termed MAGUKs (membrane-associated guanylate kinase homologues). The MAGUKs interact with the cytoskeleton and regulate cell proliferation, signaling pathways, and intercellular junctions. Here, we report the complete intron-exon map of the human erythroid p55 gene (HGMW-approved symbol MPP1). The structure of the p55 gene was determined from cosmid clones isolated from a cosmid library specific for the human X chromosome. There is a single copy of the p55 gene, composed of 12 exons and spanning approximately 28 kb in the q28 region of the human X chromosome. The exon sizes range from 69 (exon 5) to 203 bp (intron 2) to {approximately}14 kb (intron 1). The intron-exon boundaries conform to the donor/acceptor consensus sequence, GT-AG, for splice junctions. Several of the exon boundaries correspond to the boundaries of functional domains in the p55 protein. These domains include a SH3 motif and a region that binds to cytoskeletal protein 4.1. In addition, a comparison of the genomic and the primary structures of p55 reveals a highly conserved phosphotyrosine domain located between the protein 4.1 binding domain and the guanylate kinase domain. Finally, promoter activity measurements of the region immediately upstream of the p55 gene, which contains several cis-elements commonly found in housekeeping genes, suggest that a CpG island may be associated with the p55 gene expression in vivo. 42 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Adenylate cyclase in Arthrospira platensis responds to light through transcription.

    PubMed

    Kashith, M; Keerthana, B; Sriram, S; Ramamurthy, V

    2016-08-19

    Cyclic 3',5' adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule, but its role in higher plants was in doubt due to its very low concentration. In this study we wanted to look at the flux of cAMP in response to light in algae, considered to be the more primitive form of photosynthetic organisms. While it did not fluctuate very much in the tested green algae, in the cyanobacterium Arthrospira platensis its level was closely linked to exposure to light. The expression from cyaC, the major isoform of adenylate cyclase was strongly influenced by exposure of the cells to light. There was about 300 fold enhancement of cyaC transcripts in cells exposed to light compared to the transcripts in cells in the dark. Although post-translational regulation of adenylate cyclase activity has been widely known, our studies suggest that transcriptional control could also be an important aspect of its regulation in A. platensis. PMID:27311855

  4. Differential effects of ceramides upon adenylyl cyclase subtypes.

    PubMed

    Bösel, A; Pfeuffer, T

    1998-01-30

    Ceramides are reported to stimulate different effector systems, among them atypical protein kinases C (PKCs). When HEK 293 cells, stably expressing adenylyl cyclase type II (AC II), were treated with various ceramide derivatives, adenylyl cyclase activity was enhanced 8-15-fold. The stimulation by the most potent analog, C18/C24 ceramide, was comparable to that by the phorbolester TPA. The stimulatory effect of ceramide was not restricted to AC II, although the type I and type V enzymes were affected less dramatically. Unexpectedly, the dihydro derivatives of ceramides, generally serving as non-activating controls, exhibited only slightly lower stimulation than ceramides, whereas short-chain ceramides (e.g. C2) were without effect. The action of ceramides was at least partially inhibited by okadaic acid, suggesting involvement of a phosphatase. Furthermore, ceramides and TPA operated synergistically. While the PKC inhibitor staurosporine counteracted the action of phorbol-esters, it significantly (2.5x) enhanced the effect of ceramides. PMID:9490008

  5. Crystallization of the class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Natasha; Kim, Sook-Kyung; Reddy, Prasad T.; Gallagher, D. Travis

    2006-03-01

    The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Y. pestis has been crystallized in an orthorhombic form suitable for structure determination. The class IV adenylyl cyclase from Yersinia pestis has been cloned and crystallized in both a triclinic and an orthorhombic form. An amino-terminal His-tagged construct, from which the tag was removed by thrombin, crystallized in a triclinic form diffracting to 1.9 Å, with one dimer per asymmetric unit and unit-cell parameters a = 33.5, b = 35.5, c = 71.8 Å, α = 88.7, β = 82.5, γ = 65.5°. Several mutants of this construct crystallized but diffracted poorly. A non-His-tagged native construct (179 amino acids, MW = 20.5 kDa) was purified by conventional chromatography and crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. These crystals have unit-cell parameters a = 56.8, b = 118.6, c = 144.5 Å, diffract to 3 Å and probably have two dimers per asymmetric unit and V{sub M} = 3.0 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}. Both crystal forms appear to require pH below 5, complicating attempts to incorporate nucleotide ligands into the structure. The native construct has been produced as a selenomethionine derivative and crystallized for phasing and structure determination.

  6. Receptor guanylyl cyclases in Inka cells targeted by eclosion hormone.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jer-Cherng; Yang, Ruey-Bing; Adams, Michael E; Lu, Kuang-Hui

    2009-08-11

    A signature of eclosion hormone (EH) action in insect ecdysis is elevation of cGMP in Inka cells, leading to massive release of ecdysis triggering hormone (ETH) and ecdysis initiation. Although this aspect of EH-induced signal transduction is well known, the receptor mediating this process has not been identified. Here, we describe a receptor guanylyl cyclase BdmGC-1 and its isoform BdmGC-1B in the Oriental fruit fly Bactrocera dorsalis that are activated by EH. The B form exhibits the conserved domains and putative N-glycosylation sites found in BdmGC-1, but possesses an additional 46-amino acid insertion in the extracellular domain and lacks the C-terminal tail of BdmGC-1. Combined immunolabeling and in situ hybridization reveal that BdmGC-1 is expressed in Inka cells. Heterologous expression of BdmGC-1 in HEK cells leads to robust increases in cGMP following exposure to low picomolar concentrations of EH. The B-isoform responds only to higher EH concentrations, suggesting different physiological roles of these cyclases. We propose that BdmGC-1 and BdmGC-1B are high- and low-affinity EH receptors, respectively. PMID:19666575

  7. Role of soluble adenylyl cyclase in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jonathan; Levin, Lonny R.

    2012-01-01

    This review discusses the potential place of soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in the framework of signaling in the cardiovascular system. cAMP has been studied as a critical and pleiotropic second messenger in cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and smooth muscle vascular cells for many years. It is involved in the transduction of signaling by catecholamines, prostaglandins, adenosine, and glucagon, just to name a few. These hormones can act via cAMP by binding to a G protein-coupled receptor on the plasma membrane with subsequent activation of a heterotrimeric G protein and its downstream effector, transmembrane adenylyl cyclase. This has long been the canonical standard for cAMP production in a cell. However, the relatively recent discovery of a unique source of cAMP, sAC, creates the potential for a shift in this signaling paradigm. In fact, sAC has been shown to play a role in apoptosis in coronary endothelial cells and cardiomyocytes. Additionally, it links nutrient utilization with ATP production in the liver and brain, which suggests one of many potential roles for sAC in cardiac function. The possibility of producing cAMP from a source distal to the plasma membrane provides a critical new building block for reconstructing the cellular signaling infrastructure. PMID:22058150

  8. Regulation of NANC neural bronchoconstriction in vivo in the guinea-pig: involvement of nitric oxide, vasoactive intestinal peptide and soluble guanylyl cyclase.

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Y. H.; Barnes, P. J.; Rogers, D. F.

    1993-01-01

    1. We investigated the effect of the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and the peptidase alpha-chymotrypsin on non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC neural) bronchoconstriction induced by electrical stimulation of the vagus nerves and by capsaicin in anaesthetized guinea-pigs in vivo using pulmonary insufflation pressure (PIP) as an index of bronchial tone. We also investigated the contribution of soluble guanylyl cyclase (SGC) to NANC neural relaxant mechanisms. 2. In the presence of atropine and propranolol, electrical stimulation of the vagus nerves induced a frequency-dependent increase in PIP above baseline of 67% at 2.5 Hz, of 128% at 5 Hz and of 230% at 10 Hz. L-NAME (1-50 mg kg-1, i.v.), at doses inducing increases in systemic blood pressure, dose-relatedly potentiated NANC bronchoconstriction. At 10 mg kg-1 i.v., L-NAME significantly (P < 0.05) potentiated NANC bronchoconstriction by a further 106% at 2.5 Hz and a further 147% at 5 Hz but did not potentiate the increase in PIP at 10 Hz. L-NAME did not induce bronchoconstriction in sham-stimulated control animals. D-NAME did not potentiate NANC bronchoconstriction. Raising systemic blood pressure with phenylephrine did not potentiate vagally-induced bronchoconstriction (2.5 Hz). 3. The NO precursor L-arginine, but not D-arginine, (100 mg kg-1, i.v.) significantly reversed the potentiation by L-NAME of NANC bronchoconstriction. L-Arginine alone significantly inhibited neurogenic bronchoconstriction at 10 Hz (by 74%); the inhibition of 25% at 2.5 Hz was not significant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7679032

  9. Investigation of the role of nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway in ascorbic acid-mediated protection against acute kidney injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Koul, Vaishali; Kaur, Anudeep; Singh, Amrit Pal

    2015-08-01

    The present study investigated the possible involvement of nitric oxide/soluble guanylyl cyclase (NO/sGC) pathway in ascorbic acid (AA)-mediated protection against acute kidney injury (AKI) in rats. The rats were subjected to bilateral renal ischemia by occluding renal pedicles for 40 min followed by reperfusion for 24 h. The AKI was assessed in terms of measuring creatinine clearance (CrCl), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), plasma uric acid, potassium level, fractional excretion of sodium (FeNa), and microproteinuria. The NO level and oxidative stress in renal tissues were assessed by measuring myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, superoxide anion generation, and reduced glutathione level. AA (50 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) was administered for 3 days before subjecting rats to AKI. In separate groups, the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, L-NAME (20 mg/kg, i.p.) and sGC inhibitor, methylene blue (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was administered prior to AA treatment in rats. The significant decrease in CrCl and increase in BUN, plasma uric acid, potassium, FeNa, microproteinuria, and oxidative stress in renal tissues demonstrated ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI in rats. The AA treatment ameliorated ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI along with the increase in renal NO level. The pretreatment with L-NAME and methylene blue abolished protective effect of AA. It is concluded that AA protects against ischemia-reperfusion-induced AKI. Moreover, the NO/sGC pathway finds its definite involvement in AA-mediated reno-protective effect. PMID:26142728

  10. Asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases (CrtLm) from non-photosynthetic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Tao, L; Picataggio, S; Rouvière, P E; Cheng, Q

    2004-03-01

    Carotenoids have important functions in photosynthesis, nutrition, and protection against oxidative damage. Some natural carotenoids are asymmetrical molecules that are difficult to produce chemically. Biological production of carotenoids using specific enzymes is a potential alternative to extraction from natural sources. Here we report the isolation of lycopene beta-cyclases that selectively cyclize only one end of lycopene or neurosporene. The crtLm genes encoding the asymmetrically acting lycopene beta-cyclases were isolated from non-photosynthetic bacteria that produced monocyclic carotenoids. Co-expression of these crtLm genes with the crtEIB genes from Pantoea stewartii (responsible for lycopene synthesis) resulted in the production of monocyclic gamma-carotene in Escherichia coli. The asymmetric cyclization activity of CrtLm could be inhibited by the lycopene beta-cyclase inhibitor 2-(4-chlorophenylthio)-triethylamine (CPTA). Phylogenetic analysis suggested that bacterial CrtL-type lycopene beta-cyclases might represent an evolutionary link between the common bacterial CrtY-type of lycopene beta-cyclases and plant lycopene beta- and epsilon-cyclases. These lycopene beta-cyclases may be used for efficient production of high-value asymmetrically cyclized carotenoids. PMID:14740205

  11. A C21-Steroidal Glycoside Isolated from the Roots of Cynanchum auriculatum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis in Human Gastric Cancer SGC-7901 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Qi; Zhang, Shui-Juan; Lu, Hong; Yang, Bo; Ye, Liang-Fei; Zhang, Ru-Song

    2013-01-01

    Caudatin 3-O-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-D-oleandropyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-D-cymaropyranosyl-(1 → 4)-β-D-cymaropyranoside (CGII) is one of the C21-steroidal glycosides isolated from the roots of Cynanchum auriculatum ROYLE ex WIGHT. This study aimed to determine the cell growth, cell proliferation, and apoptotic cell death of human gastric cancer cells after CGII treatment. MTT assay was used to determine cell growth; fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was used to evaluate cell cycle distribution and apoptotic cell death. Immunoblotting was applied for measuring the expression of proteins involved in the cell cycle progression. The activities of caspase-3, -8, and -9 were detected by colorimetric caspase activity assays. CGII inhibited cell growth of human gastric cancer SGC-7901 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Treatment of SGC-7901 cells with CGII resulted in G1 phase cell cycle arrest, accompanied with decreased expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6. CGII induced cell apoptosis and activated caspase-3, caspase-8, and caspase-9. In contrast, pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk partially abolished the CGII-induced growth inhibition of SGC-7901 cells. In conclusion, CGII inhibits cell growth of human gastric cancer cells by inducing G1 phase cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis cascades. PMID:24454488

  12. Prokaryotic adenylate cyclase toxin stimulates anterior pituitary cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Cronin, M.J.; Evans, W.S.; Rogol, A.D.; Weiss, A.A.; Thorner, M.O.; Orth, D.N.; Nicholson, W.E.; Yasumoto, T.; Hewlett, E.L.

    1986-08-01

    Bordetella pertussis synthesis a variety of virulence factors including a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) toxin. Treatment of anterior pituitary cells with this AC toxin resulted in an increase in cellular cAMP levels that was associated with accelerated exocytosis of growth hormone (GH), prolactin, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and luteinizing hormone (LH). The kinetics of release of these hormones, however, were markedly different; GH and prolactin were rapidly released, while LH and ACTH secretion was more gradually elevated. Neither dopamine agonists nor somatostatin changes the ability of AC toxin to generate cAMP (up to 2 h). Low concentrations of AC toxin amplified the secretory response to hypophysiotrophic hormones. The authors conclude that bacterial AC toxin can rapidly elevate cAMP levels in anterior pituitary cells and that it is the response that explains the subsequent acceleration of hormone release.

  13. Monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine improve the sensory quality of fermented cooked sausages with 50% and 75% replacement of NaCl with KCl.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Bibiana Alves; Campagnol, Paulo Cezar Bastianello; Morgano, Marcelo Antônio; Pollonio, Marise Aparecida Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    Fermented cooked sausages were produced by replacing 50% and 75% of NaCl with KCl and adding monosodium glutamate, disodium inosinate, disodium guanylate, lysine and taurine. The manufacturing process was monitored by pH and water activity measurements. The sodium and potassium contents of the resulting products were measured. The color values (L*, a* and b*), texture profiles and sensory profiles were also examined. Replacing 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl depreciated the sensory quality of the products. The reformulated sausages containing monosodium glutamate combined with lysine, taurine, disodium inosinate and disodium guanylate masked the undesirable sensory attributes associated with the replacement of 50% and 75% NaCl with KCl, allowing the production of fermented cooked sausages with good sensory acceptance and approximately 68% sodium reduction. PMID:24008059

  14. Structural and Biochemical Analysis of the Essential Diadenylate Cyclase CdaA from Listeria monocytogenes*

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Dickmanns, Achim; Neumann, Piotr; Gunka, Katrin; Arens, Johannes; Kaever, Volkhard; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf; Commichau, Fabian M.

    2015-01-01

    The recently identified second messenger cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is involved in several important cellular processes, such as cell wall metabolism, maintenance of DNA integrity, ion transport, transcription regulation, and allosteric regulation of enzyme function. Interestingly, c-di-AMP is essential for growth of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Although the genome of B. subtilis encodes three c-di-AMP-producing diadenlyate cyclases that can functionally replace each other, the phylogenetically related human pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus possess only one enzyme, the diadenlyate cyclase CdaA. Because CdaA is also essential for growth of these bacteria, the enzyme is a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. Here we present the first crystal structure of the L. monocytogenes CdaA diadenylate cyclase domain that is conserved in many human pathogens. Moreover, biochemical characterization of the cyclase revealed an unusual metal cofactor requirement. PMID:25605729

  15. Structural and biochemical analysis of the essential diadenylate cyclase CdaA from Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Jonathan; Dickmanns, Achim; Neumann, Piotr; Gunka, Katrin; Arens, Johannes; Kaever, Volkhard; Stülke, Jörg; Ficner, Ralf; Commichau, Fabian M

    2015-03-01

    The recently identified second messenger cyclic di-AMP (c-di-AMP) is involved in several important cellular processes, such as cell wall metabolism, maintenance of DNA integrity, ion transport, transcription regulation, and allosteric regulation of enzyme function. Interestingly, c-di-AMP is essential for growth of the Gram-positive model bacterium Bacillus subtilis. Although the genome of B. subtilis encodes three c-di-AMP-producing diadenlyate cyclases that can functionally replace each other, the phylogenetically related human pathogens like Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus possess only one enzyme, the diadenlyate cyclase CdaA. Because CdaA is also essential for growth of these bacteria, the enzyme is a promising target for the development of novel antibiotics. Here we present the first crystal structure of the L. monocytogenes CdaA diadenylate cyclase domain that is conserved in many human pathogens. Moreover, biochemical characterization of the cyclase revealed an unusual metal cofactor requirement. PMID:25605729

  16. 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate and adenylate cyclase in phototransduction by limulus ventral photoreceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, J E; Kaupp, U B; Malbon, C C

    1984-01-01

    Biochemical and electrophysiological measurements were made on photoreceptor cells from Limulus ventral eyes to investigate the possible role of cyclic AMP and adenylate cyclase in the visual transduction mechanism. Cyclic AMP content in a photoreceptor-enriched fraction (the end organs) of Limulus ventral eyes was approximately 15 pmol/mg protein. The cyclic AMP content was increased by bathing eyes in 1-methyl-3-isobutyl xanthine or forskolin and was increased almost 100-fold when bathed in both. Illumination did not change cyclic AMP content significantly in any of these conditions. Discrete events that can be recorded electrophysiologically occur spontaneously in darkness. An increase in the frequency of discrete events is evoked by dim illumination. The discrete events are a sign of excitation of Limulus photoreceptor cells. Drug-induced changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness were not correlated with changes in cyclic AMP content. Adenylate cyclase activity measured from a small number of pooled photoreceptor clusters was stimulated by fluoride and vanadate ions, hydrolysis-resistant analogues of GTP, cholera toxin and forskolin. The Limulus enzyme is similar pharmacologically to mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Activation of adenylate cyclase by drugs was not correlated with changes in the rate of occurrence of discrete events recorded electrophysiologically in darkness. A heat-treated Lubrol extract of membranes from Limulus ventral eyes reconstituted the adenylate cyclase activity of membranes from S49 mouse lymphoma cyc- mutant cells which lack a functional regulatory protein. These findings suggest that Limulus ventral eye photoreceptors contain a regulatory protein that mediates the activation of adenylate cyclase by guanine nucleotides, fluoride or cholera toxin. This regulatory protein is homologous with that found in mammalian and avian adenylate cyclases. Our findings suggest that

  17. Structure and mechanism of the diterpene cyclase ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Köksal, Mustafa; Hu, Huayou; Coates, Robert M.; Peters, Reuben J.; Christianson, David W.

    2011-09-20

    The structure of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase reveals three {alpha}-helical domains ({alpha}, {beta} and {gamma}), as also observed in the related diterpene cyclase taxadiene synthase. However, active sites are located at the interface of the {beta}{gamma} domains in ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase but exclusively in the {alpha} domain of taxadiene synthase. Modular domain architecture in plant diterpene cyclases enables the evolution of alternative active sites and chemical strategies for catalyzing isoprenoid cyclization reactions.

  18. Adenylate cyclase in prothoracic glands during the last larval instar of the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Chen, C H; Gu, S H; Chow, Y S

    2001-04-27

    We have previously reported that the absence of prothoracicotropic hormone (PTTH) signal transduction during the early last larval instar of Bombyx mori plays a role in leading to very low ecdysteroid levels in the hemolymph, inactivation of the corpora allata, as well as larval-pupal transformation. In the present study, adenylate cyclase was characterized in crude preparations of prothoracic gland cell membranes in an effort to localize the cause of refractoriness to PTTH. It was found that cyclase activity of the prothoracic glands from the day 6 last instar showed activation responses to fluoride, a guanine nucleotide analogue, as well as calmodulin (CaM) in dose-dependent fashions. The additive effects of day 5 prothoracic gland adenylate cyclase stimulation by fluoride and CaM imply that there may exist Gs protein-dependent and CaM-dependent forms of adenylate cyclase. For day 1 last instar prothoracic glands, which showed no response to stimulation by PTTH in either cAMP generation or ecdysteroidogenesis, adenylate cyclase activity exhibited far less responsiveness to Ca(2+)/CaM than did that from day 5 glands. These findings suggest that day 1 prothoracic glands may possess some lesions in the receptor-Ca(2+) influx-adenylate cyclase signal transduction pathway and these impairments in PTTH signal transduction may be, at least in part, responsible for decreased ecdysteroidogenesis. PMID:11267904

  19. Prenatal exposure to cocaine decreases adenylyl cyclase activity in embryonic mouse striatum.

    PubMed

    Unterwald, Ellen M; Ivkovic, Sanja; Cuntapay, Marie; Stroppolo, Antonella; Guinea, Barbara; Ehrlich, Michelle E

    2003-12-30

    Adenylyl cyclase activity was measured in the striatum of naive mice as a function of age and in mice exposed in utero to cocaine. In naive Swiss-Webster mice, basal and forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity increased gradually from embryonic day 13 (E13) until 2-3 weeks of age when activity peaked before decreasing slightly to adult levels. The ability of the dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF 82958, to stimulate adenylyl cyclase activity also increased in magnitude until P15. In a separate study, pregnant Swiss-Webster mice were injected twice daily with cocaine (15 mg/kg, s.c.) or an equal volume of saline from E10 to E17. Adenylyl cyclase activity was measured in the striatum of E18 embryos. Basal adenylyl cyclase activity was significantly reduced following prenatal exposure to cocaine. Likewise, the ability of forskolin or SKF 82958 to stimulate adenylyl cyclase was attenuated following cocaine exposure. DeltaFosB was not induced, contrary to what is seen in adult mice. These results demonstrate a functional change in a critical signal transduction pathway following chronic in utero exposure to cocaine that might have profound effects of the development of the brain. Alterations in the cAMP system may underlie some of the deficits seen in humans exposed in utero to cocaine. PMID:14741752

  20. Cloning, chromosomal mapping, and expression of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase

    SciTech Connect

    Villacres, E.C.; Xia, Z.; Bookbinder, L.H.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.; Storm, D.R.

    1993-05-01

    The neural-specific calmodulin-sensitive adenylyl cyclase (type I), which was first cloned from bovine brain, has been implicated in learning and memory. The objective of this study was to clone and determine the chromosomal localization of human fetal brain type I adenylyl cyclase. A 3.8-kb cDNA clone was isolated that contained sequence coinciding with the 3{prime} end 2553 nucleotides of the bovine open reading frame. This clone shows 87% nucleotide and 92% translated amino acid sequence identity to the bovine clone. The most significant sequence differences were in the carboxy-terminal 100 amino acid residues. This region contains one of several possible calmodulin binding domains and the only putative cAMP-dependent protein kinase A phosphorylation site. A chimera was constructed that contained the 5{prime} half of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase and the 3{prime} half of the human type I adenylyl cyclase. The activity of the chimeric gene product and its sensitivity to calmodulin and calcium were indistinguishable from those of the bovine type I adenylyl cyclase. In situ hybridization was used to localize the human type I adenylyl cyclase gene to the proximal portion of the short arm of chromosome 7. 36 refs., 4 figs.

  1. Guanylate binding protein-1 mediates EGFRvIII and promotes glioblastoma growth in vivo but not in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yanwei; Mukasa, Akitaki; Ma, Jiawei; Hong, Lei; Yu, Shuye; Sun, Lili; Huang, Qiang; Purow, Benjamin; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and deadly primary brain tumor in adults. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is frequently amplified and mutated in GBM. We previously reported that Guanylate binding protein-1 (GBP1) is a novel transcriptional target gene of EGFR and plays a role in GBM invasion. Here we demonstrate that GBP1 can also be induced by EGFRvIII at the transcriptional level through the p38 MAPK/Yin Yang 1 (YY1) signaling pathway. Silencing of GBP1 by RNA interference significantly inhibits EGFRvIII-mediated GBM cell proliferation in vitro and in a mouse model. Overexpression of GBP1 has no obvious effect on glioblastoma cell proliferation in vitro. In contrast, in an orthotopic glioma mouse model GBP1 overexpression significantly promotes glioma growth and reduces survival rate of glioma-bearing mice by increasing cell proliferation and decreasing cell apoptosis in tumor. Clinically, GBP1 expression is elevated in human GBM tumors and positively correlates with EGFRvIII status in GBM specimens, and its expression is inversely correlated with the survival rate of GBM patients. Taken together, these results reveal that GBP1 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for GBMs with EGFRvIII mutation. PMID:26848767

  2. Nonstructural Protein 1 of Influenza A Virus Interacts with Human Guanylate-Binding Protein 1 to Antagonize Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Wenjun; Wei, Jianchao; Shao, Donghua; Deng, Xufang; Wang, Shaohui; Li, Beibei; Tong, Guangzhi; Ma, Zhiyong

    2013-01-01

    Human guanylate-binding protein 1 (hGBP1) is an interferon-inducible protein involved in the host immune response against viral infection. In response to infection by influenza A virus (IAV), hGBP1 transcript and protein were significantly upregulated. Overexpression of hGBP1 inhibited IAV replication in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. The lysine residue at position 51 (K51) of hGBP1 was essential for inhibition of IAV replication. Mutation of K51 resulted in an hGBP1 that was unable to inhibit IAV replication. The viral nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) was found to interact directly with hGBP1. K51 of hGBP1 and a region between residues 123 and 144 in NS1 were demonstrated to be essential for the interaction between NS1 and hGBP1. Binding of NS1 to hGBP1 resulted in a significant reduction in both GTPase activity and the anti-IAV activity of hGBP1. These findings indicated that hGBP1 contributed to the host immune response against IAV replication and that hGBP1-mediated antiviral activity was antagonized by NS1 via binding to hGBP1. PMID:23405236

  3. Insights into Regulated Ligand Binding Sites from the Structure of ZO-1 Src Homology 3-Guanylate Kinase Module

    SciTech Connect

    Lye, Ming F.; Fanning, Alan S.; Su, Ying; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2010-11-09

    Tight junctions are dynamic components of epithelial and endothelial cells that regulate the paracellular transport of ions, solutes, and immune cells. The assembly and permeability of these junctions is dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) proteins, members of the membrane-associated guanylate kinase homolog (MAGUK) protein family, which are characterized by a core Src homology 3 (SH3)-GUK module that coordinates multiple protein-protein interactions. The structure of the ZO-1 SH3-GUK domain confirms that the interdependent folding of the SH3 and GUK domains is a conserved feature of MAGUKs, but differences in the orientation of the GUK domains in three different MAGUKs reveal interdomain flexibility of the core unit. Using pull-down assays, we show that an effector loop, the U6 region in ZO-1, forms a novel intramolecular interaction with the core module. This interaction is divalent cation-dependent and overlaps with the binding site for the regulatory molecule calmodulin on the GUK domain. These findings provide insight into the previously observed ability of the U6 region to regulate TJ assembly in vivo and the structural basis for the complex protein interactions of the MAGUK family.

  4. Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase inactivation by the host cell.

    PubMed Central

    Gilboa-Ron, A; Rogel, A; Hanski, E

    1989-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis produces a calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (AC) which acts as a toxin capable of penetrating eukaryotic cells and generating high levels of intracellular cyclic AMP. Transfer of target cells into B. pertussis AC-free medium leads to a rapid decay in the intracellular AC activity, implying that the invasive enzyme is unstable in the host cytoplasm. We report here that treatment of human lymphocytes with a glycolysis inhibitor and an uncoupler of oxidative phosphorylation completely blocked the intracellular inactivation of B. pertussis AC. Lymphocyte lysates inactivated all forms of B. pertussis AC in the presence of exogenous ATP. This inactivation was associated with degradation of an 125I-labelled 200 kDa form of B. pertussis AC. It appears that ATP is required for the proteolytic pathway, but not as an energy source, since non-hydrolysable ATP analogues supported inactivation and complete degradation of the enzyme. The possibility that binding of ATP to B. pertussis AC renders it susceptible to degradation by the host cell protease is discussed. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. PMID:2554887

  5. Adenylate Cyclase Toxin promotes bacterial internalisation into non phagocytic cells

    PubMed Central

    Martín, César; Etxaniz, Asier; Uribe, Kepa B.; Etxebarria, Aitor; González-Bullón, David; Arlucea, Jon; Goñi, Félix M.; Aréchaga, Juan; Ostolaza, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough, a respiratory infectious disease that is the fifth largest cause of vaccine-preventable death in infants. Though historically considered an extracellular pathogen, this bacterium has been detected both in vitro and in vivo inside phagocytic and non-phagocytic cells. However the precise mechanism used by B. pertussis for cell entry, or the putative bacterial factors involved, are not fully elucidated. Here we find that adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT), one of the important toxins of B. pertussis, is sufficient to promote bacterial internalisation into non-phagocytic cells. After characterization of the entry route we show that uptake of “toxin-coated bacteria” proceeds via a clathrin-independent, caveolae-dependent entry pathway, allowing the internalised bacteria to survive within the cells. Intracellular bacteria were found inside non-acidic endosomes with high sphingomyelin and cholesterol content, or “free” in the cytosol of the invaded cells, suggesting that the ACT-induced bacterial uptake may not proceed through formation of late endolysosomes. Activation of Tyr kinases and toxin-induced Ca2+-influx are essential for the entry process. We hypothesize that B. pertussis might use ACT to activate the endocytic machinery of non-phagocytic cells and gain entry into these cells, in this way evading the host immune system. PMID:26346097

  6. Catalytic Mechanism of Mammalian Adenylyl Cyclase: A Computational Investigation.

    PubMed

    Hahn, David K; Tusell, Jose R; Sprang, Stephen R; Chu, Xi

    2015-10-13

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) catalyzes the synthesis of cyclic AMP, an important intracellular regulatory molecule, from ATP. We propose a catalytic mechanism for class III mammalian AC based on density functional theory calculations. We employ a model of the AC active site derived from a crystal structure of mammalian AC activated by Gα·GTP and forskolin at separate allosteric sites. We compared the calculated activation free energies for 13 possible reaction sequences involving proton transfer, nucleophilic attack, and elimination of pyrophosphate. The proposed most probable mechanism is initiated by deprotonation of 3'OH and water-mediated transfer of the 3'H to the γ-phosphate. Proton transfer is followed by changes in coordination of the two magnesium ion cofactors and changes in the conformation of ATP to enhance the role of 3'O as a nucleophile and to bring 3'O close to Pα. The subsequent phosphoryl transfer step is concerted and rate-limiting. Comparison of the enzyme-catalyzed and nonenzymatic reactions reveals that the active site residues lower the free energy barrier for both phosphoryl transfer and proton transfer and significantly shift the proton transfer equilibrium. Calculations for mutants K1065A and R1029A demonstrate that K1065 plays a significant role in shifting the proton transfer equilibrium, whereas R1029 is important for making the transition state of concerted phosphoryl transfer tight rather than loose. PMID:26393535

  7. Structure of RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA.

    PubMed

    Desai, Kevin K; Bingman, Craig A; Cheng, Chin L; Phillips, George N; Raines, Ronald T

    2014-10-01

    RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3'-phosphate to form a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA-AMP and RNA(3')pp(5')A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3'-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes substrate RNA by ensuring that the terminal 3'-phosphate makes a large contribution to RNA binding. Furthermore, the RNA 3'-phosphate is poised for in-line attack on the P-N bond that links the phosphorous atom of AMP to N(ε) of His307. Thus, we provide the first insights into RNA 3'-phosphate termini recognition and the mechanism of 3'-phosphate activation by an Rtc enzyme. PMID:25161314

  8. Expression of soluble adenylyl cyclase in acral melanomas.

    PubMed

    Li, H; Kim, S M; Savkovic, V; Jin, S A; Choi, Y D; Yun, S J

    2016-06-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) regulates melanocytic cells, and is a diagnostic marker for pigmented skin lesions. Because only a few studies on sAC expression in acral melanomas have been performed, we investigated the histopathological significance of sAC expression in 33 cases of acral melanoma, and assessed its diagnostic value in distinguishing melanoma in situ (MIS, n = 17) from acral invasive melanomas (n = 16) and melanocytic naevi (n = 11). Acral melanomas exhibited more marked nuclear immunopositivity compared with acral melanocytic naevi. sAC expression significantly correlated with the nuclear morphology of melanocytes and melanoma cells, namely, hyperchromatic nuclei and prominent nucleoli within vesicular nuclei. sAC expression was predominantly observed in the hyperchromatic nuclei of MIS and the prominent nucleoli invasive melanomas, respectively. In vitro culture models of melanocytes and melanoma cell lines exhibited sAC staining patterns similar to those of acral melanomas. Differentiation induction showed that nuclear and nucleolar expression varied depending on cell morphology. sAC immunostaining may be useful for the differential diagnosis of acral melanocytic lesions, and sAC expressed in the nucleus and nucleolus might be related to cytological and nuclear changes associated with invasion and progression of acral melanomas. PMID:26290224

  9. Effects of 5‑fluorouracil and class III phosphoinositide 3‑kinase small interfering RNA combination therapy on SGC7901 human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bao-Song; Sun, Jia-Lei; Gong, Wei; Zhang, Xing-Ding; Wu, Yong-You; Xing, Chun-Gen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of small interfering RNA‑mediated inhibition of Class III phosphoinositide 3‑kinase (PI3K) signal transduction on the proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy of SGC7901 gastric cancer cells. The present study also aimed to examine the contribution of autophagic inhibition to the antitumor effects of 5‑fluorouracil (5‑FU). A PI3K(III)‑RNA interference (i)‑green fluorescent protein (GFP) recombinant replication adenovirus (AD) and the negative control (NC)‑RNAi‑GFP control AD were constructed and infected into SGC7901 cells. A methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay was used to determine the growth rate of the SGC7901 cells. Immunofluorescent staining was used to detect microtubule‑associated protein 1 light chain 3 expression. The mitochondrial membrane potential was measured using the JC‑1 fluorescent probe. Autophagic expression was monitored with MDC staining and transmission electron microscopy. The results revealed that following combination treatment of the SGC7901 gastric cancer cells with 5‑FU + PI3K(III)‑RNAi‑AD, the optical density absorbance values at 24, 48 and 72 h were 0.17 ± 1.64, 0.13 ± 4.64 and 0.11 ± 3.56%, respectively, with cell viability inhibition ratios of 45.89 ± 6.67, 72.57 ± 9.48 and 87.51 ± 4.65%, respectively. As compared with the other treatment groups, the inhibition rate in the combined treatment group was significantly higher (P<0.05). The percentages of the cells with green fluorescence in the combined treatment group were 74.4 ± 3.86 (24 h), 82.3 ± 1.84 (48 h) and 92.5 ± 1.1% (72 h), which were larger than those of the other groups. The percentage of cells with green fluorescence became larger, which indicated that the mitochondrion membrane potential had been reduced to a greater extent. MDC staining revealed that the number of autophagic vacuoles in the cells (measured at 24, 48 and 72 h) decreased gradually with time, with more autophagic

  10. Endothelin-1, superoxide and adeninediphosphate ribose cyclase in shark vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Fellner, Susan K; Parker, Laurel

    2005-03-01

    In vascular smooth muscle (VSM) of Squalus acanthias, endothelin-1 (ET-1) signals via the ET(B) receptor. In both shark and mammalian VSM, ET-1 induces a rise in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) via activation of the inositol trisphosphate (IP(3)) receptor (IP(3)R) and subsequent release of Ca(2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). IP(3)R-mediated release of SR Ca(2+) causes calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) via the ryanodine receptor (RyR), which can be sensitized by cyclic adeninediphosphate ribose (cADPR). cADPR is synthesized from NAD(+) by a membrane-bound bifunctional enzyme, ADPR cyclase. We have previously shown that the antagonists of the RyR, Ruthenium Red, high concentrations of ryanodine and 8-Br cADPR, diminish the [Ca(2+)](i) response to ET-1 in shark VSM. To investigate how ET-1 might influence the activity of the ADPR cyclase, we employed inhibitors of the cyclase. To explore the possibility that ET-1-induced production of superoxide (O(2)*-) might activate the cyclase, we used an inhibitor of NAD(P)H oxidase (NOX), DPI and a scavenger of O(2)*-, TEMPOL. Anterior mesenteric artery VSM was loaded with fura-2AM to measure [Ca(2+)](i). In Ca(2+)-free shark Ringers, ET-1 increased [Ca(2+)](i) by 104+/-8 nmol l(-1). The VSM ADPR cyclase inhibitors, nicotinamide and Zn(2+), diminished the response by 62% and 72%, respectively. Both DPI and TEMPOL reduced the response by 63%. The combination of the IP(3)R antagonists, 2-APB or TMB-8, with DPI or TEMPOL further reduced the response by 83%. We show for the first time that in shark VSM, inhibition of the ADPR cyclase reduces the [Ca(2+)](i) response to ET-1 and that superoxide may be involved in the activation of the cyclase. PMID:15767306