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Sample records for gujarat india earthquake

  1. India: Gujarat

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    article title:  Dewatering Effects from the Gujarat Earthquake   ... fountaining from the Earth. These effects, referred to as dewatering, can result from intense ground shaking by strong earthquakes in ... with shallow water tables. Scientists initially observed dewatering in parts of the Rann of Kutch (a large salt pan in northern ...

  2. Wrong Place, Wrong Time: Coincidental Involvement in the Gujarat Earthquake, India (2001).

    PubMed

    Coughlin, R Richard; Roy, Nobhojit; Patel, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons have traditionally answered the call in times of disaster. Shortly after the devastating earthquake in January 2001, in Gujarat India, that call came from a buffer zone hospital. The Gandhi Lincoln Hospital in Deesa, Gujarat was struggling with an influx of injured survivors. Five days after the initial event, 2 of the traveling American authors met up with the Director of Surgery at the hospital. The clinical load was primarily extremity injuries and wounds. The authors present their assessment of the orthopaedic response highlighting factors of success, barriers, and lessons learned. Despite their published accounts, many of these lessons were not applied to the Haiti earthquake response. PMID:26356205

  3. Stochastic finite fault modelling of M w 4.8 earthquake in Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sumer; Kumar, Dinesh; Choudhury, Pallabee; Yadav, R. B. S.

    2012-07-01

    The modified stochastic finite fault modelling technique based on dynamic corner frequency has been used to simulate the strong ground motions of M w 4.8 earthquake in the Kachchh region of Gujarat, India. The accelerograms have been simulated for 14 strong motion accelerographs sites (11 sites in Kachchh and three sites in Saurashtra) where the earthquake has been recorded. The region-specific source, attenuation and generic site parameters, which are derived from recordings of small to moderate earthquakes, have been used for the simulations. The main characteristics of the simulated accelerograms, comprised of peak ground acceleration (pga), duration, Fourier and response spectra, predominant period, are in general in good agreement with those of observed ones at most of the sites. The rate of decay of simulated pga values with distance is found to be similar with that of observed values. The successful modelling of the empirical accelerograms indicates that the method can be used to prepare wide range of scenarios based on simulation which provide the information useful for evaluating and mitigating the seismic hazard in the region.

  4. Seismological evidence for monsoon induced micro to moderate earthquake sequence beneath the 2011 Talala, Saurashtra earthquake, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. P.; Mishra, O. P.

    2015-10-01

    In order to understand the processes involved in the genesis of monsoon induced micro to moderate earthquakes after heavy rainfall during the Indian summer monsoon period beneath the 2011 Talala, Saurashtra earthquake (Mw 5.1) source zone, we assimilated 3-D microstructures of the sub-surface rock materials using a data set recorded by the Seismic Network of Gujarat (SeisNetG), India. Crack attributes in terms of crack density (?), the saturation rate (?) and porosity parameter (?) were determined from the estimated 3-D sub-surface velocities (Vp, Vs) and Poisson's ratio (?) structures of the area at varying depths. We distinctly imaged high-?, high-? and low-? anomalies at shallow depths, extending up to 9-15 km. We infer that the existence of sub-surface fractured rock matrix connected to the surface from the source zone may have contributed to the changes in differential strain deep down to the crust due to the infiltration of rainwater, which in turn induced micro to moderate earthquake sequence beneath Talala source zone. Infiltration of rainwater during the Indian summer monsoon might have hastened the failure of the rock by perturbing the crustal volume strain of the causative source rock matrix associated with the changes in the seismic moment release beneath the surface. Analyses of crack attributes suggest that the fractured volume of the rock matrix with high porosity and lowered seismic strength beneath the source zone might have considerable influence on the style of fault displacements due to seismo-hydraulic fluid flows. Localized zone of micro-cracks diagnosed within the causative rock matrix connected to the water table and their association with shallow crustal faults might have acted as a conduit for infiltrating the precipitation down to the shallow crustal layers following the fault suction mechanism of pore pressure diffusion, triggering the monsoon induced earthquake sequence beneath the source zone.

  5. Gujarat, Western India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Extremely high sediment loads are delivered to the Arabian Sea along the coast of Pakistan (upper left) and western India. In the case of the Indus River (far upper left) this sedimentation, containing large quantities of desert sand, combines with wave action to create a large sand-bar like delta. In the arid environment, the delta lacks much vegetation, but contains numerous mangrove-lined channels. This true-color image from May 2001 shows the transition from India's arid northwest to the wetter regions farther south along the coast. The increase in vegetation along the coast is brought about by the moisture trapping effect of the Western Ghats Mountain Range that runs north-south along the coast. Heavy sediment is visible in the Gulf of Kachchh (north) and the Gulf of Khambhat(south), which surround the Gujarat Peninsula.

  6. Crustal heterogeneities beneath the 2011 Talala, Saurashtra earthquake, Gujarat, India source zone: Seismological evidence for neo-tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. P.; Mishra, O. P.; Rastogi, B. K.; Kumar, Santosh

    2013-01-01

    During the 1st decade of the 21st century, the study area of Talala, Saurashtra of western India witnessed three damaging earthquakes of moderate magnitude, year 2007 [Mw 5.0; Mw 4.8] and in the year 2011 [Mw 5.1] that generated public panic in the region. The last damaging moderate earthquake of the 20th October 2011 in Talala region (21.09°N;70.45°E), located at about 200 km south to the devastating 2001 Bhuj (23.412°N, 70.232°E) mainshock (Mw 7.6), jolted the entire Saurashtra region of Gujarat. A long series of aftershocks followed hereafter, recorded at nine seismograph/accelerograph stations. Hypocenters of aftershocks were relocated accurately using absolute and relative travel time (double-difference) method. In this study, we, for the first time, determined 3-D tomographic images of the upper crust beneath the 2011 Talala earthquake source zone by inverting about 1135 P and 1125 S wave arrival time data. Estimates of seismic velocities (Vp, Vs) and Poisson's ratio (?) structures offer a reliable interpretation of crustal heterogeneities and their bearing on geneses of moderate earthquakes and their aftershock sequences beneath the source zone. It is found that the 2011 Talala mainshock hypocenter depth (6 km) is located near the boundary of the low and high velocity (Vp, Vs) and the source zone is associated with low-? anomalies guarded by the prominent high-? anomalies along the active fault zone having strike-slip motion beneath the earthquake source zone. The pattern of distribution of (Vp, Vs, ?) and its association with occurrences of aftershocks provide seismological evidence for the neo-tectonics in the region having left lateral strike-slip motion of the fault.

  7. Seismogenesis of the lower crustal intraplate earthquakes occurring in Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Pandey, O. P.

    2011-08-01

    Large intraplate continental earthquakes like the 1811-12 New Madrid (M w ? 8.0) and the 2001 Bhuj (Mw7.7) were highly destructive because they occurred in strong crust, but the mechanisms underlying their seismogenesis are not understood. Here we show, using local earthquake velocity tomography, and joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocity dispersion that the crust and uppermost mantle beneath the 2001 Bhuj earthquake region of western India is far more complex than hitherto known through previous studies. A new image of the crust and underlying mantle lithosphere indicates the presence of a 18-km thick high velocity (Vp: 7.15-8.11 km/s) differentiated crustal and mantle magmatic layer above a hot and thin lithosphere (only 70 km) in the epicentral region of 2001 Bhuj earthquake. This magmatic layer begins at the depth of 24 km and continues down to 42 km depth. Below this region, brittle-ductile transition reaches as deep as the Moho (˜34 km) due to the possible presence of olivine rich mafic magma. Our 1-D velocity structure envisages an initial phase of plume activity (Deccan plume at 65 m.y. ago) resulting in basaltic magma in the eclogitic layers at sub-lithospheric levels, wherein they were subjected to crystallization under ultra-high pressure conditions. Our study also delineates an updoming of Moho (˜4-7 km) as well as asthenosphere (˜6-10 km) below the Kachchh rift zone relative to surrounding areas, suggesting the presence of a confined body of partial melts below the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary. Restructuring of this warm and thin lithosphere may have been caused due to rifting (at 184 and 88 m.y. ago) and tholeiitic and alkalic volcanism related to the Deccan Traps K/T boundary event (at 65 m.y. ago). Recent study of isotopic ratios proposed that the alkalic basalts found in Kachchh are generated from a CO 2 rich lherzolite partial melts in the asthenosphere that ascended along deep lithospheric rift faults into the lithosphere. It appears that such kind of crust-mantle structure, deepening of brittle-ductile transition and a high input of volatiles containing CO 2 emanating from mantle control the seismogenesis of lower crustal earthquakes in the Kachchh continental rift zone.

  8. int. j. remote sensing, 2002, vol. 23, no. 16, 31233128 Changes observed in land and ocean after Gujarat earthquake of

    E-print Network

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    and ruptures and also excessive liquefaction after the earthquake are seen in the satellite image and have also after Gujarat earthquake of 26 January 2001 using IRS data R. P. SINGH*, S. BHOI and A. K. SAHOO Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India The Gujarat earthquake

  9. Wind Resource Assessment of Gujarat (India)

    SciTech Connect

    Draxl, C.; Purkayastha, A.; Parker, Z.

    2014-07-01

    India is one of the largest wind energy markets in the world. In 1986 Gujarat was the first Indian state to install a wind power project. In February 2013, the installed wind capacity in Gujarat was 3,093 MW. Due to the uncertainty around existing wind energy assessments in India, this analysis uses the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to simulate the wind at current hub heights for one year to provide more precise estimates of wind resources in Gujarat. The WRF model allows for accurate simulations of winds near the surface and at heights important for wind energy purposes. While previous resource assessments published wind power density, we focus on average wind speeds, which can be converted to wind power densities by the user with methods of their choice. The wind resource estimates in this study show regions with average annual wind speeds of more than 8 m/s.

  10. Attenuation characteristics of coda waves in Mainland Gujarat (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Arun K.; Sutar, Anup K.; Chopra, Sumer; Kumar, Santosh; Rastogi, B. K.

    2012-03-01

    The attenuation characteristics based on coda waves of Mainland Gujarat (India) have been investigated in the present study. The broadband waveforms of 53 local earthquakes (Mw 1.1-3.3) having focal depths in the 6.0-33.6 km range recorded at five stations of Mainland Gujarat region has been used for the analysis. The frequency-dependent relationships (Q = Q0fn) for coda-Q (Qc) and dependency of coda-Q on lapse time windows have been determined for the said region. The average lapse time dependent coda-Q relations estimated for the region are: Qc = (87 ± 13)f(1.01 ± 0.06) (lapse time: 30 s), Qc = (112 ± 20)f(0.94 ± 0.08) (lapse time: 40 s) and Qc = (120 ± 22)f(0.76 ± 0.07) (lapse time: 50 s). The increase in Qc values with lapse time shows the depth dependence of Qc as longer lapse time windows will sample larger area. The observed quality factor is strongly dependent on frequency and lapse time, which indicates that the upper lithosphere, is more heterogeneous and seismotectonically active, while the lower lithosphere is homogeneous and relatively less active. A comparison of the coda-Q estimated for Mainland Gujarat region with those of nearby Kachchh and Saurashtra regions shows that Mainland Gujarat region is more heterogeneous. The rate of decay of attenuation (Q-1) with frequency for the relations obtained here is found to be comparable with those of other regions of the world though the absolute values differ. The obtained relations are expected to be useful for the estimation of source parameters of the earthquakes in the Mainland Gujarat region where no such relations were available earlier. These relations are also important for the simulation of earthquake strong ground motions in the region.

  11. Anomalous changes in column water vapor after Gujarat earthquake , S. Sarkar b

    E-print Network

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    phenomena may give information as precursor of earthquakes. In view of this, soon after the deadly GujaratAnomalous changes in column water vapor after Gujarat earthquake S. Dey a , S. Sarkar b , R to analyze the changes in column water vapor in response to the Gujarat earthquake, occurred on January 26

  12. Coulomb static stress variations in the Kachchh, Gujarat, India: Implications for the occurrences of two recent earthquakes (Mw = 5.6) in the 2001 Bhuj earthquake region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik; Chadha, R. K.; Raju, I. P.; Kumar, N.; Satyamurty, C.; Narsaiah, R.; Maji, A.

    2007-04-01

    Double difference algorithm was used to relocate aftershock sequences of two Mw = 5.6 Kachchh earthquakes (India), which have occurred on 2006 March 7 and April 6, along almost vertical strike-slip Gedi fault (GF) and south dipping reverse North Wagad fault (NWF), respectively. The relocated focal depths delineate a marked variation of 4 and 7 km in the brittle-ductile transition depths beneath GF and NWF, respectively. We modelled the Coulomb failure stress change (?CFS) produced by the 2001 mainshock and 2006 GEDI events on an optimally oriented plane. A strong correlation with occurrences of aftershocks and regions of increased ?CFS is obtained on both the faults. The predicted ?CFS on the GF increased by 0.14 MPa at 3 km depth, where the 2006 March 7 Mw = 5.6 event occurred. The variation in brittle-ductile transition depths may be related to the perturbation in geothermal gradient resulted from the presence of intrusives or varying saturation state of fluid-filled fractured rock matrix beneath both the fault zones.

  13. Attenuation of Coda Waves in the Saurashtra Region, Gujarat (India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Babita; Kumar, Dinesh; Teotia, S. S.; Rastogi, B. K.; Gupta, Arun K.; Prajapati, Srichand

    2012-01-01

    The attenuation characteristics based on coda waves of two areas—Jamnagar and Junagarh of Saurashtra, Gujarat (India)—have been investigated in the present study. The frequency dependent relationships have been developed for both the areas using single back scattering model. The broadband waveforms of the vertical components of 33 earthquakes (Mw 1.5-3.5) recorded at six stations of the Jamnagar area, and broadband waveforms of 68 earthquakes (Mw 1.6-5) recorded at five stations of the Junagarh area have been used for the analysis. The estimated relations for the Junagarh area are: Q c = (158 ± 5)f(0.99±0.04) (lapse time : 20 s), Q c = (170 ± 4.4)f(0.97±0.02) (lapse time : 30 s) and Q c = (229 ± 6.6)f(0.94±0.03) (lapse time : 40 s) and for the Jamnagar area are: Q c = (178 ± 3)f(0.95±0.05) (lapse time : 20 s), Q c = (224 ± 6)f(0.98±0.06) (lapse time : 30 s) and Q c = (282 ± 7)f(0.91±0.03) (lapse time : 40 s). These are the first estimates for the areas under consideration. The Junagarh area appears to be more attenuative as compared to the Jamnagar area. The increase in Q c values with lapse time found here for both the areas show the depth dependence of Q c as longer lapse time windows will sample larger area. The rate of decay of attenuation ( Q -1) with frequency for the relations obtained here is found to be comparable with those of other regions of the world though the absolute values differ. A comparison of the coda-Q estimated for the Saurashtra region with those of the nearby Kachchh region shows that the Saurashtra region is less heterogeneous. The obtained relations are expected to be useful for the estimation of source parameters of the earthquakes in the Saurashtra region of Gujarat where no such relations were available earlier. These relations are also important for the simulation of earthquake strong ground motions in the region.

  14. Size and orientation of the fault plane for the 2001 Gujarat, India earthquake (Mw7.7) from aftershock observations: A high stress drop

    E-print Network

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    : 7212 Seismology: Earthquake ground motions and engineering; 7205 Seismology: Continental crust (1242); 7215 Seismology: Earthquake parameters; 7223 Seismology: Seismic hazard assessment and prediction; 7230 Seismology: Seismicity and seismotectonics. Citation: Negishi, H., J. Mori, T. Sato, R. Singh, S. Kumar

  15. A possible physical mechanism for the unusually long sequence of seismic activity following the 2001 Bhuj Mw7.7 earthquake, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodkin, Mikhail V.; Mandal, Prantik

    2012-04-01

    The 2001 Bhuj earthquake took place in a region away from the active plate boundaries, which qualifies this earthquake to be a typical intraplate event that claimed a death toll of 20,000 people. The aftershock sequence of this earthquake is still continuing for the last eleven years, which makes this aftershock sequence as a unique intraplate earthquake sequence in the world. This sequence is being monitored by a close digital seismic network consisting of 5-12 three-component broadband seismographs and 10-20 accelerographs that led to a homogeneous earthquake catalog consisting of precise and accurate estimates of hypocentral and source parameters. This catalog enabled us to examine the evolution of this earthquake sequence. Our study reveals a few interconnected regularities in the rate of earthquake occurrence, b-values, fractal dimensions, stress drops, and the mean earthquake depth values. We observe that a slow decrease in background seismic activity and a number of bursts in seismic activity characterize the 2001 Bhuj earthquake sequence. We also notice that the background seismic activity is associated with a monotonic decrease in the mean earthquake depth values while the bursts in seismic activity are found to be associated with a decrease in fractal dimension, b-value and mean earthquake depth estimates, and an increase in stress drop values. We propose that these bursts in seismic activity are related to the episodes of break in deep fluid circulation in the direction of the Earth's surface. The effective background permeability of the mid-crust in the 2001 Bhuj earthquake region is evaluated to be about k ? 10- 13 m2 based on the estimates of changes in mean earthquake depth. Thus, we infer that seismogenesis of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake sequence is probably connected with active deep fluid circulation underlying the Kachchh seismic zone.

  16. SRTM Radar Image with Color as Height: Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the area around the January 26, 2001, earthquake in western India, the deadliest in the country's history with some 20,000 fatalities. The epicenter of the magnitude 7.6 earthquake was just to the left of the center of the image. The Gulf of Kachchh (or Kutch) is the black area running from the lower left corner towards the center of the image. The city of Bhuj is in the yellow-toned area among the brown hills left of the image center and is the historical capital of the Kachchh region. Bhuj and many other towns and cities nearby were almost completely destroyed by the shaking of the earthquake. These hills reach up to 500 meters (1,500 feet) elevation. The city of Ahmedabad, capital of Gujarat state, is the radar-bright area next to the right side of the image. Several buildings in Ahmedabad were also destroyed by the earthquake. The dark blue areas around the center of the image and extending to the left side are low-lying salt flats called the Rann of Kachchh with the Little Rann just to the right of the image center. The bumpy area north of the Rann (green and yellow colors) is a large area of sand dunes in Pakistan. A branch of the Indus River used to flow through the area on the left side of this image, but it was diverted by a previous large earthquake that struck this area in 1819.

    The annotated version of the image includes a 'beachball' that shows the location and slip direction of the January 26, 2001, earthquake from the Harvard Quick CMT catalog: http://www.seismology.harvard.edu/CMTsearch.html. [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    This image combines two types of data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The image brightness corresponds to the strength of the radar signal reflected from the ground, while colors show the elevation as measured by SRTM. Colors range from blue at the lowest elevations to brown and white at the highest elevations. This image is a mosaic of four SRTM swaths.

    This image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington DC.

    Size: 450 by 300 kilometers (280 by 190 miles) Location: 23.5 deg. North lat., 70.5 deg. East lon. Orientation: North up Original Data Resolution: SRTM 30 meters (99 feet) Date Acquired: four days in February, 2000

  17. Sensitivity analysis of seismic hazard for the northwestern portion of the state of Gujarat, India

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; Rastogi, B.K.; Schweig, E.S.; Harmsen, S.C.; Gomberg, J.S.

    2004-01-01

    We test the sensitivity of seismic hazard to three fault source models for the northwestern portion of Gujarat, India. The models incorporate different characteristic earthquake magnitudes on three faults with individual recurrence intervals of either 800 or 1600 years. These recurrence intervals imply that large earthquakes occur on one of these faults every 266-533 years, similar to the rate of historic large earthquakes in this region during the past two centuries and for earthquakes in intraplate environments like the New Madrid region in the central United States. If one assumes a recurrence interval of 800 years for large earthquakes on each of three local faults, the peak ground accelerations (PGA; horizontal) and 1-Hz spectral acceleration ground motions (5% damping) are greater than 1 g over a broad region for a 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years' hazard level. These probabilistic PGAs at this hazard level are similar to median deterministic ground motions. The PGAs for 10% in 50 years' hazard level are considerably lower, generally ranging between 0.2 g and 0.7 g across northwestern Gujarat. Ground motions calculated from our models that consider fault interevent times of 800 years are considerably higher than other published models even though they imply similar recurrence intervals. These higher ground motions are mainly caused by the application of intraplate attenuation relations, which account for less severe attenuation of seismic waves when compared to the crustal interplate relations used in these previous studies. For sites in Bhuj and Ahmedabad, magnitude (M) 7 3/4 earthquakes contribute most to the PGA and the 0.2- and 1-s spectral acceleration ground motion maps at the two considered hazard levels. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Law of the landless : the Dalit bid for land redistribution in Gujarat, India

    E-print Network

    McDougal, Topher L. (Topher Leinberger)

    2007-01-01

    This study examines how government's implementation of land reforms in Gujarat, India informs Dalit (i.e., 'Outcaste') activism for land redistribution. It takes as a case study the Navsarjan Trust (or simply Navsarjan), ...

  19. Crustal structure of the Gujarat region, India: New constraints from the analysis of teleseismic receiver functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Sumer; Chang, Tao-Ming; Saikia, Sowrav; Yadav, R. B. S.; Choudhury, Pallabee; Roy, Ketan Singha

    2014-12-01

    In this study, receiver function analysis is carried out at 32 broadband stations spread all over the Gujarat region, located in the western part of India to image the sedimentary structure and investigate the crustal composition for the entire region. The powerful Genetic Algorithm technique is applied to the receiver functions to derive S-velocity structure beneath each site. A detail image in terms of basement depths and Moho thickness for the entire Gujarat region is obtained for the first time. Gujarat comprises of three distinct regions: Kachchh, Saurashtra and Mainland. In Kachchh region, depth of the basement varies from around 1.5 km in the eastern part to 6 km in the western part and around 2-3 km in the northern part to 4-5 km in the southern part. In the Saurashtra region, there is not much variation in the depth of the basement and is between 3 km and 4 km. In Gujarat mainland part, the basement depth is 5-8 km in the Cambay basin and western edge of Narmada basin. In other parts of the mainland, it is 3-4 km. The depth of Moho beneath each site is obtained using stacking algorithm approach. The Moho is at shallower depth (26-30 km) in the western part of Kachchh region. In the eastern part and epicentral zone of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake, large variation in the Moho depths is noticed (36-46 km). In the Saurashtra region, the crust is more thick in the northern part. It varies from 36-38 km in the southern part to 42-44 km in the northern part. In the mainland region, the crust is more thick (40-44 km) in the northern and southern part and is shallow in Cambay and Narmada basins (32-36 km). The large variations of Poisson's ratio across Gujarat region may be interpreted as heterogeneity in crustal composition. High values of ? (?0.30) at many sites in Kachchh and few sites in Saurashtra and Mainland regions may be related to the existence of high-velocity lower crust with a mafic/ultramafic composition and, locally, to the presence of partial melt. The existing tectono-sedimentary models proposed by various researchers were also examined.

  20. Current Neonatal Resuscitation Practices among Paediatricians in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Satvik C.; Nimbalkar, Archana S.; Patel, Dipen V.; Sethi, Ankur R.; Phatak, Ajay G.; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M.

    2014-01-01

    Aim. We assessed neonatal resuscitation practices among paediatricians in Gujarat. Methods. Cross-sectional survey of 23 questions based on guidelines of Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP) and Navjaat Shishu Suraksha Karyakram (NSSK) was conducted using web-based tool. Questionnaire was developed and consensually validated by three neonatologists. Results. Total of 142 (21.2%) of 669 paediatricians of Gujarat, India, whose e-mail addresses were available, attempted the survey and, from them, 126 were eligible. Of these, 74 (58.7%) were trained in neonatal resuscitation. Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with mechanical ventilation facilities was available for 54% of respondents. Eighty-eight (69.8%) reported correct knowledge and practice regarding effective bag and mask ventilation (BMV) and chest compressions. Knowledge and practice about continuous positive airway pressure use in delivery room were reported in 18.3% and 30.2% reported use of room air for BMV during resuscitation. Suctioning oral cavity before delivery in meconium stained liquor was reported by 27.8% and 38.1% cut the cord after a minute of birth. Paediatricians with NRP training used appropriate method of tracheal suction in cases of nonvigorous newborns than those who were not trained. Conclusions. Contemporary knowledge about neonatal resuscitative practices in paediatricians is lacking and requires improvement. Web-based tools provided low response in this survey. PMID:24688549

  1. Characteristics of Postpartum Depression in Anand District, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Himadri L; Ganjiwale, Jaishree D; Nimbalkar, Archana S; Vani, Shashi N; Vasa, Rohitkumar; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar M

    2015-10-01

    Characteristics of postpartum depression (PPD) in Anand District, Gujarat, India. PPD affects 1 in 10 women in the developed world. It has been implicated as an independent factor with adverse effect on child health, and health care-seeking behavior of mothers. We sought to find the prevalence of PPD in our hospital by including mothers who registered and delivered live babies at our hospital. Basic demographic information related to pregnancy was acquired from mothers and Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS), pre-translated and validated in Gujarati language, was administered. Current study observed prevalence of PPD as 48.5% using cutoff score of 10.5 for classifying depression in Gujarati women. Factors associated with depression after multivariable logistic regression were: age of mother, modified Kuppuswami category (MKC) score, family type, violence from husband, gravida, para and sex of infant. PPD has higher prevalence in our study vis-a-vis Western countries. This may be because of early administration of EPDS. PMID:26179494

  2. Numerical modeling of seismicity and geodynamics of the Kachchh rift zone, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorobieva, Inessa; Mandal, Prantik; Gorshkov, Alexander

    2014-11-01

    The numerical block-and-fault model of lithosphere dynamics and seismicity (BAFD) is used to understand crustal motion and features of the observed seismicity in the Kachchh rift zone, Gujarat, Western India. The block-model allows simulating seismicity and geodynamics simultaneously unlike other modeling approaches for studying seismicity or geodynamics. The model structure of Kachchh rift zone is composed of seven major crustal blocks separated by fault planes. Based on the orientation of boundary crustal block movements, we develop a set of numerical experiments to analyze the spatial distribution of earthquakes, frequency-to-magnitude relationships, earthquake focal mechanisms, velocity field, and fault slip rates in the model. The main results of our modeling suggest that an NNW-SSE trending compression is a principal driving force in the Kachchh rift zone that explains basic features of the regional seismicity, direction of block motions, and the presence of an extensional stress regime associated with the Cambay rift zone. Large synthetic events occur on the fault segments associated with the Allah-Bund fault, Katrol hill fault and north Wagad fault which have been causative faults for the 1819 Mw7.7 Allah-Bund, 1956 Mw6.0 Anjar and 2001 Mw7.7 Bhuj earthquakes. The frequency-magnitude distribution for both synthetic seismicity and observed seismicity shows a similar slope. The focal mechanisms of the synthetic events are found to be consistent with those of earthquakes in the region. A special attention has been paid to study long-term and post-seismic deformations. Our results are in a qualitative agreement with the GPS post-seismic observations in the Kachchh rift zone. We infer that the observed seismicity and crustal block motions are a consequence of the dynamics of the entire regional fault and block system rather than that of a single causative fault only.

  3. Malaria in seasonal migrant population in Southern Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, H C; Chandrashekar, Pant; Kurien, G; Sreehari, U; Yadav, R S

    2011-12-01

    Malaria in migrant workers is always a major problem to control due to their temporary stay in shelters, and other operational constraints. Hence, a study was undertaken in brick kilns in Bharuch district, Gujarat state, India to study the problem of malaria in the work force. Mass blood surveys were carried out in 15 brick kilns. Blood slides were collected from both febrile and afebrile cases. Positive cases were treated as per the national drug policy and were followed up. Mosquito collections were carried out by pyrethrum spray collection in early morning hours. Human blood index and sporozoite rates were determined as per standard procedures. All age groups were found affected with malaria at brick kilns. Prevalence of malaria was significantly higher in ? 14 years of age-group as compared to adults. Post treatment follow up examination of patients revealed high malaria infection due to non-compliance of chloroquine. The appearance of parasitaemia among Plasmodium falciparum treated cases indicate the possibility of chloroquine resistance. The proportion of P. falciparum was >50% in migrant population. In stable population in villages, overall decline in malaria cases was observed in 2008-2010. The sporozoite rate of 4.2% in Anopheles culicifacies indicates active malaria transmission at brick kilns. The investigation demonstrated that suitable microclimatic conditions for malaria transmission exist in these areas during hottest period. The district health department should consider these factors in planning malaria surveillance and control. As current magnitude and diversity of population movements in rural as well as in urban areas are unprecedented, this issue is worthy of attention. PMID:22433894

  4. Gandhi, Non-Cooperation, and Socio-Civic Education in Gujarat, India: Harnessing the Vernaculars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Vaidehi

    2006-01-01

    This article offers an interconnected, grounded understanding of how two Gandhian endeavours in the city of Ahmedabad in Gujarat, India, make us rethink the notion of "education" in terms of civic and communal engagement. Drawing on local, vernacular ways of living, learning, being, reasoning, and believing--in this case Gujarati--I show how these…

  5. Ambiguities about English: Ideologies and Critical Practice in Vernacular-Medium College Classrooms in Gujarat, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Vaidehi

    2005-01-01

    Situated amid tertiary-level institutions in the city of Ahmedabad, in Gujarat, India, this article explores how particular ideologies countering English inform pedagogic choices made by language teachers teaching in "vernacular-medium" (VM) college classrooms. The ideologies under discussion are two linked "thought structures." The first, the…

  6. Social Stratification and Mobility in a Rural Community (Mahi) in Gujarat, India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panchanadikar, K. C.; Panchanadikar, J.

    Analyzing the interaction between factors that are stable and factors that initiate change re: promotion of social mobility or crystalization of existing social stratification, this paper presents a case study of Mahi, a rural village in Gujarat, India. Utilizing data derived from two field studies (1961-1962 and March 1967-June 1967), the stable…

  7. Communication Behavior of Village Level Workers in Surat and Mehsana Districts, Gujarat State, India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Ishwarlal Chaturdas

    This study investigated communication patterns, procedures, and background characteristics associated with effectiveness in village level workers (VLWs) in two districts of Gujarat, India. Questionnaire interviews were held with 222 VLWs who had induced farmers to adopt one or more farm practices. An appraisal form was used to measure the…

  8. Written Textual Production and Consumption (WTPC) in Vernacular and English-Medium Settings in Gujarat, India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Vaidehi

    2003-01-01

    Sketches key facets in the larger socioeducational machinery that shapes the written textual production and consumption (WTPC) of English-medium (EM) and "vernacular-medium" (VM) students in Gujarat, India. Lays out ways in which articulator macro-structures align together to produce and shape conditions that privilege the WTPC of EM students over…

  9. MARINE SEISMIC AND MARINE MAGNETOTELLURICS IN GULF OF KUTCH REGION, GUJARAT, INDIA

    E-print Network

    Harinarayana, T.

    MARINE SEISMIC AND MARINE MAGNETOTELLURICS IN GULF OF KUTCH REGION, GUJARAT, INDIA PROJECT 2009 #12;Technical Report No: NGRI-2009-EXP-679 MARINE SEISMIC AND MARINE MAGNETOTELLURICS IN GULF CHAPTER-1: MARINE MAGNETOTELLURIC STUDIES 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Background of the project 1.3 Special

  10. Use of Seismotectonic Information for the Seismic Hazard Analysis for Surat City, Gujarat, India: Deterministic and Probabilistic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaker, T. P.; Rathod, Ganesh W.; Rao, K. S.; Gupta, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    Surat, the financial capital of Gujarat, India, is a mega city with a population exceeding five millions. The city falls under Zone III of the Seismic Zoning Map of India. After the devastating 2001 Bhuj earthquake of Mw 7.7, much attention is paid towards the seismic microzonation activity in the state of Gujarat. In this work, an attempt has been made to evaluate the seismic hazard for Surat City (21.170 N, 72.830 E) based on the probabilistic and deterministic seismic hazard analysis. After collecting a catalogue of historical earthquakes in a 350 km radius around the city and after analyzing a database statistically, deterministic analysis has been carried out considering known tectonic sources; a further recurrence relationship for the control region is found out. Probabilistic seismic hazard analyses were then carried out for the Surat region considering five seismotectonic sources selected from a deterministic approach. The final results of the present investigations are presented in the form of peak ground acceleration and response spectra at bed rock level considering the local site conditions. Rock level Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration values at 0.01 s and 1.0 s corresponding to 10% and 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years have been calculated. Further Uniform Hazard Response Spectrum (UHRS) at rock level for 5% damping, and 10% and 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, were also developed for the city considering all site classes. These results can be directly used by engineers as basic inputs in earthquake-resistant design of structures in and around the city.

  11. Serosurvey of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus in domestic animals, Gujarat, India, 2013.

    PubMed

    Mourya, Devendra T; Yadav, Pragya D; Shete, Anita; Majumdar, Triparna D; Kanani, Amit; Kapadia, Dhirendra; Chandra, Vartika; Kachhiapatel, Anantdevesh J; Joshi, Pravinchandra T; Upadhyay, Kamalesh J; Dave, Paresh; Raval, Dinkar

    2014-09-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne viral disease that causes a fatal hemorrhagic illness in humans. This disease is asymptomatic in animals. CCHF was first confirmed in a nosocomial outbreak in 2011 in Gujarat State. Another notifiable outbreak occurred in July, 2013, in Karyana Village, Amreli district, Gujarat State. Anti-CCHF virus (CCHFV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies were detected in domestic animals from the adjoining villages of the affected area, indicating a considerable amount of positivity against domestic animals. The present serosurvey was carried out to determine the prevalence of CCHFV among bovine, sheep, and goat populations from 15 districts of Gujarat State, India. A total of 1226 serum samples from domestic animals were screened for IgG antibodies using a CCHF animal IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Antibodies were detected in all the 15 districts surveyed; with positivity of 12.09%, 41.21%, and 33.62% in bovine, sheep, and goat respectively. This necessitates the surveillance of CCHFV IgG antibodies in animals and hemorrhagic fever cases in human. PMID:25229708

  12. Usage of EMBRACETM in Gujarat, India: Survey of Paediatricians

    PubMed Central

    Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Patel, Harshil; Dongara, Ashish; Patel, Dipen V.; Bansal, Satvik

    2014-01-01

    Aim. EMBRACETM is an innovative, low cost infant warmer for use in neonates. It contains phase change material, which stays at constant temperature for 6 hours. We surveyed paediatricians using EMBRACETM regarding benefits, risks, and setup in which it was used in Gujarat. Methods. Questionnaire was administered telephonically to 52 out of 53 paediatricians. Results. EMBRACETM was used for an average of 8.27 (range of 3–18, SD = 3.84) months by paediatricians. All used it for thermoregulation during transfers, for average (SD) duration of 42 (0.64)?m per transfer, 62.7% used it at mother's side for average (SD) 11.06 (7.89)?h per day, and 3.9% prescribed it at home. It was used in low birth weight neonates only by 56.9% while 43.1% used it for all neonates. While hyperthermia was not reported, 5.9% felt that EMBRACETM did not prevent hypothermia. About 54.9% felt that they could not monitor the newborn during EMBRACETM use. Of paediatricians who practiced kangaroo mother care (KMC), 7.7% have limited/stopped/decreased the practice of KMC and substituted it with EMBRACETM. Conclusions. EMBRACETM was acceptable to most but concerns related to monitoring neonates and disinfection remained. Most paediatricians felt that it did not hamper KMC practice. PMID:25530887

  13. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Brevundimonas diminuta XGC1, Isolated from a Tuberculosis Patient in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arpita; Chandratre, Khyati; Chaudhary, Abhinav; Chaudhary, Spandan; Badani, Namrata; Chaudhary, Pooja S.; Dhawan, Dipali; Vudathala, Srinivas

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome of Brevundimonas diminuta strain XGC1, isolated from a tuberculosis-infected patient in Gujarat, India. This study also reveals that the B. diminuta XGC1 strain has acquired mutation to confer resistance to quinolone drugs. PMID:26112790

  14. Emergence of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever in Amreli District of Gujarat State, India, June to July 2013.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pragya D; Gurav, Yogesh K; Mistry, Madhulika; Shete, Anita M; Sarkale, Prasad; Deoshatwar, Avinash R; Unadkat, Vishwa B; Kokate, Prasad; Patil, Deepak Y; Raval, Dinkar K; Mourya, Devendra T

    2014-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) etiology was detected in a family cluster (nine cases, including two deaths) in the village of Karyana, Amreli District, and also a fatal case in the village of Undra, Patan District, in Gujarat State, India. Anti-CCHFV IgG antibodies were detected in domestic animals from Karyana and adjoining villages. Hyalomma ticks from households were found to be positive for CCHF viral RNA. This confirms the emergence of CCHFV in new areas and the wide spread of this disease in Gujarat State. PMID:24211848

  15. Lead in paint and soil in Karnataka and Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Clark, C S; Thuppil, V; Clark, R; Sinha, S; Menezes, G; D'Souza, H; Nayak, N; Kuruvilla, A; Law, T; Dave, P; Shah, S

    2005-01-01

    Blood lead surveys in several areas of India have found very high percentages of children with elevated blood lead levels. Fifty-three percent of children under 12 years of age in a seven-city screening had blood lead levels equal to or greater than 10 microg/dL, the level currently considered elevated by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). A number of these surveys focused on populations near lead smelters or in areas with high lead levels from combustion of lead-containing gasoline. There is little information available, however, on the levels of lead in paint in India and in soil. Field portable X-ray fluorescence analyzers were used to determine environmental lead levels in paint, dust, air, soil, and other bulk samples near several lead-using industries and in the residential environments of children with very high blood lead levels, at least four times as high as the CDC limit. Soils near industrial operations, such as secondary lead smelters, and battery dismantling units contained levels up to 100,000 ppm of lead. Four of 29 currently available paints from five manufacturers measured 1.0 mg/cm2 or above--the current U.S. definition of lead-based paint in housing-after the application of a single coat; four others measured at least 1.0 after three coats, and three others likely reached this level after the application of an additional one or two coats. In 5 of 10 homes of the elevated blood lead children, three or more locations in or around the home were found to have lead paint levels of 1.0 mg/cm2 or higher. Soil exceeding the U.S. standard for residential areas (400 ppm) was found at only one of the houses. Other sources of lead exposure, including traditional ayurvedic medicine tablets, were also observed. Similar surveys would be useful elsewhere in India and in other developing countries. PMID:15764522

  16. Molluscan fauna from the Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat, India — Part 3. Gastropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Kantimati G.; Kapoor, Satarupa Bhattacharjee; Borkar, Vidyadhar D.

    2010-06-01

    Systematic description of 25 gastropod species from the Khari Nadi Formation (Aquitanian) and Chhasra Formation (Burdigalian) from the Kachchh District, Gujarat, India is given. A checklist of 116 forms including those reported by earlier researchers, emending taxonomic identifications wherever necessary, is also provided. Vredenburg had referred these two formations together as ‘the Gaj Beds of Kachchh’. He noticed the affinity of molluscs among the Miocene deposits of Kachchh and Kathiawar regions of Gujarat, and Sind province of Pakistan. He also observed that molluscs from his ‘Lower Gaj’ and ‘Upper Gaj’ Formations showed relationship respectively with the Rembang (Aquitanian) and Njalindung (Burdigalian) series of the East Indies. Aquitanian and Burdigalian ages assigned by him were later substantiated by Raju on the basis of foraminifera. Present studies corroborated that the molluscan assemblage from the Miocene rocks of Kachchh is closely related to that from the Gaj Beds of Sind and the Ashapura Clay Member of Kathiawar; besides revealing that the fauna from these three formations taken together is essentially endemic. Discovery of certain species from the Quilon Beds in the Miocene of Kachchh evinces a close affinity between these two formations. The present fauna includes five extant forms, while 29 forms have related species in the Recent fauna.

  17. Lower Oligocene bivalves of Ramanian Stage from Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachhara, R. P.; Jodhawat, R. L.; Devi, K. Bigyapati

    2012-04-01

    Marine Oligocene sequences in India outcrop only in western part of Kachchh. Earlier researchers have recognized the Oligocene strata under the Nari Series (Nagappa 1959; Chatterji and Mathur 1966). The Nari Series has a type area in Pakistan. It has two subdivisions - the Lower Nari (Lower Oligocene) and the Upper Nari (Upper Oligocene). It seems that there is no valid proof about the age of the Lower Nari due to lack of proper fauna (Eames 1975), and according to Pascoe (1962), the Upper Nari slightly transgress into Aquitanian (Lower Miocene), therefore, one has to be very cautious. Biswas and Raju (1971) reclassified the Oligocene strata of Kachchh and lithostratigraphically clubbed them as the Maniyara Fort Formation with type section along the Bermoti stream. This Formation has four members. The lower three members correspond to the Ramanian Stage (Lower Oligocene, Biswas 1971, 1973) while the uppermost to the Waiorian Stage (Upper Oligocene, Biswas 1965, 1971, 1973). The Ramanian Stage is characterized by large forams especially Nummulites fichteli, Nummulites fichteli intermedius, Lepidocyclina ( Eulepidina) dialata and Operculina sp. Several ostracods are also known to occur. Megafauna include bivalves, gastropods, echinoids, corals, mammals and reptiles. Concerning bivalves earlier researchers have recorded a few taxa namely Trisidos semitorta (Lamarck), Cubitostrea angulata (J de C Sowerby), Pecten ( Amussiopecten) labadyei d'Archiac and Haime, Periglypta puerpera (Linne') var. aglaurae Brongniart, Ostrea fraasi Mayer Eymer and listed Pecten laevicostatus J de C Sowerby, Callista pseudoumbonella Vredenburg and Clementia papyracea (Gray) from Kachchh as against overall 42 forms from the Nari Series as a whole (Vredenburg 1928). This tempted us to make an attempt to collect bivalve fauna systematically which are occurring prolifically in the Ramanian Stage. In the present work, for this purpose, sections are worked out around Lakhpat (23°50'N; 68°47'E), Maniyara Fort (23°28'05?N; 68°37'E) Rakhdi Dam (23°27'26?N; 68°40'10?E) and Waior (23°25'05?N; 68°41'37?E) with a view to highlight the entombed bivalve taxa. Authors have encountered 53 species of which 23 are restricted to the Ramanian Stage.

  18. Monsoon-induced earthquake activity in Talala, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hainzl, S.; Aggarwal, S. K.; Khan, P. K.; Rastogi, B. K.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the episodic swarm activity observed in the region around Talala is related to a poroelastic response of the seismogenic crust to surface water flux, leading to pore pressure changes at depth. In particular, we evaluate models where these pore-pressure changes result from rainfall-induced ground-water recharge with corresponding pore pressure diffusion into depth and reservoir-induced pressure changes related to two dams located around 10 km from the swarm region. Based on the observed reservoir and rainfall data, we estimate the time-dependent pressure variations in the active seismogenic volume and calculate the resulting seismicity rates assuming rate- and state-dependent frictional nucleation. Our results show that pore pressure variations can well explain the general observations, with highest correlations for the reservoir-triggering mechanism. However, the latter model requires unrealistically small values of effective normal stresses in the source region unless pore-pressure diffusion is guided by a highly permeable fracture zone.

  19. The Gujarat Earthquake: Mitigations Failures and Lessons learnt for Future Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katuri, A. K.; Mittal, J.; Kumar, K.

    Time and again, the Indian subcontinent has been suffering from diverse natural calamities, ranging from droughts to floods, landslides to earthquakes, and cyclones to spells of famines. Recently, in October 1999, a severe cyclone battered the eastern coast of Orissa affecting millions of people, blowing away homes, damaging buildings, destroying crops and wiping out a huge cattle population. The Gujarat earthquake of January 2001 was another monumental disaster that affected more than 15 million people causing colossal loss of life and property estimated at US 1.30 billion, though actual may be much higher. More than 200 international and domestic voluntary agencies promptly rushed aid to the damaged areas at the shake of the quake-2001. In this crucial rescue phase, teams were scattered across affected villages and urban centers, clueless of precise locations and extent of damage. Problems faced during the relief and rehabilitation were- absence of a comprehensive information system (both spatial and attribute), absence of a nodal agency to disseminate information on the type of relief required, absence of high precision remotely sensed data, appropriate for preparation and implementation of long term reconstruction and rehabilitation plan (Development Plan). Repeated disaster assessments by multiple agencies led to wastage of time and resources. All this led to non-coherence amongst the coordinating agencies, and rescue &relief teams. Spatial and attribute damage assessment could have been easier in the presence of comprehensive geographic and demographic information supported by high precision satellite imageries to compare pre and post disaster situation. Disaster management includes pre-disaster preparedness planning, post- disaster damage assessment, search and rescue, rehabilitation and reconstruction activities. Unlike other disasters, scientific alerts, forecasts and warnings of impending earthquake still require more attention. Disaster Preparedness Plan for speedy rescue and relief operations needs to be in place with improved information system for post disaster recovery. This paper draws upon the shortfalls faced in the management of Gujarat earthquake; a lesson learnt and presents a comprehensive strategy for Systems networking including the role of space programs in disaster management. The proposed structure is a top down approach for cooperation, emerging from bottom level demand. The missing key elements in the post-disaster situation were - effective information system, high resolution remote sensing data (for effective town planning), operational GIS, with support network from some or all of the governmental agencies. An integrated global communication network for wider dissemination of forecasts, warning and monitoring on a global level and sharing of related knowledge and information can play a vital role in disaster reduction. Needless to say, the local, regional and national disaster communication networks must be fully integrated in the global grid. The proposed structure for disaster management has a National Disaster Mitigation Establishment (NDME) as the apex body under the auspices of the central government, which would be networked across nations to similar other NDMEs. Each NDME would handle the coordination and monitoring of its state units which may be called as State Disaster Management Establishments (SDME). The SDMEs with various district or sub-district level units would collate data. The Network would be supported with field staff at its offices and would liaison with respective higher level DMEs where the lowest unit may be a village / town or cluster of villages. This paper emphasizes the need for comprehensive information system with Spatial Decision Support System (DSS) at three different levels for total disaster management.

  20. Enrichment of arsenic in the Quaternary sediments from Ankaleshwar industrial area, Gujarat, India: an anthropogenic influence.

    PubMed

    Shirke, K D; Pawar, N J

    2015-09-01

    Arsenic (As) contamination of sediments and waters is known from Bengal and other parts of eastern and central India. However, there is paucity of reports that document occurrence of As in Quaternary sediments from western India. In this paper, we report the enrichment of As in the Quaternary sediments of Ankaleshwar area in the western Indian state of Gujarat. Twenty-five surface and five profile samples were analyzed that indicated spatial and vertical distribution of As in the sediments. The As content of fine size fractions (<63 ?m) compared with upper continental crust (UCC) and standard shale indicates anomalous As enrichment that is supported by moderate to high geo-accumulation index (Igeo) as well as pollution index (Pi). Enrichment of As is seen in surface sediments from the industrial and urban land use regions, followed by oil field and agricultural land suggesting strong influence of anthropogenic factors. Although the arsenic concentration decreases with depth, the relatively higher values of As coupled with Igeo and Pi index values suggest downward migration of metal that is likely to contaminate groundwater. This calls for urgent remediation so that the ill effects of As contamination can be minimized. PMID:26311266

  1. Political ecology of groundwater: the contrasting case of water-abundant West Bengal and water-scarce Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherji, Aditi

    2006-03-01

    Three apparently disparate themes (groundwater, farmers and politics) interweave in this account of how groundwater-related policies in India have very little to do with the scarcity, depletion or quality of groundwater, and more to do with rural politics manifested, among other things, in terms of the presence or absence of farmer lobbies. Examples from two states of India, the water-abundant state of West Bengal and water-scarce state of Gujarat, were investigated using readily available data, analysis of the literature, interviews and fieldwork. In the case of West Bengal, although there is no pressing groundwater crisis, the government of West Bengal (GOWB) was able to successfully implement strict groundwater regulations along with a drastic increase in electricity tariff. More importantly, GOWB was able to implement these without any form of visible farmer protest, though these measures negatively affected farmer incomes. On the other hand, in Gujarat, where there is a real and grave groundwater crisis, the government of Gujarat has neither been able to implement strict groundwater regulations, nor has it been able to increase electricity tariff substantially. Thus, through the lens of ‘political ecology’ the contrasting case of these two Indian states is explained.

  2. Understanding CBHI hospitalisation patterns: a comparison of insured and uninsured women in Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Community-based health insurance has been associated with increased hospitalisation in low-income settings, but with limited analysis of the illnesses for which claims are submitted. A review of claims submitted to VimoSEWA, an inpatient insurance scheme in Gujarat, India, found that fever, diarrhoea and hysterectomy, the latter at a mean age of 37 years, were the leading reasons for claims by adult women. We compared the morbidity, outpatient treatment-seeking and hospitalisation patterns of VimoSEWA-insured women with uninsured women. Methods We utilised data from a cross-sectional survey of 1,934 insured and uninsured women in Gujarat, India. Multivariable logistic regression identified predictors of insurance coverage and the association of insurance with hospitalisation. Self-reported data on morbidity, outpatient care and hospitalisation were compared between insured and uninsured women. Results Age, marital status and occupation of adult women were associated with insurance status. Reported recent morbidity, type of illness and outpatient treatment were similar among insured and uninsured women. Multivariable analysis revealed strong evidence of a higher odds of hospitalisation amongst the insured (OR?=?2.7; 95% ci. 1.6, 4.7). The leading reason for hospitalisation for uninsured and insured women was hysterectomy, at a similar mean age of 36, followed by common ailments such as fever and diarrhoea. Insured women appeared to have a higher probability of being hospitalised than uninsured women for all causes, rather than specifically for fever, diarrhoea or hysterectomy. Length of stay was similar while choice of hospital differed between insured and uninsured women. Conclusions Despite similar reported morbidity patterns and initial treatment-seeking behaviour, VimoSEWA members were more likely to be hospitalised. The data did not provide strong evidence that inpatient hospitalisation replaced outpatient treatment for common illnesses or that insurance was the primary inducement for hysterectomy in the population. Rather, it appears that VimoSEWA members behaved differently in deciding if, and where, to be hospitalised for any condition. Further research is required to explore this decision-making process and roles, if any, played by adverse selection and moral hazard. Lastly, these hospitalisation patterns raise concerns regarding population health needs and access to quality preventive and outpatient services. PMID:25064209

  3. Towards a Managed Aquifer Recharge strategy for Gujarat, India: An economist’s dialogue with hydro-geologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Tushaar

    2014-10-01

    Gujarat state in Western India exemplifies all challenges of an agrarian economy founded on groundwater overexploitation sustained over decades by perverse energy subsidies. Major consequences are: secular decline in groundwater levels, deterioration of groundwater quality, rising energy cost of pumping, soaring carbon footprint of agriculture and growing financial burden of energy subsidies. In 2009, Government of Gujarat asked the present author, an economist, to chair a Taskforce of senior hydro-geologists and civil engineers to develop and recommend a Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR) strategy for the state. This paper summarizes the recommended strategy and its underlying logic. It also describes the imperfect fusion of socio-economic and hydro-geologic perspectives that occurred in course of the working of the Taskforce and highlights the need for trans-disciplinary perspectives on groundwater governance.

  4. EARTHQUAKE LOSS ESTIMATION FOR INDIA BASED ON MACROECONOMIC INDICATORS

    E-print Network

    Bilham, Roger

    of earthquakes within the last 100 years and numbers of fatalities and damage are listed in Table 1 [3EARTHQUAKE LOSS ESTIMATION FOR INDIA BASED ON MACROECONOMIC INDICATORS P.K. DUNBAR1 , R.G. BILHAM2]. India has also experienced some of the most devastating earthquakes ever recorded. Examples

  5. Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy: A report on clinical, biochemical, and genetic study in Gujarat population, India

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Mandava V.; Sindhav, Gaurang M.; Mehta, Jitendra J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In India, various groups have studied different regions to find out deletion pattern of dystrophin gene. We have investigated its deletion pattern among Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy (D/BMD) patients across Gujarat. Moreover, in this study we also correlate the same with reading frame rule. However, we too consider various clinicopathological features to establish as adjunct indices when deletion detection fails. Materials and Methods: In this pilot study, a total of 88 D/BMD patients consulting at our centers in Gujarat, India were included. All patients were reviewed on basis of their clinical characteristics, tested by three primer sets of 10-plex, 9-plex, and 7-plex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for genetic analysis; whereas, biochemical indices were measured using automated biochemical analyzers. Results: The diagnosis of D/BMD was confirmed by multiplex-PCR (M-PCR) in D/BMD patients. A number of 65 (73.86%) out of 88 patients showed deletion in dystrophin gene. The exon 50 (58.46%) was the most frequent deletion found in our study. The mean age of onset of DMD and BMD was 4.09 ± 0.15 and 7.14 ± 0.55 years, respectively. In patients, mean creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and myoglobin levels were elevated significantly (P < 0.05) in comparison to controls. Addition to CPK, LDH and myoglobin are good adjunct when deletion detection failed. These data are further in accordance with world literature when correlated with frame rule. Conclusion: The analysis has been carried out for the first time for a total of 88 D/BMD patients particularly from Gujarat, India. More research is essential to elucidate specific mutation pattern in association with management and therapies of proband. PMID:25221400

  6. Visibility Graph Analysis of the 2003-2012 Earthquake Sequence in the Kachchh Region of Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Lovallo, Michele; Aggarwal, S. K.; Khan, P. K.; Rastogi, B. K.

    2015-02-01

    A visibility graph (VG) is a rather novel statistical method in earthquake sequence analysis; it maps a time series into networks or graphs, converting dynamical properties of the time series into topological properties of networks. By using the VG approach, we defined the parameter window mean interval connectivity time , that informs about the mean linkage time between earthquakes. We analysed the time variation of in the aftershock-depleted catalogue of Kachchh Gujarat (Western India) seismicity from 2003 to 2012, and we found that : i) changes through time, indicating that the topological properties of the earthquake network are not stationary; and, ii) appeared to significantly decrease before the largest shock (M5.7) that occurred on March 7, 2006 near the Gedi fault, an active fault in the Kachchh region.

  7. Active tectonics of NE Gujarat (India) by morphometric and morphostructural studies of Vatrak River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Rachna

    2012-05-01

    Landscape owes its shape to the combination of tectonic and climatic forces. Differential displacement of land by tectonic processes changes the elevation of earth's surface locally and in turn affects the rate of geomorphic processes which are altitude dependent. The tectonic and geomorphic processes are very tightly coupled and their results are intertwined. To extract the tectonic signal, the numerical modelling of the landscape of the Vatrak River basin, part of which falls in the northern part of the Gujarat Alluvial Plains of western India, has been undertaken applying morphometric and morphostructural approach. The study helped in understanding the role of tectonic elements in the evolution of the basin. Demarcation of geomorphic indicators of active tectonics (which include the analyses of asymmetry factor, valley floor ratio, gradient, basin elongation ratio, long profile and related parameters, pseudo hypsometric integral, drainage basin asymmetry), drainage pattern analysis and azimuthal distribution of stream channels have been performed for each drainage network and associated basin. The morphological field evidence of tectonics combined with the results of morphometric analysis has been used to obtain information about the orientation of tectonic elements and the possible reconstruction of their activity in recent times. The analyses indicate eastward tilting of the drainage systems, strong asymmetry in some reaches, pronounced elongation of certain tributaries, long profiles indicating base level lowering, poor organisation of the hydrographic network, and close alignment between lower order streams and active faults. All these analyses point towards the active tectonism in the area. Data obtained through the statistical analysis of preferred stream orientations confirm that the old tectonic directions markedly influenced the drainage network development of the older order streams, whereas, streams of lower order which preferentially follow the N-S and NE-SW directions suggest that these tectonic trends were active until very recent times.

  8. Jarosite Precipitation from Acidic Saline Waters in Kachchh, Gujarat, India: an Appropriate Martian Analogue?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, S.; Gupta, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Banerjee, S.; Chauhan, P.; Parthasarathy, G.

    2014-12-01

    The origin of jarosite [KFe3(SO4)2(OH)6] on the Martian surface has been an intriguing problem since the Mars Exploration Rover 'Opportunity' first revealed its presence at the Meridiani Planum on Mars. To explain its origin, several terrestrial analogue sites have been studied in different geographical zones. Although several models have been suggested, there is a consensus that only the prevalence of acidic and oxidizing aqueous environmental conditions are conducive to form jarosite. In the Kachchh region of Gujarat, western India, jarosite has been recently discovered from gorges dissecting the Paleocene Matanumadh Formation sediments, that overlie basalts of the Deccan Volcanic Province. This formation comprises pebble conglomerates, carbonaceous shales and purple sandstones capped by a laterite on top. Jarosite, in association with gypsum and goethite, has been detected through FTIR and VNIR spectrometry in almost all litho-units of the succession, albeit in different modes and concentrations. The occurrence of jarosite within black shale in other parts of the world, has been attributed to the oxidation of pyrites within the shale layers. However, in shales of the Matanumadh Formation, jarosite is restricted to fractures that cut across the bedding, while the overlying purple sandstone unit only preserves jarosite in shale clasts within the sandstone. Since the sandstone overlies the black shale layer, downward percolation of sulfate-bearing water from the oxidation of pyrite within the shale layer cannot explain jarosite formation in this unit. In addition, no jarosite is observed below or within pyrite-rich lignite bearing sections in other parts of Kachchh. Alternative suggestions, that jarosite developed in the immediate aftermath of Deccan volcanism as surface waters were rendered acidic by interaction with the final phase of volcanic effusives, are also unlikely as on-going studies suggest that jarosite is not restricted to the Matanumadh Formation. The consistent association of jarosite-bearing horizons with gypsum in Kachchh indicate that saline water intrusion may have played an important role in its formation. Since this association is also reported from the Meridiani Planum, a model explaining the origin of jarosite formation in Kachchh may also be relevant for the Martian surface.

  9. Healthcare-Seeking Behaviors of Mothers regarding their Children in a Tribal Community of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Chandwani, Haresh; Pandor, Jyotsna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The mortality and morbidity from the diseases which contribute to the deaths among children can be reduced if early intervention is made in terms of appropriate care and treatment. Thus, utmost care should be taken to prevent diseases, recognize the danger signals, and treat them urgently. Thus, healthcare-seeking behavior is of prime importance and is pivotal in the well-being of the individual as well as the community. The aims of this research were to determine the possible factors that affect the healthcare-seeking behavior of mothers for their children in a tribal community of Narmada district and to determine the reasons for not seeking curative care for children who are perceived to be sick. Methods: A cross-sectional, community-based study of 405 mothers of the Dediyapada Block in Narmada District Gujarat, India, was undertaken, using a two-stage, cluster-sampling technique. The study was conducted from June through August 2011 using the questionnaire method. The chi squared test was used to determine the association between various factors and the healthcare-seeking behaviors of mothers. Results: The mothers were in the age range of 17 to 44 years, with the mean (+SD) being 26.2+3.2 years. Ninety-one percent of the children, irrespective of gender, had completed their primary immunization. Regarding curative healthcare-seeking behavior, 16.5% of the males and 42% of the females received no treatment. Joint family structure (P<0.05, df=1, ?2=41.39), mass media exposure (P<0.05, df=1, ?2=16.42), literacy status (P<0.05, df=1, ?2=60.76), socioeconomic status of the mothers (P<0.05, df=1, ?2=56.08), and gender differences among children (P<0.05, df=1, ?2=21.18) were found to be associated significantly with the healthcare-seeking behavior of the mothers. Conclusion: Increased maternal education, generation of intensified awareness through the mass media approach, implementing gender-sensitive interventions, and counseling may have positive implications in the future, leading to better health outcomes and favorable health indicators. PMID:26052410

  10. The transition of childbirth practices among tribal women in Gujarat, India - a grounded theory approach

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Under the National Rural Health Mission, the current emphasis is on achieving universal institutional births through incentive schemes as part of reforms related to childbirth in India. There has been rapid progress in achieving this goal. To understand the choices made as well as practices and perceptions related to childbirth amongst tribal women in Gujarat and how these have been influenced by modernity in general and modernity brought in through maternal health policies. Method A model depicting the transition in childbirth practices amongst tribal women was constructed using the grounded theory approach with; 8 focus groups of women, 5 in depth interviews with traditional birth attendants, women, and service providers and field notes on informal discussions and observations. Results A transition in childbirth practices across generations was noted, i.e. a shift from home births attended by Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) to hospital births. The women and their families both adapted to and shaped this transition through a constant ’trade-off between desirable and essential’- the desirable being a traditional homebirth in secure surroundings and the essential being the survival of mother and baby by going to hospital. This transition was shaped by complex multiple factors: 1) Overall economic growth and access to modern medical care influencing women’s choices, 2) External context in terms of the international maternal health discourses and national policies, especially incentive schemes for promoting institutional deliveries, 3) Socialisation into medical childbirth practices, through exposure to many years of free outreach services for maternal and child health, 4) Loss of self reliance in the community as a consequence of role redefinition and deskilling of the TBAs and 5) Cultural belief that intervention is necessary during childbirth aiding easy acceptance of medical interventions. Conclusion In resource poor settings where choices are limited and mortality is high, hospital births are perceived as increasing the choices for women, saving lives of mothers and babies, though there is a need for region specific strategies. Modern obstetric technology is utilised and given meanings based on socio-cultural conceptualisations of birth, which need to be considered while designing policies for maternal health. PMID:24088383

  11. Socio-economic, Biophysical, and Perceptional Factors Associated with Agricultural Adaptation of Smallholder Farmers in Gujarat, Northwest India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, M.; DeFries, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change is predicted to negatively impact many agricultural communities across the globe, particularly smallholder farmers who often do not have access to appropriate technologies to reduce their vulnerability. To better predict which farmers will be most impacted by future climate change at a regional scale, we use remote sensing and agricultural census data to examine how cropping intensity and crop type have shifted based on rainfall variability across Gujarat, India from 1990 to 2010. Using household-level interviews, we then identify the socio-economic, biophysical, perceptional, and psychological factors associated with smallholder farmers who are the most impacted and the least able to adapt to contemporaneous rainfall variability. We interviewed 750 farmers in 2011 and 2012 that span a rainfall, irrigation, socio-economic, and caste gradient across central Gujarat. Our results show that farmers shift cropping practices in several ways based on monsoon onset, which farmers state is the main observable rainfall signal influencing cropping decisions during the monsoon season. When monsoon onset is delayed, farmers opt to plant more drought-tolerant crops, push back the date of sowing, and increase the number of irrigations used. Comparing self-reported income and yields, we find that switching crops does not improve agricultural income, shifting planting date does not influence crop yield, yet increasing the number of irrigations significantly increases yield. Future work will identify which social (e.g. social networks), psychological (e.g. risk preference), and knowledge (e.g. information sources) factors are associated with farmers who are best able to adapt to rainfall variability.

  12. Has Chiranjeevi Yojana changed the geographic availability of free comprehensive emergency obstetric care services in Gujarat, India?

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Kranti Suresh; Yasobant, Sandul; Patel, Amit; Upadhyay, Ashish; Mavalankar, Dileep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The high rate of maternal mortality in India is of grave concern. Poor rural Indian women are most vulnerable to preventable maternal deaths primarily because they have limited availability of affordable emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within reasonable geographic proximity. Scarcity of obstetricians in the public sector combined with financial barriers to accessing private sector obstetrician services preclude this underserved population from availing lifesaving functions of comprehensive EmOC such as C-section. In order to overcome this limitation, Government of Gujarat initiated a unique public–private partnership program called Chiranjeevi Yojana (CY) in 2005. The program envisaged leveraging private sector providers to increase availability and thereby accessibility of EmOC care for vulnerable sections of society. Under CY, private sector providers render obstetric care services to poor women at no cost to patients. This paper examines the CY's effectiveness in improving availability of CEmOC services between 2006 and 2012 in three districts of Gujarat, India. Methods Primary data on facility locations, EmOC functionality, and obstetric bed availability were collected in the years 2012 and 2013 in three study districts. Secondary data from Census 2001 and 2011 were used along with required geographic information from Topo sheets and Google Earth maps. ArcGIS version 10 was used to analyze the availability of services using two-step floating catchment area (2SFCA) method. Results Our analysis suggests that the availability of CEmOC services within reasonable travel distance has greatly improved in all three study districts as a result of CY. We also show that the declining participation of the private sector did not result in an increase in distance to the nearest facility, but the extent of availability of providers for several villages was reduced. Spatial and temporal analyses in this paper provide a comprehensive understanding of trends in the availability of EmOC services within reasonable travel distance. Conclusions This paper demonstrates how GIS could be useful for evaluating programs especially those focusing on improving availability and geographic accessibility. The study also shows usefulness of GIS for programmatic planning, particularly for optimizing resource allocation. PMID:26446287

  13. Eos,Vol. 84, No. 26, 1 July 2003 Two years after a devastating earthquake in

    E-print Network

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    the earthquake on 26 January 2001, Indian scientists established a Global Position- ing System (GPS) networkEos,Vol. 84, No. 26, 1 July 2003 Two years after a devastating earthquake in Gujarat,India,scientists from many disciplines met at an international workshop to share the latest knowledge about Earth system

  14. Neo-deterministic definition of earthquake hazard scenarios: a multiscale application to India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresan, Antonella; Magrin, Andrea; Parvez, Imtiyaz A.; Rastogi, Bal K.; Vaccari, Franco; Cozzini, Stefano; Bisignano, Davide; Romanelli, Fabio; Panza, Giuliano F.; Ashish, Mr; Mir, Ramees R.

    2014-05-01

    The development of effective mitigation strategies requires scientifically consistent estimates of seismic ground motion; recent analysis, however, showed that the performances of the classical probabilistic approach to seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) are very unsatisfactory in anticipating ground shaking from future large earthquakes. Moreover, due to their basic heuristic limitations, the standard PSHA estimates are by far unsuitable when dealing with the protection of critical structures (e.g. nuclear power plants) and cultural heritage, where it is necessary to consider extremely long time intervals. Nonetheless, the persistence in resorting to PSHA is often explained by the need to deal with uncertainties related with ground shaking and earthquakes recurrence. We show that current computational resources and physical knowledge of the seismic waves generation and propagation processes, along with the improving quantity and quality of geophysical data, allow nowadays for viable numerical and analytical alternatives to the use of PSHA. The advanced approach considered in this study, namely the NDSHA (neo-deterministic seismic hazard assessment), is based on the physically sound definition of a wide set of credible scenario events and accounts for uncertainties and earthquakes recurrence in a substantially different way. The expected ground shaking due to a wide set of potential earthquakes is defined by means of full waveforms modelling, based on the possibility to efficiently compute synthetic seismograms in complex laterally heterogeneous anelastic media. In this way a set of scenarios of ground motion can be defined, either at national and local scale, the latter considering the 2D and 3D heterogeneities of the medium travelled by the seismic waves. The efficiency of the NDSHA computational codes allows for the fast generation of hazard maps at the regional scale even on a modern laptop computer. At the scenario scale, quick parametric studies can be easily performed to understand the influence of the model characteristics on the computed ground shaking scenarios. For massive parametric tests, or for the repeated generation of large scale hazard maps, the methodology can take advantage of more advanced computational platforms, ranging from GRID computing infrastructures to HPC dedicated clusters up to Cloud computing. In such a way, scientists can deal efficiently with the variety and complexity of the potential earthquake sources, and perform parametric studies to characterize the related uncertainties. NDSHA provides realistic time series of expected ground motion readily applicable for seismic engineering analysis and other mitigation actions. The methodology has been successfully applied to strategic buildings, lifelines and cultural heritage sites, and for the purpose of seismic microzoning in several urban areas worldwide. A web application is currently being developed that facilitates the access to the NDSHA methodology and the related outputs by end-users, who are interested in reliable territorial planning and in the design and construction of buildings and infrastructures in seismic areas. At the same, the web application is also shaping up as an advanced educational tool to explore interactively how seismic waves are generated at the source, propagate inside structural models, and build up ground shaking scenarios. We illustrate the preliminary results obtained from a multiscale application of NDSHA approach to the territory of India, zooming from large scale hazard maps of ground shaking at bedrock, to the definition of local scale earthquake scenarios for selected sites in the Gujarat state (NW India). The study aims to provide the community (e.g. authorities and engineers) with advanced information for earthquake risk mitigation, which is particularly relevant to Gujarat in view of the rapid development and urbanization of the region.

  15. Fossil Steginoporellid (Cheilostomata: Neocheilostomina), Bryozoa from the Tertiary sediments of Western Kachchh, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonar, Mohan A.; Gaikwad, Sharad G.

    2013-02-01

    Five species of Steginoporella from the Palaeogene rocks of the Western Kachchh, Gujarat are described in this paper. Out of five steginoporellids, S. mathuri n.sp., S. murachbanensis n.sp. and S. chiplonkari n.sp. are new to science; S. bhujensis is already reported from this region; and Steginoporella sp. indet is reported for the first time in these rocks. All these species show Indo-Pacific affinities. The occurrence of Steginoporella from Middle Eocene to Early Miocene indicates that two stages of radiation had taken place in Kachchh. Phylogenetic analysis using PAST programme indicates that S. mathuri is very distinct from other species of Steginoporella; while S. murachbanensis and S. bhujensis form the same clade.

  16. Study of cation-exchange capacity of soil near fluorspar mining with special reference to Kadipani mine (Gujarat, India).

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Alka; Deshmukh, Jitendra P

    2011-10-01

    One of the important functions of soil is exchange of cations, whereby essential trace metals are made available to plants as nutrients. Both minerals and organics fractions of soil exchange the cations. Clay minerals exchange cation because of the presence of negatively charged sites on the mineral while organic materials exchange cations by means of their carboxylate groups and other basic functional groups. Cation exchange in soil provides trace metal nutrients to plant. The metal ions are taken up by the roots while H+ is exchanged for the metal ions. Therefore, the measurement of Cation Exchange Capacity (CEC) of soil is important and this becomes more significant when the mining activity is carried out in the surrounding environment as mining activity may adversely impact the soil texture and organic matter content and sometimes changes the pH which is the main regulator of CEC in soil. The studies related to the assessment of CEC of soil were carried out. 14 soil samples, including one sample of mine site, were collected during summer season from different villages within 10 km radius from the mine site. These samples were then analyzed. The efforts were made to establish the CEC of soil quality of Kadipani, Distt. Vadodara, Gujarat, India. This study is useful for making the decisions regarding the environmental measures required for mining activity. PMID:23505823

  17. Spectral pathways for exploration of secondary uranium: An investigation in the desertic tracts of Rajasthan and Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Rishikesh; Kalimuthu, R.; Ramakrishnan, D.

    2015-10-01

    This study aims at identifying potential zones of secondary uranium enrichment using hyperspectral remote sensing, ?-ray spectrometry, fluorimetry and geochemical techniques in the western Rajasthan and northern Gujarat, India. The investigated area has suitable source rocks, conducive past-, and present-climate that can facilitate such enrichment. This enrichment process involves extensive weathering of uranium bearing source rocks, leaching of uranyl compounds in groundwater, and their precipitation in chemical deltas along with duricrusts like calcretes and gypcretes. Spatial distribution of groundwater calcretes (that are rich in Mg-calcite) and gypcretes (that are rich in gypsum) along palaeochannels and chemical deltas were mapped using hyperspectral remote sensing data based on spectral absorptions in 1.70 ?m, 2.16 ?m, 2.21 ?m, 2.33 ?m, 2.44 ?m wavelength regions. Subsequently based on field radiometric survey, zones of U anomalies were identified and samples of duricrusts and groundwater were collected for geochemical analyses. Anomalous concentration of U (2345.7 Bq/kg) and Th (142.3 Bq/kg) are observed in both duricrusts and groundwater (U-1791 ?g/l, Th-34 ?g/l) within the palaeo-delta and river confluence. The estimated carnotite Solubility Index also indicates the secondary enrichment of U and the likelihood of occurrence of an unconventional deposit.

  18. Decadal changes in the land use/land cover and shoreline along the coastal districts of southern Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Misra, A; Balaji, R

    2015-07-01

    The coastal zone along the districts of Surat, Navsari, and Valsad in southern Gujarat, India, is reported to be facing serious environmental challenges in the form of shoreline erosion, wetland loss, and man-made encroachments. This study assesses the decadal land use/ land cover (LULC) changes in these three districts for the years 1990, 2001, and 2014 using satellite datasets of Landsat TM, ETM, and OLI. The LULC changes are identified by using band ratios as a pre-classification step, followed by implementation of hybrid classification (a combination of supervised and unsupervised classification). An accuracy assessment is carried out for each dataset, and the overall accuracy ranges from 90 to 95%. It is observed that the spatial extents of aquaculture, urban built-up, and barren classes have appreciated over time, whereas the coverage of mudflats has depreciated due to rapid urbanization. The changes in the shoreline of these districts have also been analyzed for the same years, and significant changes are found in the form of shoreline erosion. The LULC maps prepared as well as the shoreline change analysis done for this study area will enable the local decision makers to adopt better land-use planning and shoreline protection measures, which will further aid in sustainable future developments in this region. PMID:26108747

  19. Fluid Inclusion Study of Quartz Xenocrysts in Mafic Dykes from Kawant Area, Chhota Udaipur District, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randive, Kirtikumar; Hurai, Vratislav

    2015-09-01

    Unusual mafic dykes occur in the proximity of the Ambadongar Carbonatite Complex, Lower Narmada Valley, Gujarat, India. The dykes contain dense population of quartz xenocrysts within the basaltic matrix metasomatised by carbonate-rich fluids. Plagioclase feldspars, relict pyroxenes, chlorite, barite, rutile, magnetite, Fe-Ti oxides and glass were identified in the basaltic matrix. Quartz xenocrysts occur in various shapes and sizes and form an intricate growth pattern with carbonates. The xenocrysts are fractured and contain several types of primary and secondary, single phase and two-phase fluid inclusions. The two-phase inclusions are dominated by aqueous liquid, whereas the monophase inclusions are composed of carbonic gas and the aqueous inclusions homogenize to liquid between 226°C and 361°C. Majority of the inclusions are secondary in origin and are therefore unrelated to the crystallization of quartz. Moreover, the inclusions have mixed carbonic-aqueous compositions that inhibit their direct correlation with the crustal or mantle fluids. The composition of dilute CO2-rich fluids observed in the quartz xenocrysts appear similar to those exsolved during the final stages of evolution of the Amba Dongar carbonatites. However, the carbonates are devoid of fluid inclusions and therefore their genetic relation with the quartz xenocrysts cannot be established.

  20. Development and Implementation of South Asia’s First Heat-Health Action Plan in Ahmedabad (Gujarat, India)

    PubMed Central

    Knowlton, Kim; Kulkarni, Suhas P.; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Mavalankar, Dileep; Jaiswal, Anjali; Connolly, Meredith; Nori-Sarma, Amruta; Rajiva, Ajit; Dutta, Priya; Deol, Bhaskar; Sanchez, Lauren; Khosla, Radhika; Webster, Peter J.; Toma, Violeta E.; Sheffield, Perry; Hess, Jeremy J.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent heat waves, already a concern in rapidly growing and urbanizing South Asia, will very likely worsen in a warming world. Coordinated adaptation efforts can reduce heat’s adverse health impacts, however. To address this concern in Ahmedabad (Gujarat, India), a coalition has been formed to develop an evidence-based heat preparedness plan and early warning system. This paper describes the group and initial steps in the plan’s development and implementation. Evidence accumulation included extensive literature review, analysis of local temperature and mortality data, surveys with heat-vulnerable populations, focus groups with health care professionals, and expert consultation. The findings and recommendations were encapsulated in policy briefs for key government agencies, health care professionals, outdoor workers, and slum communities, and synthesized in the heat preparedness plan. A 7-day probabilistic weather forecast was also developed and is used to trigger the plan in advance of dangerous heat waves. The pilot plan was implemented in 2013, and public outreach was done through training workshops, hoardings/billboards, pamphlets, and print advertisements. Evaluation activities and continuous improvement efforts are ongoing, along with plans to explore the program’s scalability to other Indian cities, as Ahmedabad is the first South Asian city to address heat-health threats comprehensively. PMID:24670386

  1. Occurrence and distribution of selected heavy metals and boron in groundwater of the Gulf of Khambhat region, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Devang; Survaiya, Mayur D; Basha, Shaik; Mandal, Subir K; Thorat, R B; Haldar, Soumya; Goel, Sangita; Dave, Himal; Baxi, Krushnakant; Trivedi, Rohit H; Mody, Kalpana H

    2014-03-01

    The concentration of selected heavy metals, like As, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn as well as B, was measured by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) in groundwater samples from various locations in the Gulf of Khambhat (GoK), an inlet of the Arabian Sea in the state of Gujarat, India, during post-monsoon, winter, and pre-monsoon seasons in a year. Most heavy elements are characterized by low mobility under slightly alkaline and reducing conditions; concentrations in confined aquifers are smaller than the maximum permissible values for drinking water. The temporal changes indicate that a majority of metals is entering the aquifer during monsoon. Principle component analysis of the heavy metal data suggests that Co, Cu, Cd, and Zn are interrelated with each other and derived significantly from anthropogenic route, while input of Pb and Cr may be due to atmospheric deposition in the study area. Both weathering of rocks and anthropogenic input were found to be main sources of elements in the groundwater. The heavy metal levels in groundwaters of the GoK region in comparison with some of the European and Asian sites were higher; however, these metal levels were found to be comparable with few urban sites in the world. PMID:24293301

  2. Naphthalene degradation by bacterial consortium (DV-AL) developed from Alang-Sosiya ship breaking yard, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Patel, Vilas; Jain, Siddharth; Madamwar, Datta

    2012-03-01

    Naphthalene degrading bacterial consortium (DV-AL) was developed by enrichment culture technique from sediment collected from the Alang-Sosiya ship breaking yard, Gujarat, India. The 16S rRNA gene based molecular analyzes revealed that the bacterial consortium (DV-AL) consisted of four strains namely, Achromobacter sp. BAB239, Pseudomonas sp. DV-AL2, Enterobacter sp. BAB240 and Pseudomonas sp. BAB241. Consortium DV-AL was able to degrade 1000 ppm of naphthalene in Bushnell Haas medium (BHM) containing peptone (0.1%) as co-substrate with an initial pH of 8.0 at 37°C under shaking conditions (150 rpm) within 24h. Maximum growth rate and naphthalene degradation rate were found to be 0.0389 h(-1) and 80 mg h(-1), respectively. Consortium DV-AL was able to utilize other aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons such as benzene, phenol, carbazole, petroleum oil, diesel fuel, and phenanthrene and 2-methyl naphthalene as sole carbon source. Consortium DV-AL was also efficient to degrade naphthalene in the presence of other pollutants such as petroleum hydrocarbons and heavy metals. PMID:22217733

  3. Revision of the Cretaceous fossil plant-assemblage from Gardeshwar (Gujarat, India): A conifer dominated floral association from an Upper Gondwana sequence on the West Coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jana, Brajendra Nath; King, Sarah C.; Hilton, Jason

    2013-09-01

    A small but diverse fossil plant assemblage from Gardeshwar in Gujarat Province of western India is reinvestigated, based on analysis of recently collected specimens that represent previously unrecognised taxa in combination with a critical review of previously reported taxa from the site. The assemblage is dominated by conifers including Brachyphyllum Brongniart, Elatocladus Halle, Pagiophyllum Heer, the cone Conites Sternberg, and ovulate scales of an araucarian conifer. Other plant groups are rare but include notable occurrences of the pteridophytes Lycopodites Lindley and Hutton and Gleichenia Smith, and the seed fern Sphenopteris (Brongniart) Sternberg. This assemblage is important as it represents the only datable fossils available from the Gardeshwar Formation and from the information presented we conclude it belongs to the Lower Cretaceous Allocladus-Brachyphyllum-Pagiophyllum floral biozone. The Gardeshwar assemblage association is unusual as it lacks the distinctive genus Allocladus but includes other taxa more typical of the Lower Cretaceous fern-dominated Weichselia-Onychiopsis-Gleichenia floral biozone, and may represent a transitional assemblage with characters of both biozones. However, this investigation highlights the lack of detailed stratigraphic analyses on the Lower Cretaceous sedimentary sequences of the west coast of India from which it remains uncertain if these two ‘biozones' are of different ages or whether they represent stratigraphically contemporaneous but ecologically distinct environments.

  4. Changes in atmospheric aerosol parameters after Gujarat earthquake of January 26, 2001

    E-print Network

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    ,*, S. Mukai a , R.P. Singh b a Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Kinki of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India Received 16 October 2002; received in revised form 3 March 2003; accepted 5 visible and near-infrared (0.412, 0.443, 0.490, 0.510, 0.555, 0.670, 0.765 and 0.865 lm). The aerosol

  5. Modelling the impact and cost-effectiveness of the HIV intervention programme amongst commercial sex workers in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Isaac C-H; Guinness, Lorna; Vickerman, Peter; Watts, Charlotte; Vannela, Gangadhar; Vadhvana, Jagdish; Foss, Anna M; Malodia, Laxman; Gandhi, Meena; Jani, Gaurang

    2007-01-01

    Background Ahmedabad is an industrial city in Gujarat, India. In 2003, the HIV prevalence among commercial sex workers (CSWs) in Ahmedabad reached 13.0%. In response, the Jyoti Sangh HIV prevention programme for CSWs was initiated, which involves outreach, peer education, condom distribution, and free STD clinics. Two surveys were performed among CSWs in 1999 and 2003. This study estimates the cost-effectiveness of the Jyoti Sangh HIV prevention programme. Methods A dynamic mathematical model was used with survey and intervention-specific data from Ahmedabad to estimate the HIV impact of the Jyoti Sangh project for the 51 months between the two CSW surveys. Uncertainty analysis was used to obtain different model fits to the HIV/STI epidemiological data, producing a range for the HIV impact of the project. Financial and economic costs of the intervention were estimated from the provider's perspective for the same time period. The cost per HIV-infection averted was estimated. Results Over 51 months, projections suggest that the intervention averted 624 and 5,131 HIV cases among the CSWs and their clients, respectively. This equates to a 54% and 51% decrease in the HIV infections that would have occurred among the CSWs and clients without the intervention. In the absence of intervention, the model predicts that the HIV prevalence amongst the CSWs in 2003 would have been 26%, almost twice that with the intervention. Cost per HIV infection averted, excluding and including peer educator economic costs, was USD 59 and USD 98 respectively. Conclusion This study demonstrated that targeted CSW interventions in India can be cost-effective, and highlights the importance of replicating this effort in other similar settings. PMID:17683595

  6. Geochemical study of laterites of the Jamnagar district, Gujarat, India: Implications on parent rock, mineralogy and tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshram, R. R.; Randive, K. R.

    2011-11-01

    The laterite deposits occur in a linear stretch along the northern Arabian Sea coast in the Jamnagar and Porbandar districts of, Gujarat state, India. These deposits are characterised by presence of gibbsite, kaoline, calcite, quartz, anatase, natroalunite, goethite and hematite, and relicts of mafic minerals and plagioclase. On the basis of petro-mineralogy and geochemistry, these deposits are grouped as aluminous laterites (Fe 2O 3 - 1.45-3.84%, Av. 3.13, Al 2O 3 - 39.31-57.24, Av. 45.80) and laterites (Fe 2O 3 - 9.84-32.21, Av. 25.13%, Al 2O 3 - 34.74-49.59, Av. 41.27). The major, trace and REE characteristics of laterites indicate that these were formed in situ by the alteration of parent rocks of trachytic/andesitic composition, and the process of bauxitisation followed the path of destruction of kaolinite and deferruginisation. The correlation patterns of several trace and rare earth elements and their preferential enrichment have indicated that there is an influence of precursor rock on the distribution of trace elements. The Jamnagar laterite deposits occur as capping over the Deccan Trap basaltic lava flows and pyroclasic deposits. Lateritisation prevailed during Palaeocene age when India was separated from the Seychelles and passing over the equator. During this time climate, morphology and drainage conditions were favourable for lateritisation that result in the formation of Jamnagar and other laterite deposits within the Deccan Province. Flood basaltic provinces of Deccan, Columbia, North Australia and Hawaii appear good location for hosting laterite deposits due to their wide areal extent, small geological time span and uniform chemical composition. However, comparison of the major flood basaltic provinces of the world has indicated that their palaeopositions along with palaeoclimate, morphology and drainage are equally important factors for facilitating lateritisation.

  7. Revisiting the 1897 Shillong and 1905 Kangra earthquakes in northern India: Site Response, Moho reflections and a Triggered Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Bilham, Roger

    1 Revisiting the 1897 Shillong and 1905 Kangra earthquakes in northern India: Site Response, Moho reflections and a Triggered Earthquake Susan E. Hough(1), Roger Bilham(2), Nicolas Ambraseys(3), and Nicole distributions for the Mw8.0 Shillong Plateau earthquake of 1897 and the Mw7.8 Kangra earthquake of 1905

  8. Appropriate Management of Acute Diarrhea in Children Among Public and Private Providers in Gujarat, India: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Christa L Fischer; Taneja, Sunita; LeFevre, Amnesty; Black, Robert E; Mazumder, Sarmila

    2015-01-01

    Diarrhea remains a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among children under 5 years of age in low- and middle-income countries. In 2006, the Indian government formally endorsed the World Health Organization guidelines that introduced zinc supplementation and low-osmolarity oral rehydration salts (ORS) for the treatment of diarrhea. Despite this, zinc is rarely prescribed and has not been available in the public sector in India until very recently. The Diarrhea Alleviation Through Zinc and ORS Treatment (DAZT) project was implemented in Gujarat between 2011 and 2013 to accelerate the uptake of zinc and ORS among public and private providers in 6 rural districts. As part of an external evaluation of DAZT, we interviewed 619 randomly selected facility- and community-based public and private providers 2–3 months after a 1-day training event had been completed (or, in the case of private providers, after at least 1 drug-detailing visit by a pharmaceutical representative had occurred) and supplies were in place. The purpose of the interviews was to assess providers’ knowledge of appropriate treatment for diarrhea in children, reported treatment practices, and availability of drugs in stock. More than 80% of all providers interviewed reported they had received training or a drug-detailing visit on diarrheal treatment in the past 6 months. Most providers in all cadres (range, 68% to 100%) correctly described how to prepare ORS and nearly all (range, 90% to 100%) reported routinely prescribing it to treat diarrhea in children. Reported routine prescription of zinc was lower, ranging from 62% among private providers to 96% among auxiliary nurse-midwives. Among providers who reported ever not recommending zinc (n?=?242), the 2 most frequently reported reasons for not doing so were not completely understanding zinc for diarrhea treatment and not having zinc in stock at the time of contact with the patient. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, recent training or drug-detailing visits and having zinc in stock were associated with reported zinc prescribing (P<.05). Recent training among public providers was significantly associated with having correct knowledge of zinc treatment duration and dosage, but the same was not true of drug-detailing visits among private providers. Treating diarrhea with zinc and low-osmolarity ORS is new for public and private providers in India and other low- and middle-income countries. Sufficient training and logistics support to ensure consistent supplies are critical if providers are to begin routinely treating all diarrhea episodes with zinc and ORS. PMID:26085020

  9. Palynostratigraphy and depositional environment of Vastan Lignite Mine (Early Eocene), Gujarat, western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. R.; Sahni, Ashok; Rana, R. S.; Verma, Poonam

    2013-04-01

    Early Eocene sedimentary successions of south Asia, are marked by the development of extensive fossil-bearing, lignite-rich sediments prior to the collision of India with Asia and provide data on contemporary equatorial faunal and vegetational assemblages. One such productive locality in western India is the Vastan Lignite Mine representing approximately a 54-52 Ma sequence dated by the presence of benthic zone marker species, Nummulites burdigalensis burdigalensis. The present study on Vastan Lignite Mine succession is based on the spore-pollen and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages and documents contemporary vegetational changes. 86 genera and 105 species belonging to algal remains (including dinoflagellate cysts), fungal remains, pteridophytic spores and angiospermous pollen grains have been recorded. On the basis of first appearance, acme and decline of palynotaxa, three cenozones have been recognized and broadly reflect changing palaeodepositional environments. These are in ascending stratigraphic order (i) Proxapertites Spp. Cenozone, (ii) Operculodinium centrocarpum Cenozone and (iii) Spinizonocolpites Spp. Cenozone. The basal sequence is lagoonal, palm-dominated and overlain by more open marine conditions with dinoflagellate cysts and at the top, mangrove elements are dominant. The succession has also provided a unique record of fish, lizards, snakes, and mammals.

  10. Burden of Self-Reported Noncommunicable Diseases in 26 Villages of Anand District of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dinesh; Raithatha, Shyamsundar J.; Gupta, Shanti; Raj, Ravi; Kharod, Nikhil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) account for 53% of deaths and 44% of disability adjusted life years lost in India. A survey was undertaken to measure the prevalence of tobacco and alcohol use and self-reported NCDs in a rural community in western part of India. Methodology. Trained Village Health Workers did the survey in the years 2012-13 under supervision. The data was collected for five NCDs, namely, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cancer, heart disease, and mental illnesses. Results. 18,269 households with a population of 89755 were covered. Prevalence of any form of tobacco use in the age group of >20 years was 34.5 and 52.7% and 15.2% in males and females, respectively. Prevalence of any NCD was 5.3% with a slightly higher prevalence in females (5.4%) than males (5.2%) in the age group of 20–69 years. Prevalence of NCD multimorbidity (?2 NCDs) was 0.7% in the age group of 20–69 years. 80.7% of hypertensives and 94.9% of diabetics were taking treatment. More females than males were taking antihypertensive treatment. Conclusion. Tobacco use was high. Prevalence of NCDs was less than that reported in other studies. Data generated from this study can be useful in planning a community based NCD programme.

  11. Estimation of seismic ground motions using deterministic approach for major cities of Gujarat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Choudhury, D.

    2012-06-01

    A deterministic seismic hazard analysis has been carried out for various sites of the major cities (Ahmedabad, Surat, Bhuj, Jamnagar and Junagadh) of the Gujarat region in India to compute the seismic hazard exceeding a certain level in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and to estimate maximum possible PGA at each site at bed rock level. The seismic sources in Gujarat are very uncertain and recurrence intervals of regional large earthquakes are not well defined. Because the instrumental records of India specifically in the Gujarat region are far from being satisfactory for modeling the seismic hazard using the probabilistic approach, an attempt has been made in this study to accomplish it through the deterministic approach. In this regard, all small and large faults of the Gujarat region were evaluated to obtain major fault systems. The empirical relations suggested by earlier researchers for the estimation of maximum magnitude of earthquake motion with various properties of faults like length, surface area, slip rate, etc. have been applied to those faults to obtain the maximum earthquake magnitude. For the analysis, seven different ground motion attenuation relations (GMARs) of strong ground motion have been utilized to calculate the maximum horizontal ground accelerations for each major city of Gujarat. Epistemic uncertainties in the hazard computations are accounted for within a logic-tree framework by considering the controlling parameters like b-value, maximum magnitude and ground motion attenuation relations (GMARs). The corresponding deterministic spectra have been prepared for each major city for the 50th and 84th percentiles of ground motion occurrence. These deterministic spectra are further compared with the specified spectra of Indian design code IS:1893-Part I (2002) to validate them for further practical use. Close examination of the developed spectra reveals that the expected ground motion values become high for the Kachchh region i.e. Bhuj city and moderate in the Mainland Gujarat, i.e. cities of Surat and Ahmedabad. The seismic ground motion level in the Saurashtra is moderate but marginally differs from that as presently specified in IS:1893-Part I (2002). Based on the present study, the recommended PGA values for the cities studied are 0.13 g, 0.15 g, 0.64 g, 0.14 g and 0.2 g for Ahmedabad city, Surat City, Bhuj City, Jamnagar City and Junagadh city, respectively. The prepared spectra can be further used for seismic resistant design of structures within the above major city boundaries of Gujarat to quantify seismic loading on structures.

  12. ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 447, Vol. 41, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 201-222 WHITHER PERFORMANCE-BASED ENGINEERING IN INDIA?

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    ISET Journal of Earthquake Technology, Paper No. 447, Vol. 41, No. 1, March 2004, pp. 201 Institute of Technology Roorkee Roorkee-247667 ABSTRACT The Kutch Earthquake of January 26, 2001 in Gujarat this earthquake, doubts arose about our professional practices, building by-laws, construction materials, building

  13. A very large dew and rain ridge collector in the Kutch area (Gujarat, India)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharan, G.; Clus, O.; Singh, S.; Muselli, M.; Beysens, D.

    2011-07-01

    SummaryThe world's largest dew and rain collecting system, comprised of ridge-and-trough modules, was constructed in March 2006 at Panandhro in the semi-arid area of Kutch (NW India). The main goals were (i) to collect dew on a scale that could be beneficial to the local population (ii) to determine the efficiency of this new module shape, (iii) to determine whether results obtained from small measurement condensers can be projected to large condensers, (iv) to apply a computational fluid dynamic simulation to improve the condenser set-up. Preliminary studies performed with four standard plane condensers of 1 m 2 surface area, inclined 30° from horizontal, identified Panandhro as a promising site. The cumulated dew water during 192 days was 12.6 mm with a maximum of 0.556 mm/night. A large dew condenser (850 m 2 net total surface) was designed with 10 ridge-and-trough modules. The ridges are trapezoidal, 33 m long, 0.5 m wide at the top, 2.2 m wide at the base and sloping 30° from horizontal. The depth of the troughs between the ridges is 0.5 m. A 2.5 cm thick polystyrene foam rests on the surface as insulation with a radiative foil on top (similar to that developed by OPUR, see www.opur.fr). Numerical simulations using the computational fluid dynamic software PHOENICS were performed. The most profitable orientation was with the condenser oriented back to the wind direction, a configuration that lowers the wind velocity near the foil due to the combination of free convection and wind recirculation flows. A comparison of water yields over one year of measurements between four 1 m 2 plane condensers and a 850 m 2 ridge condenser showed a 42% lower yield on the large condenser. The difference is attributed mainly to folds in the plastic foil allowing water to fill the central ridge, thus decreasing radiative cooling. The output for 2007 was 6545 L, corresponding to 7.7 mm/day on average. The largest event was 251.4 L/night (0.3 mm). Such a condenser can also collect rain (and, to a lesser extent, fog). Chemical and biological analyses showed that dew water, once filtered and bottled, could be used for drinking after a light treatment to increase the pH. The price of this water could be lowered to reach 30% (dew only) or even 3% (dew plus rain) of the market prize.

  14. Double Outbreak of Measles in the Talaja Block of Bhavnagar District, Gujarat, India 2011: A Need for Improving the Vaccine Coverage and the Community Participation

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Pankhuri P.; Chauhan, Naresh T.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two outbreaks of measles were reported from an urban and a village area of Bhavnagar District, Gujarat, India in January and March 2011 respectively. Aim The present study was conducted to investigate and to assess various epidemiological features which were associated with the measles outbreak. Settings and Design The present study was designed as a cross sectional study, which was conducted in an urban and a rural area of the Talaja block of the Bhavnagar district of Gujarat, India from December 2010 to April 2011. Methods and Material The suspected cases were detected through an active case finding in the community. We defined a case clinically by the WHO criteria as the occurrence of a febrile rash with or without cough, coryza and conjunctivitis in a resident of the Talaja-urban and the Gorkhi village of the Talaja block, in the period from 1st December 2010 to 30th April 2011. Blood samples from 10 case patients were collected for the IgM antibody detection. A community based, retrospective, cohort design was carried out to find the vaccine efficacy in the Gorkhi village. Statistical Analysis We entered and analyzed the data by using an MS-Excel sheet. Results This study identified 27 confirmed cases of measles in the urban area of Talaja and 78 cases in Gorkhi village. All the 105 case patients belonged to the age group of 3 months-15 years. According to their mothers’ statements, out of the 105 measles cases in the two areas, 40 (38%) case patients were immunized. Ten sera from five case-patients each from both the areas were tested; all were found to be positive for the IgM/IgG antibodies by ELISA. Conclusions The outbreaks occurred due to a poor community participation and the poor vaccine coverage levels. PMID:23373035

  15. The 01/26/2001 Bhuj, India, Earthquake: Intraplate or Interplate?

    E-print Network

    Yang, Youqing "Richard"

    - centrations of earthquakes, volcanism, and other tectonic activity within narrowly defined plate boundaries255 The 01/26/2001 Bhuj, India, Earthquake: Intraplate or Interplate? Qingsong Li, Mian Liu Day (01/26/2001) earthquake near Bhuj in western In- dia killed nearly 20,000 people and destroyed

  16. The 01/26/2001 Bhuj, India, Earthquake: Intraplate or Interplate?

    E-print Network

    Liu, Mian

    - centrations of earthquakes, volcanism, and other tectonic activity within narrowly defined plate boundaries- 1 - The 01/26/2001 Bhuj, India, Earthquake: Intraplate or Interplate? Qingsong Li, Mian Liu Day (01/26/2001) earthquake near Bhuj in western In- dia killed nearly 20,000 people and destroyed

  17. Earthquake interevent time distribution in Kachchh, Northwestern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasari, Sumanta; Dikshit, Onkar

    2015-12-01

    Statistical properties of earthquake interevent times have long been the topic of interest to seismologists and earthquake professionals, mainly for hazard-related concerns. In this paper, we present a comprehensive study on the temporal statistics of earthquake interoccurrence times of the seismically active Kachchh peninsula (western India) from thirteen probability distributions. Those distributions are exponential, gamma, lognormal, Weibull, Levy, Maxwell, Pareto, Rayleigh, inverse Gaussian (Brownian passage time), inverse Weibull (Frechet), exponentiated exponential, exponentiated Rayleigh (Burr type X), and exponentiated Weibull distributions. Statistical inferences of the scale and shape parameters of these distributions are discussed from the maximum likelihood estimations and the Fisher information matrices. The latter are used as a surrogate tool to appraise the parametric uncertainty in the estimation process. The results were found on the basis of two goodness-of-fit tests: the maximum likelihood criterion with its modification to Akaike information criterion (AIC) and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) minimum distance criterion. These results reveal that (i) the exponential model provides the best fit, (ii) the gamma, lognormal, Weibull, inverse Gaussian, exponentiated exponential, exponentiated Rayleigh, and exponentiated Weibull models provide an intermediate fit, and (iii) the rest, namely Levy, Maxwell, Pareto, Rayleigh, and inverse Weibull, fit poorly to the earthquake catalog of Kachchh and its adjacent regions. This study also analyzes the present-day seismicity in terms of the estimated recurrence interval and conditional probability curves (hazard curves). The estimated cumulative probability and the conditional probability of a magnitude 5.0 or higher event reach 0.8-0.9 by 2027-2036 and 2034-2043, respectively. These values have significant implications in a variety of practical applications including earthquake insurance, seismic zonation, location identification of lifeline structures, and revision of building codes.

  18. Earthquake Recurrence and Rupture Dynamics of Himalayan Frontal Thrust, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Senthil; Wesnousky, Steven G.; Rockwell, Thomas K.; Ragona, Daniel; Thakur, Vikram C.; Seitz, Gordon G.

    2001-12-01

    The Black Mango fault is a structural discontinuity that transforms motion between two segments of the active Himalayan Frontal Thrust (HFT) in northwestern India. The Black Mango fault displays evidence of two large surface rupture earthquakes during the past 650 years, subsequent to 1294 A.D. and 1423 A.D., and possibly another rupture at about 260 A.D. Displacement during the last two earthquakes was at minimum 4.6 meters and 2.4 to 4.0 meters, respectively, and possibly larger for the 260 A.D. event. Abandoned terraces of the adjacent Markanda River record uplift due to slip on the underlying HFT of 4.8 +/- 0.9 millimeters per year or greater since the mid-Holocene. The uplift rate is equivalent to rates of fault slip and crustal shortening of 9.6-3.5+7.0 millimeters per year and 8.4-3.6+7.3 millimeters per year, respectively, when it is assumed that the HFT dips 30° +/- 10°.

  19. GIS-based colour composites and overlays to delineate heavy metal contamination zones in the shallow alluvial aquifers, Ankaleshwar industrial estate, south Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Suyash; Shirke, K. D.; Pawar, N. J.

    2008-03-01

    In an attempt to delineate heavy metal contamination precincts and to evaluate the extent and degree of toxic levels, besides their possible sources, 38 water samples from Ankaleshwar Industrial Estate, south Gujarat, India were analyzed. By clutching geochemical analyses and GIS-based colour composites areas depicting anomalously high concentration of heavy metals (Mo, Zn, Pb, Ni, Co, Cd, etc.) in the groundwater were revealed. The multicomponent overlays in grey-scale facilitated in identifying situates of heavy metal ‘hot spots’, and lateral protuberances of the contamination plume around defile stretch of the main stream Amla Khadi flowing through the area. The multiple pollution plumes emerging from other parts of the area further coincide with effluent laden streams and small channels indicating industrial establishments as major sources of groundwater contamination. Influent nature of the streams, accelerated infiltration process, high mass influx and shallow groundwater table are the factors conducive for easy access of heavy metals to the phreatic aquifers affecting over 20 km2 area. On the basis of P/ U ratios (concentration of metals in polluted water to unpolluted water), geogenic and anthropogenic sources have been identified. Very high levels of technogenic elements present in the ground water raise concerns about possible migration into food crops, as the area is an important horticultural locale and is highly cultivated.

  20. Analysis of slipback of rural water supply systems in India using FIETS framework and IMIS database : Gujarat Case Study

    E-print Network

    Novellino Fajardo, Marianna Isabel, 1978-

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this project is to address the failure rate or "slipback" of rural water supply systems in India by analyzing performance of previous water projects using the national government database called IMIS. Data ...

  1. The hydrocarbon potential, thermal maturity, sequence stratigraphic setting and depositional palaeoenvironment of carbonaceous shale and lignite successions of Panandhro, northwestern Kutch Basin, Gujarat, Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, Vinay K.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the present paper is to provide geochemical and palynological data to characterize lignites and carbonaceous shales from Panandhro, northwestern Kutch Basin, Gujarat, Western India, in terms of their hydrocarbon potential, thermal maturity, sequence stratigraphic settings and depositional palaeoenvironment. The samples, collected in Panandhro lignite mine, belong to Naredi Formation of Late Paleocene-Early Eocene age. The geochemical results are based on proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, X-ray diffraction and Rock-Eval py-rolysis analyses, whereas palynological data include palynofossil composition and thermal alteration index (TAI). The TOC, hydrogen index (HI), cracked hydrocarbon (S2), bitumen index (BI), quality index (QI), and the total genetic potential (S1+S2) values indicate that the studied lignites and carbonaceous shales have good source rock potential. The organic matter is predominantly of type II and type II/III kerogen, which has potential to generate oil as well as gas. Thermal maturity determined from thermal alteration index (TAI), T max and production index (PI) indicates that the organic matter is immature, and in the diagenesis stage of organic matter transformation. The deposition of the studied carbonaceous shales and lignites took place in palaeoenvironments varying from brackish mangrove to freshwater swamp. This study indicates that the proportion of ferns, palms, volatile matter content, S/C, H/C ratios, as well as the presence of siderite and quartz can be used as an indicator of accommodation trends in the coal depositional system. The Panandhro carbonaceous shales and lignites were deposited during the lowstand systems tract with many cycles of small magnitude trangressive-regressive phases. Thus, the geochemistry and ecological palynology are useful not only for the investigation of coal quality and origin, but also to infer accommodation space settings of the mire. This can be gainfully utilized in the coal industry for coal mine planning, development and exploitation, because of the predictive ability to infer changes in stratigraphy and coal quality.

  2. The hydrocarbon potential, thermal maturity, sequence stratigraphic setting and depositional palaeoenvironment of carbonaceous shale and lignite successions of Panandhro, northwestern Kutch Basin, Gujarat, Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahay, Vinay

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the present paper is to provide geochemical and palynological data to characterize lignites and carbonaceous shales from Panandhro, northwestern Kutch Basin, Gujarat, Western India, in terms of their hydrocarbon potential, thermal maturity, sequence stratigraphic settings and depositional palaeoenvironment. The samples, collected in Panandhro lignite mine, belong to Naredi Formation of Late Paleocene-Early Eocene age. The geochemical results are based on proximate analysis, ultimate analysis, X-ray diffraction and Rock-Eval py-rolysis analyses, whereas palynological data include palynofossil composition and thermal alteration index (TAI). The TOC, hydrogen index (HI), cracked hydrocarbon (S2), bitumen index (BI), quality index (QI), and the total genetic potential (S1+S2) values indicate that the studied lignites and carbonaceous shales have good source rock potential. The organic matter is predominantly of type II and type II/III kerogen, which has potential to generate oil as well as gas. Thermal maturity determined from thermal alteration index (TAI), Tmax and production index (PI) indicates that the organic matter is immature, and in the diagenesis stage of organic matter transformation. The deposition of the studied carbonaceous shales and lignites took place in palaeoenvironments varying from brackish mangrove to freshwater swamp. This study indicates that the proportion of ferns, palms, volatile matter content, S/C, H/C ratios, as well as the presence of siderite and quartz can be used as an indicator of accommodation trends in the coal depositional system. The Panandhro carbonaceous shales and lignites were deposited during the lowstand systems tract with many cycles of small magnitude trangressive-regressive phases. Thus, the geochemistry and ecological palynology are useful not only for the investigation of coal quality and origin, but also to infer accommodation space settings of the mire. This can be gainfully utilized in the coal industry for coal mine planning, development and exploitation, because of the predictive ability to infer changes in stratigraphy and coal quality.

  3. Satellite image based quantification of invasion and patch dynamics of mesquite ( Prosopis juliflora) in Great Rann of Kachchh, Kachchh Biosphere Reserve, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasha, S. Vazeed; Satish, K. V.; Reddy, C. Sudhakar; Prasada Rao, P. V. V.; Jha, C. S.

    2014-10-01

    The invasion of alien species is a significant threat to global biodiversity and the top driver of climate change. The present study was conducted in the Great Rann of Kachchh, part of Kachchh Biosphere Reserve, Gujarat, India, which has been severely affected by invasion of Prosopis juliflora. The invasive weed infestation has been identified using multi-temporal remote sensing datasets of 1977, 1990, 1999, 2005 and 2011. Spatial analyses of the transition matrix, extent of invasive colonies, patchiness, coalescence and rate of spread were carried out. During the study period of three and half decades, almost 295 km2 of the natural land cover was converted into Prosopis cover. This study has shown an increment of 42.9% of area under Prosopis cover in the Great Rann of Kachchh, part of the Kachchh Biosphere Reserve during 1977 to 2011. Spatial analysis indicates high occupancy of Prosopis cover with most of the invasion (95.9%) occurring in the grasslands and only 4.1% in other land cover types. The process of Prosopis invasion shows high patch initiation, followed by coalescence, indicating aggressive colonization of species. The number of patches within an area of < 1 km2 increased from 1977 to 2011, indicating the formation of new Prosopis habitats by replacing the grasslands. The largest patch of Prosopis cover increased from 144 km2 in 1977 to 430 km2 in 2011. The estimated mean patch size was 7.8 km2 in 1977. The mean patch size was largest during 2011, i.e., 9 km2. The annual spread rate for Prosopis has been estimated as 2.1% during 2005-2011. The present work has investigated the long term changes in Prosopis cover in the Great Rann of Kachchh, part of Kachchh Biosphere Reserve. The spatial database generated will be useful in preparing strategies for the management of Prosopis juliflora.

  4. Reduction of catastrophic health care expenditures by a community-based health insurance scheme in Gujarat, India: current experiences and challenges.

    PubMed Central

    Ranson, Michael Kent

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the Self Employed Women's Association's Medical Insurance Fund in Gujarat in terms of insurance coverage according to income groups, protection of claimants from costs of hospitalization, time between discharge and reimbursement, and frequency of use. METHODS: One thousand nine hundred and thirty claims submitted over six years were analysed. FINDINGS: Two hundred and fifteen (11%) of 1927 claims were rejected. The mean household income of claimants was significantly lower than that of the general population. The percentage of households below the poverty line was similar for claimants and the general population. One thousand seven hundred and twelve (1712) claims were reimbursed: 805 (47%) fully and 907 (53%) at a mean reimbursement rate of 55.6%. Reimbursement more than halved the percentage of catastrophic hospitalizations (>10% of annual household income) and hospitalizations resulting in impoverishment. The average time between discharge and reimbursement was four months. The frequency of submission of claims was low (18.0/1000 members per year: 22-37% of the estimated frequency of hospitalization). CONCLUSIONS: The findings have implications for community-based health insurance schemes in India and elsewhere. Such schemes can protect poor households against the uncertain risk of medical expenses. They can be implemented in areas where institutional capacity is too weak to organize nationwide risk-pooling. Such schemes can cover poor people, including people and households below the poverty line. A trade off exists between maintaining the scheme's financial viability and protecting members against catastrophic expenditures. To facilitate reimbursement, administration, particularly processing of claims, should happen near claimants. Fine-tuning the design of a scheme is an ongoing process - a system of monitoring and evaluation is vital. PMID:12219151

  5. Household Resources and Their Changing Relationships: Case Studies in Gujarat, India. International Agriculture Publications General Series Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magrabi, Frances M., Ed.; Verma, Amita, Ed.

    This publication contains case studies based on rural life in northern India. The titles include: (1) "Profiles of Two Indian Rural Settings"; (2) "Visitors View a Village"; (3) "Village Households"; (4) "Agriculture"; (5) "Women's Needs: Health and Nutrition"; (6) "Meal Pattern, Nutrient Intake, Intra-Familial Distribution of Foods, Food Habits,…

  6. A new insight into crustal heterogeneity beneath the 2001 Bhuj earthquake region of Northwest India and its implications for rupture initiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, A. P.; Mishra, O. P.; Yadav, R. B. S.; Kumar, Dinesh

    2012-04-01

    The seismic characteristics of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake (Mw 7.6) has been examined from the proxy indicators, relative size distribution (3D b-value mapping) and seismic tomography using a new data set to understand the role of crustal heterogeneities in rupture initiations of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake of the Gujarat (India), one of the disastrous Indian earthquakes of the new millennium. The aftershocks sequence recorded by 22 seismograph stations of Gujarat Seismic Network (GSNet) during the period from 2006 to 2009, encompassing approximately 80 km × 70 km rupture area had revealed clustering of aftershocks at depth of 5-35 km, which is seismogenic layer responsible for the occurrence of continued aftershocks activity in the study region. The 3D b-value mapping estimated from a total of 3850 precisely located aftershocks with magnitude of completeness Mc ? 2.7 shows that a high b-value region is sandwiched within the main shock hypocenter at the depth of 20-25 km and low b-value region above and below of the 2001 Bhuj main shock hypocenter. Estimates of 3-D seismic velocity (Vp; Vs) and Poisson's ratio (?) structure beneath the region demonstrated a very close correspondence with the b-value mapping that supports the similar physicochemical processes of retaining fluids within the fractured rock matrix beneath the 2001 Bhuj mainshock hypocenter. The overall b-value is estimated close to 1.0 which reveals that seismogenesis is related to crustal heterogeneity, which, in turn also supported by low-Vs and high-? structures. The high b-value and high-? anomaly at the depth of 20-25 km indicate the presence of highly fractured heterogeneous rock matrix with fluid intrusions into it at deeper depth beneath the main shock hypocenter region. Low b-value and high-Vp in the region is observed towards the north-east and north-west of the main shock that might be an indication of the existence of relatively competent rock masses with negligible volume of cracks that may have contained over-pressurized fluids without molten rocks.

  7. Major and trace element abundances, and Sr and Nd isotopic composition of Carbonatites from Amba Dongar, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Jyoti; Paul, Debajyoti; Viladkar, Shrinivas G.; Sensarma, Sarajit

    2015-04-01

    Despite significant progress during the last decade, the petrogenesis of carbonatites is still highly debated regarding the exact mechanism of carbonatite magma generation (fractional crystallization of carbonated-silicate magmas, liquid immiscibility of carbonated-silicate magmas, partial melting of carbonated mantle peridotite or carbonated lherzolitic mantle) and its evolution. The Amba Dongar carbonatite complex in Chhota Udaipur district, Gujarat is the youngest Indian carbonatite complex, which intruded into the ~ 90 Ma Bagh sandstones and limestone and 68-65 Ma Deccan flood basalts. The emplacement age (40Ar/39Ar age of 65±0.3 Ma; Ray and Pande, 1999) coincides with the age of main pulse of Deccan flood basalts at ca. 65 Ma. We report new geochemical data (major oxide and trace element abundances, and Sr and Nd isotopic ratios) on 23 carbonatite samples from Amba Dongar. The Amba Dongar carbonatite complex consists of carbonatite (sövite, and ankerite), and associated nephelinite, phonolite, and both pre- and post-carbonatite basalts. Detailed minerology of carbonatite include dominant calcite along with pyrochlore, apatite, magnetite, aegirine-augite and accessory phases. Apatite crystals are observed in carbonatite as well as in nephelinite. In sövites, apatite occur in various forms including cumulus, clusters and scattered within and along the boundary of calcite crystals. Two generation of apatite crystals are commonly observed in sövite and nephelinite; textural changes suggest presence of different five pulses of sövitic magma during the emplacement of the sövite ring dike. Bulk major oxides and trace element (including REEs) compositions of carbonatites and associated silicate rocks are determined by WD-XRF and ICP-MS, respectively. Major oxides abundances are consistent with the already available data on the Amba Dongar carbonatite complex. Trace element concentrations for the sövite reveals high concentrations of Sr (929-7476 ppm), Ba (344-52072 ppm) and Nb (35-2115 ppm). The ankeritic carbonatites are extremely enriched in the incompatible trace elements (e.g., ~7-32 times higher Ba, highest REE ~40,000 ppm and ~600 ppm of Th). Chondrite-normalized REE patterns show high degree of LREE enrichment suggesting low-degree partial melting of the source. The chondrite normalized La/Yb ratio of sövite and ankeritic carbonatite vary in the range 70-411. The radiogenic Sr-Nd isotopic composition of sövites (87Sr/86Sr: 0.7055-0.7066; É?Nd: -6.0 to -2.2) and ankerites (0.7058-0.7081; -3.8 to -1.9) reveal more isotopic variability compared to the available data (sövites 0.7054-0.706; -2.5 to -1.5; ankerites 0.7056-0.7065; -2.5 to -1.5). It is likely that EM I and II type sources are involved in the generation of Amba Dongar carbonatite complex. More data on carbonatites and associated silicate rocks will be helpful to establish the composition of parental carbonatite melts, depth of generation (lithosphere vs asthenosphere), their spatial relation with associated silicate rocks, and the evolution of the primary carbonatite melt over time.

  8. The June 2000 Mw 7.9 earthquakes south of Sumatra: Deformation in the IndiaAustralia Plate

    E-print Network

    Abercrombie, Rachel E.

    The June 2000 Mw 7.9 earthquakes south of Sumatra: Deformation in the India­Australia Plate Rachel 2002; accepted 23 October 2002; published 11 January 2003. [1] Two large (Mw 7.9) earthquakes occurred on 4 and 18 June 2000, south of Sumatra, beneath the Indian Ocean. Both earthquakes were predominantly

  9. Real Time Inventory Management: Visual Survey of Interior Architecture Elements and Space Making Crafts of Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Routh, R.; Singh, N.; Shah, P.

    2013-07-01

    In India, most of the inventories and documentations conducted for built heritage have been very nominal in nature and completely overlook the rich and opulent characters of the built form. This creates an imperative need of identifying and creating a detailed inventory of Interior Architecture (I.A.) Elements together with the SMCs and SSCs. This paper presents the process and the technique developed and termed as Real Time Visual Mapping (RTVM). RTVM is a procedure that incorporates the tablet survey, developed using open source tools, and is the first of its kind visual survey technique in India. The procedure comprises of an interactive form for mapping and helps manage the inventory generated from semi-urban and urban areas. The technique allows the user to transfer the mapped data in real time from the field, which can be produced through an interactive catalogue and map application. The recorded inputs reveal data ranging from type of elements to materials used, along with the various levels of traditional building crafts and expressions involved.

  10. Characterizing rainfall of hot arid region by using time-series modeling and sustainability approaches: a case study from Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machiwal, Deepesh; Kumar, Sanjay; Dayal, Devi

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed at characterization of rainfall dynamics in a hot arid region of Gujarat, India by employing time-series modeling techniques and sustainability approach. Five characteristics, i.e., normality, stationarity, homogeneity, presence/absence of trend, and persistence of 34-year (1980-2013) period annual rainfall time series of ten stations were identified/detected by applying multiple parametric and non-parametric statistical tests. Furthermore, the study involves novelty of proposing sustainability concept for evaluating rainfall time series and demonstrated the concept, for the first time, by identifying the most sustainable rainfall series following reliability (R y), resilience (R e), and vulnerability (V y) approach. Box-whisker plots, normal probability plots, and histograms indicated that the annual rainfall of Mandvi and Dayapar stations is relatively more positively skewed and non-normal compared with that of other stations, which is due to the presence of severe outlier and extreme. Results of Shapiro-Wilk test and Lilliefors test revealed that annual rainfall series of all stations significantly deviated from normal distribution. Two parametric t tests and the non-parametric Mann-Whitney test indicated significant non-stationarity in annual rainfall of Rapar station, where the rainfall was also found to be non-homogeneous based on the results of four parametric homogeneity tests. Four trend tests indicated significantly increasing rainfall trends at Rapar and Gandhidham stations. The autocorrelation analysis suggested the presence of persistence of statistically significant nature in rainfall series of Bhachau (3-year time lag), Mundra (1- and 9-year time lag), Nakhatrana (9-year time lag), and Rapar (3- and 4-year time lag). Results of sustainability approach indicated that annual rainfall of Mundra and Naliya stations (R y = 0.50 and 0.44; R e = 0.47 and 0.47; V y = 0.49 and 0.46, respectively) are the most sustainable and dependable compared with that of other stations. The highest values of sustainability index at Mundra (0.120) and Naliya (0.112) stations confirmed the earlier findings of R y-R e-V y approach. In general, annual rainfall of the study area is less reliable, less resilient, and moderately vulnerable, which emphasizes the need of developing suitable strategies for managing water resources of the area on sustainable basis. Finally, it is recommended that multiple statistical tests (at least two) should be used in time-series modeling for making reliable decisions. Moreover, methodology and findings of the sustainability concept in rainfall time series can easily be adopted in other arid regions of the world.

  11. SRTM Anaglyph: Bhuj, India, Two Weeks After earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On January 26, 2001, the city of Bhuj suffered the most deadly earthquake in India's history. About 20,000 were killed and more than one million homes were damaged or destroyed. Shortly after the quake, geologists conducted field investigations to inventory and analyze the natural effects of the event. Stereoscopic views, similar to this anaglyph, aided the geologists in locating landforms indicative of long-term (and possibly ongoing) deformation. Soon, elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) will be used in the study of a wide variety of natural hazards worldwide.

    In this image, the city of Bhuj appears as a medium gray area at the scene center, and the city airport is toward the north (top). Vegetation appears very dark. Rugged but low relief hills of previously folded and faulted bedrock appear south (bottom) and northwest (upper-left) of the city.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image (taken just two weeks after the earthquake) over preliminary digital elevation data from the SRTM and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. The Landsat7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center,Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 13.5 x 20.6 kilometers ( 8.4 x 12.8 miles) Location: 23.3 deg. North lat., 69.7 deg. East lon. Orientation: North toward the top Image Data: Landsat Band 3 Date Acquired: February 2000 (SRTM), February 9, 2001 (Landsat)

  12. SRTM Stereo Pair: Bhuj, India, Two Weeks After earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    On January 26, 2001, the city of Bhuj suffered the most deadly earthquake in India's history. About 20,000 people were killed, and more than one million homes were damaged or destroyed. Shortly after the quake, geologists conducted field investigations to inventory and analyze the natural effects of the event. Stereoscopic views, similar to this image, aided the geologists in locating landforms indicative of long-term (and possibly ongoing) deformation. Soon, elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) will be used in the study of a wide variety of natural hazards worldwide.

    In this image, the city of Bhuj appears as a gray area at the scene center, and the city airport is toward the north (top). Vegetation appears green. Rugged but low relief hills of previously folded and faulted bedrock appear south (bottom) and northwest (upper-left) of the city.

    This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image (taken just two weeks after the earthquake) over a preliminary SRTM elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing) or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyses of the large and growing Landsat image archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on February 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect three-dimensional measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter-long (200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), and the German and Italian space agencies. It is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, Washington, DC.

    Size: 13.5 x 20.6 kilometers ( 8.4 x 12.8 miles) Location: 23.3 deg. North lat., 69.7 deg. East lon. Orientation: North toward the top Image Data: Landsat Bands 1, 2+4, 3 as blue, green, red, respectively Date Acquired: February 2000 (SRTM), February 9, 2001 (Landsat)

  13. Quantifying the media bias in intensity surveys: Lessons from the 2001 Bhuj, India, earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Pande, P.

    2007-01-01

    Many seismologists have looked at the 26 January 2001 Bhuj earthquake as a key modern calibration event that could be used to improve estimates of magnitudes of large historic mainshocks in stable continental regions. Since no instrumental data are available for important historic events such as the 1819 Allah Bund, India, and the 1811-1812 New Madrid, central U.S. mainshocks, calibration hinges on comparisons of the macroseismic effects of these earthquakes with those of comparable modern earthquakes for which a reliable, instrumentally determined moment magnitude is available. However, although such a comparison is conceptually straightforward, in practice it is complicated by potentially significant inconsistencies in methods used to quantify macroseismic effects in different regions and/or times. For the Bhuj earthquake, extensive intensity data sets have been compiled and published from both media accounts and detailed direct surveys. Comparing the two provides a quantification of the previously suspected media bias, whereby earthquake effects can be exaggerated in media accounts. This bias is a strong function of intensity level, with substantial bias at the highest shaking levels and significantly less bias at low intensities. Because only sparse documentary data are in general available for older historic earthquakes, the results of this study suggest that their inferred intensity distributions might be similarly biased. We further use the survey-based intensity values to develop a new relationship between intensities and ground motions.

  14. Government of Gujarat has selected Dr.Harinarayana as an independent Director on the board of Directors of

    E-print Network

    Harinarayana, T.

    Government of Gujarat has selected Dr.Harinarayana as an independent Director on the board), Hyderabad, was chosen by the Government of Gujarat as an independent Director for it's state owned company, Government of India, Best Scientist Award by the Government of Andhra Pradesh, Elected Fellow of AP Akademi

  15. A comparative study on the Earthquake Information Management Systems (EIMS) in India, Afghanistan and Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ajami, Sima

    2012-01-01

    Context: Damages and loss of life sustained during an earthquake results from falling structures and flying glass and objects. To address these and other problems, new information technology and systems as a means can improve crisis management and crisis response. The most important factor for managing the crisis depends on our readiness before disasters by useful data. Aims: This study aimed to determine the Earthquake Information Management System (EIMS) in India, Afghanistan and Iran, and describe how we can reduce destruction by EIMS in crisis management. Materials and Methods: This study was an analytical comparison in which data were collected by questionnaire, observation and checklist. The population was EIMS in selected countries. Sources of information were staff in related organizations, scientific documentations and Internet. For data analysis, Criteria Rating Technique, Delphi Technique and descriptive methods were used. Results: Findings showed that EIMS in India (Disaster Information Management System), Afghanistan (Management Information for Natural Disasters) and Iran are decentralized. The Indian state has organized an expert group to inspect issues about disaster decreasing strategy. In Iran, there was no useful and efficient EIMS to evaluate earthquake information. Conclusions: According to outcomes, it is clear that an information system can only influence decisions if it is relevant, reliable and available for the decision-makers in a timely fashion. Therefore, it is necessary to reform and design a model. The model contains responsible organizations and their functions. PMID:23555130

  16. Earthquakes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ... during an earthquake. Be Ready! Earthquakes Disasters & Severe Weather Earthquakes Extreme Heat Floods Hurricanes Landslides Tornadoes Tsunamis ...

  17. Coda Q Attenuation and Source Parameters Analysis in North East India Using Local Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, A. K.; Mohanty, W. K.; Earthquake Seismology

    2010-12-01

    Alok Kumar Mohapatra1* and William Kumar Mohanty1 *Corresponding author: alokgpiitkgp@gmail.com 1Department of Geology and Geophysics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India. Pin-721302 ABSTRACT In the present study, the quality factor of coda waves (Qc) and the source parameters has been estimated for the Northeastern India, using the digital data of ten local earthquakes from April 2001 to November 2002. Earthquakes with magnitude range from 3.8 to 4.9 have been taken into account. The time domain coda decay method of a single back scattering model is used to calculate frequency dependent values of Coda Q (Qc) where as, the source parameters like seismic moment(Mo), stress drop, source radius(r), radiant energy(Wo),and strain drop are estimated using displacement amplitude spectrum of body wave using Brune's model. The earthquakes with magnitude range 3.8 to 4.9 have been used for estimation Qc at six central frequencies 1.5 Hz, 3.0 Hz, 6.0 Hz, 9.0 Hz, 12.0 Hz, and 18.0 Hz. In the present work, the Qc value of local earthquakes are estimated to understand the attenuation characteristic, source parameters and tectonic activity of the region. Based on a criteria of homogeneity in the geological characteristics and the constrains imposed by the distribution of available events the study region has been classified into three zones such as the Tibetan Plateau Zone (TPZ), Bengal Alluvium and Arakan-Yuma Zone (BAZ), Shillong Plateau Zone (SPZ). It follows the power law Qc= Qo (f/fo)n where, Qo is the quality factor at the reference frequency (1Hz) fo and n is the frequency parameter which varies from region to region. The mean values of Qc reveals a dependence on frequency, varying from 292.9 at 1.5 Hz to 4880.1 at 18 Hz. Average frequency dependent relationship Qc values obtained of the Northeastern India is 198 f 1.035, while this relationship varies from the region to region such as, Tibetan Plateau Zone (TPZ): Qc= 226 f 1.11, Bengal Alluvium and Arakan-Yuma Zone (BAZ) : Qc= 301 f 0.87, Shillong Plateau Zone (SPZ): Qc=126 fo 0.85. It indicates Northeastern India is seismically active but comparing of all zones in the study region the Shillong Plateau Zone (SPZ): Qc= 126 f 0.85 is seismically most active. Where as the Bengal Alluvium and Arakan-Yuma Zone (BAZ) are less active and out of three the Tibetan Plateau Zone (TPZ)is intermediate active. This study may be useful for the seismic hazard assessment. The estimated seismic moments (Mo), range from 5.98×1020 to 3.88×1023 dyne-cm. The source radii(r) are confined between 152 to 1750 meter, the stress drop ranges between 0.0003×103 bar to 1.04×103 bar, the average radiant energy is 82.57×1018 ergs and the strain drop for the earthquake ranges from 0.00602×10-9 to 2.48×10-9 respectively. The estimated stress drop values for NE India depicts scattered nature of the larger seismic moment value whereas, they show a more systematic nature for smaller seismic moment values. The estimated source parameters are in agreement to previous works in this type of tectonic set up. Key words: Coda wave, Seismic source parameters, Lapse time, single back scattering model, Brune's model, Stress drop and North East India.

  18. The Association between Provider Practice and Knowledge of ORS and Zinc Supplementation for the Treatment of Childhood Diarrhea in Bihar, Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh, India: A Multi-Site Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lamberti, Laura M.; Fischer Walker, Christa L.; Taneja, Sunita; Mazumder, Sarmila; Black, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Programs aimed at reducing the burden of diarrhea among children under-five in low-resource settings typically allocate resources to training community-level health workers, but studies have suggested that provider knowledge does not necessarily translate into adequate practice. A diarrhea management program implemented in Bihar, Gujarat and Uttar Pradesh, India trained private sector rural medical practitioners (RMPs) and public sector Accredited Social Health Activists (ASHAs) and Anganwadi workers (AWWs) in adequate treatment of childhood diarrhea with oral rehydration salts (ORS) and zinc. We used cross-sectional program evaluation data to determine the association between observed diarrhea treatment practices and reported knowledge of ORS and zinc among each provider cadre. Methods We conducted principal components analysis on providers’ responses to diarrhea treatment questions in order to generate a novel scale assessing ORS/zinc knowledge. We subsequently regressed a binary indicator of whether ORS/zinc was prescribed during direct observation onto the resulting knowledge scores, controlling for other relevant knowledge predictors. Results There was a positive association between ORS/zinc knowledge score and prescribing ORS and zinc to young children with diarrhea among private sector RMPs (aOR: 2.32; 95% CI: 1.29-4.17) and public sector ASHAs and AWWs (aOR 2.48; 95% CI: 1.90-3.24). Controlling for knowledge score, receipt of training in the preceding 6 months was a good predictor of adequate prescribing in the public but not the private sector. In the public sector, direct access to ORS and zinc supplies was also highly associated with prescribing. Conclusions To enhance the management of childhood diarrhea in India, programmatic activities should center on increasing knowledge of ORS and zinc among public and private sector providers through biannual trainings but should also focus on ensuring sustained access to an adequate supply chain. PMID:26098305

  19. Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pakiser, Louis C.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in earthquakes with an introduction to the subject. Following a section presenting an historical look at the world's major earthquakes, the booklet discusses earthquake-prone geographic areas, the nature and workings of earthquakes, earthquake

  20. Earthquake!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, Sandra

    1987-01-01

    A learning unit about earthquakes includes activities for primary grade students, including making inferences and defining operationally. Task cards are included for independent study on earthquake maps and earthquake measuring. (CB)

  1. Earthquakes

    MedlinePLUS

    An earthquake happens when two blocks of the earth suddenly slip past one another. Earthquakes strike suddenly, violently, and without warning at any time of the day or night. If an earthquake occurs in a populated area, it may cause ...

  2. "Probing Reservoir Triggered Earthquakes at Koyna, India through Scientific Deep Drilling"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, H. K.; Nayak, S.; Bansal, B.; Rao, P.; Roy, S.; Arora, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Koyna region, located in the ~65 Ma old Deccan Traps of India, is globally the most prominent site of artificial water reservoir triggered earthquakes (RTS). Triggered earthquakes are occurring since impoundment of the Koyna Dam in1962 including M 6.3 December 10, 1967; 22 M>5, and thousands of smaller earthquakes. Filling of the nearby Warna Reservoir gave a further impetus to triggered earthquakes. The entire earthquake activity is limited to an area of about 20 km x 30 km, with most focal depths being within 6 km. There is no other earthquakes source within 50 km of the Koyna Dam. An ICDP Workshop held at Hyderabad and Koyna in March 2011 found Koyna to be the most suitable site to investigate RTS through deep drilling. A preparatory phase of investigations was recommended. Studies carried out since 2011 in the preparatory phase were recently reviewed in the second ICDP Workshop held at Koyna from May 16 to 18, 2014. Results of detailed airborne magnetic and gravity-gradient surveys, MT surveys, drilling of 6 boreholes going to depths of ~ 1500 m and logging, heat flow measurements, seismological investigations including the deployment of two borehole seismometers, and LiDAR surveys were reviewed. Significant results include absence of sediments below the basalt cover, the thickness of the basalt column and its relation with the surface elevation, and almost flat topography of the basement. The temperatures at the depth of 5 km would be around 130 to 150 degrees Celsius, in confirmation of earlier estimates. To achieve desired accuracies of a few tens of meters in focal parameters, seismometers need to be placed below the basalt cover. This has led to the plan of putting eight borehole seismometers with good azimuthal coverage around the earthquake zone. Two of them have been already in operation and six more are likely to be installed in the months to come. The future plan of work include: Submitting a proposal to ICDP for the main boreholes by Jan 15, 2015. Details need to be worked out. Drilling two 3 km deep boreholes by summer of 2015 (leap-frog with two rigs). Concurrent planning of deep borehole(s), firming the specifications by the summer of 2015 and drilling through October 2015 through December 2017. Plan for an international meeting and visit to Koyna in 2017.

  3. Deep Scientific Drilling at Koyna, India to Investigate Reservoir Triggered Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Harsh; Nayak, Shailesh; Bansal, Brijesh; Roy, Sukanta; Purnachandra Rao, Nemalikanti; S, Satyanarayana H. V.; M, Tiwari V.; Arora, Kusumita; K, Patro B. P.; Dodla, Shashidhar; Kothamasu, Mallika

    2015-04-01

    The Koyna region, located in the ~65 Ma old Deccan Traps of India, is globally the most prominent site of artificial water reservoir triggered earthquakes (RTS). Triggered earthquakes are occurring since impoundment of the Koyna Dam in 1962 including M 6.3 December 10, 1967; 22 M>5, and thousands of smaller earthquakes. Filling of the nearby Warna Reservoir gave an impetus to triggered earthquakes. The entire earthquake activity is limited to an area of about 20 km x 30 km, with most focal depths being within 6 km. There is no other earthquakes source within 50 km of the Koyna Dam. An ICDP Workshop held at Hyderabad and Koyna in March 2011 found Koyna to be the most suitable site to investigate RTS through deep drilling. A preparatory phase of investigations was recommended. Studies carried out since 2011 in the preparatory phase were recently reviewed in the second ICDP Workshop held at Koyna from May 16 to 18, 2014. Results of detailed airborne magnetic and gravity-gradient surveys, MT surveys, drilling of 6 boreholes going to depths of ~ 1500 m and logging, heat flow measurements, seismological investigations including the deployment of two borehole seismometers, and LiDAR surveys were reviewed. Significant results include absence of sediments below the basalt cover, the thickness of the basalt column and its relation with the surface elevation, and almost flat topography of the basement. The temperatures at the depth of 5 km would be around 130 to 150 degrees Celsius, in confirmation of earlier estimates. To achieve desired accuracies of ~ 50 meters in focal parameters, seismometers need to be placed below the basalt cover. This has led to the plan of putting eight borehole seismometers with good azimuthal coverage around the earthquake zone. Four of them are already in operation and four more are likely to be installed in the months to come. The future plan of work includes: • Submitting a proposal to ICDP for two pilot boreholes by Jan 15, 2015. • Drilling 2 pilot boreholes of 3 km depth during 2015. • Concurrent planning of deep borehole(s), firming the specifications by the end of 2015 and drilling and setting of deep borehole observatory during 2016 and 2017. • Plan for an international meeting and visit to Koyna in 2017.

  4. Distribution of Earthquake Interevent Times in Northeast India and Adjoining Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasari, Sumanta; Dikshit, Onkar

    2015-10-01

    This study analyzes earthquake interoccurrence times of northeast India and its vicinity from eleven probability distributions, namely exponential, Frechet, gamma, generalized exponential, inverse Gaussian, Levy, lognormal, Maxwell, Pareto, Rayleigh, and Weibull distributions. Parameters of these distributions are estimated from the method of maximum likelihood estimation, and their respective asymptotic variances as well as confidence bounds are calculated using Fisher information matrices. Three model selection criteria namely the Chi-square criterion, the maximum likelihood criterion, and the Kolmogorov-Smirnov minimum distance criterion are used to compare model suitability for the present earthquake catalog (Y adav et al. in Pure Appl Geophys 167:1331-1342, 2010). It is observed that gamma, generalized exponential, and Weibull distributions provide the best fitting, while exponential, Frechet, inverse Gaussian, and lognormal distributions provide intermediate fitting, and the rest, namely Levy, Maxwell Pareto, and Rayleigh distributions fit poorly to the present data. The conditional probabilities for a future earthquake and related conditional probability curves are presented towards the end of this article.

  5. 2001 Bhuj, India, earthquake engineering seismoscope recordings and Eastern North America ground-motion attenuation relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.; Kumar, A.

    2003-01-01

    Engineering seismoscope data collected at distances less than 300 km for the M 7.7 Bhuj, India, mainshock are compatible with ground-motion attenuation in eastern North America (ENA). The mainshock ground-motion data have been corrected to a common geological site condition using the factors of Joyner and Boore (2000) and a classification scheme of Quaternary or Tertiary sediments or rock. We then compare these data to ENA ground-motion attenuation relations. Despite uncertainties in recording method, geological site corrections, common tectonic setting, and the amount of regional seismic attenuation, the corrected Bhuj dataset agrees with the collective predictions by ENA ground-motion attenuation relations within a factor of 2. This level of agreement is within the dataset uncertainties and the normal variance for recorded earthquake ground motions.

  6. Scientific Deep Drilling to Study Reservoir Triggered Earthquakes at Koyna, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, H. K.; Sen, M.; Rao, P. N.; Dodla, S.; Kothamasu, M.; Roy, S.

    2012-12-01

    The Koyna region near the west coast of India is the premier site of Reservoir Triggered Seismicity (RTS), where triggered earthquakes have been occurring in a restricted area of 20x30 km2 since the impoundment of Shivajisagar Lake in 1962. These include the largest triggered earthquake of M~6.3 on Dec 10 1967, 22 earthquakes of M?5, about 200 earthquakes of M~4, and several thousand smaller earthquakes. The RTS was further enhanced by impoundment of the nearby located Warna reservoir in 1985. The seismic zone is quite isolated with no other source of activity within 50 km of the Koyna dam. The seismicity distribution during the past ~5 years defines two seismic zones in the area, each about 10 km long, relatively narrow (~2 km) and shallow (6-8 km). The earthquake activity is governed by the annual water cycle, increasing in response to the rapid filling of the reservoirs during the monsoon rains as well as the post-monsoon unloading cycle. We plan to carry out scientific deep drilling in the seismic zone. A borehole penetrating the Deccan Traps cover and reaching the focal depths (~7 km) in the granitic basement is envisaged. This will provide a unique opportunity to directly measure the physical and mechanical properties of rocks, pore fluid pressure, hydrology, temperature, and other parameters of an intra-plate active fault zone in the "near-field" of earthquakes, before during and after their occurrence. Down hole measurements complemented by observations on cores and cuttings, analyses of fluid and gas samples, geophysical and geological characterization studies including fault zone monitoring would help answer questions related to the genesis of RTS. Precursory parameters obtained from continuous monitoring of deep, in-situ measurements may help in formulating a comprehensive earthquake model for RTS sites in general and the Koyna region in particular. A preparatory phase of investigations including compilation of existing datasets, acquisition of new datasets and exploratory drilling aimed at delineation of the fine structure of the subsurface fault zone(s) is underway. New datasets include low-elevation aeromagnetic profiles, high-resolution seismic profiling across the seismic zone, micro-topography studies using Lidar, dense seismological observations made in the epicentral area, magnetotelluric profiling and deep resistivity sounding across the zone, and closely spaced gravity measurements. The exploratory boreholes and availability of core samples will allow measurements of heat flow, in-situ stress, hydrological parameters, etc. besides detailed geochemical characterization of the basaltic lava pile, information regarding the presence of infra-Trappean sediments and the nature of the underlying granite basement. Information obtained from these studies will guide the planning for scientific deep drilling to be undertaken during the next phase.

  7. Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roper, Paul J.; Roper, Jere Gerard

    1974-01-01

    Describes the causes and effects of earthquakes, defines the meaning of magnitude (measured on the Richter Magnitude Scale) and intensity (measured on a modified Mercalli Intensity Scale) and discusses earthquake prediction and control. (JR)

  8. 78 FR 42505 - U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ...Ahmedabad--This is the largest city in Gujarat and the 7th largest city in India, with...Ahmedabad, the commercial capital of Gujarat. At present, there are approximately 3,500 drug manufacturing facilities in Gujarat. The state houses several...

  9. Investigations related to scientific deep drilling to study reservoir-triggered earthquakes at Koyna, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Harsh; Purnachandra Rao, N.; Roy, Sukanta; Arora, Kusumita; Tiwari, V. M.; Patro, Prasanta K.; Satyanarayana, H. V. S.; Shashidhar, D.; Mallika, K.; Akkiraju, Vyasulu V.; Goswami, Deepjyoti; Vyas, Digant; Ravi, G.; Srinivas, K. N. S. S. S.; Srihari, M.; Mishra, S.; Dubey, C. P.; Raju, D. Ch. V.; Borah, Ujjal; Chinna Reddy, K.; Babu, Narendra; Rohilla, Sunil; Dhar, Upasana; Sen, Mrinal; Bhaskar Rao, Y. J.; Bansal, B. K.; Nayak, Shailesh

    2015-09-01

    Artificial water reservoir-triggered earthquakes have continued at Koyna in the Deccan Traps province, India, since the impoundment of the Shivaji Sagar reservoir in 1962. Existing models, to comprehend the genesis of triggered earthquakes, suffer from lack of observations in the near field. To investigate further, scientific deep drilling and setting up a fault zone observatory at depth of 5-7 km is planned in the Koyna area. Prior to undertaking deep drilling, an exploratory phase of investigations has been launched to constrain subsurface geology, structure and heat flow regime in the area that provide critical inputs for the design of the deep borehole observatory. Two core boreholes drilled to depths of 1,522 and 1,196 m have penetrated the Deccan Traps and sampled the granitic basement in the region for the first time. Studies on cores provide new and direct information regarding the thickness of the Deccan Traps, the absence of infra-Trappean sediments and the nature of the underlying basement rocks. Temperatures estimated at a depth of 6 km in the area, made on the basis of heat flow and thermal properties data sets, do not exceed 150 °C. Low-elevation airborne gravity gradient and magnetic data sets covering 5,012 line km, together with high-quality magnetotelluric data at 100 stations, provide both regional information about the thickness of the Deccan Traps and the occurrence of localized density heterogeneities and anomalous conductive zones in the vicinity of the hypocentral zone. Acquisition of airborne LiDAR data to obtain a high-resolution topographic model of the region has been completed over an area of 1,064 km2 centred on the Koyna seismic zone. Seismometers have been deployed in the granitic basement inside two boreholes and are planned in another set of six boreholes to obtain accurate hypocentral locations and constrain the disposition of fault zones.

  10. The Mw 7.7 Bhuj earthquake: Global lessons for earthquake hazard in intra-plate regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schweig, E.; Gomberg, J.; Petersen, M.; Ellis, M.; Bodin, P.; Mayrose, L.; Rastogi, B.K.

    2003-01-01

    The Mw 7.7 Bhuj earthquake occurred in the Kachchh District of the State of Gujarat, India on 26 January 2001, and was one of the most damaging intraplate earthquakes ever recorded. This earthquake is in many ways similar to the three great New Madrid earthquakes that occurred in the central United States in 1811-1812, An Indo-US team is studying the similarities and differences of these sequences in order to learn lessons for earthquake hazard in intraplate regions. Herein we present some preliminary conclusions from that study. Both the Kutch and New Madrid regions have rift type geotectonic setting. In both regions the strain rates are of the order of 10-9/yr and attenuation of seismic waves as inferred from observations of intensity and liquefaction are low. These strain rates predict recurrence intervals for Bhuj or New Madrid sized earthquakes of several thousand years or more. In contrast, intervals estimated from paleoseismic studies and from other independent data are significantly shorter, probably hundreds of years. All these observations together may suggest that earthquakes relax high ambient stresses that are locally concentrated by rheologic heterogeneities, rather than loading by plate-tectonic forces. The latter model generally underlies basic assumptions made in earthquake hazard assessment, that the long-term average rate of energy released by earthquakes is determined by the tectonic loading rate, which thus implies an inherent average periodicity of earthquake occurrence. Interpreting the observations in terms of the former model therefore may require re-examining the basic assumptions of hazard assessment.

  11. Geographic smoothing of solar PV: results from Gujarat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, Kelly; Apt, Jay

    2015-10-01

    We examine the potential for geographic smoothing of solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity generation using 13 months of observed power production from utility-scale plants in Gujarat, India. To our knowledge, this is the first published analysis of geographic smoothing of solar PV using actual generation data at high time resolution from utility-scale solar PV plants. We use geographic correlation and Fourier transform estimates of the power spectral density (PSD) to characterize the observed variability of operating solar PV plants as a function of time scale. Most plants show a spectrum that is linear in the log-log domain at high frequencies f, ranging from {f}-1.23 to {f}-1.56 (slopes of -1.23 and -1.56), thus exhibiting more relative variability at high frequencies than exhibited by wind plants. PSDs for large PV plants have a steeper slope than those for small plants, hence more smoothing at short time scales. Interconnecting 20 Gujarat plants yields a {f}-1.66 spectrum, reducing fluctuations at frequencies corresponding to 6 h and 1 h by 23% and 45%, respectively. Half of this smoothing can be obtained through connecting 4-5 plants; reaching marginal improvement of 1% per added plant occurs at 12-14 plants. The largest plant (322 MW) showed an {f}-1.76 spectrum. This suggests that in Gujarat the potential for smoothing is limited to that obtained by one large plant.

  12. Magnetotelluric studies in the Central India Tectonic Zone: Implications for intraplate stress regimes and generation of shallow earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naganjaneyulu, K.; Aggarwal, Lavika; Santosh, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Central India Tectonic Zone (CITZ) dissects the Indian Peninsula into the northern and southern crustal blocks. The CITZ has been a seismically active region since the Precambrian. Whereas the relatively deep crustal earthquakes near the Narmada faults in the eastern part of the CITZ have been well-investigated, the mechanisms for the shallow earthquakes in the western part remain unknown. Here we present results from a new magnetotelluric study to derive the crustal structure and to understand its implications. Our data show a thick and highly resistive (>500 ohm m) crust in the south of Tapti River, as against a less resistive one in the north. These results in conjunction with heat flow values indicate that the crust below the southern part has stable continental cratonic signatures. On the northern side of the Tapti River, we infer the ascent of basaltic magmas from the mantle into the shallow crust and crystallization into layered intrusions. These mafic-ultramafic bodies could be a potential cause for the shallow earthquakes in the western part of the CITZ. The mafic-ultramafic bodies below the crust of CITZ would locally modify the intraplate stresses, which in turn would facilitate the occurrence of earthquakes due to reactivation of pre-existing faults. Thus, the large accumulation of strain energy in the deep crust beneath the region can be attributed to the presence of high stress bodies emplaced at depth during the Deccan Volcanic activity.

  13. Structure of the Koyna-Warna Seismic Zone, Maharashtra, India: A possible model for large induced earthquakes elsewhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catchings, R. D.; Dixit, M. M.; Goldman, M. R.; Kumar, S.

    2015-05-01

    The Koyna-Warna area of India is one of the best worldwide examples of reservoir-induced seismicity, with the distinction of having generated the largest known induced earthquake (M6.3 on 10 December 1967) and persistent moderate-magnitude (>M5) events for nearly 50 years. Yet, the fault structure and tectonic setting that has accommodated the induced seismicity is poorly known, in part because the seismic events occur beneath a thick sequence of basalt layers. On the basis of the alignment of earthquake epicenters over an ~50 year period, lateral variations in focal mechanisms, upper-crustal tomographic velocity images, geophysical data (aeromagnetic, gravity, and magnetotelluric), geomorphic data, and correlation with similar structures elsewhere, we suggest that the Koyna-Warna area lies within a right step between northwest trending, right-lateral faults. The sub-basalt basement may form a local structural depression (pull-apart basin) caused by extension within the step-over zone between the right-lateral faults. Our postulated model accounts for the observed pattern of normal faulting in a region that is dominated by north-south directed compression. The right-lateral faults extend well beyond the immediate Koyna-Warna area, possibly suggesting a more extensive zone of seismic hazards for the central India area. Induced seismic events have been observed many places worldwide, but relatively large-magnitude induced events are less common because critically stressed, preexisting structures are a necessary component. We suggest that releasing bends and fault step-overs like those we postulate for the Koyna-Warna area may serve as an ideal tectonic environment for generating moderate- to large- magnitude induced (reservoir, injection, etc.) earthquakes.

  14. Radon and Helium as productive tools for earthquake precursory and fault delineation studies in NW Himalayas, India: An overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, B.; Mahajan, S.; Walia, V.; Kumar, A.; Singh, S.; Yang, T. F.

    2009-12-01

    To determine the role of radon and helium as a productive tool for fault delineation and earthquake precursory studies, continuous measurements are made in the soil-gas and groundwater in NW Himalayas, India. The area under study is seismically active and falls in the High Seismic Zones IV and V of the Seismic Map of India. The NW Himalayas are tectonically active due to the northward movement of the Indian plate towards Eurasian plate and the frequent occurrence of small magnitude earthquake indicates that the area is under unusually high stress and strain. The temporal variations in the radon concentration in soil-gas and groundwater are continuous monitored, at three different stations viz. Amritsar (Zone IV), Dharamsala (Zone V) and Dalhousie (Zone IV), using Barasol probes (Algade, France) and RAD7 (Durrige, USA) respectively. The radon anomalies, in the data are correlated with micro seismic events recorded along Main Boundary Thrust (MBT) and Main Central Thrust (MCT) of NW Himalayas within the grid (28 - 34° North, 72 - 79° East). The anomalous change in the radon concentration before an event suggests that continuous radon monitoring in a grid pattern can serve as a productive tool in earthquake prediction studies. The MCT and MBT are associated with evolution of Himalayan orogeny. Besides the longitudinal lineaments several transverse lineaments occur as faults and fractures trending normally or obliquely to Himalayan trend. Keeping this thing in view, a geochemical soil-gas surveys have been conducted in the NW Himalayas. To carry out the present investigation soil-gas samples were collected in sample bags at depth of about 0.7 - 1.0 m by using hollow steel probe. The collected soil-gas sample bags are analyzed for radon and helium using RTM 2100 and Helium Leak Sniff Detector respectively. The data analysis clearly reveals anomalous values of subsurface gases along the fault and lineaments.

  15. Active Fault Mapping of Naga-Disang Thrust (Belt of Schuppen) for Assessing Future Earthquake Hazards in NE India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, A.

    2014-12-01

    We observe the geodynamic appraisal of Naga-Disang Thrust North East India. The Disang thrust extends NE-SW over a length of 480 km and it defines the eastern margin of Neogene basin. It branches out from Haflong-Naga thrust and in the NE at Bulbulia in the right bank of Noa Dihing River, it is terminated by Mishmi thrust, which extends into Myanmar as 'Sagaing fault,which dip generally towards SE. It extends between Dauki fault in the SW and Mishmi thrust in the NE. When the SW end of 'Belt of Schuppen' moved upwards and towards east along the Dauki fault, the NE end moved downwards and towards west along the Mishmi thrust, causing its 'S' shaped bending. The SRTM generated DEM is used to map the topographic expression of the schuppen belt, where these thrusts are significantly marked by topographic break. Satellite imagery map also shows presence lineaments supporting the post tectonic activities along Naga-Disang Thrusts. The southern part of 'Belt of Schuppen' extends along the sheared western limb of southerly plunging Kohima synform, a part of Indo Burma Ranges (IBR) and it is seismically active.The crustal velocity at SE of Schuppen is 39.90 mm/yr with a azimuth of 70.780 at Lumami, 38.84 mm/yr (Azimuth 54.09) at Senapati and 36.85 mm/yr (Azimuth 54.09) at Imphal. The crustal velocity at NW of Schuppen belt is 52.67 mm/yr (Azimuth 57.66) near Dhauki Fault in Meghalaya. It becomes 43.60 mm/yr (Azimuth76.50) - 44.25 (Azimuth 73.27) at Tiding and Kamlang Nagar around Mishmi thrust. The presence of Schuppen is marked by a change in high crustal velocity from Indian plate to low crustal velocity in Mishmi Suture as well as Indo Burma Ranges. The difference in crustal velocities results in building up of strain along the Schuppen which may trigger a large earthquake in the NE India in future. The belt of schuppean seems to be seismically active, however, the enough number of large earthquakes are not recorded. These observations are significant on Naga-Disang Thrusts to reveal a possible seismic gap in NE India observed from two great earthquakes in the region viz. 1897 (Shillong 8.7M) and 1950 (Arunachal-China 8.7M), which is required to be investigated.

  16. Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Cowen, A R; Denney, J P

    1994-04-01

    On January 25, 1 week after the most devastating earthquake in Los Angeles history, the Southern California Hospital Council released the following status report: 928 patients evacuated from damaged hospitals. 805 beds available (136 critical, 669 noncritical). 7,757 patients treated/released from EDs. 1,496 patients treated/admitted to hospitals. 61 dead. 9,309 casualties. Where do we go from here? We are still waiting for the "big one." We'll do our best to be ready when Mother Nature shakes, rattles and rolls. The efforts of Los Angeles City Fire Chief Donald O. Manning cannot be overstated. He maintained department command of this major disaster and is directly responsible for implementing the fire department's Disaster Preparedness Division in 1987. Through the chief's leadership and ability to forecast consequences, the city of Los Angeles was better prepared than ever to cope with this horrendous earthquake. We also pay tribute to the men and women who are out there each day, where "the rubber meets the road." PMID:10133439

  17. Detection of acaricidal resistance in Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum from Banaskantha district, Gujarat.

    PubMed

    Singh, N K; Gelot, I S; Jyoti; Bhat, S A; Singh, Harkirat; Singh, Veer

    2015-09-01

    The resistance status in Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum collected from Banaskantha district, Gujarat (India) was estimated by larval packet test (LPT) with different concentrations of amitraz (125, 250, 500, 750 and 1,000 ppm) and cypermethrin (100, 200, 300, 400 and 500 ppm). The regression graphs of mean mortality of larvae ticks were plotted against values of progressively increasing concentrations of amitraz and cypermethrin for the estimation of LC95 values and were determined as 1,529.39 and 351.84 ppm, respectively. Further a resistance of level I was determined against cypermethrin whereas, a comparatively higher resistance level (II) was recorded against amitraz. The current study appears to be the pioneer report of amitraz and cypermethrin resistance in H. a. anatolicum from the Gujarat state, India. PMID:26345072

  18. An insight into crack density, saturation rate, and porosity model of the 2001 Bhuj earthquake in the stable continental region of western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, O. P.; Singh, A. P.; Kumar, Dinesh; Rastogi, B. K.

    2014-04-01

    The 2001 Bhuj earthquake (Mw 7.6) source zone is examined in the light of crack density (?), saturation rate (?) and porosity parameter (?) using new data set derived from a large aftershock sequence recorded by the Gujarat seismic network (GSNet) during November, 2006-December, 2009. Processes of rupture initiations of the mainshock and its aftershock sequence are better understood by synthesizing the dynamic snapshots of the source zone using the new dataset. Pattern of crustal heterogeneities associated with high-?, high-? and high-? anomalies at depths varying from 20 km to 25 km is similar to those of earlier study by Mishra and Zhao (2003). The anomalous zone is found extended distinctly by 50-60 km in the lateral direction, indicating the reinforcement of cracks and fractured volume of rock matrix due to long aftershock sequence since 2001 Bhuj earthquake in the source area. It is inferred that the presence of a fluid-filled fractured rock matrix with super saturation may have affected the structural and seismogenic strengths of the source zone and is still contributing significantly to the geneses of earthquakes in and around the source zone. Anomalous pattern of high-? with wider distribution of high-? indicates the existence of micro-cracks in the lower crust, while high-? suggests the cementation of cracks through permeation of residual magma/metamorphic fluids into the hypocenter zone. The results suggest that the existence of residual fluids in the fractured rock matrix in the mid to lower crust might have played a key role in triggering the 2001 mainshock and is still responsible for its continued long aftershock sequences.

  19. Earthquake scenario in West Bengal with emphasis on seismic hazard microzonation of the city of Kolkata, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nath, S. K.; Adhikari, M. D.; Maiti, S. K.; Devaraj, N.; Srivastava, N.; Mohapatra, L. D.

    2014-09-01

    Seismic microzonation is a process of estimating site-specific effects due to an earthquake on urban centers for its disaster mitigation and management. The state of West Bengal, located in the western foreland of the Assam-Arakan Orogenic Belt, the Himalayan foothills and Surma Valley, has been struck by several devastating earthquakes in the past, indicating the need for a seismotectonic review of the province, especially in light of probable seismic threat to its capital city of Kolkata, which is a major industrial and commercial hub in the eastern and northeastern region of India. A synoptic probabilistic seismic hazard model of Kolkata is initially generated at engineering bedrock (Vs30 ~ 760 m s-1) considering 33 polygonal seismogenic sources at two hypocentral depth ranges, 0-25 and 25-70 km; 158 tectonic sources; appropriate seismicity modeling; 14 ground motion prediction equations for three seismotectonic provinces, viz. the east-central Himalaya, the Bengal Basin and Northeast India selected through suitability testing; and appropriate weighting in a logic tree framework. Site classification of Kolkata performed following in-depth geophysical and geotechnical investigations places the city in D1, D2, D3 and E classes. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment at a surface-consistent level - i.e., the local seismic hazard related to site amplification performed by propagating the bedrock ground motion with 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years through a 1-D sediment column using an equivalent linear analysis - predicts a peak ground acceleration (PGA) range from 0.176 to 0.253 g in the city. A deterministic liquefaction scenario in terms of spatial distribution of liquefaction potential index corresponding to surface PGA distribution places 50% of the city in the possible liquefiable zone. A multicriteria seismic hazard microzonation framework is proposed for judicious integration of multiple themes, namely PGA at the surface, liquefaction potential index, NEHRP soil site class, sediment class, geomorphology and ground water table in a fuzzy protocol in the geographical information system by adopting an analytical hierarchal process. The resulting high-resolution surface consistent hazard, liquefaction and microzonation maps are expected to play vital roles in earthquake-related disaster mitigation and management of the city of Kolkata.

  20. Modelling of Strong Ground Motions from 1991 Uttarkashi, India, Earthquake Using a Hybrid Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Teotia, S. S.; Sriram, V.

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple and efficient hybrid technique for simulating earthquake strong ground motion. This procedure is the combination of the techniques of envelope function (M idorikawa et al. Tectonophysics 218:287-295, 1993) and composite source model (Z eng et al. Geophys Res Lett 21:725-728, 1994). The first step of the technique is based on the construction of the envelope function of the large earthquake by superposition of envelope functions for smaller earthquakes. The smaller earthquakes (sub-events) of varying sizes are distributed randomly, instead of uniform distribution of same size sub-events, on the fault plane. The accelerogram of large event is then obtained by combining the envelope function with a band-limited white noise. The low-cut frequency of the band-limited white noise is chosen to correspond to the corner frequency for the target earthquake magnitude and the high-cut to the Boore's f max or a desired frequency for the simulation. Below the low-cut frequency, the fall-off slope is 2 in accordance with the ?2 earthquake source model. The technique requires the parameters such as fault area, orientation of the fault, hypocenter, size of the sub-events, stress drop, rupture velocity, duration, source-site distance and attenuation parameter. The fidelity of the technique has been demonstrated by successful modeling of the 1991 Uttarkashi, Himalaya earthquake (Ms 7). The acceptable locations of the sub-events on the fault plane have been determined using a genetic algorithm. The main characteristics of the simulated accelerograms, comprised of the duration of strong ground shaking, peak ground acceleration and Fourier and response spectra, are, in general, in good agreement with those observed at most of the sites. At some of the sites the simulated accelerograms differ from observed ones by a factor of 2-3. The local site geology and topography may cause such a difference, as these effects have not been considered in the present technique. The advantage of the technique lies in the fact that detailed parameters such as velocity-Q structures and empirical Green's functions are not required or the records of the actual time history from the past earthquakes are not available. This method may find its application in preparing a wide range of scenarios based on simulation. This provides information that is complementary to the information available in probabilistic hazard maps.

  1. 76 FR 34041 - Clean Technologies Mission to India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ...located and one of India's fastest growing metropolitan areas. Ahmedabad is the 7th largest city in India, and is located in Gujarat which is one of the leading industrialized states in India. Ahmedabad is the second largest industrial center in...

  2. Seismotectonics in Northeast India: a stress analysis of focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes and its kinematic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelier, Jacques; Baruah, Saurabh

    2009-07-01

    In Northeast India, three major plates interact along two convergent boundaries: the Himalayas and the Indo-Burma Ranges, which meet at the Assam Syntaxis. To clarify this tectonic interaction and the underlying dynamics, we determine the regional seismotectonic stress from the stress inversion of 285 double couple focal mechanism solutions of earthquakes with an average magnitude of 5. We then compare the reconstructed stress regimes with the available information about geodetically determined relative displacements. North-south compression, in a direction consistent with India-Eurasia convergence, prevails in the whole area from the Eastern Himalayas to the Bengal Basin, through the Shillong-Mikir Massif and the Upper Assam Valley. E-W extension in Tibet is related to this N-S India-Eurasia convergence. Not only does the major N-S compression affect the outer segments of the Indo-Burma Ranges, it also extends into the descending slab of Indian lithosphere below these ranges, although stresses at depth are controlled by bending of the slab beneath the Burmese arc. The existence of widespread N-S compression in the Bengal Basin, far away from the Himalayan front, is compatible with the previously proposed convergence between a Shillong-Mikir-Assam Valley block and the Indian craton. E-W compression inside this block supports the hypothesis of a component of eastward extrusion. Stress inversion of focal mechanism solutions in the Indo-Burma Ranges reveals a complex stress pattern. The Burmese arc and its underlying lithosphere experience nearly arc-perpendicular extension with ESE-WNW trends in the northernmost, NE-trending segment and ENE-WSW trends in the main N-S arc segment. Such extensional stress, documented from many arcs, is likely a response to pull from and bending of the subducting plate. At the same time, the Indo-Burma Ranges are under compression as a result of oblique convergence between the Sunda and Indian plates. The maximum compressive stress rotates from NE-SW across the inner and northern arc to E-W near the Bengal Basin. This rotation is consistent with the deformation partitioning reflected in the rotation of relative displacement vectors, from a SSW-directed Sunda-Burma motion to a WSW-directed Burma-India motion. As a consequence of this partitioning, the major belt-parallel fault zones show a variety of movements across the main N-S arc segment, from right-lateral slip in the inner ranges to oblique reverse-dextral slip in the outer ranges and pure thrusting in the westernmost foreland belt.

  3. Seismic Velocity Assessment In The Kachchh Region, India, From Multiple Waveform Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, R.; Sen, M. K.; Mandal, P.; Pulliam, J.; Agrawal, M.

    2014-12-01

    The primary goal of this study is to estimate well constrained crust and upper mantle seismic velocity structure in the Kachchh region of Gujarat, India - an area of active interest for earthquake monitoring purposes. Several models based on 'stand-alone' surface wave dispersion and receiver function modeling exist in this area. Here we jointly model the receiver function, surface wave dispersion and, S and shear-coupled PL wavetrains using broadband seismograms of deep (150-700 km), moderate to-large magnitude (5.5-6.8) earthquakes recorded teleseismically at semi-permanent seismograph stations in the Kachchh region, Gujarat, India. While surface wave dispersion and receiver function modeling is computationally fast, full waveform modeling makes use of reflectivity synthetic seismograms. An objective function that measures misfit between all three data is minimized using a very fast simulated annealing (VFSA) approach. Surface wave and receiver function data help reduce the model search space which is explored extensively for detailed waveform fitting. Our estimated crustal and lithospheric thicknesses in this region vary from 32 to 41 km and 70 to 80 km, respectively, while crustal P and S velocities from surface to Moho discontinuity vary from 4.7 to 7.0 km/s and 2.7 to 4.1 km/s, respectively. Our modeling clearly reveals a zone of crustal as well as an asthenospheric upwarping underlying the Kachchh rift zone relative to the surrounding unrifted area. We believe that this feature plays a key role in the seismogenesis of lower crustal earthquakes occurring in the region through the emanation of volatile CO2 into the hypocentral zones liberating from the crystallization of carbonatite melts in the asthenosphere. Such a crust-mantle structure might be related to the plume-lithosphere interaction during the Deccan/Reunion plume episode (~65 Ma).

  4. India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaan, Leslie

    This text examines India's rich and long history, then uses this perspective to focus on present day problems and aspirations. It forces students to reevaluate their stereotyped images of India by presenting a nation that has striven to recover from a past of colonial domination, is presently faced with regional ethnic discord and disparity, and…

  5. India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semaan, Leslie; Lightman, Kathleen

    Not only is India one of the oldest continuous civilizations in the world, it has also become one of the greatest industrial nations. This package explores India's heritage, its people, and the traumatic changes of the 20th century. Contents include: Introduction, Climate, The Land, Cities, Agriculture, Rural Life, History, Religions, Dress, Food,…

  6. 75 FR 12175 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp from India: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ...Cold Storage 19) Hiravati Exports Pvt. Ltd. 20) Hiravati International Pvt. Ltd. (located at Jawar Naka, Porbandar, Gujarat, 360 575, India) 21) Indian Aquatic Products 22) Innovative Foods Limited 23) Interseas 24) K R M Marine Exports...

  7. 75 FR 41813 - Certain Frozen Warmwater Shrimp From India: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ...Storage (19) Hiravati Exports Pvt. Ltd. (20) Hiravati International Pvt. Ltd. (located at Jawar Naka, Porbandar, Gujarat, 360 575, India) (21) Indian Aquatic Products (22) Innovative Foods Limited (23) Interseas (24) K R M Marine...

  8. Variability of Photovoltaic Power in the State of Gujarat Using High Resolution Solar Data

    SciTech Connect

    Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Weekley, A.; Lopez, A.; Zhang, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Parsons, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-03-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  9. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  10. Variability of Power from Large-Scale Solar Photovoltaic Scenarios in the State of Gujarat (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, B.; Hummon, M.; Cochran, J.; Stoltenberg, B.; Batra, P.; Mehta, B.; Patel, D.

    2014-04-01

    India has ambitious goals for high utilization of variable renewable power from wind and solar, and deployment has been proceeding at a rapid pace. The western state of Gujarat currently has the largest amount of solar generation of any Indian state, with over 855 Megawatts direct current (MWDC). Combined with over 3,240 MW of wind, variable generation renewables comprise nearly 18% of the electric-generating capacity in the state. A new historic 10-kilometer (km) gridded solar radiation data set capturing hourly insolation values for 2002-2011 is available for India. We apply an established method for downscaling hourly irradiance data to one-minute irradiance data at potential PV power production locations for one year, 2006. The objective of this report is to characterize the intra-hour variability of existing and planned photovoltaic solar power generation in the state of Gujarat (a total of 1.9 gigawatts direct current (GWDC)), and of five possible expansion scenarios of solar generation that reflect a range of geographic diversity (each scenario totals 500-1,000 MW of additional solar capacity). The report statistically analyzes one year's worth of power variability data, applied to both the baseline and expansion scenarios, to evaluate diurnal and seasonal power fluctuations, different timescales of variability (e.g., from one to 15 minutes), the magnitude of variability (both total megawatts and relative to installed solar capacity), and the extent to which the variability can be anticipated in advance. The paper also examines how Gujarat Energy Transmission Corporation (GETCO) and the Gujarat State Load Dispatch Centre (SLDC) could make use of the solar variability profiles in grid operations and planning.

  11. Tsunami: India

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... 9.0 earthquake occurred off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. This was the fourth largest earthquake in the world since 1900 and ... in modern history, causing devastation along the shores of Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, and other countries. The initial ...

  12. Deformation in Northeast India and Indo-Burmese Arc derived from GPS and Earthquake data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumaran, S. P.; Kreemer, C. W.; Blewitt, G.; Reddy, C. D.

    2011-12-01

    GPS/acoustic (GPS/A) seafloor geodetic observation is a precise seafloor positioning technique and has made great progress over the last decade. GPS/A observation determines the positions of acoustic mirror-type transponders installed on the seafloor by combining the two techniques of kinematic GPS and acoustic ranging through a ship or a buoy. The original idea was proposed by Prof. Spiess at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 1985 and its protocol and hardware were made through research and development of his group by the mid-1990s. In Japan, three research groups, Japan Coast Guard, Tohoku University and Nagoya University, began to develop the GPS/A observation system in the 1990s, established GPS/A observation sites mainly on the landward slope of the plate boundaries around Japan, such as the Japan Trench and the Nankai trough, and have been carrying out campaign observations since around 2000. The primary purpose of our observation is to detect and monitor the crustal deformation caused by the subduction of the oceanic plate near the plate boundary where large interplate earthquakes have repeatedly occurred. By continuous efforts for over a decade, the positioning precision has achieved a few centimeters and seafloor movements such as intraplate deformation and coseismic displacements have been successfully detected. In particular, regarding the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0), which occurred off northeastern Japan on March 11, 2011, east-southeastward coseismic displacements of up to 31 m were observed above the focal region, especially close to the epicenter, while those detected by on-land GPS measurements over 100 km away from the epicenter, conducted by the Geospatial Information Authority of Japan, was up to 5.3 m. Coseismic slip models on the plate boundary estimated from not only GPS data but also GPS/A results indicate that a huge slip of more than 50 m generated close to the trench axis, which was much larger than that estimated from GPS data only. This demonstrates the indispensable roles of seafloor geodesy. After the event, Tohoku University and Nagoya University deployed additional GPS/A sites along the Japan Trench in order to monitor postseismic movements offshore spatially, especially close to the trench axis. In addition, Japan Coast Guard deployed additional GPS/A sites along the Nankai Trough, southwestern Japan, where there are growing concerns about the occurrence of a huge earthquake in the future. This expansion will enable us to detect the spatial change of intraplate velocities along the Nankai Trough, which reflects the difference of the degrees of interplate coupling. We have more than 50 GPS/A sites in total and have been carrying out several campaign observations per site per year. Seafloor geodetic data is an important key to understand the mechanism of the occurrence of interplate earthquakes which occur in the sea area.

  13. Multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis of magnitude series of seismicity of Kachchh region, Western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aggarwal, S. K.; Lovallo, Michele; Khan, P. K.; Rastogi, B. K.; Telesca, Luciano

    2015-05-01

    The sequence of magnitudes of the earthquakes occurred in Kachchh area (Gujarat, Western India) from 2003 to 2012, has been analysed by using the multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis. The complete and the aftershock-depleted catalogues with minimum magnitude M3 were investigated. Both seismic catalogues show multifractal characteristics. The aftershock-depleted catalogue is more multifractal and also more persistent than the whole catalogue; this indicates that aftershock magnitudes contribute to increase the homogeneity and the randomness of the magnitude sequence of the whole seismicity. The singularity spectrum of the whole catalogue, however, is more left-skewed than that of the aftershock-depleted one, indicating a stronger dependence of the multifractality on the large magnitude fluctuations.

  14. Study of Hydrous Sulfates from the Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) of Kutch, India: Implications for Aqueous Alteration Processes on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, S.; Jain, N.; Parthasarathy, G.; Chauhan, P.; Ajai

    2012-03-01

    The Deccan Volcanic Province (DVP) at Gujarat, India is consider as a good analogue for the study of clay and hydrous sulphate minerals.This study can lead in interpreting the environmental conditions on the early Mars.

  15. India.

    PubMed

    1989-03-01

    In 1988, India's population stood at 817 million, 25% of which was concentrated in urban areas. The annual rate of population growth is 2.01%. Life expectancy is currently 56 years, and infant mortality is 90/1000 live births. Education is compulsory to the age of 14 years, but the adult literacy rate is only 36%. Of the work force of 300 million, 70% are engaged in agriculture, 19% are in industry and commerce, 8% work in the services and government sector, and 3% are employed in transport and communications. India's gross national product currently stands at US$246 billion, with a real growth rate of 1.8% and a per capita income of $313. Although India is a federal republic, its central government has greater power in relation to its states than is the case in the US and there is a parliamentary system. Nonetheless, some states have been revitalizing traditional village councils and introducing grassroots democracy at the village level. A relatively sophisticated industrial base and pool of skilled labor have emerged since India achieved independence, although agriculture remains the crucial economic sector. There was a surge in agricultural production in the late 1960s and early 1970s as a result of the "green revolution" that made India largely self-sufficient in grain production through the use of hybrid seeds, irrigation, and fertilizer. However, failed monsoons and severe drought conditions have created fluctuations in the output of the agricultural sector in recent years. Gradual deregulation of industry and trade is providing increased incentives for foreign trade, and the Indian Government is encouraging collaborations that involve the transfer of high technology. PMID:12177992

  16. A rare case of subconjunctival dirofilariasis by Dirofilaria repens in rural Gujarat.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rupal; Singh, Suman; Bhavsar, Samir

    2014-05-01

    Dirofilariasis is a worldwide zoonotic filariasis with over 782 cases reported so far from different parts of the world. Human dirofilariasis, caused by Dirofilaria repens, have been reported to occur widely throughout Asia, Europe, and Africa. It has not been widely recognized in India, however; several cases have been reported in last few years. There is probably a focus of human infection with D. repens in Kerala. Herein, we present a review of human infections by D. repens, along with a case report of subconjunctival dirofilariasis from rural part of Gujarat. PMID:24088633

  17. PREVALENCE OF ERGOT OF SORGHUM IN INDIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On-farm sorghum ergot surveys were conducted in India in 1999, 2000 and 2001. A seven state area was surveyed including 250 fields in Andhra Pradesh, 451 fields in Karnataka, 413 fields in Maharashtra, 127 fields in Tamil Nadu, 3 in Rajasthan, 10 in Uttar Pradesh, and 1 in Gujarat. Ergot incidence ...

  18. Three-dimensional modeling of intraplate stresses in the epicentral zone of the 21 May 1997 Jabalpur earthquake of Mw 5.8, central India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Prantik

    2010-04-01

    Three-dimensional intraplate stresses induced by topography and crustal density heterogeneities have been modeled for a region in central India (latitude: 21-26°N, longitude: 77-82°E) that was affected by the 1927 Son-valley ( Mw 6.4) and the 1997 Jabalpur ( Mw 5.8) earthquakes. The modeled stresses show that these two events occurred in the zones of significant increase in gradients of the principal stress difference ( ?1 - ?3) contours. The highest value of these differential stresses (˜ 90 MPa) is obtained at 5 km depth beneath the epicentral zone of 1927 Son-valley earthquake, whereas, a value of 35 MPa is obtained at the focal depth (˜ 35 km) of the 1997 Jabalpur mainshock. Further, depth sections of estimated differential stresses delineate a south-dipping high stress body penetrating the whole crust (probably a mafic intrusive intruded during the Deccan volcanism episode) beneath a zone (bounded by Narmada north fault in the north and Narmada south fault in the south) within which all aftershocks including mainshocks of the 1997 Jabalpur and the 1927 Son-valley have occurred. The modeled direction of principal stresses, as well as inferred mode of faulting (at 5, 20, 35, and 40 km depths), correlates strongly with the long period (20-50 s) centroid moment tensor solutions for the broadband recordings of the Mw 5.8 Jabalpur mainshock. Results suggest that estimated large intraplate stresses associated with an inferred mafic intrusive in the presence of high pore pressure (resulted from the dehydration of the serpentinite minerals) and deep brittle/ductile transition may contribute to the failure of rock along the pre-existing weak Narmada south fault leading to the earthquakes in the deep crust. It is proposed that the causal association of large intraplate stresses and the pre-existing deep crustal faults would control the future locales of earthquakes in the Narmada-Son lineament.

  19. Anomalous Behavior of D-Layer Preparation Time of the Ionosphere Due to Earthquakes as observed from Malda (India)

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Achintya K.; Nandy, Nilmadhab; Bari, Md. Washimul; Choudhury, Asit K.

    2010-10-20

    The anomalous behavior of D-layer preparation time of the ionosphere are observed only before, during and after the earthquakes, which took place in the neighbouring region by monitoring the Very Low Frequency (VLF) signal using Gyrator II loop antenna. The anomalies were also observed in the sunrise terminator times during seismically active days. These anomalous behavior may be due to the Lithosphere-Ionosphere coupling. These anomalies may be a precursor of earthquake.

  20. Elastic properties of amphibolite and granulite facies mid-crustal basement rocks of the Deccan volcanic covered 1993 Latur-Killari earthquake region, Maharastra (India) and mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Priyanka; Pandey, O. P.; Rao, M. V. M. S.; Reddy, G. Koti

    2012-07-01

    Present study provides a new data set of P- and S-wave velocities and density of metasomatized mid-crustal amphibolite and granulite facies basement rocks of the 1993 Latur-Killari earthquake region of Maharashtra (India), which is concealed below a thick suite of Deccan volcanics. This includes laboratory tests, geochemical analysis and petrographic examination on 29 fresh cored samples, selected from the depths between 351.7 m and 616.8 m of the KLR-1 borehole, drilled in the earthquake epicentral zone. These samples show a wide range in SiO2 content from 52.2 to 70.0 wt.%. Majority of these samples are characterized by intermediate composition with a mean density of 2.85 g/cm3 (range, 2.72-3.06 g/cm3) and average P- and S-wave velocities of 6.23 km/s (5.83-6.61 km/s) and 3.56 km/s (3.21-3.96), respectively. They also contain quite high amount of FeOT and CaO with respective means of 9.76 and 6.59 wt.%. Average Poisson's ratio is 0.25, together with respective values of Young's, bulk and rigidity modulus at 90.8 GPa, 62.0 GPa and 36.3 GPa. Inspite of having higher densities, some of the biotite and FeO-rich samples, exhibit unusually low velocities consequent to metasomatic activity. Our study demonstrates that the mantle metasomatic alteration and retrogression of the underlying high-velocity mafic crust under the Latur-Killari earthquake region, accompanied by geodynamic process of uplift and erosion during the geologic past, has led to severe changes in the petrophysical and elastic properties of the studied rocks.

  1. Coseismic displacements from SAR image offsets between different satellite sensors: Application to the 2001 Bhuj (India) earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Teng; Wei, Shengji; Jónsson, Sigurjón

    2015-09-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image offset tracking is increasingly being used for measuring ground displacements, e.g., due to earthquakes and landslide movement. However, this technique has been applied only to images acquired by the same or identical satellites. Here we propose a novel approach for determining offsets between images acquired by different satellite sensors, extending the usability of existing SAR image archives. The offsets are measured between two multiimage reflectivity maps obtained from different SAR data sets, which provide significantly better results than with single preevent and postevent images. Application to the 2001 Mw7.6 Bhuj earthquake reveals, for the first time, its near-field deformation using multiple preearthquake ERS and postearthquake Envisat images. The rupture model estimated from these cross-sensor offsets and teleseismic waveforms shows a compact fault slip pattern with fairly short rise times (<3 s) and a large stress drop (20 MPa), explaining the intense shaking observed in the earthquake.

  2. earthquake warning earthquake strikes

    E-print Network

    Emergency earthquake warning When an earthquake strikes Immediately after the earthquake Several-8550 For Students LargeLaargege Earthquake #12;According to tables explaining the JMA (Japan Meteorological Agency situation Wooden houses Ground situation Lifelines Slopes, etc. situation In preparation for an earthquake

  3. earthquake warning earthquake strikes

    E-print Network

    Emergency earthquake warning When an earthquake strikes Immediately after the earthquake Several, Kanagawa 226-8503 For Students LargeLaargege Earthquake #12;According to tables explaining the JMA (Japan for an earthquake with a seismic intensity of 5-Lower or greater, this manual summarizes what you should do

  4. Anand Niketan Ashram, Rangpur, India: An Education for Meaningful Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desai, Prakash O.; Haggerson, Nelson L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a visit to the Anand Niketan Ashram in the interior of the State of Gujarat India, an internationally known school with a model education for meaningful citizen participation. Explores the program's philosophy activities and describes how the authors came together to have this experience and write this article. (BSR)

  5. "Education for All" and the Rabaris of Kachchh, Western India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyer, Caroline

    2000-01-01

    Discusses a pilot scheme for literacy education for the Rabaris of Gujarat State, India to suggest possible ways to meet the critical literacy needs of Indian nomadic pastoralists. Reviews tensions between the Rabaris' desire to "learn to talk" though sedentary education and the peripatetic teaching program. (SLD)

  6. Stratigraphic evidence for earthquakes and tsunamis on the west coast of South Andaman Island, India during the past 1000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Javed N.; Banerjee, Chiranjib; Khan, Afzal; Johnson, Frango C.; Shishikura, Masanobu.; Satake, Kenji.; Singhvi, Ashok K.

    2015-10-01

    Stratigraphic records from west coast of South Andaman Island revealed evidence of three historical earthquakes and associated transoceanic tsunamis during past 1000 yrs, in addition to the Mw 9.3 tsunamigenic earthquake of 26 December, 2004. Our finding suggests that along with Sumatran arc segment the Andaman-Arakan segment is also capable of generating mega-subduction zone earthquakes and transoceanic tsunamis. To study the near sub-surface stratigraphic succession we excavated shallow trenches and obtained geoslices from two sites around Collinpur (sites 1 and 2). The exposed succession comprised 11 lithounits (Unit a - youngest and k - oldest) of alternating sequence of coarser units overlain by peaty soils and some of these are indicative of deposition during paleo-tsunami events. Event I that predated AD 800, and is marked by a 35-40 cm thick deposit of fine gravel to coarse sands along with broken shell fragments (Unit k). Event II dated around AD 660-800, is represented by 20-25 cm thick coarse sand and broken shell fragments (Unit i). Based on stratigraphic evidences of land-level changes, this event is attributed to a near source rupture along Andaman-Arakan segment, accompanied by a transoceanic tsunami. Event III, occurred around AD 1120-1300, is marked by a 50 cm thick sand deposit (Unit g). The 2004 tsunami resulted in deposition of 15 cm thick medium to coarse sand at the same location. We infer that the 2004 tsunami and Event III resulted in different styles of sedimentation at the same site. Four events at Collinpur along with the record of a subsidence event of AD 1679 from the east coast of Andaman, close-to, Port Blair (Malik et al., 2011), suggest that mega-subduction zone earthquakes and associated tsunamis recur at an interval of 300-500 years at variable locations along the Sumatra-Andaman subduction zone.

  7. Evaluation of water quality index for River Sabarmati, Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Kosha A.; Joshi, Geeta S.

    2015-07-01

    An attempt has been made to develop water quality index (WQI), using six water quality parameters pH, dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, electrical conductivity, nitrate nitrogen and total coliform measured at three different stations along the Sabarmati river basin from the year 2005 to 2008. Rating scale is developed based on the tolerance limits of inland waters and health point of view. Weighted arithmetic water quality index method was used to find WQI along the stretch of the river basin. It was observed from this study that the impact of human activity and sewage disposal in the river was severe on most of the parameters. The station located in highly urban area showed the worst water quality followed by the station located in moderately urban area and lastly station located in a moderately rural area. It was observed that the main cause of deterioration in water quality was due to the high anthropogenic activities, illegal discharge of sewage and industrial effluent, lack of proper sanitation, unprotected river sites and urban runoff.

  8. 78 FR 42505 - U.S. Healthcare Education Mission to New Delhi, Hyderabad, and Ahmedabad, India, January 27...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... future business prospects by establishing valuable contacts with prospective business partners and... business-friendly states in India and has some of the country's most dynamic entrepreneurs. The state's.... Gujarat has a 42% share of India's pharmaceutical/healthcare business. Mission Scenario Participation...

  9. Earthquakes in Stable Continental Crust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Arch C.; Kanter, Lisa R.

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are some of the reasons for earthquakes which occur in stable crust away from familiar zones at the ends of tectonic plates. Crust stability and the reactivation of old faults are described using examples from India and Australia. (CW)

  10. Simultaneous estimation of earthquake source parameters and crustal Q value from broadband data of selected aftershocks of the 2001 M w 7.7 Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; Lijesh, S.; Mandal, P.

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents the simultaneous estimation of source parameters and crustal Q values for small to moderate-size aftershocks ( M w 2.1-5.1) of the M_{w }7.7 2001 Bhuj earthquake. The horizontal-component S-waves of 144 well located earthquakes (2001-2010) recorded at 3-10 broadband seismograph sites in the Kachchh Seismic Zone, Gujarat, India are analyzed, and their seismic corner frequencies, long-period spectral levels and crustal Q values are simultaneously estimated by inverting the horizontal component of the S-wave displacement spectrum using the Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear inversion technique, wherein the inversion scheme is formulated based on the ?-square source spectral model. The static stress drops (? ?) are then calculated from the corner frequency and seismic moment. The estimated source parameters suggest that the seismic moment ( M 0) and source radius ( r) of aftershocks are varying from 1.12 × 1012 to 4.00 × 1016 N-m and 132.57 to 513.20 m, respectively. Whereas, estimated stress drops (? ?) and multiplicative factor ( E mo) values range from 0.01 to 20.0 MPa and 1.05 to 3.39, respectively. The corner frequencies are found to be ranging from 2.36 to 8.76 Hz. The crustal S-wave quality factor varies from 256 to 1882 with an average of 840 for the Kachchh region, which agrees well with the crustal Q value of the seismically active New Madrid region, USA. Our estimated stress drop values are quite large compared to the other similar size Indian intraplate earthquakes, which can be attributed to the presence of crustal mafic intrusives and aqueous fluids in the lower crust as revealed by the earlier tomographic study of the region.

  11. Active faulting in apparently stable peninsular India: rift inversion and a Holocene-age great earthquake on the Tapti Fault

    E-print Network

    Copley, Alex; Mitra, Supriyo; Sloan, R Alastair; Gaonkar, Sharad; Reynolds, Kirsty

    2014-07-23

    India (discussed below). However, there is a marked change in incision along the line of the fan offset, with minor streams incising steep-sided gullies into the higher part of the fan. We interpret the sharp topo- graphic step to represent an offset due... to a significantly lower base level is likely to prevent significant volumes of sediment from accumulating, which are instead transported and deposited in the ocean. The proximity to the oceanic base level suggests that in times of changing erosion...

  12. Earthquakes and emergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earthquakes and emerging infections may not have a direct cause and effect relationship like tax evasion and jail, but new evidence suggests that there may be a link between the two human health hazards. Various media accounts have cited a massive 1993 earthquake in Maharashtra as a potential catalyst of the recent outbreak of plague in India that has claimed more than 50 lives and alarmed the world. The hypothesis is that the earthquake may have uprooted underground rat populations that carry the fleas infected with the bacterium that causes bubonic plague and can lead to the pneumonic form of the disease that is spread through the air.

  13. Country watch: India.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, R D

    1995-01-01

    At the first nongovernmental organization (NGO) networking meeting on HIV/AIDS in Gujarat State, India (July 1992), the 80 participants concluded that training for grassroots volunteers was urgently needed. The Gujarat AIDS Prevention Unit (GAP-SIRMCE) assumed responsibility for organizing this capacity-building activity. GAP facilitators formulated a training-of-trainers program and outlined a workshop manual. Feedback was obtained from NGOs and experts from training programs so that a manual could be finalized. 200 NGOs were invited to participate; 65 sent delegations for training during the 1-year project. They included NGOs working on health, rural and agricultural development, family welfare, slum development, cooperative movements, and women's groups. The workshops lasted 1-3 days, generally had 10-12 participants (2 trainees per NGO). Topics included basic information on HIV/AIDS, sexuality, and barriers to condom use. There were discussions on negotiating safer sex and identifying fulfilling alternatives to sex acts. Condom demonstrations were also done. GAP then presented important educational messages. Each workshop ended with an evaluation. One of the lessons learned during the project concerned funding of participants. Some NGOs said their participation depended on money received for travel and daily subsistence. It was decided that GAP should not offer such reimbursements because this encourages NGOs to see workshop participation merely as a means of earning money. The Gujarat NGOs in the Indian Network of NGOs on HIV/AIDS have identified 2 major areas for future collaboration. The first was adolescent sex education; more than 98% of NGOs wanted to offer such programs. The second area concerned training in counseling skills in relation to HIV/AIDS and also in family planning, drug addiction, and family and marriage counseling. PMID:12289025

  14. Liquefaction Effects from the Bhuj earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    These MISR images show the Kachchh region in the Gujarat province of western India. On January 26, 2001, a magnitude 7.7 earthquake devastated this area, killing 20,000 people and destroying buildings, dams, and port facilities. The two upper MISR images are pre- and post-earthquake scenes acquired on January 15 and January 31, 2001, respectively (Terra orbits 5736 and 5969). They are 'true-color' images made by combining the red, green and blue bands from the nadir (vertically down-looking) camera. The two lower views are 'false-color' images made by combining the red bands from three different cameras. Blue is assigned to the camera pointing 70 degrees forward (more sun-facing), green to the nadir camera, and red to the camera pointing 70 degrees aftward. Each of these images is about 275 kilometers wide by 218 kilometers high.

    The earthquake epicenter was just below the southern tip of the large, white area on the right-hand side of the images, and about 70 kilometers northeast of the city of Bhuj. The earthquake may have occurred on the Kachchh Mainland Fault, which extends from the region of the epicenter westward along the curved boundary between the darker brown region to the south and the lighter brown area north of it. The compressive stresses responsible for the earthquake are related to the collision of India with Asia and the resulting rise of the Himalayas to the northeast.

    That part of the Kachchh region which lies north of the Kachchh Mainland Fault includes the Banni Plains and the Rann of Kachchh. It is a low, flat basin characterized by salt pans and mud flats. The salt forms in the Rann of Kachchh as mineral-laden waters evaporate. The salt flats can be seen in the nadir images as highly reflective, white and gray areas. During the earthquake, strong shaking produced liquefaction in the fine silts and sands below the water table in the Rann of Kachchh. This caused the mineral grains to settle and expel their interstitial water to the surface. Field investigations have found abundant evidence of mud volcanos, sand boils, and fissures from which salty ground water erupted over an area exceeding 10,000 square kilometers. Evidence of the expelled water can also be seen on the MISR images.

    Notice the delicate, dendritic pattern of stream channels throughout many of the salt-flats on the post-earthquake image, especially due north of the epicenter. These carried water brought to the surface by liquefaction during the earthquake. Areas where shallow surface water is present are much easier to see on the false-color multi-angle composite images. Wet areas are exhibiting a combination of enhanced forward-scattered light due to the reflection by the water, and enhanced backward scattering due to surface roughness or the presence of sediments. This combination results in blue to purple hues.

    The region of sand dunes in the upper right and the Indus River valley and delta in the upper left are inside Pakistan. Near the top of the images, there is an east-west trending linear feature separating the Thar desert of Pakistan from the Rann of Kachchh. This is the Nagar Parkar Fault. On both pre-earthquake images, this feature is evident only from the contrasting brown colors on either side of it. On the post-earthquake images, a narrow ribbon defines the boundary between the two geologic provinces. However, only in the multi-angle composite do we see evidence that this ribbon may be a water-filled channel. Because this area is politically sensitive and fairly inaccessible, no field teams have been able to verify liquefaction effects or the presence of water there.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Earth Science, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  15. Beyond the Education Silo? Tackling Adolescent Secondary Education in Rural India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Orla; Bhabha, Jacqueline

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we examine the factors contributing to gender inequality in secondary schooling in India by critically reviewing the government's secondary education policy. Drawing on the findings of a study in rural Gujarat, we couple this analysis with an examination of the gendered dynamics that restrict girls' ability to fully benefit…

  16. Marital Ideoscapes in 21st-Century India: Creative Combinations of Love and Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Netting, Nancy S.

    2010-01-01

    Although arranged marriage has survived in India, the custom is increasingly challenged by the current influx of new commodities, media, and ideas. Interviews with 15 male and 15 female unmarried professionals, age 22 to 29, in Vadodara, Gujarat, showed that educated youth have moved beyond the conventional love-versus-arranged marriage dichotomy.…

  17. Relationship between Household Literacy and Educational Engagement: Analysis of Data from Rajkot District, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudgar, Amita; Miller, Karyn; Kothari, Brij

    2012-01-01

    Household engagement in a child's education is a complex process; depending on the culture and the context, it may be revealed through a variety of behaviours. Using data from one district in rural Gujarat, India, four indicators of a household's educational engagement were employed to investigate the relationship between household literacy levels…

  18. Girls' Education and Discursive Spaces for Empowerment: Perspectives from Rural India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Payal P.

    2011-01-01

    This article examines a national girls' education program and its role in addressing gender inequality in the Indian state of Gujarat. In 2004, the Ministry of Education, Government of India, enacted the Kasturba Gandhi Balika Vidyala (KGBV) program. As a national program designed to increase educational access for the most marginalized girls, the…

  19. A Clinical Study of Vitiligo in a Rural Set up of Gujarat

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Rita V.; Patel, Bhumi B.; Chaudhary, Arvind H.; Mehta, Malay J.; Pilani, Abhishek P.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentary condition caused by inactivation or destruction of melanocytes in epidermis and hair follicle. Worldwide incidence of 1% has been reported; similar to various dermatological clinics in India. Widespread prejudice, ignorance, taboos, lack of scientific appraisal, and confusion of vitiligo with leprosy makes it an immense psychological stress. Aim: To know the clinical profile of vitiligo patient with associated cofactors. Materials and Methods: Total 1,010 patients of vitiligo attended in outpatient department at Shree Krishna Hospital (SKH) and Matar camp, Gujarat over 1 year period from August 2011 to July 2012 were included in this study. Detail history and clinical examination of patients were done. Results: Out of 1,010 patients 57.3% were females and 42.7 % were males. Most cases developed vitiligo by 2nd decade of life. Progressive course was found in 60.9 % of patients. Vitiligo vulgaris (57.8%) was most common morphological type. Most common site of onset (41.5%) and involvement (75.7%) was lower limb. Family history was present in 20.4%. Conclusions: Vitiligo constitutes important dermatological disease especially in India. The data suggest that local epidemiological behavior of vitiligo need not be the same across different regions. Vitiligo differs substantially in various clinical aspects. PMID:25136154

  20. Re-ordering a Border Space: Relief, Rehabilitation, and Nation-Building in North- Eastern India after the 1950 Assam Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Guyot-Réchard, Bérénice

    2015-04-08

    to be aseismic.7 Yet if the 1897 disaster was bad enough, the 1950 earthquake was a cataclysm of even greater proportions. At the time, the latter ranked as the fifth biggest tremor ever recorded.8 Newspapers likened it to a gigantic atomic bomb.9... ://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/world/10_largest_world.php [accessed 18 March 2014]. 9 'Assam earthquake released 1,000,000 times more energy than atom bomb', The Assam Tribune (28 April 1951). 3 come. When these natural dams burst, the water engulfed the countryside, and rivers...

  1. A fruit wing of Shorea Roxb. from the Early Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat and its bearing on palaeoclimatic interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Anumeha; Guleria, J. S.; Mehrotra, R. C.

    2012-02-01

    A new fossil fruit wing of Shorea Roxb. belonging to the family Dipterocarpaceae is described from the Early Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat. It resembles best the extant species Shorea macroptera Dyer, which is a prominent member of the tropical evergreen forests of the Malayan Peninsula. The present finding, along with the other megafossil records described from the same area, indicates a typical tropical vegetation with a warm and humid climate at the time of deposition in contrast to the present day xeric vegetation in the area. As the family Dipterocarpaceae no longer exists in western India, it is essential to discuss the time of its extinction and possible causes, which may include drastic changes in the climate of the region. The present finding also supports the theory of a Malaysian origin for the family in contrast to the hypothesis of a Gondwanan origin.

  2. What Does "Literate in English" Mean?: Divergent Literacy Practices for Vernacular- vs. English-Medium Students in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramanathan, Vai

    2002-01-01

    Offers a close analysis of how English is presented and taught in state-mandated vernacular- and English-medium textbooks used in Grades K-12 in Gujarat, India. Argues that the divergent English instruction as presented in the textbooks contribute to producing two different cultural models regarding being "literate in English." (Author/VWL)

  3. Everyday Earthquakes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svec, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Describes methods to access current earthquake information from the National Earthquake Information Center. Enables students to build genuine learning experiences using real data from earthquakes that have recently occurred. (JRH)

  4. Functional microbial diversity dynamics in common effluent treatment plants of South Gujarat and hydrocarbon degradation.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Purvi; Munshi, Nasreen; Vaidya, Alok; Jha, Sanjay; Kumar, G Naresh

    2015-06-01

    Common effluent treatment plants (CETPs) of South Gujarat region, India, process wastewater generated by more than 2500 industries because of the nonfeasibility of processing at the individual industrial unit. This study assessed functional microbial diversity in wastewater samples of CETPs over a geological belt using Ecoplate®, isolation of the most abundant bacteria, and screening for hydrocarbon degradation. The high evenness (EPielou) values (0.9) in almost all samples indicated a highly even community structure. Principal component analysis of carbon source utilization showed a cluster of all inlet samples except E1 and another cluster of all outlet samples; aeration tank community samples were dispersed. In spite of the high richness found in microbial communities, 60 morphologically similar organisms were observed and isolated; 46 out of them were subjected to amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis with MboI, HaeIII, and TaqI enzyme, followed by UPGMA clustering. In screening the most abundant bacteria from each cluster, one of the cultures showed a high potential for hydrocarbon degradation and was identified as Pseudomonas citronellolis by 16S rDNA sequencing. Because of its highly adapted inherent nature, this bacterium may help augment the conventional procedure in wastewater treatment and efficiently decrease the organic load. PMID:25925663

  5. Palynology and clay mineralogy of the Deccan volcanic associated sediments of Saurashtra, Gujarat: Age and paleoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samant, Bandana; Mohabey, D. M.; Srivastava, P.; Thakre, Deepali

    2014-02-01

    The intertrappean sediments associated with Deccan Continental Flood Basalt (DCFB) sequence at Ninama in Saurashtra, Gujarat yielded palynoassemblage comprising at least 12 genera and 14 species including Paleocene taxa such as Intrareticulites brevis, Neocouperipollis spp., Striacolporites striatus, Retitricolpites crassimarginatus and Rhombipollis sp. The lava flows of Saurashtra represent the northwestern most DCFB sequence in India. It is considered that the Saurashtra lava flows represent the earliest volcanic activity in the Late Cretaceous of the Reunion Mantle Plume on the northward migrating Indian Plate. The present finding of the Paleocene palynoflora from Ninama sediments indicate Paleocene age for the associated lava flows occurring above the intertrappean bed which suggests that the Saurashtra plateau witnessed eruption of Deccan lava flows even during Paleocene. The clay mineral investigation of the Ninama sediments which are carbonate dominated shows dominance of low charge smectite (LCS) along with the presence of mica and vermiculite. Based on the clay mineral assemblage it is interpreted that arid climatic conditions prevailed during the sedimentation. The smectite dominance recorded within these sediments is in agreement with global record of smectite peak close to the Maastrichtian-Paleocene transition and climatic aridity.

  6. Upwarped high velocity mafic crust, subsurface tectonics and causes of intraplate Latur-Killari (M 6.2) and Koyna (M 6.3) earthquakes, India - A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, O. P.; Chandrakala, K.; Parthasarathy, G.; Reddy, P. R.; Reddy, G. Koti

    2009-05-01

    A unique attempt is made to understand the genesis of intraplate seismicity in the Latur-Killari and Koyna seismogenic regions of India, through derived crustal structure by synthesizing active and passive seismic, magnetotelluric, gravity and heat flow data. It has indicated presence of relatively high velocity/density intermediate granulite (and amphibolite) facies rocks underneath the Deccan volcanic cover caused mainly due to a continuous geodynamic process of uplift and erosion since Precambrian times. These findings have been independently confirmed by detailed borehole geological, geochemical and mineralogical investigations. The crystalline basement rock is found to contain 2 wt% of carbon-di-oxide fluid components. The presence of geodynamic process, associated with thermal anomalies at subcrustal depths, is supported by a high mantle heat flow (29-36 mW/m 2) beneath both regions, although some structural and compositional variations may exist as evidenced by P- and S-wave seismic velocities. We suggest that the stress, caused by ongoing uplift and a high mantle heat flow is continuously accumulating in this denser and rheologically stronger mafic crust within which earthquakes tend to nucleate. These stresses appear to dominate over and above those generated by the India-Eurasia collision. The role of fluids in stress generation, as advocated through earlier studies, appears limited.

  7. EARTHQUAKES POWEROUTAGES

    E-print Network

    TSUNAMI HURRICANES EARTHQUAKES POWEROUTAGES FIRE FOREMERGENCIES PREPAREFOREMERGENCIES Sign up in the event of a widespread disaster, such as a hurricane or earthquake. If a large area is affected, phone

  8. Forecasting Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In this video there are scenes of damage from the Northridge Earthquake and interviews with Dr. Andrea Donnelan, Geophysics at JPL, and Dr. Jim Dolan, earthquake geologist from Cal. Tech. The interviews discuss earthquake forecasting by tracking changes in the earth's crust using antenna receiving signals from a series of satellites called the Global Positioning System (GPS).

  9. A media-based assessment of damage and ground motions from the January 26th, 2001 M 7.6 Bhuj, India earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hough, S.E.; Martin, S.; Bilham, R.; Atkinson, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    We compiled available news and internet accounts of damage and other effects from the 26th January, 2001, Bhuj earthquake, and interpreted them to obtain modified Mercalli intensities at over 200 locations throughout the Indian subcontinent. These values are used to map the intensity distribution using a simple mathematical interpolation method. The maps reveal several interesting features. Within the Kachchh region, the most heavily damaged villages are concentrated towards the western edge of the inferred fault, consistent with western directivity. Significant sediment-induced amplification is also suggested at a number of locations around the Gulf of Kachchh to the south of the epicenter. Away from the Kachchh region intensities were clearly amplified significantly in areas that are along rivers, within deltas, or on coastal alluvium such as mud flats and salt pans. In addition we use fault rupture parameters inferred from teleseismic data to predict shaking intensity at distances of 0-1000 km. We then convert the predicted hard rock ground motion parameters to MMI using a relationship (derived from internet-based intensity surveys) that assigns MMI based on the average effects in a region. The predicted MMIs are typically lower by 1-2 units than those estimated from news accounts. This discrepancy is generally consistent with the expected effect of sediment response, but it could also reflect other factors such as a tendency for media accounts to focus on the most dramatic damage, rather than the average effects. Our modeling results also suggest, however, that the Bhuj earthquake generated more high-frequency shaking than is expected for earthquakes of similar magnitude in California, and may therefore have been especially damaging.

  10. Cross-sensor SAR image offsets for deriving coseismic displacements: Application to the 2001 Bhuj (India) earthquake using ERS and Envisat data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, T.; Wei, S.; Jonsson, S.; Avouac, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is a powerful imaging technique for measuring ground deformation, either through Interferometric SAR (InSAR) or image offset tracking. However, these methods are only applied to SAR images acquired by the same satellite, which limits the measurement capability for many earthquakes. Here we propose a novel approach that allows for calculating offsets between images acquired from the European ERS and Envisat satellites. To achieve this cross-sensor offset calculation, we first coregister pre-event (ERS) and post-event (Envisat) SAR images separately to generate averaged pre- and post-event SAR amplitude maps. We then compute the orbital offsets between these two maps in order to resample the ERS average map onto the grid of the averaged Envisat image. We finally calculate the cross-sensor image offsets based on cross-correlating selected sub-images distributed throughout the coregistered averaged SAR maps. Application to the 2001 Bhuj earthquake reveals, for the first time, its near-field coseismic displacement field right above the epicenter. We compare our measurements with the surface displacement field predicted from the published source model of Copley et al. [2011]. This model was derived from tele-seismic waveforms and limited far-field geodetic data. The comparison between the two displacement maps shows consistent displacement patterns, yet a systematic shift, which likely is due to the limited near-fault resolution of the data used in the previous model. We then perform a joint inversion using the newly derived SAR image offsets and tele-seismic waveforms. The preferred source model suggests a compact slip pattern at depths of 20-30 km with a peak slip of ~10 meters and a fairly short rise time (<3s). The large slip rate and low attenuation in the crust are likely responsible for the widely felt ground shaking despite of its compact source area. The result demonstrates that it is possible to correlate non-coherent SAR images acquired by different sensors to measure surface displacements. This approach extends further the possibility of mining the archive of SAR images for various types of earth-science studies.

  11. UNBIASED MOMENT-RATE SPECTRA AND ABSOLUTE SITE EFFECTS IN THE KACHCHH BASIN, INDIA, FROM THE ANALYSIS OF THE AFTERSHOCKS OF THE 2001 Mw 7.6 BHUJ EARTHQUAKE

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Bodin, P; Mayeda, K; Akinci, A

    2005-05-04

    What can be learned about absolute site effects on ground motions and about earthquake source spectra from recordings at temporary seismic stations, none of which could be considered a 'reference' (hard rock) site, for which no geotechnical information is available, in a very poorly instrumented region? This challenge motivated our current study of aftershocks of the 2001 Mw 7.6 Bhuj earthquake, in Western India. Crustal attenuation and spreading relationships based on the same data used here were determined in an earlier study. In this paper we decouple the ambiguity between absolute source radiation and site effects by first computing robust estimates of moment-rate spectra of about 200 aftershocks in each of two depth ranges. Using these new estimates of sourcespectra, and our understanding of regional wave propagation, we extract the absolute site terms of the sites of the temporary deployment. Absolute site terms (one for each component of the ground motion, for each station) are computed in an average sense, via an L{sub 1}-norm minimization, and results for each site are averaged over wide ranges of azimuths and takeoff angles. The Bhuj deployment is characterized by a variable shallow geology, mostly of soft sedimentary units. Vertical site terms in the region were observed to be almost featureless and slightly < 1.0 within wide frequency ranges. As a result, H/V spectral ratios mimic the absolute behaviors of absolute horizontal site terms, and they generally overpredict them. On the contrary, with respect to the results for sedimentary rock sites (limestone, dolomite) obtained by Malagnini et al. (2004), H/V spectral ratios in their study did not have much in common with absolute horizontal site terms. Spectral ratios between the vector sum of the computed horizontal site terms for the temporary deployment with respect to the same quantity computed at the hardest rock station available, BAC1, are seriously biased by its non-flat, non-unitary site response. This indicates that often the actual behavior of a rock outcrop is far from that of an ideal, reference site.

  12. Flexure of the Indian Plate and Intraplate Earthquakes Roger Bilham, Rebecca Bendick and Kali Wallace

    E-print Network

    Bilham, Roger

    in fatal earthquakes in India appears to exceed the global average. This recent increase in fatalities from1 Flexure of the Indian Plate and Intraplate Earthquakes Roger Bilham, Rebecca Bendick and Kali moving Indian plate appears fundamental to explaining the current distribution of intraplate earthquakes

  13. Earthquake Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donovan, Neville

    1979-01-01

    Provides a survey and a review of earthquake activity and global tectonics from the advancement of the theory of continental drift to the present. Topics include: an identification of the major seismic regions of the earth, seismic measurement techniques, seismic design criteria for buildings, and the prediction of earthquakes. (BT)

  14. Earthquake prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turcotte, Donald L.

    1991-01-01

    The state of the art in earthquake prediction is discussed. Short-term prediction based on seismic precursors, changes in the ratio of compressional velocity to shear velocity, tilt and strain precursors, electromagnetic precursors, hydrologic phenomena, chemical monitors, and animal behavior is examined. Seismic hazard assessment is addressed, and the applications of dynamical systems to earthquake prediction are discussed.

  15. Corporate involvement in disaster response and recovery : an analysis of the Gujarat Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Sayegh, Tracy, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Disaster vulnerability is a serious issue in developing countries where globalization, development patterns, poverty and environmental degradation are placing more people at risk to natural disasters. Recent appeals for ...

  16. Earthquake Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espinoza, Fernando

    2000-01-01

    Indicates the importance of the development of students' measurement and estimation skills. Analyzes earthquake data recorded at seismograph stations and explains how to read and modify the graphs. Presents an activity for student evaluation. (YDS)

  17. Options for Optimal Coverage of Free C-Section Services for Poor Mothers in Indian State of Gujarat: Location Allocation Analysis Using GIS

    PubMed Central

    De Costa, Ayesha; Mavalankar, Dileep V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Gujarat, a western state of India, has seen a steep rise in the proportion of institutional deliveries over the last decade. However, there has been a limited access to cesarean section (C-Section) deliveries for complicated obstetric cases especially for poor rural women. C-section is a lifesaving intervention that can prevent both maternal and perinatal mortality. Poor women bear a disproportionate burden of maternal mortality, and lack of access to C-section, especially for these women, is an important contributor for high maternal and perinatal mortality in resource limited settings. To improve access for this underserved population in the context of inadequate public provision of emergency obstetric services, the state government of Gujarat initiated a public private partnership program called “Chiranjeevi Yojana” (CY) in 2005 to increase the number of facilities providing free C-section services. This study aimed to analyze the current availability of these services in three districts of Gujarat and to identify the best locations for additional service centres to optimize access to free C-section services using Geographic Information System technology. Methodology Supply and demand for obstetric care were calculated using secondary data from sources such as Census and primary data from cross-sectional facility survey. The study is unique in using primary data from facilities, which was collected in 2012–13. Information on obstetric beds and functionality of facilities to calculate supply was collected using pretested questionnaire by trained researchers after obtaining written consent from the participating facilities. Census data of population and birth rates for the study districts was used for demand calculations. Location-allocation model of ArcGIS 10 was used for analyses. Results Currently, about 50 to 84% of populations in all three study districts have access to free C-section facilities within a 20km radius. The model suggests that about 80–96% of the population can be covered for free C-section services with addition of 4–6 centres in critical but underserved regions. It was also suggested that upgrading of public sector facilities with minimal investment can improve the services. Conclusion This study highlights utility of Geographic Information System technology for planning service centres to optimize access to vital lifesaving procedure such as C-section. Although the location allocation methodology has been available for decades, it has been used sparsely by public health professionals. This paper makes an important contribution to the literature for use of the method for planning in resource limited settings. PMID:26332207

  18. Do the pre-service education programmes for midwives in India prepare confident ‘registered midwives’? A survey from India

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Bharati; Hildingsson, Ingegerd; Johansson, Eva; Prakasamma, Malvarappu; Ramani, K.V.; Christensson, Kyllike

    2015-01-01

    Objective The graduates of the diploma and degree programmes of nursing and midwifery in India are considered skilled birth attendants (SBAs). This paper aimed to assess the confidence of final-year students from pre-service education programmes (diploma and bachelor's) in selected midwifery skills from the list of midwifery competencies of the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM). Design A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Gujarat, India, involving 633 final-year students from 25 educational institutions (private or government), randomly selected, stratified by the type of programme (diploma and bachelor's). Students assessed their confidence on a four-point scale, in four midwifery competency domains – antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. Explorative factor analysis was used to reduce skill statements into separate subscales for each domain. Results Overall, 25–40% of students scored above the 75th percentile and 38–50% below the 50th percentile of confidence in all subscales for antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum, and newborn care. The majority had not attended the required number of births prescribed by the Indian Nursing Council. Conclusions The pre-service education offered in the diploma and bachelor's programmes in Gujarat does not prepare confident SBAs, as measured on selected midwifery competencies of the ICM. One of the underlying reasons was less clinical experience during their education. The duration, content, and pedagogy of midwifery education within the integrated programmes need to be reviewed. PMID:26649550

  19. Emergence and extinction of Dipterocarpaceae in western India with reference to climate change: Fossil wood evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Anumeha; Mehrotra, R. C.; Guleria, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Climate has played a crucial role in assigning a different kind of topography to Rajasthan and Gujarat since the Cenozoic time. Evidently, three genera, namely, Dipterocarpus Gaert. f., Hopea Roxb. and Shorea Roxb. of the Dipterocarpaceae are described from the Neogene sediments of western India (Rajasthan and Gujarat). These taxa are marked by their complete absence in the region today. The presence of Dipterocarpaceae in western India has been noticed from the Early Eocene up to the Plio-Pleistocene in deep time. The family is usually a dominant component of the humid tropical and subtropical flora of the Indo-Malayan region and its discovery, along with earlier described fossils from western India indicates existence of ancient tropical rain forests in western India. A change in the climate affected warm and humid conditions occurring there during the Cenozoic resulting in arid to semi-arid climate at present which is responsible for the ultimate extinction of Dipterocarpaceae in the region. In addition, the palaeobiogeography of Dipterocarpaceae is reviewed.

  20. Quality of Life Perspective Towards Acne among Adolescents at Tertiary Care Center of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Ashok Raman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acne is the most common disease of skin affecting adolescents, which can have a significant psychological impact leading to anxiety and depression. Aims Study was undertaken to see the impact of acne on the Quality of life Materials and Methods The study was conducted from March 2012 to February 2013, in the age group 14–25, using a validated self-administered questionnaire The questions were evaluated using 4 point Likert scale (0–3). Statistical Analysis Statistical calculations were done using Excel 2010 and Statgraphics Centurion XVI.I. Results Among 869 participants, 608(69.97%) had acne while 261 (30.03%) had no acne. Of acne sufferers 43.75% were males and 56.25% were females with maximum 67.93% in the age group 18–21. Of Non-acne participants 57.09% considered acne as a problem and 54.02% were disturbed by the idea of having acne. Study showed p-values<0.05 indicating statistically significant non-zero correlations at 95.0% confidence level. Conclusion The quality of life scale of acne varies according to individual perception and differs from population to population. Questionnaire evaluation is a useful tool, but cannot replace proper psychological assessment. PMID:26557597

  1. Maternal Socialization of Children's Anger, Sadness, and Physical Pain in Two Communities in Gujarat, India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raval, Vaishali Vidhatri; Martini, Tanya Susan

    2009-01-01

    Despite the recognition of cultural influences in child socialization, little is known about socialization of emotion in children from different cultures. This study examined (a) Gujarati Indian mothers' reports concerning their beliefs, affective and behavioral responses to their children's displays of anger, sadness, and physical pain, and (b)…

  2. Study of computerized spirometric parameters of traffic police personnel of Saurashtra region, Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Makwana, Amit H; Solanki, Jayesh D; Gokhale, Pradnya A; Mehta, Hemant B; Shah, Chinmay J; Gadhavi, Bhakti P

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Air pollution due to road traffic is a serious health hazard and air quality crisis in cities is mainly due to vehicular emission. Thus the persons who are continuously exposed are at an increased risk. The study was carried out to evaluate the extent of impairment in lung function in traffic police personnel compared to matched unexposed control group. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted to measure the spirometric parameters of 100 traffic police personnel, aged 20-55 years, working in Saurashtra region, as compared to matched control group, consisting of 100 unexposed males. Measurement of lung volumes and capacities was done with SPIROEXCEL. The statistical analysis was carried out with Graph pad instat 3. Results: Traffic police personnel had significantly declined forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1), slow vital capacity (SVC) and maximum voluntary ventilation (MVV) when compared with predictive normal values, which is probably due to exposure to vehicular exhaust. Comparison of test values between groups showed significantly reduced FVC, MVV and increased FEV1/FVC ratio and insignificantly declined FEV1 and SVC in cases as compared to controls. Traffic personnel with longer duration of exposure showed significantly reduced lung functions than those with shorter duration. Smokers showed lower test values as compared to non-smokers with significance only in unexposed group. Conclusion: The effect of pollution by vehicular exhausts may be responsible for these pulmonary function impairments and traffic police personnel should be offered personal protective or preventive measures. PMID:26628759

  3. Modelling of lindane transport in groundwater of metropolitan city Vadodara, Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Sharma, M K; Jain, C K; Rao, G Tamma; Rao, V V S Gurunadha

    2015-05-01

    Migration pattern of organochloro pesticide lindane has been studied in groundwater of metropolitan city Vadodara. Groundwater flow was simulated using the groundwater flow model constructed up to a depth of 60 m considering a three-layer structure with grid size of 40?×?40?×?40 m(3). The general groundwater flow direction is from northeast to south and southwest. The river Vishwamitri and river Jambua form natural hydrologic boundary. The constant head in the north and south end of the study area is taken as another boundary condition in the model. The hydraulic head distribution in the multilayer aquifer has been computed from the visual MODFLOW groundwater flow model. TDS has been computed though MT3D mass transport model starting with a background concentration of 500 mg/l and using a porosity value of 0.3. Simulated TDS values from the model matches well with the observed data. Model MT3D was run for lindane pesticide with a background concentration of 0.5??g/l. The predictions of the mass transport model for next 50 years indicate that advancement of containment of plume size in the aquifer system both spatially and depth wise as a result of increasing level of pesticide in river Vishwamitri. The restoration of the aquifer system may take a very long time as seen from slow improvement in the groundwater quality from the predicted scenarios, thereby, indicating alarming situation of groundwater quality deterioration in different layers. It is recommended that all the industries operating in the region should install efficient effluent treatment plants to abate the pollution problem. PMID:25910721

  4. Comparative molecular analysis of chemolithoautotrophic bacterial diversity and community structure from coastal saline soils, Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Soils harbour high diversity of obligate as well as facultative chemolithoautotrophic bacteria that contribute significantly to CO2 dynamics in soil. In this study, we used culture dependent and independent methods to assess the community structure and diversity of chemolithoautotrophs in agricultural and coastal barren saline soils (low and high salinity). We studied the composition and distribution of chemolithoautotrophs by means of functional marker gene cbbL encoding large subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase and a phylogenetic marker 16S rRNA gene. The cbbL form IA and IC genes associated with carbon fixation were analyzed to gain insight into metabolic potential of chemolithoautotrophs in three soil types of coastal ecosystems which had a very different salt load and sulphur content. Results In cbbL libraries, the cbbL form IA was retrieved only from high saline soil whereas form IC was found in all three soil types. The form IC cbbL was also amplified from bacterial isolates obtained from all soil types. A number of novel monophyletic lineages affiliated with form IA and IC phylogenetic trees were found. These were distantly related to the known cbbL sequences from agroecosystem, volcanic ashes and marine environments. In 16S rRNA clone libraries, the agricultural soil was dominated by chemolithoautotrophs (Betaproteobacteria) whereas photoautotrophic Chloroflexi and sulphide oxidizers dominated saline ecosystems. Environmental specificity was apparently visible at both higher taxonomic levels (phylum) and lower taxonomic levels (genus and species). The differentiation in community structure and diversity in three soil ecosystems was supported by LIBSHUFF (P?=?0.001) and UniFrac. Conclusion This study may provide fundamentally new insights into the role of chemolithoautotrophic and photoautotrophic bacterial diversity in biochemical carbon cycling in barren saline soils. The bacterial communities varied greatly among the three sites, probably because of differences in salinity, carbon and sulphur contents. The cbbL form IA-containing sulphide-oxidizing chemolithotrophs were found only in high saline soil clone library, thus giving the indication of sulphide availability in this soil ecosystem. This is the first comparative study of the community structure and diversity of chemolithoautotrophic bacteria in coastal agricultural and saline barren soils using functional (cbbL) and phylogenetic (16S rDNA) marker genes. PMID:22834535

  5. Earthquake Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    During NASA's Apollo program, it was necessary to subject the mammoth Saturn V launch vehicle to extremely forceful vibrations to assure the moonbooster's structural integrity in flight. Marshall Space Flight Center assigned vibration testing to a contractor, the Scientific Services and Systems Group of Wyle Laboratories, Norco, California. Wyle-3S, as the group is known, built a large facility at Huntsville, Alabama, and equipped it with an enormously forceful shock and vibration system to simulate the liftoff stresses the Saturn V would encounter. Saturn V is no longer in service, but Wyle-3S has found spinoff utility for its vibration facility. It is now being used to simulate earthquake effects on various kinds of equipment, principally equipment intended for use in nuclear power generation. Government regulations require that such equipment demonstrate its ability to survive earthquake conditions. In upper left photo, Wyle3S is preparing to conduct an earthquake test on a 25ton diesel generator built by Atlas Polar Company, Ltd., Toronto, Canada, for emergency use in a Canadian nuclear power plant. Being readied for test in the lower left photo is a large circuit breaker to be used by Duke Power Company, Charlotte, North Carolina. Electro-hydraulic and electro-dynamic shakers in and around the pit simulate earthquake forces.

  6. 76 FR 58769 - Ports and Maritime Technology Trade Mission to India

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ...entire project will entail an investment of approximately $2 billion. Ahmedabad, Gujarat The state of Gujarat has one major port (Mundra) and 41 minor ports. Gujarat is an industrial powerhouse where many multinational corporations have...

  7. 77 FR 19192 - Circular Welded Carbon-Quality Steel Pipe From India: Preliminary Affirmative Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ...Memorandum'') at the ``State Government of Gujarat Tax Incentives'' section. 3. Duty...Memorandum at the ``State Government of Gujarat Tax Incentives'' section. B. Export...Memorandum at the ``State Government of Gujarat (SGOG) Tax Incentives''...

  8. America's faulty earthquake plans

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, J

    1989-10-01

    In this article, the author discusses the liklihood of major earthquakes in both the western and eastern United States as well as the level of preparedness of each region of the U.S. for a major earthquake. Current technology in both earthquake-resistance design and earthquake detection is described. Governmental programs for earthquake hazard reduction are outlined and critiqued.

  9. UNCORRECTED 2 Changes in atmospheric aerosol parameters after Gujarat

    E-print Network

    Singh, Ramesh P.

    and Technology, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi Osaka 577-8502, Japan 6 b Department of Civil Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur 208 016, India 7 Abstract 8 The analysis of Sea visible and near-infrared 55(0.412, 0.443, 0.490, 0.510, 0.555, 0.670, 0.765 and 0.865 56lm). The aerosol

  10. Defeating Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, R. S.

    2012-12-01

    The 2004 M=9.2 Sumatra earthquake claimed what seemed an unfathomable 228,000 lives, although because of its size, we could at least assure ourselves that it was an extremely rare event. But in the short space of 8 years, the Sumatra quake no longer looks like an anomaly, and it is no longer even the worst disaster of the Century: 80,000 deaths in the 2005 M=7.6 Pakistan quake; 88,000 deaths in the 2008 M=7.9 Wenchuan, China quake; 316,000 deaths in the M=7.0 Haiti, quake. In each case, poor design and construction were unable to withstand the ferocity of the shaken earth. And this was compounded by inadequate rescue, medical care, and shelter. How could the toll continue to mount despite the advances in our understanding of quake risk? The world's population is flowing into megacities, and many of these migration magnets lie astride the plate boundaries. Caught between these opposing demographic and seismic forces are 50 cities of at least 3 million people threatened by large earthquakes, the targets of chance. What we know for certain is that no one will take protective measures unless they are convinced they are at risk. Furnishing that knowledge is the animating principle of the Global Earthquake Model, launched in 2009. At the very least, everyone should be able to learn what his or her risk is. At the very least, our community owes the world an estimate of that risk. So, first and foremost, GEM seeks to raise quake risk awareness. We have no illusions that maps or models raise awareness; instead, earthquakes do. But when a quake strikes, people need a credible place to go to answer the question, how vulnerable am I, and what can I do about it? The Global Earthquake Model is being built with GEM's new open source engine, OpenQuake. GEM is also assembling the global data sets without which we will never improve our understanding of where, how large, and how frequently earthquakes will strike, what impacts they will have, and how those impacts can be lessened by our actions. Using these global datasets will help to make the model as uniform as possible. The model must be built by scientists in the affected countries with GEM's support, augmented by their insights and data. The model will launch in 2014; to succeed it must be open, international, independent, and continuously tested. But the mission of GEM is not just the likelihood of ground shaking, but also gaging the economic and social consequences of earthquakes, which greatly amplify the losses. For example, should the municipality of Istanbul retrofit schools, or increase its insurance reserves and recovery capacity? Should a homeowner in a high-risk area move or strengthen her building? This is why GEM is a public-private partnership. GEM's fourteen public sponsors and eight non-governmental organization members are standing for the developing world. To extend GEM into the financial world, we draw upon the expertise of companies. GEM's ten private sponsors have endorsed the acquisition of public knowledge over private gain. In a competitive world, this is a courageous act. GEM is but one link in a chain of preparedness: from earth science and engineering research, through groups like GEM, to mitigation, retrofit or relocate decisions, building codes and insurance, and finally to prepared hospitals, schools, and homes. But it is a link that our community can make strong.

  11. Relationship between household literacy and educational engagement: Analysis of data from Rajkot district, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudgar, Amita; Miller, Karyn; Kothari, Brij

    2012-02-01

    Household engagement in a child's education is a complex process; depending on the culture and the context, it may be revealed through a variety of behaviours. Using data from one district in rural Gujarat, India, four indicators of a household's educational engagement were employed to investigate the relationship between household literacy levels and the household's engagement in the education of its child members. The findings on educational engagement were also compared across households with different wealth and income levels. Uniformly, indicators of household literacy levels were found to be more important in understanding a household's educational engagement than a household's wealth and income levels.

  12. HIGH RESOLUTION SATELLITE IMAGERY NEW PERSPECTIVES FOR THE EARTHQUAKE RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-print Network

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    satellite imagery to Bhuj (India) earthquake of January 26th, 2001 & Boumerdes (Algeria) earthquake of May The roofs are not continuous, indicating important damage. Example on Zemmouri, Algeria Absence of shadow, indicating collapse. Example on Zemmouri, Algeria #12;Principles of damage detectionPrinciples of damage

  13. Increase in Ozone hole and hence UV-B Preceding Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2007-05-01

    Before the occurrence of earthquake, the change has been observed in ozone hole as well as UV-B flux in the atmosphere of the earth. After earthquake the UV-B flux reduces, which is correlated with the fluctuation in atmospheric temperature as well as Electron flux in Sun-Earth environment. Actual measurement show a linear relationship in between Coronal Mass Ejection and increase in Solar UV- B before the earthquakes in various parts of India.

  14. Genetic counselling in tribals in India.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Dipika; Das, Kishalaya

    2011-10-01

    Genetic counselling in tribals unlike general population residing in cities and near villages is a difficult task due of their lower literacy and poor socio-economic status. However, sustained effort is essential with a close interaction in the local language, certain misbeliefs need to be removed gradually taking into account their socio-cultural background. The present communication deals with our experience in counselling for haemoglobinopathies during Neonatal Screening Programme undertaken for sickle cell disease in Kalahandi district of Orissa and Community Screening Programmes in primitive tribes of India in four States viz. Orissa, Gujarat, Tamil Nadu and Maharashtra. Counselling during neonatal screening programme was very well accepted demonstrating the benefit to the small babies as regards the morbidity. Premarital marriage counselling was also accepted by them. The success rate as followed up for 5 years is almost 50 per cent, the limitation being long follow up. Genetic counselling in these areas has to be continuous to achieve success and therefore the need for setting up of permanent centres in the tribal areas in India. PMID:22089621

  15. Towards a Better Earthquake and Tsunami Monitoring System: Indian Effort

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bansal, B.; Gupta, G.

    2005-12-01

    The December 26, 2004 earthquake (mw 9.3) in the Andaman-Sumatra subduction zone was unprecedented in its size, rupture extent as well as tsunamigenic capacity. Knowledge about the lack of a predecessor to this event was part of the reason for the apparent lack of anticipation and preparedness. Clearly, this event has changed the perception of earthquake/tsunami hazard along the Andaman and Nicobar Islands as well as regions along the southwest coast of India, far removed from the source earthquake. The government of India is embarking on a major programme to study the earthquake processes in the Andaman and Nicobar regions, part of the subduction zone stretching about 1000 km, most of which was affected by the earthquake. These efforts include expansion and modernization of the existing seismic network, continuous and campaign-mode GPS surveys, geological and geophysical investigations and inundation mapping. Research programmes being funded by the DST aims at improved understanding of the seismic sources, their past behavior, rupture characteristics, physical processing related to earthquakes in this subduction zone and style of deformation using geodetic techniques. A network of more than 100 seismological stations operate in India presently, most of them being operated by the India Meteorological Department, the nodal agency for seismological studies. Linking and modernization and addition of more seismic observatories are underway. The station at Port Blair has been upgraded as broadband and a good network of portable stations are now operational. Added to these are the GPS campaign mode surveys that are being done along the entire arc. Establishment of a multiparametric geophysical observatory to monitor physical processes prior to large earthquakes is another experiment in plan. The structure of the Tsunami Warning System being proposed also involves establishment of more tide gauges and pressure sensors at strategic locations. It is expected that the data generated through various research initiatives will provide the necessary scientific basis for the proposed warning system.

  16. EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES

    E-print Network

    Polly, David

    EARTHQUAKE PREPAREDNESS FOR LABORATORIES By: Christopher E. Kohler (Environmental Health and Safety) and Walter E. Gray (Indiana Geological Survey) Earthquakes occur with little or no warning, and so planning of an earthquake. While most historical earthquakes were minor, Indiana's proximity to two seismic zones

  17. 2011 TOHOKUCHIHOTAIHEIYOU OKI EARTHQUAKE

    E-print Network

    Guillas, Serge

    2011 TOHOKUCHIHOTAIHEIYOU OKI EARTHQUAKE M. HORI Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo Seminar on the Honshu Earthquake & Tsunami UCL Institute for Risk & Disaster Reduction March 24, 2011 #12;Earthquake Details · Magnitude in Richter scale 9.0 · Moment Magnitude 9.0 · Location 38.03N, 143.15E · Depth

  18. Analytical Conditions for Compact Earthquake Prediction Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengor, T.

    2009-04-01

    This paper concerns itself with The atmosphere and ionosphere include non-uniform electric charge and current distributions during the earthquake activity. These charges and currents move irregularly when an activity is scheduled for an earthquake at the future. The electromagnetic characteristics of the region over the earth change to domains where irregular transportations of non-uniform electric charges are observed; therefore, the electromagnetism in the plasma, which moves irregularly and contains non-uniform charge distributions, is studied. These cases of charge distributions are called irregular and non-uniform plasmas. It is called the seismo-plasma if irregular and non-uniform plasma defines a real earthquake activity, which will come to truth. Some signals involving the above-mentioned coupling effects generate some analytical conditions giving the predictability of seismic processes [1]-[5]. These conditions will be discussed in this paper. 2 References [1] T. Sengor, "The electromagnetic device optimization modeling of seismo-electromagnetic processes," IUGG Perugia 2007. [2] T. Sengor, "The electromagnetic device optimization modeling of seismo-electromagnetic processes for Marmara Sea earthquakes," EGU 2008. [3] T. Sengor, "On the exact interaction mechanism of electromagnetically generated phenomena with significant earthquakes and the observations related the exact predictions before the significant earthquakes at July 1999-May 2000 period," Helsinki Univ. Tech. Electrom. Lab. Rept. 368, May 2001. [4] T. Sengor, "The Observational Findings Before The Great Earthquakes Of December 2004 And The Mechanism Extraction From Associated Electromagnetic Phenomena," Book of XXVIIIth URSI GA 2005, pp. 191, EGH.9 (01443) and Proceedings 2005 CD, New Delhi, India, Oct. 23-29, 2005. [5] T. Sengor, "The interaction mechanism among electromagnetic phenomena and geophysical-seismic-ionospheric phenomena with extraction for exact earthquake prediction genetics," 10th SA of the IAGA 2005, Abst. CD,. GAI, C109, No.: IAGA2005-A-0134, Toulouse, France, July18-29, 2005.

  19. 75 FR 43488 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Final Results of Countervailing Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ...Programs Administered by the State Government of Gujarat 1. State Government of Gujarat (SGOG) Tax Incentives: Sales Tax Exemptions...of Goods During the POR 2. State Government of Gujarat (SGOG) Tax Incentives: Deferrals on...

  20. 75 FR 1495 - Certain Hot-Rolled Carbon Steel Flat Products From India: Preliminary Results of Countervailing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ...administered by the state governments of Gujarat, Maharashtra, Andhra Pradesh, Chhattisgarh...Administered by the State Government of Gujarat,'' ``Programs Administered...Memorandum at ``State Government of Gujarat Tax Incentives'' section. 12....

  1. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India

    PubMed Central

    Colah, Roshan B.; Mukherjee, Malay B.; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-01-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with ?-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of ?-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Odisha and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease. PMID:26139766

  2. Sickle cell disease in tribal populations in India.

    PubMed

    Colah, Roshan B; Mukherjee, Malay B; Martin, Snehal; Ghosh, Kanjaksha

    2015-05-01

    The sickle gene is widespread among many tribal population groups in India with prevalence of heterozygotes varying from 1-40 per cent. Co-inheritance of the sickle gene with ?-thalassaemia, HbD Punjab and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency has also been reported. Most of the screening programmes in India now use high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis although the solubility test is also sensitive and cheap. Sickle cell disease (SCD) among tribal populations is generally milder than among non-tribal groups with fewer episodes of painful crises, infections, acute chest syndrome and need for hospitalization. This has partly been attributed to the very high prevalence of ?-thalassaemia among these tribes as well as higher foetal haemoglobin levels. However, the clinical presentation is variable with many cases having a severe presentation. There is not much information available on maternal and perinatal outcome in tribal women with sickle cell disease. Newborn screening programmes for SCD have recently been initiated in Maharashtra, Gujarat, Orissa and Chattisgarh and monitoring these birth cohorts will help to understand the natural history of SCD in India. Prenatal diagnosis is acceptable by tribal families in India. The Indian Council of Medical Research and the National Rural Health Mission in different States are undertaking outreach programmes for better management and control of the disease. PMID:26139766

  3. Energy Balance of Rural Ecosystems In India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chhabra, A.; Madhava Rao, V.; Hermon, R. R.; Garg, A.; Nag, T.; Bhaskara Rao, N.; Sharma, A.; Parihar, J. S.

    2014-11-01

    India is predominantly an agricultural and rural country. Across the country, the villages vary in geographical location, area, human and livestock population, availability of resources, agricultural practices, livelihood patterns etc. This study presents an estimation of net energy balance resulting from primary production vis-a-vis energy consumption through various components in a "Rural Ecosystem". Seven sites located in different agroclimatic regions of India were studied. An end use energy accounting "Rural Energy Balance Model" is developed for input-output analysis of various energy flows of production, consumption, import and export through various components of crop, trees outside forest plantations, livestock, rural households, industry or trade within the village system boundary. An integrated approach using field, ancillary, GIS and high resolution IRS-P6 Resourcesat-2 LISS IV data is adopted for generation of various model inputs. The primary and secondary field data collection of various energy uses at household and village level were carried out using structured schedules and questionnaires. High resolution multi-temporal Resourcesat-2 LISS IV data (2013-14) was used for generating landuse/landcover maps and estimation of above-ground Trees Outside Forests phytomass. The model inputs were converted to energy equivalents using country-specific energy conversion factors. A comprehensive geotagged database of sampled households and available resources at each study site was also developed in ArcGIS framework. Across the study sites, the estimated net energy balance ranged from -18.8 Terra Joules (TJ) in a high energy consuming Hodka village, Gujarat to 224.7 TJ in an agriculture, aquaculture and plantation intensive Kollaparru village, Andhra Pradesh. The results indicate that the net energy balance of a Rural Ecosystem is largely driven by primary production through crops and natural vegetation. This study provides a significant insight to policy relevant recommendations for Energy Sustainable Rural India.

  4. Stress triggering of the great Indian Ocean strike-slip earthquakes in a diffuse plate boundary zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiseman, Kelly; Bürgmann, Roland

    2012-11-01

    On April 11, 2012, two great magnitude 8+ earthquakes occurred within a two-hour period off the west coast of northern Sumatra, Indonesia, in the broadly distributed India-Australia plate boundary zone. The magnitude 8.6 mainshock holds the distinction of being both the largest instrumentally recorded strike-slip earthquake and the largest earthquake away from a recognized plate boundary fault. The mainshock involved sequential ruptures of multiple fault planes oriented nearly perpendicular to each other. The adjacent 2004 megathrust earthquake statically loaded the northern Wharton Basin oceanic lithosphere on both of the 2012 mainshock fault plane orientations, and greatly enhanced the rate of earthquake activity in the region for a year. Viscoelastic relaxation of the asthenosphere following the 2004 and 2005 megathrust earthquakes continued to positively stress the offshore region, correlating with the locations of later strike-slip earthquakes, including two magnitude 7+ and the 2012 magnitude 8+ earthquakes.

  5. Speeding earthquake disaster relief

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortensen, Carl; Donlin, Carolyn; Page, Robert A.; Ward, Peter

    1995-01-01

    In coping with recent multibillion-dollar earthquake disasters, scientists and emergency managers have found new ways to speed and improve relief efforts. This progress is founded on the rapid availability of earthquake information from seismograph networks.

  6. Deep Scientific Drilling at Koyna, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, H. K.

    2011-12-01

    The Stable Continental Region (SCR) earthquakes tend to claim more human lives and inflict heavier financial losses as they occur where not expected and the local and regional preparedness to mitigate such catastrophes is minimal. Artificial water Reservoir Triggered Seismicity (RTS), most prominent in SCR, provides an exceptional window to comprehend genesis of such earthquakes. Since the first scientific reporting of the RTS at the Boulder Dam, USA during 1930s, over 100 cases of RTS have been reported globally. Damaging earthquakes exceeding M 6 have occurred at Hsingfengkiang (China), Kariba (Zambia -Zimbabwe border), Kremasta (Greece) and Koyna (India). It is debated that the 2008 M 7.8 Sichuan earthquake in China, which claimed over 80,000 human lives was triggered by filling of a nearby reservoir. Located close to the west coast of India, Koyna is a classical site of RTS, where triggered earthquakes have been occurring since the impoundment in 1962, including the largest RTS earthquake of M 6.3 on December 10, 1967 which claimed over 200 human lives and destroyed Koyna town. Over the past 49 years 22 earthquakes of M ? 5 and several thousand smaller earthquakes have occurred in a restricted area of 20 X 30 sq. km. with no other seismic activity within 50 km of the Koyna Dam. The latest M 5.1 earthquake occurred on December 12, 2009. Although several studies have clearly established the association of continued RTS at Koyna with precipitation driven loading and unloading of the Koyna and Warna reservoirs, the trigger mechanism is little understood. Our knowledge about the physical properties of rocks and fluids in the fault zones and how they affect the build-up of stress for an extended period is limited by the lack of data from the near field region. A deep bore hole of up to 7 km depth at a scientifically and logistically suitable location is under an advance stage of planning. A detailed workshop and field visits involving some 50 scientists from 10 countries were held under the auspices of International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP) and the Ministry of Earth Sciences (MoES), Government of India, during March 21 through 26, 2011 to discuss all aspects of the proposed scientific drilling at Koyna. In addition to a pilot bore hole of about 2.5 km, 4 other bore holes penetrating the basalt cover of about 1 km thickness, are proposed to be drilled to conduct a suite of geophysical and hydro-geological experiments and measurements. Results of these investigations would be complementary to SAFOD experiment being conducted on the plate boundary.

  7. Redefining Earthquakes and the Earthquake Machine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubenthal, Michael; Braile, Larry; Taber, John

    2008-01-01

    The Earthquake Machine (EML), a mechanical model of stick-slip fault systems, can increase student engagement and facilitate opportunities to participate in the scientific process. This article introduces the EML model and an activity that challenges ninth-grade students' misconceptions about earthquakes. The activity emphasizes the role of models…

  8. Real Earthquakes, Real Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schomburg, Aaron

    2003-01-01

    One teacher took her class on a year long earthquake expedition. The goal was to monitor the occurrences of real earthquakes during the year and mark their locations with push pins on a wall-sized world map in the hallway outside the science room. The purpose of the project was to create a detailed picture of the earthquakes that occurred…

  9. Children's Ideas about Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Canan Lacin

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake, a natural disaster, is among the fundamental problems of many countries. If people know how to protect themselves from earthquake and arrange their life styles in compliance with this, damage they will suffer will reduce to that extent. In particular, a good training regarding earthquake to be received in primary schools is considered…

  10. Earthquake and Schools. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC.

    Designing schools to make them more earthquake resistant and protect children from the catastrophic collapse of the school building is discussed in this videotape. It reveals that 44 of the 50 U.S. states are vulnerable to earthquake, but most schools are structurally unprepared to take on the stresses that earthquakes exert. The cost to the…

  11. Operational earthquake forecasting can enhance earthquake preparedness

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, T.H.; Marzocchi, W.; Michael, A.J.; Gerstenberger, M.C.

    2014-01-01

    We cannot yet predict large earthquakes in the short term with much reliability and skill, but the strong clustering exhibited in seismic sequences tells us that earthquake probabilities are not constant in time; they generally rise and fall over periods of days to years in correlation with nearby seismic activity. Operational earthquake forecasting (OEF) is the dissemination of authoritative information about these time?dependent probabilities to help communities prepare for potentially destructive earthquakes. The goal of OEF is to inform the decisions that people and organizations must continually make to mitigate seismic risk and prepare for potentially destructive earthquakes on time scales from days to decades. To fulfill this role, OEF must provide a complete description of the seismic hazard—ground?motion exceedance probabilities as well as short?term rupture probabilities—in concert with the long?term forecasts of probabilistic seismic?hazard analysis (PSHA).

  12. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning

    PubMed Central

    Minson, Sarah E.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Glennie, Craig L.; Murray, Jessica R.; Langbein, John O.; Owen, Susan E.; Heaton, Thomas H.; Iannucci, Robert A.; Hauser, Darren L.

    2015-01-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an Mw (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California’s Hayward fault, and real data from the Mw 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing. PMID:26601167

  13. Crowdsourced earthquake early warning.

    PubMed

    Minson, Sarah E; Brooks, Benjamin A; Glennie, Craig L; Murray, Jessica R; Langbein, John O; Owen, Susan E; Heaton, Thomas H; Iannucci, Robert A; Hauser, Darren L

    2015-04-01

    Earthquake early warning (EEW) can reduce harm to people and infrastructure from earthquakes and tsunamis, but it has not been implemented in most high earthquake-risk regions because of prohibitive cost. Common consumer devices such as smartphones contain low-cost versions of the sensors used in EEW. Although less accurate than scientific-grade instruments, these sensors are globally ubiquitous. Through controlled tests of consumer devices, simulation of an M w (moment magnitude) 7 earthquake on California's Hayward fault, and real data from the M w 9 Tohoku-oki earthquake, we demonstrate that EEW could be achieved via crowdsourcing. PMID:26601167

  14. The Geology of Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Robert E.

    The Geology of Earthquakes is a major contribution that brings together under one cover the many and complex elements of geology that are fundamental to earthquakes and seismology. Here are described and analyzed the basic causes of earthquakes, the resulting effects of earthquakes and faulting on the surface of the Earth, techniques of analyzing these effects, and engineering and public policy considerations for earthquake hazard mitigation. The three authors have played major roles in developing the fundamentals in both scientific and policy matters; thus they speak with an authority that few others could.

  15. Commensurability of earthquake occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hui; Han, Yanben; Su, Youjin; Wang, Rui

    2013-07-01

    During recent years huge earthquakes frequently occurred and caused surprise attack on many places of the globe. Frequent exceptional strong disasters of earthquakes remind that we must strengthen our research on cause of formation, mechanism, prediction and forecast of earthquakes, and achieve the goal of advancing the development of Earth science and mitigation of seismic disasters. The commensurability of earthquake occurrences has been studied by means of the commensurability revealed by the Titius-Bode law in the paper. The studied results show that the earthquakes basically all occur at the commensurable point of its time axis, respectively. It also shows that occurrence of the earthquakes is not accidental, showing certain patterns and inevitability, and the commensurable value is different for earthquakes occurring in different areas.

  16. Evaluation of GVI-based indices for drought early warning in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeyaseelan, A. T.; Kogan, Felix N.

    2006-12-01

    Drought is the major disaster, which occurs in some part of India every year due to monsoon variability. India has established satellite based National Agricultural Drought Assessment and Monitoring System (NADAMS), at National Remote Sensing Agency, Department of Space since 1987. NADAMS provides near real time monitoring and early warning of drought conditions at National level using NOAA AVHRR and at regional level using IRS WiFS and AWiFS data. ISRO-NASA-NOAA science cooperation project has been initiated during 2005 for development of satellite based decision support drought monitor system in India. Initially, the evaluation of GVI based indices for drought early warning in India was taken up. The study was carried out over five small regions each covering part of a district and over five large regions each covering few districts in each state of Gujarat, Maharashtra and Rajasthan states and the result of the study is presented in this paper. The weekly GVI based indices such as Vegetation Condition Index (VCI), Temperature Condition Index (TCI), Vegetation Health Index (VHI) for the period from 1991-2004 over 5 small regions covering part of districts namely Banaskantha district of Gujarat state to represent Bajra crop, Surendra nagar district of Gujarat state to represent Cotton crop, Nasik district of Maharashtra to represent Bajra crop, Bhandara district to represent Rice crop and Akola district of Maharastra to represent Jowar crop was selected. The weekly GVI based indices over 5 large regions with larger database from 1981 to 2004 covering few districts of Rajasthan state to represent winter wheat and few districts of Maharashtra state to represent Jowar, Rice and Cotton crops were selected. The comparison of seasonal average VCI, TCI and VHI with the corresponding crops yield over 5 small regions indicate better regression coefficient for VHI than VCI or TCI. The comparison over 5 large regions covering larger data base from 1982-2004 indicate better regression coefficient for VCI than VHI or TCI. Results of the study suggests over smaller region, the VCI and TCI combined VHI indices relates better with crop yields, whereas over larger region, the VCI itself relates better with crop yields than with TCI or the VCI and TCI combined VHI.

  17. India: Kachchh

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... The earthquake may have occurred on the Kachchh Mainland Fault, which extends from the region of the epicenter westward along the curved ... the Kachchh region which lies north of the Kachchh Mainland Fault includes the Banni Plains and the Rann of Kachchh. It is a low, flat ...

  18. Weather Satellite Thermal IR Responses Prior to Earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OConnor, Daniel P.

    2005-01-01

    A number of observers claim to have seen thermal anomalies prior to earthquakes, but subsequent analysis by others has failed to produce similar findings. What exactly are these anomalies? Might they be useful for earthquake prediction? It is the purpose of this study to determine if thermal anomalies can be found in association with known earthquakes by systematically co-registering weather satellite images at the sub-pixel level and then determining if statistically significant responses occurred prior to the earthquake event. A new set of automatic co-registration procedures was developed for this task to accommodate all properties particular to weather satellite observations taken at night, and it relies on the general condition that the ground cools after sunset. Using these procedures, we can produce a set of temperature-sensitive satellite images for each of five selected earthquakes (Algeria 2003; Bhuj, India 2001; Izmit, Turkey 2001; Kunlun Shan, Tibet 2001; Turkmenistan 2000) and thus more effectively investigate heating trends close to the epicenters a few hours prior to the earthquake events. This study will lay tracks for further work in earthquake prediction and provoke the question of the exact nature of the thermal anomalies.

  19. A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of Northeast India

    E-print Network

    Gupta, Vinay Kumar

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of Northeast India Sandip Das,a... Ishwer D. Gupta.1193/1.2163914 INTRODUCTION Seismic hazard analysis plays an important role in the earthquake-resistant design of structures these shortcomings, a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis a Department of Civil Engineering, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur, UP

  20. Environmental Relationship of Benthic Fauna in the Near Shore Waters off Gulf of Kutch, North West Coast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanagoudra, S. N.; Bhat, U. G.

    2014-12-01

    The present study was undertaken for a period of two years from December 2010 to May 2012.Studying the benthos of Gulf of Kutch near shore waters is also useful in understanding changes in biological diversity of Gujarat coast. The use of benthos in aquatic ecological research is especially effective in assessing long term changes and detecting input from diffuse sources. The benthos reflects the effects organic enrichment by responding through detectable changes in population dynamics on a time scale of months to years. This is in contrast to plankton which shows a more immediate change to point sources with no long term consequences to the populations (Gray et al 1992). Benthoses were collected from 6 stations on regular basis and were identified. Altogether 60 species belonging to 39 families were identified and placed taxonomically during the course of investigation with sediment samples. Benthic environmental relationship species were observed and recorded. Our studies of monthly comparisons have become an interesting and popular approach in ecology and environmental relationships in the past a number of studies have been conducted on the ecology of macro benthic populations of Gulf of Kutch near shore. My research helps in Gulf of Kutch of the west coast of India has become an important economic asset of the country serving commercial navigation and the fishing sector with environmental relation of benthos in the Gulf of Kutch Gujarat. India.

  1. Levy Flights and Earthquakes

    E-print Network

    O. Sotolongo-Costa; J. C. Antoranz; A. Posadas; F. Vidal; A. Vazquez

    2002-05-27

    Levy flights representation is proposed to describe earthquake characteristics like the distribution of waiting times and position of hypocenters in a seismic region. Over 7500 microearthquakes and earthquakes from 1985 to 1994 were analyzed to test that its spatial and temporal distributions are such that can be described by a Levy flight with anomalous diffusion (in this case in a subdiffusive regime). Earthquake behavior is well described through Levy flights and Levy distribution functions such as results show.

  2. Project Title: Earthquake Documentary Interviews

    E-print Network

    Hickman, Mark

    Project Title: Earthquake Documentary Interviews Bachelor of Arts Internship Company: Chris Thomson Academic Adviser: Mary Wiles Project Reference Number: S112/CEISMIC/29/NP - Earthquake collected on the earthquake, its survivors and their stories. This project is unique

  3. Earthquakes of the Holocene.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, D.P.

    1987-01-01

    Areas in which significant new data and insights have been obtained are: 1) fault slip rates; 2) earthquake recurrence models; 3) fault segmentation; 4) dating past earthquakes; 5) paleoseismicity in the E and central US; 6) folds and earthquakes, and 7) future earthquake behavior. Summarizes important trends in each of these research areas based on information published between June 1982 and June 1986 and preprints of papers in press. The bibliography for this period contains mainly referred publications in journals and books.-from Author

  4. Earthquakes and Plate Boundaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowman, Paul; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Contains the contents of the Student Investigation booklet of a Crustal Evolution Education Project (CEEP) instructional modules on earthquakes. Includes objectives, procedures, illustrations, worksheets, and summary questions. (MA)

  5. Are Earthquake Magnitudes Clustered?

    SciTech Connect

    Davidsen, Joern; Green, Adam

    2011-03-11

    The question of earthquake predictability is a long-standing and important challenge. Recent results [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 098501 (2007); ibid.100, 038501 (2008)] have suggested that earthquake magnitudes are clustered, thus indicating that they are not independent in contrast to what is typically assumed. Here, we present evidence that the observed magnitude correlations are to a large extent, if not entirely, an artifact due to the incompleteness of earthquake catalogs and the well-known modified Omori law. The latter leads to variations in the frequency-magnitude distribution if the distribution is constrained to those earthquakes that are close in space and time to the directly following event.

  6. Historical earthquakes in Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suleiman, A. S.

    2003-04-01

    As a result of the relative motion of the African and European plates, Libya, located at the north central margin of the African continent, has experienced a considerable intraplate tectonism particularly at its northern coastal regions. In this study I present a reevaluation of the seismicity of Libya with special focus on the historical seismicity. Data on historical seismicity is of crucial importance for seismic hazard assessment in Libya. The earliest records of earthquakes in Libya is documented back from the Roman period when two large earthquakes (262 A.D. and 365 A.D) destroyed most of the temples and public buildings of Cyrene. A number of earthquakes that affected Libya in the Middle ages includes the 704 A.D. earthquake of Sabha (southern Libya) which reportedly destroyed several towns and village. In 1183 A.D., a powerful earthquake destroyed Tripoli, killing 20,000 people. Mild tremors were felt in Tripoli in 1803, 1811 and 1903 A.D. The Hun Graben area was the site of several earthquakes through history, in April 19 -1935 a great earthquake (mb=7.1) hit this area, followed by a very large number of aftershocks including two of magnitudes 6.0 and 6.5 on the Richter scale. In 1941 a major earthquake of magnitude 5.6 hit the Hun Graben area. In 1939 an earthquake of magnitude 5.6 occurred in the Gulf of Sirt area, followed by a number of aftershocks. Reinterpretation and improvement of the source quality for selected earthquakes will be presented. The present study aims to focus on investigating the original sources of information and in developing historical earthquake database.

  7. Delhi, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Delhi is the second largest metropolis in India, with a population of 16 million. Located in northern India along the banks of the Yamuna River, Delhi has the status of a federally-administered union territory. Within it is the district of New Delhi, India's capital. Delhi is one of the oldest continually inhabited cites in the world, with traces of human occupation dating to the second millennium BC. The image was acquired September 22, 2003, covers an area of 30.6 x 34.8 km, and is located near 28.6 degrees north latitude, 77.2 degrees east longitude.

    The image was acquired on August 4, 2005, covers an area of 55.8 x 55.8 km, and is located at 68.6 degrees north latitude, 134.7 degrees west longitude.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  8. A Study on High-risk Premarital Sexual Behavior of College Going Male Students in Jamnagar City of Gujarat, India

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Viral R; Makwana, Naresh R; Yadav, Babusingh S; Yadav, Sudha

    2013-01-01

    Background: The pre-marital sex and live-in relationship among young people are increasing at an alarming rate. Remote consequences of such high risk behaviors are increase in the incidence of STDs (including HIV), unsafe and illegal abortion, adolescent pregnancy and motherhood, single mother child/abandoned child, juvenile delinquency and many more. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the high-risk sexual behaviors in depth, influenced by various factors including age at sexual debut, type of partners, consistent condom usage, hostel stay, socioeconomic class, etc. among college-going male youth. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in Jamnagar among undergraduate (18-24 years) male college students. A total of 450 students were randomly selected from three colleges of Jamnagar. Results: Out of all 450 participants, 49.11% were in the age group of 18-20 years. Among study subjects, 13.78% had one or more pre-marital sexual exposures. In students with positive pre-marital sexual history, the various sex partners were girlfriends (95.16%), commercial sex workers (14.5%), homosexuals (6.45%), and multiple sex partners (33.88%). Among students, 62.9% were using condom consistently. Three-fifth of the ones indulged in premarital sex, were in the age group of 16-20 at the time of sexual debut. Conclusions: Most of the students were quite young (16-18 years) at the time of first pre-marital sexual exposure. Consistent condom usage was not uniform. The students staying at hostels, indulged in premarital sex, were found to have multiple sex partners. PMID:24971287

  9. Combined gravity and magnetic modeling over Pavagadh and Phenaimata igneous complexes, Gujarat, India: Inference on emplacement history of Deccan volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Bijendra; Prabhakara Rao, M. R. K.; Prajapati, S. K.; Swarnapriya, Ch.

    2014-02-01

    A large number of igneous intrusions related to the Deccan magmatism are exposed in the western and central part of the Indian shield. Gravity and magnetic (G-M) surveys over some of these igneous intrusive bodies depict gravity high and bipolar magnetic anomalies as the most characteristic signatures. The present G-M survey was carried out over the Pavagadh and Phenaimata igneous intrusives. Associated with the Phenaimata complex, Bouguer gravity anomaly shows an elliptical shaped relative gravity high of about 40 mGal and bipolar magnetic anomaly varies from South to North between -800 nT and 1200 nT. The joint G-M modeling reveals the presence of a dense mafic body (2.86 g/cm3). This body is characterized by a remanant magnetization; the related inclination (I) = ˜44° and declination (D) = ˜160° may correspond with the 29R polarity chron of Deccan magnetostratigraphy. Remanant magnetization together with age data suggest that the Phenaimata igneous intrusive emplaced during the end of the main magmatism phase of Deccan. Over the Pavagadh, a circular gravity and magnetic lows of about -15 mGal and -500 nT respectively is reported for the first time which is surrounded by a gravity and magnetic high of about 30 mGal and 350 nT, respectively. The joint G-M modeling over the Pavagadh intrusive reveals the presence of a deep-seated cone shaped high-density (?3.0 g/cm3) gabbroic body which might extend up to a great depth. Its top surface reaches up to a depth of about 10.0 km. Overlying this body is a low-density (2.40 g/cm3) rhyolite, which extends up to the surface and is the source for low gravity anomaly. It is surrounded by another high-density (2.89 and 3.02 g/cm3) mafic bodies with reverse remanant magnetization direction (I = ˜38° and D = ˜152°). The modeled direction of remanant magnetization for the rhyolite (I = -32° and D = 336°) and deeper gabbroic (I = -32° and D = 340°) bodies show normal polarity. Measured magnetization direction for the mafic body surrounding the rhyolite relates to the middle reverse polarity (29R) chron. Inferred declination and inclination may then correspond to upper normal (29N), middle reverse (29R) and lower normal (30N) polarity chrons. Therefore, the magma forming the Pavagadh igneous complex was emplaced covering the major span of Deccan eruption. G-M model suggests that the magma chambers developed within the higher crustal levels and rhyolite originated from the underlying mafic magma through assimilation and fractional crystallization (AFC).

  10. Proceedings of the Thirty Ninth National Conference on Fluid Mechanics and Fluid Power December 1315, 2012, SVNIT Surat, Gujarat, India

    E-print Network

    Khandekar, Sameer

    of various engineering processes. Examples include dropwise condensation, bio- MEMS applications, drug delivery applications, lab-on-chip processes, and adhesive technology. Contact angles carry information

  11. Earthquakes and Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Clearinghouse for Educational Facilities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Earthquakes are low-probability, high-consequence events. Though they may occur only once in the life of a school, they can have devastating, irreversible consequences. Moderate earthquakes can cause serious damage to building contents and non-structural building systems, serious injury to students and staff, and disruption of building operations.…

  12. Earthquake Monitoring in Haiti

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Following the devastating 2010 Haiti earthquake, the USGS has been helping with earthquake awareness and monitoring in the country, with continued support from the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID). This assistance has helped the Bureau des Mines et de l'Energie (BME) in Port-au-Prin...

  13. Earthquake sound perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Patrizia; Sbarra, Paola; De Rubeis, Valerio

    2012-12-01

    Sound is an effect produced by almost all earthquakes. Using a web-based questionnaire on earthquake effects that included questions relating to seismic sound, we collected 77,000 responses for recent shallow Italian earthquakes. An analysis of audibility attenuation indicated that the decrease of the percentage of respondents hearing the sound was proportional to the logarithm of the epicentral distance and linearly dependent on earthquake magnitude, in accordance with the behavior of ground displacement. Even if this result was based on Italian data, qualitative agreement with the results of theoretical displacement, and of a similar study based on French seismicity suggests wider validity. We also found that, given earthquake magnitude, audibility increased together with the observed macroseismic intensity, leading to the possibility of accounting for sound audibility in intensity assessment. Magnitude influenced this behavior, making small events easier to recognize, as suggested by their frequency content.

  14. 1 INTRODUCTION Korea has a long history of earthquakes. Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    1 INTRODUCTION Korea has a long history of earthquakes. Earthquake events are well documented by those historic and recent earthquakes was not very high, and it is believed that Korea belongs to a low to moderate seismicity zone. However, after the Northridge and Kobe earthquakes, there was a growing concern

  15. Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake

    E-print Network

    Chen, Sheng-Wei

    Taiwan Nantou County earthquake 20130327 1 #12;0327 Taiwan Nantou County earthquake Source, Intensity 5 #12;I II III IV V VI VII Intensity Shake map of the March 27 Earthquake The peak ground and Technology Center for Disaster Reduction (NCDR) #12;Earthquake Response and Evacuation are a Part of Students

  16. Life-Stage and Mobility: An Exploratory GPS Study of Mobility in Multigenerational Families, Ahmedabad, India.

    PubMed

    Isaacson, Michal; D'Ambrosio, Lisa; Samanta, Tannistha; Coughlin, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    As the population of older adults in India grows, research is needed to plan a sustainable future for India's older adults. This article reports results from a Global Positioning System (GPS)-based pilot study that examined the mobility of middle-class, older adults living in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Using mobility as a lens through which to examine the lives of older adults, we map potential research and identify policy areas of interest considering older adults in urban India. The study explores the role of life stage in mobility as well as the effects of gender and urban environment on mobility. Using this distinctive perspective on day-to-day life, we propose themes through which, using policy and planning tools, the living environments of older adults in Indian cities can be improved. These policy measures include focusing on walkability and pedestrian safety in residential areas and building on existing mixed land use to create high accessibility to goods and services in urban environments. PMID:26161686

  17. Bombay, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Formerly known as Bombay, the city of Mumbai is situated on India's west coast, on the Arabian Sea, roughly 500 km (310 miles) south of the Tropic of Cancer. Its large harbor and ideal location facing Africa, Europe, and the Middle East make it an excellent city for trade. Sometimes referred to as the 'Gateway of India,' Mumbai handles more than one third of the country's foreign trade. The city supports a population of more than 12 million people in an area of roughly 619 square km (239 square miles). The port was acquired in 1534 by Portugal, which named it Bom Bahia, meaning 'beautiful bay.' Originally, the city rested upon seven small islands, mostly basaltic bedrock from earlier lava flows. These islands are now connected to one another by reclaimed land, but each island, or neighborhood, still retains a distinct identity within the city. (For more details, visit Welcome to Bombay: The Gateway of India.) The blue-grey pixels in this false-color image are urban areas. The dark green areas are heavily vegetated surfaces while the light brown regions are more sparsely vegetated. This image of Mumbai was acquired by the Enhanced Thematic Mapper plus (ETM+), flying aboard the Landsat 7 satellite. July 23, 2002, marks the 30th anniversary of the Landsat program. (Click to read the press release-Celebrating 30 Years of Imaging the Earth.) The Landsat program has been particularly instrumental in tracking land use and land cover changes-such as increased urban growth-over the last three decades. Image courtesy Ron Beck, USGS EROS Data Center Satellite Systems Branch

  18. Can earthquakes be Karen Felzer

    E-print Network

    Felzer, Karen

    Can earthquakes be predicted? Karen Felzer U.S. Geological Survey #12;Earthquake predictions that most seismologists agree with #12;Long term earthquake probabilities These kinds of predictions to duck and cover! >99% chance that a M 6.7 earthquake will occur in CA within 30 years. 2008 Working

  19. The Challenge of Centennial Earthquakes to Improve Modern Earthquake Engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Saragoni, G. Rodolfo

    2008-07-08

    The recent commemoration of the centennial of the San Francisco and Valparaiso 1906 earthquakes has given the opportunity to reanalyze their damages from modern earthquake engineering perspective. These two earthquakes plus Messina Reggio Calabria 1908 had a strong impact in the birth and developing of earthquake engineering. The study of the seismic performance of some up today existing buildings, that survive centennial earthquakes, represent a challenge to better understand the limitations of our in use earthquake design methods. Only Valparaiso 1906 earthquake, of the three considered centennial earthquakes, has been repeated again as the Central Chile, 1985, Ms = 7.8 earthquake. In this paper a comparative study of the damage produced by 1906 and 1985 Valparaiso earthquakes is done in the neighborhood of Valparaiso harbor. In this study the only three centennial buildings of 3 stories that survived both earthquakes almost undamaged were identified. Since for 1985 earthquake accelerogram at El Almendral soil conditions as well as in rock were recoded, the vulnerability analysis of these building is done considering instrumental measurements of the demand. The study concludes that good performance of these buildings in the epicentral zone of large earthquakes can not be well explained by modern earthquake engineering methods. Therefore, it is recommended to use in the future of more suitable instrumental parameters, such as the destructiveness potential factor, to describe earthquake demand.

  20. Earthquake Science ISSN 1674-4519

    E-print Network

    Liu, Mian

    assessments. Keywords Aftershock Á Earthquake Á Intraplate seismicity Á Earthquake hazard 1 Introduction different implications for earthquake hazard assessment in this region, the so- called ``Capital Circle

  1. Early Eocene lagomorph (Mammalia) from Western India and the early diversification of Lagomorpha

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Kenneth D; DeLeon, Valerie Burke; Missiaen, Pieter; Rana, R.S; Sahni, Ashok; Singh, Lachham; Smith, Thierry

    2008-01-01

    We report the oldest known record of Lagomorpha, based on distinctive, small ankle bones (calcaneus and talus) from Early Eocene deposits (Middle Ypresian equivalent, ca 53?Myr ago) of Gujarat, west-central India. The fossils predate the oldest previously known crown lagomorphs by several million years and extend the record of lagomorphs on the Indian subcontinent by 35?Myr. The bones show a mosaic of derived cursorial adaptations found in gracile Leporidae (rabbits and hares) and primitive traits characteristic of extant Ochotonidae (pikas) and more robust leporids. Together with gracile and robust calcanei from the Middle Eocene of Shanghuang, China, also reported here, the Indian fossils suggest that diversification within crown Lagomorpha and possibly divergence of the family Leporidae were already underway in the Early Eocene. PMID:18285282

  2. To capture an earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, W.L. )

    1990-11-01

    An earthquake model based on the theory of plate tectonics is presented. It is assumed that the plates behave elastically in response to slow, steady motions and the strains concentrate within the boundary zone between the plates. When the accumulated stresses exceed the bearing capacity of the rocks, the rocks break, producing an earthquake and releasing the accumulated stresses. As the steady movement of the plates continues, strain begins to reaccumulate. The cycle of strain accumulation and release is modeled using the motion of a block, pulled across a rough surface by a spring. A model earthquake can be predicted by taking into account a precursory event or the peak spring force prior to slip as measured in previous cycles. The model can be applied to faults, e.g., the San Andreas fault, if the past earthquake history of the fault and the rate of strain accumulation are known.

  3. Earthquakes for Kids

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hazard Maps & Data Seismic Design Hazard Analysis Tools Faults Data & Products Data Products Learn EQ Topics for ... Buildings NSMP – Strong Motion Crustal Deformation Research Characterizing Faults Early Warning Crustal Deformation Earthquake Processes Ground Failure ...

  4. Nonlinear processes in earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, E.M.; Frohlich, C.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Three-dimensional, elastic-wave-propagation calculations were performed to define the effects of near-source geologic structure on the degree to which seismic signals produced by earthquakes resemble {open_quotes}non-double-couple{close_quotes} sources. Signals from sources embedded in a subducting slab showed significant phase and amplitude differences compared with a {open_quotes}no-slab{close_quotes} case. Modifications to the LANL elastic-wave propagation code enabled improved simulations of path effects on earthquake and explosion signals. These simulations demonstrate that near-source, shallow, low-velocity basins can introduce earthquake-like features into explosion signatures through conversion of compressive (P-wave) energy to shear (S- and R-wave) modes. Earthquake sources simulated to date do not show significant modifications.

  5. Northridge, CA Earthquake Damage

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The person in this image was a USGS employee at the time this was taken. Collection of USGS still images taken after the January 17, 1994 Northridge earthquake highlighting the damage to buildings and infrastructure....

  6. Account of an Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Snying dkar skyid

    2009-11-17

    China/Snying dkar skyid Tape No. / Track / Item No. Stag rig 013.WAV Length of track 00:03:25 Related tracks (include description/relationship if appropriate) Title of track Account of an Earthquake Translation of title Description (to... be used in archive entry) Glu mo mtsho describes her experience of being in a strong earthquake. Genre or type (i.e. epic, song, ritual) Personal account Name of recorder (if different from collector) Date of recording 17 November 2009...

  7. Crust beneath the northwestern Deccan Volcanic Province, India: Evidence for uplift and magmatic underplating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, K. Madhusudhan; Kumar, M. Ravi; Rastogi, B. K.

    2015-05-01

    The northwestern Deccan Volcanic Province of India and its pericratonic rift basins were reactivated during different stages after the breakup of India from the Gondwanaland and collision with the Asian plate. In this study, we present results of crustal thickness and average crustal Vp/Vs ratios beneath this plume-affected region using common conversion point imaging and H-k stacking analysis of 6893 receiver functions using data from a network comprising 58 broadband seismic stations sited on diverse tectonic terrains. We find large variations in crustal thickness, with the Moho depths varying from 28 to 43 km in the Kachchh rift, 28 to 38 km in the Cambay rift, 39.5-41.5 km in the north and eastern parts of the Cambay rift, and 29 to 39 km in the Saurashtra region and South Gujarat. A Moho upwarp of 6 to 7 km in the Saurashtra region can be attributed to positive buoyancy and uplift due to thermal influx affected by the Reunion plume. High crustal Vp/Vs ratios beneath the Kachchh rift (1.8 to 2.05), coastal areas of Saurashtra (1.75 to 2.06), and North Gujarat (1.81 to 1.85) indicate dominance of a mafic/ultramafic crust. High regional heat flow, high electrical conductivity, large intracrustal S wave velocity reduction, and high average crustal Poisson's ratios are consistent with partial melt related to the process of magmatic underplating in the lower crust. At other stations, the crust appears to be felsic with Vp/Vs ratios in the range of 1.57 to 1.76.

  8. Extreme events in Uttarakhand, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimri, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Uttarakhand in NW Himalaya, India is prone to various disasters, which include earthquakes, cloud bursts, landslides, floods etc. These disasters have a cascading effect. The cloud burst results in flooding of rivers and landslides. The earthquakes shake the ground causing landslides, which sometimes block the natural path of river making artificial dams. These artificial dams can cause river flooding. The situation becomes more devastating, if heavy rainfall occurs. Such disasters are increasing in recent times. There could be several reasons for the rise in frequency of these disasters because of global and local environment changes. The global changes such as rise of global temperatures due to increase in CO2 concentration in the atmosphere can be responsible for melting of Himalayan Glaciers and changes in precipitation/ rainfall patterns etc. Anthropogenic causes such as deforestation, establishment of new townships, new hydro-power projects, mining activities etc are also making the condition more vulnerable by changing the course of river channels. A case study of such extreme event is presented. The region is affected by changes of both global and local origin, tectonically as well as climatologically.

  9. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard. PMID:23846903

  10. Charles Darwin's earthquake reports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiev, Shamil

    2010-05-01

    As it is the 200th anniversary of Darwin's birth, 2009 has also been marked as 170 years since the publication of his book Journal of Researches. During the voyage Darwin landed at Valdivia and Concepcion, Chile, just before, during, and after a great earthquake, which demolished hundreds of buildings, killing and injuring many people. Land was waved, lifted, and cracked, volcanoes awoke and giant ocean waves attacked the coast. Darwin was the first geologist to observe and describe the effects of the great earthquake during and immediately after. These effects sometimes repeated during severe earthquakes; but great earthquakes, like Chile 1835, and giant earthquakes, like Chile 1960, are rare and remain completely unpredictable. This is one of the few areas of science, where experts remain largely in the dark. Darwin suggested that the effects were a result of ‘ …the rending of strata, at a point not very deep below the surface of the earth…' and ‘…when the crust yields to the tension, caused by its gradual elevation, there is a jar at the moment of rupture, and a greater movement...'. Darwin formulated big ideas about the earth evolution and its dynamics. These ideas set the tone for the tectonic plate theory to come. However, the plate tectonics does not completely explain why earthquakes occur within plates. Darwin emphasised that there are different kinds of earthquakes ‘...I confine the foregoing observations to the earthquakes on the coast of South America, or to similar ones, which seem generally to have been accompanied by elevation of the land. But, as we know that subsidence has gone on in other quarters of the world, fissures must there have been formed, and therefore earthquakes...' (we cite the Darwin's sentences following researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474). These thoughts agree with results of the last publications (see Nature 461, 870-872; 636-639 and 462, 42-43; 87-89). About 200 years ago Darwin gave oneself airs by the problems which began to discuss only during the last time. Earthquakes often precede volcanic eruptions. According to Darwin, the earthquake-induced shock may be a common mechanism of the simultaneous eruptions of the volcanoes separated by long distances. In particular, Darwin wrote that ‘… the elevation of many hundred square miles of territory near Concepcion is part of the same phenomenon, with that splashing up, if I may so call it, of volcanic matter through the orifices in the Cordillera at the moment of the shock;…'. According to Darwin the crust is a system where fractured zones, and zones of seismic and volcanic activities interact. Darwin formulated the task of considering together the processes studied now as seismology and volcanology. However the difficulties are such that the study of interactions between earthquakes and volcanoes began only recently and his works on this had relatively little impact on the development of geosciences. In this report, we discuss how the latest data on seismic and volcanic events support the Darwin's observations and ideas about the 1835 Chilean earthquake. The material from researchspace. auckland. ac. nz/handle/2292/4474 is used. We show how modern mechanical tests from impact engineering and simple experiments with weakly-cohesive materials also support his observations and ideas. On the other hand, we developed the mathematical theory of the earthquake-induced catastrophic wave phenomena. This theory allow to explain the most important aspects the Darwin's earthquake reports. This is achieved through the simplification of fundamental governing equations of considering problems to strongly-nonlinear wave equations. Solutions of these equations are constructed with the help of analytic and numerical techniques. The solutions can model different strongly-nonlinear wave phenomena which generate in a variety of physical context. A comparison with relevant experimental observations is also presented.

  11. Usage trends for memory and vitality-enhancing medicines: A pharmacoepidemiological study involving pharmacists of the Gujarat region

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Jigna Samir; Goyal, R. K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the study was to explore the trends and rationale of use of memory and vitality-enhancing medicines (MVEM) in the Gujarat region. Materials and Methods: A prospective pharmacoepidemiological study involving pharmacists of Gujarat region was carried out in the year 2005. Pharmacists (n = 351) working in general and Ayurvedic medical stores were selected from 12 districts of Gujarat region. The pharmacists were explained about the objective of the study and were given a pretested, validated questionnaire. Outcome Measures: The questionnaire included the questions regarding herbal MVEM used most commonly, percentage sale of herbal MVEM – sold with or without prescriptions – age group of patients and professional groups who used these drugs most commonly. Results: The number of individuals using MVEM was highest in the age group of 11–20 years (17.54%), followed by the 21–40 years group (17.12%), supporting the results that the professional group of students (17.29%) and the persons of business or service class (15.29%) are the highest users of these medicines. Evaluation of various constituents in the marketed polyherbal MVEM revealed that Brahmi (Bacopa monniera), Shankhpushpi (Evolvulus alsinoides), Ashwangandha (Withania somnifera), Jatamansi (Nardostychos jatamansi), Vacha (Acorus calamus) and Amla (Phyllanthus emblica) were the common ingredients in the polyherbal preparations. Conclusions: This study highlights commonly used Ayurvedic medicines that can be explored for safely enhancing memory and vitality performance. Hence, detailed and scientifically designed research on these drugs would help to identify safe and effective drugs for enhancing the same. PMID:21170204

  12. Initiatives to Reduce Earthquake Risk of Developing Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, B. E.

    2008-12-01

    The seventeen-year-and-counting history of the Palo Alto-based nonprofit organization GeoHazards International (GHI) is the story of many initiatives within a larger initiative to increase the societal impact of geophysics and civil engineering. GHI's mission is to reduce death and suffering due to earthquakes and other natural hazards in the world's most vulnerable communities through preparedness, mitigation and advocacy. GHI works by raising awareness in these communities about their risk and about affordable methods to manage it, identifying and strengthening institutions in these communities to manage their risk, and advocating improvement in natural disaster management. Some of GHI's successful initiatives include: (1) creating an earthquake scenario for Quito, Ecuador that describes in lay terms the consequences for that city of a probable earthquake; (2) improving the curricula of Pakistani university courses about seismic retrofitting; (3) training employees of the Public Works Department of Delhi, India on assessing the seismic vulnerability of critical facilities such as a school, a hospital, a police headquarters, and city hall; (4) assessing the vulnerability of the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives in Dharamsala, India; (5) developing a seismic hazard reduction plan for a nonprofit organization in Kathmandu, Nepal that works to manage Nepal's seismic risk; and (6) assisting in the formulation of a resolution by the Council of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to promote school earthquake safety among OECD member countries. GHI's most important resource, in addition to its staff and Board of Trustees, is its members and volunteer advisors, who include some of the world's leading earth scientists, earthquake engineers, urban planners and architects, from the academic, public, private and nonprofit sectors. GHI is planning several exciting initiatives in the near future. One would oversee the design and construction of an earthquake- and tsunami-resistant structure in Sumatra to house a tsunami museum, a community training center, and offices of a local NGO that is preparing Padang for the next tsunami. This facility would be designed and built by a team of US and Indonesian academics, architects, engineers and students. Another initiative would launch a collaborative research program on school earthquake safety with the scientists and engineers from the US and the ten Islamic countries that comprise the Economic Cooperation Organization. Finally, GHI hopes to develop internet and satellite communication techniques that will allow earthquake risk managers in the US to interact with masons, government officials, engineers and architects in remote communities of vulnerable developing countries, closing the science and engineering divide.

  13. Biogeographic and evolutionary implications of a diverse paleobiota in amber from the early Eocene of India

    PubMed Central

    Rust, Jes; Singh, Hukam; Rana, Rajendra S.; McCann, Tom; Singh, Lacham; Anderson, Ken; Sarkar, Nivedita; Nascimbene, Paul C.; Stebner, Frauke; Thomas, Jennifer C.; Solórzano Kraemer, Monica; Williams, Christopher J.; Engel, Michael S.; Sahni, Ashok; Grimaldi, David

    2010-01-01

    For nearly 100 million years, the India subcontinent drifted from Gondwana until its collision with Asia some 50 Ma, during which time the landmass presumably evolved a highly endemic biota. Recent excavations of rich outcrops of 50–52-million-year-old amber with diverse inclusions from the Cambay Shale of Gujarat, western India address this issue. Cambay amber occurs in lignitic and muddy sediments concentrated by near-shore chenier systems; its chemistry and the anatomy of associated fossil wood indicates a definitive source of Dipterocarpaceae. The amber is very partially polymerized and readily dissolves in organic solvents, thus allowing extraction of whole insects whose cuticle retains microscopic fidelity. Fourteen orders and more than 55 families and 100 species of arthropod inclusions have been discovered thus far, which have affinities to taxa from the Eocene of northern Europe, to the Recent of Australasia, and the Miocene to Recent of tropical America. Thus, India just prior to or immediately following contact shows little biological insularity. A significant diversity of eusocial insects are fossilized, including corbiculate bees, rhinotermitid termites, and modern subfamilies of ants (Formicidae), groups that apparently radiated during the contemporaneous Early Eocene Climatic Optimum or just prior to it during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum. Cambay amber preserves a uniquely diverse and early biota of a modern-type of broad-leaf tropical forest, revealing 50 Ma of stasis and change in biological communities of the dipterocarp primary forests that dominate southeastern Asia today. PMID:20974929

  14. Earthquake impact scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Jaiswal, K.S.; Marano, K.D.; Bausch, D.

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of the USGS prompt assessment of global earthquakes for response (PAGER) system, which rapidly assesses earthquake impacts, U.S. and international earthquake responders are reconsidering their automatic alert and activation levels and response procedures. To help facilitate rapid and appropriate earthquake response, an Earthquake Impact Scale (EIS) is proposed on the basis of two complementary criteria. On the basis of the estimated cost of damage, one is most suitable for domestic events; the other, on the basis of estimated ranges of fatalities, is generally more appropriate for global events, particularly in developing countries. Simple thresholds, derived from the systematic analysis of past earthquake impact and associated response levels, are quite effective in communicating predicted impact and response needed after an event through alerts of green (little or no impact), yellow (regional impact and response), orange (national-scale impact and response), and red (international response). Corresponding fatality thresholds for yellow, orange, and red alert levels are 1, 100, and 1,000, respectively. For damage impact, yellow, orange, and red thresholds are triggered by estimated losses reaching $1M, $100M, and $1B, respectively. The rationale for a dual approach to earthquake alerting stems from the recognition that relatively high fatalities, injuries, and homelessness predominate in countries in which local building practices typically lend themselves to high collapse and casualty rates, and these impacts lend to prioritization for international response. In contrast, financial and overall societal impacts often trigger the level of response in regions or countries in which prevalent earthquake resistant construction practices greatly reduce building collapse and resulting fatalities. Any newly devised alert, whether economic- or casualty-based, should be intuitive and consistent with established lexicons and procedures. Useful alerts should also be both specific (although allowably uncertain) and actionable. In this analysis, an attempt is made at both simple and intuitive color-coded alerting criteria; yet the necessary uncertainty measures by which one can gauge the likelihood for the alert to be over- or underestimated are preserved. The essence of the proposed impact scale and alerting is that actionable loss information is now available in the immediate aftermath of significant earthquakes worldwide on the basis of quantifiable loss estimates. Utilizing EIS, PAGER's rapid loss estimates can adequately recommend alert levels and suggest appropriate response protocols, despite the uncertainties; demanding or awaiting observations or loss estimates with a high level of accuracy may increase the losses. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  15. Earthquakes and Earthquake Engineering. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buydos, John F., Comp.

    An earthquake is a shaking of the ground resulting from a disturbance in the earth's interior. Seismology is the (1) study of earthquakes; (2) origin, propagation, and energy of seismic phenomena; (3) prediction of these phenomena; and (4) investigation of the structure of the earth. Earthquake engineering or engineering seismology includes the…

  16. Earthquake and Geothermal Energy

    E-print Network

    Kapoor, Surya Prakash

    2013-01-01

    The origin of earthquake has long been recognized as resulting from strike-slip instability of plate tectonics along the fault lines. Several events of earthquake around the globe have happened which cannot be explained by this theory. In this work we investigated the earthquake data along with other observed facts like heat flow profiles etc... of the Indian subcontinent. In our studies we found a high-quality correlation between the earthquake events, seismic prone zones, heat flow regions and the geothermal hot springs. As a consequence, we proposed a hypothesis which can adequately explain all the earthquake events around the globe as well as the overall geo-dynamics. It is basically the geothermal power, which makes the plates to stand still, strike and slip over. The plates are merely a working solid while the driving force is the geothermal energy. The violent flow and enormous pressure of this power shake the earth along the plate boundaries and also triggers the intra-plate seismicity. In the light o...

  17. The India Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Alim, Jamaal

    2012-01-01

    Even though lawmakers in India don't seem likely to pass any laws that would enable foreign universities to set up shop in India anytime soon, opportunities still abound for institutions of higher learning in the United States to collaborate with their Indian counterparts and to engage and recruit students in India as well. That's the consensus…

  18. Effect of Climate Change on Invasion Risk of Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica Férussac, 1821: Achatinidae) in India

    PubMed Central

    Rekha Sarma, Roshmi; Munsi, Madhushree; Neelavara Ananthram, Aravind

    2015-01-01

    The Giant African Snail (Achatina fulica) is considered to be one the world’s 100 worst invasive alien species. The snail has an impact on native biodiversity, and on agricultural and horticultural crops. In India, it is known to feed on more than fifty species of native plants and agricultural crops and also outcompetes the native snails. It was introduced into India in 1847 and since then it has spread all across the country. In this paper, we use ecological niche modeling (ENM) to assess the distribution pattern of Giant African Snail (GAS) under different climate change scenarios. The niche modeling results indicate that under the current climate scenario, Eastern India, peninsular India and the Andaman and Nicobar Islands are at high risk of invasion. The three different future climate scenarios show that there is no significant change in the geographical distribution of invasion prone areas. However, certain currently invaded areas will be more prone to invasion in the future. These regions include parts of Bihar, Southern Karnataka, parts of Gujarat and Assam. The Andaman and Nicobar and Lakshadweep Islands are highly vulnerable to invasion under changed climate. The Central Indian region is at low risk due to high temperature and low rainfall. An understanding of the invasion pattern can help in better management of this invasive species and also in formulating policies for its control. PMID:26618637

  19. Sand boils without earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, T.L.; Clark, M.M.

    1993-01-01

    Sedimentary deformation caused by liquefaction has become a popular means for inferring prehistoric strong earthquakes. This report describes a new mechanism for generating such features in the absence of earthquakes. Sand boils and a 180-m-long sand dike formed in Fremont Valley, California, when sediment-laden surface runoff was intercepted along the upslope part of a 500-m-long preexisting ground crack, flowed subhorizonally in the crack, and then flowed upward in the downslope part of the crack where it discharged as sand boils on the land surface. If the sand boils and their feeder dike were stratigraphically preserved, they could be misinterpreted as evidence for earthquake-induced liquefaction. -Authors

  20. Slow earthquakes triggered by typhoons.

    PubMed

    Liu, ChiChing; Linde, Alan T; Sacks, I Selwyn

    2009-06-11

    The first reports on a slow earthquake were for an event in the Izu peninsula, Japan, on an intraplate, seismically active fault. Since then, many slow earthquakes have been detected. It has been suggested that the slow events may trigger ordinary earthquakes (in a context supported by numerical modelling), but their broader significance in terms of earthquake occurrence remains unclear. Triggering of earthquakes has received much attention: strain diffusion from large regional earthquakes has been shown to influence large earthquake activity, and earthquakes may be triggered during the passage of teleseismic waves, a phenomenon now recognized as being common. Here we show that, in eastern Taiwan, slow earthquakes can be triggered by typhoons. We model the largest of these earthquakes as repeated episodes of slow slip on a reverse fault just under land and dipping to the west; the characteristics of all events are sufficiently similar that they can be modelled with minor variations of the model parameters. Lower pressure results in a very small unclamping of the fault that must be close to the failure condition for the typhoon to act as a trigger. This area experiences very high compressional deformation but has a paucity of large earthquakes; repeating slow events may be segmenting the stressed area and thus inhibiting large earthquakes, which require a long, continuous seismic rupture. PMID:19516339

  1. Earthquake Safety Guide for Homeowners

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Earthquake Safety Guide for Homeowners FEMA 530 / September 2005 FEMA #12; PublishingInformation The Homeowner's Guide to Earthquake Safety was originally developed and published by the California Seismic that slid 2 feet off its foundation as a result of the 6.5 San Simeon Earthquake. #12;CONTENTS Page

  2. Turkish Children's Ideas about Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Canan Lacin

    2007-01-01

    Earthquake, a natural disaster, is among the fundamental problems of many countries. If people know how to protect themselves from earthquake and arrange their life styles in compliance with this, damage they will suffer will reduce to that extent. In particular, a good training regarding earthquake to be received in primary schools is considered…

  3. Earthquake Resistant Cathedral in Chile

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A cathedral in the central square of Chillán, Chile replaces the ancient cathedral that collapsed during the strong earthquake of 1939. This modern structure was constructed with earthquake resistance as the primary consideration. The only damage caused by the M 8.8 earthquake on Feb. 27, 2010 was b...

  4. Earthquakes in Afghanistan Nicholas Ambraseys

    E-print Network

    Bilham, Roger

    1 Earthquakes in Afghanistan Nicholas Ambraseys Dept. of Civil Engineering, Imperial College 80309-0399 We summarize the written history of earthquakes in Afghanistan from 734 AD to the present in the form of a new catalog of more than 1300 earthquakes, and narrative accounts of damage sustained during

  5. PAGER--Rapid assessment of an earthquake?s impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, D.J.; Jaiswal, K.; Marano, K.D.; Bausch, D.; Hearne, M.

    2010-01-01

    PAGER (Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response) is an automated system that produces content concerning the impact of significant earthquakes around the world, informing emergency responders, government and aid agencies, and the media of the scope of the potential disaster. PAGER rapidly assesses earthquake impacts by comparing the population exposed to each level of shaking intensity with models of economic and fatality losses based on past earthquakes in each country or region of the world. Earthquake alerts--which were formerly sent based only on event magnitude and location, or population exposure to shaking--now will also be generated based on the estimated range of fatalities and economic losses.

  6. California earthquake history

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Toppozada, T.; Branum, D.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the advancement in our knowledge of California's earthquake history since ??? 1800, and especially during the last 30 years. We first review the basic statewide research on earthquake occurrences that was published from 1928 through 2002, to show how the current catalogs and their levels of completeness have evolved with time. Then we review some of the significant new results in specific regions of California, and some of what remains to be done. Since 1850, 167 potentially damaging earthquakes of M ??? 6 or larger have been identified in California and its border regions, indicating an average rate of 1.1 such events per year. Table I lists the earthquakes of M ??? 6 to 6.5 that were also destructive since 1812 in California and its border regions, indicating an average rate of one such event every ??? 5 years. Many of these occurred before 1932 when epicenters and magnitudes started to be determined routinely using seismographs in California. The number of these early earthquakes is probably incomplete in sparsely populated remote parts of California before ??? 1870. For example, 6 of the 7 pre-1873 events in table I are of M ??? 7, suggesting that other earthquakes of M 6.5 to 6.9 occurred but were not properly identified, or were not destructive. The epicenters and magnitudes (M) of the pre-instrumental earthquakes were determined from isoseismal maps that were based on the Modified Mercalli Intensity of shaking (MMI) at the communities that reported feeling the earthquakes. The epicenters were estimated to be in the regions of most intense shaking, and values of M were estimated from the extent of the areas shaken at various MMI levels. MMI VII or greater shaking is the threshold of damage to weak buildings. Certain areas in the regions of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Eureka were each shaken repeatedly at MMI VII or greater at least six times since ??? 1812, as depicted by Toppozada and Branum (2002, fig. 19).

  7. Creating a Global Building Inventory for Earthquake Loss Assessment and Risk Management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Wald, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Earthquakes have claimed approximately 8 million lives over the last 2,000 years (Dunbar, Lockridge and others, 1992) and fatality rates are likely to continue to rise with increased population and urbanizations of global settlements especially in developing countries. More than 75% of earthquake-related human casualties are caused by the collapse of buildings or structures (Coburn and Spence, 2002). It is disheartening to note that large fractions of the world's population still reside in informal, poorly-constructed & non-engineered dwellings which have high susceptibility to collapse during earthquakes. Moreover, with increasing urbanization half of world's population now lives in urban areas (United Nations, 2001), and half of these urban centers are located in earthquake-prone regions (Bilham, 2004). The poor performance of most building stocks during earthquakes remains a primary societal concern. However, despite this dark history and bleaker future trends, there are no comprehensive global building inventories of sufficient quality and coverage to adequately address and characterize future earthquake losses. Such an inventory is vital both for earthquake loss mitigation and for earthquake disaster response purposes. While the latter purpose is the motivation of this work, we hope that the global building inventory database described herein will find widespread use for other mitigation efforts as well. For a real-time earthquake impact alert system, such as U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER), (Wald, Earle and others, 2006), we seek to rapidly evaluate potential casualties associated with earthquake ground shaking for any region of the world. The casualty estimation is based primarily on (1) rapid estimation of the ground shaking hazard, (2) aggregating the population exposure within different building types, and (3) estimating the casualties from the collapse of vulnerable buildings. Thus, the contribution of building stock, its relative vulnerability, and distribution are vital components for determining the extent of casualties during an earthquake. It is evident from large deadly historical earthquakes that the distribution of vulnerable structures and their occupancy level during an earthquake control the severity of human losses. For example, though the number of strong earthquakes in California is comparable to that of Iran, the total earthquake-related casualties in California during the last 100 years are dramatically lower than the casualties from several individual Iranian earthquakes. The relatively low casualties count in California is attributed mainly to the fact that more than 90 percent of the building stock in California is made of wood and is designed to withstand moderate to large earthquakes (Kircher, Seligson and others, 2006). In contrast, the 80 percent adobe and or non-engineered masonry building stock with poor lateral load resisting systems in Iran succumbs even for moderate levels of ground shaking. Consequently, the heavy death toll for the 2003 Bam, Iran earthquake, which claimed 31,828 lives (Ghafory-Ashtiany and Mousavi, 2005), is directly attributable to such poorly resistant construction, and future events will produce comparable losses unless practices change. Similarly, multistory, precast-concrete framed buildings caused heavy casualties in the 1988 Spitak, Armenia earthquake (Bertero, 1989); weaker masonry and reinforced-concrete framed construction designed for gravity loads with soft first stories dominated losses in the Bhuj, India earthquake of 2001 (Madabhushi and Haigh, 2005); and adobe and weak masonry dwellings in Peru controlled the death toll in the Peru earthquake of 2007 (Taucer, J. and others, 2007). Spence (2007) after conducting a brief survey of most lethal earthquakes since 1960 found that building collapses remains a major cause of earthquake mortality and unreinforced masonry buildings are one of the mos

  8. Earthquake prediction comes of age

    SciTech Connect

    Lindth, A. . Office of Earthquakes, Volcanoes, and Engineering)

    1990-02-01

    In the last decade, scientists have begun to estimate the long-term probability of major earthquakes along the San Andreas fault. In 1985, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) issued the first official U.S. government earthquake prediction, based on research along a heavily instrumented 25-kilometer section of the fault in sparsely populated central California. Known as the Parkfield segment, this section of the Sand Andreas had experienced its last big earthquake, a magnitude 6, in 1966. Estimated probabilities of major quakes along the entire San Andreas by a working group of California earthquake experts, using new geologic data and careful analysis of past earthquakes, are reported.

  9. Fractal dynamics of earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Bak, P.; Chen, K.

    1995-05-01

    Many objects in nature, from mountain landscapes to electrical breakdown and turbulence, have a self-similar fractal spatial structure. It seems obvious that to understand the origin of self-similar structures, one must understand the nature of the dynamical processes that created them: temporal and spatial properties must necessarily be completely interwoven. This is particularly true for earthquakes, which have a variety of fractal aspects. The distribution of energy released during earthquakes is given by the Gutenberg-Richter power law. The distribution of epicenters appears to be fractal with dimension D {approx} 1--1.3. The number of after shocks decay as a function of time according to the Omori power law. There have been several attempts to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law by starting from a fractal distribution of faults or stresses. But this is a hen-and-egg approach: to explain the Gutenberg-Richter law, one assumes the existence of another power-law--the fractal distribution. The authors present results of a simple stick slip model of earthquakes, which evolves to a self-organized critical state. Emphasis is on demonstrating that empirical power laws for earthquakes indicate that the Earth`s crust is at the critical state, with no typical time, space, or energy scale. Of course the model is tremendously oversimplified; however in analogy with equilibrium phenomena they do not expect criticality to depend on details of the model (universality).

  10. Infrasonic observation of earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Mutschlecner, J.P.; Whitaker, R.W.

    1998-12-31

    Infrasound signals generated by earthquakes have been detected at arrays operated by the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Three modes of propagation are possible and all have been observed by the authors. The observations suggest that regions remote from the epicenters are excited and may serve as secondary source regions. A relation is found between the normalized peak amplitudes and the seismic magnitudes.

  11. Road Damage Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Ground shaking triggered liquefaction in a subsurface layer of water-saturated sand, producing differential lateral and vertical movement in a overlying carapace of unliquified sand and slit, which moved from right to left towards the Pajaro River. This mode of ground failure, termed lateral spreading, is a principal cause of liquefaction-related earthquake damage caused by the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: S.D. Ellen, U.S. Geological Survey

  12. Earthquake damage to schools

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    These unusual slides show earthquake damage to school and university buildings around the world. They graphically illustrate the potential danger to our schools, and to the welfare of our children, that results from major earthquakes. The slides range from Algeria, where a collapsed school roof is held up only by students' desks; to Anchorage, Alaska, where an elementary school structure has split in half; to California and other areas, where school buildings have sustained damage to walls, roofs, and chimneys. Interestingly, all the United States earthquakes depicted in this set of slides occurred either on a holiday or before or after school hours, except the 1935 tremor in Helena, Montana, which occurred at 11:35 am. It undoubtedly would have caused casualties had the schools not been closed days earlier by Helena city officials because of a damaging foreshock. Students in Algeria, the People's Republic of China, Armenia, and other stricken countries were not so fortunate. This set of slides represents 17 destructive earthquakes that occurred in 9 countries, and covers more than a century--from 1886 to 1988. Two of the tremors, both of which occurred in the United States, were magnitude 8+ on the Richter Scale, and four were magnitude 7-7.9. The events represented by the slides (see table below) claimed more than a quarter of a million lives.

  13. Predicting Iceland's earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bovarsson, Reynir; Einarsson, Pall

    A research project involving seismologists from the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) started recently. The long-term project goal is to reduce earthquake losses and strengthen the physical basis for earthquake prediction.The project originated in the Council of Europe. In a resolution passed in 1980, the council stressed the importance of concentrating earthquake prediction research in five test areas in Europe, one of which was the South Iceland Seismic Zone (see Figure 1). The resolution led to discussion among Nordic seismologists on cooperative work in the Icelandic test area. They agreed that an appropriate first step would be to establish a digital data acquisition system around which geophysical monitoring and other experiments could be designed. A proposal for a 5 - 6-year project, which was submitted to the Nordic Council and the Council of Nordic Ministers, was approved in 1987. The participants are planning a data acquisition system and geophysical experiments that can give information about changes in physical properties of the crust before large earthquakes.

  14. Fragments, Combustion and Earthquakes

    E-print Network

    Oscar Sotolongo-Costa; Antonio Posadas

    2005-03-16

    This paper is devoted to show the advantages of introducing a geometric viewpoint and a non extensive formulation in the description of apparently unrelated phenomena: combustion and earthquakes. Here, it is shown how the introduction of a fragmentation analysis based on that formulation leads to find a common point for description of these phenomena

  15. The 1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance: A Case Study - Using an Earthquake Anniversary to Promote Earthquake Preparedness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brocher, T. M.; Garcia, S.; Aagaard, B. T.; Boatwright, J. J.; Dawson, T.; Hellweg, M.; Knudsen, K. L.; Perkins, J.; Schwartz, D. P.; Stoffer, P. W.; Zoback, M.

    2008-12-01

    Last October 21st marked the 140th anniversary of the M6.8 1868 Hayward Earthquake, the last damaging earthquake on the southern Hayward Fault. This anniversary was used to help publicize the seismic hazards associated with the fault because: (1) the past five such earthquakes on the Hayward Fault occurred about 140 years apart on average, and (2) the Hayward-Rodgers Creek Fault system is the most likely (with a 31 percent probability) fault in the Bay Area to produce a M6.7 or greater earthquake in the next 30 years. To promote earthquake awareness and preparedness, over 140 public and private agencies and companies and many individual joined the public-private nonprofit 1868 Hayward Earthquake Alliance (1868alliance.org). The Alliance sponsored many activities including a public commemoration at Mission San Jose in Fremont, which survived the 1868 earthquake. This event was followed by an earthquake drill at Bay Area schools involving more than 70,000 students. The anniversary prompted the Silver Sentinel, an earthquake response exercise based on the scenario of an earthquake on the Hayward Fault conducted by Bay Area County Offices of Emergency Services. 60 other public and private agencies also participated in this exercise. The California Seismic Safety Commission and KPIX (CBS affiliate) produced professional videos designed forschool classrooms promoting Drop, Cover, and Hold On. Starting in October 2007, the Alliance and the U.S. Geological Survey held a sequence of press conferences to announce the release of new research on the Hayward Fault as well as new loss estimates for a Hayward Fault earthquake. These included: (1) a ShakeMap for the 1868 Hayward earthquake, (2) a report by the U. S. Bureau of Labor Statistics forecasting the number of employees, employers, and wages predicted to be within areas most strongly shaken by a Hayward Fault earthquake, (3) new estimates of the losses associated with a Hayward Fault earthquake, (4) new ground motion simulations of a Hayward Fault earthquake, (5) a new USGS Fact Sheet about the earthquake and the Hayward Fault, (6) a virtual tour of the 1868 earthquake, and (7) a new online field trip guide to the Hayward Fault using locations accessible by car and public transit. Finally, the California Geological Survey and many other Alliance members sponsored the Third Conference on Earthquake Hazards in the East Bay at CSU East Bay in Hayward for the three days following the 140th anniversary. The 1868 Alliance hopes to commemorate the anniversary of the 1868 Hayward Earthquake every year to maintain and increase public awareness of this fault, the hazards it and other East Bay Faults pose, and the ongoing need for earthquake preparedness and mitigation.

  16. Source area and rupture parameters of the 31 December 1881 Mw = 7.9 Car Nicobar earthquake estimated from tsunamis

    E-print Network

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Source area and rupture parameters of the 31 December 1881 Mw = 7.9 Car Nicobar earthquake on the India/Andaman plate boundary resulting in 10­60 cm of uplift of the island of Car Nicobar. The rupture., and R. Bilham, Source area and rupture parameters of the 31 December 1881 Mw = 7.9 Car Nicobar

  17. Turkish Compulsory Earthquake Insurance (TCIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdik, M.; Durukal, E.; Sesetyan, K.

    2009-04-01

    Through a World Bank project a government-sponsored Turkish Catastrophic Insurance Pool (TCIP) is created in 2000 with the essential aim of transferring the government's financial burden of replacing earthquake-damaged housing to international reinsurance and capital markets. Providing coverage to about 2.9 Million homeowners TCIP is the largest insurance program in the country with about 0.5 Billion USD in its own reserves and about 2.3 Billion USD in total claims paying capacity. The total payment for earthquake damage since 2000 (mostly small, 226 earthquakes) amounts to about 13 Million USD. The country-wide penetration rate is about 22%, highest in the Marmara region (30%) and lowest in the south-east Turkey (9%). TCIP is the sole-source provider of earthquake loss coverage up to 90,000 USD per house. The annual premium, categorized on the basis of earthquake zones type of structure, is about US90 for a 100 square meter reinforced concrete building in the most hazardous zone with 2% deductible. The earthquake engineering related shortcomings of the TCIP is exemplified by fact that the average rate of 0.13% (for reinforced concrete buildings) with only 2% deductible is rather low compared to countries with similar earthquake exposure. From an earthquake engineering point of view the risk underwriting (Typification of housing units to be insured, earthquake intensity zonation and the sum insured) of the TCIP needs to be overhauled. Especially for large cities, models can be developed where its expected earthquake performance (and consequently the insurance premium) can be can be assessed on the basis of the location of the unit (microzoned earthquake hazard) and basic structural attributes (earthquake vulnerability relationships). With such an approach, in the future the TCIP can contribute to the control of construction through differentiation of premia on the basis of earthquake vulnerability.

  18. Earthquake Fast Facts Below is a list of earthquake fast facts. Did you know...?

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    Earthquake Fast Facts Below is a list of earthquake fast facts. Did you know...? Earthquakes or night. Smaller earthquakes often follow the main shock. An earthquake is caused by the breaking and shifting of rock beneath the earth's surface. Ground shaking from earthquakes can collapse buildings

  19. Detection, Isolation and Confirmation of Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus in Human, Ticks and Animals in Ahmadabad, India, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mourya, Devendra T.; Yadav, Pragya D.; Shete, Anita M.; Gurav, Yogesh K.; Raut, Chandrashekhar G.; Jadi, Ramesh S.; Pawar, Shailesh D.; Nichol, Stuart T.; Mishra, Akhilesh C.

    2012-01-01

    Background In January 2011, human cases with hemorrhagic manifestations in the hospital staff were reported from a tertiary care hospital in Ahmadabad, India. This paper reports a detailed epidemiological investigation of nosocomial outbreak from the affected area of Ahmadabad, Gujarat, India. Principal Findings Samples from 3 suspected cases, 83 contacts, Hyalomma ticks and livestock were screened for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus by qRT-PCR of which samples of two medical professionals (case C and E) and the husband of the index case (case D) were positive for CCHFV. The sensitivity and specificity of indigenous developed IgM ELISA to screen CCHFV specific antibodies in human serum was 75.0% and 97.5% respectively as compared to commercial kit. About 17.0% domestic animals from Kolat, Ahmadabad were positive for IgG antibodies while only two cattle and a goat showed positivity by qRT-PCR. Surprisingly, 43.0% domestic animals (Buffalo, cattle, sheep and goat) showed IgG antibodies in the adjoining village Jivanpara but only one of the buffalo was positive for CCHFV. The Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum ticks were positive in PCR and virus isolation. CCHFV was isolated from the blood sample of case C, E in Vero E-6 cells and Swiss albino mice. In partial nucleocapsid gene phylogeny from CCHFV positive human samples of the years 2010 and 2011, livestock and ticks showed this virus was similar to Tajikistan (strain TAJ/H08966), which belongs in the Asian/middle east genetic lineage IV. Conclusions The likely source of CCHFV was identified as virus infected Hyalomma ticks and livestock at the rural village residence of the primary case (case A). In addition, retrospective sample analysis revealed the existence of CCHFV in Gujarat and Rajasthan states before this outbreak. An indigenous developed IgM ELISA kit will be of great use for screening this virus in India. PMID:22616022

  20. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for recurrence, duration, and frequency response. At the Southern California field sites, one loop antenna was positioned for omni-directional reception and also detected a strong First Schumann Resonance; however, additional Schumann Resonances were absent. At the Timpson, TX field sites, loop antennae were positioned for directional reception, due to earthquake-induced, hydraulic fracturing activity currently conducted by the oil and gas industry. Two strong signals, one moderately strong signal, and approximately 6-8 weaker signals were detected in the immediate vicinity. The three stronger signals were mapped by a biangulation technique, followed by a triangulation technique for confirmation. This was the first antenna mapping technique ever performed for determining possible earthquake epicenters. Six and a half months later, Timpson experienced two M4 (M4.1 and M4.3) earthquakes on September 2, 2013 followed by a M2.4 earthquake three days later, all occurring at a depth of five kilometers. The Timpson earthquake activity now has a cyclical rate and a forecast was given to the proper authorities. As a result, the Southern California and Timpson, TX field results led to an improved design and construction of a third prototype antenna. With a loop antenna array, a viable communication system, and continuous monitoring, a full fracture cycle can be established and observed in real-time. In addition, field data could be reviewed quickly for assessment and lead to a much more improved earthquake forecasting capability. The EM precursors determined by this method appear to surpass all prior precursor claims, and the general public will finally receive long overdue forecasting.

  1. The Earthquake That Tweeted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, D.

    2011-12-01

    Advances in mobile technology and social networking are enabling new behaviors that were not possible even a few short years ago. When people experience a tiny earthquake, it's more likely they're going to reach for their phones and tell their friends about it than actually take cover under a desk. With 175 million Twitter accounts, 750 million Facebook users and more than five billion mobile phones in the world today, people are generating terrific amounts of data simply by going about their everyday lives. Given the right tools and guidance these connected individuals can act as the world's largest sensor network, doing everything from reporting on earthquakes to anticipating global crises. Drawing on the author's experience as a user researcher and experience designer, this presentation will discuss these trends in crowdsourcing the collection and analysis of data, and consider their implications for how the public encounters the earth sciences in their everyday lives.

  2. Do Earthquakes Shake Stock Markets?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how major earthquakes affected the returns and volatility of aggregate stock market indices in thirty-five financial markets over the last twenty years. Results show that global financial markets are resilient to shocks caused by earthquakes even if these are domestic. Our analysis reveals that, in a few instances, some macroeconomic variables and earthquake characteristics (gross domestic product per capita, trade openness, bilateral trade flows, earthquake magnitude, a tsunami indicator, distance to the epicenter, and number of fatalities) mediate the impact of earthquakes on stock market returns, resulting in a zero net effect. However, the influence of these variables is market-specific, indicating no systematic pattern across global capital markets. Results also demonstrate that stock market volatility is unaffected by earthquakes, except for Japan. PMID:26197482

  3. Earthquakes and plate tectonics.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1982-01-01

    Earthquakes occur at the following three kinds of plate boundary: ocean ridges where the plates are pulled apart, margins where the plates scrape past one another, and margins where one plate is thrust under the other. Thus, we can predict the general regions on the earth's surface where we can expect large earthquakes in the future. We know that each year about 140 earthquakes of magnitude 6 or greater will occur within this area which is 10% of the earth's surface. But on a worldwide basis we cannot say with much accuracy when these events will occur. The reason is that the processes in plate tectonics have been going on for millions of years. Averaged over this interval, plate motions amount to several mm per year. But at any instant in geologic time, for example the year 1982, we do not know, exactly where we are in the worldwide cycle of strain build-up and strain release. Only by monitoring the stress and strain in small areas, for instance, the San Andreas fault, in great detail can we hope to predict when renewed activity in that part of the plate tectonics arena is likely to take place. -from Author

  4. Sand Volcano Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Sand boil or sand volcano measuring 2 m (6.6 ft.) in length erupted in median of Interstate Highway 80 west of the Bay Bridge toll plaza when ground shaking transformed loose water-saturated deposit of subsurface sand into a sand-water slurry (liquefaction) in the October 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. Vented sand contains marine-shell fragments. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditions that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. (Credit: J.C. Tinsley, U.S. Geological Survey)

  5. Housing Damage Following Earthquake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An automobile lies crushed under the third story of this apartment building in the Marina District after the Oct. 17, 1989, Loma Prieta earthquake. The ground levels are no longer visible because of structural failure and sinking due to liquefaction. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: J.K. Nakata, U.S. Geological Survey.

  6. Foreshocks of strong earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guglielmi, A. V.; Sobisevich, L. E.; Sobisevich, A. L.; Lavrov, I. P.

    2014-07-01

    The specific enhancement of ultra-low-frequency (ULF) electromagnetic oscillations a few hours prior to the strong earthquakes, which was previously mentioned in the literature, motivated us to search for the distinctive features of the mechanical (foreshock) activity of the Earth's crust in the epicentral zones of the future earthquakes. Activation of the foreshocks three hours before the main shock is revealed, which is roughly similar to the enhancement of the specific electromagnetic ULF emission. It is hypothesized that the round-the-world seismic echo signals from the earthquakes, which form the peak of energy release 2 h 50 min before the main events, act as the triggers of the main shocks due to the cumulative action of the surface waves converging to the epicenter. It is established that the frequency of the fluctuations in the foreshock activity decreases at the final stages of the preparation of the main shocks, which probably testifies to the so-called mode softening at the approach of the failure point according to the catastrophe theory.

  7. Space geodesy and earthquake prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilham, Roger

    1987-01-01

    Earthquake prediction is discussed from the point of view of a new development in geodesy known as space geodesy, which involves the use of extraterrestrial sources or reflectors to measure earth-based distances. Space geodesy is explained, and its relation to terrestrial geodesy is examined. The characteristics of earthquakes are reviewed, and the ways that they can be exploited by space geodesy to predict earthquakes is demonstrated.

  8. EQInfo - earthquakes world-wide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Bernd; Herrnkind, Stephan

    2014-05-01

    EQInfo is a free Android app providing recent earthquake information from various earthquake monitoring centers as GFZ, EMSC, USGS and others. It allows filtering of agency, region and magnitude as well as controlling update interval, institute priority and alarm types. Used by more than 25k active users and beeing in the top ten list of Google Play, EQInfo is one of the most popular apps for earthquake information.

  9. Documentary reconstruction of monsoon rainfall variability over western India, 1781-1860

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, George C. D.; Nash, David J.

    2014-02-01

    Investigations into the climatic forcings that affect the long-term variability of the Indian summer monsoon are constrained by a lack of reliable rainfall data prior to the late nineteenth century. Extensive qualitative and quantitative meteorological information for the pre-instrumental period exists within historical documents, although these materials have been largely unexplored. This paper presents the first reconstruction of monsoon variability using documentary sources, focussing on western India for the period 1781-1860. Three separate reconstructions are generated, for (1) Mumbai, (2) Pune and (3) the area of Gujarat bordering the Gulf of Khambat. A composite chronology is then produced from the three reconstructions, termed the Western India Monsoon Rainfall reconstruction (WIMR). The WIMR exhibits four periods of generally deficient monsoon rainfall (1780-1785, 1799-1806, 1830-1838 and 1845-1857) and three of above-normal rainfall (1788-1794, 1813-1828 and 1839-1844). The WIMR shows good correspondence with a dendroclimatic drought reconstruction for Kerala, although agreement with the western Indian portion of the tree-ring derived Monsoon Asia Drought Atlas is less strong. The reconstruction is used to examine the long-term relationship between the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and monsoon rainfall over western India. This exhibits peaks and troughs in correlation over time, suggesting a regular long-term fluctuation. This may be an internal oscillation in the ENSO-monsoon system or may be related to volcanic aerosol forcings. Further reconstructions of monsoon rainfall are necessary to validate this. The study highlights uncertainties in existing published rainfall records for 1817-1846 for western India.

  10. Assessment of Interplate and Intraplate Earthquakes 

    E-print Network

    Bellam, Srigiri Shankar

    2012-10-19

    of earthquakes are observed in the surface plates, interplate and intraplate earthquakes, which are classified, based on the location of the origin of an earthquake either between two plates or within the plate respectively. Limited work has been completed...

  11. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174 Section 120...Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake hazards. When loan proceeds are...construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  12. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174 Section 120...Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake hazards. When loan proceeds are...construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  13. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174 Section 120...Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake hazards. When loan proceeds are...construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  14. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174 Section 120...Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake hazards. When loan proceeds are...construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  15. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174 Section 120...Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake hazards. When loan proceeds are...construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  16. Parkfield, California, earthquake prediction experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bakun, W.H.; Lindh, A.G.

    1985-08-16

    Five moderate (magnitude 6) earthquakes with similar features have occurred on the Parkfield section of the San Andreas fault in central California since 1857. The next moderate Parkfield earthquake is expected to occur before 1993. The Parkfield prediction experiment is designed to monitor the details of the final stages of the earthquake preparation process; observations and reports of seismicity and aseismic slip associated with the last moderate Parkfield earthquake in 1966 constitute much of the basis of the design of the experiment. 46 references, 4 figures.

  17. A Clinico-Etiological Study of Dermatoses in Pediatric Age Group in Tertiary Health Care Center in South Gujarat Region

    PubMed Central

    Jawade, Sugat A; Chugh, Vishal S; Gohil, Sneha K; Mistry, Amit S; Umrigar, Dipak D

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dermatologic conditions have different presentation and management in pediatric age group from that in adult; this to be studied separately for statistical and population based analysis. Objective: To study the pattern of various dermatoses in infants and children in tertiary health care center in South Gujarat region. Materials and Methods: This is a prospective study; various dermatoses were studied in pediatric patients up to 14 years of age attending the Dermatology OPD of New Civil Hospital, Surat, Gujarat over a period of 12 months from June 2009 to June 2010. All patients were divided into four different study groups: <1 month (neonates), 1 month to 1 year, >1 to 6 years and 7 to 14 years. Results: There were 596 boys and 425 girls in total 1021 study populations. Majority of the skin conditions in neonates were erythema toxicum neonatorum (12.97%), scabies (9.92%), mongolian spot (9.16%), and seborrheic dermatitis (7.63%). In > 1 month to 14 years age group of children among infectious disorder, children were found to be affected most by scabies (24.49%), impetigo (5.96%), pyoderma (5.62%), molluscum contagiosum (5.39%), tinea capitis (4.49%), leprosy (2.02%), and viral warts (1.35%) while among non-infectious disorders, they were affected by atopic dermatitis (4.27%), pityriasis alba (4.16%), seborrheic dermatitis (3.60%), pityriasis rosea (3.15%), others (3.01%), phrynoderma (2.70%), lichen planus (2.58%), contact dermatitis (1.57%) and ichthyosis (1.45%). Conclusion: There is a need to emphasize on training the management of common pediatric dermatoses to dermatologists, general practitioners and pediatricians for early treatment. PMID:26677296

  18. Molecular characterisation of Aspergillus flavus isolates from peanut fields in India using AFLP

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Diwakar; Radhakrishnan, T.; Kumar, Vinod; Bagwan, N.B.; Basu, M.S.; Dobaria, J.R.; Mishra, Gyan P.; Chanda, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    Aflatoxin contamination of peanut, due to infection by Aspergillus flavus, is a major problem of rain-fed agriculture in India. In the present study, molecular characterisation of 187 Aspergillus flavus isolates, which were sampled from the peanut fields of Gujarat state in India, was performed using AFLP markers. On a pooled cluster analysis, the markers could successfully discriminate among the ‘A’, ‘B’ and ‘G’ group A. flavus isolates. PCoA analysis also showed equivalent results to the cluster analysis. Most of the isolates from one district could be clustered together, which indicated genetic similarity among the isolates. Further, a lot of genetic variability was observed within a district and within a group. The results of AMOVA test revealed that the variance within a population (84%) was more than that between two populations (16%). The isolates, when tested by indirect competitive ELISA, showed about 68.5% of them to be atoxigenic. Composite analysis between the aflatoxin production and AFLP data was found to be ineffective in separating the isolate types by aflatoxigenicity. Certain unique fragments, with respect to individual isolates, were also identified that may be used for development of SCAR marker to aid in rapid and precise identification of isolates. PMID:26413047

  19. Salt Kinematics after Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftabi, P.; Roustaei, M.

    2007-12-01

    Salt extrusions are simple natural models. The shapes of salt extrusions are complex gauges of the forces extruding them [9]. The uplift rates of a part of the Namakdan is between 1-3 mm/y-1 at the rim to 3-6 mm/yr-1 in the interior [5]. The salt glacier flowed plastically during the brief annual rainy season [6].The salt flow faster with temperature rise and flow slowly when temperature fall [3]. The displacements with>10cm/y and >50 cm/y suggest that, the salt extruded with rate 82 mm a-1 [9] but spread cm to m per year [8].The recent InSAR study Near Namakdan had no explanations about high activity of salt after earthquake [10].The coseismic vertical displacements suggest reactivation of blind thrust [11] .Our recent field measurements reported here suggest that any fast flow in salt may related to the mild to strong Earthquakes and may caused by diapiric reactivation. The earthquake of 27Nov 2005 with Mw ~ 6 occurred in Qeshm Island has a distance of 65 km to Bandar Abbass.The base of our measurements illustrated by Aftabi[1,2]and suggested by Bailly[4].Two wooden stakes about 50 cm in length and (2x3 cm<) in section were hammered vertically into the surficial marly salt along a line on the SW slopes of the thin southern namakier of Namakdan. Two others hammered on the walls of the cave in the south western part of the Namakdan diapir. The distance between stakes was measured (+/- a mm and cm) using a meter scale and the azimuths between them were measured (+/- a degree) by compass. Between readings, the meter scale was stored and carried in an ice chest to minimize its thermal expansion or contraction. Readings were made immediately one and two day after in the same times after installation measurements. We expected repeat of the main shock as mild earthquake one year later as earthquake cycling, we therefore return there and measured distance between stakes in salt one year after main shock but in the same times.IIEES reported the 26 and 27th 06 mild earthquake with Ml 3.3[12]. The distances between stakes both lengthened between measurements demonstrating local extension strains in the tiny southern namakier of Namakdan inside the cave and out in the marly cover.We interpreted some big activities in our 05 InSAR image as brine movements in the rim of the salt.Some of the distances between stakes exhibited complete elastic recovery during one day [1]. Others time-dependant elastic-plastic recovery[1], while in the Namakdan diapir the stakes just extended rapidly in scale of 1cm after 24 hours indicate permanent non recoverable plastic strains[1]with high rate after earthquake.With special thanks to M.Madani, C.J.Talbot and E.Feilding. REF: [1]Aftabi, P., 2000[2]Aftabi, p. et al, 2005[3]Aftabi, P., 2006[4]Bailly, E.B, 1931[5]Bruthans, J et al,In Press [6]Talbot, C.J., & Rojers, E.A.1980[7]Talbot, C.J, 1998[8] Talbot, C.J et al., 2000[9]Talbot, C.J, &Aftabi, P., 2004 [10]Nilforoushan, F. et al., 2005[11]Niessen et al.,In press [12] www.iiees.ac.ir

  20. The Shillong Plateau and the great 1897 Assam earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    England, Philip; Bilham, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Previous analysis of triangulation data of the Survey of India concluded that the great 1897 Assam earthquake occurred on a south dipping fault near the northern edge of the Shillong Plateau, which was named the Oldham fault. This attribution has been questioned on geological and geodetic grounds. We refine the triangulation data, adding recently discovered observations, and demonstrate that they require average slip of 25 ± 5 m on a fault that dips south at ˜40° beneath the plateau. The best fitting solution to the geodetic observations gives a rupture length of 79 km. However, the Chedrang fault, immediately to the west of the Oldham fault, appears to have slipped as a subvertical tear fault during or shortly after the 1897 earthquake, with over 10 m of down-to-the-west normal-sense slip. This observation suggests that the western end of the main rupture approached within a few kilometers of the Chedrang fault, giving a length of 95 km for the rupture. This range of parameters gives a magnitude 8.15earthquake. The triangulation data cannot be satisfied by slip on the north dipping faults that border the southern edge of the Shillong Plateau nor by slip on a south dipping fault that has been postulated in the Brahmaputra Valley. GPS velocities show that up to 5 mm/yr of shortening is taken up across the plateau and its borders; this suggests, via moment-frequency relations, that the interval between great earthquakes in the region is several thousand years but that earthquakes of magnitude 7 or greater should occur roughly once per century.

  1. Earthquake spatial distribution: the correlation dimension

    E-print Network

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2007-01-01

    EARTHQUAKE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION X - 15 Fig. 3 green ? simulationearthquake spatial pattern. We test these formulae by simulation.simulation. We consider lacunarity or intermittency of spatial earthquake

  2. Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India IBM Research India

    E-print Network

    Toronto, University of

    Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India Mohit Jain IBM Research India mohitjain@in.ibm.com Deepika@cs.cmu.edu Amarjeet Singh IIIT Delhi, India amarjeet@iiitd.ac.in Abstract-- Though rapid increase in energy factors affecting energy consumption in urban India. However, the small numbers of participants in those

  3. Palliative care in India.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, S K; Chandra, P S

    1998-03-01

    While India has a long tradition of home-based spiritual and religious care of the dying, there has been no contemporary palliative care until relatively recently. The existing and planned palliative care services in India are presented, and future perspectives and the opportunities for training for both professionals and lay volunteers are discussed. PMID:9540164

  4. Self-Organized Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, J. B.; Holliday, J. R.; Turcotte, D. L.; Klein, W.

    2011-12-01

    Self-Organized Criticality was proposed by the Per Bak et al. [1] as a means of explaining scaling laws observed in driven natural systems, usually in (slowly) driven threshold systems. The example used by Bak was a simple cellular automaton model of a sandpile, in which grains of sand were slowly dropped (randomly) onto a flat plate. After a period of time, during which the 'critical state' was approached, a series of self-similar avalanches would begin. Scaling exponents for the frequency-area statistics of the sandpile avalanches were found to be approximately 1, a value that characterizes 'flicker noise' in natural systems. SOC is associated with a critical point in the phase diagram of the system, and it was found that the usual 2-scaling field theory applies. A model related to SOC is the Self-Organized Spinodal (SOS), or intermittent criticality model. Here a slow but persistent driving force leads to quasi-periodic approach to, and retreat from, the classical limit of stability, or spinodal. Scaling exponents for this model can be related to Gutenberg-Richter and Omori exponents observed in earthquake systems. In contrast to SOC models, nucleation, both classical and non-classical types, is possible in SOS systems. Tunneling or nucleation rates can be computed from Langer-Klein-Landau-Ginzburg theories for comparison to observations. Nucleating droplets play a role similar to characteristic earthquake events. Simulations of these systems reveals much of the phenomenology associated with earthquakes and other types of "burst" dynamics. Whereas SOC is characterized by the full scaling spectrum of avalanches, SOS is characterized by both system-size events above the nominal frequency-size scaling curve, and scaling of small events. Applications to other systems including integrate-and-fire neural networks and financial crashes will be discussed. [1] P. Bak, C. Tang and K. Weisenfeld, Self-Organized Criticality, Phys. Rev. Lett., 59, 381 (1987).

  5. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1?MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1–10?MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor “foreshocks”, since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years. PMID:25156190

  6. Anthropogenic Triggering of Large Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulargia, Francesco; Bizzarri, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    The physical mechanism of the anthropogenic triggering of large earthquakes on active faults is studied on the basis of experimental phenomenology, i.e., that earthquakes occur on active tectonic faults, that crustal stress values are those measured in situ and, on active faults, comply to the values of the stress drop measured for real earthquakes, that the static friction coefficients are those inferred on faults, and that the effective triggering stresses are those inferred for real earthquakes. Deriving the conditions for earthquake nucleation as a time-dependent solution of the Tresca-Von Mises criterion applied in the framework of poroelasticity yields that active faults can be triggered by fluid overpressures < 0.1 MPa. Comparing this with the deviatoric stresses at the depth of crustal hypocenters, which are of the order of 1-10 MPa, we find that injecting in the subsoil fluids at the pressures typical of oil and gas production and storage may trigger destructive earthquakes on active faults at a few tens of kilometers. Fluid pressure propagates as slow stress waves along geometric paths operating in a drained condition and can advance the natural occurrence of earthquakes by a substantial amount of time. Furthermore, it is illusory to control earthquake triggering by close monitoring of minor ``foreshocks'', since the induction may occur with a delay up to several years.

  7. Make an Earthquake: Ground Shaking!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savasci, Funda

    2011-01-01

    The main purposes of this activity are to help students explore possible factors affecting the extent of the damage of earthquakes and learn the ways to reduce earthquake damages. In these inquiry-based activities, students have opportunities to develop science process skills and to build an understanding of the relationship among science,…

  8. Earthquakes Threaten Many American Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Nancy E.

    2010-01-01

    Millions of U.S. children attend schools that are not safe from earthquakes, even though they are in earthquake-prone zones. Several cities and states have worked to identify and repair unsafe buildings, but many others have done little or nothing to fix the problem. The reasons for ignoring the problem include political and financial ones, but…

  9. Earthquake Preparedness Checklist for Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1999

    A brochure provides a checklist highlighting the important questions and activities that should be addressed and undertaken as part of a school safety and preparedness program for earthquakes. It reminds administrators and other interested parties on what not to forget in preparing schools for earthquakes, such as staff knowledge needs, evacuation…

  10. Early Eocene rodents (Mammalia) from the Subathu Formation of type area (Himachal Pradesh), NW sub-Himalaya, India: Palaeobiogeographic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Smita; Kumar, Kishor

    2015-08-01

    Based on isolated upper cheek teeth, two new early Eocene rodents (Subathumys solanorius gen. et sp. nov. and Subathumys globulus gen. et sp. nov.) and three others (Birbalomys cf. sondaari, Birbalomys sp., cf. Chapattimys sp.) are recorded from the lower-middle part of the Subathu Formation of the type area in Himachal Pradesh, northwestern sub-Himalaya (India). The new rodents exhibit morphological features most similar to the unified ctenodactyloid family Chapattimyidae (including Yuomyidae), which is also represented in the assemblage from the upper part (middle Eocene) of the Subathu Formation. The associated lower cheek teeth are provisionally described as three indeterminate chapattimyid taxa. The new Subathu rodents are somewhat younger than the previously documented early Eocene assemblages from the Indian subcontinent, and are chronologically intermediate between the early Eocene ailuravines from Gujarat in the western peninsular India and the middle Eocene chapattimyids from northwestern India and Pakistan. They suggest that chapattimyids originated in the sub-Himalayan region during the Ypresian, which is earlier than previously believed. The absence of ailuravines in this as well as younger rodent assemblages from the subcontinent seems to suggest that ailuravines (Ischyromyidae), within a relatively short time after their appearance in the peninsular India in the early Eocene, may have been replaced by the indigenous chapattimyids. The co-occurrence in the early Eocene Subathu assemblage of three or more chapattimyids indicates their early radiation and dominance during the early and middle Eocene. This record of rodents opens the possibility of recovery of other small mammal remains in older levels of the Subathu Formation, which will be important for understanding linkage with early Eocene faunas from peninsular India, Europe and North America.

  11. Earthquake Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    IAEMIS (Integrated Automated Emergency Management Information System) is the principal tool of an earthquake preparedness program developed by Martin Marietta and the Mid-America Remote Sensing Center (MARC). It is a two-component set of software, data and procedures to provide information enabling management personnel to make informed decisions in disaster situations. The NASA-developed program ELAS, originally used to analyze Landsat data, provides MARC with a spatially-oriented information management system. Additional MARC projects include land resources management, and development of socioeconomic data.

  12. Seismic hazard evaluation of the Oman India pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.W.; Thenhaus, P.C.; Mullee, J.E.; Preston, R.

    1996-12-31

    The proposed Oman India pipeline will traverse approximately 1,135 km of the northern Arabian Sea floor and adjacent continental shelves at depths of over 3 km on its route from Ra`s al Jifan, Oman, to Rapar Gadhwali, India. The western part of the route crosses active faults that form the transform boundary between the Arabian and Indian tectonic plates. The eastern terminus of the route lies in the vicinity of the great (M {approximately} 8) 1829 Kutch, India earthquake. A probabilistic seismic hazard analysis was used to estimate the values of peak ground acceleration (PGA) with return periods of 200, 500 and 1,000 years at selected locations along the pipeline route and the submarine Indus Canyon -- a possible source of large turbidity flows. The results defined the ground-shaking hazard along the pipeline route and Indus Canyon for evaluation of risks to the pipeline from potential earthquake-induced geologic hazards such as liquefaction, slope instability, and turbidity flows. 44 refs.

  13. Earthquake Scaling, Simulation and Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Michael Karl

    Earthquakes are among the most devastating natural events faced by society. In 2011, just two events, the magnitude 6.3 earthquake in Christcurch New Zealand on February 22, and the magnitude 9.0 Tohoku earthquake off the coast of Japan on March 11, caused a combined total of $226 billion in economic losses. Over the last decade, 791,721 deaths were caused by earthquakes. Yet, despite their impact, our ability to accurately predict when earthquakes will occur is limited. This is due, in large part, to the fact that the fault systems that produce earthquakes are non-linear. The result being that very small differences in the systems now result in very big differences in the future, making forecasting difficult. In spite of this, there are patterns that exist in earthquake data. These patterns are often in the form of frequency-magnitude scaling relations that relate the number of smaller events observed to the number of larger events observed. In many cases these scaling relations show consistent behavior over a wide range of scales. This consistency forms the basis of most forecasting techniques. However, the utility of these scaling relations is limited by the size of the earthquake catalogs which, especially in the case of large events, are fairly small and limited to a few 100 years of events. In this dissertation I discuss three areas of earthquake science. The first is an overview of scaling behavior in a variety of complex systems, both models and natural systems. The focus of this area is to understand how this scaling behavior breaks down. The second is a description of the development and testing of an earthquake simulator called Virtual California designed to extend the observed catalog of earthquakes in California. This simulator uses novel techniques borrowed from statistical physics to enable the modeling of large fault systems over long periods of time. The third is an evaluation of existing earthquake forecasts, which focuses on the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) test: the first competitive test of earthquake forecasts in California.

  14. Earthquake Simulator Finds Tremor Triggers

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Paul

    2015-03-27

    Using a novel device that simulates earthquakes in a laboratory setting, a Los Alamos researcher has found that seismic waves-the sounds radiated from earthquakes-can induce earthquake aftershocks, often long after a quake has subsided. The research provides insight into how earthquakes may be triggered and how they recur. Los Alamos researcher Paul Johnson and colleague Chris Marone at Penn State have discovered how wave energy can be stored in certain types of granular materials-like the type found along certain fault lines across the globe-and how this stored energy can suddenly be released as an earthquake when hit by relatively small seismic waves far beyond the traditional “aftershock zone” of a main quake. Perhaps most surprising, researchers have found that the release of energy can occur minutes, hours, or even days after the sound waves pass; the cause of the delay remains a tantalizing mystery.

  15. Are Earthquakes a Critical Phenomenon?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramos, O.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquakes, granular avalanches, superconducting vortices, solar flares, and even stock markets are known to evolve through power-law distributed events. During decades, the formalism of equilibrium phase transition has coined these phenomena as critical, which implies that they are also unpredictable. This work revises these ideas and uses earthquakes as the paradigm to demonstrate that slowly driven systems evolving through uncorrelated and power-law distributed avalanches (UPLA) are not necessarily critical systems, and therefore not necessarily unpredictable. By linking the correlation length to the pdf of the distribution, and comparing it with the one obtained at a critical point, a condition of criticality is introduced. Simulations in the classical Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) earthquake model confirm the findings, showing that earthquakes are not a critical phenomenon. However, one single catastrophic earthquake may show critical properties and, paradoxically, the emergence of this temporal critical behaviour may eventually carry precursory signs of catastrophic events.

  16. Testing an earthquake prediction algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kossobokov, V.G.; Healy, J.H.; Dewey, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    A test to evaluate earthquake prediction algorithms is being applied to a Russian algorithm known as M8. The M8 algorithm makes intermediate term predictions for earthquakes to occur in a large circle, based on integral counts of transient seismicity in the circle. In a retroactive prediction for the period January 1, 1985 to July 1, 1991 the algorithm as configured for the forward test would have predicted eight of ten strong earthquakes in the test area. A null hypothesis, based on random assignment of predictions, predicts eight earthquakes in 2.87% of the trials. The forward test began July 1, 1991 and will run through December 31, 1997. As of July 1, 1995, the algorithm had forward predicted five out of nine earthquakes in the test area, which success ratio would have been achieved in 53% of random trials with the null hypothesis.

  17. Testing earthquake source inversion methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, M.; Mai, P.M.; Schorlemmer, D.

    2011-01-01

    Source Inversion Validation Workshop; Palm Springs, California, 11-12 September 2010; Nowadays earthquake source inversions are routinely performed after large earthquakes and represent a key connection between recorded seismic and geodetic data and the complex rupture process at depth. The resulting earthquake source models quantify the spatiotemporal evolution of ruptures. They are also used to provide a rapid assessment of the severity of an earthquake and to estimate losses. However, because of uncertainties in the data, assumed fault geometry and velocity structure, and chosen rupture parameterization, it is not clear which features of these source models are robust. Improved understanding of the uncertainty and reliability of earthquake source inversions will allow the scientific community to use the robust features of kinematic inversions to more thoroughly investigate the complexity of the rupture process and to better constrain other earthquakerelated computations, such as ground motion simulations and static stress change calculations.

  18. The CATDAT damaging earthquakes database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniell, J. E.; Khazai, B.; Wenzel, F.; Vervaeck, A.

    2011-08-01

    The global CATDAT damaging earthquakes and secondary effects (tsunami, fire, landslides, liquefaction and fault rupture) database was developed to validate, remove discrepancies, and expand greatly upon existing global databases; and to better understand the trends in vulnerability, exposure, and possible future impacts of such historic earthquakes. Lack of consistency and errors in other earthquake loss databases frequently cited and used in analyses was a major shortcoming in the view of the authors which needed to be improved upon. Over 17 000 sources of information have been utilised, primarily in the last few years, to present data from over 12 200 damaging earthquakes historically, with over 7000 earthquakes since 1900 examined and validated before insertion into the database. Each validated earthquake includes seismological information, building damage, ranges of social losses to account for varying sources (deaths, injuries, homeless, and affected), and economic losses (direct, indirect, aid, and insured). Globally, a slightly increasing trend in economic damage due to earthquakes is not consistent with the greatly increasing exposure. The 1923 Great Kanto (214 billion USD damage; 2011 HNDECI-adjusted dollars) compared to the 2011 Tohoku (>300 billion USD at time of writing), 2008 Sichuan and 1995 Kobe earthquakes show the increasing concern for economic loss in urban areas as the trend should be expected to increase. Many economic and social loss values not reported in existing databases have been collected. Historical GDP (Gross Domestic Product), exchange rate, wage information, population, HDI (Human Development Index), and insurance information have been collected globally to form comparisons. This catalogue is the largest known cross-checked global historic damaging earthquake database and should have far-reaching consequences for earthquake loss estimation, socio-economic analysis, and the global reinsurance field.

  19. The Disadvantage to the Rural Population in Earthquake Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyss, M.

    2014-12-01

    Scenario calculations show that the rural population is more vulnerable to earthquake disasters because of their comparatively weak building stock. For calculating damage due to strong ground shaking, the building stock is modeled separately for different countries and in each country separately in three settlement size classes. It is generally understood that cities contain more buildings that are resistant to strong shaking than villages. A corollary of this observation is that villagers are more likely to be killed by their collapsing homes than city dwellers. The quantitative excess of the vulnerability of villagers compared to city dwellers varies as a function of the following parameters: (1) Country, (2) epicentral distance, and (3) earthquake magnitude, in addition to the quality of the built environment. For estimating quantitatively the difference of mortality in villages compared to cities, we used the building stock as modeled in the earthquake loss estimating tool QLARM. For the scenario calculations, the epicenters and depths of recent large or damaging earthquakes were selected and their magnitudes were set to M7.5, in cases where the magnitude of the historic event had been smaller. The countries for which we estimated the excess rural mortality included: Algeria, China, Greece, Guatemala, India, Iran, Mexico and Turkey. In all of these countries and for all distances the mortality rate was found to be larger in the villages. Depending on the parameters (1), (2) and (3), the percentage of fatalities in villages was higher by 20% to 97% than in cities. In the case of Greece, where the QLARM data are the most detailed, a clear function of the per cent of fatalities as a function of settlement size emerged. Because indigenous peoples live typically in small settlements, these findings mean that the indigenous population is exposed to a greater earthquake risk than the average population. Although it is understandable that earthquake risk mitigation has focused on megacities, the conclusion of this study is that the rural population needs more help in earthquake risk mitigation than the urban population.

  20. GPS Analyses of the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S. A.; Gudmundsson, Ólafur

    2005-03-01

    The Sumatra, Indonesia, earthquake on 26 December 2004 was one of the most devastating earthquakes in history. With a magnitude of Mw = 9.3 (revised based on normal-mode amplitudes by Stein and Okal, http://www.earth.northwestern.edu/people/seth/research/sumatra.html), it is the second largest earthquake recorded since 1900. It occurred about 100 km off the west coast of northern Sumatra, where the relatively dense Indo-Australian plate moves beneath the lighter Burma plate, resulting in stress accumulation. The average relative velocity of the two plates is about 6 cm/yr. On 26 December 2004, however, the two plates moved by a distance of several meters, releasing the stress accumulated over hundreds of years. The result was a devastating tsunami that hit coastlines across the Indian Ocean, killing about 300,000 people in Indonesia, Sri Lanka, India, Thailand, Burma, Malaysia, Somalia, and other countries (Guardian, 29 January 2005, http://www.guardian.co.uk/tsunami/story/0,15671,1380895,00.html).

  1. Influence of Earthquake Parameters on Tsunami Wave Height and Inundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulangara Madham Subrahmanian, D.; Sri Ganesh, J.; Venkata Ramana Murthy, M.; V, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    After Indian Ocean Tsunami (IOT) on 26th December, 2004, attempts are being made to assess the threat of tsunami originating from different sources for different parts of India. The Andaman - Sumatra trench is segmented by transcurrent faults and differences in the rate of subduction which is low in the north and increases southward. Therefore key board model with initial deformation calculated using different strike directions, slip rates, are used. This results in uncertainties in the earthquake parameters. This study is made to identify the location of origin of most destructive tsunami for Southeast coast of India and to infer the influence of the earthquake parameters in tsunami wave height travel time in deep ocean as well as in the shelf and inundation in the coast. Five tsunamigenic sources were considered in the Andaman - Sumatra trench taking into consideration the tectonic characters of the trench described by various authors and the modeling was carried out using TUNAMI N2 code. The model results were validated using the travel time and runup in the coastal areas and comparing the water elevation along Jason - 1's satellite track. The inundation results are compared from the field data. The assessment of the tsunami threat for the area south of Chennai city the metropolitan city of South India shows that a tsunami originating in Car Nicobar segment of the Andaman - Sumatra subduction zone can generate the most destructive tsunami. Sensitivity analysis in the modelling indicates that fault length influences the results significantly and the tsunami reaches early and with higher amplitude. Strike angle is also modifying the tsunami followed by amount of slip.

  2. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    " or "ground motions") resulting from (or attempting to simulate) real earthquakes must be obtained. GroundTenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July National Conference in Earthquake Engineering, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, Anchorage, AK

  3. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July earthquakes, utilizing physics-based models of earthquake rupture and wave propagation, is an area of active between earthquake scientists and engineering users, and testing/rating methodologies for simulated ground

  4. EARTHQUAKE SAFETY: Oklahoma has had an increased number of earthquakes in recent years, including the record-

    E-print Network

    Oklahoma, University of

    EARTHQUAKE SAFETY: Oklahoma has had an increased number of earthquakes in recent years, including the record- breaking 5.6 magnitude earthquake that occurred on Saturday, November 6, 2011. To stay safe before, during and after an earthquake, take the following precautions: Before an earthquake Assemble

  5. Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake Rupture Gilead Wurman

    E-print Network

    Allen, Richard M.

    Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake Rupture By Gilead Wurman 2010 #12; #12; 1 Abstract Earthquake Early Warning and the Physics of Earthquake Rupture of whether earthquake ruptures are self-similar, cascading failures, or whether their size is somehow

  6. Gravity drives Great Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lister, Gordon; Forster, Marnie

    2010-05-01

    The most violent of Great Earthquakes are driven by ruptures on giant megathrusts adjacent to actively forming mountain belts. Current theory suggests that the seismic rupture harvests (and thus releases) elastic energy that has been previously stored in locked segments of the megathrust. The general belief, however, is that this energy was accumulated as the result of relative motion of the adjacent stiff elastic tectonic plates. This mechanism fails to explain many first order aspects of large earthquakes, however. The energy source for strain accumulation must also include gravitational collapse of orogenic crust and/or in the foundering (or roll-back) of an adjacent subducting lithospheric slab. Therefore we have conducted an analysis of the geometry of aftershocks, and report that this allows distinction of two types of failure on giant megathrusts. Mode I failure involves horizontal shortening, and is consistent with the classic view that megathrusts fail in compression, with motion analogous to that expected if accretion takes place against a rigid (or elastic) backstop. Mode II failure involves horizontal extension, and requires the over-riding plate to stretch during an earthquake. This process is likely to continue during the subsequent period of afterslip, and therefore will again be evident in aftershock patterns. Mode I behaviour may well have applied to the southern segment of the Sumatran megathrust, from whence emanated the rupture that drove the 2004 Great Earthquake. Mode II behaviour appears to apply to the northern segment of the same rupture, however. The geometry of aftershocks beneath the Andaman Sea suggest that the crust above the initial rupture failed in an extensional mode. The edge of the Indian plate is foundering, with slab-hinge roll-back in a direction orthogonal to its motion vector. The only possible cause for this extension therefore is westward roll-back of the subducting Indian plate, and the consequent gravity-driven movement of the over-riding crust and mantle. This is possible for the crust and mantle above major subduction zones is mechanically weakened by the flux of heat and water associated with subduction zone processes. In consequence the lithosphere of the over-riding orogens can act more like a fluid than a rigid plate. Such fluid-like behaviour has been noted for the Himalaya and for the crust of the uplifted adjacent Tibetan Plateau, which appear to be collapsing. Similar conclusions as to the fluid-like behaviour of an orogen can also be reached for the crust and mantle of Myanmar and Indonesia, since here again, there is evidence for arc-normal motion adjacent to rolling-back subduction zones. Prior to the Great Sumatran Earthquake of 2004 we had postulated such movements on geological time-scales, describing them as ‘surges‘ driven by the gravitational potential energy of the adjacent orogen. But we considered time-scales that were very different to those that apply in the lead up, or during and subsequent to a catastrophic seismic event. The Great Sumatran Earthquake taught us quite differently. Data from satellites support the hypothesis that extension took place in a discrete increment, which we interpret to be the result of a gravitationally driven surge of the Indonesian crust westward over the weakened rupture during and after the earthquake. Mode II megathrusts are tsunamigenic for one very simple reason: the crust has been attenuated as the result of ongoing extension, so they can be overlain by large tracts of water, and they have a long rupture run time, allowing a succession of stress accumulations to be harvested. The after-slip beneath the Andaman Sea was also significant (in terms of moment) although non-seismogenic in its character. Operation of a Mode II megathrust prior to catastrophic failure may involve relatively quiescent motion with a mixture of normal faults and reverse faults, much like south of Java today. Ductile yield may produce steadily increasing (and accelerating) subsidence (on decadal time scales) as roll-back deepens the trench an

  7. Earthquake damage to transportation systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCullough, Heather

    1994-01-01

    Earthquakes represent one of the most destructive natural hazards known to man. A large magnitude earthquake near a populated area can affect residents over thousands of square kilometers and cause billions of dollars in property damage. Such an event can kill or injure thousands of residents and disrupt the socioeconomic environment for months, sometimes years. A serious result of a large-magnitude earthquake is the disruption of transportation systems, which limits post-disaster emergency response. Movement of emergency vehicles, such as police cars, fire trucks and ambulances, is often severely restricted. Damage to transportation systems is categorized below by cause including: ground failure, faulting, vibration damage, and tsunamis.

  8. Fractal Models of Earthquake Dynamics

    E-print Network

    Bhattacharya, Pathikrit; Kamal,; Samanta, Debashis

    2009-01-01

    Our understanding of earthquakes is based on the theory of plate tectonics. Earthquake dynamics is the study of the interactions of plates (solid disjoint parts of the lithosphere) which produce seismic activity. Over the last about fifty years many models have come up which try to simulate seismic activity by mimicking plate plate interactions. The validity of a given model is subject to the compliance of the synthetic seismic activity it produces to the well known empirical laws which describe the statistical features of observed seismic activity. Here we present a review of two such models of earthquake dynamics with main focus on a relatively new model namely The Two Fractal Overlap Model.

  9. Identification of novel mutations in HEXA gene in children affected with Tay Sachs disease from India.

    PubMed

    Mistri, Mehul; Tamhankar, Parag M; Sheth, Frenny; Sanghavi, Daksha; Kondurkar, Pratima; Patil, Swapnil; Idicula-Thomas, Susan; Gupta, Sarita; Sheth, Jayesh

    2012-01-01

    Tay Sachs disease (TSD) is a neurodegenerative disorder due to ?-hexosaminidase A deficiency caused by mutations in the HEXA gene. The mutations leading to Tay Sachs disease in India are yet unknown. We aimed to determine mutations leading to TSD in India by complete sequencing of the HEXA gene. The clinical inclusion criteria included neuroregression, seizures, exaggerated startle reflex, macrocephaly, cherry red spot on fundus examination and spasticity. Neuroimaging criteria included thalamic hyperdensities on CT scan/T1W images of MRI of the brain. Biochemical criteria included deficiency of hexosaminidase A (less than 2% of total hexosaminidase activity for infantile patients). Total leukocyte hexosaminidase activity was assayed by 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-?-D-glucosamine lysis and hexosaminidase A activity was assayed by heat inactivation method and 4-methylumbelliferyl-N-acetyl-?-D-glucosamine-6-sulphate lysis method. The exons and exon-intron boundaries of the HEXA gene were bidirectionally sequenced using an automated sequencer. Mutations were confirmed in parents and looked up in public databases. In silico analysis for mutations was carried out using SIFT, Polyphen2, MutationT@ster and Accelrys Discovery Studio softwares. Fifteen families were included in the study. We identified six novel missense mutations, c.340 G>A (p.E114K), c.964 G>A (p.D322N), c.964 G>T (p.D322Y), c.1178C>G (p.R393P) and c.1385A>T (p.E462V), c.1432 G>A (p.G478R) and two previously reported mutations. c.1277_1278insTATC and c.508C>T (p.R170W). The mutation p.E462V was found in six unrelated families from Gujarat indicating a founder effect. A previously known splice site mutation c.805+1 G>C and another intronic mutation c.672+30 T>G of unknown significance were also identified. Mutations could not be identified in one family. We conclude that TSD patients from Gujarat should be screened for the common mutation p.E462V. PMID:22723944

  10. Twitter earthquake detection: Earthquake monitoring in a social world

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Earle, Paul; Bowden, Daniel C.; Guy, Michelle R.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public text messages, can augment USGS earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. Rapid detection and qualitative assessment of shaking events are possible because people begin sending public Twitter messages (tweets) with in tens of seconds after feeling shaking. Here we present and evaluate an earthquake detection procedure that relies solely on Twitter data. A tweet-frequency time series constructed from tweets containing the word "earthquake" clearly shows large peaks correlated with the origin times of widely felt events. To identify possible earthquakes, we use a short-term-average, long-term-average algorithm. When tuned to a moderate sensitivity, the detector finds 48 globally-distributed earthquakes with only two false triggers in five months of data. The number of detections is small compared to the 5,175 earthquakes in the USGS global earthquake catalog for the same five-month time period, and no accurate location or magnitude can be assigned based on tweet data alone. However, Twitter earthquake detections are not without merit. The detections are generally caused by widely felt events that are of more immediate interest than those with no human impact. The detections are also fast; about 75% occur within two minutes of the origin time. This is considerably faster than seismographic detections in poorly instrumented regions of the world. The tweets triggering the detections also provided very short first-impression narratives from people who experienced the shaking.

  11. Computer simulation of earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1977-01-01

    In a computer simulation study of earthquakes a seismically active strike slip fault is represented by coupled mechanical blocks which are driven by a moving plate and which slide on a friction surface. Elastic forces and time independent friction are used to generate main shock events, while viscoelastic forces and time dependent friction add aftershock features. The study reveals that the size, length, and time and place of event occurrence are strongly influenced by the magnitude and degree of homogeneity in the elastic, viscous, and friction parameters of the fault region. For example, periodically reoccurring similar events are observed in simulations with near-homogeneous parameters along the fault, whereas seismic gaps are a common feature of simulations employing large variations in the fault parameters. The study also reveals correlations between strain energy release and fault length and average displacement and between main shock and aftershock displacements.

  12. Earthquake Breccias (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Melosh, B. L.; Lamothe, K.; Schnitzer, V.; Bate, C.

    2013-12-01

    Fault breccias are one of the fundamental classes of fault rocks and are observed in many exhumed faults. Some breccias have long been assumed to form co-seismically, but textural or mechanistic evidence for the association with earthquakes has never been documented. For example, at dilational jogs in brittle faults, it is common to find small bodies of chaotic breccia in lenticular or rhombohedral voids bounded by main slip surfaces and linking segments. Sibson interpreted these 'implosion breccias' as evidence of wall rock fracturing during sudden unloading when the dilational jogs open during earthquake slip (Sibson 1985, PAGEOPH v. 124, n. 1, 159-175). However, the role of dynamic fracturing in forming these breccias has not been tested. Moreover, the criteria for identifying implosion breccia have not been defined - do all breccias in dilational jogs or step-overs represent earthquake slip? We are building a database of breccia and microbreccia textures to develop a strictly observational set of criteria for distinction of breccia texture classes. Here, we present observations from the right-lateral Pofadder Shear Zone, South Africa, and use our textural criteria to identify the relative roles of dynamic and quasi-static fracture patterns, comminution/grinding and attrition, hydrothermal alteration, dissolution, and cementation. Nearly 100% exposure in the hyper-arid region south of the Orange River allowed very detailed mapping of frictional fault traces associated with rupture events, containing one or more right-steps in each rupture trace. Fracture patterns characteristic of on- and off-fault damage associated with propagation of dynamic rupture are observed along straight segments of the faults. The wall rock fractures are regularly spaced, begin at the fault trace and propagate at a high angle to the fault, and locally branch into subsidiary fractures before terminating a few cm away. This pattern of fractures has been previously linked to dynamic fracture tip propagation in both field studies and analog experiments. In dilational jogs, these fractures interact and intersect the wall rock foliation to cut the wall rock into distinctive clast shapes and sizes, giving the breccia a characteristic texture that can be defined quantitatively by image analysis. Breccia clast morphology, size distribution and angularity are markers for dynamic fracture patterns. Older microbreccias are cemented, and interfingering grain boundaries between quartz in clasts and quartz in cement show that crystal plastic deformation of quartz has occurred after breccia cementation. These deformed breccias are cut by younger breccias, establishing cyclicity of brittle and ductile slip on the Pofadder Shear Zone. Our results distinguish between fault breccias that could have formed quasi-statically, and those that are the result of dynamic processes and therefore define a new tool for recognizing earthquakes in the rock record.

  13. Sichuan Earthquake in China

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Sichuan earthquake in China occurred on May 12, 2008, along faults within the mountains, but near and almost parallel the mountain front, northwest of the city of Chengdu. This major quake caused immediate and severe damage to many villages and cities in the area. Aftershocks pose a continuing danger, but another continuing hazard is the widespread occurrence of landslides that have formed new natural dams and consequently new lakes. These lakes are submerging roads and flooding previously developed lands. But an even greater concern is the possible rapid release of water as the lakes eventually overflow the new dams. The dams are generally composed of disintegrated rock debris that may easily erode, leading to greater release of water, which may then cause faster erosion and an even greater release of water. This possible 'positive feedback' between increasing erosion and increasing water release could result in catastrophic debris flows and/or flooding. The danger is well known to the Chinese earthquake response teams, which have been building spillways over some of the new natural dams.

    This ASTER image, acquired on June 1, 2008, shows two of the new large landslide dams and lakes upstream from the town of Chi-Kua-Kan at 32o12'N latitude and 104o50'E longitude. Vegetation is green, water is blue, and soil is grayish brown in this enhanced color view. New landslides appear bright off-white. The northern (top) lake is upstream from the southern lake. Close inspection shows a series of much smaller lakes in an elongated 'S' pattern along the original stream path. Note especially the large landslides that created the dams. Some other landslides in this area, such as the large one in the northeast corner of the image, occur only on the mountain slopes, so do not block streams, and do not form lakes.

  14. 1939 Chile Earthquake Memorial Placard

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    A memorial placard next to a cathedral in Chillán, Chile commemorates the 30,000 people who died in the 1939 earthquake. This high death toll motivated the adoption of strict building design codes for the reconstruction of the cathedral....

  15. Fault heterogeneity and earthquake scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, Alison; Steacy, Sandy

    2007-08-01

    There is an on-going debate in the seismological community as to whether stress drop is independent of earthquake size and this has important implications for earthquake physics. Here we investigate this question in a simple 2D cellular automaton that includes heterogeneity. We find that when the range of heterogeneity is low, the scaling approaches that of constant stress drop. However, clear deviations from the constant stress drop model are observed when the range of heterogeneity is large. Further, fractal distributions of strength show more significant departures from constant scaling than do random ones. Additionally, sub-sampling the data over limited magnitude ranges can give the appearance of constant stress drop even when the entire data set does not support this. Our results suggest that deviations from constant earthquake scaling are real and reflect the heterogeneity of natural fault zones, but may not provide much information about the physics of earthquakes.

  16. Observed Weather Satellite Thermal IR Responses Prior to Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryant, N. A.; Zobrist, A. L.; Logan, L. L.; Freund, F.; Nishenko, S.

    2002-12-01

    A number of observers claim to have seen thermal anomalies prior to earthquakes, but subsequent analysis by others have failed to produce similar findings. It was the purpose of this study to determine if thermal anomalies could be found in association with known earthquakes by systematically co-registering weather satellite images at the sub-pixel level and then determining if statistically significant responses had occurred prior to an event. Earthquakes associated with plate movement (strike-slip and thrust faulting), rather than volcanism, were to be considered. A new set of automatic co-registration procedures were developed for this task to accommodate all properties particular to weather satellite observations taken at night. Spacecraft and sensor ephemeris and the horizontal displacement due to elevation were all factored in, and final adjustment for minor satellite deviations (related to roll, pitch, and yaw) were made by using image-to-image tiepoint correlations. Reliance upon visual clues in an image (frequently the subject of debate in the past) is not required. The technique relies on the general condition where ground cools after sunset. The technique applies best to the use of the geosynchronous weather satellites (GOES, Meteosat, and GMS), where images are taken every thirty minutes. Use of the geosynchronous satellites also reduces the potential for miscalculation of trends due to weather front movement or local cloud/fog formation. The polar orbiting satellites have better resolution (1km vs 5km) and better signal-to-noise, but only acquire images twice during an evening, thereby making trend analysis difficult. Case studies investigated to date include the Hector Mine California and Ikrit Turkey earthquakes of 1999, and the Bhuj India quake of 2001. The result of the new analytic procedures has been the observance of apparent heating trends close to epicenters in satellite data acquisitions a few hours prior to an earthquake. When observations along known fault-lines showed a much-reduced `temperature' decline through the evening, or in some cases an actual `temperature' increase, an earthquake occurred. This result may indicate mid-infrared luminescence associated with crustal deformation(Freund, 2002), rather than heat emission. Other events are currently under investigation using the methods developed.

  17. Heat-Related Mortality in India: Excess All-Cause Mortality Associated with the 2010 Ahmedabad Heat Wave

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Mavalankar, Dileep; Nori-Sarma, Amruta; Rajiva, Ajit; Dutta, Priya; Jaiswal, Anjali; Sheffield, Perry; Knowlton, Kim; Hess, Jeremy J.; Azhar, Gulrez Shah; Deol, Bhaskar; Bhaskar, Priya Shekhar; Hess, Jeremy; Jaiswal, Anjali; Khosla, Radhika; Knowlton, Kim; Mavalankar, Mavalankar; Rajiva, Ajit; Sarma, Amruta; Sheffield, Perry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In the recent past, spells of extreme heat associated with appreciable mortality have been documented in developed countries, including North America and Europe. However, far fewer research reports are available from developing countries or specific cities in South Asia. In May 2010, Ahmedabad, India, faced a heat wave where the temperatures reached a high of 46.8°C with an apparent increase in mortality. The purpose of this study is to characterize the heat wave impact and assess the associated excess mortality. Methods We conducted an analysis of all-cause mortality associated with a May 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India, to determine whether extreme heat leads to excess mortality. Counts of all-cause deaths from May 1–31, 2010 were compared with the mean of counts from temporally matched periods in May 2009 and 2011 to calculate excess mortality. Other analyses included a 7-day moving average, mortality rate ratio analysis, and relationship between daily maximum temperature and daily all-cause death counts over the entire year of 2010, using month-wise correlations. Results The May 2010 heat wave was associated with significant excess all-cause mortality. 4,462 all-cause deaths occurred, comprising an excess of 1,344 all-cause deaths, an estimated 43.1% increase when compared to the reference period (3,118 deaths). In monthly pair-wise comparisons for 2010, we found high correlations between mortality and daily maximum temperature during the locally hottest “summer” months of April (r?=?0.69, p<0.001), May (r?=?0.77, p<0.001), and June (r?=?0.39, p<0.05). During a period of more intense heat (May 19–25, 2010), mortality rate ratios were 1.76 [95% CI 1.67–1.83, p<0.001] and 2.12 [95% CI 2.03–2.21] applying reference periods (May 12–18, 2010) from various years. Conclusion The May 2010 heat wave in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India had a substantial effect on all-cause excess mortality, even in this city where hot temperatures prevail through much of April-June. PMID:24633076

  18. Global earthquake fatalities and population

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holzer, Thomas L.; Savage, James C.

    2013-01-01

    Modern global earthquake fatalities can be separated into two components: (1) fatalities from an approximately constant annual background rate that is independent of world population growth and (2) fatalities caused by earthquakes with large human death tolls, the frequency of which is dependent on world population. Earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (and 50,000) have increased with world population and obey a nonstationary Poisson distribution with rate proportional to population. We predict that the number of earthquakes with death tolls greater than 100,000 (50,000) will increase in the 21st century to 8.7±3.3 (20.5±4.3) from 4 (7) observed in the 20th century if world population reaches 10.1 billion in 2100. Combining fatalities caused by the background rate with fatalities caused by catastrophic earthquakes (>100,000 fatalities) indicates global fatalities in the 21st century will be 2.57±0.64 million if the average post-1900 death toll for catastrophic earthquakes (193,000) is assumed.

  19. Hydrological signatures of earthquake strain

    SciTech Connect

    Muir-Wood, R.; King, G.C.P. |

    1993-12-01

    The character of the hydrological changes that follow major earthquakes has been investigated and found to be dependent on the style of faulting. The most significant response is found to accompany major normal fault earthquakes. Increases in spring and river discharges peak a few days after the earthquake, and typically, excesss flow is sustained for a period of 6-12 months. In contrast, hydrological changes accompanying pure reverse fault earthquakes are either undetected or indicate lowering of well levels and spring flows. Strike-slip and oblique-slip fault movements are associated with a mixture of responses but appear to release no more than 10% of the water volume of the same sized normal fault event. For two major normal fault earthquakes in the western United States (those of Hebgen Lake on August 17, 1959, and Borah Peak on October 28, 1983), there is sufficient river flow information to allow the magnitude and extent of the postseismic discharge to be quantified. The discharge has been converted to a rainfall equivalent, which is found to exceed 100 mm close to the fault and to remain above 10 mm at distances greater than 50 km. Results suggest that water-filled craks are ubiquitous throughout the brittle continental crust and that these cracks open and close throughout the earthquake cycle. The existence of tectonically induced fluid flows on the scale that we demonstrate has major implications for our understanding of the mechanical and chemical behavior of crustal rocks.

  20. Mapping Tectonic Stress Using Earthquakes

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, Richard; Townend, John; Vignaux, Tony

    2005-11-23

    An earthquakes occurs when the forces acting on a fault overcome its intrinsic strength and cause it to slip abruptly. Understanding more specifically why earthquakes occur at particular locations and times is complicated because in many cases we do not know what these forces actually are, or indeed what processes ultimately trigger slip. The goal of this study is to develop, test, and implement a Bayesian method of reliably determining tectonic stresses using the most abundant stress gauges available - earthquakes themselves.Existing algorithms produce reasonable estimates of the principal stress directions, but yield unreliable error bounds as a consequence of the generally weak constraint on stress imposed by any single earthquake, observational errors, and an unavoidable ambiguity between the fault normal and the slip vector.A statistical treatment of the problem can take into account observational errors, combine data from multiple earthquakes in a consistent manner, and provide realistic error bounds on the estimated principal stress directions.We have developed a realistic physical framework for modelling multiple earthquakes and show how the strong physical and geometrical constraints present in this problem allow inference to be made about the orientation of the principal axes of stress in the earth's crust.

  1. Progress in Understanding the Pre-Earthquake Associated Events by Analyzing IR Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ouzounov, Dimitar; Taylor, Patrick; Bryant, Nevin

    2004-01-01

    We present latest result in understanding the potential relationship between tectonic stress, electro-chemical and thermodynamic processes in the Earths crust and atmosphere with an increase in IR flux as a potential signature of electromagnetic (EM) phenomena that are related to earthquake activity, either pre-, co- or post seismic. Thermal infra-red (TIR) surveys performed by the polar orbiting (NOAA/AVHRR MODIS) and geosynchronous weather satellites (GOES, METEOSAT) gave an indication of the appearance (from days to weeks before the event) of "anomalous" space-time TIR transients that are associated with the location (epicenter and local tectonic structures) and time of a number of major earthquakes with M>5 and focal depths less than 50km. We analyzed broad category of associated pre-earthquake events, which provided evidence for changes in surface temperature, surface latent heat flux, chlorophyll concentrations, soil moisture, brightness temperature, emissivity of surface, water vapour in the atmosphere prior to the earthquakes occurred in Algeria, India, Iran, Italy, Mexico and Japan. The cause of such anomalies has been mainly related to the change of near-surface thermal properties due to complex lithosphere-hydrosphere-atmospheric interactions. As final results we present examples from the most recent (2000-2004) worldwide strong earthquakes and the techniques used to capture the tracks of EM emission mid-IR anomalies and a methodology for practical future use of such phenomena in the early warning systems.

  2. Earthquakes and trauma: review of triage and injury-specific, immediate care.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Cadosch, Dieter; Rajan, Gunesh; Zellweger, René

    2008-01-01

    Earthquakes present a major threat to mankind. Increasing knowledge about geophysical interactions, progressing architectural technology, and improved disaster management algorithms have rendered modern populations less susceptible to earthquakes. Nevertheless, the mass casualties resulting from earthquakes in Great Kanto (Japan), Ancash (Peru), Tangshan (China), Guatemala, Armenia, and Izmit (Turkey) or the recent earthquakes in Bhuj (India), Bam (Iran), Sumatra (Indonesia) and Kashmir (Pakistan) indicate the devastating effect earthquakes can have on both individual and population health. Appropriate preparation and implementation of crisis management algorithms are of utmost importance to ensure a large-scale medical-aid response is readily available following a devastating event. In particular, efficient triage is vital to optimize the use of limited medical resources and to effectively mobilize these resources so as to maximize patient salvage. However, the main priorities of disaster rescue teams are the rescue and provision of emergency care for physical trauma. Furthermore, the establishment of transport evacuation corridors, a feature often neglected, is essential in order to provide the casualties with a chance for survival. The optimal management of victims under such settings is discussed, addressing injuries of the body and psyche by means of simple diagnostic and therapeutic procedures globally applicable and available. PMID:18557301

  3. Modern Mammals dispersion linked to the Paleocene Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) and early Eocene climatic optimum, new insights from India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozyem, H. M.; Adatte, T.; Keller, G.; Spangenberg, J.; Bajpai, S.; Samant, B.

    2012-12-01

    The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.9Ma)) is globally related with the extinction of deep benthic foraminifera, the diversification of both planktic foraminifera and modern mammals. In India, the tempo and timing of modern mammal dispersion, their association with the PETM or EECO (Early Eocene Climatic Optimum) and the India-Asia collision remain uncertain. Four Indian sections (Giral, Bhavnagar, Vastan and Tadkeshware lignite mines) have been studied using sedimentology, micropaleontology, mineralogy (bulk and clay mineralogy) and geochemistry (stable isotopes, major and trace elements, organic matter). Both PETM and ETM2 (second Eocene Thermal Maximum, 53.7Ma), a short-lived warming episode that followed the PETM, are globally marked by a pronounced ?13Ccarb and ?13Corg negative excursion. Both isotopic excursions have been recognized in the Vastan and Tarkeswhar lignite mines (Cambay basin, Gujarat) associated with the main mammal bearing level. The lower shift is located above the first lignite seam and corresponds to the transition from continental to shallow marine conditions. The upper excursion appears to be linked to the ETM2 and corresponds to a second marine incursion containing bivalves, benthic (Nummulites burdigalensis) and planktic foraminifera located below the second lignite seam. A very pronounced ?13Corg peak has been detected in the Giral lignite mine (Barmer, Rajhastan) around 6m above the vertebrate bearing level and may correspond to the PETM. This correlation is confirmed by palynological data and more particularly by a dinoflagellate acme that globally characterizes the PETM interval. Our micropaleontological data combined with stable carbone isotopes indicate the presence of both PETM and ETM2 events and constrain the age of the early mammals in northwestern India in between these two thermal events in the early Eocene. These new data will significantly improve the ongoing debate on whether mammals originated in or out of India.

  4. India. Fulbright-Hays Summer Seminar Abroad 1994 (India).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dickler, Paul

    This curriculum packet on politics and international relations in India contains an essay, three lessons and a variety of charts, maps, and additional readings to support the unit. The essay is entitled "India 1994: The Peacock and the Vulture." The lessons include: (1) "The Kashmir Dispute"; (2) "India: Domestic Order and International Affairs, A…

  5. A cross-sectional, randomized cluster sample survey of household vulnerability to extreme heat among slum dwellers in ahmedabad, india.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kathy V; Azhar, Gulrez S; Nair, Rajesh; Knowlton, Kim; Jaiswal, Anjali; Sheffield, Perry; Mavalankar, Dileep; Hess, Jeremy

    2013-06-01

    Extreme heat is a significant public health concern in India; extreme heat hazards are projected to increase in frequency and severity with climate change. Few of the factors driving population heat vulnerability are documented, though poverty is a presumed risk factor. To facilitate public health preparedness, an assessment of factors affecting vulnerability among slum dwellers was conducted in summer 2011 in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Indicators of heat exposure, susceptibility to heat illness, and adaptive capacity, all of which feed into heat vulnerability, was assessed through a cross-sectional household survey using randomized multistage cluster sampling. Associations between heat-related morbidity and vulnerability factors were identified using multivariate logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering effects. Age, preexisting medical conditions, work location, and access to health information and resources were associated with self-reported heat illness. Several of these variables were unique to this study. As sociodemographics, occupational heat exposure, and access to resources were shown to increase vulnerability, future interventions (e.g., health education) might target specific populations among Ahmedabad urban slum dwellers to reduce vulnerability to extreme heat. Surveillance and evaluations of future interventions may also be worthwhile. PMID:23778061

  6. A Cross-Sectional, Randomized Cluster Sample Survey of Household Vulnerability to Extreme Heat among Slum Dwellers in Ahmedabad, India

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Kathy V.; Azhar, Gulrez S.; Nair, Rajesh; Knowlton, Kim; Jaiswal, Anjali; Sheffield, Perry; Mavalankar, Dileep; Hess, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Extreme heat is a significant public health concern in India; extreme heat hazards are projected to increase in frequency and severity with climate change. Few of the factors driving population heat vulnerability are documented, though poverty is a presumed risk factor. To facilitate public health preparedness, an assessment of factors affecting vulnerability among slum dwellers was conducted in summer 2011 in Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India. Indicators of heat exposure, susceptibility to heat illness, and adaptive capacity, all of which feed into heat vulnerability, was assessed through a cross-sectional household survey using randomized multistage cluster sampling. Associations between heat-related morbidity and vulnerability factors were identified using multivariate logistic regression with generalized estimating equations to account for clustering effects. Age, preexisting medical conditions, work location, and access to health information and resources were associated with self-reported heat illness. Several of these variables were unique to this study. As sociodemographics, occupational heat exposure, and access to resources were shown to increase vulnerability, future interventions (e.g., health education) might target specific populations among Ahmedabad urban slum dwellers to reduce vulnerability to extreme heat. Surveillance and evaluations of future interventions may also be worthwhile. PMID:23778061

  7. A Distributed Approach to Computational Earthquake Science: Opportunities and Challenges

    E-print Network

    ) Cooperation for Earthquake Simulation, Earthquake Data Enhanced Cyber-Infrastructure for Disaster Evaluation1 A Distributed Approach to Computational Earthquake Science: Opportunities and Challenges Andrea Abstract--Advances in understanding earthquakes increasingly requires the integration of models

  8. Nitsche Extended Finite Element Methods for Earthquake Simulation

    E-print Network

    Columbia University

    Nitsche Extended Finite Element Methods for Earthquake Simulation Ethan T. Coon Submitted Nitsche Extended Finite Element Methods for Earthquake Simulation Ethan T. Coon Modeling earthquakes loading localizes both spatially and temporally into earthquakes on fault systems. This localization

  9. Self-Organization in Models Sandpiles, Earthquakes, and Flashing Fireflies.

    E-print Network

    Christensen, Kim

    Self-Organization in Models of Sandpiles, Earthquakes, and Flashing Fireflies. Kim Christensen.2 The earthquake mechanism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 1 #12;2 CONTENTS 4.2.1 Measurements of earthquakes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 4.3 Self-similarities in earthquakes

  10. Passive margin earthquakes: Reviewing knowledge and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-03-01

    Earthquakes like the August 2011 magnitude 5.8 Mineral, Va., temblor that occur on “passive” continental margins surprise people because they expect earthquakes to occur only on plate boundaries. But, in fact, large and damaging intraplate earthquakes occur fairly regularly on passive margins around the world. For instance, in North America the magnitude ˜7 Charleston earthquake shook South Carolina in 1886, causing severe damage and about 60 deaths, and the 1929 magnitude 7.2 earthquake on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland caused a tsunami, a large landslide, and 28 fatalities. Although they are fairly common, these earthquakes are not well studied, and their specific geologic settings and causes are unclear.

  11. Do earthquakes exhibit self-organized criticality?

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaosong; Du, Shuming; Ma, Jin

    2004-06-01

    If earthquakes are phenomena of self-organized criticality (SOC), statistical characteristics of the earthquake time series should be invariant after the sequence of events in an earthquake catalog are randomly rearranged. In this Letter we argue that earthquakes are unlikely phenomena of SOC because our analysis of the Southern California Earthquake Catalog shows that the first-return-time probability PM(T) is apparently changed after the time series is rearranged. This suggests that the SOC theory should not be used to oppose the efforts of earthquake prediction. PMID:15245263

  12. Comparison of two large earthquakes: the 2008 Sichuan Earthquake and the 2011 East Japan Earthquake.

    PubMed

    Otani, Yuki; Ando, Takayuki; Atobe, Kaori; Haiden, Akina; Kao, Sheng-Yuan; Saito, Kohei; Shimanuki, Marie; Yoshimoto, Norifumi; Fukunaga, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Between August 15th and 19th, 2011, eight 5th-year medical students from the Keio University School of Medicine had the opportunity to visit the Peking University School of Medicine and hold a discussion session titled "What is the most effective way to educate people for survival in an acute disaster situation (before the mental health care stage)?" During the session, we discussed the following six points: basic information regarding the Sichuan Earthquake and the East Japan Earthquake, differences in preparedness for earthquakes, government actions, acceptance of medical rescue teams, earthquake-induced secondary effects, and media restrictions. Although comparison of the two earthquakes was not simple, we concluded that three major points should be emphasized to facilitate the most effective course of disaster planning and action. First, all relevant agencies should formulate emergency plans and should supply information regarding the emergency to the general public and health professionals on a normal basis. Second, each citizen should be educated and trained in how to minimize the risks from earthquake-induced secondary effects. Finally, the central government should establish a single headquarters responsible for command, control, and coordination during a natural disaster emergency and should centralize all powers in this single authority. We hope this discussion may be of some use in future natural disasters in China, Japan, and worldwide. PMID:22410538

  13. VENEREOLOGY IN INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Sivaranjini, Ramassamy

    2011-01-01

    Venereology-the study of venereal diseases or more recently, the sexually transmitted infections (STI) includes a variety of pathogens namely viruses, bacteria, fungi and protozoa for which the common factor is the mode of transmission and acquisition: Sexual relations between human beings. Medical and other historians have often suggested that well-known diseases such as syphilis, gonorrhea, chancroid and lymphogranuloma venereum have existed since earliest times. However, it is difficult to identify modern disease entities based on written historical record. Studying the origin of STIs helps us to learn the political, economic and moral conditions that led to the disease. Effective management of STI rests on three pillars of diagnosis, prevention and treatment. For most of past 50 years in India, the diagnostic pillar has been the least well-supported. Until well into present century, diagnosis of STI in India was clinical. Treatment of STIs in India followed the methods used in England. Of course in the 19th century, in many parts of the world, only a few had access to modern methods of treatment; in India, there was extensive use of Ayurvedic treatment with traditional medicines. This article thus gives just an overview and evolution of venereology in India with regard to venereal diseases (now more often known as STIs/disease), control measures, academic, association and journal development and finally future perspective. PMID:21965840

  14. Laboratory Generated M -6 Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaskey, Gregory C.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Lockner, David A.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2014-10-01

    We consider whether mm-scale earthquake-like seismic events generated in laboratory experiments are consistent with our understanding of the physics of larger earthquakes. This work focuses on a population of 48 very small shocks that are foreshocks and aftershocks of stick-slip events occurring on a 2.0 m by 0.4 m simulated strike-slip fault cut through a large granite sample. Unlike the larger stick-slip events that rupture the entirety of the simulated fault, the small foreshocks and aftershocks are contained events whose properties are controlled by the rigidity of the surrounding granite blocks rather than characteristics of the experimental apparatus. The large size of the experimental apparatus, high fidelity sensors, rigorous treatment of wave propagation effects, and in situ system calibration separates this study from traditional acoustic emission analyses and allows these sources to be studied with as much rigor as larger natural earthquakes. The tiny events have short (3-6 ?s) rise times and are well modeled by simple double couple focal mechanisms that are consistent with left-lateral slip occurring on a mm-scale patch of the precut fault surface. The repeatability of the experiments indicates that they are the result of frictional processes on the simulated fault surface rather than grain crushing or fracture of fresh rock. Our waveform analysis shows no significant differences (other than size) between the M -7 to M -5.5 earthquakes reported here and larger natural earthquakes. Their source characteristics such as stress drop (1-10 MPa) appear to be entirely consistent with earthquake scaling laws derived for larger earthquakes.

  15. Earthquake clusters in Corinth Rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesimeri, Maria; Papadimitriou, Eleftheria; Karakostas, Vasilios; Tsaklidis, George

    2013-04-01

    Clusters commonly occur as main shock-aftershock (MS-AS) sequences but also as earthquake swarms, which are empirically defined as an increase in seismicity rate above the background rate without a clear triggering main shock earthquake. Earthquake swarms occur in a variety of different environments and might have a diversity of origins, characterized by a high b-value in their magnitude distribution. The Corinth Rift, which was selected as our target area, appears to be the most recent extensional structure, with a likely rate of fault slip of about 1cm/yr and opening of 7mm/yr. High seismic activity accommodates the active deformation with frequent strong (M?6.0) events and several seismic excitations without a main shock with clearly discriminative magnitude. Identification of earthquake clusters that occurred in this area in last years and investigation of their spatio-temporal distribution is attempted, with the application of known declustering algorithms, aiming to associate their occurrence with certain patterns in seismicity behavior. The earthquake catalog of the National Hellenic Seismological Network is used, and a certain number of clusters were extracted from the dataset, with the MS-AS sequences being distinguished from earthquake swarms. Spatio-temporal properties of each subset were analyzed in detail, after determining the respective completeness magnitude. This work was supported in part by the THALES Program of the Ministry of Education of Greece and the European Union in the framework of the project entitled "Integrated understanding of Seismicity, using innovative Methodologies of Fracture mechanics along with Earthquake and non-extensive statistical physics - Application to the geodynamic system of the Hellenic Arc, SEISMO FEAR HELLARC".

  16. Earthquake Response of Suspension Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdik, Mustafa; Apayd?n, Nurdan

    Suspension bridges represent critical nodes of major transportation systems. Bridge failure during strong earthquakes poses not only a threat of fatalities but causes a substantial interruption of emergency efforts. Although wind induced vibrations have historically been the primary concern in the design of suspension bridges, earthquake effects have also gained importance in recent decades. This study involves ambient vibration testing and sophisticated three-dimensional dynamic finite element analysis and earthquake performance assessment of Fatih Sultan Mehmet and suspension Bo?aziçi bridges in Istanbul under earthquake excitation. Nonlinear time history analysis of 3D finite-element models of Fatih Sultan Mehmet and Bo?aziçi suspension bridges included initial stresses in the cables, suspenders, and towers in equilibrium under dead load conditions. Multi-support scenario earthquake excitation was applied to the structure. Suspension bridges are complex 3-D structures that can exhibit a large number of closely spaced coupled modes of vibration. The large number of closely spaced modes, spatially different ground motion characteristics, and the potential for nonlinear behaviour complicate the seismic response of suspension bridges. Spatial variation of ground motion exhibits itself with different ground motions at supports due to the wave passage, incoherence and local site effects. The source of nonlinear behaviour is due to geometric nonlinearity and the presence of cables that can only carry tensile forces. The natural frequencies of vibration and the corresponding mode shapes in their dead load and live load configurations are determined. Displacement time histories and stresses at critical points of the bridges are computed and their earthquake performance under the action of scenario earthquake are estimated.

  17. Computer simulation of earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    Two computer simulation models of earthquakes were studied for the dependence of the pattern of events on the model assumptions and input parameters. Both models represent the seismically active region by mechanical blocks which are connected to one another and to a driving plate. The blocks slide on a friction surface. In the first model elastic forces were employed and time independent friction to simulate main shock events. The size, length, and time and place of event occurrence were influenced strongly by the magnitude and degree of homogeniety in the elastic and friction parameters of the fault region. Periodically reoccurring similar events were frequently observed in simulations with near homogeneous parameters along the fault, whereas, seismic gaps were a common feature of simulations employing large variations in the fault parameters. The second model incorporated viscoelastic forces and time-dependent friction to account for aftershock sequences. The periods between aftershock events increased with time and the aftershock region was confined to that which moved in the main event.

  18. EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2002; 31:18551877 (DOI: 10.1002/eqe.193)

    E-print Network

    Michalak, Anna M.

    EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2002; 31 H. Law; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering; The John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering are designed to limit their response to various external disturbances such as earthquakes and winds

  19. Coseismic offsets due to the 11 April 2012 Indian Ocean earthquakes (Mw 8.6 and 8.2) derived from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Rajeev Kumar; Kundu, Bhaskar; Gahalaut, Kalpna; Catherine, Joshi; Gahalaut, Vineet K.; Ambikapthy, A.; Naidu, M. S.

    2013-07-01

    11 April 2012 earthquake (Mw 8.6) in the Indian Ocean, about 100 km west off the Sumatra subduction zone, is the largest intraplate strike-slip earthquake in the known history. Two hours later, it triggered another great earthquake of Mw 8.2 in its vicinity. The earthquakes reflect the internal deformation of the diffused plate boundary between India and Australia caused by the differential plate motion between them. The slip occurred on conjugate planes, and the presence of some of them has been reported from the swath bathymetry and satellite magnetic anomalies. We estimate coseismic offsets due to these earthquakes at continuous GPS sites in the Andaman-Nicobar region and at other International GNSS Service (IGS) sites around the earthquakes source region. The sites on the Andaman Islands, which are about 900-1200 km to the north of the earthquake epicenters, experienced predominantly southward coseismic offset of up to 3 cm. The nearest site, Campbell Bay, on Great Nicobar Island, about 500 km to the north of the earthquake, documented an ESE offset of about 4 cm. The coseismic offsets are consistent with the finite-fault slip models derived from back projection of the seismic waves recorded by the global networks.

  20. Quick control of bubonic plague outbreak in Uttar Kashi, India.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Veena; Rana, U V S; Jain, S K; Kumar, Kaushal; Pal, I S; Arya, R C; Ichhpujani, R L; Lal, Shiv; Agarwal, S P

    2004-12-01

    A localized outbreak of bubonic plague occurred in village Dangud (population 332), district Uttar Kashi, Uttaranchal, India in the second week of October 2004. 8 cases were considered outbreak associated based on their clinical and epidemiological characteristics; 3 (27.3%) of them died within 48 hours of developing illness. All the 3 fatal cases and five surviving cases had enlargement of inguinal lymph nodes. None of them had pneumonia. The age of the cases ranged from 23-70 years and both sexes were affected. No such illness was reported from adjoining villages. The outbreak was fully contained within two weeks of its onset by supervised comprehensive chemoprophylaxis using tetracycline. A total of approximately 1250 persons were given chemoprophylaxis in three villages. There was no clear history of rat fall in the village. No flea was found on rodents or animals. 16 animal serum samples were found to be negative for antibodies against F-1 antigen of Y. pestis. However, Y. pestis was isolated from two rodents (Rattus rattus and Mus musculus) trapped in the village. One case and three animal sera showed borderline sero-positivity against rickettsial infection. The diagnosis of plague was confirmed by detection of four fold rise of antibody titre against F-1 antigen of Yersinia pestis in paired sera of three cases (one of the WHO approved criteria of diagnosis of confirmed plague). This outbreak and the occurrence of earlier outbreaks of plague in Surat (Gujarat) and Beed (Maharashtra) in 1994 and in district Shimla (Himachal Pradesh) in 2002 confirm that plague infection continue to exist in sylvatic foci in many parts of India which is transmitted to humans occasionally. Thus, there is a strong need for the States to monitor the plague activity in known sylvatic foci regularly and have a system of surveillance to facilitate prompt diagnosis and treatment of cases to control the disease. This investigation highlights that with high index of suspicion the disease can be diagnosed early and mounting of supervised comprehensive response can prevent the disease to proceed to pneumonic stage where man to man transmission gets established and outbreak assumes larger dimensions. PMID:16506545

  1. Using Third-Party Inspectors in Building Energy Codes Enforcement in India

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Sha; Evans, Meredydd; Kumar, Pradeep; Van Wie, Laura; Bhatt, Vatsal

    2013-01-31

    India is experiencing fast income growth and urbanization, and this leads to unprecedented increases in demand for building energy services and resulting energy consumption. In response to rapid growth in building energy use, the Government of India issued the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC) in 2007, which is consistent with and based on the 2001 Energy Conservation Act. ECBC implementation has been voluntary since its enactment and a few states have started to make progress towards mandatory implementation. Rajasthan is the first state in India to adopt ECBC as a mandatory code. The State adopted ECBC with minor additions on March 28, 2011 through a stakeholder process; it became mandatory in Rajasthan on September 28, 2011. Tamil Nadu, Gujarat, and Andhra Pradesh have started to draft an implementation roadmap and build capacity for its implementation. The Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE) plans to encourage more states to adopt ECBC in the near future, including Haryana, Uttar Pradesh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, West Bengal, and Delhi. Since its inception, India has applied the code on a voluntary basis, but the Government of India is developing a strategy to mandate compliance. Implementing ECBC requires coordination between the Ministry of Power and the Ministry of Urban Development at the national level as well as interdepartmental coordination at the state level. One challenge is that the Urban Local Bodies (ULBs), the enforcement entities of building by-laws, lack capacity to implement ECBC effectively. For example, ULBs in some states might find the building permitting procedures to be too complex; in other cases, lack of awareness and technical knowledge on ECBC slows down the amendment of local building by-laws as well as ECBC implementation. The intent of this white paper is to share with Indian decision-makers code enforcement approaches: through code officials, third-party inspectors, or a hybrid approach. Given the limited capacity and human resources available in the state and local governments, involving third-party inspectors could rapidly expand the capacity for plan reviews and broad implementation. However, the procedures of involving third-parties need to be carefully designed in order to guarantee a fair process. For example, there should be multiple checks and certification requirements for third-party inspectors, and the government should have the final approval when third-party inspectors are used in a project. This paper discusses different approaches of involving third-parties in ECBC enforcement; the Indian states may choose the approaches that work best in their given circumstances.

  2. Mammal Dispersion linked to The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM): New Insights from India.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khozyem, H.; Adatte, T.; Keller, G.; Spangenberg, J. E.; Bajpai, S.; Samant, B.; Mathur, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM, 55.5Ma) is globally related with the extinction of deep benthic foraminifera, the diversification of both plancktic foraminifera and mammals. In India, the tempo and timing of mammals dispersion, their association with the PETM or EECO (Early Eocene Climatic Optimum) and the India- Asia collision remain uncertain (Smith et al., 2006 Clementz, 2010). Three sections located in north and northwest India have been studied using sedimentology, micropaleontology, mineralogy (bulk and clay mineralogy) and geochemistry (stable isotopes, major and trace elements, organic matter). Both PETM and ETM2 (second Eocene Thermal Maximum, 53.7Ma), a short-lived warming episode that followed the PETM, are globally marked by a pronounced ?13Ccarb and org negative peak. Both isotopic excursions have been recognized in the Vastan and Tarkeswhar lignite mines (Cambay basin, Gujarat), above the main mammals bearing level. The lower shift is located above the first lignite seam (=lignite 2 of Sahni et al, 2004, 2009) and corresponds to the transition from continental to shallow marine conditions marked by benthic foraminifera and bivalves. The upper excursion appears to be linked to the ETM2 and corresponds to a second marine incursion containing bivalves, benthic (Nummulites burdigalensis) and planktic foraminifera located below the second lignite seam (lignite 1 of Sahni et al, 2004, 2009). A single but very pronounced ?13Corg peak has been detected in the Giral Lignite mine (Barmer, Rajhastan), around 6m above the vertebrates bearing level and may correspond to the PETM. This correlation is confirmed by palynological data (Tripathi et al., 2009, Sahni et al., 2004, 2009) and more particularly by an acme in the dinoflagellate Apectodinium that globally characterizes the PETM interval (Sluijs et al. 2007). Our micropaleontological data combined with stable carbone isotopes indicate the presence of both PETM and ETM2 events and constrain the age of the early mammals in northwestern India in between these two thermal events (early Eocene). These new data will improve significantly the ongoing debate on « in-to or out-of-India » palaeobiogeographic hypothese.

  3. Gerontology in India.

    PubMed

    Panruti, Ramamurti V; Liebig, Phoebe S; Duvvuru, Jamuna

    2015-12-01

    India, with a population of 1.22 billion, has a predominantly agriculture-based economy. Its 90 million elderly population heavily depend on their children for financial support and caregiving. Research on aging in India today is focused on the medical, biological, behavioral, and social sciences. Aging as an independent subject is only taught at a few institutions. Several national and state agencies and many nongovernmental organizations offer housing, day care, and health care services. The 1999 National Policy on Older Persons is being revised, 2 National Institutes on Aging have been designated, and a pilot health program targeting seniors has been implemented. India's greatest concern is how to provide adequate health care and income security for its huge elderly population, especially the uneducated rural poor. PMID:26585602

  4. The music of earthquakes and Earthquake Quartet #1

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Michael, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquake Quartet #1, my composition for voice, trombone, cello, and seismograms, is the intersection of listening to earthquakes as a seismologist and performing music as a trombonist. Along the way, I realized there is a close relationship between what I do as a scientist and what I do as a musician. A musician controls the source of the sound and the path it travels through their instrument in order to make sound waves that we hear as music. An earthquake is the source of waves that travel along a path through the earth until reaching us as shaking. It is almost as if the earth is a musician and people, including seismologists, are metaphorically listening and trying to understand what the music means.

  5. Serogroups, atypical biochemical characters, colicinogeny and antibiotic resistance pattern of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli isolated from diarrhoeic calves in Gujarat, India.

    PubMed

    Arya, G; Roy, A; Choudhary, V; Yadav, M M; Joshi, C G

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the antibiotic resistance, colicinogeny, serotyping and atypical biochemical characteristics of 41 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) strains detected using polymerase chain reaction from 90 E. coli strains isolated from 46 diarrhoeic calves. The STEC strains belonged to 14 different serogroups. Seventeen per cent of the STEC strains carried the eaeA gene while 14.28% of the 49 non-STEC strains were eaeA positive. Twenty eight (68.29%) of the 41 STEC strains were rhamnose non-fermentors. All the STEC strains revealed resistance to at least three of the antibiotics tested. 100% resistance was found against kanamycin and cephalexin followed by cephaloridine, enrofloxacin, amikacin, ampicillin, tetracycline, ceftiofur, ciprofloxacin, colistin and co-trimoxazole. Eighteen (44%) of the STEC strains produced colicin and all these colicinogenic strains were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Eleven STEC strains (26.82%) showed urease activity. The results of this study suggest that diarrhoeic calves are an important reservoir of STEC strains that are potentially pathogenic for farm animals and humans. Moreover, rhamnose fermentation, colicinogeny and atypical biochemical behaviour, such as urease activity, may serve as important markers or diagnostic tools for epidemiological surveys to trace the source of infection in disease outbreaks. PMID:18234027

  6. Characterization and evaluation of hydrological processes responsible for spatiotemporal variation of surface water quality at Narmada estuarine region in Gujarat, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nirmal; Kumar, Pankaj; Basil, George; Kumar, Rita N.; Kharrazi, Ali; Avtar, Ram

    2015-09-01

    This study is an effort to trace the spatiotemporal variation in water at Narmada estuarine region through solute concentration. A total of 72 water samples were collected and analyzed from three sampling points along with in situ measurement of tidal height at monthly basis for 2 years. Result shows that spatiotemporal variation of water quality occurs because of the following main mechanisms, i.e., carbonate weathering, dilution and seawater-freshwater mixing. Firstly, points situated toward inland showing the simple dilution effect on receiving high amount of monsoonal precipitation. Secondly, tidal fluctuation pattern has a strong influence on the water quality taken from the point located in near proximity to the coast. Finally, it can be concluded that water quality shows a different response, in accordance with the different tidal phase and the distance from the sea.

  7. Active tectonics and earthquake potential of the Myanmar region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Sieh, Kerry; Tun, Soe Thura; Lai, Kuang-Yin; Myint, Than

    2014-04-01

    This paper describes geomorphologic evidence for the principal neotectonic features of Myanmar and its immediate surroundings. We combine this evidence with published structural, geodetic, and seismic data to present an overview of the active tectonic architecture of the region and its seismic potential. Three tectonic systems accommodate oblique collision of the Indian plate with Southeast Asia and extrusion of Asian territory around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalayan mountain range. Subduction and collision associated with the Sunda megathrust beneath and within the Indoburman range and Naga Hills accommodate most of the shortening across the transpressional plate boundary. The Sagaing fault system is the predominant locus of dextral motion associated with the northward translation of India. Left-lateral faults of the northern Shan Plateau, northern Laos, Thailand, and southern China facilitate extrusion of rocks around the eastern syntaxis of the Himalaya. All of these systems have produced major earthquakes within recorded history and continue to present major seismic hazards in the region.

  8. India Through Literature: An Annotated Bibliography for Teaching India. Part I: India Through the Ancient Classics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Donald; Johnson, Jean

    The past and the present interweave in contemporary India. To understand India, one must know of the traditional stories. Two short pocket books make them accessible and acceptable to students: 1) The Dance of Shiva and Other Tales from India by Oroon Ghosh, published by the New American Library in New York; and, 2) Gods, Demons, and Others by R.…

  9. Earthquake and Tsunami booklet based on two Indonesia earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Y.; Aci, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many destructive earthquakes occurred during the last decade in Indonesia. These experiences are very important precepts for the world people who live in earthquake and tsunami countries. We are collecting the testimonies of tsunami survivors to clarify successful evacuation process and to make clear the characteristic physical behaviors of tsunami near coast. We research 2 tsunami events, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and 2010 Mentawai slow earthquake tsunami. Many video and photographs were taken by people at some places in 2004 Indian ocean tsunami disaster; nevertheless these were few restricted points. We didn't know the tsunami behavior in another place. In this study, we tried to collect extensive information about tsunami behavior not only in many places but also wide time range after the strong shake. In Mentawai case, the earthquake occurred in night, so there are no impressive photos. To collect detail information about evacuation process from tsunamis, we contrived the interview method. This method contains making pictures of tsunami experience from the scene of victims' stories. In 2004 Aceh case, all survivors didn't know tsunami phenomena. Because there were no big earthquakes with tsunami for one hundred years in Sumatra region, public people had no knowledge about tsunami. This situation was highly improved in 2010 Mentawai case. TV programs and NGO or governmental public education programs about tsunami evacuation are widespread in Indonesia. Many people know about fundamental knowledge of earthquake and tsunami disasters. We made drill book based on victim's stories and painted impressive scene of 2 events. We used the drill book in disaster education event in school committee of west Java. About 80 % students and teachers evaluated that the contents of the drill book are useful for correct understanding.

  10. EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2013; 00:120

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    -based methods: primarily by modeling the seismic hazard using simulated scenario earthquakes [e.g., 1, 5, 6] or using Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) of various earthquake events (defined by source and magnitudeEARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING AND STRUCTURAL DYNAMICS Earthquake Engng Struct. Dyn. 2013; 00

  11. USING THE EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING INTENSITY SCALE TO IMPROVE URBAN AREA EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-print Network

    Irfanoglu, Ayhan

    USING THE EARTHQUAKE ENGINEERING INTENSITY SCALE TO IMPROVE URBAN AREA EARTHQUAKE EMERGENCY distribution estimation of earthquake damage in building stocks is presented. The purpose is to start a strong urban area earthquake. We used a pair of ground motion and building-tag color databases

  12. Earthquake Location, Direct, Global-Search Methods E 2449 Earthquake Location,

    E-print Network

    Earthquake Location, Direct, Global-Search Methods E 2449 Earthquake Location, Direct, Global Kingdom Article Outline Glossary Definition of the Subject Introduction The Earthquake Location Problem or temporal av- erage of some characteristic of an earthquake, such as surface shaking intensity or moment

  13. Potential for a large earthquake near Los Angeles inferred from the 2014 La Habra earthquake

    E-print Network

    Loudon, Catherine

    Potential for a large earthquake near Los Angeles inferred from the 2014 La Habra earthquake Andrea in destructive earthquakes similar to or larger than the 1933 M6.4 Long Beach and 1994 M6.7 Northridge events concurrently with measurable surface deformation, even in moderate magnitude earthquakes, as part of a fault

  14. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Baker, Jack W.

    Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering July and earthquake source characteristics (e.g. source type, magnitude, and distance) obtained from seismic hazard the contribution of interface earthquakes in subduction zones that are known to produce long duration ground

  15. What to Do BEFOREBEFORE an Earthquake What to Do DURINGDURING an Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Wang, Yuhang

    What to Do BEFOREBEFORE an Earthquake What to Do DURINGDURING an Earthquake What to Do AFTERAFTER an Earthquake For Local Emergency Managers & CitizensFor Local Emergency Managers & Citizens BE PREPARED! For more information, log onto: www.gema.ga.gov www.ready.ga.gov www.geophysics.eas.gatech.edu Earthquake

  16. Earthquake Damage Assessment Using Objective Image Segmentation: A Case Study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    E-print Network

    Earthquake Damage Assessment Using Objective Image Segmentation: A Case Study of 2010 Haiti Earthquake Thomas Oommen1 , Umaa Rebbapragada2 , and Daniel Cerminaro3 1 Department of Geological Engineering Haiti earthquake provided a new opportunity to analyze earthquake-induced damage. Previous work has

  17. Earthquake Archaeology: a logical approach?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, I. S.; Buck, V. A.

    2001-12-01

    Ancient earthquakes can leave their mark in the mythical and literary accounts of ancient peoples, the stratigraphy of their site histories, and the structural integrity of their constructions. Within this broad cross-disciplinary tramping ground, earthquake geologists have tended to focus on those aspects of the cultural record that are most familiar to them; the physical effects of seismic deformation on ancient constructions. One of the core difficulties with this 'earthquake archaeology' approach is that recent attempts to isolate structural criteria that are diagnostic or strongly suggestive of a seismic origin are undermined by the recognition that signs of ancient seismicity are generally indistinguishable from non-seismic mechanisms (poor construction, adverse geotechnical conditions). We illustrate the difficulties and inconsistencies in current proposed 'earthquake diagnostic' schemes by reference to two case studies of archaeoseismic damage in central Greece. The first concerns fallen columns at various Classical temple localities in mainland Greece (Nemea, Sounio, Olympia, Bassai) which, on the basis of observed structural criteria, are earthquake-induced but which are alternatively explained by archaeologists as the action of human disturbance. The second re-examines the almost type example of the Kyparissi site in the Atalanti region as a Classical stoa offset across a seismic surface fault, arguing instead for its deformation by ground instability. Finally, in highlighting the inherent ambiguity of archaeoseismic data, we consider the value of a logic-tree approach for quantifying and quantifying our uncertainities for seismic-hazard analysis.

  18. Earthquakes & Volcanoes, Volume 23, Number 6, 1992

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey; Gordon, David W., (Edited By)

    1993-01-01

    Earthquakes and Volcanoes is published bimonthly by the U.S. Geological Survey to provide current information on earthquakes and seismology, volcanoes, and related natural hazards of interest to both generalized and specialized readers.

  19. Earthquakes and the urban environment. Volume I

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the complex nature of earthquake effects, current investigations encompass many disciplines, including those of both the physical and social sciences. Research activities center on such diversified topics as earthquake mechanics, earthquake prediction and control, the prompt and accurate detection of tsunamis (seismic sea waves), earthquake-resistant construction, seismic building code improvements, land use zoning, earthquake risk and hazard perception, disaster preparedness, plus the study of the concerns and fears of people who have experienced the effects of an earthquake. This monograph attempts to amalgamate recent research input comprising the vivifying components of urban seismology at a level useful to those having an interest in the earthquake and its effects upon an urban environment. Volume 1 contains chapters on earthquake parameters and hazards.

  20. Earthquakes and the urban environment. Volume II

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the complex nature of earthquake effects, current investigations encompass many disciplines, including those of both the physical and social sciences. Research activities center on such diversified topics as earthquake mechanics, earthquake prediction and control, the prompt and accurate detection of tsunamis (seismic sea waves), earthquake-resistant construction, seismic building code improvements, land use zoning, earthquake risk and hazard perception, disaster preparedness, plus the study of the concerns and fears of people who have experienced the effects of an earthquake. This monograph attempts to amalgamate recent research input comprising the vivifying components of urban seismology at a level useful to those having an interest in the earthquake and its effects upon an urban environment. Volume 2 contains chapters on earthquake prediction, control, building design and building response.

  1. St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Robert A.; Steckel, Phyllis; Schweig, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    St. Louis has experienced minor earthquake damage at least 12 times in the past 200 years. Because of this history and its proximity to known active earthquake zones, the St. Louis Area Earthquake Hazards Mapping Project will produce digital maps that show variability of earthquake hazards in the St. Louis area. The maps will be available free via the internet. They can be customized by the user to show specific areas of interest, such as neighborhoods or transportation routes.

  2. EARTHQUAKES - VOLCANOES (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2014-05-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1)Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2)Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3)The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is going to be, when we know the record of specific earthquakes and the routes they have followed towards the East. For example, to foresee an earthquake in the Mediterranean region, we take starting point earthquakes to Latin America (0°-40°).The aforementioned elements will reach Italy in an average time period of 49 days and Greece in 53 days. The most reliable preceding phenomenon to determine the epicenter of an earthquake is the rise of the crust's temperature at the area where a large quantity of elements is concentrated, among other phenomena that can be detected either by instruments or by our senses. When there is an active volcano along the route between the area where the "starting-point" earthquake occurred and the area where we expect the same elements to cause a new earthquake, it is possible these elements will escape through the volcano's crater, carrying lava with them. We could contribute to that end, nullifying earthquakes that might be triggered by these elements further to the east, by using manmade resources, like adequate quantities of explosives at the right moment.

  3. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2013-04-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1)Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2)Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3)The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is going to be, when we know the record of specific earthquakes and the routes they have followed towards the East. For example, to foresee an earthquake in the Mediterranean region, we take starting point earthquakes to Latin America (0°-40°).The aforementioned elements will reach Italy in an average time period of 49 days and Greece in 53 days. The most reliable preceding phenomenon to determine the epicenter of an earthquake is the rise of the crust's temperature at the area where a large quantity of elements is concentrated, among other phenomena that can be detected either by instruments or by our senses. When there is an active volcano along the route between the area where the "starting-point" earthquake occurred and the area where we expect the same elements to cause a new earthquake, it is possible these elements will escape through the volcano's crater, carrying lava with them. We could contribute to that end, nullifying earthquakes that might be triggered by these elements further to the east, by using manmade resources, like adequate quantities of explosives at the right moment.

  4. A few earthquake conundrums resolved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampin, Stuart; Gao, Yuan; De Santis, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Several fundamental questions (conundrums) about earthquakes and rocks are inexplicable in terms of conventional sub-critical geophysics. These questions have become so familiar that they are now generally accepted as the way earthquakes and rocks behave and are not recognised as presenting conceptual difficulties. These conundrums are resolved by a new understanding of fluid-rock deformation, where fluid-saturated microcracks in almost all rocks are so closely-spaced they verge on failure and hence are highly-compliant critical-systems which impose a range of new properties on conventional sub-critical geophysics. This new understanding of fluid-rock deformation, this New Geophysics, allows earthquakes to be stress-forecast, and has implications and applications to many solid Earth developments.

  5. Earthquake Forecast via Neutrino Tomography

    E-print Network

    Bin Wang; Ya-Zheng Chen; Xue-Qian Li

    2011-03-29

    We discuss the possibility of forecasting earthquakes by means of (anti)neutrino tomography. Antineutrinos emitted from reactors are used as a probe. As the antineutrinos traverse through a region prone to earthquakes, observable variations in the matter effect on the antineutrino oscillation would provide a tomography of the vicinity of the region. In this preliminary work, we adopt a simplified model for the geometrical profile and matter density in a fault zone. We calculate the survival probability of electron antineutrinos for cases without and with an anomalous accumulation of electrons which can be considered as a clear signal of the coming earthquake, at the geological region with a fault zone, and find that the variation may reach as much as 3% for $\\bar \

  6. Earthquakes - Volcanoes (Causes - Forecast - Counteraction)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsiapas, Elias

    2015-04-01

    Earthquakes and volcanoes are caused by: 1) Various liquid elements (e.g. H20, H2S, S02) which emerge from the pyrosphere and are trapped in the space between the solid crust and the pyrosphere (Moho discontinuity). 2) Protrusions of the solid crust at the Moho discontinuity (mountain range roots, sinking of the lithosphere's plates). 3) The differential movement of crust and pyrosphere. The crust misses one full rotation for approximately every 100 pyrosphere rotations, mostly because of the lunar pull. The above mentioned elements can be found in small quantities all over the Moho discontinuity, and they are constantly causing minor earthquakes and small volcanic eruptions. When large quantities of these elements (H20, H2S, SO2, etc) concentrate, they are carried away by the pyrosphere, moving from west to east under the crust. When this movement takes place under flat surfaces of the solid crust, it does not cause earthquakes. But when these elements come along a protrusion (a mountain root) they concentrate on its western side, displacing the pyrosphere until they fill the space created. Due to the differential movement of pyrosphere and solid crust, a vacuum is created on the eastern side of these protrusions and when the aforementioned liquids overfill this space, they explode, escaping to the east. At the point of their escape, these liquids are vaporized and compressed, their flow accelerates, their temperature rises due to fluid friction and they are ionized. On the Earth's surface, a powerful rumbling sound and electrical discharges in the atmosphere, caused by the movement of the gasses, are noticeable. When these elements escape, the space on the west side of the protrusion is violently taken up by the pyrosphere, which collides with the protrusion, causing a major earthquake, attenuation of the protrusions, cracks on the solid crust and damages to structures on the Earth's surface. It is easy to foresee when an earthquake will occur and how big it is going to be, when we know the record of specific earthquakes and the routes they have followed towards the East. For example, to foresee an earthquake in the Mediterranean region, we take starting point earthquakes to Latin America (0°-40°).The aforementioned elements will reach Italy in an average time period of 49 days and Greece in 53 days. The most reliable preceding phenomenon to determine the epicenter of an earthquake is the rise of the crust's temperature at the area where a large quantity of elements is concentrated, among other phenomena that can be detected either by instruments or by our senses. When there is an active volcano along the route between the area where the "starting-point" earthquake occurred and the area where we expect the same elements to cause a new earthquake, it is possible these elements will escape through the volcano's crater, carrying lava with them. We could contribute to that end, nullifying earthquakes that might be triggered by these elements further to the east, by using manmade resources, like adequate quantities of explosives at the right moment.

  7. Interaction Between the Himalaya and the Flexed Indian Plate--Spatial Fluctuations in Seismic Hazard in India in the Past Millennium?

    SciTech Connect

    Bilham, Roger; Szeliga, Walter

    2008-07-08

    Between the tenth and early 16th centuries three megaquakes allowed most of the northern edge of the Indian plate to slip 20-24 m northward relative to the overlying Himalaya. Although the renewal time for earthquakes with this large amount of slip is less than 1300 years given a geodetic convergence rate of 16-20 mm/yr, recently developed scaling laws for the Himalaya suggest that the past 200 years of great earthquakes may be associated with slip of less than 10 m and renewal times of approximately 500 years. These same theoretical models show that the rupture lengths of the Himalaya's Medieval earthquakes (300-600 km) are too short to permit 24 m of slip given the relationships demonstrated by recent events. There is thus reason to suppose that recent earthquakes may have responded to different elastic driving forces from those that drove the megaquakes of Medieval times.An alternative source of energy to drive Himalayan earthquakes exists in the form of the elastic and gravitational energy stored in flexure of the Indian plate. The flexure is manifest in the form of a 200-450 m high bulge in central India, which is sustained by the forces of collision and by the end-loading of the plate by the Himalaya and southern Tibet. These flexural stresses are responsible for earthquakes in the sub-continent. The abrupt release of stress associated with the northward translation of the northern edge of the Indian plate by 24 m, were the process entirely elastic, would result in a deflation of the crest of the bulge by roughly 0.8 m. Geometrical changes, however, would be moderated by viscous rheologies in the plate and by viscous flow in the mantle in the following centuries.The hypothesized relaxation of flexural geometry following the Himalayan megaquake sequence would have the effect of backing-off stresses throughout central India resulting in quiescence both in the Himalaya and the Indian plate. The historical record shows an absence of great Himalayan earthquakes in the late 16th to early 19th centuries, and colonial records for this period contain few records of earthquakes in central India. Although this may be an artifact caused by a poor recorded history, it is unlikely that Mw>8.2 earthquakes have escaped notice in the Mughal or early colonial histories.Recent mid-plate earthquakes in India may thus represent a redevelopment of flexural stressing of the Indian plate. Their return also signifies the development of stresses in the Himalaya that will eventually be released in great Himalayan earthquakes.

  8. Earthquakes in the New Zealand Region.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Cleland

    1995-01-01

    Presents a thorough overview of earthquakes in New Zealand, discussing plate tectonics, seismic measurement, and historical occurrences. Includes 10 figures illustrating such aspects as earthquake distribution, intensity, and fissures in the continental crust. Tabular data includes a list of most destructive earthquakes and descriptive effects…

  9. Modeling, Forecasting and Mitigating Extreme Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismail-Zadeh, A.; Le Mouel, J.; Soloviev, A.

    2012-12-01

    Recent earthquake disasters highlighted the importance of multi- and trans-disciplinary studies of earthquake risk. A major component of earthquake disaster risk analysis is hazards research, which should cover not only a traditional assessment of ground shaking, but also studies of geodetic, paleoseismic, geomagnetic, hydrological, deep drilling and other geophysical and geological observations together with comprehensive modeling of earthquakes and forecasting extreme events. Extreme earthquakes (large magnitude and rare events) are manifestations of complex behavior of the lithosphere structured as a hierarchical system of blocks of different sizes. Understanding of physics and dynamics of the extreme events comes from observations, measurements and modeling. A quantitative approach to simulate earthquakes in models of fault dynamics will be presented. The models reproduce basic features of the observed seismicity (e.g., the frequency-magnitude relationship, clustering of earthquakes, occurrence of extreme seismic events). They provide a link between geodynamic processes and seismicity, allow studying extreme events, influence of fault network properties on seismic patterns and seismic cycles, and assist, in a broader sense, in earthquake forecast modeling. Some aspects of predictability of large earthquakes (how well can large earthquakes be predicted today?) will be also discussed along with possibilities in mitigation of earthquake disasters (e.g., on 'inverse' forensic investigations of earthquake disasters).

  10. Appendix H: WGCEP Historical California Earthquake Catalog

    E-print Network

    Felzer, Karen

    Appendix H: WGCEP Historical California Earthquake Catalog By Karen R. Felzer1 and Tianqing Cao2-USGS Suggested citation: Felzer, K.R., and Cao, Tianqing, 2008, WGCEP Historical California earthquake catalog, Appendix H in The Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast, version 2 (UCERF 2): U.S. Geological

  11. PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big?

    E-print Network

    Stein, Seth

    PERSPECTIVES Deep Earthquakes: A Fault Too Big? Seth Stein Because deep Earth processes are inacces. Recent results for the mys- terious deep earthquakes that occur to depths greater than 600 km is that large deep earthquakes (1-3) seem to have occurred on faults larger than ex- pected from the competing

  12. Earthquakes: A Teacher's Package for K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Science Teachers Association, Washington, DC.

    Like rain, an earthquake is a natural occurrence which may be mild or catastrophic. Although an earthquake may last only a few seconds, the processes that cause it have operated within the earth for millions of years. Until recently, the cause of earthquakes was a mystery and the subject of fanciful folklore to people all around the world. This…

  13. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174... Applying to All Business Loans Requirements Imposed Under Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake..., the construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  14. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174... Applying to All Business Loans Requirements Imposed Under Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake..., the construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  15. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174... Applying to All Business Loans Requirements Imposed Under Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake..., the construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  16. Understanding and responding to earthquake hazards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raymond, C. A.; Lundgren, P. R.; Madsen, S. N.; Rundle, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Advances in understanding of the earthquake cycle and in assessing earthquake hazards is a topic of great importance. Dynamic earthquake hazard assessments resolved for a range of spatial scales and time scales will allow a more systematic approach to prioritizing the retrofitting of vulnerable structures, relocating populations at risk, protecting lifelines, preparing for disasters, and educating the public.

  17. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174... Applying to All Business Loans Requirements Imposed Under Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake..., the construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  18. 13 CFR 120.174 - Earthquake hazards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Earthquake hazards. 120.174... Applying to All Business Loans Requirements Imposed Under Other Laws and Orders § 120.174 Earthquake..., the construction must conform with the “National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  19. Ninth Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    Masud, Arif

    Ninth Canadian Conference on Earthquake Engineering Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 26-29 June 2007 EARTHQUAKE DESIGN CODES FOR PAKISTAN: AN OPTION OR A NECESSITY? Masud1 , A. and Elnashai2 , A. S. ABSTRACT The Kashmir earthquake of October 8, 2005 which had a magnitude of 7.6 inflicted a heavy toll on lives

  20. VOLUME NUMBER Unified Scaling Law Earthquakes

    E-print Network

    Christensen, Kim

    VOLUME NUMBER P I CA REV I L APRIL Unified Scaling Law Earthquakes Bak, * Christensen, Leon Danon (Received August 2001; published April 2002) distribution waiting times between earthquakes occurring to aftershocks, is nothing the limit general hierarchical properties earthquakes. There unique operational

  1. Unified scaling law for earthquakes Kim Christensen*

    E-print Network

    Christensen, Kim

    Colloquium Unified scaling law for earthquakes Kim Christensen* , Leon Danon*, Tim Scanlon of earth- quakes in a given region and for a given cutoff magnitude. The law shows that earthquakes occur that they are created by the same mechanism. Earthquakes are a complicated spatiotemporal phenomenon which is poorly

  2. Deepest Ocean Borehole to Plumb Earthquakes, Tsunamis

    E-print Network

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Deepest Ocean Borehole to Plumb Earthquakes, Tsunamis A grand challenge for Earth Sciences is to understand earthquake dynamics. Subduction zones generate about 90% of the Earth's seismicity, resulting the portion of the fault capable of generating magnitude 8.0 earthquakes. By gaining access to the birthplace

  3. Izmit, Turkey 1999 Earthquake Interferogram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is an interferogram that was created using pairs of images taken by Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR). The images, acquired at two different times, have been combined to measure surface deformation or changes that may have occurred during the time between data acquisition. The images were collected by the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-2) on 13 August 1999 and 17 September 1999 and were combined to produce these image maps of the apparent surface deformation, or changes, during and after the 17 August 1999 Izmit, Turkey earthquake. This magnitude 7.6 earthquake was the largest in 60 years in Turkey and caused extensive damage and loss of life. Each of the color contours of the interferogram represents 28 mm (1.1 inches) of motion towards the satellite, or about 70 mm (2.8 inches) of horizontal motion. White areas are outside the SAR image or water of seas and lakes. The North Anatolian Fault that broke during the Izmit earthquake moved more than 2.5 meters (8.1 feet) to produce the pattern measured by the interferogram. Thin red lines show the locations of fault breaks mapped on the surface. The SAR interferogram shows that the deformation and fault slip extended west of the surface faults, underneath the Gulf of Izmit. Thick black lines mark the fault rupture inferred from the SAR data. Scientists are using the SAR interferometry along with other data collected on the ground to estimate the pattern of slip that occurred during the Izmit earthquake. This then used to improve computer models that predict how this deformation transferred stress to other faults and to the continuation of the North Anatolian Fault, which extends to the west past the large city of Istanbul. These models show that the Izmit earthquake further increased the already high probability of a major earthquake near Istanbul.

  4. Model of clustering of earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Barenblatt, G. I.; Keilis-Borok, V. I.; Vishik, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional model of the expansion of a crack in an elastic medium is considered in which friction depends on the slip rate and the modulus of cohesion depends on the speed of expansion of the crack. Elastic waves are neglected (quasi-static model). Under some conditions, the expansion of the crack is realized by the alternation of slow and fast episodes (“shocks”) of slip. This offers a possible qualitative explanation of several forms of earthquake clustering, including clustering that is premonitory to strong earthquakes. PMID:16593080

  5. Earth science: lasting earthquake legacy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parsons, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    On 31 August 1886, a magnitude-7 shock struck Charleston, South Carolina; low-level activity continues there today. One view of seismic hazard is that large earthquakes will return to New Madrid and Charleston at intervals of about 500 years. With expected ground motions that would be stronger than average, that prospect produces estimates of earthquake hazard that rival those at the plate boundaries marked by the San Andreas fault and Cascadia subduction zone. The result is two large 'bull's-eyes' on the US National Seismic Hazard Maps — which, for example, influence regional building codes and perceptions of public safety.

  6. Earthquake Education in Prime Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Groot, R.; Abbott, P.; Benthien, M.

    2004-12-01

    Since 2001, the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC) has collaborated on several video production projects that feature important topics related to earthquake science, engineering, and preparedness. These projects have also fostered many fruitful and sustained partnerships with a variety of organizations that have a stake in hazard education and preparedness. The Seismic Sleuths educational video first appeared in the spring season 2001 on Discovery Channel's Assignment Discovery. Seismic Sleuths is based on a highly successful curriculum package developed jointly by the American Geophysical Union and The Department of Homeland Security Federal Emergency Management Agency. The California Earthquake Authority (CEA) and the Institute for Business and Home Safety supported the video project. Summer Productions, a company with a reputation for quality science programming, produced the Seismic Sleuths program in close partnership with scientists, engineers, and preparedness experts. The program has aired on the National Geographic Channel as recently as Fall 2004. Currently, SCEC is collaborating with Pat Abbott, a geology professor at San Diego State University (SDSU) on the video project Written In Stone: Earthquake Country - Los Angeles. Partners on this project include the California Seismic Safety Commission, SDSU, SCEC, CEA, and the Insurance Information Network of California. This video incorporates live-action demonstrations, vivid animations, and a compelling host (Abbott) to tell the story about earthquakes in the Los Angeles region. The Written in Stone team has also developed a comprehensive educator package that includes the video, maps, lesson plans, and other supporting materials. We will present the process that facilitates the creation of visually effective, factually accurate, and entertaining video programs. We acknowledge the need to have a broad understanding of the literature related to communication, media studies, science education, and hazard response to create a program that is both educational and provides a public service. Seismic Sleuths and Written in Stone are the harbingers of a new genre of earthquake programs that are the antithesis of the 1974 film Earthquake and the 2004 miniseries 10.5. Film producers and those in the earthquake education community are demonstrating that it is possible to tell an exciting story, inspire awareness, and encourage empowerment without sensationalism.

  7. Earthquake location in island arcs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engdahl, E.R.; Dewey, J.W.; Fujita, K.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive data set of selected teleseismic P-wave arrivals and local-network P- and S-wave arrivals from large earthquakes occurring at all depths within a small section of the central Aleutians is used to examine the general problem of earthquake location in island arcs. Reference hypocenters for this special data set are determined for shallow earthquakes from local-network data and for deep earthquakes from combined local and teleseismic data by joint inversion for structure and location. The high-velocity lithospheric slab beneath the central Aleutians may displace hypocenters that are located using spherically symmetric Earth models; the amount of displacement depends on the position of the earthquakes with respect to the slab and on whether local or teleseismic data are used to locate the earthquakes. Hypocenters for trench and intermediate-depth events appear to be minimally biased by the effects of slab structure on rays to teleseismic stations. However, locations of intermediate-depth events based on only local data are systematically displaced southwards, the magnitude of the displacement being proportional to depth. Shallow-focus events along the main thrust zone, although well located using only local-network data, are severely shifted northwards and deeper, with displacements as large as 50 km, by slab effects on teleseismic travel times. Hypocenters determined by a method that utilizes seismic ray tracing through a three-dimensional velocity model of the subduction zone, derived by thermal modeling, are compared to results obtained by the method of joint hypocenter determination (JHD) that formally assumes a laterally homogeneous velocity model over the source region and treats all raypath anomalies as constant station corrections to the travel-time curve. The ray-tracing method has the theoretical advantage that it accounts for variations in travel-time anomalies within a group of events distributed over a sizable region of a dipping, high-velocity lithospheric slab. In application, JHD has the practical advantage that it does not require the specification of a theoretical velocity model for the slab. Considering earthquakes within a 260 km long by 60 km wide section of the Aleutian main thrust zone, our results suggest that the theoretical velocity structure of the slab is presently not sufficiently well known that accurate locations can be obtained independently of locally recorded data. Using a locally recorded earthquake as a calibration event, JHD gave excellent results over the entire section of the main thrust zone here studied, without showing a strong effect that might be attributed to spatially varying source-station anomalies. We also calibrated the ray-tracing method using locally recorded data and obtained results generally similar to those obtained by JHD. ?? 1982.

  8. Electrifying rural India

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J.L.; Ullal, H.S.

    1999-12-01

    NREL personnel team with the Indian and US governments and an Indian NGO to bring photovoltaic electricity to rural residents of the Sundarbans in India. India is the world's second most populous country, quickly approaching one billion people. Although it has a well-developed electricity grid, many residents have little or no access to electricity and the benefits associated with it. Many rural areas, for example, are isolated from the grid and will not be connected for many years, if ever. One such area is the Sundarbans located in the delta region of the two great rivers, the Ganges and Brahmaputra. The region lies partially in India and partially in Bangladesh. It is estimated that 1.5 million people live in this area, crisscrossed by many islands and rivers, who have only marginal supplies of electricity generated primarily from diesel generators and batteries. Working with the regional non-governmental organization (NGO), the Ramakrishna Mission and the West Bengal Renewable Energy Development Agency, the governments of India and the US initiated a rural electrification initiative in Sundarbans. The initiative was designed to demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of photovoltaics (PV) to provide limited supplies of electricity for applications such as solar home lighting systems (SHS), water pumping, vaccine refrigeration, communications and economic development activities.

  9. Teaching English in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatia, Sugan Chand

    Proposed and actual constitutional changes made in 1963 and 1965 concerning the status of English in India are discussed in the light of nation-wide sociological implications. The author examines the position of Hindi and English as the official languages of the nation and comments on the continuing importance of English as the language of…

  10. Planting Trees in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, James M.

    Reforestation is desperately needed in India. Three-fourths of the country's ground surface is experiencing desertification, and primitive forests are being destroyed. Reforestation would help moderate temperatures, increase ground water levels, improve soil fertility, and alleviate a wood shortage. In the past, people from the United States, such…

  11. Can India's "Literate" Read?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kothari, Brij; Bandyopadhyay, Tathagata

    2010-01-01

    This paper takes a close look at India's literacy rate by exploring whether the officially "literate" can read and at what level. In a large sample, aged 7+, drawn from four Hindi-speaking states, two methods were used to measure literacy. One was the standard Census Method (CM) which relies on self-reporting and the other was a Reading Method…

  12. Women's Work in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devi, D. Radha; Ravindran, M.

    1983-01-01

    The proportion of women in paid employment in India is very low, and working women tend to be concentrated in low-wage, low-status, unskilled jobs, especially in agriculture. Even for the few women working in the modern sector, discrimination is pervasive, and change seems unlikely to occur soon. (IS)

  13. India's population in transition.

    PubMed

    Visaria, L; Visaria, P

    1995-10-01

    This demographic profile of India addresses fertility, family planning, and economic issues. India is described as a country shifting from economic policies of self-reliance to active involvement in international trade. Wealth has increased, particularly at higher educational levels, yet 25% still live below the official poverty line and almost 66% of Indian women are illiterate. The government program in family planning, which was instituted during the early 1950s, did not change the rate of natural increase, which remained stable at 2.2% over the past 30 years. 1993 marked the first time the growth rate decline to under 2%. The growth rate in 1995 was 1.9%. The total population is expected double in 36 years. Only Nigeria, Pakistan, and Bangladesh had a higher growth rate and higher fertility in 1995. India is geographically diverse (with the northern Himalayan mountain zone, the central alluvial plains, the western desert region, and the southern peninsula with forest, mountains, and plains). There are regional differences in the fertility rates, which range from replacement level in Kerala and Goa to 5.5 children in Uttar Pradesh. Fertility is expected to decline throughout India due to the slower pace of childbearing among women over the age of 35 years, the increase in contraceptive use, and increases in marriage age. Increased educational levels in India and its state variations are related to lower fertility. Literacy campaigns are considered to be effective means of increasing the educational levels of women. Urbanization is not expected to markedly affect fertility levels. Urban population, which is concentrated in a few large cities, remains a small proportion of total population. Greater shifts are evident in the transition from agriculture to other wage labor. Fertility is expected to decline as women's share of labor force activity increases. The major determinant of fertility decline in India is use of family planning, which has improved in access and use during the 1980s. If India is to keep a stable population under 1.6 billion in the future, Indians may have to accept only one child per family. PMID:12290691

  14. Dancing Earthquake Science Assists Recovery from the Christchurch Earthquakes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Egan, Candice J.; Quigley, Mark C.

    2015-01-01

    The 2010-2012 Christchurch (Canterbury) earthquakes in New Zealand caused loss of life and psychological distress in residents throughout the region. In 2011, student dancers of the Hagley Dance Company and dance professionals choreographed the performance "Move: A Seismic Journey" for the Christchurch Body Festival that explored…

  15. EERI Special Earthquake Report --December 2005 Learning from Earthquakes

    E-print Network

    Irfanoglu, Ayhan

    of the epicenter--is the largest city in the region, with a population of about 200,000, and was severely damaged. Dotted line: the 1972 Line of Con- trol. #12;2 EERI Special Earthquake Report -- December 2005 Landslides: There were numerous landslides, generally minor to moder- ate but massive in some instances, causing some

  16. Testing hypotheses of earthquake occurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, Y. Y.; Jackson, D. D.; Schorlemmer, D.; Gerstenberger, M.

    2003-12-01

    We present a relatively straightforward likelihood method for testing those earthquake hypotheses that can be stated as vectors of earthquake rate density in defined bins of area, magnitude, and time. We illustrate the method as it will be applied to the Regional Earthquake Likelihood Models (RELM) project of the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). Several earthquake forecast models are being developed as part of this project, and additional contributed forecasts are welcome. Various models are based on fault geometry and slip rates, seismicity, geodetic strain, and stress interactions. We would test models in pairs, requiring that both forecasts in a pair be defined over the same set of bins. Thus we offer a standard "menu" of bins and ground rules to encourage standardization. One menu category includes five-year forecasts of magnitude 5.0 and larger. Forecasts would be in the form of a vector of yearly earthquake rates on a 0.05 degree grid at the beginning of the test. Focal mechanism forecasts, when available, would be also be archived and used in the tests. The five-year forecast category may be appropriate for testing hypotheses of stress shadows from large earthquakes. Interim progress will be evaluated yearly, but final conclusions would be made on the basis of cumulative five-year performance. The second category includes forecasts of earthquakes above magnitude 4.0 on a 0.05 degree grid, evaluated and renewed daily. Final evaluation would be based on cumulative performance over five years. Other types of forecasts with different magnitude, space, and time sampling are welcome and will be tested against other models with shared characteristics. All earthquakes would be counted, and no attempt made to separate foreshocks, main shocks, and aftershocks. Earthquakes would be considered as point sources located at the hypocenter. For each pair of forecasts, we plan to compute alpha, the probability that the first would be wrongly rejected in favor of the second, and beta, the probability that the second would be wrongly rejected in favor of the first. Computing alpha and beta requires knowing the theoretical distribution of likelihood scores under each hypothesis, which we will estimate by simulations. Each forecast is given equal status; there is no "null hypothesis" which would be accepted by default. Forecasts and test results would be archived and posted on the RELM web site. The same methods can be applied to any region with adequate monitoring and sufficient earthquakes. If fewer than ten events are forecasted, the likelihood tests may not give definitive results. The tests do force certain requirements on the forecast models. Because the tests are based on absolute rates, stress models must be explicit about how stress increments affect past seismicity rates. Aftershocks of triggered events must be accounted for. Furthermore, the tests are sensitive to magnitude, so forecast models must specify the magnitude distribution of triggered events. Models should account for probable errors in magnitude and location by appropriate smoothing of the probabilities, as the tests will be "cold hearted:" near misses won't count.

  17. Earthquake Warning Performance in Vallejo for the South Napa Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurman, G.; Price, M.

    2014-12-01

    In 2002 and 2003, Seismic Warning Systems, Inc. installed first-generation QuakeGuardTM earthquake warning devices at all eight fire stations in Vallejo, CA. These devices are designed to detect the P-wave of an earthquake and initiate predetermined protective actions if the impending shaking is estimated at approximately Modifed Mercalli Intensity V or greater. At the Vallejo fire stations the devices were set up to sound an audio alert over the public address system and to command the equipment bay doors to open. In August 2014, after more than 11 years of operating in the fire stations with no false alarms, the five units that were still in use triggered correctly on the MW 6.0 South Napa earthquake, less than 16 km away. The audio alert sounded in all five stations, providing fire fighters with 1.5 to 2.5 seconds of warning before the arrival of the S-wave, and the equipment bay doors opened in three of the stations. In one station the doors were disconnected from the QuakeGuard device, and another station lost power before the doors opened completely. These problems highlight just a small portion of the complexity associated with realizing actionable earthquake warnings. The issues experienced in this earthquake have already been addressed in subsequent QuakeGuard product generations, with downstream connection monitoring and backup power for critical systems. The fact that the fire fighters in Vallejo were afforded even two seconds of warning at these epicentral distances results from the design of the QuakeGuard devices, which focuses on rapid false positive rejection and ground motion estimates. We discuss the performance of the ground motion estimation algorithms, with an emphasis on the accuracy and timeliness of the estimates at close epicentral distances.

  18. Air pollution and heat exposure study in the workplace in a glass manufacturing unit in India.

    PubMed

    Bhanarkar, A D; Srivastava, A; Joseph, A E; Kumar, Rakesh

    2005-10-01

    Air pollution in the workplace environment due to industrial operation have been found to cause serious occupational health hazard. Similarly, heat stress is still most neglected occupational hazard in the tropical and subtropical countries like India. The hot climate augments the heat exposure close to sources like furnaces. In this study an attempt is made to assess air pollution and heat exposure levels to workers in the workplace environment in glass manufacturing unit located in the State of Gujarat, India. Samples for workplace air quality were collected for SPM, SO(2), NO(2) and CO(2) at eight locations. Results of workplace air quality showed 8-hourly average concentrations of SPM: 165-9118 microg/m(3), SO(2): 6-9 microg/m(3) and NO(2): 5-42 microg/m(3), which were below the threshold limit values of workplace environment. The level of CO(2) in workplace air of the plant was found to be in the range 827-2886 microg/m(3), which was below TLV but much higher than the normal concentration for CO(2) in the air (585 mg/m(3)). Indoor heat exposure was studied near the furnace and at various locations in an industrial complex for glass manufacturing. The heat exposure parameters including the air temperature, the wet bulb temperature, and the globe parameters were measured. The Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT), an indicator of heat, exceeded ACGIH TLVs limits most of the time at all the locations in workplace areas. The recommended duration of work and rest have also been estimated. PMID:16240190

  19. REGIONAL SEISMIC AMPLITUDE MODELING AND TOMOGRAPHY FOR EARTHQUAKE-EXPLOSION DISCRIMINATION

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, W R; Pasyanos, M E; Matzel, E; Gok, R; Sweeney, J; Ford, S R; Rodgers, A J

    2008-07-08

    We continue exploring methodologies to improve earthquake-explosion discrimination using regional amplitude ratios such as P/S in a variety of frequency bands. Empirically we demonstrate that such ratios separate explosions from earthquakes using closely located pairs of earthquakes and explosions recorded on common, publicly available stations at test sites around the world (e.g. Nevada, Novaya Zemlya, Semipalatinsk, Lop Nor, India, Pakistan, and North Korea). We are also examining if there is any relationship between the observed P/S and the point source variability revealed by longer period full waveform modeling (e. g. Ford et al 2008). For example, regional waveform modeling shows strong tectonic release from the May 1998 India test, in contrast with very little tectonic release in the October 2006 North Korea test, but the P/S discrimination behavior appears similar in both events using the limited regional data available. While regional amplitude ratios such as P/S can separate events in close proximity, it is also empirically well known that path effects can greatly distort observed amplitudes and make earthquakes appear very explosion-like. Previously we have shown that the MDAC (Magnitude Distance Amplitude Correction, Walter and Taylor, 2001) technique can account for simple 1-D attenuation and geometrical spreading corrections, as well as magnitude and site effects. However in some regions 1-D path corrections are a poor approximation and we need to develop 2-D path corrections. Here we demonstrate a new 2-D attenuation tomography technique using the MDAC earthquake source model applied to a set of events and stations in both the Middle East and the Yellow Sea Korean Peninsula regions. We believe this new 2-D MDAC tomography has the potential to greatly improve earthquake-explosion discrimination, particularly in tectonically complex regions such as the Middle East. Monitoring the world for potential nuclear explosions requires characterizing seismic events and discriminating between natural and man-made seismic events, such as earthquakes and mining activities, and nuclear weapons testing. We continue developing, testing, and refining size-, distance-, and location-based regional seismic amplitude corrections to facilitate the comparison of all events that are recorded at a particular seismic station. These corrections, calibrated for each station, reduce amplitude measurement scatter and improve discrimination performance. We test the methods on well-known (ground truth) datasets in the U.S. and then apply them to the uncalibrated stations in Eurasia, Africa, and other regions of interest to improve underground nuclear test monitoring capability.

  20. Predecessors of the giant 1960 Chile earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cisternas, M.; Atwater, B.F.; Torrejon, F.; Sawai, Y.; Machuca, G.; Lagos, M.; Eipert, A.; Youlton, C.; Salgado, I.; Kamataki, T.; Shishikura, M.; Rajendran, C.P.; Malik, J.K.; Rizal, Y.; Husni, M.

    2005-01-01

    It is commonly thought that the longer the time since last earthquake, the larger the next earthquake's slip will be. But this logical predictor of earthquake size, unsuccessful for large earthquakes on a strike-slip fault, fails also with the giant 1960 Chile earthquake of magnitude 9.5 (ref. 3). Although the time since the preceding earthquake spanned 123 years (refs 4, 5), the estimated slip in 1960, which occurred on a fault between the Nazca and South American tectonic plates, equalled 250-350 years' worth of the plate motion. Thus the average interval between such giant earthquakes on this fault should span several centuries. Here we present evidence that such long intervals were indeed typical of the last two millennia. We use buried soils and sand layers as records of tectonic subsidence and tsunami inundation at an estuary midway along the 1960 rupture. In these records, the 1960 earthquake ended a recurrence interval that had begun almost four centuries before, with an earthquake documented by Spanish conquistadors in 1575. Two later earthquakes, in 1737 and 1837, produced little if any subsidence or tsunami at the estuary and they therefore probably left the fault partly loaded with accumulated plate motion that the 1960 earthquake then expended. ?? 2005 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Pre-earthquake magnetic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoville, J.; Heraud, J.; Freund, F.

    2015-08-01

    A semiconductor model of rocks is shown to describe unipolar magnetic pulses, a phenomenon that has been observed prior to earthquakes. These pulses are suspected to be generated deep in the Earth's crust, in and around the hypocentral volume, days or even weeks before earthquakes. Their extremely long wavelength allows them to pass through kilometers of rock. Interestingly, when the sources of these pulses are triangulated, the locations coincide with the epicenters of future earthquakes. We couple a drift-diffusion semiconductor model to a magnetic field in order to describe the electromagnetic effects associated with electrical currents flowing within rocks. The resulting system of equations is solved numerically and it is seen that a volume of rock may act as a diode that produces transient currents when it switches bias. These unidirectional currents are expected to produce transient unipolar magnetic pulses similar in form, amplitude, and duration to those observed before earthquakes, and this suggests that the pulses could be the result of geophysical semiconductor processes.

  2. Detecting Earthquakes--Part 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenberg, C.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Basic concepts associated with seismic wave propagation through the earth and the location of seismic events were explained in part 1 (appeared in January 1983 issue). This part focuses on the construction of a student seismometer for detecting earthquakes and underground nuclear explosions anywhere on the earth's surface. (Author/JN)

  3. Earthquake Safety: Activities for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Washington, DC.

    Lessons on earthquake safety involving planning, preparation, and practice are presented in this booklet for teachers. Included are classroom activities designed for K-6 students, teaching notes, "Learning Links" that summarize interdisciplinary connections, a set of 15 masters for reproducing transparencies, handouts, and worksheets. Part 1 shows…

  4. Fault heterogeneity and earthquake scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetherington, A.; Steacy, S.

    2006-12-01

    There is an on-going debate in the seismological community as to whether stress drop is independent of earthquake size. The problem is generally illustrated in plots of seismic moment vs. source radius and in some instances the same diagram has been used to support either the argument that stress drop scales with increasing earthquake size or that it is constant. Data from multiple studies tend to support the constant stress drop view whereas results from small data sets tend to support the opposite. Here we investigate this question in a simple 2D cellular automaton that includes heterogeneity. Each cell in the 512 x 64 model is assigned a maximum and minimum breaking strength, and the distributions of these strengths are drawn from either random or fractal distributions. We find that when the range of heterogeneity is low (i.e. the difference between maximum and minimum breaking strength), the scaling approaches that of constant stress drop. However, clear deviations from the constant stress drop model are observed when the range of heterogeneity is large. Further, fractal distributions of strength show more significant scaling than do random ones. These results suggest that the potential departures in earthquake scaling may be real and may reflect heterogeneity in the earthquake source process.

  5. Hypothesis testing and earthquake prediction.

    PubMed

    Jackson, D D

    1996-04-30

    Requirements for testing include advance specification of the conditional rate density (probability per unit time, area, and magnitude) or, alternatively, probabilities for specified intervals of time, space, and magnitude. Here I consider testing fully specified hypotheses, with no parameter adjustments or arbitrary decisions allowed during the test period. Because it may take decades to validate prediction methods, it is worthwhile to formulate testable hypotheses carefully in advance. Earthquake prediction generally implies that the probability will be temporarily higher than normal. Such a statement requires knowledge of "normal behavior"--that is, it requires a null hypothesis. Hypotheses can be tested in three ways: (i) by comparing the number of actual earth-quakes to the number predicted, (ii) by comparing the likelihood score of actual earthquakes to the predicted distribution, and (iii) by comparing the likelihood ratio to that of a null hypothesis. The first two tests are purely self-consistency tests, while the third is a direct comparison of two hypotheses. Predictions made without a statement of probability are very difficult to test, and any test must be based on the ratio of earthquakes in and out of the forecast regions. PMID:11607663

  6. Hypothesis testing and earthquake prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, D D

    1996-01-01

    Requirements for testing include advance specification of the conditional rate density (probability per unit time, area, and magnitude) or, alternatively, probabilities for specified intervals of time, space, and magnitude. Here I consider testing fully specified hypotheses, with no parameter adjustments or arbitrary decisions allowed during the test period. Because it may take decades to validate prediction methods, it is worthwhile to formulate testable hypotheses carefully in advance. Earthquake prediction generally implies that the probability will be temporarily higher than normal. Such a statement requires knowledge of "normal behavior"--that is, it requires a null hypothesis. Hypotheses can be tested in three ways: (i) by comparing the number of actual earth-quakes to the number predicted, (ii) by comparing the likelihood score of actual earthquakes to the predicted distribution, and (iii) by comparing the likelihood ratio to that of a null hypothesis. The first two tests are purely self-consistency tests, while the third is a direct comparison of two hypotheses. Predictions made without a statement of probability are very difficult to test, and any test must be based on the ratio of earthquakes in and out of the forecast regions. PMID:11607663

  7. Dim prospects for earthquake prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geller, Robert J.

    I was misquoted by C. Lomnitz's [1998] Forum letter (Eos, August 4, 1998, p. 373), which said: [I wonder whether Sasha Gusev [1998] actually believes that branding earthquake prediction a ‘proven nonscience’ [Geller, 1997a] is a paradigm for others to copy.”Readers are invited to verify for themselves that neither “proven nonscience” norv any similar phrase was used by Geller [1997a].

  8. A note on evaluating VAN earthquake predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselentis, G.-Akis; Melis, Nicos S.

    The evaluation of the success level of an earthquake prediction method should not be based on approaches that apply generalized strict statistical laws and avoid the specific nature of the earthquake phenomenon. Fault rupture processes cannot be compared to gambling processes. The outcome of the present note is that even an ideal earthquake prediction method is still shown to be a matter of a “chancy” association between precursors and earthquakes if we apply the same procedure proposed by Mulargia and Gasperini [1992] in evaluating VAN earthquake predictions. Each individual VAN prediction has to be evaluated separately, taking always into account the specific circumstances and information available. The success level of epicenter prediction should depend on the earthquake magnitude, and magnitude and time predictions may depend on earthquake clustering and the tectonic regime respectively.

  9. Earthquakes and the urban environment. Volume III

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, G.L.

    1980-01-01

    Because of the complex nature of earthquake effects, current investigations encompass many disciplines, including those of both the physical and social sciences. Research activities center on such diversified topics as earthquake mechanics, earthquake prediction and control, the prompt and accurate detection of tsunamis (seismic sea waves), earthquake-resistant construction, seismic building code improvements, land use zoning, earthquake risk and hazard perception, disaster preparedness, plus the study of the concerns and fears of people who have experienced the effects of an earthquake. This monograph attempts to amalgamate recent research input comprising the vivifying components of urban seismology at a level useful to those having an interest in the earthquake and its effects upon an urban environment. Volume 3 contains chapters on seismic planning, social aspects and future prospects.

  10. Automatic earthquake confirmation for early warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuyuk, H. S.; Colombelli, S.; Zollo, A.; Allen, R. M.; Erdik, M. O.

    2015-07-01

    Earthquake early warning studies are shifting real-time seismology in earthquake science. They provide methods to rapidly assess earthquakes to predict damaging ground shaking. Preventing false alarms from these systems is key. Here we developed a simple, robust algorithm, Authorizing GRound shaking for Earthquake Early warning Systems (AGREEs), to reduce falsely issued alarms. This is a network threshold-based algorithm, which differs from existing approaches based on apparent velocity of P and S waves. AGREEs is designed to function as an external module to support existing earthquake early warning systems (EEWSs) and filters out the false events, by evaluating actual shaking near the epicenter. Our retrospective analyses of the 2009 L'Aquila and 2012 Emilia earthquakes show that AGREEs could help an EEWS by confirming the epicentral intensity. Furthermore, AGREEs is able to effectively identify three false events due to a storm, a teleseismic earthquake, and broken sensors in Irpinia Seismic Network, Italy.

  11. Earthquake swarms in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, S. G.; Pritchard, M. E.; Lohman, R. B.

    2011-10-01

    We searched for earthquake swarms in South America between 1973 and 2009 using the global Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) catalogue. Seismicity rates vary greatly over the South American continent, so we employ a manual search approach that aims to be insensitive to spatial and temporal scales or to the number of earthquakes in a potential swarm. We identify 29 possible swarms involving 5-180 earthquakes each (with total swarm moment magnitudes between 4.7 and 6.9) within a range of tectonic and volcanic locations. Some of the earthquake swarms on the subduction megathrust occur as foreshocks and delineate the limits of main shock rupture propagation for large earthquakes, including the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, Chile and 2007 Mw 8.1 Pisco, Peru earthquakes. Also, subduction megathrust swarms commonly occur at the location of subduction of aseismic ridges, including areas of long-standing seismic gaps in Peru and Ecuador. The magnitude-frequency relationship of swarms we observe appears to agree with previously determined magnitude-frequency scaling for swarms in Japan. We examine geodetic data covering five of the swarms to search for an aseismic component. Only two of these swarms (at Copiapó, Chile, in 2006 and near Ticsani Volcano, Peru, in 2005) have suitable satellite-based Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) observations. We invert the InSAR geodetic signal and find that the ground deformation associated with these swarms does not require a significant component of aseismic fault slip or magmatic intrusion. Three swarms in the vicinity of the volcanic arc in southern Peru appear to be triggered by the Mw= 8.5 2001 Peru earthquake, but predicted static Coulomb stress changes due to the main shock were very small at the swarm locations, suggesting that dynamic triggering processes may have had a role in their occurrence. Although we identified few swarms in volcanic regions, we suggest that particularly large volcanic swarms (those that could be detected using the PDE catalogue) occur in areas of infrequent eruption and may be related to large regional fault zones.

  12. Earthquake precursors: activation or quiescence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rundle, John B.; Holliday, James R.; Yoder, Mark; Sachs, Michael K.; Donnellan, Andrea; Turcotte, Donald L.; Tiampo, Kristy F.; Klein, William; Kellogg, Louise H.

    2011-10-01

    We discuss the long-standing question of whether the probability for large earthquake occurrence (magnitudes m > 6.0) is highest during time periods of smaller event activation, or highest during time periods of smaller event quiescence. The physics of the activation model are based on an idea from the theory of nucleation, that a small magnitude earthquake has a finite probability of growing into a large earthquake. The physics of the quiescence model is based on the idea that the occurrence of smaller earthquakes (here considered as magnitudes m > 3.5) may be due to a mechanism such as critical slowing down, in which fluctuations in systems with long-range interactions tend to be suppressed prior to large nucleation events. To illuminate this question, we construct two end-member forecast models illustrating, respectively, activation and quiescence. The activation model assumes only that activation can occur, either via aftershock nucleation or triggering, but expresses no choice as to which mechanism is preferred. Both of these models are in fact a means of filtering the seismicity time-series to compute probabilities. Using 25 yr of data from the California-Nevada catalogue of earthquakes, we show that of the two models, activation and quiescence, the latter appears to be the better model, as judged by backtesting (by a slight but not significant margin). We then examine simulation data from a topologically realistic earthquake model for California seismicity, Virtual California. This model includes not only earthquakes produced from increases in stress on the fault system, but also background and off-fault seismicity produced by a BASS-ETAS driving mechanism. Applying the activation and quiescence forecast models to the simulated data, we come to the opposite conclusion. Here, the activation forecast model is preferred to the quiescence model, presumably due to the fact that the BASS component of the model is essentially a model for activated seismicity. These results lead to the (weak) conclusion that California seismicity may be characterized more by quiescence than by activation, and that BASS-ETAS models may not be robustly applicable to the real data.

  13. Is A Great Earthquake Imminent Or Not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, C.; Xing, H. L.

    2007-12-01

    For the earthquake prone Indonesia, the question about whether there will be a big earthquake is probably insignificant. Instead, a more pertinent question should be when it will happen. In the aftermath of the 2004 M9 Sumatra-Andaman Sea Earthquake, the M8.4 earthquake that occurred on September 12th, 2007 has certainly brought some panic. Because this earthquake occurred within a so-called gap where some great historical earthquakes occurred several hundreds of years ago, a very natural question is raised: Is a bigger earthquake treading the heel of this event? The author is trying to answer this question using the LURR method. By examining the temporal and spatial pattern of LURR evolution in Sumatra region, significant LURR anomalies appeared not only prior to the 2004 mainshock, but also prior to the 2006 M7.7 South Java earthquake. Moreover, all the earthquakes larger than M7.0 after the 2006 Java earthquake (2006.7.17 M7. 7) occurred in the predicted zone in the PAGEOPH paper which submitted and accepted before the recent earthquakes occurred (also see the follwing web site). Based on the currently availble data, we find that a bigger earthquake is unlikely to occur in the near future. Although the LURR temporal pattern shows high anomaly before the mainshock of the M8.4 earthquake, the LURR value has dropped since the mainshock, indicating the stability in this region is being restored. On the other hand, the spatial pattern shows the area around the 2004 M9 earthquake has higher LURR value than other areas, indicating that the northern part of Sumatra is still the most unstable. Because of insufficient data in this region, the result and the conclusion are preliminary and subject to further revision when more data is available.

  14. Recent earthquakes in northern New York

    SciTech Connect

    Revetta, F.A.; Bockus, C.; O'Brian, B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Massena, New York area located along the St. Lawrence River in northern New York has been the site of significant earthquake activity including the largest earthquake in New York (m = 6.0) on September 5, 1944. Historic earthquake data indicates the Cornwall-Massena area is a region of relatively high seismic activity, and the earthquake activity has been persistent for over a 400 year period. During the past year eleven small earthquakes have been recorded by the Potsdam Seismic Network in northern New York. Four of these earthquakes had epicenters located in the Massena-Cornwall area. One epicenter was located along the Carthage-Colton Mylonite Zone and one epicenter was located n the epicentral region of the October 7, 1984 Goodnow earthquake. Five earthquakes had epicenters located in Ontario and Quebec. These earthquake epicenters lie in a belt of seismicity that extends north-westerly from the northern Adirondacks into the Canadian Shield of western Quebec. Several explanations that have been presented to explain these earthquakes are (1) mafic intrusions (2) unmapped northwest trending faults (3) extension of the New England seamount chain and (4) crustal fractures due to the area passing over a hotspot. Four earthquakes in the Massena area lie very near extensions of the Gloucester and Winchester Spring faults into New York and may be related to the faults. Focal mechanism solutions of two earthquakes indicate thrusting along NW striking fault planes. Another possibility is the earthquakes are related to the Carthage-Colton Mylonite Zone. One earthquake is within four kms of the CCMZ and if the zone is extended northward beneath the lower Paleozoics, it passes through the epicenters on the Cornwall-Massena area.

  15. Impact of Three-Parameter Weibull Models in Probabilistic Assessment of Earthquake Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasari, Sumanta; Dikshit, Onkar

    2014-07-01

    This paper investigates the suitability of a three-parameter (scale, shape, and location) Weibull distribution in probabilistic assessment of earthquake hazards. The performance is also compared with two other popular models from same Weibull family, namely the two-parameter Weibull model and the inverse Weibull model. A complete and homogeneous earthquake catalog ( Yadav et al. in Pure Appl Geophys 167:1331-1342, 2010) of 20 events ( M ? 7.0), spanning the period 1846 to 1995 from north-east India and its surrounding region (20°-32°N and 87°-100°E), is used to perform this study. The model parameters are initially estimated from graphical plots and later confirmed from statistical estimations such as maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and method of moments (MoM). The asymptotic variance-covariance matrix for the MLE estimated parameters is further calculated on the basis of the Fisher information matrix (FIM). The model suitability is appraised using different statistical goodness-of-fit tests. For the study area, the estimated conditional probability for an earthquake within a decade comes out to be very high (?0.90) for an elapsed time of 18 years (i.e., 2013). The study also reveals that the use of location parameter provides more flexibility to the three-parameter Weibull model in comparison to the two-parameter Weibull model. Therefore, it is suggested that three-parameter Weibull model has high importance in empirical modeling of earthquake recurrence and seismic hazard assessment.

  16. Engaging Students in Earthquake Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, I. E.; Benthien, M.

    2004-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center Communication, Education, and Outreach program (SCEC CEO) has been collaborating with the University of Southern California (USC) Joint Education Project (JEP) and the Education Consortium of Central Los Angeles (ECCLA) to work directly with the teachers and schools in the local community around USC. The community surrounding USC is 57 % Hispanic (US Census, 2000) and 21% African American (US Census, 2000). Through the partnership with ECCLA SCEC has created a three week enrichment intersession program, targeting disadvantaged students at the fourth/fifth grade level, dedicated entirely to earthquakes. SCEC builds partnerships with the intersession teachers, working together to actively engage the students in learning about earthquakes. SCEC provides a support system for the teachers, supplying them with the necessary content background as well as classroom manipulatives. SCEC goes into the classrooms with guest speakers and take the students out of the classroom on two field trips. There are four intersession programs each year. SCEC is also working with USC's Joint Education Project program. The JEP program has been recognized as one of the "oldest and best organized" Service-Learning programs in the country (TIME Magazine and the Princeton Review, 2000). Through this partnership SCEC is providing USC students with the necessary tools to go out to the local schools and teach students of all grade levels about earthquakes. SCEC works with the USC students to design engaging lesson plans that effectively convey content regarding earthquakes. USC students can check out hands-on/interactive materials to use in the classrooms from the SCEC Resource Library. In both these endeavors SCEC has expanded our outreach to the local community. SCEC is reaching over 200 minority children each year through our partnerships, and this number will increase as our programs grow.

  17. Physical Environment and Social Context: An Approach to Planning for Rural Settlement in Gujarat. Development Series Report 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Jay A.; Vijayan, K.

    Provisional conclusions concerning the interpenetration of social and physical aspects of rural planning research, conducted by the School of Planning (Ahmedabad, India) are considered in this report. Three principal elements whose implementation and maintenance determine physical development are identified: (1) improvements in infrastructure; (2)…

  18. Earthquake engineering research needs in light of lessons learned from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Masayoshi; Lavan, Oren; Kurata, Masahiro; Luo, Yunbiao

    2014-08-01

    Earthquake engineering research and development have received much attention since the first half of the twentieth century. This valuable research presented a huge step forward in understanding earthquake hazard mitigation, which resulted in appreciable reduction of the effects of past earthquakes. Nevertheless, the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and the subsequent tsunami resulted in major damage. This paper presents the timeline of earthquake mitigation and recovery, as seen by the authors. Possible research directions where the authors think that many open questions still remain are identified. These are primarily based on the important lessons learned from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake.

  19. Severe Flooding in India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Floods devestated parts of eastern India along the Brahmaputra River in June 2000. In some tributaries of the Brahmaputra, the water reached more than 5 meters (16.5 feet) above flood stage. At least 40 residents died, and the flood waters destroyed a bridge linking the region to the rest of India. High water also threatened endangered Rhinos in Kaziranga National Park. Flooded areas are shown in red in the above image. The map was derived from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data taken on June 15, 2000. For more information on observing floods with satellites, see: Using Satellites to Keep our Head above Water and the Dartmouth Flood Observatory Image by the Dartmouth Flood Observatory

  20. India's Worsening Uranium Shortage

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis, Michael M.

    2007-01-15

    As a result of NSG restrictions, India cannot import the natural uranium required to fuel its Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs); consequently, it is forced to rely on the expediency of domestic uranium production. However, domestic production from mines and byproduct sources has not kept pace with demand from commercial reactors. This shortage has been officially confirmed by the Indian Planning Commission’s Mid-Term Appraisal of the country’s current Five Year Plan. The report stresses that as a result of the uranium shortage, Indian PHWR load factors have been continually decreasing. The Uranium Corporation of India Ltd (UCIL) operates a number of underground mines in the Singhbhum Shear Zone of Jharkhand, and it is all processed at a single mill in Jaduguda. UCIL is attempting to aggrandize operations by establishing new mines and mills in other states, but the requisite permit-gathering and development time will defer production until at least 2009. A significant portion of India’s uranium comes from byproduct sources, but a number of these are derived from accumulated stores that are nearing exhaustion. A current maximum estimate of indigenous uranium production is 430t/yr (230t from mines and 200t from byproduct sources); whereas, the current uranium requirement for Indian PHWRs is 455t/yr (depending on plant capacity factor). This deficit is exacerbated by the additional requirements of the Indian weapons program. Present power generation capacity of Indian nuclear plants is 4350 MWe. The power generation target set by the Indian Department of Atomic Energy (DAE) is 20,000 MWe by the year 2020. It is expected that around half of this total will be provided by PHWRs using indigenously supplied uranium with the bulk of the remainder provided by breeder reactors or pressurized water reactors using imported low-enriched uranium.

  1. Dengue in India

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Nivedita; Srivastava, Sakshi; Jain, Amita; Chaturvedi, Umesh C.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue virus belongs to family Flaviviridae, having four serotypes that spread by the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. It causes a wide spectrum of illness from mild asymptomatic illness to severe fatal dengue haemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS). Approximately 2.5 billion people live in dengue-risk regions with about 100 million new cases each year worldwide. The cumulative dengue diseases burden has attained an unprecedented proportion in recent times with sharp increase in the size of human population at risk. Dengue disease presents highly complex pathophysiological, economic and ecologic problems. In India, the first epidemic of clinical dengue-like illness was recorded in Madras (now Chennai) in 1780 and the first virologically proved epidemic of dengue fever (DF) occurred in Calcutta (now Kolkata) and Eastern Coast of India in 1963-1964. During the last 50 years a large number of physicians have treated and described dengue disease in India, but the scientific studies addressing various problems of dengue disease have been carried out at limited number of centres. Achievements of Indian scientists are considerable; however, a lot remain to be achieved for creating an impact. This paper briefly reviews the extent of work done by various groups of scientists in this country. PMID:23041731

  2. Medicine in South India

    PubMed Central

    McHenry, Malcolm M.

    1978-01-01

    A three-month sabbatical allowed a superficial overview of Indian medical history and practice. As in Western nations, cost is a major determinant of health care delivery in India; poverty and fiscal shortages, however, deny care to many. The education of Indian physicians is similar to that in Western nations and a high level of clinical competence is seen. However, physician compensation is woefully low by Western standards. India possesses its own indigenous medical systems, purported to be the oldest in the world and predating Hippocrates by several millenia. Most Indians are cared for by native practitioners whose medical techniques are intricately related to the Hindu and Islamic religions. Many of their herbal medicines have been assimilated into contemporary Western practice. Diseases unknown to us except by textbooks are commonly seen and effectively treated. On the other hand, Western diseases such as coronary arteriosclerosis are not uncommon in a land of massive overpopulation and malnutrition. The humbling aspect of this experience is the realization that medical practice dating back several millenia can be made more modern and carried out competently by contemporary physicians. A Western physician working in India finds an unparalleled variety of disease in a totally different medical-religious environment allowing him to reorganize his priorities and to rediscover himself in the world within which he lives. PMID:716392

  3. MENTAL HOSPITALS IN INDIA

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, K.; Venugopal, D.; Alimchandani, A.K.

    2000-01-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present status The earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals. Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  4. Paragonimus & paragonimiasis in India

    PubMed Central

    Singh, T. Shantikumar; Sugiyama, Hiromu; Rangsiruji, Achariya

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the discovery of the first indigenous case in 1981, paragonimiasis has gained recognition as a significant food borne parasitic zoonosis in India. The data available on the occurrence of paragonimiasis, until today, may be just the tip of an iceberg as the study areas covered were restricted to Northeast Indian States. Nevertheless, the results of research on paragonimiasis in India have revealed valuable information in epidemiology, life cycle, pathobiology and speciation of Indian Paragonimus. Potamiscus manipurensis, Alcomon superciliosum and Maydelliathelphusa lugubris were identified as the crab hosts of Paragonimus. Paragonimus miyazakii manipurinus n. sub sp., P. hueit’ungensis, P. skrjabini, P. heterotremus, P. compactus, and P. westermani have been described from India. P. heterotremus was found as the causative agent of human paragonimiasis. Ingestion of undercooked crabs and raw crab extract was the major mode of infection. Pulmonary paragonimiasis was the commonest clinical manifestation while pleural effusion and subcutaneous nodules were the common extra-pulmonary forms. Clinico-radiological features of pulmonary paragonimiasis simulated pulmonary tuberculosis. Intradermal test, ELISA and Dot-immunogold filtration assay (DIGFA) were used for diagnosis and epidemiological survey of paragonimiasis. Phylogenitically, Indian Paragonimus species, although nested within the respective clade were distantly related to others within the clade. PMID:22960885

  5. Carbon taxes and India

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H.; Shukla, P.R.

    1994-07-01

    Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

  6. THE KASHMIR EARTHQUAKE OF OCTOBER 8, 2005 A QUICKLOOK REPORT

    E-print Network

    Masud, Arif

    THE KASHMIR EARTHQUAKE OF OCTOBER 8, 2005 A QUICKLOOK REPORT Ahmad Jan Durrani Amr Salah Elnashai Youssef M.A. Hashash Sung Jig Kim Arif Masud Mid-America Earthquake Center University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Mid-America Earthquake CenterMid-America Earthquake Center #12;2Mid-America Earthquake

  7. Napa earthquake: An earthquake in a highly connected world

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossu, R.; Steed, R.; Mazet-Roux, G.; Roussel, F.

    2014-12-01

    The Napa earthquake recently occurred close to Silicon Valley. This makes it a good candidate to study what social networks, wearable objects and website traffic analysis (flashsourcing) can tell us about the way eyewitnesses react to ground shaking. In the first part, we compare the ratio of people publishing tweets and with the ratio of people visiting EMSC (European Mediterranean Seismological Centre) real time information website in the first minutes following the earthquake occurrence to the results published by Jawbone, which show that the proportion of people waking up depends (naturally) on the epicentral distance. The key question to evaluate is whether the proportions of inhabitants tweeting or visiting the EMSC website are similar to the proportion of people waking up as shown by the Jawbone data. If so, this supports the premise that all methods provide a reliable image of the relative ratio of people waking up. The second part of the study focuses on the reaction time for both Twitter and EMSC website access. We show, similarly to what was demonstrated for the Mineral, Virginia, earthquake (Bossu et al., 2014), that hit times on the EMSC website follow the propagation of the P waves and that 2 minutes of website traffic is sufficient to determine the epicentral location of an earthquake on the other side of the Atlantic. We also compare with the publication time of messages on Twitter. Finally, we check whether the number of tweets and the number of visitors relative to the number of inhabitants is correlated to the local level of shaking. Together these results will tell us whether the reaction of eyewitnesses to ground shaking as observed through Twitter and the EMSC website analysis is tool specific (i.e. specific to Twitter or EMSC website) or whether they do reflect people's actual reactions.

  8. Istanbul Earthquake Early Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alcik, H.; Mert, A.; Ozel, O.; Erdik, M.

    2007-12-01

    As part of the preparations for the future earthquake in Istanbul a Rapid Response and Early Warning system in the metropolitan area is in operation. For the Early Warning system ten strong motion stations were installed as close as possible to the fault zone. Continuous on-line data from these stations via digital radio modem provide early warning for potentially disastrous earthquakes. Considering the complexity of fault rupture and the short fault distances involved, a simple and robust Early Warning algorithm, based on the exceedance of specified threshold time domain amplitude levels is implemented. The band-pass filtered accelerations and the cumulative absolute velocity (CAV) are compared with specified threshold levels. When any acceleration or CAV (on any channel) in a given station exceeds specific threshold values it is considered a vote. Whenever we have 2 station votes within selectable time interval, after the first vote, the first alarm is declared. In order to specify the appropriate threshold levels a data set of near field strong ground motions records form Turkey and the world has been analyzed. Correlations among these thresholds in terms of the epicenter distance the magnitude of the earthquake have been studied. The encrypted early warning signals will be communicated to the respective end users. Depending on the location of the earthquake (initiation of fault rupture) and the recipient facility the alarm time can be as high as about 8s. The first users of the early warning signal will be the Istanbul gas company (IGDAS) and the metro line using the immersed tube tunnel (MARMARAY). Other prospective users are power plants and power distribution systems, nuclear research facilities, critical chemical factories, petroleum facilities and high-rise buildings. In this study, different algorithms based on PGA, CAV and various definitions of instrumental intensity will be discussed and triggering threshold levels of these parameters will be studied. More complex algorithms based on artificial neural networks (ANN) can also be used [Boese et al., 2003]. ANN approach considers the problem of earthquake early-warning as a pattern recognition task. The seismic patterns can be defined by the shape and frequency content of the parts of accelerograms that are available at each time step. ANN can extract the engineering parameters PGA, CAV and instrumental intensity from these patterns, and map them to any location in the surrounded area. Boese M., Erdik, M., Wenzel, F. (2003), Artificial Neural Networks for Earthquake Early Warning, Proceedings AGU2003 Abstracts, S42B-0155

  9. A smartphone application for earthquakes that matter!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossu, Rémy; Etivant, Caroline; Roussel, Fréderic; Mazet-Roux, Gilles; Steed, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Smartphone applications have swiftly become one of the most popular tools for rapid reception of earthquake information for the public, some of them having been downloaded more than 1 million times! The advantages are obvious: wherever someone's own location is, they can be automatically informed when an earthquake has struck. Just by setting a magnitude threshold and an area of interest, there is no longer the need to browse the internet as the information reaches you automatically and instantaneously! One question remains: are the provided earthquake notifications always relevant for the public? What are the earthquakes that really matters to laypeople? One clue may be derived from some newspaper reports that show that a while after damaging earthquakes many eyewitnesses scrap the application they installed just after the mainshock. Why? Because either the magnitude threshold is set too high and many felt earthquakes are missed, or it is set too low and the majority of the notifications are related to unfelt earthquakes thereby only increasing anxiety among the population at each new update. Felt and damaging earthquakes are the ones that matter the most for the public (and authorities). They are the ones of societal importance even when of small magnitude. A smartphone application developed by EMSC (Euro-Med Seismological Centre) with the financial support of the Fondation MAIF aims at providing suitable notifications for earthquakes by collating different information threads covering tsunamigenic, potentially damaging and felt earthquakes. Tsunamigenic earthquakes are considered here to be those ones that are the subject of alert or information messages from the PTWC (Pacific Tsunami Warning Centre). While potentially damaging earthquakes are identified through an automated system called EQIA (Earthquake Qualitative Impact Assessment) developed and operated at EMSC. This rapidly assesses earthquake impact by comparing the population exposed to each expected level of shaking intensity with empirical models of fatality losses calibrated on past earthquakes in each country. Non-seismic detections and macroseismic questionnaires collected online are combined to identify as many as possible of the felt earthquakes regardless their magnitude. Non seismic detections include Twitter earthquake detections, developed by the US Geological Survey, where the number of tweets containing the keyword "earthquake" is monitored in real time and flashsourcing, developed by the EMSC, which detect traffic surges on its rapid earthquake information website caused by the natural convergence of eyewitnesses who rush to the Internet to investigate the cause of the shaking that they have just felt. All together, we estimate that the number of detected felt earthquakes is around 1 000 per year, compared with the 35 000 earthquakes annually reported by the EMSC! Felt events are already the subject of the web page "Latest significant earthquakes" on EMSC website (http://www.emsc-csem.org/Earthquake/significant_earthquakes.php) and of a dedicated Twitter service @LastQuake. We will present the identification process of the earthquakes that matter, the smartphone application itself (to be released in May) and its future evolutions.

  10. Identifying the source of tar balls deposited along the beaches of Goa in 2013 and comparing with historical data collected along the West Coast of India.

    PubMed

    Suneel, V; Vethamony, P; Naik, B G; Krishna, M S; Jadhav, Lakshmikant

    2015-09-15

    Deposition of oil residues, also known as tar balls, is a seasonal phenomenon, and it occurs only in the southwest monsoon season along the west coast of India. This has become a serious environmental issue, as Goa is a global tourist destination. The present work aims at identifying the source oil of the tar balls that consistently depositing along the Goa coast using multi-marker fingerprint technique. In this context, the tar ball samples collected in May 2013 from 9 beaches of Goa coast and crude oils from different oil fields and grounded ship were subject to multi-marker analyses such as n-alkanes, pentacyclic terpanes, regular steranes, compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) and principle component analysis (PCA). The n-alkane weathering index shows that samples have been weathered to various degrees, and the status of weathering is moderate. Since the international tanker route passes closer to the west coast of India (WCI), it is generally presumed that tanker wash is the source of the tar balls. We found that 2010/2011 tar balls are as tanker wash, but the present study demonstrates that the Bombay High (BH) oil fields can also contribute to oil contamination (tar balls) along ? 650 km stretch of the WCI, running from Gujarat in the north to Goa in the south. The simulated trajectories show that all the particles released in April traveled in the southeast direction, and by May, they reached the Goa coast with the influence of circulation of Indian monsoon system. PMID:25965045

  11. Long-term changes of earthquake inter-event times and low-frequency earthquake recurrence in central California

    E-print Network

    Frankel, Kurt L.

    Long-term changes of earthquake inter-event times and low-frequency earthquake recurrence Keywords: nonvolcanic tremor low-frequency earthquake Parkfield earthquake long-term changes episodic tremor and slip central California a b s t r a c t The temporal evolution of earthquake inter-event time

  12. Unified scaling law for earthquakes

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Kim; Danon, Leon; Scanlon, Tim; Bak, Per

    2002-01-01

    We propose and verify a unified scaling law that provides a framework for viewing the probability of the occurrence of earthquakes in a given region and for a given cutoff magnitude. The law shows that earthquakes occur in hierarchical correlated clusters, which overlap with other spatially separated correlated clusters for large enough time periods and areas. For a small enough region and time-scale, only a single correlated group can be sampled. The law links together the Gutenberg–Richter Law, the Omori Law of aftershocks, and the fractal dimensions of the faults. The Omori Law is shown to be the short time limit of general hierarchical phenomenon containing the statistics of both “main shocks” and “aftershocks,” indicating that they are created by the same mechanism. PMID:11875203

  13. A resonance mechanism of earthquakes

    E-print Network

    Flambaum, V V

    2015-01-01

    It had been observed in [1] that there are periodic 4-6 hours pulses of ? 200 ?Hz seismogravita- tional oscillations ( SGO ) before 95 % of powerful earthquakes. We explain this by beating between an oscillation eigenmode of a whole tectonic plate and a local eigenmode of an active zone which tranfers the oscillation energy from the tectonic plate to the active zone causing the eathrquake. Oscillation frequencies of the plate and ones of the active zone are tuned to a resonance by an additional pressure applied to the active zone due to collision of neighboring plates or convection in the upper mantia (plume). Corresponding theory may be used for short-term prediction of the earthquakes and tsunami.

  14. Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iijima, Y.; Minoura, K.; Hirano, S.; Yamada, T.

    2011-12-01

    The 11 March 2011, Mw 9.0 Great East Japan Earthquake, already among the most destructive earthquakes in modern history, emanated from a fault rupture that extended an estimated 500 km along the Pacific coast of Honshu. This earthquake is the fourth among five of the strongest temblors since AD 1900 and the largest in Japan since modern instrumental recordings began 130 years ago. The earthquake triggered a huge tsunami, which invaded the seaside areas of the Pacific coast of East Japan, causing devastating damages on the coast. Artificial structures were destroyed and planted forests were thoroughly eroded. Inrush of turbulent flows washed backshore areas and dunes. Coastal materials including beach sand were transported onto inland areas by going-up currents. Just after the occurrence of the tsunami, we started field investigation of measuring thickness and distribution of sediment layers by the tsunami and the inundation depth of water in Sendai plain. Ripple marks showing direction of sediment transport were the important object of observation. We used a soil auger for collecting sediments in the field, and sediment samples were submitted for analyzing grain size and interstitial water chemistry. Satellite images and aerial photographs are very useful for estimating the hydrogeological effects of tsunami inundation. We checked the correspondence of micro-topography, vegetation and sediment covering between before and after the tsunami. The most conspicuous phenomenon is the damage of pine forests planted in the purpose of preventing sand shifting. About ninety-five percent of vegetation coverage was lost during the period of rapid currents changed from first wave. The landward slopes of seawalls were mostly damaged and destroyed. Some aerial photographs leave detailed records of wave destruction just behind seawalls, which shows the occurrence of supercritical flows. The large-scale erosion of backshore behind seawalls is interpreted to have been caused by supercritical flows, resulting in the loss of landward seawall slopes. Such erosion was also observed at landward side of footpath between rice fields. The Sendai plain was subjected just after the main shock of the earthquake. Seawater inundation resulting from tsunami run-up lasted two months. The historical document Sandai-jitsuroku, which gives a detailed history of all of Japan, describes the Jogan earthquake and subsequent tsunami which have attacked Sendai plain in AD 869. The document describes the prolonged period of flooding, and it is suggested that co-seismic subsidence of the plain took place. The inundation area of the Jogan tsunami estimated by the distribution of tsunami deposit mostly overlaps with that of the 3.11 tsunami. Considering the very similarity of seismic shocks between the both, we interpreted the Great East Japan Earthquake Tsunami is the second coming of the Jogan Earthquake Tsunami.

  15. Administrative issues involved in disaster management in India.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Jagdish

    2006-12-01

    India as a country is vulnerable to a number of disasters, from earthquakes to floods. Poor and weaker members of the society have always been more vulnerable to various types of disasters. Disasters result in unacceptably high morbidity and mortality amongst the affected population. Damage to infrastructure and reduction in revenues from the affected region due to low yield add to the economic losses. Poor co-ordination at the local level, lack of early-warning systems, often very slow responses, paucity of trained dedicated clinicians, lack of search and rescue facilities and poor community empowerment are some of the factors, which have been contributing to poor response following disasters in the past. The first formal step towards development of policies relating to disaster care in India was the formulation of the National Disaster Response Plan (NDRP) which was formulated initially by the Government of India for managing natural disasters only. However, this was subsequently amended to include man-made disasters as well. It sets the scene for formulating state and district level plans in all states to bring cohesiveness and a degree of uniform management in dealing with disasters. A National Disaster Management Authority has been constituted which aims to provide national guidelines and is headed by the Prime Minister of India. It is the highest decision-making body for the management of disasters in the country. The authority has the responsibility for co-ordinating response and post-disaster relief and rehabilitation. Each state is required to set up Disaster Management Authorities and District Disaster Management Committees for co-ordination and close supervision of activities and efforts related to the management of disasters. PMID:17162696

  16. Nature and Geometry of tectonic elements associated with Bhuj Earthquake from High resolution Aeromagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, M.; S. Prasanna, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Kutch Rift basin is an important tectonic unit of Indian sub-continent where the disastrous Bhuj earthquake of Mw 7.8 occurred on 26 January 2001 (republic day of India) killing more than 20,000 people and leaving over 6,00,000 people homeless. The Bhuj earthquake was considered as one of the largest intraplate earthquake. Although liquefaction phenomenon and mud volcanoes were reported, no surface rupture was reported; generally an earthquake of this magnitude is associated with surface ruptures. Following the earthquake several Geophysical studies like Magnetotelluric, gravity, geomagnetic depth sounding, long period magnetotelluric, GPS and others were undertaken to understand the cause of this massive intra-plate earthquake. Despite these efforts several enigmatic questions related to the earthquake and the tectonic setting of the Kutch region still remain unanswered one of them being the location of the fault plane associated with the Mainshock of the Bhuj earthquake: is it the Kutch Mainland fault (KMF) or the south dipping North Wagad fault 25 km north of the KMF. Much of the earthquake affected region was covered by inaccessible salt plains due to which the existing geophysical data coverage is very poor. A semi detailed high-resolution airborne magnetic survey, with line spacing of 1km,was conducted during the period January 23, 2008 to May 16, 2008 covering an area of 56593 Sq.Km over the Kutch basin and surrounding areas. The objective of the survey was to acquire high resolution magnetic data to map the anomalous magnetic field distribution pattern in order to understand the lithology and sub surface structural settings in aid of geological interpretation for various purposes. From an analysis of the generated aeromagnetic map we were able to bring out signatures of several hitherto unknown faults and intrusives. We find that the epicenter of the main shock of Bhuj earthquake lies on the intersection point of three faults, a kind of triple point junction; the epicenters of aftershocks fall on the NW-SE and NE-SW faults emanating from the main epicenter. The V shaped NW-SE and NE-SW faults are related to the directional change of the compressional forces on either side of the Bhuj epicenter, as seen in the GPS data. We conclude that these subsurface faults are reactivated by the Bhuj earthquake and result in subsurface ruptures; consequently no surface ruptures are identified associated with the Bhuj earthquake. This is for the first time that the magnetic data has been able to decode the rupture information associated with an earthquake. Crustal structure and nature of this seismogenic region was generated along few profiles through the modeling of aeromagnetic data using available information from satellite gravity, MT and seismic data as constraints. The results of these will be presented.

  17. 2011 Tohoku Earthquake and Japan's Nuclear Disaster - Implications for Indian Ocean Rim countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadha, R. K.

    2011-12-01

    The Nuclear disaster in Japan after the M9.0 Tohoku earthquake on March 11, 2011 has elicited global response to have a relook at the safety aspects of the nuclear power plants from all angles including natural hazards like earthquakes and tsunami. Several countries have gone into safety audits of their nuclear programs in view of the experience in Japan. Tectonically speaking, countries located close to subduction zones or in direct line of impact of the subduction zones are the most vulnerable to earthquake or tsunami hazard, as these regions are the locale of great tsunamigenic earthquakes. The Japan disaster has also cautioned to the possibility of great impact to the critical structures along the coasts due to other ocean processes caused by ocean-atmosphere interactions and also due to global warming and sea level rise phenomena in future. This is particular true for island countries. The 2011 Tohoku earthquake in Japan will be remembered more because of its nuclear tragedy and tsunami rather than the earthquake itself. The disaster happened as a direct impact of a tsunami generated by the earthquake 130 km off the coast of Sendai in the Honshu region of Japan. The depth of the earthquake was about 25 km below the ocean floor and it occurred on a thrust fault causing a displacement of more than 20 meters. At few places, water is reported to have inundated areas up to 8-10 km inland. The height of the tsunami varied between 10 and 3 meters along the coast. Generally, during an earthquake damage to buildings or other structures occur due to strong shaking which is expressed in the form of ground accelerations 'g'. Although, Peak Ground Accelerations (PGA) consistently exceeded 2g at several places from Sendai down south, structures at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant did not collapse due to the earthquake. In the Indian Ocean Rim countries, Indian, Pakistan and South Africa are the three countries where Nuclear power plants are operational, few of them along the coasts. There are a few countries where nuclear installations are planned and hence, a critical analysis is required to know the realistic hazard due to earthquakes and tsunami in these countries. The December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami generated due to Sumatra earthquake of M9.3 claimed more than 250,000 lives but did not caused a situation like in Japan. We studied the tsunami run-up heights and inundation along the east coast of India. The maximum run-up height of 5.2 meters was observed at Nagapattinam with lateral inundation up to 800 meters and the minimum was at Devanaampatnam with a lateral inundation up to 340 meters. At Kalpakkam Nuclear Power Plant, the tsunami run-up height was 4.1 meters and water entered up to 360 meters inside the campus. Using the observed data we modeled several scenarios for Indian coast line for different earthquakes along the subduction zone of Andaman-Sumatra in the east and Makran in south Pakistan in the western side using N2 Tsunami Model. The results obtained for few critical structures will be presented with an overview of scenarios for other countries.

  18. Earthquake Hazard Mitigation Strategy in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnawati, D.; Anderson, R.; Pramumijoyo, S.

    2008-05-01

    Because of the active tectonic setting of the region, the risks of geological hazards inevitably increase in Indonesian Archipelagoes and other ASIAN countries. Encouraging community living in the vulnerable area to adapt with the nature of geology will be the most appropriate strategy for earthquake risk reduction. Updating the Earthquake Hazard Maps, enhancement ofthe existing landuse management , establishment of public education strategy and method, strengthening linkages among stake holders of disaster mitigation institutions as well as establishement of continues public consultation are the main strategic programs for community resilience in earthquake vulnerable areas. This paper highlights some important achievements of Earthquake Hazard Mitigation Programs in Indonesia, together with the difficulties in implementing such programs. Case examples of Yogyakarta and Bengkulu Earthquake Mitigation efforts will also be discussed as the lesson learned. The new approach for developing earthquake hazard map which is innitiating by mapping the psychological aspect of the people living in vulnerable area will be addressed as well.

  19. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Thomas, Jeremy N.

    2013-01-01

    We examine the claim that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity, might play a role in triggering earthquakes. We count the number of earthquakes having magnitudes that exceed chosen thresholds in calendar years, months, and days, and we order these counts by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure the statistical significance of the difference between the earthquake-number distributions below and above the median of the solar-terrestrial averages by ?2 and Student's t tests. Across a range of earthquake magnitude thresholds, we find no consistent and statistically significant distributional differences. We also introduce time lags between the solar-terrestrial variables and the number of earthquakes, but again no statistically significant distributional difference is found. We cannot reject the null hypothesis of no solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes.

  20. The U. S. earthquake prediction program

    SciTech Connect

    Wesson, R.L.; Filson, J.R.

    1981-09-01

    The U.S. Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program is discussed. Responsibility for managing research of the program is shared between the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Science Foundation (NSF). The primary goals of the program are to: 1) investigate seismically active regions as a means of understanding the basic earthquake process; 2) provide a physical basis for the short-term prediction of earthquakes; 3) determine the measurable phenomena that might be useful as earthquake precursors; and 4) to develop an experimental earthquake prediction system. To meet these requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey has prepared a 5-year plan which is the result of internal discussions as well as review by the Survey's Earthquake Studies Advisory Panel. This 5-year plan is outlined.

  1. Earthquakes at North Atlantic passive margins

    SciTech Connect

    Gregersen, S. ); Basham, P.W. )

    1989-01-01

    The main focus of this volume is the earthquakes that occur at and near the continental margins on both sides of the North Atlantic. The book, which contains the proceedings of the NATO workshop on Causes and Effects of Earthquakes at Passive Margins and in Areas of Postglacial Rebound on Both Sides of the North Atlantic, draws together the fields of geophysics, geology and geodesy to address the stress and strain in the Earth's crust. The resulting earthquakes produced on ancient geological fault zones and the associated seismic hazards these pose to man are also addressed. Postglacial rebound in North America and Fennoscandia is a minor source of earthquakes today, during the interglacial period, but evidence is presented to suggest that the ice sheets suppressed earthquake strain while they were in place, and released this strain as a pulse of significant earthquakes after the ice melted about 9000 years ago.

  2. Intermediate-term earthquake prediction.

    PubMed Central

    Keilis-Borok, V I

    1996-01-01

    An earthquake of magnitude M and linear source dimension L(M) is preceded within a few years by certain patterns of seismicity in the magnitude range down to about (M - 3) in an area of linear dimension about 5L-10L. Prediction algorithms based on such patterns may allow one to predict approximately 80% of strong earthquakes with alarms occupying altogether 20-30% of the time-space considered. An area of alarm can be narrowed down to 2L-3L when observations include lower magnitudes, down to about (M - 4). In spite of their limited accuracy, such predictions open a possibility to prevent considerable damage. The following findings may provide for further development of prediction methods: (i) long-range correlations in fault system dynamics and accordingly large size of the areas over which different observed fields could be averaged and analyzed jointly, (ii) specific symptoms of an approaching strong earthquake, (iii) the partial similarity of these symptoms worldwide, (iv) the fact that some of them are not Earth specific: we probably encountered in seismicity the symptoms of instability common for a wide class of nonlinear systems. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:11607660

  3. On earthquake prediction in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uyeda, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    Japan's National Project for Earthquake Prediction has been conducted since 1965 without success. An earthquake prediction should be a short-term prediction based on observable physical phenomena or precursors. The main reason of no success is the failure to capture precursors. Most of the financial resources and manpower of the National Project have been devoted to strengthening the seismographs networks, which are not generally effective for detecting precursors since many of precursors are non-seismic. The precursor research has never been supported appropriately because the project has always been run by a group of seismologists who, in the present author's view, are mainly interested in securing funds for seismology - on pretense of prediction. After the 1995 Kobe disaster, the project decided to give up short-term prediction and this decision has been further fortified by the 2011 M9 Tohoku Mega-quake. On top of the National Project, there are other government projects, not formally but vaguely related to earthquake prediction, that consume many orders of magnitude more funds. They are also un-interested in short-term prediction. Financially, they are giants and the National Project is a dwarf. Thus, in Japan now, there is practically no support for short-term prediction research. Recently, however, substantial progress has been made in real short-term prediction by scientists of diverse disciplines. Some promising signs are also arising even from cooperation with private sectors. PMID:24213204

  4. Record Breaking Earthquakes and Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcotte, D. L.; Malamud, B. D.; van Aalsburg, J. D.; Newman, W. I.; Rundle, J. B.

    2009-05-01

    A record-breaking event is the largest (smallest) event to occur during a specified time window in a specified region. In this paper we consider the record-breaking statistics of global earthquakes and temperatures at a specified observatory. For the record-breaking earthquakes we consider the global CMT catalog for the period 1977 to 2007. We determine the numbers and magnitudes of the record-breaking earthquakes during specified time intervals. The results are in excellent agreement with the theory for random events. For record- breaking temperatures we utilize records from the Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, for the period 1977 to 2006. We choose this site because observations made at it established the systematic increase in anthropogenic CO2 in the atmosphere. We have averaged over the 365 days of the year and have determined the average numbers of record-beaking high temperatures and low temperatures measured both forward and backward. We give results as a function of the time of day. We have carried out numerical simulations to quantitatively relate our data to temperature trends. We find a near uniform warming trend of 0.04 °C yr-1 at night and little change during the day.

  5. Local earthquake tomography of Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckett, Richard; Baptie, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Scotland is a relatively aseismic region for the use of local earthquake tomography, but 40 yr of earthquakes recorded by a good and growing network make it possible. A careful selection is made from the earthquakes located by the British Geological Survey (BGS) over the last four decades to provide a data set maximising arrival time accuracy and ray path coverage of Scotland. A large number of 1-D velocity models with different layer geometries are considered and differentiated by employing quarry blasts as ground-truth events. Then, SIMULPS14 is used to produce a robust 3-D tomographic P-wave velocity model for Scotland. In areas of high resolution the model shows good agreement with previously published interpretations of seismic refraction and reflection experiments. However, the model shows relatively little lateral variation in seismic velocity except at shallow depths, where sedimentary basins such as the Midland Valley are apparent. At greater depths, higher velocities in the northwest parts of the model suggest that the thickness of crust increases towards the south and east. This observation is also in agreement with previous studies. Quarry blasts used as ground truth events and relocated with the preferred 3-D model are shown to be markedly more accurate than when located with the existing BGS 1-D velocity model.

  6. On Earthquake Prediction in Japan

    PubMed Central

    UYEDA, Seiya

    2013-01-01

    Japan’s National Project for Earthquake Prediction has been conducted since 1965 without success. An earthquake prediction should be a short-term prediction based on observable physical phenomena or precursors. The main reason of no success is the failure to capture precursors. Most of the financial resources and manpower of the National Project have been devoted to strengthening the seismographs networks, which are not generally effective for detecting precursors since many of precursors are non-seismic. The precursor research has never been supported appropriately because the project has always been run by a group of seismologists who, in the present author’s view, are mainly interested in securing funds for seismology — on pretense of prediction. After the 1995 Kobe disaster, the project decided to give up short-term prediction and this decision has been further fortified by the 2011 M9 Tohoku Mega-quake. On top of the National Project, there are other government projects, not formally but vaguely related to earthquake prediction, that consume many orders of magnitude more funds. They are also un-interested in short-term prediction. Financially, they are giants and the National Project is a dwarf. Thus, in Japan now, there is practically no support for short-term prediction research. Recently, however, substantial progress has been made in real short-term prediction by scientists of diverse disciplines. Some promising signs are also arising even from cooperation with private sectors. PMID:24213204

  7. India's Trade in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Shailendra

    2015-01-01

    India has had an extremely adverse balance of trade in education. Though only a minor education exporter through Mode 2, India is the world's second largest student-sending country. Nevertheless, given English as the medium of instruction especially in apex institutions, low tuition and cost of living, quite a few world-class institutions, and a…

  8. E-Learning in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Sanjaya

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the e-learning in India. It describes the historical developments of e-learning and identifies major stakeholders and institutions that have initiated e-learning programs after the creation of the National Task Force on Information Technology and Software Development constituted by the Prime Minister of India

  9. Science and Technology in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Assesses the current status of science and technology in India, focusing on developments in agriculture, energy, medicine, space, basic sciences, and engineering. Indicates that although India has benefited in many fields from international collaboration during the last 30 years, the country's leaders have also placed particularly strong emphasis…

  10. Passages From India, Vol. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geils, Kenneth, Ed.

    This collection of articles from Indian newspapers is designed for use in the secondary classroom to assist with the study of India. There are 12 categories of articles: (1) Women: Like Avis, #2 But Trying Harder; (2) Calcutta: City of Joy; (3) India: Feeling Its Curry; (4) Us & Them: Misunderstandings; (5) Those Monsoon Showers May Come Your Way;…

  11. Passages from India, Vol. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geils, Kenneth, Ed.

    This is compendium of readings designed for use in the secondary classroom to assist with the study of India. There are seventeen categories of readings: (1) introduction to the subcontinent; (2) description of society; (3) caste and its continuing impact; (4) leadership roles; (5) women in India; (6) role playing in society; (7) marriage; (8)…

  12. Environment and Culture in India.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leuthold, David

    India suffers from severe environmental problems with respect to deforestation, flooding, and pollution. These problems are associated with industrialization, lack of money to enforce anti-pollution practices, climatic and population pressures, and cultural factors. Half of India's forests have been cut in the last 40 years. Deforestation is the…

  13. Indigenisation of Psychology in India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalal, Ajit K.

    2011-01-01

    Academic psychology which made a new beginning in India in the early part of 20th century was modelled on the Western scientific tradition. The teaching of psychology was very much on the British pattern since the colonial rule, whereas the research was mostly an extension of the Western work in India. Psychology went through massive expansion…

  14. Promoting reuse of Earthquake Engineering data through the

    E-print Network

    ). "Small Scale Testing Phase 1", Network for Earthquake Engineering Simulation (database), DatasetPromoting reuse of Earthquake Engineering data through the NEEShub Professor JoAnn Browning, University of Kansas SERIES Concluding Workshop Joint with USNEES "Earthquake Engineering Research

  15. Analysis of Deaths Caused by Interplate and Intraplate Earthquakes 

    E-print Network

    Jogunoori, Pushkin

    2012-07-16

    Two kinds of earthquakes, interplate and intraplate, occur in the world. Interplate earthquakes occur at the plate boundaries and are common. Intraplate earthquakes occur within the stable continental land mass and are less common. Fatality models...

  16. Earthquake Prediction: Is It Better Not to Know?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MOSAIC, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Discusses economic, social and political consequences of earthquake prediction. Reviews impact of prediction on China's recent (February, 1975) earthquake. Diagrams a chain of likely economic consequences from predicting an earthquake. (CS)

  17. 75 FR 18787 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will hold a... Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Director, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100...

  18. 77 FR 18792 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will hold a... Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Director, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100...

  19. University Ss. Cyril and Methodius Institute of Earthquake Engineering

    E-print Network

    University Ss. Cyril and Methodius Institute of Earthquake Engineering and Engineering Seismology-Skopje SERIES Concluding Workshop, NEES "Earthquake Engineering Research Infrastructures" JRC-Ispra, May 28: Vlatko Sesov Kemal Edip and Julijana Cvetanovska #12;SERIES Concluding Workshop, NEES "Earthquake

  20. 75 FR 75457 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will hold a... Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Director, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100...

  1. 77 FR 64314 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will meet... needs for existing buildings, to review the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP)...

  2. 76 FR 18165 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. ] SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will hold... be sent to National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Director, National Institute of...

  3. 77 FR 27439 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will hold a... Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Director, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100...

  4. 77 FR 19224 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will hold a... Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Director, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100...

  5. 75 FR 8042 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting... meeting. SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee), will hold a.... Jack Hayes, National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Director, National Institute of Standards...

  6. Statistical distributions of earthquake numbers: consequence of branching process

    E-print Network

    Kagan, Yan Y

    2010-01-01

    Accuracy of modern global earthquake catalogs, Phys. EarthGlobal seis- o micity of 2003: Centroid-moment-tensor solutions for 1087 earthquakes,earthquake distributions and clustering for the global CMT

  7. 76 FR 61113 - Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ...U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee AGENCY...Public Law 106-503, the Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee (SESAC...USGS's participation in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. The...

  8. 78 FR 64973 - National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-30

    ...Survey [GX14GG009950000] National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC...to Public Law 96-472, the National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC...S. Geological Survey on proposed earthquake predictions, on the completeness...

  9. 75 FR 8042 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...CONTACT: Dr. Jack Hayes, National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  10. 77 FR 19224 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...the meeting should be sent to National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  11. 75 FR 75457 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-03

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...the meeting should be sent to National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  12. 75 FR 66388 - Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ...USGS-GX11GG009950000] Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee AGENCY...Public Law 106-503, the Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee (SESAC...USGS's participation in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. The...

  13. 77 FR 64314 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...existing buildings, to review the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  14. 75 FR 2159 - Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ...U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee AGENCY...Public Law 106-503, the Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee (SESAC...USGS's participation in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. The...

  15. 75 FR 50749 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...meeting is to receive information on NEHRP earthquake related activities and to gather...

  16. 77 FR 75610 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...prior to the meeting on the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  17. 75 FR 18787 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-13

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...the meeting should be sent to National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  18. 76 FR 19123 - National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-06

    ...2011-GX11GG009950000] National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC...to Public Law 96-472, the National Earthquake Prediction Evaluation Council (NEPEC...S. Geological Survey on proposed earthquake predictions, on the completeness...

  19. 77 FR 27439 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...the meeting should be sent to National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...

  20. 76 FR 18165 - Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ...and Technology Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction Meeting AGENCY: National...SUMMARY: The Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR or Committee...the meeting should be sent to National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program...