Science.gov

Sample records for gulf of mexico region

  1. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; Hardin, Danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV

  2. 76 FR 61695 - Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy (Preliminary)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy (Preliminary) AGENCY: Environmental... the Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy (Preliminary) for public review and... Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Strategy. Additionally, the Task Force was instructed to build upon...

  3. NASA'S SERVIR Gulf of Mexico Project: The Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Irwin, Daniel; Presson, Joan; Estes, Maury; Estes, Sue; Judd, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC) is a NASA-funded project that has as its goal to develop an integrated, working, prototype IT infrastructure for Earth science data, knowledge and models for the five Gulf U.S. states and Mexico, and to demonstrate its ability to help decision-makers better understand critical Gulf-scale issues. Within this preview, the mission of this project is to provide cross cutting solution network and rapid prototyping capability for the Gulf of Mexico region, in order to demonstrate substantial, collaborative, multi-agency research and transitional capabilities using unique NASA data sets and models to address regional problems. SERVIR Mesoamerica is seen as an excellent existing framework that can be used to integrate observational and GIs data bases, provide a sensor web interface, visualization and interactive analysis tools, archival functions, data dissemination and product generation within a Rapid Prototyping concept to assist decision-makers in better understanding Gulf-scale environmental issues.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Initiative: NASA Capacity Building in the Gulf Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D.; Graham, W. D.; Searby, N. D.

    2012-12-01

    In the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, NASA created the Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI) to help the region recover and to build the capacity of local and regional organizations to utilize NASA Earth science assets to establish effective policies, encourage sustainable natural resource management and utilization, and to expeditiously respond to crises. GOMI worked closely with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA), a regional collaboration of the five US Gulf states and 13 federal agencies, to select projects that addressed high priority issues of the region. Many capabilities developed by this initiative have been adopted by end-users and have been leveraged to respond to other natural and man made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), record breaking floods along the Mississippi River (2011), unprecedented tornado supercells (2011), and extreme drought (2012). Examples of successful capacity building projects will be presented and the lessons learned from these projects will be discussed.

  5. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... article title:  Continued Spread of Gulf of Mexico Oil Slick       View Larger ... on NASA's Terra spacecraft passed over the Deepwater Horizon oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico on May 8, 2010, at approximately 16:50 UTC ...

  6. 77 FR 22760 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Gulf of Mexico Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Region Gulf of Mexico Electronic Logbook Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...) under the Shrimp Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The electronic logbook (ELB) regulations for the Gulf... will help improve estimating bycatch in the Gulf shrimp fleet. II. Method of Collection The...

  7. KT boundary impact glasses from the Gulf of Mexico region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claeys, Philippe; Alvarez, Walter; Smit, Jan; Hildebrand, A. R.; Montanari, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) tektite glasses occur at several sites around the Gulf of Mexico. Contrary to rumor among KTB workers, glass fragments have been found by several researchers in the base of the spherule bed at Arroyo el Mimbral in NE Mexico. The presence of green, red, and transparent glass fragments at Mimbral only, demonstrates that the Mimbral glass is not a laboratory contamination by Beloc glass. The chemistry and ages of the glass are consistent with an origin from the Chixculub impact crater in Yucatan. No evidence supports a volcanic origin for the KTB glasses. A discussion of tektite glass from the KT boundary is presented.

  8. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Activity in the Gulf Coast Region of Mexico, 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A. Paige; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Irene; Leal, Grace; Flores-Mayorga, Jose M.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Singh, Amber J.; Borland, Erin M.; Powers, Ann M.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been the causative agent for sporadic epidemics and equine epizootics throughout the Americas since the 1930s. In 1969, an outbreak of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) spread rapidly from Guatemala and through the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, reaching Texas in 1971. Since this outbreak, there have been very few studies to determine the northward extent of endemic VEEV in this region. This study reports the findings of serologic surveillance in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico from 2003–2010. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on viral isolates from this region to determine whether there have been substantial genetic changes in VEEV since the 1960s. Based on the findings of this study, the Gulf Coast lineage of subtype IE VEEV continues to actively circulate in this region of Mexico and appears to be responsible for infection of humans and animals throughout this region, including the northern State of Tamaulipas, which borders Texas. PMID:23133685

  9. Synthesis of Seafood Catch, Distribution, and Consumption Patterns in the Gulf of Mexico Region

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle and Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    The purpose of this task was to gather and assemble information that will provide a synthesis of seafood catch, distribution and consumption patterns for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) region. This task was part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored project entitled ''Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.'' Personal interviews were conducted with a total of 905 recreational fishermen and 218 commercial fishermen (inclusive of shrimpers, crabbers, oystermen and finfishermen) in Louisiana and Texas using survey questionnaires developed for the study. Results of these interviews detail the species and quantities caught, location of catch, mode of fishing, distribution of catch, family consumption patterns and demographics of the fishermen.

  10. GPS derived ground motions (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Wang, G.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates current ground motions derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root-mean-square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. GPS observations in southeastern Louisiana indicate minor (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but consistent subsidence over time and space. This poses a potential threat to the safety of costal infrastructure in the long-term.

  11. GPS-derived ground deformation (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Guoquan

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates current ground deformation derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root mean square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. The subsidence rate in southeastern Louisiana is relatively smaller (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but tends to be steady over time. This poses a potential threat to the safety of coastal infrastructure in the long-term.

  12. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  13. INTEGRATED COASTAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) Office in cooperation with Gulf State agencies, EPA Regions 4 and 6, EPA's Office of Water and Office of Research and Development (ORD), and the GMP principal partners are developing an integrated coastal monitoring program for the Gulf of Mexico....

  14. GULF OF MEXICO HYPOXIA MONITORING AND MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA ORD in partnership with the Gulf of Mexico Program Office, the Office of Water and Regions 4 and 6 have developed and implemented plans for a framework that will help guide the science needed to address the hypoxia problem in the Gulf of Mexico. ORD's Gulf Ecology Divis...

  15. Regional maps of subsurface geopressure gradients of the onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, Lauri A.; Kinney, Scott A.; Dubiel, Russell F.; Pitman, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey created a comprehensive geopressure-gradient model of the regional pressure system spanning the onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico basin, USA. This model was used to generate ten maps that included (1) five contour maps characterizing the depth to the surface defined by the first occurrence of isopressure gradients ranging from 0.60 psi/ft to 1.00 psi/ft, in 0.10-psi/ft increments; and (2) five supporting maps illustrating the spatial density of the data used to construct the contour maps. These contour maps of isopressure-gradients at various increments enable the identification and quantification of the occurrence, magnitude, location, and depth of the subsurface pressure system, which allows for the broad characterization of regions exhibiting overpressured, underpressured, and normally pressured strata. Identification of overpressured regions is critical for exploration and evaluation of potential undiscovered hydrocarbon accumulations based on petroleum-generation pressure signatures and pressure-retention properties of reservoir seals. Characterization of normally pressured regions is essential for field development decisions such as determining the dominant production drive mechanisms, evaluating well placement and drainage patterns, and deciding on well stimulation methods such as hydraulic fracturing. Identification of underpressured regions is essential for evaluating the feasibility of geological sequestration and long-term containment of fluids such as supercritical carbon dioxide for alternative disposal methods of greenhouse gases. This study is the first, quantitative investigation of the regional pressure systems of one of the most important petroleum provinces in the United States. Although this methodology was developed for pressure studies in the Gulf of Mexico basin, it is applicable to any basin worldwide.

  16. Local and regional species diversity of benthic Isopoda (Crustacea) in the deep Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, George D. F.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies of deep-sea faunas considered the influence of mid-domain models in the distribution of species diversity and richness with depth. In this paper, I show that separating local diversity from regional species richness in benthic isopods clarifies mid-domain effects in the distribution of isopods in the Gulf of Mexico. Deviations from the randomised implied species ranges can be informative to understanding general patterns within the Gulf of Mexico. The isopods from the GoMB study contained 135 species, with a total of 156 species including those from an earlier study. More than 60 species may be new to science. Most families of deep-sea isopods (suborder Asellota) were present, although some were extremely rare. The isopod family Desmosomatidae dominated the samples, and one species of Macrostylis (Macrostylidae) was found in many samples. Species richness for samples pooled within sites ranged from 1 to 52 species. Because species in pooled samples were highly correlated with individuals, species diversity was compared across sites using the expected species estimator ( n=15 individuals, ES 15). Six depth transects had idiosyncratic patterns of ES 15, and transects with the greatest short-range variation in topography, such as basins and canyons, had the greatest short-range disparity. Basins on the deep slope did not have a consistent influence (i.e., relatively higher or lower than surrounding areas) on the comparative species diversity. ES 15 of all transects together showed a weak mid-domain effect, peaking around 1200-1500 m, with low values at the shallowest and deepest samples (Sigsbee Abyssal Plain); no longitudinal (east-west) pattern was found. The regional species pool was analyzed by summing the implied ranges of all species. The species ranges in aggregate did not have significant patterns across longitudes, and many species had broad depth ranges, suggesting that the isopod fauna of the Gulf of Mexico is well dispersed. The summed

  17. 30 CFR 250.150 - How do I name facilities and wells in the Gulf of Mexico Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I name facilities and wells in the Gulf of Mexico Region? 250.150 Section 250.150 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General Naming and...

  18. Processing of the marine magnetic anomalies of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico (GOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Andreina; Dyment, Jérôme; Thébault, Erwan

    2015-04-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies are useful to better understand the structure and age of the seafloor and constrain its nature and formation. In this work, we applied a dedicated processing of the NGDC marine magnetic measurements over the Caribbean region. The number of available surveys amounts to 516 representing 2.612.994 data points between epochs 1958 and 2012. The pre-processing was done by survey. First, data associated to velocities lesser than 5 knots were rejected. Then, the data were corrected for the main internal field using the CM4 model for epochs ranging between 1960 and 2002,5 and the IGRF-11 model outside the time range of the CM4 model. A visual inspection of the anomalies allowed us to identify, to remove evident outliers and to define a priority order for each survey. We evaluated the magnetic heading effect and corrected the data for it although statistics analysis suggested that this correction brings only a marginal improvement. The cross-overs differences were estimated using the x2sys package (Wessel, 2010) and then corrected using a Matlab code. The statistics confirmed the importance of this processing and improved the internal crossovers, with in particular a clear reduction of extreme values. This processing allows us to present a marine magnetic anomaly map of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico to 0.18 degree spatial resolution and to discuss the magnetic signature of some of the striking structures of the area.

  19. Geologic assessments and characterization of marine sand resources - Gulf of Mexico region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Cichon, Helena A.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts geologic surveys and research in marine areas of the United States and its territories and possessions. An objective in some of the investigations is locating and evaluating marine sand and gravel resources and interpretation of the origins of the sand body deposits. Results from such studies over the past 30 years show that many extremely large deposits are located close to expanding metropolitan areas, which have a need for aggregate materials for construction, and near-developed coastal areas, where beach replenishment may be used to mitigate coastal erosion. The Gulf of Mexico continental shelf from the Florida Peninsula to the Mexico border is an enormous area, but little attention has been directed on sand and gravel resources. Based on limited surveys, the total sand and gravel resources for the entire Gulf of Mexico is estimated to be 269 billion cubic meters. However, the sand tends to be fine-grained and is often mixed with mud; gravel deposits, except for shell, are mostly nonexistent.

  20. Deep Crustal Structure Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Eddy, D. R.; Norton, I. O.; Karner, G. D.; Johnson, C. A.; Kneller, E. A.; Snedden, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of the GUMBO (GUlf of Mexico Basin Opening) project that constrains seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Data were acquired in 2010 along four profiles 300-500 km in length, using the industry vessel R/V Iron Cat and ocean bottom seismometers at 10-12 km spacing. Plate tectonic models for the Gulf of Mexico region have rifting initiating in the Late Triassic or Early Jurassic, with seafloor spreading beginning ~166-154 Ma in the western Gulf, propagating to the eastern Gulf, and ending ~154-135 Ma. Many models include transform motion along the Florida margin during initiation of continental rifting. We observe a strong change in rifting style from west to east across the ocean basin. Our western profile, offshore Texas, images highly heterogeneous crust with sediment velocities directly overlying Moho in some locations. These observations are consistent with either sedimentary basins within rifted continental crust or ultra-slow-spreading oceanic crust. The profile offshore Lousiana images thicker, faster, and more homogeneous crust. This could suggest an eastward increase in magmatic output during rifting. The eastern profiles offshore Alabama and Florida image the ocean-continent boundary and extensive regions of oceanic crust. The thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to 6-7 km over a horizontal distance of 150 km in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The profile offshore Alabama, near a region where syn-rift volcanism has been interpreted on seismic reflection data, has

  1. 78 FR 28146 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Texas Closure AGENCY... Texas estuaries to the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) so the shrimp may reach a larger, more valuable size and to... the Gulf of Mexico (FMP). The FMP was prepared by the Gulf of Mexico......

  2. Estimation of the spectral parameter kappa in the region of the Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Raúl R.; Ávila-Barrientos, Lenin

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed records from the Broadband Seismological Network of the Gulf of California (RESBAN) and from stations of the NARS-Baja array, operated by CICESE, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, to make estimates of the spectral decay parameter kappa ( κ). This attenuation parameter is important for evaluating the seismic risk and hazard of this region. Thirteen shallow earthquakes with focal depths less than 20 km and magnitudes between 5.1 and 6.6 were selected to calculate κ and the near-site attenuation κ 0. We used three different approaches to estimate κ 0: (a) with individual measurements of κ from vector modulus of three-component spectral amplitudes at different epicentral distances and extrapolating to zero distance to estimate κ 0, (b) with individual measurements using vertical component spectra, and (c) measuring from the high-frequency part of the site transfer function determined calculating the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. For most stations, the three methods give similar results. At short distances (50-60 km), κ takes values close to 0.04 s at NE76, the station located in the middle of the array. κ increases with distance taking an average value of up to 0.18 s for distances close to 500 km. κ 0 at most sites is close to 0.03 s, except for GUYB (Guaymas) that has a κ 0 = 0.05 s and NE83 (Navolato) with κ 0 = 0.065 s, both stations located in the continent, on the eastern side of the gulf, where the soils are less consolidated. Finally, we analyze if κ 0 correlates with magnitude and back azimuth, and we found that for most stations, κ 0 does not correlate with either one. However, station TOPB, located on basalt, shows a moderate correlation with magnitude, with κ 0 increasing with increasing M W in a short back-azimuth range. We also found that for station NE74, located on soft soil, κ 0 correlates with back azimuth, having lower values for azimuths near 120°.

  3. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... pattern of land and runoff is associated with the Chandeleur Islands, which are part of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge. This refuge is ... and waterfowl. Oil is reported to have reached the islands on May 6. Eighteen days later, this image shows filaments of oil ...

  4. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... weaker. The views at the two different angles cover the same physical area of 42 by 30 kilometers (26 by 19 miles). Controlled burns of the ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  5. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... the way the surface reflects light. This change in the reflection of sunlight makes the oil slick appear lighter blue on the darker ... degree forward viewing (Af) camera. The Af camera sees the reflection of sunlight from the oil more strongly than the Aa camera, so this ...

  6. 78 FR 63946 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Revisions to Headboat Reporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...NMFS proposes regulations to implement management measures described in a framework action to the Fishery Management Plans for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf), as prepared by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Gulf Council); and Coastal Migratory Pelagic (CMP) Resources of the Gulf and South Atlantic Region, as prepared by the Gulf Council and the South......

  7. Prebreakup geology of the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean: Its relation to Triassic and Jurassic rift systems of the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartok, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A review of the prebreakup geology of west central Pangea, comprising northern South America, the Gulf of Mexico, and West Africa, combined with a study of the Mesozoic rift trends of the region confirms a relation between the rift systems and the underlying older grain of deformation. The prebreakup analysis focuses attention on the Precambrian, early Paleozoic, and late Paleozoic tectonic events affecting the region and assumes a Pindell fit. Two late Precambrian orogenic belts are observed in west central Pangea. Along the northern South American margin and Yucatan a paleo northeast trending Pan-African aged fold belt is documented. A second system is observed along West Africa extending from the High Atlas to the Mauritanides and Rockelides. Similar aged orogenies in the Appalachians are compared. During the late Paleozoic, renewed orogenic activity, associated with the Gondwana-Laurentia suture, affected large segments of west central Pangea. The general trend of the system is northeast-southwest and essentially parallels the Guayana craton and West African and eastern North American cratons. Mesozoic rifling closely followed either the Precambrian trends or the late Paleozoic orogenic belt. The Triassic component focused along the western portions of the Gulf of Mexico continuing into eastern Mexico and western South America. The Jurassic rift trend followed along the separation between Yucatan and northern South America. At Lake Maracaibo the Jurassic rift system eventually overlaps the Triassic rifts. The Jurassic rift resulted in the "Hispanic Corridor" that permitted Tethyan and Pacific marine faunas to mix at a time when the Gulf of Mexico underwent continental sedimentation.

  8. GULF OF MEXICO AQUATIC MORTALITY NETWORK (GMNET)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five U.S. states share the northern coast of the Gulf, and each has a program to monitor mortalities of aquatic organisms (fish, shellfish, birds). However, each state has different standards, procedures, and documentation of mortality events. The Gulf of Mexico Aquatic Mortality...

  9. 76 FR 30705 - Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Gulf of Mexico Citizen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Gulf of Mexico Citizen... considered for appointment to the Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee (GMCAC). Vacancies are... Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee (GMCAC) to provide independent citizen advice to the EPA...

  10. Deep Crustal Structure Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail; Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of two wide-angle seismic refraction profiles in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico that constrain seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin. Profile GUMBO 3 extends 523 km from offshore Alabama south-southwest via the De Soto Canyon to the central Gulf of Mexico, while GUMBO 4 extends 507 km from the northwestern Florida peninsula across the Florida Escarpment to the central Gulf of Mexico. On both profiles, ocean bottom seismometers were positioned at 12-km spacing, and recorded air gun shots at offsets >100 km. We use a tomographic inversion of first-arrival and secondary travel time picks from these data to build a layered velocity model (water, sediments, crystalline crust, mantle) along each profile. On GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4 the thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to ~7 km (GUMBO 4) or ~8 km (GUMBO 3) over a horizontal distance of ~150 km. Velocities of 7-7.5 km/s are observed at the base of the crust along most of GUMBO 3, while velocities of 6.5-7 km/s are observed at similar depths along GUMBO 4. We suggest that higher lower crustal velocities, and thicker oceanic crust, on GUMBO 3 compared to GUMBO 4 may be explained by elevated syn-rift mantle temperatures in the vicinity of the De Soto Canyon and South Georgia Rift during rifting and continental breakup. We have integrated seismic refraction, seismic reflection, and well data to interpret sequence stratigraphic units along GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4. We have constructed a geologic history of the late-Jurassic/early-Cretaceous, beginning first with Louann

  11. Gulf of Mexico dead zone - the last 150 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, Lisa; Swarzenski, P.W.; Poore, R.Z.

    2006-01-01

    'Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone-The Last 150 Years' discusses the dead zone that forms seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico when subsurface waters become depleted in dissolved oxygen and cannot support most life.

  12. Lagrangian predictability of high-resolution regional models: the special case of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P. C.; Ivanov, L. M.; Kantha, L. H.; Margolina, T. M.; Melnichenko, O. V.; Poberezhny, Y. A.

    2004-02-01

    The Lagrangian prediction skill (model ability to reproduce Lagrangian drifter trajectories) of the nowcast/forecast system developed for the Gulf of Mexico at the University of Colorado at Boulder is examined through comparison with real drifter observations. Model prediction error (MPE), singular values (SVs) and irreversible-skill time (IT) are used as quantitative measures of the examination. Divergent (poloidal) and nondivergent (toroidal) components of the circulation attractor at 50m depth are analyzed and compared with the Lagrangian drifter buoy data using the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition and the measures, respectively. Irregular (probably, chaotic) dynamics of the circulation attractor reproduced by the nowcast/forecast system is analyzed through Lyapunov dimension, global entropies, toroidal and poloidal kinetic energies. The results allow assuming exponential growth of prediction error on the attractor. On the other hand, the q-th moment of MPE grows by the power law with exponent of 3q/4. The probability density function (PDF) of MPE has a symmetrical but non-Gaussian shape for both the short and long prediction times and for spatial scales ranging from 20km to 300km. The phenomenological model of MPE based on a diffusion-like equation is developed. The PDF of IT is non-symmetric with a long tail stretched towards large ITs. The power decay of the tail was faster than 2 for long prediction times.

  13. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operation. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1995-01-18

    Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included analyses of samples. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the continued analyses of samples and field sampling at Bay de Chene. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included preparing a draft final report. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work also involved preparing a draft final report. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities included a presentation at the Minerals Management Service Information Transfer Meeting for the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  14. 78 FR 14983 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC539 Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Gulf of Mexico...

  15. Permo-Triassic reconstruction of western Pangea and the evolution of the Gulf of Mexico&solCaribbean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindell, James; Dewey, John F.

    1982-04-01

    A Permo-Triassic reconstruction of western Pangea (North America, South America, Africa) is proposed that is characterized by (1) definition of the North Atlantic fit by matching of marginal offsets (fracture zones) along the opposing margins, (2) a South Atlantic fit that is tighter than the BuIlard fit and that is achieved by treating Africa as two plates astride the Benue Trough and related structures during the Cretaceous, (3) complete closure of the Proto-Atlantic Ocean between North and South America, accomplished by placing the Yucatan block between the Ouachita Mountains and Venezuela, (4) a proposed Hercynian suture zone that separates zones of foreland thrusting from zones of arc-related magmatic activity; to the northwest of this suture lie the Chortis block and Mexico and most of North America, and to the southeast lie South America, the Yucatan Block, Florida and Africa, and (5) satisfaction of paleomagmatic data from North America, South America, and Africa. Beginning with the proposed reconstruction, the relative motion history of South America with respect of North America is defined by using the finite difference method. Within the framework provided by the proposed relative motion history, an evolutionary model for the development of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region is outlined in a series of 13 plate boundary reconstructions at time intervals from the Jurassic to the present. The model includes (1) formation of the Gulf of Mexico by 140 Ma, (2) Pacific provenance of the Caribbean plate through the North America-South America gap during Cretaceous time, (3) Paleocene-Early Eocene back arc spreading origin for the Yucatan Basin, whereby Cuba is the frontal arc and the Nicaragua Rise-Jamaica-Southern Hispaniola is the remnant arc, and (4) 1200 km of post-Eocene cumulative offset along both the Northern and Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary Zones, allowing large-scale eastward migration of the Caribbean plate with respect to the North and

  16. Gulf of Mexico production still recovering

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-10-12

    This paper reports that the extent of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew to Gulf of Mexico oil and gas installations continues coming into focus. A preliminary tally by Minerals Management Service offers a reasonably complete summary of gulf production and pipeline systems damage detectable at the surface. MMS requires Outer Continental Shelf operators to inspect for underwater damage all platforms, pipelines, risers, and other structures within an 85 mile corridor along the path of Andrew's eye as it churned through the gulf. OCS operators have until Oct. 16 to submit plans for the Level II surveys.

  17. Jurassic platform development, northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Triassic and Early Jurassic rifting set the stage for the subsequent development of carbonate platforms in the Late Jurassic. These platforms formed along the interior margins of salt basins separated from the main ancestral Gulf of Mexico by a series of positive features. A major sea level rise, after deposition of the Louann Salt (late Callovian), drowned the interior salt basins around the margins of the Gulf of Mexico, leading to an anoxic event. Organic-rich sediments of the lower Smackover were deposited as a basin-fill sequence, forming one of the major hydrocarbon source rocks of the region. As sea level rise slowed in the late Oxfordian, carbonate production began to catch up with sea level rise along the basin margins, leading to the initial development of a rimmed carbonate platform. The platform margin was marked by high-energy ooid grainstones, while crustacean pellet muds were deposited in the platform interior. A high-energy ooid-dominated platform (upper Smackover) developed in the late Oxfordian when sea level reached a standstill. During the subsequent Kimmeridgian sea level rise, a second rimmed carbonate platform, the Haynesville, was developed. During the initial rise, grainstones were deposited on the platform margin, while the interior was dominated by evaporites (Buckner) and siliciclastics. As sea level slowed and reached a standstill, the platform margin facies extended shoreward (Gilmer) and a high-energy platform, analogous to the upper Smackover, was formed. The Smackover and Haynesville platforms of the northwestern gulf show a parallel evolution in response to cyclic changes in Upper Jurassic sea level.

  18. 76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange Beach, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange... establishing a temporary safety zone for a portion of the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange Beach... Mexico, south of Orange Beach, Alabama to occur from October 6, 2011 through October 9, 2011. This...

  19. Sulfur biogeochemistry of cold seeps in the Green Canyon region of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formolo, Michael J.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-10-01

    Cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico provide a natural laboratory to study biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen at hydrate- and hydrocarbon-rich deep marine settings with obvious additional relevance to studies of diverse modern and ancient seeps. Of particular interest are the sulfur isotope signatures of microbial sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane and other non-methane liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Whereas most of the published sulfur isotope data from cold seep systems pertain to pore-water species, our study integrates both solid and dissolved sulfur: acid-volatile sulfides (SAVS), pyrite (Spy), elemental sulfur (S°), dissolved sulfate and ΣH2S. Modeled and 35SO42- reduction rates and δ13C and δ18O data for authigenic carbonates are integrated within this sulfur framework. Our results indicate extreme variability over narrow spatial and temporal scales within short distances (meters) from active seeps. High rates of microbial sulfate reduction can lead to complete consumption of the sulfate within the upper few centimeters of burial, while meters away the sulfate profile shows little depletion. Such small-scale variability must reflect the structure and temporal dynamics of hydrocarbon migration in the presence of low amounts of background organic matter. Our past work demonstrated that electron donors other than methane drive significant levels of microbial activity at these seeps, and very recent work has demonstrated that oxidation of higher chain volatile hydrocarbons can contribute to the high levels of microbial activity. These findings are consistent with our new results. Elevated concentrations of pyrite and diagenetic carbonate relative to background sediments are diagnostic of active seepage, yet the S isotopes tell more complex stories. Low levels of the transient, 'instantaneous' products of S cycling-AVS and S°-show high δ34S values that increase with depth. Most of the pyrite formation, however, seems

  20. GULF OF MEXICO HYPOXIA MONITORING AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greene, Richard M. and Russell G. Kreis. In press. Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Monitoring and Modeling (Abstract). To be presented at the EPA Science Forum: Healthy Communities and Ecosystems, 1-3 June 2004, Washington, DC. 1 p. (ERL,GB R990).

    Oxygen-depleted or hypoxic bottom...

  1. NOAA tools to support CSC and LCC regional climate science priorities in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Marcy, D.; Robbins, K.; Shafer, M.; Stiller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is an active regional partner with the Department of Interior (DOI) in supplying and supporting the delivery of climate science and services. A primary mechanism for NOAA-DOI coordination at the regional scale is the Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) network, which is supported in part by DOI Climate Science Centers (CSC). Together, the CSCs and LCCs provide a framework to identify landscape-scale science and services priorities for conservation and management. As a key partner of the CSCs and an active member of many LCCs, NOAA is working to ensure its own regional product and service delivery efforts will help address these conservation and management challenges. Two examples of NOAA's regional efforts are highlighted here, with a focus on the coastal and interior geographies of the western Gulf of Mexico where NOAA partners with the South Central CSC and participates as a member of the Gulf Coast Prairie LCC. Along the Texas coastline, a sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts viewer, produced by NOAA's Coastal Services Center and available via its Digital Coast interface, allows constituents to visualize estimates of sea level rise, measures of uncertainty, flood frequencies, and environmental (e.g., marsh migration) and socioeconomic (e.g., tidal flooding of built environments) impacts. In the interior of Texas and Louisiana, NOAA's Southern Regional Climate Center is leading a consortium of partners in the development of a unified source of regional water reservoir information, including current conditions, a historical database, and web-based visualization tools to illustrate spatio-temporal variations in water availability to a broad array of hydrological, agricultural, and other customers. These two examples of NOAA products can, in their existing forms, support regional conservation and management priorities for CSCs and LCCs by informing vulnerability assessments and adaptation

  2. Gulf of Mexico Region - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of the area surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s data) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of 10-meter contour-derived DEM data or higher-resolution LIDAR data. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2005.

  3. 75 FR 12700 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Inseason Action to Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... FR 250), NMFS announced that the non-sandbar LCS fishery for the Gulf of Mexico region for the 2010... Species; Inseason Action to Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non-Sandbar Large Coastal Shark Fishery... coastal sharks (LCS) in the Gulf of Mexico region. This action is necessary because the quota for the...

  4. SAR observations in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheres, David

    1992-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) exhibits a wealth of energetic ocean features; they include the Loop Current with velocities of about 2 m/s and strong shear fronts, mesoscale eddies, double vortices, internal waves, and the outflow of the 'Mighty Mississippi' river. These energetic features can have a strong impact on the economies of the states surrounding the Gulf. Large fisheries, oil and gas production as well as pollution transport are relevant issues. These circulation features in the Gulf are invisible to conventional IR and visible satellite imagery during the Summer months due to cloud cover and uniform surface temperatures. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the Gulf does penetrate the cloud cover and shows a rich assembly of features there year-round. Below are preliminary results from GOM SAR imagery taken by SEASAT in 1978 and by the AIRSAR program in 1991.

  5. 77 FR 62209 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Amendment 38 AGENCY.... ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the Gulf of Mexico... for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (FMP) for review, approval, and......

  6. ESTABLISHING A NATURE CONSERVANCY GULF OF MEXICO INITIATIVE MX974946

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Conservancy will initiate a three-year pilot program to create a Gulf of Mexico Initiative within TNC to coordinate and enhance site-based conservation work at priority Gulf coastal sites. TNC would hire an ecologist to serve as the director of TNC's Gulf of Mexico Initiative...

  7. ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF ESTUARIES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico is a vast natural resource that encompasses the coastal areas of western Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, as well as a portion of Mexico. Many estuaries flow into the Gulf of Mexico and serve as nursery grounds for fish, habitat for a wide va...

  8. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H

    2010-01-01

    Since 1985, scientists have been documenting a hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico each year. The hypoxic zone, an area of low dissolved oxygen that cannot support marine life, generally manifests itself in the spring. Since marine species either die or flee the hypoxic zone, the spread of hypoxia reduces the available habitat for marine species, which are important for the ecosystem as well as commercial and recreational fishing in the Gulf. Since 2001, the hypoxic zone has averaged 16,500 km{sup 2} during its peak summer months, an area slightly larger than the state of Connecticut, and ranged from a low of 8,500 km{sup 2} to a high of 22,000 km{sup 2}. To address the hypoxia problem, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force (or Task Force) was formed to bring together representatives from federal agencies, states, and tribes to consider options for responding to hypoxia. The Task Force asked the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to conduct a scientific assessment of the causes and consequences of Gulf hypoxia through its Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR). In 2000 the CENR completed An Integrated Assessment: Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (or Integrated Assessment), which formed the scientific basis for the Task Force's Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Action Plan, 2001). In its Action Plan, the Task Force pledged to implement ten management actions and to assess progress every 5 years. This reassessment would address the nutrient load reductions achieved, the responses of the hypoxic zone and associated water quality and habitat conditions, and economic and social effects. The Task Force began its reassessment in 2005. In 2006 as part of the reassessment, USEPA's Office of Water, on behalf of the Task Force, requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) convene an independent panel to

  9. 76 FR 41723 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Inseason Action To Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... December 8, 2010 (75 FR 76302), NMFS announced that the non- sandbar LCS fishery for the Gulf of Mexico... Species; Inseason Action To Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non-Sandbar Large Coastal Shark Fishery... large coastal sharks (LCS) in the Gulf of Mexico region. This action is necessary because the quota...

  10. Deep Eddies in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, H. H.; Bower, A. S.; Perez-Brunius, P.; Hamilton, P.

    2014-12-01

    A major Lagrangian program is currently underway to map the deep (1500-2500 m) circulation of the entire Gulf of Mexico. Beginning in 2011, more than 120 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been released in the eastern, central and western Gulf, many in pairs and triplets. Most floats are programmed to drift for two years, obtaining position fixes and temperature/pressure measurements three times daily. More than 80 floats have completed their missions, and results from the trajectories will be described with a focus on mesoscale eddying behavior. In particular, the first-ever observations of deep energetic anticyclonic eddies (possibly lenses) forming at and separating from a northeastward-flowing boundary current west of Campeche Bank will be discussed. The existence of these eddies has major implications for exchange between the continental slope and interior Gulf. The project is being supported by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

  11. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  12. Crustal Deformation in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico: Underthrusting of the Gulf of Mexico beneath Tehuantepec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Gerardo; Aguilar, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    An array of 45 broad band sensors were installed along the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southeastern. This experiment, called VEOX, was implemented on August 2007 to March 2009. Data were registered continuously during the whole period. In order to search in the seismic records of the data obtained for crustal events in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, To this purpose, an STA/LTA algorithm was designed to detect earthquakes with S-P times indicating they occurred close the seismic stations, at crustal or upper mantle depths. During the 18 months that the experiment lasted, about 40 crustal earthquakes were recorded in more than three stations, allowing us to determine a hypo central location. All earthquakes occurring at depths greater than 120 km, within the subjected slab, were discarded. The majority of this crustal or upper mantle activity occurred in the northern part of the Isthmus, along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico or just inland from it. No velocity model exists in the area. Therefore, we tested three different velocity models, including one obtained in an adjacent region and based on seismic refraction data. One of these three models rendered the more stable solutions and smaller errors in the hypocentral locations and was used as the local seismic velocity model. In order to improve the quality of the locations, we experimented using a double difference hypocentral algorithm (HYPODD). There was no noticeable improvement in the quality of the hypocenters using this technique. The best located events suggest a southwestern-dipping zone of seismic seismicity, deepening from the Gulf of Mexico towards the interior of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The focal mechanisms of the earthquakes indicate the maximum axis of compresion (P axis) is oriented nearly horizontally and in a southwest-northeast direction. These mechanisms are similar to those observed for earthquakes previously studied in the region on the basis of teleseismic data, such as the Mw 6.9, 29 August

  13. Seismic Activity in the Gulf of Mexico: a Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, S. I.; Canet, C.; Iglesias, A.; Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.

    2013-05-01

    The southwestern corner of Gulf of Mexico (around the northern Isthmus of Tehuantepec) is exposed to an intense deep (> 100 km) seismic activity caused by the subduction of the Cocos plate. Aside from this, the gulf has been considered as a zone of low or no-seismicity. However, a sparse shallow seismic activity is observed across the Gulf of Mexico; some of these earthquakes have been strongly felt (e.g. 23/05/2007 and 10/09/2006), and the Jaltipan, 1959 earthquake caused fatalities and severe destruction in central and southern Veracruz. In this work we analyze 5 relevant earthquakes that occurred since 2001. At the central Gulf of Mexico focal mechanisms show inverse faults oriented approximately NW-SE with dip near 45 degrees, suggesting a link to sediment loading and/or to salt tectonics. On the other hand, in the southwestern corner of the gulf we analyzed some clear examples of strike-slip faults and activity probably related to the Veracruz Fault. One anomalous earthquake, recorded in 2007 in the western margin of the gulf, shows a strike-slip mechanism indicating a transform regime probably related with the East Mexican Fault. The recent improvement of the Mexican Seismological broadband network have allowed to record small earthquakes distributed in and around the Gulf of Mexico. Although the intermediate and large earthquakes in the region are infrequent, the historic evidence indicates that the magnitudes could reach Mw~6.4. This fact could be taken in consideration to reassess the seismic hazard for oil and industrial infrastructure in the region.

  14. 77 FR 42251 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ...NMFS proposes regulations to implement management measures described in Amendment 34 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (FMP) prepared by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council). If implemented, this rule would remove the income qualification requirements for renewal of Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) commercial reef fish permits and increase......

  15. 78 FR 49440 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Red Snapper Management...). If implemented, this rule would increase the 2013 commercial and recreational quotas for red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) reef fish fishery and re-open the red snapper recreational season...

  16. Regional variation in mercury and stable isotopes of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in the northern Gulf of Mexico, USA.

    PubMed

    Zapp Sluis, Michelle; Boswell, Kevin M; Chumchal, Matthew M; Wells, R J David; Soulen, Brianne; Cowan, James H

    2013-02-01

    The presence of total mercury (Hg) in fish tissue and the potential associated health risks has become a global concern in marine ecosystems. Few studies have examined basin-scale variation in Hg accumulation in marine ecosystems, and determining if Hg concentrations in fish tissue vary across marine ecosystems is a key monitoring question. The present study evaluated Hg concentrations in red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) tissue across three regions of the northern Gulf of Mexico (Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, USA) and between two habitat types (oil and gas platforms and nonplatforms) within each region. Nitrogen (δ(15)N), carbon (δ(13)C), and sulfur (δ(34)S) stable isotopes were used to investigate ecological differences that may affect Hg concentrations among regions and between habitats. Mercury concentrations in red snapper tissue were positively correlated with fish total length. Regional differences in Hg concentrations were significant, with fish collected from Alabama having the highest concentrations and fish collected from Louisiana having the lowest. No significant difference existed in Hg concentrations between habitats, suggesting that association with platforms may not be a significant factor contributing to red snapper Hg concentrations. While δ(15)N did not differ significantly among the three regions, Texas red snapper were more enriched in δ(34)S and depleted in δ(13)C compared with Alabama and Louisiana red snapper. Although the majority of red snapper collected in the present study had Hg concentrations below safe consumption guidelines, regional differences suggest that spatially explicit monitoring programs may be important for basin-wide assessments. PMID:23180665

  17. Climate Risk and Vulnerability in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico Region: Interactions with Spatial Population and Land Cover Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Levy, M.; Baptista, S.; Adamo, S.

    2010-12-01

    Vulnerability to climate variability and change will depend on dynamic interactions between different aspects of climate, land-use change, and socioeconomic trends. Measurements and projections of these changes are difficult at the local scale but necessary for effective planning. New data sources and methods make it possible to assess land-use and socioeconomic changes that may affect future patterns of climate vulnerability. In this paper we report on new time series data sets that reveal trends in the spatial patterns of climate vulnerability in the Caribbean/Gulf of Mexico Region. Specifically, we examine spatial time series data for human population over the period 1990-2000, time series data on land use and land cover over 2000-2009, and infant mortality rates as a proxy for poverty for 2000-2008. We compare the spatial trends for these measures to the distribution of climate-related natural disaster risk hotspots (cyclones, floods, landslides, and droughts) in terms of frequency, mortality, and economic losses. We use these data to identify areas where climate vulnerability appears to be increasing and where it may be decreasing. Regions where trends and patterns are especially worrisome include coastal areas of Guatemala and Honduras.

  18. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 23 June 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1992-11-10

    A Sampling and Analysis Plan was prepared and submitted to a Scientific Review Committee for comment. Substantial comments relative to study objectives, sampling design, and sampling periods coupled with the passage of Hurricane Andrew precluded the scheduled initiation of sampling at offshore and coastal sites (Tasks 3 -- Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics and 4 -- Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas). A proposed revised schedule has been prepared for Tasks 3 and 4. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region), activities have involved identification and collection of the necessary data for the economic analysis. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Region Consumption and Use Patterns), activities have included near completion of the literature review and a reevaluation of the data collection efforts relative to the wholesaler, process plant, and restaurant components. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan), work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting.

  19. ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF ESTUARIES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The predominantly shallow estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico are ranked highest in the Nation in terms of water surface area, freshwater inflow, and wetlands area. Estuaries are an ecologically and economically valuable resource in the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. Environmental Protecti...

  20. Regional resource depletion and industry activity: The case of oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Stable and declining oil and gas prices have changed the industry's price expectations and, along with depletion of promising exploration prospects, has resulted in reduced exploration. Even with intensive additional exploration, production in most U.S. areas is expected to decline. What does this imply for the drilling and petroleum industry suppliers in particular regions? How should planners in government and the private sector project and incorporate the consequences of these changes in their strategies? This paper answers these questions for the industry operating in the offshore Gulf of Mexico. Future oil and gas production, as well as demand for offshore drilling and production facilities, are shown to depend on the size distribution of undiscovered fields, their associated production costs, and oil and gas prices. Declining well productivity is a consequence of development of progressively smaller fields so that long-run drilling demand should not decline in proportion to the expected production decline. Calculations show a substantial payoff to the drilling industry, in terms of potential demand increases, if it can develop and implement cost reducing technologies. Implications of these results for other offshore producing areas such as the North Sea are also discussed. ?? 1986.

  1. 75 FR 28760 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ...In accordance with the framework procedures for adjusting management measures of the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf FMP) and the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the South Atlantic region (South Atlantic FMP) NMFS provisionally recertifies two bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) and revises the construction and installation requirements......

  2. Gulf of Mexico data being collected

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This article was written to solicit information on geophysical well logs for the Gulf of Mexico which exhibited low resistivity in the reservoir. Because petroleum is normally a poor conductor of electricity, a low resistivity measurement in the reservoir will normally indicate water. However, as most petroleum geologists know, this is not always the case and should not be used as a sole decision maker in abandoning a well site. Therefore, this author solicits the readers to submit examples of pay zones in low resistivity reservoirs. The results will be published in a future text on this subject.

  3. 2013 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 7,316 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 18,900 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 13,400 to 24,200), the 7th largest reported and about the size of New Jersey. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 74.5 km3 (95% credible interval, 51.5 to 97.0), also the 7th largest on record.

  4. 2014 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 4,761 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 14,000 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 8,000 to 20,000) – an “average year”. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 50 km3 (95% credible interval, 20 to 77).

  5. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This...

  6. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This......

  7. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This......

  8. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This......

  9. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This...

  10. An oilspill risk analysis for the Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf lease area; regional environmental impact statement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBelle, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)lease area region. Results of the analysis can be used to determine relative risks associated with oil production in different regions to be offered in OCS Lease Sales 72, 74, and 79. The analysis considered the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model; and locations of major environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were (1) that oil exists in the lease area, and (2) that oil will be, found and produced from tracts sold in sales 72, 74, and 79. On the basis of a most likely resource estimate of 241 million barrels of oil to be produced over an 18-year production life from sales to be held in 1983 (sales 72, 74, 79), it was calculated that approximately one oilspill of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is 41-percent. For a high resource estimate case of sales to be held in 1983, 717 million barrels are estimated to be produced over an 18-year production life with an 83-percent chance of one or more spills of 1,000 barrels or larger occurring and contacting land within 30 days. These results depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from OCS platforms to shore. Given a total development scenario in which 5.6 billion barrels of oil are estimated to be present and produced, it was calculated that 18 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur over the 40-year production life of the proposed lease area. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than

  11. Nutrient Enrichment Drives Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Donald F.; Boynton, Walter R.; Crowder, Larry B.; Diaz, Robert J.; Howarth, Robert W.; Mee, Laurence D.; Nixon, Scott W.; Rabalais, Nancy N.; Rosenberg, Rutger; Sanders, James G.; Scavia, Donald; Turner, R. Eugene

    2009-04-01

    During most summers over the past 30 years, bottom dissolved oxygen across a large area of the Louisiana and upper Texas continental shelf declined to concentrations too low (hypoxia) for most fish and large invertebrate animals to survive. This area is one of the best known “dead zones” proliferating around the world [Diaz and Rosenberg, 2008]. During July 2008, hypoxic bottom waters extended across 20,720 square kilometers (Figure 1), but they were probably even more extensive because winds from Hurricane Dolly mixed the waters off Texas before the survey could be completed. Increased inputs of nutrients (principally nitrogen and phosphorus) from the U.S. agricultural heartland within the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) are implicated in the development and spread of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Consequently, the causes of, and solutions for, hypoxia have been subjects of extensive debate and analysis. An integrated scientific assessment led to a 2001 Action Plan [Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, 2001] with a goal of reducing the area of the hypoxic zone to less than 5000 square kilometers by reducing nitrogen loading [Rabalais et al., 2007].

  12. Streamflow to the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Judd, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-four major streams discharging directly to the Gulf of Mexico and having drainage areas exceeding 200 square miles have been identified in the United States. Periods of record for daily values of streamflow and water quality are summarized for the lower reaches of each of these streams. Forty-four U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations along the Gulf Coast with at least 40 years of daily streamflow data also were identified. These stations include most of the major streams and comprise 95 percent of the drainage area to the Gulf from the United States. Temporal trends are determined for daily mean streamflow for selected long-term stations for each of three streamflow perspectives: mean, minimum daily mean, and maximum daily mean. Distributions of monthly streamflow are determined for each of the 44 long-term stations. Temporal trends in streamflow and variations in monthly streamflow distributions are related to factors that affect streamflow: precipitation, land use, with- drawals, reservoir operations, and other factors. Trends in streamflow and variations in streamflow distributions at many stations are coincident with expected changes in streamflow caused by these factors.

  13. Pre-breakup geology of the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean: Its relation to Triassic and Jurassic rift systems of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Bartok, P. )

    1993-02-01

    A review of the pre-breakup geology of west-central Pangea, comprised of northern South America, Gulf of Mexico and West Africa, combined with a study of the Mesozoic rift trends of the region confirms a relation between the rift systems and the underlying older grain of deformation. The pre-breakup analysis focuses attention on the Precambrian, Early Paleozoic and Late Paleozoic tectonic events affecting the region and assumes a Pindell fit. Two Late Precambrian orogenic belts are observed in the west central Pangea. Along the northern South American margin and Yucatan a paleo northeast trending Pan-African aged fold belt is documented. A second system is observed along West Africa extending from the High Atlas to the Mauritanides and Rockelides. During the Late Paleozoic, renewed orogenic activity, associated with the Gondwana/Laurentia suture, affected large segments of west central Pangea. The general trend of the system is northeast-southwest and essentially parallels the Gyayana Shield, West African, and eastern North American cratons. Mesozoic rifting closely followed either the Precambrian trends or the Late Paleozoic orogenic belt. The Triassic component focuses along the western portions of the Gulf of Mexico continuing into eastern Mexico and western South America. The Jurassic rift trend followed along the separation between Yucatan and northern South America. At Lake Maracaibo the Jurassic rift system eventually overlaps the Triassic rifts. The Jurassic rift resulted in the [open quotes]Hispanic Corridor[close quotes] that permitted Tethyan and Pacific marine faunas to mix at a time when the Gulf of Mexico underwent continental sedimentation.

  14. Sea level rise in Louisiana and Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.; Penland, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Data from two tide-gage networks in Louisiana and the northern Gulf of Mexico were analyzed to determine local and regional trends in relative sea level rise. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) maintains a network of 83 tide-gage stations throughout coastal Louisiana. Of these, 20 have records for two lunar nodal cycles or more, and some date back to 1933. The authors used the USACE data set to determine the local and regional character of relative sea level rise in Louisiana. The National ocean Survey (NOS) maintains nine tide gage stations throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. All of the records of these stations exceed two lunar nodal cycles, and some date back to 1908. The authors used the NOS data set to determine the character of relative sea level rise throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico. This investigation updates and extends the previous systematic regional tide gage analysis (which covered 1908-1983) to 1988.

  15. 77 FR 21955 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    .... The final rule for Amendment 5 to the FMP for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (56 FR 22827..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Red Snapper Management... management measures described in a regulatory amendment to the Fishery Management Plan for the Reef...

  16. 76 FR 54727 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Requirements Spiny Lobster Amendment 1 (July 15, 1987, 52 FR 22659) initially implemented the Federal spiny... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... Fishery Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic (FMP)...

  17. Florida lineament: Key tectonic element of eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The origin of the Florida lineament, a major basement lineament that strikes northwest-southeast across the West Florida Shelf and southern Florida, is a key to the history of the Gulf of Mexico. Regional magnetic and gravity trends are truncated along the Florida lineament. New geologic data from recent wells on the West Florida Shelf and magnetic anomaly data indicate that pre-Mesozoic basement terranes on opposite sides of the Florida lineament were contiguous prior to Triassic-Jurassic volcanism and exhibit only minimal lateral offset across the Florida lineament at present. The lack of major lateral offset of pre-Mesozoic basement terranes across the Florida lineament and lithologic and geophysical data suggest that the lineament represents a Triassic-Jurassic extensional rift margin. The Florida lineament is interpreted to be the southeastward continuation of the well-documented peripheral fault system, which delineates the rifted continental margin of the northern Gulf basin. The continuation of the peripheral fault system along the Florida lineament suggests that the tectonostratigraphic terranes associated with the Mesozoic producing trends of the northern Gulf basin may extend southeastward along the Florida lineament. The interpretation of the Florida lineament as an extensional rift margin places significant constraints on any tectonic model of the Gulf of Mexico region. A tectonic interpretation consistent with the constraints suggests that the West Florida Shelf and southern Florida region formed as the result of Triassic-Jurassic extension around a pole of rotation in central Florida. The central Florida pole of rotation is intermediate to the poles of rotation counterclockwise of Yucatan out of the northern Gulf basin. This suggests that the region south of the Florida lineament underwent extension synchronous with the rotation of the Yucatan block.

  18. NASA's Contributions to the Gulf of Mexico Alliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glorioso, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the contribution that NASA has made and the plans for future missions that will assist the mission of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA). Specific reference to the work of the Stennis Space Center is reviewed. Some of the projects are: Coastal Online Assessment and Synthesis Tool (COAST), Regional Sediment Management, Coral Reef Early Warning System, Harmful Algal Bloom, Hypoxia, Land-Use and Land-Cover (LULC) Change from 1974-2008 around Mobile Bay, AL, Satellite Estimation of Suspended Particulate Loads in and around Mobile Bay, AL, Estimating Relative Nutrient Contributions of Agriculture and Forests Using MODIS Time Series, Coastal Marsh Monitoring for Persistent Saltwater Intrusion, Standardized Remote Sensing PRoduct for Water Clarity estimation within Gulf of Mexico Coastal Waters.

  19. Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and central and eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, and in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico. These trends are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps, reservoirs, and hydrocarbon types. The source for the Jurassic hydrocarbons is Smackover algal mudstones. The Jurassic oil trend includes the area north of the regional peripheral fault systems in the tri-state area, and extends into the area north of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs and salt anticlines, with Smackover grainstones and dolostones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones as reservoirs. This trend has potential for Jurassic oil accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic oil and gas-condensate trend includes the onshore area between the regional peripheral fault systems and Wiggins arch and extends into the area of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs, salt related anticlines, and extensional faults. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Haynesville carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Smackover grainstones, packstones, dolostones, and marine sandstones, and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones serve as reservoirs. This trend contains most of the Jurassic fields in the eastern Gulf coastal plain. The trend has high potential for significant petroleum accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic deep natural gas trend includes the onshore area south of the Wiggins arch and extends into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf. Traps are faulted salt anticlines with basement highs as potential traps. Cotton Valley deltaic-strandplain sandstones and Norphlet eolian sandstones are the reservoirs. Several gas discoveries below 20,000 ft have been made in this trend in Mississippi and offshore Alabama. The trend has excellent potential for major gas accumulations in coastal Alabama and central Gulf of Mexico.

  20. Measuring Capacity for Resilience among Coastal Counties of the US Northern Gulf of Mexico Region

    PubMed Central

    Reams, Margaret A.; Lam, Nina S. N.; Baker, Ariele

    2016-01-01

    Many have voiced concern about the long-term survival of coastal communities in the face of increasingly intense storms and sea level rise. In this study we select indicators of key theoretical concepts from the social-ecological resilience literature, aggregate those indicators into a resilience-capacity index, and calculate an index score for each of the 52 coastal counties of Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Building upon Cutter’s Social Vulnerability Index work [1], we use Factor Analysis to combine 43 variables measuring demographics, social capital, economic resources, local government actions, and environmental conditions within the counties. Then, we map the counties’ scores to show the spatial distribution of resilience capacities. The counties identified as having the highest resilience capacities include the suburban areas near New Orleans, Louisiana and Tampa, Florida, and the growing beach-tourist communities of Alabama and central Florida. Also, we examine whether those counties more active in oil and gas development and production, part of the region’s “energy coast”, have greater capacity for resilience than other counties in the region. Correlation analyses between the resilience-capacity index scores and two measures of oil and gas industry activity (total employment and number of business establishments within five industry categories) yielded no statistically significant associations. By aggregating a range of important contextual variables into a single index, the study demonstrates a useful approach for the more systematic examination and comparison of exposure, vulnerability and capacity for resilience among coastal communities.

  1. HIGH CYANOBACTERIAL ABUNDANCE IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic phytoplankton comprise a wide variety of taxa spanning more than 2 orders of magnitude in size, yet studies of estuarine phytoplankton often overlook the picoplankton, particularly chroococcoid cyanobacteria (c.f. Synechocococcus). Three Gulf of Mexico estuaries (Apalachi...

  2. Phytoplankton and sediments in Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Affected both by terrestrial factors like agriculture, deforestation, and erosion, and by marine factors like salinity levels, ocean temperature and water pollution, coastal environments are the dynamic interface between land and sea. In this MODIS image from January 15, 2002, the Gulf of Mexico is awash in a mixture of phytoplankton and sediment. Tan-colored sediment is flowing out into the Gulf from the Mississippi River, whose floodplain cuts a pale, wide swath to the right of center in the image, and also from numerous smaller rivers along the Louisiana coast (center). Mixing with the sediment are the multi-colored blue and green swirls that reveal the presence of large populations of marine plants called phytoplankton. Phytoplankton populations bloom and then fade, and these cycles affect fish and mammals-including humans-higher up the food chain. Certain phytoplankton are toxic to both fish and humans, and coastal health departments must monitor ecosystems carefully, often restricting fishing or harvesting of shellfish until the blooms have subsided.

  3. Hydrocarbon flux from natural deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Fulton, Patrick M.

    2014-06-01

    High salinities and high temperatures at the seafloor record the upward flow of water and hydrocarbons from depth at natural vents in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. We present a multiphase heat- and solute-transport model, in which water supplied from depth transports heat and salt, and hydrocarbon transports heat. We show that there is a unique water and hydrocarbon flux that simulates the observed salinity and temperature. We estimate the hydrocarbon flux to be 3.2-15×104 t yr and 1.8-8.0×104 t yr from two vents at lease blocks MC852/853 and GB425. These fluxes are 1-4 orders of magnitude greater than previous estimates from individual deepwater vents. If these results are extrapolated to the entire Gulf of Mexico, then we estimate the regional hydrocarbon flux to be at least 100× greater than previous estimates and 14-120% of the hydrocarbon flux from the Macondo oil spill. Large natural seepage may inoculate marine basins such as the Gulf of Mexico from oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout by sustaining populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

  4. Sperm whales (Physeter catodon) in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collum, L.A.; Fritts, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of the sperm whale, Physeter catodon, was documented in the Gulf of Mexico during 1979 to 1981 using regular aerial surveys and opportunistic sightings from ships. Most sightings were in the western Gulf of Mexico in deep waters near the edge of the continental shelf. A total of 47 adults and 12 young animals was sighted in groups containing from one to 14 animals.

  5. HABSOS INTEGRATED CASE STUDY FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is part of a Harmful Algal Bloom Observing System Pilot Project for which the Gulf of Mexico Program is the coordinator. The Program office along with the EPA Gulf Breeze Laboratory will be working with the NOAA National Coastal Data Development Center, the National...

  6. Carbon Sequestration in Wetland Soils of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal wetlands play an important but complex role in the global carbon cycle, contributing to the ecosystem service of greenhouse gas regulation through carbon sequestration. Although coastal wetlands occupy a small percent of the total US land area, their potential for carbon...

  7. LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF THE TENSAS RIVER BASIN, MISSISSIPPI RIVER DELTA REGION, AND GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A group of landscape ecological indicators were applied to biophysical data masked to the Tensas River Basin. The indicators were use to identify and prioritize sources of nutrients in a
    Mississippi River System sub-basin. Remotely sensed data were used for change detection a...

  8. Metals in Bone Tissue of Antillean Manatees from the Gulf of Mexico and Chetumal Bay, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Romero-Calderón, Ana G; Morales-Vela, Benjamin; Rosíles-Martínez, René; Olivera-Gómez, León D; Delgado-Estrella, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of seven metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn) were analyzed in 33 bone tissue samples of Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) found dead in lagoons and rivers of Tabasco and Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico and Chetumal Bay in the Caribbean region. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn were significantly different between regions, with greater levels found in the Gulf of Mexico group than in the Mexican Caribbean group (p < 0.05). Pb concentrations differed significantly between adults and calves. No differences were observed between sexes. Metal concentrations detected in the manatee bones were higher than most of those reported for bones in other marine mammals around the world. Future studies are necessary to establish whether the metal concentrations represent a risk to the health of the species. PMID:26519079

  9. 76 FR 80343 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Plan and Amendment 11 to the Spiny Lobster Fishery Management Plan in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Regions. DATES: Public hearings for Amendment 35 (Reef Fish) and Amendment 11 (Spiny Lobster) will... removing the fixed closed season. Spiny Lobster Amendment 11 The Gulf Council is holding two...

  10. 76 FR 18723 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper IFQ...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... information collection instrument and instructions should be directed to Rich Malinowski, (727) 824-5305 or Rich.Malinowski@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract This request is for an extension of...

  11. 76 FR 59102 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Spiny Lobster Tail-Separation Permit Requirements Spiny Lobster Amendment 1 (July 15, 1987, 52 FR 22659... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... to implement Amendment 10 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

  12. Gulf of Mexico Oceanography Atlas available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The second full-color volume of the Atlas Oceanogáfico del Golfo de México has recently been published by the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas of México (GEO-IIE) (see Eos, Feb. 20, 1990, for announcement of volume 1). This second of an eight-volume series describes the hydrography, baroclinic flows and transports, water masses distributions, and the kinematic properties of anticyclonic-cyclonic ring pairs (modons) of the central and western Gulf of Mexico (26°-20°40‧N, 97°40‧-93°W). The data presented and analyzed in this volume were collected during the Argos 86-1 oceanographic cruise conducted by the GEO-IIE aboard the R/V Justo Sierra during October and November 1986. Authors of the volume are Víctor M. V. Vidal, Francisco V. Vidal, and Abel Hernández. It has 16 chapters in 715 pages, including 248 full-page color plates and 35 tables.

  13. Tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Pindell, J.L.; Barrett, S.F.; Dewey, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The authors propose a three-phase geologic-kinematic model for the evolution of the Gulf of Mexico/Caribbean region starting with a detailed Late Paleozoic (Alleghenian) plate reconstruction and using a revised relative-motion history for North America (NOAM) and South American (SOAM). The completely closed initial reconstruction incorporates the effects of Jurassic syn-rift crustal extension, an improved Equatorial Atlantic fit, and the post-rift accretion and deformation in northwestern South America. The Yucatan block and western Bahamas continental basement occupied the area of the present Gulf of Mexico. The three phases of evolution are: MIDDLE JURASSIC-CHAMPANIAN; SOAM migrated east-southeast from NOAM, and the Yucatan block rotated 43/sup 0/CCW about a pole in northern Florida reaching its present position by the Berriasian. Carbonate shelves formed along the rifted margins of the Gulf of Mexico and proto-Caribbean. Early Cretaceous crust of the Caribbean Plate (CARIB) formed in the Pacific Basin and was intruded by medial Cretaceous basalts (B'') somewhere to the west of South America. CARIB partially collided with southern Yucatan and northwest SOAM in the Late Cretaceous, and with the Bahamas in the late Paleocene-Middle Eocene. POST-MIDDLE EOCENE: Minor west-northwest NOAM-SOAM convergence occurred along preexisting Atlantic fracture zones. CARIB has migrated eastward by 1200 km, subducting proto-Caribbean crust and forming the Lesser Antilles arc. The original Greater Antilles-Aves Ridge arc has been dissected by anastomosing transforms connecting the Middle American and Lesser Antilles trenches.

  14. 77 FR 2991 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) of a Final Supplemental Environmental... Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard (MS 5410), New Orleans, Louisiana...

  15. 78 FR 14116 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Planning Area (EPA) Lease Sale 225...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Planning Area (EPA) Lease Sale 225 and 226, Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, Public Information Office (GM 250I),...

  16. 78 FR 21969 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning... MMAA104000 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA... Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, Public Information Office (GM 250G), 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard,...

  17. 77 FR 59185 - Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Notice of Charter Renewal AGENCY: Environmental... Committee Act (FACA), 5 U.S.C. App.2, the Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee (GMCAC) is a necessary... Mexico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: LaKeshia Robertson, Designated Federal Officer, Gulf of...

  18. 78 FR 62587 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting of the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of the Ad Hoc Red...

  19. Crust and mantle of the gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, G.W.

    1972-01-01

    A SEEMING paradox has puzzled investigators of the crustal structure of the Gulf of Mexico since Ewing et al.1 calculated that a unit area of the rather thick crust in the gulf contains less mass than does a combination of the crust and enough of the upper mantle to make a comparable thickness in the Atlantic Ocean. They also noted that the free-air gravity of the gulf is essentially normal and fails by a large factor to be low enough to reflect the mass difference that they calculated. We propose a solution to this problem. ?? 1972 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. 78 FR 61842 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC912 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Meeting of the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold meetings of the: Mackerel,...

  1. 78 FR 69649 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC992 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa,...

  2. 78 FR 38951 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC735 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., New Orleans, LA 70130; telephone: (504) 561-0500. ] Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  3. 75 FR 72790 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA056 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Blvd, Kenner, LA 70062; telephone: (504) 467-5611. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  4. 77 FR 58527 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC245 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...; telephone: (813) 874-1234. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois......

  5. 76 FR 16385 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA313 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Beach, AL 36561; telephone: (251) 981- 9811. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management...

  6. 76 FR 45516 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA608 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico...; telephone: (512) 323-5466. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North...

  7. 76 FR 56171 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA692 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...) 348-1630. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  8. 75 FR 14427 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV47 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico...., Galveston, TX 77551. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois...

  9. 76 FR 37064 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA515 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico.... Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa,......

  10. 77 FR 8810 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB007 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... 39501. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  11. 76 FR 60807 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA720 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene a meeting of the Standing, Special Shrimp and... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  12. 75 FR 7444 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU46 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  13. 78 FR 12294 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC516 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico..., March 12, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management...

  14. 75 FR 11846 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV05 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  15. 76 FR 19750 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA357 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  16. 75 FR 43147 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX75 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  17. 77 FR 58526 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC244 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public hearings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., 2012 at eight locations throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The public hearings will begin at 6 p.m....

  18. 77 FR 25144 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  19. 75 FR 80041 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA098 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management.... on Wednesday, January 12, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico...

  20. 75 FR 19941 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV87 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... than 2 p.m. Thursday, May 6, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico......

  1. 75 FR 39495 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX42 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  2. 76 FR 26252 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA415 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois...

  3. 78 FR 9372 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC488 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois...

  4. 75 FR 79341 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA095 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  5. 75 FR 7444 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU45 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607....

  6. 75 FR 43148 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX76 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  7. 78 FR 14980 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC540 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The scoping meetings will begin at 6 p.m. and will conclude no later than 9...

  8. 78 FR 77105 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD037 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico..., 2014 at nine locations throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The Council will also host a webinar...

  9. 77 FR 39998 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (985) 787-2163. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North...

  10. 75 FR 69921 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA027 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Blvd., Webster, TX 77598; telephone: (281) 332-7952. Council Address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  11. 75 FR 32747 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XW86 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... the webinar on the Gulf of Mexico's website. Directions on how to register will be posted one...

  12. 76 FR 13130 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA281 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Tuesday, March 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  13. 78 FR 59656 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC892 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...; telephone: (956) 761-6511. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North...

  14. 75 FR 63146 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ65 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203...

  15. 76 FR 53416 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA666 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... accessible via Internet. Please go to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's Web site at......

  16. 77 FR 42699 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC115 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public hearings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The public hearings will begin at 6 p.m. and will conclude no later than 9......

  17. 76 FR 80889 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA894 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...) 348-1630. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  18. 78 FR 25955 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC656 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council,...

  19. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  20. 78 FR 78824 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD051 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... register. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  1. 76 FR 58783 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA719 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607....

  2. 76 FR 4636 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA158 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council.... SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene public meetings. Additional items have... 39501. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  3. 75 FR 81585 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA114 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  4. 76 FR 41765 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA570 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  5. 76 FR 57023 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA702 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  6. 76 FR 37063 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA514 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...., Wednesday, July 13, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  7. 77 FR 42698 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC114 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois...

  8. 76 FR 28733 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA445 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The webinar will be accessible via Internet. Please go to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  9. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  10. 75 FR 39495 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX44 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Thursday, July 29, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  11. 76 FR 60807 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA720 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council..., 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management...

  12. 76 FR 37328 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA519 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  13. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  14. 76 FR 41766 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA569 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Fisheries Service (NMFS). ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Migratory Pelagic Resources in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico and Amendment 32 to the Reef Fish...

  15. 76 FR 58783 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA720 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois...

  16. 77 FR 76473 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC418 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's office located at 2203...

  17. 76 FR 81480 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA908 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... Please go to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's Web site at www.gulfcouncil.org...

  18. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  19. 77 FR 16539 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB098 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  20. 78 FR 25255 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC649 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  1. 77 FR 41376 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings...), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's Web site at www.gulfcouncil.org for instructions....

  2. 78 FR 63966 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC930 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  3. 78 FR 31519 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC697 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene a meeting of the Coastal Migratory Pelagics (CMP) Advisory... posted to the Gulf Council's Web site. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council,...

  4. 78 FR 42755 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC760 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public hearings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... Gulf of Mexico. The public hearings will begin at 6 p.m. and will conclude no later than 9 p.m....

  5. Dispersion of a tracer in the deep Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwell, James R.; He, Ruoying; Xue, Zuo; DiMarco, Steven F.; Spencer, Laura J.; Chapman, Piers

    2016-02-01

    A 25 km streak of CF3SF5 was released on an isopycnal surface approximately 1100 m deep, and 150 m above the bottom, along the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, to study stirring and mixing of a passive tracer. The location and depth of the release were near those of the deep hydrocarbon plume resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil well rupture. The tracer was sampled between 5 and 12 days after release, and again 4 and 12 months after release. The tracer moved along the slope at first but gradually moved into the interior of the Gulf. Diapycnal spreading of the patch during the first 4 months was much faster than it was between 4 and 12 months, indicating that mixing was greatly enhanced over the slope. The rate of lateral homogenization of the tracer was much greater than observed in similar experiments in the open ocean, again possibly enhanced near the slope. Maximum concentrations found in the surveys had fallen by factors of 104, 107, and 108, at 1 week, 4 months, and 12 months, respectively, compared with those estimated for the initial tracer streak. A regional ocean model was used to simulate the tracer field and help interpret its dispersion and temporal evolution. Model-data comparisons show that the model simulation was able to replicate statistics of the observed tracer distribution that would be important in assessing the impact of oil releases in the middepth Gulf.

  6. Global climate change impacts on coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico: considerations for integrated coastal management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, John W.; Yáñez-Arancibia, Alejandro; Cowan, James H.; Day, Richard H.; Twilley, Robert R.; Rybczyk, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is important in considerations of integrated coastal management in the Gulf of Mexico. This is true for a number of reasons. Climate in the Gulf spans the range from tropical to the lower part of the temperate zone. Thus, as climate warms, the tropical temperate interface, which is currently mostly offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, will increasingly move over the coastal zone of the northern and eastern parts of the Gulf. Currently, this interface is located in South Florida and around the US-Mexico border in the Texas-Tamaulipas region. Maintaining healthy coastal ecosystems is important because they will be more resistant to climate change.

  7. Consequences of Chixculub Impact for the Tectonic and Geodynamic Evolution of the Gulf of Mexico North Carribean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, C.; Crespy, A.; Martinez-Reyes, J.

    2013-05-01

    The debate for Pacific exotic origin versus in situ inter American plate Atlantic origin of the Caribbean plate is active in the scientific community since decades. Independently of the origin of this plate, its fast motion towards the east at a present rate of 2cm/yr is accepted to have been initiated during the early-most Cenozoic. The Paleocene is a key period in the global evolution of Central America mainly marked also by the Chicxulub multiring meteor impact in Yucatan. We question here the genetic relationship between this impact event and the incipient tectonic escape of the Caribbean plate. The mostly recent published models suggest this impact has affected the whole crust down to the Moho, the upper mantle being rapidly and considerably uplifted. The crust was then fragmented 600km at least from the point of impact, and large circular depressions were rapidly filled by clastic sediments from Cantarell to Western Cuba via Chiapas and Belize. North of the impact, the whole Gulf of Mexico was affected by mass gravity sliding, initiated also during the Paleocene in Texas, remaining active in this basin up to present time. South of the impact, in the Caribbean plate, the Yucatan basin was rapidly opened, indicating a fast escape of the crustal material towards the unique free boundary, the paleo-Antilles subduction zone. Shear waves velocity data below the Caribbean plate suggest this crustal tectonic escape was enhanced by the fast eastward flowing mantle supporting a fragmented and stretched crust. The proposed model suggests Chicxulub impact (but also the hypothetic Beata impact) have fragmented brittle crust, then easily drifted towards the east. This could explain the Paleogene evolution of the Caribbean plate largely stretched during its early evolution. Geologically, this evolution could explain the absence of evident Paleogene oblique subduction along the Caribbean plate northern and southern margins, marked only by Mid Cretaceous dragged volcanic

  8. Perspective on eastern migration studies: stopover ecology of migratory landbirds in the Gulf Coast region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrow, W.C., Jr.; Johnson Randall, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Millions of Nearctic-Neotropical landbirds move through the coastal habitats of the Gulf of Mexico each spring and autumn as they migrate across and around the Gulf. Migration routes in the Gulf region are not static and they shift year to year and season to season according to prevailing wind patterns. Using data from field and radar studies, we mapped patterns of migration movement and landfall in the Gulf of Mexico region. Map categories include coastal areas where migrant numbers are consistently high, consistently common, sporadically common-abundant, sporadically common, or sparse. Weather surveillance radar data indicates that habitats along the Northwest Gulf Coast are consistently used each year.

  9. Binational collaboration to study Gulf of Mexico's harmful algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Inia; Hu, Chuanmin; Steidinger, Karen; Muller-Karger, Frank; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Wolny, Jennifer; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Santamaria-del-Angel, Eduardo; Tafoya-del-Angel, Fausto; Alvarez-Torres, Porfirio; Herrera Silveira, Jorge; Allen, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis cause massive fish kills and other public health and economic problems in coastal waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico [Steidinger, 2009]. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a gulf-wide problem that require a synoptic observing system for better serving decision-making needs. The major nutrient sources that initiate and maintain these HABs and the possible connectivity of blooms in different locations are important questions being addressed through new collaborations between Mexican and U.S. researchers and government institutions. These efforts were originally organized under the U.S./Mexico binational partnership for the HABs Observing System (HABSOS), led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program (EPAGMP) and several agencies in Veracruz, Mexico, since 2006. In 2010 these efforts were expanded to include other Mexican states and institutions with the integrated assessment and management of the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem (GoMLME) program sponsored by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  10. Origin of arches in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.; Jackson, M.L.W. )

    1990-07-01

    The San Marcos and Sabine arches are prominent north- to northwest-trending basement uplifts in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin that may be late Mesozoic to Cenozoic foreland or intraplate folds rather than domes over plutons or buoyant basement blocks. These arches are subparallel to and contemporaneous with orogenic episodes in the northwest-trending fold-thrust belt of Mexico. Arch movement was also contemporaneous with rapid convergence between the North American and Pacific plates. Arch development in the gulf as a result of tectonic compression is plausible in view of increasing recognition of wide zones of foreland and intraplate deformation in continents. Current tectonic models of the development of the gulf inaccurately predict gradual, decelerating subsidence when these arches were most active.

  11. Natural and unnatural oil slicks in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Garcia-Pineda, O.; Beet, A.; Daneshgar Asl, S.; Feng, L.; Graettinger, G.; French-McCay, D.; Holmes, J.; Hu, C.; Huffer, F.; Leifer, I.; Muller-Karger, F.; Solow, A.; Silva, M.; Swayze, G.

    2015-12-01

    When wind speeds are 2-10 m s-1, reflective contrasts in the ocean surface make oil slicks visible to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) under all sky conditions. Neural network analysis of satellite SAR images quantified the magnitude and distribution of surface oil in the Gulf of Mexico from persistent, natural seeps and from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) discharge. This analysis identified 914 natural oil seep zones across the entire Gulf of Mexico in pre-2010 data. Their ˜0.1 µm slicks covered an aggregated average of 775 km2. Assuming an average volume of 77.5 m3 over an 8-24 h lifespan per oil slick, the floating oil indicates a surface flux of 2.5-9.4 × 104 m3 yr-1. Oil from natural slicks was regionally concentrated: 68%, 25%, 7%, and <1% of the total was observed in the NW, SW, NE, and SE Gulf, respectively. This reflects differences in basin history and hydrocarbon generation. SAR images from 2010 showed that the 87 day DWH discharge produced a surface-oil footprint fundamentally different from background seepage, with an average ocean area of 11,200 km2 (SD 5028) and a volume of 22,600 m3 (SD 5411). Peak magnitudes of oil were detected during equivalent, ˜14 day intervals around 23 May and 18 June, when wind speeds remained <5 m s-1. Over this interval, aggregated volume of floating oil decreased by 21%; area covered increased by 49% (p < 0.1), potentially altering its ecological impact. The most likely causes were increased applications of dispersant and surface burning operations.

  12. Natural and unnatural oil slicks in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ian R. MacDonald; O. Garcia-Pineda; A. Beet; S. Daneshgar Asl; L. Feng; D. G. Graettinger; D. French-McCay; J. Holmes; C. Hu; F. Huffer; I. Leifer; F. Mueller-Karger; A. Solow; M. Silva; Swayze, Gregg A.

    2015-01-01

    When wind speeds are 2 – 10 m s−1, reflective contrasts in the ocean surface make oil slicks visible to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) under all sky conditions. Neural network analysis of satellite SAR images quantified the magnitude and distribution of surface oil in the Gulf of Mexico from persistent, natural seeps and from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) discharge. This analysis identified 914 natural oil seep zones across the entire Gulf of Mexico in pre-2010 data. Their ∼0.1 µm slicks covered an aggregated average of 775 km2. Assuming an average volume of 77.5 m3over an 8 – 24 h lifespan per oil slick, the floating oil indicates a surface flux of 2.5 – 9.4 × 104 m3 y−1. Oil from natural slicks was regionally concentrated: 68%, 25%, 7%, and <1% of the total was observed in the NW, SW, NE and SE Gulf, respectively. This reflects differences in basin history and hydrocarbon generation. SAR images from 2010 showed that the 87-day DWH discharge produced a surface-oil footprint fundamentally different from background seepage, with an average ocean area of 11,200 km2 (SD 5,028) and a volume of 22,600 m3 (SD 5,411). Peak magnitudes of oil were detected during equivalent, ∼14-day intervals around 23 May and 18 June, when wind speeds remained <5 m s−1. Over this interval, aggregated volume of floating oil decreased by 21%; area covered increased by 49% (p < .1), potentially altering its ecological impact. The most likely causes were increased applications of dispersant and surface burning operations.

  13. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1994-01-28

    Task 2 (Preparation of the Sampling and Analysis Plan) activities involved the incorporation of the offshore site selection process into the Sampling and Analysis Plan. Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included making decisions on tissue analyses and performing analyses of water and sediment samples. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the completion of the spring benthos samples collection on pre-termination samples at Four Isle Dome and the first post-termination samples at Delacroix Island. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gum of Mexico Region) activities included continued work on development of a base case production forecast, modeling future production, and determining economic impact of treatment technologies. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work involved the completion of the fall survey season and the initiation of the survey data assembly. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities included presentations at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry annual meeting and Minerals Management Service Information Transfer Meeting. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  14. The Younger Dryas Cool Episode in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Kennett, J. P.

    1990-12-01

    Data are presented from Orca Basin piston core EN32-PC4 in the Gulf of Mexico that confirm the existence of surface water cooling during the Younger Dry as chronozone (11-10 ka). Late glacial planktonic foraminiferal species made a reappearance between 11.4 and 9.8 ka, an episode also marked by distinctly higher oxygen isotopic values derived from the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber. The presence of the Younger Dryas event in the gulf at 27°N demonstrates that surface water cooling extended to mid-latitude regions in the North Atlantic. The cool surface water interval is bracketed by rapid shifts in δ18O related to changes in the influx of meltwater to the Gulf of Mexico. A chronology based upon seven accelerator radiocarbon dates indicates that cooling commenced over a ˜500 year period and ended in less than 200 years. These results are among the first deep-sea sediment data documenting the climatic transitions bracketing the Younger Dryas with a rapidity observed in ice core records. A rapid decrease in δ18O values measured in the white form of Gs. ruber at 10.2 ka is explained by significant meltwater influx into the gulf and rapid increase in sea surface temperatures. Surprisingly, a similar decrease is not observed in the pink form of Gs. ruber, a summer surface water dweller in the gulf. This discrepancy may be explained by continued meltwater influx throughout the Younger Dryas during the summers only, such that there was no change in the δ18O of the pink form at the end of the episode. An additional possibility is that warming at the end of the Younger Dryas raised year-average temperatures and summer temperatures remained constant. The coincidence of rapid shifts in δ18O with the Younger Dryas strongly suggests a dynamic causal relationship and therefore supports a model for the cause of the Younger Dryas cooling based on changes in the routing of Laurentide glacial meltwater.

  15. 78 FR 76758 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... of Mexico Recreational Season for Red Snapper AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: NMFS announces the closure date of the recreational season for red snapper in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) for the 2014 fishing season through this temporary...

  16. Marine and Estuarine Ecology. Man and the Gulf of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Bobby N.; And Others

    "Man and the Gulf of Mexico (MGM)" is a marine science curriculum developed to meet the marine science needs of tenth through twelfth grade students in Mississippi and Alabama schools. This MGM unit, which focuses on marine and estuarine ecology, is divided into six sections. The first section contains unit objectives, discussions of the estuarine…

  17. The Gulf of Mexico loop current and deepwater drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, S.P.; Vermersch, J.A. ); Barker, J.W. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reviews petroleum industry knowledge of the Gulf of Mexico circulation feature known as the Loop Current. Data obtained in Green Canyon in 1989 indicate how the Loop Current influences drilling operations. The paper also discusses the analytic and operational considerations for drilling-riser and station-keeping system management when these currents are of concern.

  18. Manatees in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonde, Robert K.; Lefebvre, Lynn W.

    2001-01-01

    The endangered Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) inhabits rivers and estuaries along both coasts of Florida and, to a lesser extent, adjacent states (Figure 1). Since 1990, documented sightings of manatees outside of Florida have been increasing. This increase in sightings probably represents northward shifts in manatee distribution made possible by man-made sources of warm water (i.e., industrial effluents), as well as a decade of relatively warm winters. The most likely source of emigrants on the Gulf coast is the population of manatees that overwinter in the headwaters of the Crystal and Homosassa Rivers, Citrus County, FL. This group of manatees has undergone a steady increase in numbers, (approximately 7% per year from 1977-1991; Eberhardt and O’Shea 1995). Some emigrants may also come from the Tampa-Ft. Myers region, where human impacts on habitat are greater. Manatees are intelligent, long-lived mammals that appear to adapt readily to new environments and situations. However, manatees have relatively low metabolic rates, and cold winter temperatures restrict their northern distribution.

  19. Evidence of multidecadal climate variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Richard Z.; Brock, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico coastal region is vulnerable to a variety of natural hazards, many of which are linked to climate and climate variability. Hurricanes, which are one such climate-related hazard, are a major recurring problem, and the active hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005 raised interest in better understanding the controls and risks of hurricanes. Examination of historical records reveals intervals of alternating low and high hurricane activity that appear to be related to changes in average sea-surface temperature in the North Atlantic Ocean. Analyses of instrumental temperature records from the North Atlantic show decadal-scale oscillations of slightly higher versus slightly lower average temperature extending back in time for over 100 years. This oscillation is known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO).

  20. Toxiological Considerations in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Deep Water Horizon oil rig exploded on April 20, 2010, resulting in an ongoing release of light sweet petroleum crude oil and methane into Gulf of Mexico waters. The release from the deepwater wellhead 41 miles from Louisiana is at approximately 1 mile depth, and flow rates e...

  1. Marine Habitats. Man and the Gulf of Mexico Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Bobby N.; And Others

    "Man and the Gulf of Mexico (MGM)" is a marine science curriculum developed to meet the marine science needs of tenth through twelfth grade students in Mississippi and Alabama schools. This MGM unit, which focuses on marine habitats, contains an introduction (with unit objectives and brief introductory comments) followed by five sections, each…

  2. 78 FR 46292 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... abbreviated framework and requested public comment (78 FR 37500). The proposed rule and abbreviated framework... framework to the Fishery Management Plans (FMPs) for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico prepared... fisheries are managed under their respective FMPs. The Gulf reef fish FMP was prepared by the Gulf...

  3. THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF ESTUARIES: A FOCUS ON THE ATLANTIC OCEAN AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring the estuaries of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico coastlines was performed annually from 1990 to 1997 to assess ecological conditions on a regional basis for four biogeographic provinces. These province estimates - Virginian, Carolinian, West Indian, and Louisiani...

  4. 76 FR 75488 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... Amendment 10 and requested public comment (76 FR 54227). On September 23, 2011, NMFS published a proposed rule for Amendment 10 and requested public comment (76 FR 59102). The proposed rule and Amendment 10... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and...

  5. SYNOPTIC SURVEY OF TOTAL MERCURY IN RECREATIONAL FINFISH OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In association with the Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) and the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission (GSMFC), the National Seafood Inspection Laboratory (NSIL) will design a synoptic survey to determine the mercury (Hg) concentration in selected Gulf of Mexico fisheries species. ...

  6. Early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Lavoie, Dawn L.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2011-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico coastal region and its diverse ecosystems are threatened by population and development pressure and by the impacts of rising sea level and severe storms such as the series of hurricanes that has impacted the northern Gulf in recent years. In response to the complex management issues facing the region, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) organized a multidisciplinary research program to coordinate the activities of USGS and other scientists working in the northern Gulf of Mexico region (fig. 1). The Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project aims to develop a thorough understanding of the dynamic coastal ecosystems on the northern Gulf coast, the impact of human activities on these ecosystems, and the vulnerability of ecosystems and human communities to more frequent and more intense hurricanes in the future. A special issue of Geo-Marine Letters published in December 2009 is devoted to early results of studies completed as part of this project. These studies, which have been conducted at sites throughout the northern Gulf region, from the Chandeleur Islands to Apalachicola Bay, have focused on three themes: (1) The underlying geologic framework that exerts controls over coastal processes (2) The impact of human activities on nearshore water quality (3) Hurricanes and associated effects

  7. 76 FR 64327 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Fish, Shrimp, and Coral and Coral Reefs Fishery Management Plans (Generic ACL Amendment) for purposes... Register on September 26, 2011 (76 FR 59373). As part of this amendment, the GMFMC has selected to remove..., and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery; South Atlantic Snapper-Grouper Fishery...

  8. Lithosphere thickness and rupture mode variation along the Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Campos, X.; Fernández, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the lithosphere thickness along the Baja California peninsula and continental northwestern Mexico in order to identify the different rupture modes along the Gulf of California. We use receiver functions (RFs) of 29 seismological stations from three networks: NARS-Baja (Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs), RESBAN (Broadband seismic network from the Gulf of California), and SSN (National Seismological Service, Mexico). Thickness of the lithosphere varies from 43 to 89 km. The largest values are found at stations located east of Sierra Madre Occidental, and are consistent with a continental lithosphere. The thinner lithosphere is found at station NE70 (Mexicali, Mexico), consistent with a pre-rift region that has experimented serveral extension episodes. From RFs retroprojected along various profiles, we can distinguish the different rupture modes along the Gulf and identify a region under the center of the peninsula where the listhosphere has been removed by the former subduction of the Guadalupe plate.

  9. 75 FR 75173 - Gulf of Mexico Executive Council Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Executive Council Notice of Charter Renewal AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... (FACA), 5 U.S.C. App. 2, the Gulf of Mexico Executive Council (GMEC) is a necessary committee which is... associated with plans to improve and protect the water quality and living resources of the Gulf of......

  10. Summary Report on Information Technology Integration Activities For project to Enhance NASA Tools for Coastal Managers in the Gulf of Mexico and Support Technology Transfer to Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbransen, Thomas C.

    2009-04-27

    Deliverable to NASA Stennis Space Center summarizing summarizes accomplishments made by Battelle and its subcontractors to integrate NASA's COAST visualization tool with the Noesis search tool developed under the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative project.

  11. Mapping the Intricacies of the Gulf of Mexico's Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Fernández, Alexis; Green, Rebecca E.

    2011-01-01

    From hosting key shipping lines, drilling platforms, and commercial fisheries, to sustaining mangrove swamps that shelter the coastline from the hurricanes that churn its waters, the Gulf of Mexico is important to the nations surrounding it for socio-economic, ecological, military, political, and scientific reasons. Critical to all of these sectors is the Gulf's circulation—it controls hurricane tracks and intensity, biological productivity, and larvae dispersal. Since 1982, the Environmental Studies Program (ESP) of the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) has invested more than $67 million in field and numerical modeling studies to improve our understanding of the Gulf's circulation (see Figure 1). ESP-funded research has covered a broad array of topics, some applied and some basic. Studies carried out on behalf of the bureau reflect the bureau's information needs, stakeholder input, and offshore energy exploration and development trends. All ESP studies culminate in a technical report—127 technical reports on physical oceanography are publicly available (see http://www.gomr.boemre.gov/homepg/regulate/environ/techsumm/rec_pubs.html). Additionally, more than 100 peer-reviewed publications have been issued on the Gulf's physical oceanography and circulation. The AGU Geophysical Monograph Circulation in the Gulf of Mexico: Observations and Models, the very first circulation overview since 1972, was funded by ESP. Additionally, data collected during fieldwork are deposited in national archives for public dissemination.

  12. Sources, trends and regional impacts of fine particulate matter in southern Mississippi valley: significance of emissions from sources in the Gulf of Mexico coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C.; McElroy, B.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2013-04-01

    The sources of fine particles over a 10 yr period at Little Rock, Arkansas, an urban area in the southern Mississippi Valley, were identified by positive matrix factorization. The annual trends of PM2.5 and its sources, and their associations with the pathways of air mass backward trajectories were examined. Seven sources were apportioned, namely, primary traffic particles, secondary nitrate and sulphate, biomass burning, diesel particles, aged/contaminated sea salt and mineral/road dust, accounting for more than 90% of measured PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) mass. The declining trend of PM2.5 mass (0.4 μg m-3 per year) was related to lower levels of SO42- (0.2 μg m-3 per year) due to SO2 reductions from point and mobile sources. The slower decline for NO3- particles (0.1 μg m-3 per year) was attributed to the increasing NH3 emissions in the Midwest. The annual variation of biomass burning particles was associated with fires in the southeast and northwest US. Of the four regions within 500 km from the receptor site, the Gulf Coast and the southeast US accounted cumulatively for more than 65% of PM2.5 mass, nitrate, sulphate and biomass burning aerosol. Overall, more than 50% of PM2.5 and its components originated from sources outside the state. Sources within the Gulf Coast and western Gulf of Mexico include 65% of the busiest ports in the US, intense marine traffic within 400 km of the coast burning rich in S diesel, and a large number of offshore oil and natural gas platforms and many refineries. This approach allowed for the quantitative assessment of the impacts of transport from regions representing diverse mixtures of sources and weather conditions for different types of particles. The findings of this effort demonstrated the influences of emission controls on SO2 and NOx on PM2.5 mass, the potential effect of events (i.e. fires) sensitive to climate change phenomena on air pollution and the potential of offshore activities

  13. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, Abby; Wright, C. Wayne; Travers, Laurinda J.; Lebonitte, James

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived coastal topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey areas for the purposes of geomorphic change studies following major storm events. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program's National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project is a multi-year undertaking to identify and quantify the vulnerability of U.S. shorelines to coastal change hazards such as effects of severe storms, sea-level rise, and shoreline erosion and retreat. Airborne Lidar surveys conducted during periods of calm weather are compared to surveys collected following extreme storms in order to quantify the resulting coastal change. Other applications of high-resolution topography include habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, volumetric change detection, and event assessment. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northern Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, acquired on September 19, 2004, immediately following Hurricane Ivan. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532 nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking RGB (red-green-blue) digital camera, a high-resolution multi

  14. Sources, trends and regional impacts of fine particulate matter in southern Mississippi Valley: significance of emissions from sources in the Gulf of Mexico coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C.; McElroy, B.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2013-01-01

    The sources of fine particles over a 10 yr period at Little Rock, Arkansas, an urban area in southern Mississippi Valley, were identified by positive matrix factorization. The annual trends of PM2.5 and its sources and their associations with the pathways of air mass backward trajectories were examined. Seven sources were apportioned, namely, primary traffic particles, secondary nitrate and sulphate, biomass burning, diesel particles, aged/contaminated sea salt and mineral/road dust, accounting for more than 90% of measured PM2.5 mass. The declining trend of PM2.5 mass (0.4 μg m-3 yr-1) was related to lower levels of SO42- (0.2 μg m-3 yr-1) due to SO2 reductions from point and mobile sources. The slower decline for NO3- particles (0.1 μg m-3 yr-1) was attributed to the spatial variability of NH3 in Midwest. The annual variation of biomass burning particles was associated with wildland fires in southeast and northwest US that are sensitive to climate changes. The four regions within 500 km from the receptor site, the Gulf Coast and southeast US accounted cumulatively for more than 65% of PM2.5 mass, nitrate, sulphate and biomass burning aerosol. Overall, more than 50% of PM2.5 and its sources originated from sources outside the state. Sources within the Gulf Coast and western Gulf of Mexico include 65% of the busiest ports in the US, intense marine traffic within 400 km of the coast burning rich in S diesel, and a large number of offshore oil and natural gas platforms and many refineries along the coast. This approach allowed for quantitatively assessing the impacts of transport from regions representing diverse mixtures of sources and weather conditions for different types of particles. The findings of this effort demonstrated the influences of emission controls on SO2 and NOx on PM2.5 mass, the potential effect of events (i.e. fires) sensitive to climate change phenomena on air pollution and the potential of offshore activities and shipping emissions to

  15. 77 FR 74213 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... miles from the nearest Louisiana shoreline. GOM Shelf LLC, Structure Removal, Grand Isle, Block 46,...

  16. 75 FR 41818 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN: 0648-XX59 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 4, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  17. 75 FR 74008 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA068 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... teleconference call (1-888) 450-5996. At the prompt enter passcode 6273501. Council address: Gulf of...

  18. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... the Gulf of Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.720 Gulf...

  19. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... the Gulf of Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.720 Gulf...

  20. 78 FR 4130 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC449 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., 3101 Airport Boulevard, Mobile, AL 36606; telephone: (251) 476-6400. Council address: Gulf of...

  1. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... the Gulf of Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.720 Gulf...

  2. 78 FR 43146 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC763 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; Public Meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... until 12 noon on Thursday, August 8, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  3. 76 FR 80343 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA890 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... by 12 p.m., Thursday, January 12, 2012. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  4. 75 FR 72793 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA055 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... 3 p.m. on Wednesday, December 15, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  5. 78 FR 15707 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC548 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Hotel, 2900 Bayport Drive, Tampa, FL 33607; telephone: (813) 874-1234. Council address: Gulf of...

  6. 77 FR 26745 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management..., Eastern time. ADDRESSES: The webinar will be accessible via Internet. Please go to the Gulf of...

  7. 76 FR 39857 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA549 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... and conclude by 3 p.m., Thursday, July 28, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf...

  8. Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas: Digital Data Discovery and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas is an online data discovery and access tool that allows users to browse a growing collection of ecosystem-related datasets visualized as map plates. Thematically, the Atlas includes updated long-term assessments of the physical, biological, environmental, economic and living marine resource characteristics that indicate baseline conditions of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystems. These data are crucial components of integrated ecosystem assessments and modeling and support restoration and monitoring efforts in the Gulf. A multi-agency executive steering committee including members from international, federal, state, and non-governmental organizations was established to guide Atlas development and to contribute data and expertise. The Atlas currently contains over 235 maps in 70 subject areas. Each map plate is accompanied by a descriptive summary authored by a subject matter expert and each data set is fully documented by metadata in Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)-compliant standards. Source data are available in native formats and as web mapping services (WMS). Datasets are also searchable through an accompanying Map Catalog and RSS feed. The Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas is an operational example of the philosophy of leveraging resources among agencies and activities involved in geospatial data as outlined in the US Department of Interior and FGDC "Geospatial Platform Modernization Roadmap v4 - March 2011". We continue to update and add datasets through existing and new partnerships to ensure that the Atlas becomes a truly ecosystem-wide resource.

  9. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  10. Aging and sediment characteristics of northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Isphording, W.C. ); Imsand, F.D. ); Flowers, G.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Eight major estuarine systems present along the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico serve as primary depositional basins for all rivers draining into the gulf from central Louisiana eastward to the Florida peninsula. These estuaries consist of Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrews Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Pensacola Bay, Perdido Bay, Mobile Bay, Mississippi sound, and Lake Pontchartrainn. Because each receives sediment from a different river system (or systems), each estuary is characterized by sediments that are both physically and mineralogically distinct. Estuaries in the eastern Gulf, for example, possess a clay mineral suite dominated by kaolinite (derived from deeply weathered piedmont rocks), whereas those from the western Gulf are rich in smectite and mixed layer clays (reflecting a Western Interior or provenance from Paleozoic or older coastal plain sources). Similarly, weathering of rocks in the southern piedmont has provided eastern Gulf estuarine sediments with a suite of largely metamorphic rock-derived heavy minerals, whereas those in the western Gulf contain a mixed suite of both igneous- and metamorphic-derived minerals. Equally distinctive, however, are the textures of the bottom sediments themselves for each estuary when plotted on standard sand-silt-clay ternary diagrams. The relative percentages of these components are uniquely different for most of the estuaries and reflect both natural and anthropogenic conditions that exist in the watershed areas that drain into each estuary.

  11. A suggested local regions in the Southern Gulf of Mexico using a diatom database (1979-2002) and oceanic hidrographic features.

    PubMed

    Licea, Sergio; Zamudio, Ma E; Moreno-Ruiz, J L; Luna, R

    2011-07-01

    A diatom data-base of 255 species obtained from 14 oceanographic cruises (14801 entries of 647 sampling sites) together with the analysis of oceanic features were used to establish four local regions in the southern Gulf of Mexico. In addition, common species for each region were designated. This study is based on the application of cluster analysis and the species frequency data. Material for this undertaking consisted of water and net samples obtained between June 1979 and December 2002. Results show that the most frequent species (> 40%) were: Asterionellopsis glacialis, Bacteriastrum delicatulum, B. hyalinum, Chaetoceros affinis, C. coarctatus, C. compresus, C. curvisetus, C. danicus, C. decipiens, C. diversus, C. lorenzianus, C. pelagicus, C. peruvianus, Coscinodiscus radiatus, Cylindrotheca closterium, Guinardia flaccida, Hemiaulus hauckii, H. membranaceus, H. sinensis, Leptocylindrus danicus, Neocalyptrella robusta, Nitzschia bicapitata, Pleurosigma diverse-striatum, Proboscia alata, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Pseudosolenia calcar-avis, Rhizosolenia imbricata, R. setigera, Skeletonema costatum, Thalassionema bacillare, T frauenfeldii, T nitzschioides and Thalassiosira eccentrica. The species composition for each region and season are discussed. Itis concluded that sampling site assemblages are related to oceanographic conditions. A total list of species composition is given, forty-seven species taxa being new records for this area. PMID:22315823

  12. Acoustic estimates of methane gas flux from the seabed in a 6000 km2 region in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas C.; Mayer, Larry; Jerram, Kevin; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Rzhanov, Yuri; Lovalvo, Dave

    2014-05-01

    of free methane gas escaping the seabed can be found throughout the ocean basins. To understand the role of methane gas seeps in the global carbon cycle—including both gas added to the atmosphere and that which is dissolved and potentially oxidized in the ocean volume—it is important to quantify the amount of methane escaping the seabed. Few large-scale mapping projects of natural methane seeps have been undertaken, however, and even among these, quantitative estimates of flux are rare. Here we use acoustic mapping techniques to survey 357 natural methane seeps in a large region (6000 km2) of the northern Gulf of Mexico and outline a general approach for methane seep mapping using a combination of multibeam and split-beam echo sounders. Using additional measurements collected with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) together with the acoustic mapping results, we estimate the total gas flux within the 6000 km2 region to be between 0.0013 and 0.16 Tg/yr, or between 0.003 and 0.3% of the current estimates for global seabed methane seepage rates.

  13. Region-wide impairment of Atlantic croaker testicular development and sperm production in the northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic dead zone.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Rahman, Md Saydur

    2010-01-01

    Recently evidence has been obtained for reproductive impairment in estuarine populations of Atlantic croaker exposed to seasonal hypoxia. However, it is not known whether a similar disruption of reproductive function occurs in croaker inhabiting a much larger hypoxic area, the extensive dead zone in coastal regions of the northern Gulf of Mexico extending from the Mississippi Delta to East Texas. Gonadal development in male Atlantic croaker collected in September 2008 at six sites in the dead zone was compared to that in male fish sampled from three reference sites east of the Mississippi Delta which do not experience persistent hypoxia. Croaker testes collected from the dead zone were at an earlier stage of spermatogenesis than those from the reference sites. Histological examination of the testes collected from the dead zone showed that their tubules had small lumens that contained very little sperm compared to the lumens of the reference fish. Overall, sperm production was 26.2% that of the control fish at the reference sites. This decrease in spermatogenesis at the dead zone sites was accompanied by an approximately 50% decrease in testicular growth compared to that in the reference fish. The results suggest that reproductive impairment can occur over regional scales in marine fish populations exposed to extensive seasonal hypoxia in dead zones with potential long-term impacts on population abundance. PMID:19931178

  14. MAGSAT correlations with geoid anomalies. [magnetic anomalies in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    A digital data library of MAGSAT data is described and its applications and capabilities are reviewed. Polynomial trends were removed from each half-orbit in order to estimate and remove ring current effects from the data. The MAGSAT data in the Gulf of Mexico region was analyzed to define better the possible relation of the negative MAGSAT anomaly there to the negative residual geoid anomaly in the western Gulf of Mexico. Since the shape and location of the negative magnetic anomaly are variable depending upon the particular polynomial surface and curve orders used, no definitive conclusion as to the degree of correspondance between the residual geoid and MAGSAT lithosphere anomalies is offered.

  15. Macro-Ecology of Gulf of Mexico Cold Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, Erik E.; Bergquist, Derk C.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of chemosynthetic ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, similar ecosystems were found at cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Over the past two decades, these sites have become model systems for understanding the physiology of the symbiont-containing megafauna and the ecology of seep communities worldwide. Symbiont-containing bivalves and siboglinid polychaetes dominate the communities, including five bathymodiolin mussel species and six vestimentiferan (siboglinid polychaete) species in the Gulf of Mexico. The mussels include the first described examples of methanotrophic symbiosis and dual methanotrophic/thiotrophic symbiosis. Studies with the vestimentiferans have demonstrated their potential for extreme longevity and their ability to use posterior structures for subsurface exchange of dissolved metabolites. Ecological investigations have demonstrated that the vestimentiferans function as ecosystem engineers and identified a community succession sequence from a specialized high-biomass endemic community to a low-biomass community of background fauna over the life of a hydrocarbon seep site.

  16. Minimum extreme temperature in the gulf of mexico: is there a connection with solar activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravilla, D.; Mendoza, B.; Jauregui, E.

    Minimum extreme temperature ( MET) series from several meteorological stations of the Gulf of Mexico are spectrally analyzed using the Maximum Entrophy Method. We obtained periodicities similar to those found in the sunspot number, the magnetic solar cycle, comic ray fluxes and geomagnetic activity which are modulated by solar activity. We suggested that the solar signal is perhaps present in the MET record of this region of Mexico.

  17. Principles of pleistocene stratigraphy, applied to the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fillon, R.H.; Healy-Williams, N.; Ledbetter, M.T.; Thunell, R.C.; Williams, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    This study of one of the world's major oil provinces is an examination of advances made in the past decade in high resolution stratigraphy of Pleistocene marine sediments. Topics covered include magnetostratigraphy, planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, oxygen isotope stratigraphy, tephrochronology and a review and updating of terrestrial-marine correlations during the Pleistocene. The emphasis is on the Gulf of Mexico, but the techniques described can be applied to other marine sedimentary basins.

  18. Estimating the Provision of Ecosystem Services by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Wetlands.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulf of Mexico (GOM) coastal wetlands contribute to human well-being by providing many ecosystem services (e.g., commercial and recreational fishery support, protection of coastal communities from storm surge, water quality improvement, and carbon sequestration). The GOM region c...

  19. 77 FR 29594 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC028 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607; telephone:...

  20. Metagenomics of Water Column Microbes Near Brine Pool NR1 and adjacent regions of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Collected in Fall 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, A. M.; Goodwin, K. D.; Brami, D.; Schwartz, A.; Toledo, G.

    2012-12-01

    High-throughput sequencing was applied to eight water column samples collected from the Gulf of Mexico in 2009 in regions SW and west of the 2010 Macondo oil spill. Samples were collected by Niskin-equipped CTD (~200 and ~650 m depths) at two locations, including a site over a methane brine pool (Brine Pool NR1). In addition, seawater was collected ~3m lateral of the pool (649m depth) via Niskin bottle equipped on the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible. Unassembled reads were submitted to the Synthetic Genomics bioinformatics pipeline for taxonomic analysis. The distribution of Bacteria (56-73%), Archae (7-16%), Eukaryotes (12-23%), and unclassified sequences (6-10%) were similar for all samples. However, certain taxonomic classifications were relatively more abundant in deeper samples, and differences were noted for samples collected by submersible. For example, Methylophaga was classified as 38% of the order Thiotrichales for the Niskin/submersible sample compared to 0% in the 200m-depth samples and 3-11% in the 650m samples. Methylophaga is a genus of indigenous methylotrophs reported to respond during the Deepwater Horizon event of 2010. In contrast, sequence abundance for Oceanospirillales, also reported to respond during the event, was similar for all samples (6-9% of the gamma-proteobacteria).

  1. Gulf of Mexico dissolved oxygen model (GoMDOM) research and quality assurance project plan

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated high resolution mathematical modeling framework is being developed that will link hydrodynamic, atmospheric, and water quality models for the northern Gulf of Mexico. This Research and Quality Assurance Project Plan primarily focuses on the deterministic Gulf of Me...

  2. Digital archive of drilling mud weight pressures and wellbore temperatures from 49 regional cross sections of 967 well logs in Louisiana and Texas, onshore Gulf of Mexico basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, Lauri A.; Kinney, Scott A.; Kola-Kehinde, Temidayo B.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the digital archive of in-situ temperature and drilling mud weight pressure data that were compiled from several historical sources. The data coverage includes the states of Texas and Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico basin. Data are also provided graphically, for both Texas and Louisiana, as plots of temperature as a function of depth and pressure as a function of depth. The minimum, arithmetic average, and maximum values are tabulated for each 1,000-foot depth increment for temperature as well as pressure in the Texas and Louisiana data.

  3. A FRAMEWORK FOR AN INTEGRATED MONITORING PLAN FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) Office in cooperation with its principal partners (Gulf State agencies, Federal agencies, private industry, etc.) and the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) are developing an integrated c...

  4. Gulf of Mexico Helicopter Offshore System Technologies Recommended Development Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenke, Edmund J.; Williams, Larry; Calafa, Caesar

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) project in cooperation with the Department of Transportation (DOT) Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (VNTSC) contracted with the System Resources Corporation (SRC) for the evaluation of the existing environment and the identification of user and service provider needs in the Gulf of Mexico low-altitude Offshore Sector. The results of this contractor activity are reported in the Gulf of Mexico Helicopter Offshore System Technologies Engineering Needs Assessment. A recommended system design and transition strategy was then developed to satisfy the identified needs within the constraints of the environment. This work, also performed under contract to NASA, is the subject of this report.

  5. Volatile organic compounds in Gulf of Mexico sediments

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC), concentrations and compositions were documented for estuarine, coastal, shelf, slope, and deep water sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. VOC were measured (detection limit >0.01 ppb) using a closed-loop stripping apparatus with gas chromatography (GC) and flame ionization, flame photometric, and mass spectrometric detectors. The five primary sources of Gulf of Mexico sediment VOC are: (1) planktonic and benthic fauna and flora; (2) terrestrial material from riverine and atmospheric deposition; (3) anthropogenic inputs: (4) upward migration of hydrocarbons; and (5) transport by bottom currents or slumping. Detected organo-sulfur compounds include alkylated sulfides, thiophene, alkylated thiophenes, and benzothiophenes. Benzothiophenes are petroleum related. Low molecular weight organo-sulfur compounds result from the biological oxidation of organic matter. A lack of organosulfur compounds in the reducing environment of the Orca Basin may result from a lack of free sulfides which are necessary for their production.

  6. Gulf of Mexico Air Quality: CALIPSO Support for Gulf of Mexico Air Quality Relating to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Myngoc T.; Lapointe, Stephen; Jennings, Brittney; Zoumplis, Angela

    2011-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, an oil platform belonging to BP exploded and leaked a huge volume of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. In an effort to control the spread of the oil, BP applied dispersants such as Corexit and conducted in-situ burnings of the oil. This catastrophe created a complex chain of events that affected not only the fragile water and land ecosystems, but the humans who breathe the air every day. Thousands of people were exposed to fumes associated with oil vapors from the spill, burning of the oil, and the toxic mixture of dispersants. While aiding in clean-up efforts, local fishermen were directly exposure to fumes when working on the Gulf. A notable amount of Gulf Coast residents were also exposed to the oil fumes as seasonal southeasterly winds blew vapors toward land. The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) found in oil vapors include: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, naphthalene, hydrogen sulfide and particulate matter (PM). Increases in water temperature and sunlight due to the summer season allow for these VOCs and PM to evaporate into the air more rapidly. Aside from the VOCs found in oil vapors, the dispersant being used to break up the oil is highly toxic and is thought to be even more toxic than the oil itself (EPA website, 2010). To protect human health, the environment, and to make informed policy decisions relevant to the spill, the EPA Region 6 has continuously monitored the affected areas carefully for levels of pollutants in the outdoor air that are associated with petroleum products and the burning of oil along the coast. In an effort to prevent, prepare for, and respond to future oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States, the EPA has been working with local, state, and federal response partners. Air quality measurements were collected by the EPA at five active monitoring systems stationed along the coast.

  7. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study combines the expertise of federal, state, and local partners to address some of the most pressing ecological problems of the Tampa Bay estuary. This project serves as a template for integrated research projects in other coastal ecosystems in the nation. The Tampa Bay Study focuses on the scientific needs of the Bay, as identified by resource managers.

  8. Oceanic Situational Awareness Over the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfeld, Israel

    2005-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans impose a limitation on traffic capacity for a given corridor, given the projected traffic growth over the Gulf of Mexico. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. This study uses Federal Aviation Administration data from a single day for the Gulf of Mexico to analyze traffic loading to be used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from the aircraft to the satellites.

  9. An integrated approach to drilling in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Peery, M.D.; Bullock, R.D.

    1993-10-01

    This case history reviews the results of a single well and subsequent geological sidetrack drilled under an integrated partnering approach in East Cameron Block 306 of the Gulf of Mexico. The project demonstrates the benefits of partnering relationships. The integrated partnering approach proved to be an efficient and cost-effective means for the operator and service company to achieve objectives. The paper describes the operator, the drilling contractor, the service company, contract formats, project objectives, project summary, and conclusions.

  10. Patterns of the loop current system and regions of sea surface height variability in the eastern Gulf of Mexico revealed by the self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonggang; Weisberg, Robert H.; Vignudelli, Stefano; Mitchum, Gary T.

    2016-04-01

    The Self-Organizing Map (SOM), an unsupervised learning neural network, is employed to extract patterns evinced by the Loop Current (LC) system and to identify regions of sea surface height (SSH) variability in the eastern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) from 23 years (1993-2015) of altimetry data. Spatial patterns are characterized as different LC extensions and different stages in the process of LC eddy shedding. The temporal evolutions and the frequency of occurrences of these patterns are obtained, and the typical trajectories of the LC system progression on the SOM grid are investigated. For an elongated, northwest-extended, or west-positioned LC, it is common for the LC anticyclonic eddy (LCE) to separate and propagate into the western GoM, while an initially separated LCE in close proximity to the west Florida continental slope often reattaches to the LC and develops into an elongated LC, or reduces intensity locally before moving westward as a smaller eddy. Regions of differing SSH variations are also identified using the joint SOM-wavelet analysis. Along the general axis of the LC, SSH exhibits strong variability on time scales of 3 months to 2 years, also with energetic intraseasonal variations, which is consistent with the joint Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF)-wavelet analysis. In the more peripheral regions, the SSH has a dominant seasonal variation that also projects across the coastal ocean. The SOM, when applied to both space and time domains of the same data, provides a powerful tool for diagnosing ocean processes from such different perspectives.

  11. Hydrocarbon flux from natural deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, P. B.; Smith, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Natural vents that expel water and hydrocarbons are present on continental margins around the world. The expelled fluids support biological vent communities, escape to the ocean and atmosphere, and may contribute significantly to oceanic and atmospheric carbon budgets. We describe two vents in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) at lease blocks MC852/853 and GB425 that have significant flow, high salinities, and elevated temperatures. We use a steady state multi-phase flow model and show that there is a unique water and hydrocarbon flux that simulates the observed salinity and temperature. We estimate the hydrocarbon flux at each vent to be 2.0-9.9x104 t yr-1 and 1.7-7.1x104 t yr-1, respectively. We extrapolate these results and estimate the hydrocarbon flux from the entire Gulf of Mexico to be 9.7-55x106 t yr-1. This flux is at least 50x greater than previous estimates11 and is 6-40% of the hydrocarbon flux from the Macondo oil spill. Large natural seepage may inoculate marine basins such as the Gulf of Mexico from oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout by sustaining populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

  12. 78 FR 27365 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Management Council will convene a meeting of the Standing, Special Mackerel and Ecosystem Scientific and... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Atran, Population Dynamics Statistician; Gulf of Mexico...

  13. Integrated geological, geophysical, and geochemical interpretation of Upper Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-09-01

    The petroleum potential of the Upper Jurassic strata in the eastern Gulf of Mexico region is excellent. At least three Upper Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in the region. An oil trend can be identified onshore in the area north of the regional peripheral fault trend and is interpreted to extend offshore into the area north of the Destin anticline in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. An oil and gas-condensate trend can be defined onshore between the regional peripheral fault trend and the Wiggins arch. This trend is projected to extend offshore into the area of the Destin anticline. A deep natural gas trend can be delineated onshore south of the Wiggins arch and extends offshore into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf area. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. The main petroleum source rocks for the Upper Jurassic hydrocarbons are Smackover carbonate mudstones.

  14. Storm Induced Injection of the Mississippi River Plume Into the Open Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Jinchun; Miller, Richard L.; Powell, Rodney T.; Dagg, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The direct impact of the Mississippi River on the open Gulf of Mexico is typically considered to be limited due to the predominantly along-shore current pattern. Using satellite imagery, we analyzed chl a distributions in the northern Gulf of Mexico before and after the passage of two storms: Hurricane Lili and Tropical Storm Barry. Our analyses indicate that storm-induced eddies can rapidly inject large volumes of nutrient-rich Mississippi River water to the open gulf, and lead to phytoplankton blooms. Although these events last only a few weeks, they transport significant amounts of fluvial substances to the ocean. These river-ocean interactions are especially significant in tropical and subtropical regions because receiving waters are typically permanently stratified and oligotrophic.

  15. 75 FR 61705 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Workshops for South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico goliath grouper. SUMMARY: The SEDAR assessment of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico stock of goliath grouper consists of a Data Workshop, an Assessment...

  16. 76 FR 77491 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... 28 pre-data workshop webinar for Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Spanish mackerel and cobia. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 28 assessments of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic stocks of Spanish mackerel...

  17. 78 FR 15708 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Spanish mackerel and cobia Review Workshop. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 28 assessment of the Gulf of Mexico Spanish... recommendations with respect to the stock assessments of Gulf of Mexico Spanish mackerel and cobia. Although...

  18. Formation of the Gulf of Mexico Salt Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, I. O.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Eddy, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Recently acquired seismic refraction data in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have provided new insights into the basin's crustal structure. We use the four refraction profiles to build regional-scale crustal sections across the GOM, and then use these profiles as the basis for basin modeling of crustal subsidence through time. Basin modeling includes flexural backstripping of the sediment load and correction for thermal subsidence, with the aim of calculating the shape of the basin at the time (Callovian) of salt deposition. The age of salt deposition relative to rifting events is debated, with opinions ranging from salt being synrift to entirely postrift. We suggest that salt was deposited near the end of rifting, close to the time of initiation of sea floor spreading. This interpretation is based partly on reconstructing possible water depths at the start of salt deposition, using the backstripping method. If water depths were too deep, i.e. sea floor spreading already established, salt thickness based on isostatic balance would be far too large. If water depths were too shallow, i.e. little crustal thinning, salt thickness would be too thin. We can compare the outcome of this analysis with the distribution of evaporites in the Gulf of Mexico basin, which may have formed a 4 km thick layer in some areas, though these salt deposits have subsequently been remobilized. Crustal structure from the refraction data shows crustal thicknesses of 8-15 km under the salt basin. The seismic velocity structure of the thinned crust suggests that at least some of the basement was formed by magmatic intrusions. If we correct for the inferred stretching of the continental margin and thermal subsidence, we obtain a plausible depth for the margin at Callovian time. Velocity structure from the refraction data plus observations of SDRs in the eastern GOM are consistent with the margins of the GOM having a significant synrift volcanic component. We suggest that this volcanic

  19. THE MAY 23TH 2007 GULF OF MEXICO EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, J.; Jimenez, Z.

    2009-12-01

    On the 23th of May 2007 at 14:09 local time (19:09 UT) an insolated earthquake of local magnitude 5.2 occurred offshore northern Veracruz in the Gulf of Mexico. The seismic focus was located using local and regional data at 20.11° N, 97.38° W and 7.8 km depth at 175 km distance from Tuxpan a city of 134,394 inhabitants. The earthquake was widely felt along the costal states of southern Tamaulipas and Veracruz in which several schools and public buildings were evacuated. Neither Laguna Verde nuclear plant, located approximately 245 km from the epicenter, nor PEMEX petroleum company reported damage. First-motion data indicates that the rupture occurred as strike slip faulting along two possible planes, one oriented roughly north-south and the other east-west. In the present paper a global analysis of the earthquake is made to elucidate its origin and possible correlation with known geotectonic features of the region.

  20. Gulf of Mexico hypoxia: exploring increasing sensitivity to nitrogen loads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Evans, Mary Anne; Scavia, Donald

    2010-08-01

    Hypoxia is a critical issue in the Gulf of Mexico that has challenged management efforts in recent years by an increase in hypoxia sensitivity to nitrogen loads. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the recent increase in sensitivity. Two commonly cited mechanisms are bottom-water reducing conditions preventing nitrification and thus denitrification, leading to more N recycling and production of oxygen-consuming organic matter, and carryover of organic matter from previous years increasing oxygen demand, making the system more sensitive. We use models informed by these mechanisms and fit with Bayesian inference to explore changes in Gulf of Mexico hypoxia sensitivity. We show that a model including an annually fit parameter representing variation in the fraction of nutrient loading and recycling contributing to bottom water oxygen demand provides a good fit to observations and is not improved by explicit inclusion of organic matter carryover to subsequent years. Both models support two stepwise increases in system sensitivity during the period of record. This change in sensitivity has greatly increased the nutrient reduction needed to achieve the established hypoxia goal. If the Gulf remains at the current state of sensitivity, our analysis suggests a roughly 70% reduction of spring TN loads from the 1988-1996 average of 6083 ton/day may be required. PMID:20608722

  1. Mesozoic Continental Sediment-dispersal Systems of Mexico Linked to Development of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, T. F.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Barboza-Gudiño, R.; Rogers, R. D.

    2013-05-01

    Major sediment dispersal systems on western Pangea evolved in concert with thermal uplift, rift and drift phases of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, and were influenced by development of a continental arc on Pangea's western margin. Existing literature and preliminary data from fieldwork, sandstone petrology and detrital zircon analysis reveal how major drainages in Mexico changed from Late Triassic through Late Jurassic time and offer predictions for the ultimate destinations of sand-rich detritus along the Gulf and paleo-Pacific margins. Late Triassic rivers drained away from and across the present site of the Gulf of Mexico, which was then the location of a major thermal dome, the Texas uplift of recent literature. These high-discharge rivers with relatively mature sediment composition fed a large-volume submarine fan system on the paleo-Pacific continental margin of Mexico. Predictably, detrital zircon age populations are diverse and record sources as far away as the Amazonian craton. This enormous fluvial system was cut off abruptly near the Triassic-Jurassic boundary by extensive reorganization of continental drainages. Early and Middle Jurassic drainage systems had local headwaters and deposited sediment in extensional basins associated with arc magmatism. Redbeds accumulated across northern and eastern Mexico and Chiapas in long, narrow basins whose locations and dimensions are recorded primarily by inverted antiformal massifs. The Jurassic continental successions overlie Upper Triassic strata and local subvolcanic plutons; they contain interbedded volcanic rocks and thus have been interpreted as part of the Nazas continental-margin arc. The detritus of these fluvial systems is volcanic-lithic; syndepositional grain ages are common in the detrital zircon populations, which are mixed with Oaxaquia-derived Permo-Triassic and Grenville age populations. By this time, interior Pangea no longer supplied sediment to the paleo-Pacific margin, possibly because the

  2. 78 FR 59287 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ..., NMFS implemented the final rule (65 FR 16336, March 28, 2000) that divided the king mackerel Gulf... reduces the trip limit for the commercial sector of king mackerel in the eastern zone of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) in the northern Florida west coast subzone to 500 lb (227 kg) of king mackerel per day...

  3. 77 FR 52623 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ..., NMFS implemented the final rule (65 FR 16336, March 28, 2000) that divided the king mackerel Gulf... reduces the trip limit for the commercial sector of king mackerel in the eastern zone of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) in the northern Florida west coast subzone to 500 lb (227 kg) of king mackerel per day...

  4. 77 FR 60967 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment and Review (SEDAR); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ] ACTION: Notice of SEDAR 28 Gulf of Mexico Spanish mackerel and cobia assessment webinars. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 28 assessment of the Gulf of Mexico Spanish... continue deliberations and discussions regarding modeling methodologies for the Gulf of Mexico...

  5. The origins of petroleum in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, M. C., II; McDonald, T. J.; Comet, P. A.; Denoux, G. J.; Brooks, J. M.

    1992-03-01

    The distribution and chemistry of oils in the northern Gulf of Mexico and the adjacent onshore can be explained by multiple sources, fades variations, maturation, and post-generation alteration. Genetic families include Jurassic Smackover, Flexure Trend, Upper Cretaceous, and Paleogene oils. Smackover oils have high sulfur contents, pristane/phytane ratios < 1.0, CPI < 1.0, abundant extended hopanes, C 35/C 34 hopane ratios ≥1.0, and C 30/C 29 hopane ratios usuall ≤ 1.0. Flexure Trend oils are similar and contain abundant extended hopanes, high sulfur contents, and V/(Ni + V) > 0.5; these oils are inferred to be sourced in Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous strata. Upper Cretaceous oils contain a distinctive suite of tricyclic and nonhopanoid triterpanes; oleanane is low or absent. Paleogene oils can be recognized by the presence of 18α(H) oleanane and a lack of extended hopanes. These oils occur from south Texas to southern and offshore Louisiana. Two subfamilies can be recognized based on the relative abundance of triterpanes and steranes. These oils have a presumed Paleogene source. Mixing of oil types is quite prevalent at the geographic boundaries of oil types. The initial control on the distribution of oil and gas in the northern Gulf of Mexico is provided by the areal extent of source rocks. Secondary control is due to Cenozoic deposition, which provides the thermal stress to generate, as well as destroy, oil. Salt tectonics provide conduits for migrating fluids to escape the zone of thermal destruction. Mesozoic source strata again become important in the deep Gulf of Mexico, where Cenozoic sediments thin.

  6. 49 CFR 192.612 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 192.612 Section 192.612 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep as measured from... inspections of its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6...

  7. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. (a... shall prepare and follow a procedure to identify its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets...

  8. 49 CFR 192.612 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 192.612 Section 192.612 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep as measured from... inspections of its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6...

  9. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. (a... shall prepare and follow a procedure to identify its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets...

  10. 49 CFR 192.612 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 192.612 Section 192.612 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep as measured from... inspections of its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6...

  11. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. (a... shall prepare and follow a procedure to identify its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets...

  12. 49 CFR 192.612 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 192.612 Section 192.612 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep as measured from... inspections of its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6...

  13. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. (a... shall prepare and follow a procedure to identify its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets...

  14. Triassic - Jurassic kinematic relationships between the Gulf of Mexico, Central Atlantic Ocean, and Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, D. E.; Burke, K.; Hall, S. A.; Casey, J. F.

    2008-05-01

    Closing ocean basins along geomagnetic isochrons can be an objective method for analyzing reconstructed continental margins because, in general, tectonic extension at passive margins stops once new oceanic lithosphere is created. Holding Africa fixed, we close the South Atlantic Ocean to Chron M4 (126.6 Ma) and the Central Atlantic Ocean to Chron M40 (165.1 Ma). In this configuration, and with the Gulf of Mexico closed by clockwise rotation of the Yucatan continental block (~42 degrees), the positions of North America and South America indicate that the Gulf of Mexico opened at least 20 My after the opening of the Central Atlantic Ocean (ca. 180 Ma) and the earlier breakup of Pangea (ca. 200 Ma). The Gondwanan terranes of eastern Mexico, Yucatan, Florida, and the United States south of the Ouachita-Marathon Suture, remained attached to Laurasia after the breakup of the supercontinent. The Gulf of Mexico then formed in Late Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous times (ca. 160 Ma to 140 Ma) by counterclockwise rotation of the Yucatan block. Two prominent basement structures, defined by seismic refraction and gravity data, are interpreted to be hotspot tracks created by a single mantle plume during this rotation. A third prominent basement structure is interpreted to be a marginal ridge that developed along the ocean-continental transform boundary between the Yucatan block and eastern Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico formed after initial rifting and extension of continental crust and widespread salt deposition (ca. 160 Ma to 150 Ma), followed by the mantle plume eruption and sea-floor spreading (ca. 150 Ma to 140 Ma).

  15. Parameterization of Submesoscale Particle Transport in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haza, A. C.; Ozgokmen, T. M.; Griffa, A.; Poje, A. C.; Hogan, P. J.; Jacobs, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    Submesoscale flows have a significant impact on the transport at their own scales, yet require extensive data sets and numerical computations, making them challenging to approach deterministically. A recent Lagrangian parametrization to correct particle transport at the submesoscales is implemented to an eddy permitting ocean model at 1/25 degree grid for the surface circulation of the Gulf of Mexico. It combines mesoscale transport from the deterministic Lagrangian Coherent Structures (LCS) and statistical Lagrangian subgridscale (LSGS) models over the submesoscale range. Comparison to a 1km submesoscale-permitting ocean model shows a significant improvement of the scale-dependent relative dispersion and particle distribution.

  16. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  17. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  18. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  19. Biogeochemistry of Submarine Groundwater Discharge to the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telfeyan, K.; Breaux, A.; Kim, J.; Kolker, A.; Johannesson, K. H.; Cable, J. E.

    2013-12-01

    Regional radon surveys were initiated in the spring/summer of 2013 to evaluate the potential importance of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in the Mississippi River delta region. Buried paleochannels consisting of sand and other relatively coarse grained sediment likely provide transport pathways for substantial fluxes of freshwater and associated dissolved constituents to the Gulf of Mexico through their subsurface linkage with the main river channel and their higher permeability than interdistributary sediments. Initial radon investigations identify potential groundwater inputs to Lac des Allemands preferentially along bayous closest to the Mississippi, especially associated with the peak discharge of the Mississippi. Based on these radon survey results, more focused groundwater and surface water sampling was conducted to characterize the general chemistry of SGD in the region. Generally, pH and Eh change from the fresh groundwater end member to the seawater end member, demonstrating a clear river signal in the SGD and creating a dynamic environment with the potential for multiple geochemical reactions. Major cation data shows a general mixing trend in Lac des Allemands water: samples are more alkaline closest to the Mississippi River end member. Sequential sediment digestions indicate that much of the lake sediments consist of organic matter, which likely lowers the alkalinity of the lake end member. This study will also concentrate on the specific changes in oxyanion chemistry (i.e. arsenic and vanadium) along flowpaths from fresh to saline waters within the local subterranean estuaries. The oxyanions will provide a means to investigate the influence of redox chemistry in subterranean estuaries on the SGD fluxes of trace elements to the local interdistributary bays.

  20. Reducing hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico – an alternative approach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico is a high-priority national issue. Agricultural nonpoint source pollution is the greatest source of water pollution today and its consequences are particularly evident in the Gulf of Mexico. For example, Illinois, Iowa and Indiana together contribute nearly 30% of the p...

  1. 33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Headquarters Air Armament Center...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to... part 329, including the waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of...

  2. 33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Headquarters Air Armament Center...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to... part 329, including the waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of...

  3. 33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Headquarters Air Armament Center...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to... part 329, including the waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of...

  4. How oil seeps, discoveries relate in deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sassen, R.; Brooks, J.M.; Kennicutt, M.C. II; MacDonald, I.R.; Guinasso, N.L. Jr. )

    1993-04-19

    Biomarker compounds of crude oils from deep-water Gulf of Mexico seeps are consistent with an origin from deeply-buried Mesozoic carbonate source rocks. The known oil reserves, however, are trapped in shallow Miocene to Pleistocene sands. Several kilometers of vertical migration must be invoked to explain the presence of crude oil from deep sources in shallow reservoir sands. Salt-related fractures and faults serve as efficient conduits for vertical migration through the thick sedimentary section. Thermal history models suggest that oil migration off Louisiana started during the Miocene and continues at present in some areas. The paper describes visual inspection of seeps; gives an overview of the deep Gulf; and discusses seeps and fields, case histories, and frontier basins.

  5. 77 FR 32083 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-31

    ... being designated as Essential Fish Habitat. 9:30 a.m.-12 noon--The Mackerel Management Committee will... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management...

  6. 33 CFR 334.763 - Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. 334.763 Section 334.763 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....763 Naval Support Activity Panama City; Gulf of Mexico; restricted area. (a) The area. The area...

  7. 33 CFR 162.75 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries, South and Southwest Passes and... WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.75 All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the... waters of the U.S. tributary to or connected by other waterways with the Gulf of Mexico between St....

  8. Lessons learned from a one-dimensional water quality model for the Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been a major concern for many years. Several water quality models have attempted to describe the link between high nutrient loads from the Mississippi River and hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico with varied success. Here we describe the dev...

  9. Facing Today's Exploration Challenges in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detomo, R.

    2005-05-01

    The Gulf of Mexico represents one of the most intensively explored basins in the world, and yet it still delivers significant new material oil and gas discoveries every year. Because of it high productivity, geologic complexity, competitive acreage access and large profitability margins, the Gulf of Mexico presents many industry-leading challenges to Exploration today. For major companies exploring for oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico today, their challenge is to "safely, responsibly and profitably find and produce reduced accumulations in increasingly hostile settings." The GoM serves as the sportsman's playground for a significant population located in and around its waters, and therefore, operating safely and responsibly are unassailable moral and operational standards by which we sustain future development, and maintain our license to operate. With that as a backdrop, today's challenges are driven by the nature of where the business is looking for new reserves in this extremely mature basin. These "Opportunities" encompass the following: 1) large, under-explored, sub-salt areas, characterized by poor seismic imaging, uncertain geologic regimes and potentially dangerous overpressures, 2) deep true-vertical-depth opportunities in older rocks that challenge our understanding of reservoir quality prediction and hydrocarbon systems, and are at the edge of today's drilling technologies, 3) access to sensitive areas including the eastern GoM-Florida shelf, coastal areas and international borders, 4) challenging "small accumulation" discoveries that cannot support expensive appraisal or development options, are remote to infrastructure or inefficiently produce the reservoir, and finally 5) new play development, which is challenged by long maturation cycles, small acreage blocks, intense international competition, and rapid lease rolls. This talk will consider what Shell and the Oil & Gas Industry does today to succeed in this arena, and specifically will show examples

  10. Long-term noise statistics from the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eller, Anthony I.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.; Larue, James P.

    2003-04-01

    Long-term, omnidirectional acoustic noise measurements were conducted in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico during the summer of 2001. These efforts were a part of the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center project, Phase I. Initial looks at the noise time series, processed in standard one-third-octave bands from 10 to 5000 Hz, show noise levels that differ substantially from customary deep-water noise spectra. Contributing factors to this highly dynamic noise environment are an abundance of marine mammal emissions and various industrial noises. Results presented here address long-term temporal variability, temporal coherence times, the fluctuation spectrum, and coherence of fluctuations across the frequency spectrum. [Research supported by ONR.

  11. Widespread survey finds no evidence of Haplosporidium nelsoni (MSX) in Gulf of Mexico oysters.

    PubMed

    Ford, Susan E; Paterno, Jenny; Scarpa, Emily; Stokes, Nancy A; Kim, Yungkul; Powell, Eric N; Bushek, David

    2011-02-22

    The advent of molecular detection assays has provided a set of very sensitive tools for the detection of pathogens in marine organisms, but it has also raised problems of how to interpret positive signals that are not accompanied by visual confirmation. PCR-positive results have recently been reported for Haplosporidium nelsoni (MSX), a pathogen of the oyster Crassostrea virginica in 31 of 40 oysters from 6 sites in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. Histological confirmation of the PCR results was not undertaken, and no haplosporidian has been reported from the numerous histological studies and surveys of oysters in the region. To further investigate the possibility that H. nelsoni is present in this region, we sampled 210 oysters from 40 sites around the Gulf of Mexico and Puerto Rico using PCR and 180 of these using tissue-section histology also. None of the oysters showed evidence of H. nelsoni by PCR or of any haplosporidian by histology. We cannot, therefore, confirm that H. nelsoni is present and widespread in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea. Our results do not prove that H. nelsoni is absent from the region, but taken together with results from previous histological surveys, they suggest that for the purposes of controlling oyster importation, the region should continue to be considered free of the parasite. PMID:21516978

  12. Exploring the Gulf of Mexico - for a second time

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.K.

    1996-08-01

    Back in the late 1980s, a lot of smart people in the exploration business were convinced that the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) was the {degrees}Dead Sea.{close_quotes} And there were plenty of good reasons to think so: the deep water was too expensive-the shelf had lost its appeal-not many wells were being drilled. Hope for continued exploration or significant additional reserves was inconceivable. How the oil and gas industry advances technology and experience to extract hydrocarbons from beneath impeding salt domes in the GOM is discussed.

  13. Crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwafor, Emeka

    The Gulf of Mexico initiated in the Late Triassic as South America and Africa separated from North America during the break up of Pangea. Previous studies indicate three models for the opening of the GOM. These include counter clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block, rotation of the Yucatan Block about the same pole of rotation as those describing seafloor spreading in the central North Atlantic, and clockwise rotation of the Yucatan Block. There is much debate about the margin type and the crustal structure of the Eastern Gulf of Mexico (EGOM), especially below the depth of 6 km where crustal structure is poorly imaged on seismic reflection data. Two 2.5-D forward gravity and magnetic models across the margin are presented. These are constrained by basement picks from sparse seismic reflection and refraction data, spectral analysis of gravity data to determine the depth to source, magnetic susceptibility derived from results from other margins, the empirical relationship between P-wave velocity and density, and crustal scale isostatic modeling. The models, combined with a kinematic reconstruction of the GOM, show that: 1) it is a rifted margin; 2) the point where the Moho deepens downward from ˜17 km to ˜32 km is approximately 50 km outboard of the topographic shelf edge; 3) the carbonate bank retreated by several kilometers from its original termination due to the action of contourite currents; 4) extension and subsidence was accommodated with little shallow brittle faulting; 5) oceanic lithosphere is possibly outboard of the EGOM continental slope.

  14. Origin of hydrocarbons in Gulf of Mexico basin: A reappraisal

    SciTech Connect

    Bissada, K.K.; Katz, B.J.; Barnicle, S.C.; Schunk, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The origin of hydrocarbons in the Gulf of Mexico basin has been a subject of controversy for many years. One argument invokes source rocks of average organic enrichment, pervasively distributed throughout the Tertiary sequence and closely associated with the reservoir system. Another argument invokes exceptionally rich, discrete source rocks not in contact with the reservoirs, possibly in pre-Tertiary sequences. Continued exploration success in the basin hinges on the resolution of this controversy because of implications on patterns of hydrocarbon migration within the basin and the timing of petroleum generation relative to reservoir and trap development. Geochemical analyses of hundreds of crude oils, natural gases, and nonreservoir rocks from the Mesozoic and Cenozoic trends along the northern Gulf of Mexico basin indicate the general inadequacy of the Tertiary section to source the huge oil accumulations within Cenozoic reservoirs. Furthermore, other than the biogenic gas, isotopic data indicate that the majority of nonassociated gases found in Cenozoic accumulations have been thermogenically derived from much greater depths where maturation is consistent with dry gas generation. Geochemical data from several Mesozoic units in the basin, but outside the Cenozoic trend proper, indicate the existence of excellent Mesozoic source rocks. It is proposed that such units extend below the Cenozoic producing trends and are drained by deep-seated faults and piercement salt structures. Maturation history, structural style, and patterns of migration and remigration control the variable productivity along the various trends.

  15. The Central Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observing System (CenGOOS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howden, S. D.; Asper, V.; Lohrenz, S.; Roman, D.

    2005-05-01

    The University of Southern Mississippi has established a coastal ocean observing system in the north-central Gulf of Mexico, where there is a dearth of real-time oceanographic observations on the continental shelf. The development of the Central Gulf of Mexico Ocean Observing System (CenGOOS) follows overall guidelines for the Integrated Ocean Observing System as articulated by Ocean.US, and draft regional guidelines set forth by the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA). The present system consists of a 3-m discus buoy measuring both meteorological and oceanographic parameters that are telemetered to the USM Department of Marine Science every three hours via Globalstar satellite communications. Data are served via a web site (www.cengoos.org). The near-term development of the system will include: Further integration with the coastal and near coastal observatories in the region Deployment of a two station, long range, high frequency radar system for mapping surface currents in the Mississippi Bight Deployment of additional instrumented moorings in the Mississippi Bight Development of a data assimilative nowcast/forecast numerical model of the region Regional database of high resolution multibeam and side-scan sonar data The initial plan for development of CenGOOS was formulated based on input solicited from identified stakeholders, regional priorities identified through opinion surveys conducted by the GCOOS-RA, and guidance from both Ocean.US and GCOOS-RA. An overview of our accomplishments, and vision for the future will be presented. This will include the hardware infrastructure, data management and communications plans and implementation, and other activities to integrate CenGOOS with the other observing systems in the Gulf of Mexico.

  16. Permeability and compressibility of resedimented Gulf of Mexico mudrock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betts, W. S.; Flemings, P. B.; Schneider, J.

    2011-12-01

    We use a constant-rate-of strain consolidation test on resedimented Gulf of Mexico mudrock to determine the compression index (Cc) to be 0.618 and the expansion index (Ce) to be 0.083. We used crushed, homogenized Pliocene and Pleistocene mudrock extracted from cored wells in the Eugene Island block 330 oil field. This powdered material has a liquid limit (LL) of 87, a plastic limit (PL) of 24, and a plasticity index (PI) of 63. The particle size distribution from hydrometer analyses is approximately 65% clay-sized particles (<2 μm) with the remainder being less than 70 microns in diameter. Resedimented specimens have been used to characterize the geotechnical and geophysical behavior of soils and mudstones independent of the variability of natural samples and without the effects of sampling disturbance. Previous investigations of resedimented offshore Gulf of Mexico sediments (e.g. Mazzei, 2008) have been limited in scope. This is the first test of the homogenized Eugene Island core material. These results will be compared to in situ measurements to determine the controls on consolidation over large stress ranges.

  17. Numerical Modeling of Methanogenesis at Walker Ridge, Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, D.; Cook, A.; Malinverno, A.; Daigle, H.

    2014-12-01

    Methane migration is a crucial link between locations of methane generation and natural gas hydrate reservoirs, yet migration mechanisms are poorly understood in the natural environment. In this study, we evaluate constraints on methanogenesis and methane diffusion through the development of a 1-dimensional diagenetic model of the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Site Walker Ridge 313 in the Gulf of Mexico. High saturation gas hydrate was confirmed at Walker Ridge from borehole logs, which measured both high compressional velocity and high resistivity in hydrate-bearing sand layers. Gas hydrate formation depends largely on organic matter concentration and methanogenesis rates. We will test how much organic matter is required to achieve gas hydrate saturations observed at Walker Ridge. Our model will incorporate methane generation around a sand layer as it is moves down through the sediment column. Variable porosity across the sediment column due to early diagenesis and sediment compaction will also be considered. Since methane solubility is higher in finer grained sediments due to smaller pore spaces, gas hydrate will form in the sand layer from methane transported by the relatively slow process of diffusion from finer grained layers. The results of this model are critical to the development of the basin scale simulation of overall methane flux based on the geometry of WR313. The simulation results will improve scientific characterization of how hydrates form and distribute within continental margin sediments.

  18. Relationship of structural development and Cenozoic sedimentation, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Humphris, C.C. Jr.

    1985-02-01

    Development of structure in the northern Gulf of Mexico, mainly listric faulting and salt features, is directly related to Cenozoic sedimentation. Essentially all oil and gas production in this region occurs in structural features resulting from faulting and/or salt movement. A thick section of continental shallow-water sediments rimming the entire Gulf of Mexico was deposited during overall Gulf subsidence in Mesozoic time. Very little sedimentation took place in the central Gulf, so that, at the close of the Mesozoic the central Gulf probably was of abyssal depths. Cenozoic sedimentation surpassed the rate of subsidence causing sediments to prograde across the Mesozoic shelf margin, with greatest deposition occurring gulfward of this margin. These depocenters or areas of thickest sedimentation prograded gulfward throughout time (in response to sediment supply) and migrated northeastward from south Texas to south Louisiana. Listric or growth faults that formed contemporaneously with deposition are a common structural feature developed during Cenozoic sedimentation. These features are apparently caused by differential loading of higher density sandstones on prodelta shales near the shelf margin. In those areas underlain by thicker salt, such as the Miocene and younger depocenters, there is greater involvement of salt in growth-fault development. Salt features, the other major type of producing structure, are developed by salt movement as a direct response to Cenozoic sediment loading. Initiation of salt movement is believed to be due to differential loading of prograding sediments. Further salt movement and structural development are completely dependent on continued sedimentation.

  19. Biostratigraphic expression of pleistocene sequence boundaries, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.E. ); Neff, E.D. ); Johnson, G.W. ); Krantz, D.E. )

    1993-04-01

    The quaternary section west of the Mississippi River delta consists of thousands of meters of terrigenous sediments, but the stratigraphic and paleoclimatic history recorded in these sequences is often distorted as a result of salt and shale diapirism. Quaternary sequences of the western Gulf of Mexico often reflect highly variable sediment accumulation rates within and between isolated salt-withdrawal basins and missing section resulting from unconformities and extensive faulting. The sedimentary record of Ocean Drilling Program's Core 625B (northeast Gulf of Mexico) contains significant unconformaties that represent a record of sea-level change during the Pleistocene. The core may thus serve as a standard for timing of sea-level changes of the Western Gulf. Utilizing primarily relative abundances of the warm-water Globorotalia menardii complex and cool water G. inflata, we have subdivided the pre-zone W Pleistocene of Core 625B into 17 subzones, resulting in an average duration of approximately 100,000 years per unit. Based on graphic correlation, subzonal boundaries are largely coeval between sites and can provide high-resolution biostratigraphic subdivision of the Pleistocene of industrial wells on an operational basis. Also, the subzonation delineates anomalous paleotops that are reworked, erosionally truncated at sequence boundaries or delta-depressed as a result of localized sediment influx. Graphic correlation of subzonal boundaries coupled with available biostratigraphic and magnetostrategraphic datums has demonstrated the near synchronomy of subzonal boundaries and their utility in the subdivision of the Pleistocene. Using graphic correlation, the paleontologist can build viable exploration models that can be used to predict the occurrence of hydrocarbon reservoir sands. 87 refs., 13 figs.

  20. Source Functions and Path Effects from Earthquakes in the Farallon Transform Fault Region, Gulf of California, Mexico that Occurred on October 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Raúl R.; Stock, Joann M.; Hauksson, Egill; Clayton, Robert W.

    2016-07-01

    We determined source spectral functions, Q and site effects using regional records of body waves from the October 19, 2013 (M w = 6.6) earthquake and eight aftershocks located 90 km east of Loreto, Baja California Sur, Mexico. We also analyzed records from a foreshock with magnitude 3.3 that occurred 47 days before the mainshock. The epicenters of this sequence are located in the south-central region of the Gulf of California (GoC) near and on the Farallon transform fault. This is one of the most active regions of the GoC, where most of the large earthquakes have strike-slip mechanisms. Based on the distribution of the aftershocks, the rupture propagated northwest with a rupture length of approximately 27 km. We calculated 3-component P- and S-wave spectra from ten events recorded by eleven stations of the Broadband Seismological Network of the GoC (RESBAN). These stations are located around the GoC and provide good azimuthal coverage (the average station gap is 39°). The spectral records were corrected for site effects, which were estimated calculating average spectral ratios between horizontal and vertical components (HVSR method). The site-corrected spectra were then inverted to determine the source functions and to estimate the attenuation quality factor Q. The values of Q resulting from the spectral inversion can be approximated by the relations Q_{P} = 48.1 ± 1.1 f^{0.88 ± 0.04} and Q_{S} = 135.4 ± 1.1 f^{0.58 ± 0.03} and are consistent with previous estimates reported by Vidales-Basurto et al. (Bull Seism Soc Am 104:2027-2042, 2014) for the south-central GoC. The stress drop estimates, obtained using the ω2 model, are below 1.7 MPa, with the highest stress drops determined for the mainshock and the aftershocks located in the ridge zone. We used the values of Q obtained to recalculate source and site effects with a different spectral inversion scheme. We found that sites with low S-wave amplification also tend to have low P-wave amplification, except

  1. Gulf of Mexico Air/Sea Interaction: Measurements and Initial Data Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, C.; Huang, C. H.; Roberts, P. T.; Bariteau, L.; Fairall, C. W.; Gibson, W.; Ray, A.

    2011-12-01

    Corporate, government, and university researchers collaborated to develop an atmospheric boundary layer environmental observations program on an offshore platform in the Gulf of Mexico. The primary goals of this project were to provide data to (1) improve our understanding of boundary layer processes and air-sea interaction over the Gulf of Mexico; (2) improve regional-scale meteorological and air quality modeling; and (3) provide a framework for advanced offshore measurements to support future needs such as emergency response, exploration and lease decisions, wind energy research and development, and meteorological and air quality forecasting. In October 2010, meteorological and oceanographic sensors were deployed for an extended period (approximately 12 months) on a Chevron service platform (ST 52B, 90.5W, 29N) to collect boundary layer and sea surface data sufficient to support these objectives. This project has significant importance given the large industrial presence in the Gulf, sizeable regional population nearby, and the recognized need for precise and timely pollutant forecasts. Observations from this project include surface meteorology; sodar marine boundary layer winds; microwave radiometer profiles of temperature, relative humidity, and liquid water; ceilometer cloud base heights; water temperature and current profiles; sea surface temperature; wave height statistics; downwelling solar and infrared radiation; and air-sea turbulent momentum and heat fluxes. This project resulted in the collection of an unprecedented set of boundary layer measurements over the Gulf of Mexico that capture the range of meteorological and oceanographic interactions and processes that occur over an entire year. This presentation will provide insight into the logistical and scientific issues associated with the deployment and operations of unique measurements in offshore areas and provide results from an initial data analysis of boundary layer processes over the Gulf of

  2. Prospects and Techniques for Eddy-Resolving Acoustic Tomography in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caruthers, J. W.; Nechaev, D.; Roman, D. A.; Sidorovskaia, N. A.; Ioup, G. E.; Ioup, J.; Yaremchuk, M.

    2007-05-01

    For several decades monitoring and modeling the dynamics and physical structure of the Gulf of Mexico have been major efforts undertaken by oceanographers of the United States and other American countries. There are very interesting physical oceanographic features in the Gulf, not the least of which are the Gulf Loop Current and the eddies it spawns. Satellite sensing of IR and altimeter imagery has been a major input to modeling those features. Such efforts are very important to the economy and well being of much of the United States and Mexico, including fisheries, mineral economies, hurricane strengths and paths in the summer, and severe snow storms in the eastern US in the winter. A major shortcoming of the present monitoring of the Gulf is the lack of subsurface input to the dynamic models of the Gulf. Acoustic tomography is a viable means of providing that missing input. Several universities have come together to investigate the prospects for establishing a Gulf Eddy Monitoring System (GEMS) for the deep eastern half of the Gulf using acoustic tomography. The group has conducted several acoustics experiments and propagation studies to determine the feasibility of long-range propagation in the eastern Gulf and the mitigation of adverse effects on marine mammal populations in that region under the Office of Naval Research project entitled the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center (LADC). The group has also convened an invited session for the 9th World Multiconference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics (WMSCI 2005) Orlando, FL, July 2005. This paper discusses prospects for establishing the GEMS tomographic system, its technical characteristics, and its contributions to advancing the knowledge of the dynamics of the Gulf. This presentation will concentrate on the characteristics of a single-slice tomographic system, called GEMS Phase I, across the approaches to the DeSoto Canyon in the northeastern Gulf and its prospect for monitoring the movements of

  3. Hurricane Risk Variability along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline

    PubMed Central

    Trepanier, Jill C.; Ellis, Kelsey N.; Tucker, Clay S.

    2015-01-01

    Hurricane risk characteristics are examined across the U. S. Gulf of Mexico coastline using a hexagonal tessellation. Using an extreme value model, parameters are collected representing the rate or λ (frequency), the scale or σ (range), and the shape or ξ (intensity) of the extreme wind distribution. These latent parameters and the 30-year return level are visualized across the grid. The greatest 30-year return levels are located toward the center of the Gulf of Mexico, and for inland locations, along the borders of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama. Using a geographically weighted regression model, the relationship of these parameters to sea surface temperature (SST) is found to assess sensitivity to change. It is shown that as SSTs increase near the coast, the frequency of hurricanes in these grids decrease significantly. This reinforces the importance of SST in areas of likely tropical cyclogenesis in determining the number of hurricanes near the coast, along with SSTs along the lifespan of the storm, rather than simply local SST. The range of hurricane wind speeds experienced near Florida is shown to increase with increasing SSTs (insignificant), suggesting that increased temperatures may allow hurricanes to maintain their strength as they pass over the Florida peninsula. The modifiable areal unit problem is assessed using multiple grid sizes. Moran’s I and the local statistic G are calculated to examine spatial autocorrelation in the parameters. This research opens up future questions regarding rapid intensification and decay close to the coast and the relationship to changing SSTs. PMID:25767885

  4. NOAA Ecosystem Data Assembly Center for the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. R.; Beard, R. H.; Arnone, R. A.; Cross, S. L.; Comar, P. G.; May, N.; Strange, T. P.

    2006-12-01

    Through research programs at the NOAA Northern Gulf of Mexico Cooperative Institute (CI), NOAA is establishing an Ecosystem Data Assembly Center (EDAC) for the Gulf of Mexico. The EDAC demonstrates the utility of integrating many heterogeneous data types and streams used to characterized and identify ecosystems for the purpose of determining the health of ecosystems and identifying applications of the data within coastal resource management activities. Data streams include meteorological, physical oceanographic, ocean color, benthic, biogeochemical surveys, fishery, as well as fresh water fluxes (rainfall and river flow). Additionally the EDAC will provide an interface to the ecosystem data through an ontology based on the Coastal/Marine Ecological Classification System (CMECS). Applications of the ontological approach within the EDAC will be applied to increase public knowledge on habitat and ecosystem awareness. The EDAC plans to leverage companion socioeconomic studies to identify the essential data needed for continued EDAC operations. All data-management architectures and practices within the EDAC ensure interoperability with the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) national backbone by incorporating the IOOS Data Management and Communications Plan. Proven data protocols, standards, formats, applications, practices and architectures developed by the EDAC will be transitioned to the NOAA National Data Centers.

  5. A seismic-reflection investigation of gas hydrates and sea-floor features of the upper continental slope of the Garden Banks and Green Canyon regions, northern Gulf of Mexico: report for cruise G1-99-GM (99002)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cooper, Alan; Twichell, David; Hart, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    During April 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a 13-day cruise in the Garden Banks and Green Canyon regions of the Gulf of Mexico. The R/V Gyre, owned by Texas A&M University, was chartered for the cruise. The general objectives were (1) to acquire very high resolution seismic-reflection data and side-scan sonar images of the upper and middle continental slope (200-1200-m water depths), (2) to study the acoustic character and features of the sea floor for evidence of sea-floor hazards, and (3) to look for evidence of subsurface gas hydrates and their effects. The Gulf of Mexico is well known for hydrocarbon resources, with emphasis now on frontier deep-water areas. For water depths greater than about 250 m, the pressure-termperature conditions are correct for the development of shallow-subsurface gas hydrate formation (Anderson et al., 1992). Gas hydrates are ice-like mixtures of gas and water (Kvenvolden, 1993). They are known to be present from extensive previous sampling in sea-floor cores and from mound-like features observed on the sea floor in many parts of the northern Gulf, including the Green Canyon and Garden Banks areas (e.g., Roberts, 1995). Seismic-reflection data are extensive in the Gulf of Mexico, but few very-high-resolution data like those needed for gas-hydrate studies exist in the public domain. The occurrence and mechanisms of gas hydrate formation and dissociation are important to understand, because of their perceived economic potential for methane gas, their potential controls on local and regional sea-floor stability, and their possible effects on earth climates due to massive release of methane greenhouse gas into the atmosphere. Three high-resolution seismic-reflection systems and one side-scan sonar system were used on the cruise to map the surface reflectance and features of the sea floor and the acoustic geometries and character of the shallow sub-surface. The cruise was designed to acquire regional and detailed local

  6. Cold Surge Activity Over the Gulf of Mexico in a Warmer Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Edgar; Magaña Rueda, Victor; Caetano, Ernesto; Kusunoki, S. %J. Frontiers in Earth Science, Volume 1, id. 19 (2014)

    2014-08-01

    Cold surges are a dominant feature of midlatitude tropical interaction. During the North Hemisphere (NH) winter, midlatitude waves propagating from the Rocky Mountains into the Gulf of Mexico result in cold surges, also known as Nortes or Tehuantepecers, associated with severe weather over the southern part of Mexico. The magnitude of their intense surface winds, precipitation and drops in surface temperature depends on the characteristics of the midlatitude wave propagating into the tropics. The high spatial resolution (20km X 20km) version of the TL959L60-AGC Model of the Meteorological Research Institute of Japan is used to examine changes in cold surge activity under the A1B greenhouse gas emission scenario for the 2080 - 2099 period. The model realistically reproduces the spatial and temporal characteristics of cold surges for the 1980 - 1989 control period. The effect of changes in baroclinicity, static stability and mean flow over North America suggest that in a warmer climate, increased cold surge activity over the Gulf of Mexico would occur. However, these systems would have shorter wavelength (higher phase speeds) and shorter lifespans that could reduce the total amount of winter precipitation. The increased frequency of cold surges over the Gulf of Mexico would be a consequence of weaker baroclinicity and static stability in the lower troposphere over the cold surge genesis region, along with more dominant westerly winds, resulting from ENSO-like conditions in the atmospheric circulations over North America.

  7. ECONOMICS AND APPRAISAL OF CONVENTIONAL OIL AND GAS IN THE WESTERN GULF OF MEXICO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Haynes, John L.

    1984-01-01

    The oil and gas industry frequently appraises undiscovered oil and gas resources on a regional basis to decide whether to start or continue exploration programs. The appraisals are of little value unless conditioned by estimates of the costs of finding and producing the resources. This paper presents an economic appraisal of undiscovered oil and gas resources in the western Gulf of Mexico. Also presented are a description of the model used to make the assessment, results of a sensitivity analysis, and a discussion of the implications of the results to the industry. The appraisal is shown to be relatively robust to changes in physical and engineering assumptions. Because the number of commercial discoveries was found to be quite sensitive to economic conditions, the analysis has important implications in terms of forecasting future industry drilling and other associated activities in the western Gulf of Mexico.

  8. Active diapirism and slope steepening, northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, R.G.; Bouma, A.H.

    1982-01-01

    Large diapiric and nondiapiric masses of Jurassic salt and Tertiary shale underlie the northern Gulf of Mexico continental slope and adjacent outer continental shelf. Local steepening of the sea floor in response to the vertical growth of these structures is a serious concern to those involved in the site selection and the construction of future oil and gas production and transportation facilities in this frontier petroleum province. The evidence given in this paper supports the conclusion that the present continental slope region of the northern Gulf of Mexico is undergoing active diapirism and consequent slope steepening. Because most of the sediment on the flanks of diapiric structures consists of underconsolidated muds, slumping will take place regularly in response to further diapiric movement.-from Authors

  9. Introduction to "northern Gulf of Mexico ecosystem change and hazards susceptibility"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, J.C.; Lavoie, D.L.; Poore, R.Z.

    2009-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico and its diverse natural resources are threatened by population and development pressure, and by the impacts of rising sea level and severe storms. In the wake of the devastating 2005 hurricane season, and in response to the complex management issues facing the region, the U.S. Geological Survey organized the multidisciplinary "Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazards Susceptibility" project. This special issue of Geo-Marine Letters hosts a few of the early results in the form of 11 papers covering three themes: (1) the control exerted by the underlying geologic framework on geomorphology and nearshore processes and features; (2) impact of human activities on nearshore water quality; and (3) hurricanes and associated effects. ?? 2009 US Government.

  10. Coast Guard details causes of Gulf of Mexico offshore blowout

    SciTech Connect

    Ford, R.E.

    1980-11-17

    An investigation of the March 1979 gas blowout that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, leading to an explosion, fire, and loss of personnel, reveals that the casualties may have been fewer if the rig personnel had responded immediately to the abandon-rig alarm. The proximate cause of the explosion was the loss of well control; natural gas flowed into the wellbore, up through the drill pipe, and into the strainer cross on the mud pump. There, it simultaneously blew out the gate valve on the pump recirculation line, lifted the pressure-relief valve, and forced the relief valve line to part, thus venting to the atmosphere. The gas accumulated under, around, and in the living quarters, pump room, and engine room. The resultant explosion completely destroyed the living quarters. Seriously contributing to the accident was the crew's inability to close the kelly preventer; the blowout-preventer stack functioned properly throughout the blowout.

  11. Deep Eddies and Cross-Slope Exchange in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, Heather; Bower, Amy; Perez-Brunius, Paula; Hamilton, Peter

    2015-04-01

    A major Lagrangian program is currently underway to map the deep (1500-2500) circulation of the entire Gulf of Mexico. Beginning in 2011, more than 120 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been released in the eastern, central and western Gulf, many in pairs and triplets. The floats are programmed to drift for two years, obtaining position fixes and temperature/pressure measurements three times daily. The trajectories will be described with a focus on mesoscale eddying behavior as it relates to cross-slope exchange. In particular, the first-ever observations of deep energetic anticyclonic eddies (possibly lenses) forming at and separating from a northeastward-flowing boundary current west of Campeche Bank will be discussed. The existence of this eddy formation region has major implications for exchange between the newly-observed deep boundary current along the Mexican continental slope and the interior Gulf. The Campeche Bank exchange region appears to be the dominant deep pathway from the boundary into the western Gulf for heat, salt, and nutrients, and also for oil spill pollutants. Cross-slope exchange via eddies is also seen in other regions of the Gulf, and will be presented. The project is being supported by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

  12. Microbiology of Massive Gas Hydrates from the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanoil, B. D.; Sassen, R.; La Duc, M. T.; Sweet, S. T.; Nealson, K. H.

    2001-12-01

    Although there is significant interest in the potential interactions of microbes with gas hydrate, no direct physical association between them has been demonstrated. We examined several intact samples of naturally occurring gas hydrate from the Gulf of Mexico for evidence of microbes. All samples were collected from anaerobic hemipelagic mud within the gas hydrate stability zone, at water depths in the ca. 540 to 2000 m range. The \\delta13C of hydrate bound methane varied from -45.1 to -74.7 parts per mil compared to the Pee-Dee Belemnite standard, reflecting different gas origins. Stable isotope composition data indicated microbial consuption of methane or propane in some of the samples. Evidence of the presence of microbes was initially determined by DAPI total direct counts of hydrate-associated sediments (mean = 1.5 x 10^{9} cells g-1) and gas hydrate (mean = 1.0 x 10^{6} cells g$^{-1}). Small-subunit rRNA phylogenetic characterization was performed to assess the composition of the microbial community in one gas hydrate sample (AT425) that had no detectable associated sediment and showed evidence of microbial methane consumption. Bacteria were moderately diverse within AT425, and were dominated by gene sequences related to several groups of Proteobacteria, as well as Actinobacteria and low G+C Firmicutes. In contrast, there was low diversity of Archaea, nearly all of which were related to methanogenic Archaea, with the majority specifically related to Methanosaeta spp. The results of this study suggest that there is a direct association between microbes and gas hydrate, a finding that may have significance for hydrocarbon flux into the Gulf of Mexico and for life in extreme environments.

  13. Depositional history of the Lagniappe Delta, northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico continental shelf is characterized by superimposing deltas. One such delta, informally named Lagniappe, extends east of the Mississippi Delta from mid-shelf to the continental slope. This late Wisconsinan delta is adjacent to, but not associated with the Mississippi Delta complex: the fluvial source was probably the ancient Pearl and/or Mobile Rivers. The fluvially dominated Lagniappe Delta is characterized by complex sigmoid-oblique seismic-reflection patterns, indicating delta switching of high-energy sand-prone facies to low-energy facies. The areal distribution and sediment thickness of the delta were partially controlled by two diapirs. ?? 1989 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  14. Deepwater, subsalt prospects open new era for Gulf of Mexico action

    SciTech Connect

    Wheatley, R.

    1997-01-20

    If 1996 trends continue, exploration and development will flourish in the Gulf of Mexico this year and for many years to come. Able to drill and complete wells in steadily deeper water, and propelled by rising prices for oil and gas, operators are advancing projects throughout the Gulf. The activity is expected to nearly double oil production from the Gulf of Mexico in the next 10 years. The paper discusses targets, technology, activity indicators, operator alliances, specific fields, subsalt production and plans, transportation, Gulf role and outlook.

  15. Model test of a concrete TLP for Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretsen, K.; Nygaard, C.; Huang, E.W.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the set-up and key results of a concrete TLP model test program performed at Offshore Technology Research Center (Texas) in January, 1994 by Aker Gulf Marine. The Concrete TLP had a deck weight of 26,000 short tonnes, the water depth was 3,000 feet and the environment was typical for Gulf of Mexico. The main focus was to measure resonant tendon loads as no practical and reliable tools to estimate higher order load effects (ringing and springing) has been available. The extreme condition tendon results showed significant high frequency content which must be accounted for in design. Although difficult to distinguish between ringing and springing responses, ringing as defined herein, was not observed in any of the tests. Increased tendon stiffness and increased vertical center of gravity does not affect the total tendon tension significantly i.e. combined wave frequency and high frequency tensions. The maximum horizontal offset was estimated to 9% of the water depth (278 feet). Four moderate seastates were run to estimate relative tendon fatigue damage for the various sensitivity cases. The results show that reduced TLP natural period does not necessarily increase the fatigue life due to combined springing and first order response. The measurements also showed that the high center of gravity case increased the tendon fatigue life for the lowest sea states, but the effect was reduced for moderate sea states beyond a certain level. Both Rainflow Cycle counting and standard methods for calculating fatigue are presented.

  16. Sources and Cycling of CDOM and DOC in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coble, P. G.; Conmy, R. N.

    2008-12-01

    The distribution and cycling of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is of importance to the study of biogeochemical cycling of carbon and other elements in the ocean as well as to ocean optics due to its strong absorption of UV and short wavelength visible light. The absorption properties of gelbstoff make it photo-chemically active and also make it a controlling factor in the quality and quantity of light available for photosynthesis in the coastal ocean. Much of the variability of CDOM distribution in the ocean occurs nearshore, due to differences in riverine CDOM concentrations and discharge. CDOM and DOC sometimes show a correlation in regions where DOC concentrations are controlled by freshwater discharge. The Gulf of Mexico plays a key role in the North American Carbon cycle, draining more than 60% of the U.S. and more than 40% of Mexico, with freshwater input from 33 major river systems as well as from submarine groundwater discharge. Over the eight year period between 1998 and 2005, we have collected more than 1,000 CDOM samples 34 cruises in the region between the Mississippi River and the Florida Keys. We have also sampled 10 major river systems over multi-year periods. The major factors controlling CDOM distributions in the Gulf of Mexico are river of origin, hydrographic factors such as floods and droughts, and circulation on the shelf. Rivers in southern Florida have higher CDOM concentrations than those in the west central and southwest regions, which are higher than those found in the Mississippi River water. Dry seasons and drought years are characterized by high fluorescence efficiencies due to photobleaching. High CDOM, high salinity water masses are produced in the hypersaline waters of Florida Bay and from coastal upwelling of near-bottom waters along the shelf in the region of Charlotte Harbor. This paper will present a compilation and summary of CDOM and DOC distributions and analysis of the key controlling factors for the eastern Gulf of

  17. BIOGEOGRAPHY OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN ESTUARIES ALONG THE GULF OF MEXICO AND WESTERN ATLANTIC COASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates from 870 estuarine sites was examined to determine boundaries of biogeographical provinces along the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic coasts of the United States. Our objective was to confirm or challenge established boun...

  18. TROPHIC STRUCTURE OF MACROBENTHIC COMMUNITIES IN NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trophic structure of estuarine benthic communities in the northern Gulf of Mexico was characterized according to the functional roles and geographic distributions of the macrobenthos. acrobenthic organisms collected during two years of study were assigned to trophic groups to ass...

  19. Deep Seismic Structure of the Texas-Gulf of Mexico Passive Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, J.; Gurrola, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Texas-Gulf of Mexico region has witnessed a wide range of tectonic processes, including deformation due to orogeny, continental collision and rifting. Artifacts of these processes are likely to remain at lithospheric depths beneath the region but, until recently, the tools needed to examine structures at mantle depths were not available. With the passage of the EarthScope's USArray stations and the completion of a targeted broadband deployment, new images of the region's lithosphere have emerged. These images reveal lithospheric-scale anomalies that correlate strongly with surface features, such as a large fast anomaly that corresponds to the southern extent of the Laurentia (or 'Great Plains') craton and a large slow anomaly associated with the Southern Oklahoma Aulacogen. Other features that would not have been expected based on surface tectonics include a slow layer that we interpret to be a shear zone at the base of the cratonic root and the transitional continental lithosphere, and a zone that is bounded at its top and bottom by discontinuities and high levels of seismic anisotropy. Additionally a high velocity body underlying the Gulf Coast Plains may mark delaminating lower crust. If true it provides indirect evidence that active rifting best describes the process that led to the opening of the Gulf of Mexico. These new results are based upon the analysis of 326 USArray broadband seismic stations and a 23-station broadband deployment across Texas' passive margin, from Matagorda Island, a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico, to Johnson City, TX, on the relatively undisturbed Proterozoic crust of central Texas.

  20. Gulf of Mexico satellite radar altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, C. G.; Forsythe, R. G.; Parsons, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The dynamic topography of the sea surface was measured. The radar altimeter measurements yield average ocean topographic data which are mapped. Seasonal deviations from a 3 year mean topography are presented. The altimeters are also instrumented with sample and hold gates which provide information about the shape and amplitude of the return waveform. Parameters including ocean surface wind speed and the significant wave height are determined. One hundred eighty six wind speed and significant wave height histograms are presented.

  1. Gulf of Mexico Climate-History Calibration Study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spear, Jessica W.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2010-01-01

    Reliable instrumental records of past climate are available for about the last 150 years only. To supplement the instrumental record, reconstructions of past climate are made from natural recorders such as trees, ice, corals, and microfossils preserved in sediments. These proxy records provide information on the rate and magnitude of past climate variability, factors that are critical to distinguishing between natural and human-induced climate change in the present. However, the value of proxy records is heavily dependent on calibration between the chemistry of the natural recorder and of the modern environmental conditions. The Gulf of Mexico Climate and Environmental History Project is currently undertaking a climate-history calibration study with material collected from an automated sediment trap. The primary focus of the calibration study is to provide a better calibration of low-latitude environmental conditions and shell chemistry of calcareous microfossils, such as planktic Foraminifera.

  2. Exploring Linkages Between Gulf of Mexico Sea Surface Conditions and North American Hydroclimate during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, J. N.; Thirumalai, K.; Quinn, T. M.; Poore, R. Z.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is part of the Atlantic Warm Pool, a feature that drives oceanic moisture flux to the surrounding continent. It is connected to the North Atlantic Ocean via the loop current, which transports salt and heat from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico poleward via the Gulf Stream. As such, variations in Gulf of Mexico sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) are linked to changes in North Atlantic Ocean circulation and North American hydroclimate. Although SST and SSS variability in the Gulf of Mexico are well understood on inter-annual and glacial-interglacial timescales, little is known about centennial scale variability in these sea surface parameters through the Holocene. We present here the first continuous multi-decadal resolution time series of SST and SSS spanning the entire Holocene from the Gulf of Mexico. This proxy reconstruction is based on paired measurements of Mg/Ca and δ18O in the planktic foraminifer, Globigerinoides ruber (white variety) in the Garrison Basin. Using these data, in combination with additional Gulf of Mexico SST and SSS records from the late Holocene, we explore linkages between North American precipitation patterns and ocean circulation on centennial timescales.

  3. Early opening of initially closed Gulf of Mexico and central North Atlantic ocean

    SciTech Connect

    Van Siclen, D.C.

    1984-09-01

    This paper presents ideas on the early opening and evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and the central North Atlantic ocean. It discusses rifting activity, plate tectonics, magnetic anomalies, and the geologic time elements involved.

  4. DISTRIBUTION OF ORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN SEDIMENTS FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 1994, over 200 sediment samples were collected in accordance with EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment (EMAP) probabilistic sampling protocol from coastal and estuarine locations in the Louisianian Province (Gulf of Mexico). Organic extracts of homogenized aliquots we...

  5. Recent results from numerical models of the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico: Do they all agree?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinbaum, J.

    2013-05-01

    A great variety of numerical models of the Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico have been developed over the years. They all reproduce the basic features of the circulation in the region but do not necessarily agree in the dynamics that explains them. We review recent results related to: 1) semiannual and interannual eddy variability in the Caribbean and their possible role in determining the extension of the western Atlantic warm pool. 2) Loop Current and its eddy shedding dynamics and 3) the deep circulation in the Gulf of Mexico. Recent observations of inertial wave trapping by eddies suggest new veins for numerical research and model comparisons.

  6. 33 CFR 110.194b - Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives... center located at latitude 30°11′12″, longitude 88°30′07″, in the waters of Gulf of Mexico south of the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mississippi Sound and Gulf...

  7. 33 CFR 110.194b - Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives... center located at latitude 30°11′12″, longitude 88°30′07″, in the waters of Gulf of Mexico south of the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mississippi Sound and Gulf...

  8. 33 CFR 110.194b - Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives... center located at latitude 30°11′12″, longitude 88°30′07″, in the waters of Gulf of Mexico south of the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mississippi Sound and Gulf...

  9. 33 CFR 110.194b - Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives... center located at latitude 30°11′12″, longitude 88°30′07″, in the waters of Gulf of Mexico south of the... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mississippi Sound and Gulf...

  10. Methanotrophic gastropods from a bathyal hydrocarbon seep, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.C.; Aharon, P.; Gupta, S. )

    1992-01-01

    Two gastropods, Neritina sp. and Truncatella sp., collected live from a Gulf of Mexico active gas seep with the submersible Johnson Sea Link in September 1991, apparently incorporate methane-derived carbon in their soft tissues. Flesh of an individual Neritina sp. had a delta C-13 of [minus]50.92 per mil PDB, and that of two coexisting individuals of Truncatella sp. had values of [minus]45.11 and [minus]49.27 per mil. These isotope values are comparable to those reported for the methanotrophic mytilid bivalve Bathymodiolus sp. from other hydrocarbon seeps on the Gulf of Mexico, and are lighter than published isotopic values of chemosynthetic organisms with sulfur-oxidizing symbionts. The anomalously light carbon-isotopic values of Neritina sp. and Truncatella sp. may steam from one of three causes: (1) these gastropods host symbiotic methanotrophic bacteria, (2) their chief food is methane-oxidizing bacteria present at the seep, or (3) they incorporate some carbon from the periostracum of mussels on which they may graze. The presence of abundant juveniles of Bathymodiolus, reported to settle preferentially in areas of active seepage and high methane release, indicates that methane was abundant and supported a community with multiple trophic levels. Generally, studies of hydrocarbon-seep communities have focused on larger community members, especially bivalves and tube worms. The presence of living Neritina and Truncatella at the authors sampling site, however, draws attention to the fact that these gastropods are integral and significant parts of hydrocarbon-seep communities. Both gastropod species are members of genera that characteristically inhabit shallow marine, intertidal, and semiterrestrial environments. The presence of these genera in bathyal hydrocarbon seeps indicates that they have very broad environmental ranges, thus limiting their utility in paleoecologic reconstructions.

  11. Nutrient delivery from the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico and effects of cropland conservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Excessive nutrients transported from the Mississippi River Basin have created an ecological disaster - Gulf of Mexico hypoxia. Also, in recent years, federal expenditures on agricultural conservation practices have received intense scrutiny. Partly driven by these factors, the USDA Conservation Ef...

  12. Coordinated Field Campaigns in Chesapeake Bay and Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mannino, Antonio; Novak, Michael; Tzortziou, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events (GEO-CAPE) mission concept recommended by the U.S. National Research Council (2007) focuses on measurements of atmospheric trace gases and aerosols and aquatic coastal ecology and biogeochemistry from geostationary orbit (35,786 km altitude). Two GEO-CAPE-sponsored multi-investigator ship-based field campaigns were conducted to coincide with the NASA Earth Venture Suborbital project DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) field campaigns: (1) Chesapeake Bay in July 2011 and (2) northwestern Gulf of Mexico in September 2013. Goal: to evaluate whether GEO-CAPE coastal mission measurement and instrument requirements are optimized to address science objectives while minimizing ocean color satellite sensor complexity, size and cost - critical mission risk reduction activities. NASA continues to support science studies related to the analysis of data collected as part of these coordinated field campaigns and smaller efforts.

  13. 75 FR 9397 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic and the Gulf of Mexico; Southeastern Data, Assessment, and Review...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ... of Mexico; Southeastern Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Spiny Lobster AGENCY: National Marine... of SEDAR Webinars and Workshop for South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico spiny lobster. SUMMARY: The SEDAR update of the assessment of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico stock of spiny lobster...

  14. 76 FR 81479 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Spanish Mackerel and Cobia AGENCY: National...: Notice of SEDAR Workshops for South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Spanish mackerel and cobia. SUMMARY: The SEDAR assessments of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico stocks of Spanish mackerel and cobia...

  15. 75 FR 51983 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-24

    ... Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Assessment Webinar for SEDAR 23 Goliath Grouper...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of SEDAR 23 Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic goliath grouper assessment webinar. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 23 assessment of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic stock of goliath grouper...

  16. Seagrass status and trends in the northern Gulf of Mexico: 1940-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, L., (Edited By); Altsman, D.; DeMay, R.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past century, seagrass habitats from the bays of Texas to the gulf shores of Florida have decreased. Seagrass beds, which are highly dependent on water quality and clarity for survival, are home to a multitude of aquatic plants and animals and a source of economic activity through commercial and recreational fishing and ecotourism. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) and its partners have made a commitment to restore, enhance, and protect this important ecosystem. As seagrass habitats decrease, the need for information on the causes and effects of seagrass loss, current mapping information, and education on the importance of seagrassess becomes greater. This report is the initial effort of the GMP’s research and restoration plan for seagrasses. The purpose of this report is to provide scientists, managers, and citizens with valuable baseline information on the status and trends of seagrasses in coastal waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Within the northern Gulf of Mexico region, 14 individual estuarine systems where seagrasses occur, as well as statewide summaries for Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, are examined in this study. Each estuarine system is detailed in vignettes that address current and historical extent and quality of seagrasses, seagrass mapping and monitoring, causes of status change, restoration and enhancement activities, background information for the entire study area as well as the subareas for study, and the methodology employed to analyze and document the historical trends and current status of seagrasses. The systems, moving from west to east, include the Laguna Madre, Texas Coastal Bend region, and Galveston Bay in Texas; the Chandeleur Islands in Louisiana; the Mississippi Sound; and Perdido Bay, Pensacola/Escambia Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, St. Andrew Bay, Florida’s Big Bend region, Tampa Bay/St. Joseph Sound, Sarasota Bay, Greater Charlotte Harbor, and Florida Bay in Florida

  17. Sediment Microbial Community Dynamics and Geochemistry During Oxic and Hypoxic Periods in the Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Seasonal hypoxia in the benthic waters of the Louisiana Coastal Shelf contributes to the Gulf of Mexico "dead zone" phenomena. Limited information is available on sedimentary biogeochemical interactions during periods of hypoxia.

  18. MULTIPLE REGRESSION MODELS FOR HINDCASTING AND FORECASTING MIDSUMMER HYPOXIA IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new suite of multiple regression models were developed that describe the relationship between the area of bottom water hypoxia along the northern Gulf of Mexico and Mississippi-Atchafalaya River nitrate concentration, total phosphorus (TP) concentration, and discharge. Variabil...

  19. 75 FR 80469 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... Advisory Panel will discuss the potential role of VMS in enhanced seafood traceability in Gulf of Mexico fisheries. This will include status and review of existing seafood traceability programs and...

  20. Education Conference of the Gulf of Mexico Accord (1st, Daytona Beach, FL, September 28-30, 1995). Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, Philip R., Jr.

    Under the auspices of the North American Free Trade Agreement, five states in the United States and six states in Mexico established the Gulf of Mexico Accord to create a working partnership to foster economic development in the Gulf of Mexico. The agreement addresses six major sectors: investment; communication and transportation; health;…

  1. Environmental Conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: before and after the BP Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides a summary of ecological condition and sediment chemistry data for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries that were exposed to oil and oil-related contaminants from the BP Oil Spill.

  2. 76 FR 59373 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Generic Annual Catch Limits...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-26

    ...) for Reef Fish Resources, Red Drum, Shrimp, and Coral and Coral Reefs for the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) for... Coral and Coral Reefs FMP. The majority of harvest of octocorals occurs in waters under the...

  3. 78 FR 29116 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC680 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Correction AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting; correction....

  4. 77 FR 13096 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Port Aransas, TX. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue...) 295-5000. Wednesday, March 28, 2012, Hyatt Place, 2600 Champion Ring Road, Fort Myers, Florida...

  5. Crustal structure of the northern Gulf of Mexico from potential fields and seismic refraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, I. O.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Eddy, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    A recent seismic refraction program in the northern offshore Gulf of Mexico (US waters) has greatly enhanced understanding of the crustal structure of this previously poorly-known region. These data are the first to show how crustal thickness varies across this area. Interpretations of crustal types derived from the refraction data have helped to delineate regions of oceanic and extended continental crust, as well as regions of crustal thickening probably associated with synrift volcanism. Onshore, however, there is still a lack of refraction data so understanding of crustal structure and therefore extension history is poorly constrained. Potential field modeling can help address this issue. It is well know that gravity modeling by itself can yield many different interpretations of density distributions and hence crustal structure. Combined with refraction data these interpretations can be much better constrained. In this study crustal structure for the onshore northern Gulf of Mexico is derived from the offshore refraction data combined with regional gravity and magnetic data, along with EarthScope interpretations of crust thickness. The lack of observed rift faulting in deep seismic reflection data in the region has long been a puzzle, as the several hundreds of kilometers of extension implied by plate reconstructions should have resulted in extensive faulting. The potential field data does suggest the existence of deep grabens parallel to the coast, associated with large magnetic anomalies that may indicate a partly magmatic margin in agreement with some published interpretations. These new interpretations are used to build a model of crustal evolution of the Gulf of Mexico.

  6. 75 FR 5951 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XT85 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico..., NMFS requires any sea turtles taken incidentally during the course of fishing or scientific...

  7. 77 FR 30507 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... the age structure and life history of fish associated with offshore platforms and artificial reefs in... through October 2012, to monitor red snapper caught during recreational fishing tournaments held in Texas... age structure and life history of red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico. If approved, the EFP...

  8. 77 FR 2960 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA847 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico... Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... better document the age structure and life history of fish associated with offshore platforms...

  9. 77 FR 31586 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC022 Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico... announces the receipt of an application for an exempted fishing permit (EFP) from Florida Sea Grant. If granted, the EFP would exempt Florida Sea Grant agents from regulations at Sec. 622.41(m)(3),...

  10. CEER 2014 Dedicated Session Proposal: Restoring Water Quality along with Restoring the Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    This session focuses on the importance of restoring water quality as part of the larger Gulf of Mexico restoration efforts. Water quality has been identified as a significant indicator of water body condition, and Gulf waters have been impacted by increased urban development, agr...

  11. Differences in phosphorus and nitrogen delivery to the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Boyer, E.W.; Nolan, J.V.; Brakebill, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been linked to increased nitrogen fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Basins, though recent evidence shows that phosphorus also influences productivity in the Gulf. We developed a spatially explicit and structurally detailed SPARROW water-quality model that reveals important differences in the sources and transport processes that control nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) delivery to the Gulf. Our model simulations indicate that agricultural sources in the watersheds contribute more than 70% of the delivered N and P. However, corn and soybean cultivation is the largest contributor of N (52%), followed by atmospheric deposition sources (16%); whereas P originates primarily from animal manure on pasture and rangelands (37%), followed by corn and soybeans (25%), other crops (18%), and urban sources (12%). The fraction of in-stream P and N load delivered to the Gulf increases with stream size, but reservoir trapping of P causes large local- and regional-scale differences in delivery. Our results indicate the diversity of management approaches required to achieve efficient control of nutrient loads to the Gulf. These include recognition of important differences in the agricultural sources of N and P, the role of atmospheric N, attention to P sources downstream from reservoirs, and better control of both N and P in close proximity to large rivers. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  12. 77 FR 29682 - Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Central Planning Area, Oil and Gas Lease Sale 216/222

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico, Outer Continental Shelf, Central Planning Area, Oil and...) for Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Oil and Gas Lease Sale: 2012 Central Planning... of the continental shelf boundary between the United States and Mexico. The CPA lease sale...

  13. 33 CFR 110.194b - Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss. 110.194b Section 110.194b Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... Mississippi Sound and Gulf of Mexico, near Petit Bois Island, Miss. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1) Explosives... center located at latitude 30°11′12″, longitude 88°30′07″, in the waters of Gulf of Mexico south of...

  14. Chronic, Anthropogenic Hydrocarbon Releases in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daneshgar Asl, S.; Amos, J.; Woods, P.; Garcia-Pineda, O. G.; MacDonald, I. R.

    2012-12-01

    We used satellite remote sensing to quantify hydrocarbon releases cataloged in the Gulf of Mexico. Satellite SAR has frequently been used for detecting small volume releases of oil in the Gulf. Hydrocarbon compounds reduce water surface roughness and therefore can be detected on SAR images as dark areas. We compiled National Response Center (NRC) oil and hazardous materials spill reports in the Gulf of Mexico submitted by the polluters and by passers-by, collected and filtered by SkyTruth from 2001 to 2012 and determined whether the reports coincided with archived SAR images. So, 316 out of a total 4,574 reports could be investigated from 64 SAR images over the report locations. Some of the images covered multiple reports and oil releases described one report could be observed in more than one image. Current information on platforms, pipeline locations, and ages provided by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEM) can also help us in identifying sources of anthropogenic pollution. The visibility analysis indicated 66 reports of releases were from pipeline, platforms or other anthropogenic sources. Of these, 21 could be seen in SAR images. There were also 133 reports of releases from unknown sources. Of these, 28 were visible in the images. Moreover, 103 anthropogenic reports were attributed to the Taylor offshore platform (platform 23051 in Mississippi Canyon Block 20) which was destroyed during Hurricane Ivan in 2004 and subsequently removed. Of those, 55 were visible in the SAR images and were significantly larger when compared with other reported anthropogenic slicks. The rest of the reports were coded invisible for reasons such as attendance of multiple slicks which makes the decision difficult, report falling outside of the image, image contrast, noisy image, no slick at all, wrong coding, and no slick at the site but another slick in proximity. We then focused on the size of the visible reports which were extracted. The

  15. 77 FR 50642 - Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic; Amendment 11; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ...: Correction On July 27, 2012 (77 FR 44168, July 27, 2012), incorrect latitudinal coordinates for Lobster Trap... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 50 CFR Part 640 RIN 0648-BB44 Spiny Lobster Fishery of the... Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Regions that...

  16. 76 FR 12605 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... On December 30, 2010, a final rule was published to implement Amendment 17B (75 FR 82280). That final..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery Off the Southern Atlantic States; Amendment...-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region (Amendment 17B), which was published in the Federal...

  17. 77 FR 11477 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery off the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... ACLs were implemented through Amendment 17B to the FMP (75 FR 82280, December 30, 2010), before black..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Snapper-Grouper Fishery off the Southern Atlantic States; Amendment... Snapper- Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region (FMP) for review, approval, and implementation...

  18. 33 CFR 100.719 - Annual Suncoast Offshore Challenge; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Offshore Challenge; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL. 100.719 Section 100.719 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.719 Annual Suncoast Offshore Challenge; Gulf...

  19. 33 CFR 100.719 - Annual Suncoast Offshore Challenge; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Offshore Challenge; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL. 100.719 Section 100.719 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.719 Annual Suncoast Offshore Challenge; Gulf...

  20. 33 CFR 165.T08-290 - Safety Zone; Gulf of Mexico-Johns Pass, Florida.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone; Gulf of Mexico-Johns... OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED... § 165.T08-290 Safety Zone; Gulf of Mexico—Johns Pass, Florida. (a) Regulated area. The Coast Guard...

  1. 77 FR 45270 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-31

    ... (Magnuson-Stevens Act). Background On, April 6, 2012, NMFS published a proposed rule (77 FR 20775) to supplement the regulations that implemented management measures described in Amendment 32 (77 FR 6988..., and Coral Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico (Generic ACL Amendment) (76 FR 82044, December 29, 2011),...

  2. 78 FR 32179 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... framework action and requested public comment (78 FR 20292). The proposed rule and the framework action... closure date of the red snapper recreational fishing season in the EEZ off individual states (78 FR 17882... the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic, and the Caribbean (78 FR 22950). That interim final rule did...

  3. 78 FR 37500 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... fisheries through Amendments 14 and 20 to the respective FMPs (68 FR 26230, May 15, 2003). The intended... in June 2006, through Amendments 17 and 25 to the respective FMPs (71 FR 28282, May 16, 2006) and... framework to the Fishery Management Plans (FMPs) for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico...

  4. Crustal types, distribution of salt and the early evolution of the Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Buffler, R.T. )

    1990-05-01

    A new contour map on the top of basement shows the overall configuration of the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Basement, as used here, is all rocks lying below (older than) the extensive Middle Jurassic (Callovian ) premarine evaporites (Louann Salt, etc.) plus the Late Jurassic oceanic crust in the deep part of the basin. The contour map combined with all other available geophysical data has been used to subdivide the gulf basin into four crustal types: continental, thick transitional, thin transitional, and oceanic crust. The broad region of transitional crust and the basic architecture of the basin shown by the map is believed to have formed mainly during a separate Middle Jurassic period of widespread attenuation of the entire gulf region. The area of thick transitional crust around the periphery of the northern gulf is characterized by broad basement highs and lows with wave lengths of 200-300 km. These features controlled the general distribution and thickness of salt and the overlying Jurassic through Lower Cretaceous rocks. In the area of thin transitional crust Mesozoic basins tend to be assymetrical and generally trend more parallel to the overall basin. The boundary between thin transitional crust and oceanic crust is characterized by various salt-related features. For example, the northwest and north-central boundaries are defined by two northeast trending salt-cored foldbelts, the Perdido and Mississippi fan foldbelts, respectively. The offset between the two foldbelts may represent a major transform boundary related to the northwest opening of the gulf basin. All these data put important constraints on models for early gulf evolution.

  5. 78 FR 33259 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... the framework action and requested public comments (78 FR 12012). The proposed rule and the framework... the harvest limits established in Amendment 32 to the FMP (77 FR 6988, February 10, 2012). To project... the regulations in 50 CFR part 622 for the Gulf of Mexico, South Atlantic, and the Caribbean (78...

  6. 76 FR 68339 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... the Magnuson-Stevens Act. On November 22, 2006, NMFS published a final rule (71 FR 67447) to implement... Amendment 29 to the Reef Fish FMP (74 FR 44732, August 31, 2009), which established the Gulf of Mexico IFQ... and 29 (76 FR 50979). This rule establishes an information collection to meet the January 1,...

  7. 75 FR 39638 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Comprehensive Ecosystem-Based...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ...: scott.sandorf@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Need for Correction On June 22, 2010, (75 FR 35330..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Comprehensive Ecosystem-Based Amendment 1 for the South Atlantic Region; Correction AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and...

  8. Tiered on-the-ground implementation projects for Gulf of Mexico water quality improvements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both the Gulf Hypoxia Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and Improving Water Quality in the Mississippi River Basin (USEPA 2008) and the GOMA Governors’ Action Plan II for Healthy and Resilient Coasts (GOMA 2009) call for the development and ...

  9. 78 FR 12085 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  10. 78 FR 27422 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management MMAA104000 Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean...

  11. Coastal vulnerability assessment of the Northern Gulf of Mexico to sea-level rise and coastal change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pendleton, E.A.; Barras, J.A.; Williams, S.J.; Twichell, D.C.

    2010-01-01

    A coastal vulnerability index (CVI) was used to map the relative vulnerability of the coast to future sea-level rise along the Northern Gulf of Mexico from Galveston, TX, to Panama City, FL. The CVI ranks the following in terms of their physical contribution to sea-level rise-related coastal change: geomorphology, regional coastal slope, rate of relative sea-level rise, historical shoreline change rate, mean tidal range, and mean significant wave height. The rankings for each variable are combined and an index value is calculated for 1-kilometer grid cells along the coast. The CVI highlights those regions where the physical effects of sea-level rise might be the greatest. The CVI assessment presented here builds on an earlier assessment conducted for the Gulf of Mexico. Recent higher resolution shoreline change, land loss, elevation, and subsidence data provide the foundation for a better assessment for the Northern Gulf of Mexico. The areas along the Northern Gulf of Mexico that are likely to be most vulnerable to sea-level rise are parts of the Louisiana Chenier Plain, Teche-Vermillion Basin, and the Mississippi barrier islands, as well as most of the Terrebonne and Barataria Bay region and the Chandeleur Islands. These very high vulnerability areas have the highest rates of relative sea-level rise and the highest rates of shoreline change or land area loss. The information provided by coastal vulnerability assessments can be used in long-term coastal management and policy decision making.

  12. 76 FR 70473 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Western Planning Area (WPA) Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-14

    ..._arc.html . For the current status of all GOM WPA leasing maps and OPD's, please refer to 66 FR 28002 (published May 21, 2001), 67 FR 60701 (published September 26, 2002), and 72 FR 27590 (published May 16, 2007... FR 37560 on July 12, 1999, can be obtained from the BOEM Gulf of Mexico Region Public...

  13. Seismotectonics and Seismic Waves Transmision Characteristics of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, J.; Ruiz, V. H.

    2013-05-01

    Mexico's energy resources reside largely in the Gulf of Mexico Basin, one of the oil producing areas of greatest potential in the world. Recent scientific and technological advances on provide new insights that open new areas for exploration and exploitation that were unthinkable in the past, as in the case of the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Investigate the characteristics of this region from different perspectives should be a national priority. This research is an effort in that direction. This work consists of two parts in the first we examine the spatial distribution of seismicity and focal mechanisms of major earthquakes in the Gulf of Mexico (GM). In particular we discuss the mechanism of rupture of the event (Mw 5.9) of 10 September 2006 located off the coast of Florida, United States of America and the May 23, 2007 (Mw 5.4) off the coast of Tuxpan, Veracruz. These two are the most relevant events occurred within the basin of GM in recent years. In the second part we study the inelastic attenuation of seismic signals in the GM by analyzing the decay of the coda of the S wave and surface waves in some cases. The attenuation is estimated by calculating the quality factor Q for different paths within the basin in the frequencies range of 0.3 to 4.0 Hz. It is assumed that the Q factor is governed by the equation Q(f)=Qof**n where Qo is the value of Q (f) at 1 Hz. The calculation uses the broadband digital records of five events of medium magnitude (5.2 <= Mw <= 7) occurred off the coast of Florida and Veracruz recorded by the IRIS and SSN networks. Data from the 2010 Haiti earthquake is used for comparison purposes.

  14. Report says Gulf of Mexico oil spill assessment should include ecosystem services approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-11-01

    The oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico that resulted from the 20 April 2010 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) platform drilling the Macondo well was so massive and affected such a large and deep region of the gulf that the process of determining environmental damage in the region should be more encompassing than a typical habitat and resource equivalency approach, according to a 9 November report by the U.S. National Research Council (NRC). The congressionally requested report calls for an ecosystem services approach to complement ongoing approaches to the damage evaluation for the spill that is being conducted through the ongoing Natural Resources Damage Assessment (NRDA) process triggered by the U.S. Oil Pollution Act (OPA) of 1990.

  15. 78 FR 76595 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-18

    ... Atlantic King Mackerel AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric... King Mackerel. SUMMARY: The SEDAR assessment of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic King...

  16. 77 FR 59223 - Extension of Post-Sale Evaluation Period for Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... of Mexico Planning Area Lease Sale 216/222 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior..., 2012, the post-sale evaluation period for Consolidated Central Gulf of Mexico Planning Area Lease...

  17. Shorebird use of coastal wetland and barrier island habitat in the Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Withers, Kim

    2002-02-27

    The Gulf Coast contains some of the most important shorebird habitats in North America. This area encompasses a diverse mixture of estuarine and barrier island habitats with varying amounts of freshwater swamps and marshes, bottomland hardwood forests, and coastal prairie that has been largely altered for rice and crawfish production, temporary ponds, and river floodplain habitat. For the purposes of this review, discussion is confined to general patterns of shorebird abundance, distribution, and macro- and microhabitat use in natural coastal, estuarine, and barrier island habitats on the Gulf of Mexico Coast. The following geographic regions are considered: Northwestern Gulf (Rio Grande to Louisiana-Mississippi border), Northeastern Gulf (Mississippi to Florida Keys), and Mexico (Rio Grande to Cabo Catoche [Yucatan Strait]). Wintering and migrating shorebirds are most abundant along the Gulf Coast in Texas and Tamaulipas, particularly the Laguna Madre ecosystem. Other important areas are the Southwest Coast region of Florida and the area between Laguna Terminos and Puerto Progresso in Mexico. In general, relative abundances of shorebirds increase from north to south, and decrease south of the Tropic of Cancer (23 degrees 27' N). Based on bimonthly maximum counts within 5 latitudinal bands, the region between 25-30 degrees N is used most heavily by wintering and spring migrating birds. Non-vegetated coastal wetland habitats associated with bays, inlets and lagoons, particularly tidal flats, and sandy beaches are the habitats that appear to be favored by wintering and migrating shorebirds. In general, these habitats tend to occur as habitat complexes that allow for movement between them in relation to tidal flooding of bay-shore habitats. This relationship is particularly important to Piping Plover and may be important to others. Although vegetated habitats are used by some species, they do not appear to attract large numbers of birds. This habitat is most

  18. Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Shallow Hazards Studies Best Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, M.; Hobbs, B.

    2005-05-01

    ConocoPhillips (hConoco) has been involved in deepwater exploration in the Gulf of Mexico for the last 5 years using a dynamically positioned (DP) drillship. As part of the Federal (MMS) and State permitting process for deepwater exploration, ConocoPhillips (COPC) actively undertakes in securing seabed and shallow subsurface hazard surveys and analyses for every potential drillsite. COPC conducts seabed and shallow subsurface hazards surveys for at least two main reasons: To be a safe, efficient operator, seabed and shallow subsurface hazard surveys and analyses are necessary steps of the Exploration Work Flow to help ensure a safe well, and to fulfill MMS (or local government) regulatory requirements The purpose of shallow geohazards studies is to determine seafloor and sub-bottom conditions, inspect for possible chemosynthetic communities, and to provide a shallow hazards assessment in accordance with NTL 2003-G17. During the five years of deepwater exploration COPC has contracted Fugro Geoservices to perform hazards studies in over 30 offshore blocks. Deepwater Gulf of Mexico Shallow Hazards Studies Best Practices The results of the seabed and shallow geohazards are a critical part of the construction of all of our well plans and are dynamically used in all MDT's. The results of the seabed and shallow geohazards investigations have greatly improved our drilling efficiency by predicting and avoiding possible chemosynthetic communities, sea floor faults, shallow gas, and shallow water flow. CoP's outstanding safety record and environmental stewardship with regards to geohazards has helped us in accelerating certain Exploration Plans (within MMS guidelines). These types of efforts has saved money and kept the drilling schedule running smoothly. In the last two years, the MMS has given COPC approval to use existing 3D spec seismic volumes for Shallow Hazards Assessment at several locations where applicable. This type of effort has saved ConocoPhillips hundreds of

  19. DISSOLVED METHANE IN THE SILLS AREA, GULF OF CALIFORNIA, MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The northern part of the Gulf of California is physically separated from the rest of the Gulf by a series of sills and islands. Its waters are highly productive as several water masses interact with each other at the sills. One of the characteristics in the area is the presence o...

  20. Decadal variability in Gulf of Mexico sea surface temperatures since 1734 CE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLong, K. L.; Maupin, C. R.; Flannery, J. A.; Quinn, T. M.; lin, K.; Shen, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a major source of moisture to North America and is a source region for the Gulf Stream, which transports ocean heat northward. Sea surface temperature (SST) variations on centennial to millennial time scales have been documented for this region using paleoceanographic proxies; however, records capable of resolving decadal to subannual variability are lacking. Here we present 274 years of monthly-resolved SST variations derived from records of strontium-to-calcium ratios (Sr/Ca) extracted from four Siderastrea siderea cores recovered from coral colonies within the Dry Tortugas National Park (24°42‧N, 82°48‧W) in the Gulf of Mexico. We find no significant difference in mean Sr/Ca among these cores and significant correlation between cores (r ≥ 0.90, p ≤ 0.05 for monthly). The cross-dated chronology, determined by counting annual bands and correlating Sr/Ca variations, agrees with four 230Th dates within ±2σ analytical precision. Calibration and verification of our multi-core coral Sr/Ca record with local temperature records reveals high agreement (Sr/Ca = -0.042 SST + 10.074, R2 = 0.96; σregression = 0.70°C, 1σ), similar to those reported for single cores from this location. We find winter SSTs tend to be more variable than summer SSTs (0.99 and 0.81°C, 1σ; respectively) with periodic intervals of 10 to 15 years with cooler summer temperatures. The average reconstructed SST during the Little Ice Age (LIA; 1734-1880 CE) is colder (-0.82°C) than that during the late twentieth century (1971-2000 CE). The amplitude of decadal-scale variability (1 to 2.5°C) in the LIA is larger compared to similar scale variability in the twentieth century. The secular trend and decadal-scale variability in our reconstruction is broadly similar to an ~ decadally-resolved (~12 years/sample) Mg/Ca record from planktic foraminifer in the northern Gulf of Mexico (Richey et al., 2007), thus further confirming the reconstructed patterns of temperature

  1. Natural variability of surface oceanographic conditions in the offshore Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller-Karger, Frank E.; Smith, Joseph P.; Werner, Sandra; Chen, Robert; Roffer, Mitchell; Liu, Yanyun; Muhling, Barbara; Lindo-Atichati, David; Lamkin, John; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Enfield, David B.

    2015-05-01

    This work characterizes patterns of temporal variability in surface waters of the central Gulf of Mexico. We examine remote-sensing based observations of sea surface temperature (SST), wind speed, sea surface height anomaly (SSHA), chlorophyll-a concentration (Chl-a) and Net Primary Production (NPP), along with model predictions of mixed layer depth (MLD), to determine seasonal changes and long-term trends in the central Gulf of Mexico between the early 1980s and 2012. Specifically, we examine variability in four quadrants of the Gulf of Mexico (water depth >1000 m). All variables show strong seasonality. Chl-a and NPP show positive anomalies in response to short-term increases in wind speed and to cold temperature events. The depth of the mixed layer (MLD) directly and significantly affects primary productivity throughout the region. This relationship is sufficiently robust to enable real-time estimates of MLD based on satellite-based estimates of NPP. Over the past 15-20 years, SST, wind speed, and SSHA show a statistically significant, gradual increase. However, Chl-a and NPP show no significant trends over this period. There has also been no trend in the MLD in the Gulf of Mexico interior. The positive long-term trend in wind speed and SST anomalies is consistent with the warming phase of the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO) that started in the mid-90s. This also coincides with a negative trend in the El Niño/Southern Oscillation Multivariate ENSO Index (MEI) related to an increase in the frequency of cooler ENSO events since 1999-2000. The results suggest that over decadal scales, increasing temperature, wind speed, and mesoscale ocean activity have offsetting effects on the MLD. The lack of a trend in MLD anomalies over the past 20 years explains the lack of long-term changes in chlorophyll concentration and productivity over this period in the Gulf. Understanding the background of seasonal and long-term variability in these ocean characteristics is

  2. Petrophysical characterization of the Marlin Discovery, Deepwater Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Clemenceau, G.R.; Lockett, C.F. )

    1996-01-01

    This presentation discusses the petrophysical characterization of the Marlin discovery, a high quality gas and oil reservoir in the Deepwater Northern Gulf of Mexico. Amoco drilled the Marlin discovery well in May 1993 on Viosca Knoll Block 915. Approximately 100 MMBOE is structurally trapped here within Miocene deep-sea tan sands at 11,000 feet subsea. The petrophysical characterization of Marlin is based upon conventional core tests and data from three wells. The Marlin reservoir rock types are characterized based upon differences between their petrophysical properties. The properties, which include porosity, permeability, pore throat radius, and grain size, are derived from routine and special core analysis of a 40 foot conventional core recovered from the discovery well. Relative permeability, and capillary pressure tests, conducted at reservoir stress, further describe the rock types. The petrophysical properties average as follows; porosity 28%, permeability 1200 mD, porethroat radius 24 microns, and mean grain size 180 microns. By integrating this petrophysical model with a geologic model, that utilizes conventional core, well log, and 3D seismic interpretation, a 3-dimensional flow unit model was created for input to a reservoir simulation.

  3. Microsatellite and mitochondrial DNA analyses of the genetic structure of blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) nurseries in the northwestern Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea.

    PubMed

    Keeney, D B; Heupel, M R; Hueter, R E; Heist, E J

    2005-06-01

    Abstract We investigated the genetic structure of blacktip shark (Carcharhinus limbatus) continental nurseries in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea using mitochondrial DNA control region sequences and eight nuclear microsatellite loci scored in neonate and young-of-the-year sharks. Significant structure was detected with both markers among nine nurseries (mitochondrial PhiST = 0.350, P < 0.001; nuclear PhiST = 0.007, P < 0.001) and sharks from the northwestern Atlantic, eastern Gulf of Mexico, western Gulf of Mexico, northern Yucatan, and Belize possessed significantly different mitochondrial DNA haplotype frequencies. Microsatellite differentiation was limited to comparisons involving northern Yucatan and Belize sharks with nuclear genetic homogeneity throughout the eastern Gulf of Mexico, western Gulf of Mexico, and northwestern Atlantic. Differences in the magnitude of maternal vs. biparental genetic differentiation support female philopatry to northwestern Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Caribbean Sea natal nursery regions with higher levels of male-mediated gene flow. Philopatry has produced multiple reproductive stocks of this commercially important shark species throughout the range of this study. PMID:15910315

  4. Exploration and discoveries, 1947-1989: An historical perspective. Gulf of Mexico OCS

    SciTech Connect

    Lore, G.

    1992-10-01

    Original recoverable proved reserves of hydrocarbons in the 739 proved fields discovered through 1989 on the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are estimated to be 10.9 billion barrels of oil (BBO) and 129.1 trillion cubic feet of natural gas (Tcfg); 57 of these fields have been abandoned. Remaining proved reserves recoverable from the 682 active proved fields have been estimated to be 3.03 BBO and 40.2 Tcfg. An additional 114 active fields have not been sufficiently developed to warrant conseration as proved. The Gulf of Mexico OCS is primarily a gas province. Cumulative production through 1989 was 7.8 BBO and 89 Tcfg. On an energy-equivalent basis the production equates to nearly 67% gas. In recent years the area has contributed about 10 percent of the domestic oil production and 22 percent of the gas. Thus, future discoveries and production from the region will have a significant impact on the Nation's oil and gas supply. Exploration and subsequent development activities have gradually progressed seaward into deeper Gulf waters. Average field size has steadily decreased over time.

  5. Satellite SAR inventory of Gulf of Mexico oil seeps and shallow gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, O.; MacDonald, I. R.; Zimmer, B.; Shedd, W.; Frye, M.

    2009-04-01

    .S. territorial waters, with 481 formations, and Mexican territorial waters, with 78 formations. The formations were ground-truthed against a comprehensive database of 3D seismic cubes that cover the entire northern Gulf of Mexico (Frye 2008). Formations defined by SAR slick targets were consistently associated with gas hydrate prone regions of high surface amplitude and migration features in the sub-bottom. Many of the isolated slicks also appeared to be associated with migration features in the seismic data. Temporal variation among the slicks includes examples of intermittent individual vents within a single formation and broad-scale off-again, on-again appearance of slicks over entire images covering the same areas. References: De Beukelaer, S. M., MacDonald, I., Guinnasso, N. L. J. and Murray, J. A. (2003). Distinct side-scan sonar, RADARSAT SAR, and acoustic profiler signatures of gas and oil seeps on the Gulf of Mexico slope. Geo-Mar Lett 23: 177-186 Frye, M. (2008). Preliminary Evaluation of In-Place Gas Hydrate Resources: Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf. OCS Report, MMS U.S. Department of the Interior. Minerals Management Service. Resource Evaluation Division MacDonald, I., Leifer, I., Sassen, R. and Stine, P. (2002). Transfer of hydrocarbons from natural seeps to the water column and atmosphere. Geofluids, Blackwell Science Ltd 2(2): 95-107 Mitchell, R., MacDonald, I. R. and Kvenvolden, K. A. (1999). Estimation of total hydrocarbon seepage into the Gulf of Mexico based on satellite remote sensing images. Transactions, American Geophysical Union 80(49): Ocean Sciences Meeting Supplement, OS242

  6. Observations of Ozone and Aerosols Over Mexico and Gulf of Mexico During INTEX- B/MILAGRO Field Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, C. F.; Browell, E. V.; Hair, J. W.; Fenn, M. A.; Notari, A.; Kooi, S. A.; Ismail, S.; Avery, M. A.; Pierce, R. B.

    2007-12-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's Differential Absorption Lidar (LaRC/DIAL) system has been used to measure ozone and aerosol distributions in many airborne global tropospheric and stratospheric campaigns since 1980. The tropospheric configuration of this system was flown on the NASA DC-8 during the INTEX-B (Phase-I)/MILAGRO (I/M) field experiment, which was conducted from 24 February to 22 March 2006 over Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico. DIAL remote profile measurements were made from near the surface to above the tropopause along the flight track of the DC-8 with a small data void region of 750 m above and below the aircraft. Aerosol scattering ratios were determined at two wavelengths for a gross estimation of the relative size of the observed particles and measurements of aerosol depolarization were made to distinguish nonspherical aerosols, such as dust and some aerosols in aged fire plumes. In situ measurements of ozone from the FASTOZ instrument on the DC-8 were used to constrain the interpolation of the nadir and zenith ozone lidar measurements, which then provided an estimate of the entire tropospheric ozone profile along the flight track. A first order correction for aerosol attenuation was made to the aerosol profiles by using an assumed extinction-to- backscatter ratio to better characterize the attenuation by thick aerosol layers. The DIAL system was used to determine the large-scale variability and context of air masses being sampled in situ on the DC-8 and to direct the in situ sampling strategy in real time. Plumes from biomass burning in southern Mexico were often observed in the free troposphere over the Gulf of Mexico and over eastern Mexico. The Mexico City (MC) pollution plume was readily apparent with high ozone (>100 ppbv), high aerosol scattering (S>20), and enhanced aerosol depolarization (D>10%). The top of the MC pollution extended to a depth of about 2.5 km AGL. Some observations showed the MC plume spilling out over the mountains to

  7. The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System: A Gulf Science Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, M.; Gayanilo, F.; Kobara, S.; Jochens, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System's (GCOOS) regional science portal (gcoos.org) was designed to aggregate data and model output from distributed providers and to offer these, and derived products, through a single access point in standardized ways to a diverse set of users. The portal evolved under the NOAA-led U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) program where automated largely-unattended machine-to-machine interoperability has always been a guiding tenet for system design. The web portal has a business unit where membership lists, new items, and reference materials are kept, a data portal where near real-time and historical data are held and served, and a products portal where data are fused into products tailored for specific or general stakeholder groups. The staff includes a system architect who built and maintains the data portal, a GIS expert who built and maintains the current product portal, the executive director who marshals resources to keep news items fresh and data manger who manages most of this. The business portal is built using WordPress which was selected because it appeared to be the easiest content management system for non-web programmers to add content to, maintain and enhance. The data portal is custom built and uses database, PHP, and web services based on Open Geospatial Consortium standards-based Sensor Observation Service (SOS) with Observations and Measurements (O&M) encodings. We employ a standards-based vocabulary, which we helped develop, which is registered at the Marine Metadata Interoperability Ontology Registry and Repository (http://mmisw.org). The registry is currently maintained by one of the authors. Products appearing in the products portal are primarily constructed using ESRI software by a Ph.D. level Geographer. Some products were built with other software, generally by graduate students over the years. We have been sensitive to the private sector when deciding which products to produce. While

  8. Gulf of Mexico dead zone - 1000 year record

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, L.E.; Poore, R.Z.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    An area of oxygen-depleted bottom- and subsurfacewater (hypoxia = dissolved oxygen Since systematic measurement of the extent of the dead zone was begun in 1985, the overall pattern indicates that the area of the dead zone is increasing. Several studies have concluded that the expansion of the Louisiana shelf dead zone is related to increased nutrients (primarily nitrogen, but possibly also phosphorous) in the Mississippi River drainage basin and is responsible for the degradation of Gulf of Mexico marine habitats. The goal of this research is to augment information on the recent expansion of Louisiana shelf hypoxia and to investigate the temporal and geographic extent of the lowoxygen bottom-water conditions prior to 1985 in sediment cores collected from the Louisiana shelf. We use a specific low-oxygen faunal proxy termed the PEB index based on the cumulative percentage of three foraminifers (= % Protononion atlanticum, + % Epistominella vitrea, + % Buliminella morgani) that has been shown statistically to represent the modern seasonal Louisiana hypoxia zone. Our hypothesis is that the increased relative abundance of PEB species in dated sediment cores accurately tracks past seasonal low-oxygen conditions on the Louisiana shelf.

  9. A Broadband Investigation of the Texas/Gulf of Mexico Passive Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evanzia, D.; Ainsworth, R.; Pratt, K. W.; Pulliam, J.; Gurrola, H.

    2012-12-01

    The lithosphere of central and east Texas underwent two cycles of continental rifting and orogeny from the formation of Laurentia and assembly through the breakup of Pangea. The craton itself, exposed in the Llano uplift of central Texas, formed ~1.4 Ga as part of the great expanse of Mesoproterozoic crust that makes up southern Laurentia. Some of this crust was deformed during the Grenville orogeny ~1.1 Ga. Southern Laurentia was subsequently stable until rifting began in Cambrian time (~530 Ma). Suturing of Gondwana to Laurentia (310-290 Ma) during the assembly of Pangea formed the Ouachita orogen in west Texas. Sometime before 200 Ma rifting was initiated, opening the Gulf of Mexico (GoM). In north and east Texas the Ouachita front lies north of GoM rifting but, according to deep seismic data, Ouachita structures appear to coincide with GoM rifting in south and central Texas. This suggests that rifting in that region occurred along structures that were weakened previously by Ouachita deformation and reactivated during the Jurassic opening of the GoM. It is not clear whether the process that created the Gulf of Mexico and led to the formation of Texas' Gulf Coast Plain (GCP) is best described as "active" or "passive" rifting. A recent study interpreted the GCP to be a volcanic rifted margin—an active rifting process—using available gravity, magnetic, drilling and geological data, but older studies describe the opening of the GoM as a passive event. In the coastal plain, a large magnetic anomaly suggests that the crust here was modified by volcanism. Seismic data are sparse and of limited quality in the Gulf Coast region so we conducted a 2.5-year broadband seismograph transect across the GCP in an effort to clarify its structure and origin. In all, twenty-three broadband seismographs were deployed in a line from Matagorda Island, in the Gulf of Mexico, to Johnson City, TX, on the uplifted Llano Plateau from July 2010 to December 2012. These seismographs have

  10. Integrated Coastal Analyses in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. R.; Arnone, R. A.; Preller, R. H.; Ko, D. S.; Beard, R. H.; Hall, C. M.

    2004-12-01

    Coastal management and research require real-time access to environmental data for analyses of changing ocean conditions. The coastal ocean is impacted by offshore mesoscale forcing as well as input from terrigenous land sources in response to human impact resulting from changing land uses. Monitoring and understanding the variability of the coastal ocean is critical for defining the dispersion of pollutants and chemical agents that impact our environment and potentially our homeland security. We will demonstrate the utility of integrating real-time satellite derived ocean properties, available observations along with numerical coastal and open ocean model output for characterizing the ocean environment to support research efforts and operational programs at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Earth Sciences Applications Directorate (NASA ESA) and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Integrating and analyzing information derived from satellite and model properties of the Gulf of Mexico will focus on operational and research efforts that include Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs), fresh water outfall, and hypoxia initiatives. We will examine the physical model predictions relative to the observations in terms of model performance and validation. Additionally, examples of the research, including short-term chlorophyll advection, inferred 3-D chlorophyll profiles and correlations of local surface divergence to chlorophyll blooms, will be presented.

  11. Zooplankton and Karenia brevis in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lester, Kristen M.; Heil, Cynthia A.; Neely, Merry B.; Spence, Danylle N.; Murasko, Susan; Hopkins, Thomas L.; Sutton, Tracey T.; Burghart, Scott E.; Bohrer, Richard N.; Remsen, Andrew W.; Vargo, Gabriel A.; Walsh, John J.

    2008-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate Karenia brevis are common in the Gulf of Mexico, yet no in situ studies of zooplankton and K. brevis have been conducted there. Zooplankton abundance and taxonomic composition at non-bloom and K. brevis bloom stations within the Ecology of Harmful Algal Blooms (ECOHAB) study area were compared. At non-bloom stations, the most abundant species of zooplankton were Parvocalanus crassirostris, Oithona colcarva, and Paracalanus quasimodo at the 5-m isobath and P. quasimodo, O. colcarva, and Oikopleura dioica at the 25-m isobath. There was considerable overlap in dominance of zooplankton species between the 5 and 25-m isobaths, with nine species contributing to 90% of abundance at both isobaths. At stations within K. brevis blooms however, Acartia tonsa, Centropages velificatus, Temora turbinata, Evadne tergestina, O. colcarva, O. dioica, and P. crassirostris were dominant. Variations in abundance between non-bloom and bloom assemblages were evident, including the reduction in abundance of three key species within K. brevis blooms.

  12. Gulf of Mexico Helicopter Offshore System Technologies Engineering Needs Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenke, Edmund J.; Carpenter, Elisabeth J.; Williams, Larry; Caiafa, Caesar

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in partnership with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is conducting a research and development program to modernize the National Airspace System (NAS). The mission of NASA's Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) project is to develop advanced Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts and decision support tools for eventual deployment and implementation by the FAA and the private sector. One major objective of the NASA AATT project is to understand and promote the needs of all user classes. The Gulf of Mexico (GoMex) airspace has unique needs. A large number of helicopters operate in this area with only limited surveillance and sometimes-severe environmental conditions. Thunderstorms are the most frequent weather hazard during the spring, summer, and fall. In winter, reduced hours of daylight, low ceilings, strong winds, and icing conditions may restrict operations. Hurricanes impose the most severe weather hazard. The hurricane season, from June through October, normally requires at least one mass evacuation of all offshore platforms.

  13. Expeditions to Drill Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, Millard F.

    2005-04-01

    The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), an international collaboration of Earth, ocean, and life scientists that began in 2003, offers scientists worldwide unprecedented opportunities to address a vast array of scientific problems in all submarine settings. Recently, the scientific advisory structure of the proposal-driven IODP scheduled drilling expeditions, targeting critical scientific problems in the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Pacific Ocean, for 2005 and early 2006 (Figure 1, Table 1). The IODP, which is co-led by Japan and the United States, with strong contributions from the European Consortium for Ocean Research Drilling (ECORD) and China, is guided by an initial science plan, ``Earth, Oceans, and Life'' (www.iodp.org). For the first time, through the IODP, scientists have at their disposal both a riser (drilling vessel which has a metal tube surrounding the drill pipe that enables the return of drilling fluid and cuttings to the drill ship; the ``riser'' is attached to a ``blow-out preventer'' or shut-off device at the seafloor) and riserless drilling vessel (which lacks a riser pipe and blow-out preventer), as well as mission-specific capabilities such as drilling barges and jack-up rigs for shallow-water and Arctic drilling.

  14. Dissolved oxygen conditions in northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engle, V.D.; Kevin, Summers J.; Macauley, J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Because deficient dissolved oxygen (DO) levels may have severe detrimental effects on estuarine and marine life, DO has been widely used as an indicator of ecological conditions by environmental monitoring programs. The U.S. EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) monitored DO conditions in the estuaries of the Gulf of Mexico from 1991 to 1994. DO was measured in two ways: 1)instantaneous profiles from the surface to the bottom were taken during the day, and 2) continuous measurements were taken near the bottom at 15 min intervals for at least 12 h. This information was summarized to assess the spatial distribution and severity of DO conditions in these estuaries. Depending on the criteria used to define hypoxia (DO concentrations usually < 2 mg L-1 or 15 mg L-1) and the method by which DO is measured, we estimate that between 5.2 and 29.3% of the total estuarine area in the Louisianian Province was affected by low DO conditions.

  15. Controls on methylmercury accumulation in northern Gulf of Mexico sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bian; Schaider, Laurel A.; Mason, Robert P.; Shine, James P.; Rabalais, Nancy N.; Senn, David B.

    2015-06-01

    We examined Hg biogeochemistry in northern Gulf of Mexico (nGOM) sediments along a ∼400 km east-west transect off the Louisiana coast in order to characterize primary controls on net methylmercury (MeHg) production and accumulation in sediments and evaluate the potential influence of water column hypoxia. Total Hg (THg) and MeHg concentrations ranged from 52 to 340 pmol g-1 and 0.08 to 1.4 pmol g-1, respectively, and exhibited no clear east-west spatial trends, or trends related to water column hypoxia. Potential methylation and demethylation rate constants (km and kdm), from enriched isotope spikes (201Hg(II) and Me199Hg) to intact sediment cores, were substantially higher (0.02-0.19 d-1 and 39-63 d-1, respectively) than in other coastal sediment systems. The percentage of Hg present as MeHg in sediment cores (%MeHg = 0.04-1.1%) was comparable to other systems. Both %MeHg and km decreased with sediment depth and were significantly correlated, but neither was correlated with organic carbon (OC). Together, OC and km explained 56% of the variation in [MeHg]. These results suggest that OC primarily acts as a MeHg-binding ligand in nGOM sediments, unlike some other coastal systems where OC has been shown to directly influence Hg methylation.

  16. Gulf of Mexico miocene CO₂ site characterization mega transect

    SciTech Connect

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO₂-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the

  17. Marine seismic refraction data indicate Mesozoic syn-rift volcanism and seafloor-spreading in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Christeson, Gail; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin that formed by continental rifting and seafloor-spreading between North America and the Yucatan Block during the Jurassic to early Cretaceous. The lack of good, deeply-penetrating geophysical data in the Gulf of Mexico has precluded prior reconstructions of the timing and location of the transition from rifting to seafloor-spreading, as well as the degree to which magmatism influenced these geological processes. To illuminate the deep structure of this enigmatic region, we acquired four marine seismic refraction profiles in the northern Gulf of Mexico from the shelf to deep water as part of the Fall 2010 Gulf of Mexico Basin Opening (GUMBO) project. Here, we present the data and resulting seismic velocity structures of two GUMBO profiles in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. GUMBO Line 1 extends ~330 km offshore south Texas from Matagorda Island across Alaminos Canyon to the central Gulf. GUMBO Line 2 extends ~400 km from the shelf offshore western Louisiana across the Sigsbee Escarpment. On both lines, ocean-bottom seismometers at 10-km spacing recorded 150m-spaced airgun shots over offsets up to 80 km. We use travel times from these long-offset reflections and refractions to image seismic velocities in the sediments, crystalline crust, and upper mantle using a tomographic inversion. On average, seismic velocities increase with depth from 2 km/s near the seafloor to 5 km/s near the interpreted base of salt. On both profiles we observe a large amount of lateral heterogeneity in the sediments due to salt tectonics. The deeper seismic velocity structure along GUMBO Line 1 also exhibits substantial lateral heterogeneity (4.5 km/s to 7 km/s) that may be consistent with crystallization of thin, ultraslow-spreading oceanic crust alternating with emplacement of exhumed mantle lithosphere. If the basement here is indeed oceanic, the prominent magnetic anomaly along the Texas coastline may represent the expression of synrift volcanism

  18. Meltwater routing and the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation: A Gulf of Mexico perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Williams, C.; Randle, N.; Hastings, D. W.

    2008-12-01

    Routing of low-salinity meltwater from the Laurentide Ice Sheet (LIS) into the North Atlantic via eastern outlets (e.g., St. Lawrence and Hudson River systems) and northern outlets (e.g., Hudson Bay and Arctic Ocean) is thought to have reduced Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) and thereby triggered rapid regional to global climate change during the last glacial cycle. In contrast, southward meltwater flow to the Gulf of Mexico is generally thought to allow enhanced AMOC and warmer climates in the North Atlantic region. Situated at the outlet of the Mississippi River system, Orca Basin is ideally located to record meltwater input from the LIS. Orca Basin core MD02-2550 collected by the R/V Marion Dufresne in 2002 on IMAGES cruise VIII allows sub-centennial-scale records of Mg/Ca sea-surface temperature (SST) and δ18Oseawater back to ca. 23.9 ka. Accumulation rates average about 40 cm/k.y. Our current data extend from ca. 16.5-7 ka, with age control provided by 40 AMS radiocarbon dates (nearly all in stratigraphic order; calibrated using Calib 5.0.2). We use paired Mg/Ca and oxygen isotope data on Globigerinoides ruber to isolate changes in the oxygen isotopic composition of seawater. Four major episodic δ18O decreases of more than 2 per mil indicate substantial LIS meltwater input. Intervals of major meltwater discharge to the Gulf of Mexico do not appear to match known pulses of global sea level increase. However, abrupt reductions in southward meltwater input to the Gulf of Mexico seem to correlate with abrupt coolings in the North Atlantic region (e.g., Younger Dryas, Intra-Allerod cold period, and Oldest Dryas). In particular, a 3.5 per mil δ18O increase centered at 10,970 radiocarbon years B.P. (the "cessation event") appears to coincide with the onset of the Younger Dryas in European lakes and with Δ14C evidence from Cariaco Basin for AMOC reduction. Furthermore, recent results with the NCAR Community Climate System model (CCSM3) indicate

  19. Initial deglaciation of the Laurentide ice sheet based on Gulf of Mexico Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, E. A.; Flower, B. P.; Williams, C.

    2010-12-01

    We investigate initial melting of the Laurentide ice sheet (LIS) into the Gulf of Mexico at the end of the last glacial maximum. Specifically, we examine the timing of LIS meltwater with respect to the “early” deglacial warming of the Antarctic (~19-17 kyr), and “late” deglacial warming of Greenland (~14.7 kyr) ice sheets. While the polar air temperature records appear to be asynchronous, records of mountain glacier retreat from New Zealand, Wyoming, Montana, and other areas suggest an earlier and synchronous mid-latitude warming, closer to that of Antarctic warming. Placing LIS retreat into this global perspective is critical to understanding the coherence of interhemispheric warming. A history of the LIS, as recorded in the Gulf of Mexico, may be complicated by a period of abrupt mode switches and climate responses dubbed the “mystery interval,” from ~17.5-14.7 kyr. Early meltwater flow might have implications for early Atlantic Meridional Overturning reduction in circulation in the Northern Hemisphere. Pinpointing initial LIS ablation will help assess its potential sensitivity to regional and global climate change. Samples of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber were picked at 500-year intervals between 23 and 10 kyr, from gravity core MD50-2550 in the anoxic Orca Basin. Age control is based on over forty-five AMS 14C dates on monospecific G. ruber samples. Paired Mg/Ca and δ18O are used to calculate δ18O seawater, a proxy for salinity. Salinity can be estimated using δ18O sw/S relationships generated for the deglacial Gulf of Mexico, based on an assumed δ18O composition for the LIS as the low-salinity end-member. Preliminary data suggest that the LIS may have retreated closer to the "early” deglacial warming of the Antarctic ice sheet. If confirmed, this finding may be consistent with increased northern hemisphere insolation, enhanced by greenhouse gas forcing.

  20. Seismic stratigraphy and geologic history of Jurassic rocks, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T.

    1997-01-01

    A grid of two-dimensional seismic data tied to exploration wells defines four Jurassic sequences in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sequences correlate with well-known northern Gulf of Mexico basin stratigraphic units: the Louann Salt (L sequence), Norphlet and Smackover formations (N-S sequence), Haynesville Formation (H sequence), and Cotton Valley Group (C sequence). The Jurassic section overlies a basement surface characterized by broad highs (Middle Ground arch and Southern platform) and lows (Apalachicola basin and Tampa embayment). This basement structure controlled the distribution, thickness, and paleogeography of all the Jurassic sequences, but its influence became progressively less pronounced as sediment filled the basin. The Jurassic geologic history of the region is developed from an interpretation of these sequences. Well control documents the presence of Louann Salt in the Apalachicola basin, whereas in the Tampa embayment the interval is interpreted only from seismic data. Salt movement on the West Florida Shelf began early, during Norphlet-Smackover deposition, and slowed dramatically by the end of Haynesville deposition. Smackover paleogeography includes progradation of a carbonate shelf in the Apalachicola basin and the Tampa embayment, as well as development of carbonate buildups updip of basement hingelines, over basement highs, and above early salt structures. In the Apalachicola basin, Haynesville clastic sedimentation updip was coeval with carbonate deposition downdip, and a localized carbonate shelf margin developed to the southwest. Haynesville clastic sedimentation may have prevailed in the Tampa embayment, where oblique clinoforms represent shelf margin progradation. During deposition of the Cotton Valley sequence, the northeastern Gulf of Mexico was characterized by delta-plain and delta-platform sedimentation with seismically defined shelf margin progradation only in the Tampa embayment.

  1. The Occurrence of the Rat Lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, in Nonindigenous Snails in the Gulf of Mexico Region of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Bishop, Henry S; da Silva, Alexandre J; Carter, Jacoby; White-Mclean, Jodi; Smith, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Nonindigenous apple snails, Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), are currently spreading rapidly through the southeastern United States. This mollusk serves as an intermediate host of the rat lungworm parasite (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), which can cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans who consume infected mollusks. A PCR-based detection assay was used to test nonindigenous apple snails for the rat lungworm parasite in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, and Florida. Only apple snails obtained from the New Orleans, Louisiana, area tested positive for the parasite. These results provide the first evidence that Angiostrongylus cantonensis does occur in nonindigenous apple snails in the southeastern United States. Additionally, Angiostrongylus cantonensis was identified in the terrestrial species Achatina fulica in Miami, Florida, indicating that rat lungworm is now established in Florida as well as Louisiana. Although the study suggests that the rat lungworm is not widespread in the Gulf States region, the infected snail population could still pose a risk to human health and facilitate the spread of the parasite to new areas. PMID:23901374

  2. The occurrence of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, in nonindigenous snails in the Gulf of Mexico region of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Teem, John L.; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Bishop, Henry S.; da Silva, Alexandre J.; Carter, Jacoby; White-McLean, Jodi; Smith, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Nonindigenous apple snails, Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), are currently spreading rapidly through the southeastern United States. This mollusk serves as an intermediate host of the rat lungworm parasite (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), which can cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans who consume infected mollusks. A PCR-based detection assay was used to test nonindigenous apple snails for the rat lungworm parasite in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, and Florida. Only apple snails obtained from the New Orleans, Louisiana, area tested positive for the parasite. These results provide the first evidence that Angiostrongylus cantonensis does occur in nonindigenous apple snails in the southeastern United States. Additionally, Angiostrongylus cantonensis was identified in the terrestrial species Achatina fulica in Miami, Florida, indicating that rat lungworm is now established in Florida as well as Louisiana. Although the study suggests that the rat lungworm is not widespread in the Gulf States region, the infected snail population could still pose a risk to human health and facilitate the spread of the parasite to new areas.

  3. The occurrence of the rat lungworm, Angiostrongylus cantonensis, in nonindigenous snails in the Gulf of Mexico region of the United States.

    PubMed

    Teem, John L; Qvarnstrom, Yvonne; Bishop, Henry S; da Silva, Alexandre J; Carter, Jacoby; White-McLean, Jodi; Smith, Trevor

    2013-06-01

    Nonindigenous apple snails, Pomacea maculata (formerly Pomacea insularum), are currently spreading rapidly through the southeastern United States. This mollusk serves as an intermediate host of the rat lungworm parasite (Angiostrongylus cantonensis), which can cause eosinophilic meningitis in humans who consume infected mollusks. A PCR-based detection assay was used to test nonindigenous apple snails for the rat lungworm parasite in Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, and Florida. Only apple snails obtained from the New Orleans, Louisiana, area tested positive for the parasite. These results provide the first evidence that Angiostrongylus cantonensis does occur in nonindigenous apple snails in the southeastern United States. Additionally, Angiostrongylus cantonensis was identified in the terrestrial species Achatina fulica in Miami, Florida, indicating that rat lungworm is now established in Florida as well as Louisiana. Although the study suggests that the rat lungworm is not widespread in the Gulf States region, the infected snail population could still pose a risk to human health and facilitate the spread of the parasite to new areas. PMID:23901374

  4. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a)...

  5. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a)...

  6. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee... CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a)...

  7. The Application of Remotely Sensed Data and Models to Benefit Conservation and Restoration Along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale; Estes, Maurice, Jr.; Al-Hamdan, Mohammad; Thom, Ron; Woodruff, Dana; Judd, Chaeli; Ellis, Jean; Swann, Roberta; Johnson, Hoyt, III

    2010-01-01

    New data, tools, and capabilities for decision making are significant needs in the northern Gulf of Mexico and other coastal areas. The goal of this project is to support NASA s Earth Science Mission Directorate and its Applied Science Program and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance by producing and providing NASA data and products that will benefit decision making by coastal resource managers and other end users in the Gulf region. Data and research products are being developed to assist coastal resource managers adapt and plan for changing conditions by evaluating how climate changes and urban expansion will impact land cover/land use (LCLU), hydrodynamics, water properties, and shallow water habitats; to identify priority areas for conservation and restoration; and to distribute datasets to end-users and facilitating user interaction with models. The proposed host sites for data products are NOAA s National Coastal Data Development Center Regional Ecosystem Data Management, and Mississippi-Alabama Habitat Database. Tools will be available on the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative website with links to data portals to enable end users to employ models and datasets to develop and evaluate LCLU and climate scenarios of particular interest. These data will benefit the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program in ongoing efforts to protect and restore the Fish River watershed and around Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. The usefulness of data products and tools will be demonstrated at an end-user workshop.

  8. The Application of Remotely Sensed Data and Models to Benefit Conservation and Restoration Along the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrochi, D. A.; Estes, M. G., Jr.; Al-Hamdan, M. Z.; Thom, R.; Woodruff, D.; Judd, C.; Ellis, J. T.; Swann, R.; Johnson, H., III

    2010-12-01

    New data, tools, and capabilities for decision making are significant needs in the northern Gulf of Mexico and other coastal areas. The goal of this project is to support NASA’s Earth Science Mission Directorate and its Applied Science Program and the Gulf of Mexico Alliance by producing and providing NASA data and products that will benefit decision making by coastal resource managers and other end users in the Gulf region. Data and research products are being developed to assist coastal resource managers adapt and plan for changing conditions by evaluating how climate changes and urban expansion will impact land cover/land use (LCLU), hydrodynamics, water properties, and shallow water habitats; to identify priority areas for conservation and restoration; and to distribute datasets to end-users and facilitating user interaction with models. The proposed host sites for data products are NOAA’s National Coastal Data Development Center Regional Ecosystem Data Management, and Mississippi-Alabama Habitat Database. Tools will be available on the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative website with links to data portals to enable end users to employ models and datasets to develop and evaluate LCLU and climate scenarios of particular interest. These data will benefit the Mobile Bay National Estuary Program in ongoing efforts to protect and restore the Fish River watershed and around Weeks Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. The usefulness of data products and tools will be demonstrated at an end-user workshop.

  9. 75 FR 4535 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); data workshop...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-28

    ... Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); data workshop for yellowedge grouper and tilefish. AGENCY.... ACTION: Notice of SEDAR Data Workshop for Gulf of Mexico yellowedge grouper and tilefish. SUMMARY: The SEDAR assessments of the Gulf of Mexico stocks of yellowedge grouper and tilefish will consist of...

  10. 33 CFR 334.650 - Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. 334.650 Section 334.650 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....650 Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  11. 75 FR 45605 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... grouper and tilefish. AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of SEDAR 22 Gulf of Mexico yellowedge grouper and tilefish assessment webinar 5. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 22 assessments of the Gulf of Mexico stocks of yellowedge...

  12. 75 FR 63810 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Grouper and Tilefish AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of SEDAR 22 Gulf of Mexico yellowedge grouper and tilefish assessment webinar 8. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 22 assessments of the Gulf of Mexico stocks of yellowedge...

  13. 33 CFR 334.650 - Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. 334.650 Section 334.650 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....650 Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  14. 33 CFR 334.650 - Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south of St....650 Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. (a) The danger zone. A fan... an arc with a 10,500 meter radius with its center located on the south shore line of St....

  15. 33 CFR 334.650 - Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south of St....650 Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. (a) The danger zone. A fan... an arc with a 10,500 meter radius with its center located on the south shore line of St....

  16. 33 CFR 334.650 - Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. 334.650 Section 334.650 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....650 Gulf of Mexico, south of St. George Island, Fla.; test firing range. (a) The danger zone. A...

  17. 75 FR 60800 - Discharge of Oil From Deepwater Horizon/Macondo Well, Gulf of Mexico; Intent To Conduct...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... Discharge of Oil From Deepwater Horizon/Macondo Well, Gulf of Mexico; Intent To Conduct Restoration Planning... the substantial threat of discharge, as well as response activities, and develop and implement a plan... Subsea Macondo Well into the Gulf of Mexico, an incident that occurred on or about April 20, 2010....

  18. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. 334.640 Section 334.640 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a)...

  19. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... days after discovery, mark the location of the pipeline in accordance with 33 CFR Part 64 at the ends... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets....

  20. 33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. 334.640 Section 334.640 Navigation and Navigable Waters... REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range. (a)...

  1. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  2. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  3. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  4. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  5. 33 CFR 334.680 - Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance, small-arms firing range, Tyndall Air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St... AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.680 Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance... the Gulf of Mexico, southeast of St. Andrew Bay East Entrance within a rectangular area beginning at...

  6. Modeling the relative importance of nutrient and carbon loads, boundary fluxes, and sediment fluxes on Gulf of Mexico hypoxia

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) in the northern Gulf of Mexico experiences bottom water hypoxia in the summer. In order to gain a more fundamental understanding of the controlling factors leading to hypoxia, the Gulf of Mexico Dissolved Oxygen Model (GoMDOM) was applied to ...

  7. 33 CFR 165.840 - Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.840 Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. 165.840 Section 165.840...

  8. 33 CFR 165.840 - Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.840 Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Regulated Navigation Area, Gulf of Mexico: Mississippi Canyon Block 20, South of New Orleans, LA. 165.840 Section 165.840...

  9. Early Late Cretaceous to Holocene seismic stratigraphy and geologic history of southeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Angstadt, D.M.; Austin, J.A.; Buffler, R.T.

    1985-06-01

    Multifold seismic reflection profiles were used in conjunction with results from Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) Leg 77 to interpret the early Late Cretaceous to Holocene geologic history of the southeastern Gulf of Mexico. During the mid-Cenomanian(.) to early Paleocene(.), this region began to record the effects of a collision between a northward-migrating island arc (now part of Cuba) and a salient of the North American plate. More than 2 km (6,560 ft) of gravity-flow deposits accumulated in an elongate structural corridor or foredeep along the base of the modern Cuban slope, while the slope itself was the site of both folding and overthrusting. Clastics continued to dominate the depositional regime until the late Eocene, at which time the Cuban arc had been firmly welded to North America. A late middle to early late Eocene hiatus in Site 540, which coincides with a prominent regional seismic unconformity, marks the transition from predominantly terrigenous input to pelagic/hemipelagic deposition. Since the late Eocene, the southeastern gulf has recorded multiple cycles of deposition and erosion. Unconformities displayed on seismic profiles are numerous. Erosional agents have included the Gulf Stream system, and turbidity currents and debris flows concentrated in the vicinity of submarine canyons. Continuing slope instability is indicated by slide/slump planes along canyon walls.

  10. 33 CFR 334.730 - Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Armament Center...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR part 329, including the waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico within a circle one nautical... defined at 33 CFR part 329, including the waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico, surrounding the... Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Armament Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.......

  11. 33 CFR 334.730 - Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Armament Center...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 329, including the waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico within a circle one nautical... defined at 33 CFR part 329, including the waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico, surrounding the... Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Armament Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.......

  12. 33 CFR 334.730 - Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Armament Center...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CFR part 329, including the waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico within a circle one nautical... defined at 33 CFR part 329, including the waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico, surrounding the... Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Armament Center, Eglin Air Force Base, Fla.......

  13. Physical oceanography of the US Atlantic and eastern Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Milliman, J.D.; Imamura, E.

    1992-06-01

    The report provides a summary of the physical oceanography of the U.S. Atlantic and Eastern Gulf of Mexico and its implication to offshore oil and gas exploration and development. Topics covered in the report include: meteorology and air-sea interactions, circulation on the continental shelf, continental slope and rise circulation, Gulf Stream, Loop Current, deep-western boundary current, surface gravity-wave climatology, offshore engineering implications, implications for resource commercialization, and numerical models of pollutant dispersion.

  14. GULF OF MEXICO OCEAN LITERACY PROJECT MX964792

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will identify and implement successful strategies for reaching underserved and underrepresented audiences through the provision of field-based activities for middle school teachers and students. This project will use the other Gulf Alliance Priorities, such as water ...

  15. Elevating salinity and temperature with hydrate formation at deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Liu, Xiaoli

    2013-04-01

    We study the Ursa vent in ~1070 meters water depth at lease blocks MC852/853 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Elevated salinities and temperatures at the vent shift the base of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the seafloor (Paull et al., 2005; Ruppel et al., 2005). We model the coexistence of high salinities, high temperatures, and an uplifted hydrate phase boundary with a one-dimensional, multicomponent, multiphase, fluid- and heat-flow model of hydrate formation. In this model, free gas supplied from depth migrates vertically through a high-permeability conduit to the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ). Once reaching the base of the RHSZ, gas combines with water to form hydrate, salt is excluded, and heat is released. Hydrate formation continues until water is too warm and saline for further hydrate formation. This process self generates three-phase (gas, liquid, hydrate) equilibrium through the RHSZ and allows gas to vent from the base of the RHSZ to the seafloor. Once the reaction front breaches the seafloor, a pseudo steady state is reached in which a continuous salt flux diffuses from the seafloor, and further hydrate formation occurs at a rate necessary to replace the diffuse salt loss. This continued hydrate formation has the potential to produce large, steady fluxes of salt and heat from the seafloor. Such gas-hydrate and fluid-flow systems are important because they are especially sensitive to global ocean warming due to the large concentrations of hydrate that exist at three-phase equilibrium near the seafloor. References: Paull, C., Ussler, W., Lorenson, T., Winters, W., Dougherty, J., 2005. Geochemical constraints on the distribution of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico. Geo-Marine Letters 25, 273-280. Ruppel, C., Dickens, G.R., Castellini, D.G., Gilhooly, W., Lizarralde, D., 2005. Heat and salt inhibition of gas hydrate formation in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L04605.

  16. 76 FR 82319 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) and Central...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning... Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) of the Draft... draft Multisale EIS, you may contact the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS...

  17. A GIS Assessment to Identify and Reduce Nitrate Loads that Contribute to Hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrate leaching has been reported as one of the main pathways contributing to the nitrate flux out of the Mississippi River watershed into the Gulf of Mexico. This out-flux of nitrogen has been identified as one of the factors that contribute to the hypoxia problem in the Gulf of Mexico. The Arkans...

  18. Stable Carbon Isotope Evidence for Reduced Feeding of Gulf of Mexico Sturgeon during Their Prolonged River Residence Period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, B.; Schell, D. M.; Frazer, T.; Hoyer, M.; Chapman, F. A.

    2001-09-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios were used to delineate food sources for Gulf of Mexico sturgeon ( Acipenser oxyrinchus de sotoi), an anadromous fish that migrates between Gulf of Mexico and the coastal rivers in south-east U.S.A. The large difference in isotope ratios (˜11‰) between freshwater food sources and fish muscle tissue suggests that the Gulf of Mexico sturgeon do not feed significantly in fresh waters. Isotope ratio data from this study and also from the literature indicate that the growth of Gulf of Mexico sturgeon is almost entirely supported by coastal marine food sources. It is likely that Gulf of Mexico sturgeon use the cool springs that seep into the river as a thermal refuge during their river residence in summer and that thermal barriers may prevent the fish from exploiting the rich food sources available in the warmer portions of the Suwannee River.

  19. Deepwater in the Gulf of Mexico: An update on America`s new frontier. Report for January-December 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Langley, C.; Regg, J.; Marin, D.; Melancon, J.M.; Prendergast, M.

    1998-01-01

    Intense interest in the oil and gas potential in the Gulf of Mexico, particularly deepwater tracts, has brought a resurgence in Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) exploration, development, and production activity. Both of the 1997 lease sales in the Gulf of Mexico Central and Western Planning Areas were recordbreakers receiving the largest number of bids received, tracts bid on, and tracts leased.

  20. 78 FR 52562 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Central Planning...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-23

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Oil and Gas Lease Sales, Central Planning Area (CPA) Lease Sales 235, 241, and 247 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy... EIS for proposed Central Planning Area (CPA) Lease Sales 235, 241 and 247 in the Gulf of Mexico...

  1. 33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to.... The waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of a circular area...

  2. 33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to.... The waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of a circular area...

  3. 75 FR 19880 - Safety Zone; BW PIONEER at Walker Ridge 249, Outer Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... PIONEER at Walker Ridge 249, Outer Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico in the Federal Register (74 FR... Continental Shelf FPSO, Gulf of Mexico AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... (FPSO) system, at Walker Ridge 249 in the Outer Continental Shelf. The purpose of the safety zone is...

  4. 75 FR 69122 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease Sales for the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program...) Lease Sale 222 in the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program. The proposed sales are in the Gulf of Mexico's WPA... 2012, before the end of the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program. A SEIS is deemed appropriate to...

  5. Crustal structure and basin architecture, De Soto Canyon Salt basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    MacRae, G. . Dept. of Oceanography); Watkins, J.S. . Dept. of Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Evolution of sedimentary basins in the Gulf of Mexico can be explained by extensional processes associated with a rifted, passively subsiding continental margin. The De Soto Canyon Salt Basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico contains a thick sequence of Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments which have accumulated almost continuously since the Middle Jurassic, in a relatively stable, slowly subsiding tectonic environment. Simplified isostatic principles based on a lithosphere buoyancy model are used to quantify total tectonic subsidence, crust thickness, crustal extension and crust type. Regional gravity anomaly trends reflect the interpreted crustal configuration. Multifold seismic reflection data and well data are integrated with computed isostatic relations to establish the basic architecture of the basin. An average estimated crustal thickness of 25 km and Beta-values between 1.4 and 1.8 suggest the sedimentary succession is underlain by moderately stretched and attenuated continental crust. Linear east-west and NNW-SSE trends in Beta-value contours indicate major crustal discontinuities in the region of the Mississippi-Alabama-Florida (MAFLA) shelf and beneath the west Florida shelf, respectively. The geometry of dipping sub-salt reflectors defines a major graben extending east-west in the central part of the basin. These structural trends are thought to be in response to Late Triassic-Early Jurassic rifting. The present-day configuration of the basin was established by the Middle Jurassic.

  6. Late quaternary geologic framework, north-central Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kindinger, Jack G.; Penland, Shea; Williams, S. Jeffress; Brooks, Gregg R.; Suter, John R.; McBride, Randolph A.

    1991-01-01

    The geologic framework of the north-central Gulf of Mexico shelf is composed of multiple, stacked, delta systems. Shelf and nearshore sedimentary facies were deposited by deltaic progradation, followed by shoreface erosion and submergence. A variety of sedimentary facies has been identified, including prodelta, delta fringe, distributary, lagoonal, barrier island, and shelf sand sheet. This study is based on the interpretation and the synthesis of > 6,700 km of high-resolution seismic profiles, 75 grab samples, and 77 vibracores. The nearshore morphology, shallow stratigraphy, and sediment distribution of the eastern Louisiana shelf are the products of transgressive sedimentary processes reworking the abandoned St. Bernard delta complex. Relatively recent Mississippi delta lobe consists primarily of fine sand, silt, and clay. In the southern portion of the St. Bernard delta complex, asymmetrical sand ridges (>5 m relief) have formed as the result of marine reworking of distributary mouth-bar sands. Silty sediments from the modern Mississippi Birdsfoot delta onlap the St. Bernard delta complex along the southern edge. The distal margin of the St. Bernard complex is distinct and has a sharp contact on the north near the Mississippi Sound barrier island coastline and a late Wisconsinan delta to the south. The Chandeleur Islands and the barrier islands of Mississippi Sound have been formed by a combination of Holocene and Pleistocene fluvial processes, shoreface erosion, and ravinement of the exposed shelf. Sediments underlying the relatively thin Holocene sediment cover are relict fluvial sands, deposited during the late Wisconsinan lowstand. Subsequent relative sea-level rise allowed marine processes to rework and redistribute sediments that formed the nearshore fine-grained facies and the shelf sand sheet.

  7. 30 CFR 250.116 - How do I determine producibility if my well is in the Gulf of Mexico?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I determine producibility if my well is in the Gulf of Mexico? 250.116 Section 250.116 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE... Performance Standards § 250.116 How do I determine producibility if my well is in the Gulf of Mexico? If...

  8. Habitat-based cetacean density models for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jason J; Best, Benjamin D; Mannocci, Laura; Fujioka, Ei; Halpin, Patrick N; Palka, Debra L; Garrison, Lance P; Mullin, Keith D; Cole, Timothy V N; Khan, Christin B; McLellan, William A; Pabst, D Ann; Lockhart, Gwen G

    2016-01-01

    Cetaceans are protected worldwide but vulnerable to incidental harm from an expanding array of human activities at sea. Managing potential hazards to these highly-mobile populations increasingly requires a detailed understanding of their seasonal distributions and habitats. Pursuant to the urgent need for this knowledge for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, we integrated 23 years of aerial and shipboard cetacean surveys, linked them to environmental covariates obtained from remote sensing and ocean models, and built habitat-based density models for 26 species and 3 multi-species guilds using distance sampling methodology. In the Atlantic, for 11 well-known species, model predictions resembled seasonal movement patterns previously suggested in the literature. For these we produced monthly mean density maps. For lesser-known taxa, and in the Gulf of Mexico, where seasonal movements were less well described, we produced year-round mean density maps. The results revealed high regional differences in small delphinoid densities, confirmed the importance of the continental slope to large delphinoids and of canyons and seamounts to beaked and sperm whales, and quantified seasonal shifts in the densities of migratory baleen whales. The density maps, freely available online, are the first for these regions to be published in the peer-reviewed literature. PMID:26936335

  9. Habitat-based cetacean density models for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Jason J.; Best, Benjamin D.; Mannocci, Laura; Fujioka, Ei; Halpin, Patrick N.; Palka, Debra L.; Garrison, Lance P.; Mullin, Keith D.; Cole, Timothy V. N.; Khan, Christin B.; McLellan, William A.; Pabst, D. Ann; Lockhart, Gwen G.

    2016-01-01

    Cetaceans are protected worldwide but vulnerable to incidental harm from an expanding array of human activities at sea. Managing potential hazards to these highly-mobile populations increasingly requires a detailed understanding of their seasonal distributions and habitats. Pursuant to the urgent need for this knowledge for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, we integrated 23 years of aerial and shipboard cetacean surveys, linked them to environmental covariates obtained from remote sensing and ocean models, and built habitat-based density models for 26 species and 3 multi-species guilds using distance sampling methodology. In the Atlantic, for 11 well-known species, model predictions resembled seasonal movement patterns previously suggested in the literature. For these we produced monthly mean density maps. For lesser-known taxa, and in the Gulf of Mexico, where seasonal movements were less well described, we produced year-round mean density maps. The results revealed high regional differences in small delphinoid densities, confirmed the importance of the continental slope to large delphinoids and of canyons and seamounts to beaked and sperm whales, and quantified seasonal shifts in the densities of migratory baleen whales. The density maps, freely available online, are the first for these regions to be published in the peer-reviewed literature. PMID:26936335

  10. Habitat-based cetacean density models for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Jason J.; Best, Benjamin D.; Mannocci, Laura; Fujioka, Ei; Halpin, Patrick N.; Palka, Debra L.; Garrison, Lance P.; Mullin, Keith D.; Cole, Timothy V. N.; Khan, Christin B.; McLellan, William A.; Pabst, D. Ann; Lockhart, Gwen G.

    2016-03-01

    Cetaceans are protected worldwide but vulnerable to incidental harm from an expanding array of human activities at sea. Managing potential hazards to these highly-mobile populations increasingly requires a detailed understanding of their seasonal distributions and habitats. Pursuant to the urgent need for this knowledge for the U.S. Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico, we integrated 23 years of aerial and shipboard cetacean surveys, linked them to environmental covariates obtained from remote sensing and ocean models, and built habitat-based density models for 26 species and 3 multi-species guilds using distance sampling methodology. In the Atlantic, for 11 well-known species, model predictions resembled seasonal movement patterns previously suggested in the literature. For these we produced monthly mean density maps. For lesser-known taxa, and in the Gulf of Mexico, where seasonal movements were less well described, we produced year-round mean density maps. The results revealed high regional differences in small delphinoid densities, confirmed the importance of the continental slope to large delphinoids and of canyons and seamounts to beaked and sperm whales, and quantified seasonal shifts in the densities of migratory baleen whales. The density maps, freely available online, are the first for these regions to be published in the peer-reviewed literature.

  11. Nitrogen exchange at the continental margin: A numerical study of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, John J.; Dieterle, Dwight A.; Meyers, Mark B.; Müller-Karger, Frank E.

    A two-layered baroclinic circulation model and a 21-layered biochemical model are used to explore the consequences of Loop Current-induced upwelling and terrestrial eutrophication on “new” production within the Gulf of Mexico. During a quasi-annual penetration and eddy-shedding cycle of the Loop Current, the simulated seasonal changes of incident radiation, wind stress, and surface mixed layer depth induce an annual cycle of algal biomass that corresponds to in situ and satellite time series of chlorophyll. The simulated nitrate fields match those of shipboard surveys, while fallout of particulate matter approximates that caught in sediment traps and accumulating in bottom sediments. Assuming an f ratio of 0.06-0.12, the total primary production of the Gulf of Mexico might be 105-210g C m -2y -1 in the absence of anthropogenic nutrient loadings, i.e. 2-3 fold that of oligotrophic regions not impacted by western boundary currents. Less than 25% of the nitrogen effluent of the Mississippi River may be stored in bottom sediments, with most of this input dispersed in dissolved from beneath the pycnocline, after remineralization of particulate detritus within several production cycles derived from riverine loading. At a sinking rate of 3m d -1, however, sufficient phytodetritus survives oxidation in the water column to balance estimates of bottom metabolism and burial at the margins.

  12. Crustaceans from antipatharians on banks of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Wicksten, Mary K.; Nuttall, Marissa F.; Hickerson, Emma L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The stalked barnacle Oxynaspis gracilis, the chirostylid squat lobster Uroptychus sp., and the caridean shrimps Periclimenes cf. antipathophilus and Pseudopontonides principis have been collected at 68–124 m by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) on banks in the northern Gulf of Mexico. These species inhabited six species of antipatharian hosts. Pseudopontonides principis, Oxynaspis gracilis, and Uroptychus sp. were not confined to a single host species. Except for Oxynaspis gracilis, collected by ROV in 2004–2005, these species have not been reported previously in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. PMID:25561830

  13. Crustaceans from antipatharians on banks of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Wicksten, Mary K; Nuttall, Marissa F; Hickerson, Emma L

    2014-01-01

    The stalked barnacle Oxynaspisgracilis, the chirostylid squat lobster Uroptychus sp., and the caridean shrimps Periclimenescf.antipathophilus and Pseudopontonidesprincipis have been collected at 68-124 m by a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) on banks in the northern Gulf of Mexico. These species inhabited six species of antipatharian hosts. Pseudopontonidesprincipis, Oxynaspisgracilis, and Uroptychus sp. were not confined to a single host species. Except for Oxynaspisgracilis, collected by ROV in 2004-2005, these species have not been reported previously in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. PMID:25561830

  14. Miocene isotope chronostratigraphy: North-central Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, D.M.; Williams, D.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Isotope chronostratigraphy has proven extremely useful in providing high resolution stratigraphic correlations and detailed information relating to the complex nature of sediment accumulation rates in Plio-Pleistocene exploration wells of the north-central Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Current research on the isotopic composition of foraminifera recovered from Miocene age sediments in the north-central GOM indicate that the glacio-eustatic cycles documented in the Plio-Pleistocene are found to continue into the late Miocene. During the middle Miocene ample isotopic signals (3 per mil) exist to provide a high resolution stratigraphy. {delta}{sup 18}O data from the planktonic foraminifera Orbulina universa from Eureka core 66-73 in the Desoto Canyon form a relatively complete record from approximately 8.5-16 Ma. The record displays a greater than 3 per mil range in {delta}{sup 18}O values through the middle Miocene. This Miocene {delta}{sup 18}O record from E66-73 is compared to exploration wells from the following areas: Mississippi Canyon, central GOM, East Breaks, South Galveston, and the Green Canyon. In the downdip, deeper water sections, the primary water column signal appears to be well preserved through the middle Miocene. When working updip in shallower water depths, there appears to be some diagenetic zones displaying extremely negative {delta}{sup 18}O values ({gt}-6 per mil) that could be related to fluid migration events or possibly related to sand occurrence. Also found in these updip wells is a zone of consistent diagenetic overprint in the lower section of the well. In this interval, the base line for the {delta}{sup 18}O values is shifted by as much as 3-4 per mil in the negative direction.

  15. Part of the Gulf of Mexico became greener after oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-07-01

    Biological changes have been observed in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico since the April-July 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the largest offshore spill event in U.S. history. To overcome the difficulty of lack of sufficient field sampling data for a region-wide impact assessment, Hu et al. used multiyear satellite measurements of ocean phytoplankton's “glow” under sunlight to document the surface ocean's biological changes. They observed that during August 2010, several weeks after the leaking oil well was capped, an area stretching more than 11,000 square kilometers in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico was especially green, caused by increased phytoplankton biomass. The area was greener than it had been during any previous August since 2002. The researchers' analyses of ocean circulation and other oceanographic and environmental data indicate that the increased greenness was probably caused by the oil spill. Their findings highlight the unique value of satellite technology in observing changes in the ocean as well as the need for an integrated and sustained ocean observing system. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/ 2011GL047184, 2011)

  16. Using Radar to Understand Migratory Birds and Their Habitats: Critical Needs for the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Gregory J.; Barrow, Wylie

    2005-01-01

    Nearly all Neotropical migratory landbird species of the eastern United States as well as many western species use Louisiana and the northern Gulf of Mexico coast during their transcontinental migrations each spring and fall. Radar has determined that hundreds of millions of birds make the nocturnal crossing of the Gulf of Mexico resulting in daily flights of as many as 2.5 million individuals stopping in Louisiana to feed and rest. These migration landings are so spectacular that the term 'fallout' has been coined to describe the concentrations of birds arriving on the coast.

  17. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study - Data Information Management System (DIMS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnston, James

    2004-01-01

    The Tampa Bay Integrated Science Study is an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) that combines the expertise of federal, state and local partners to address some of the most pressing ecological problems of the Tampa Bay estuary. This project serves as a template for the application of integrated research projects in other estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico. Efficient information and data distribution for the Tampa Bay Study has required the development of a Data Information Management System (DIMS). This information system is being used as an outreach management tool, providing information to scientists, decision makers and the public on the coastal resources of the Gulf of Mexico.

  18. EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A. In press. Evaluation of Environmental Hazard Assessment Procedures for Near-Coastal Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (Abstract). To be presented at the Annual Meeting of the the Australasian Society of Ecotoxicology, July 2004, Gold Coast, Australia. 1 p. (ERL,GB R98...

  19. Dispersed oil toxicity tests with biological species indigenous to the Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fucik, K.W.; Carr, K.A.; Balcom, B.J.

    1994-08-01

    Static and flowthrough aquatic acute toxicity testing protocols were utilized on eggs and larvae of seven commercially important invertebrates and fishes from the Gulf of Mexico. Test organisms were exposed to Central and Western Gulf oils, dispersed oil, and Corexit 9527. Species included brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus), white shrimp (Penaeus setiferus), blue crab (Callinectes sapidus), eastern oyster (Crassostrea virginica), red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus), inland silverside (Menidia berylina), and spot (Leiosomus xanthurus). Atlantic menhaden (Brevoortia tyrannus) was also tested because gulf menhaden were not available. Mysids (Mysidopsis bahia) were evaluated as part of a chronic toxicity assessment.

  20. Use of Shallow Lagoon Habitats by Nekton of the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    We compared nekton use of prominent habitat types within a lagoonal system of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico (GoM). These habitat types were defined by combinations of structure (cover type) and location (distance from shore) as: Spartina edge (<1m from shore), Spartina 3 m from...

  1. Geologic interpretation of the shallow subsurface within the gas hydrate stability zone, northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutken, C.; Woolsey, J.; McGee, T.; Geresi, E.

    2003-04-01

    During the past five years, several sets of very high resolution seismic data from the Mississippi Canyon region of the northern Gulf of Mexico have been acquired and processed by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology (CMRET). These data have been recovered in support of an effort to site a permanent remote multi-sensor sea floor observatory for the study and monitoring of gas hydrates on the sea floor and in the shallow subsurface. Among the features imaged in these profiles and in other areas of documented gas hydrate occurrence in the Gulf of Mexico are what have been described as "fluid expulsion features." During July, 2002, the United States Geological Survey, aboard the R.V. "Marion Dufresne" collected a 28+-meter core from the flank of one of these features known to reside within the gas hydrate stability zone. The core-site had been selected to augment the sea floor observatory project research by providing ground-truth in an area of numerous, closely spaced, horizontal reflectors immediately adjacent to one of the fluid expulsion features. Density and P-wave velocity logs were acquired onboard. In August of 2002, the CMRET collected two orthogonal, 6-kilometer seismic profiles across the core-site using a surface source (80in3 watergun) and deep-towed receiver. Newly developed processing techniques have been applied to these data. Stratigraphic and paleontological analyses of the core samples combined with the high-resolution seismic data, produce an improved shallow subsurface geological interpretation - including subdecimeter stratal resolution - of this area of the Gulf.

  2. Topographic control of the cyclonic circulation in the southern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Brunius, P.; García-Carrillo, P.; Dubranna, J.; Candela, J.; Sheinbaum, J.

    2011-12-01

    Until recently, the Bay of Campeche was the most undersampled area of the Gulf of Mexico. Three years of mooring and drifter observations of the upper-layer velocity field have greatly improved our understanding of the dynamics in this region. They show that the mean cyclonic circulation, previously reported in the literature, is a persistent feature that extends down to 800-1000m. The gyre's size and location appear determined by the particular configuration of the isobaths in the region, which consists of a deep basin to the west, and a shallower, gently sloping submarine fan to the east. Data suggest that the flow is equivalent barotropic, and that potential vorticity conservation explains the gyre's topographic control. Preliminary results indicate that the interaction of the gyre with Loop Current eddies and wind-stress curl variations can also be explained by this hypothesis.

  3. Late Triassic-Jurassic paleogeography and origin of Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Salvador, A.

    1987-04-01

    The basic structural and stratigraphic framework of the Gulf of Mexico Basin was established during the Late Triassic and the Jurassic. During the Late Triassic and Early Jurassic, as the North American plate started to separate from the South American and African plates, the area of the future basin was part of an extensive landmass broken by tensional grabens that were filled by red beds and volcanics. Marine deposition was restricted to embayments of the Pacific Ocean in northwestern and central Mexico. These marine embayments persisted during the early Middle Jurassic, but seawater did not reach the future Gulf of Mexico Basin until the Callovian. Widespread salt deposits known today from two separate areas of the basin resulted from this initial flooding. During the Late Jurassic, marine conditions progressively extended over increasingly larger parts of the Gulf of Mexico Basin. However, the basin was not connected to the Atlantic Ocean until late in the Jurassic. This paleogeographic reconstruction suggests that the Gulf of Mexico Basin formed as a result of the southward drift of the Yucatan continental block away from the remainder of the North American plate. The separation began in the Late Triassic, continued slowly and sporadically during the Early and Middle Jurassic, and quickened after the Middle Jurassic salt formed. As a result, the salt deposits were split into the two segments known today, and oceanic crust formed in the center of the basin. Early in the Late Jurassic, the Yucatan platform reached its present position and the Gulf of Mexico Basin was born. 14 figures.

  4. SUSCEPTIBILITY OF A NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARY TO HYPOXIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bottom water hypoxia is a common adverse consequence of nutrient enrichment in estuaries and coastal waters. To protect against hypoxia, it is helpful to know which waters are most susceptible to hypoxia. Hypoxia has been observed regularly in Pensacola Bay, a northeastern Gulf o...

  5. Fisheries Management of Red Snapper in the Gulf of Mexico: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Joy N.; Snyder, Stephanie M.; Berkson, Jim; Murphy, Brian R.; McMullin, Steve L.

    2009-01-01

    In the Gulf of Mexico, the overfished population of red snapper ("Lutjanus campechanus") is a major source of revenue resulting in a dichotomy between maintaining the health of the fishery and meeting the demands of the local economies. In order to govern marine fisheries the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act of 1976 was…

  6. Guide to Common Tidal Marsh Invertebrates of the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heard, Richard W.

    The major groups of marine and estuarine macroinvertebrates of the tidal marshes of the northern Gulf of Mexico are described in this guide for students, taxonomists and generalists. Information on the recognition characteristics, distribution, habitat, and biology of salt marsh species from the coelenterate, annelid, mollusk and arthropod phyla…

  7. Common coastal foraging areas for loggerheads in the Gulf of Mexico: Opportunities for marine conservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Kristen M.; Lamont, Margaret M.; Fujisaki, Ikuko; Tucker, Anton D.; Carthy, Raymond R.

    2012-01-01

    Designing conservation strategies that protect wide-ranging marine species is a significant challenge, but integrating regional telemetry datasets and synthesizing modeled movements and behavior offer promise for uncovering distinct at-sea areas that are important habitats for imperiled marine species. Movement paths of 10 satellite-tracked female loggerheads (Caretta caretta) from three separate subpopulations in the Gulf of Mexico, USA, revealed migration to discrete foraging sites in two common areas at-sea in 2008, 2009, and 2010. Foraging sites were 102–904 km away from nesting and tagging sites, and located off southwest Florida and the northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Within 3–35 days, turtles migrated to foraging sites where they all displayed high site fidelity over time. Core-use foraging areas were 13.0–335.2 km2 in size, in water <50 m deep, within a mean distance to nearest coastline of 58.5 km, and in areas of relatively high net primary productivity. The existence of shared regional foraging sites highlights an opportunity for marine conservation strategies to protect important at-sea habitats for these imperiled marine turtles, in both USA and international waters. Until now, knowledge of important at-sea foraging areas for adult loggerheads in the Gulf of Mexico has been limited. To better understand the spatial distribution of marine turtles that have complex life-histories, we propose further integration of disparate tracking data-sets at the oceanic scale along with modeling of movements to identify critical at-sea foraging habitats where individuals may be resident during non-nesting periods.

  8. BIOGEOGRAPHY OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN ESTUARIES ALONG THE GULF OF MEXICO AND WESTERN ATLANTIC COASTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The community composition of benthic macroinvertebrates from 870 estuarine sites was examimed in order to either confirm or challenge established boundaries of biogeographical provinces along the Gulf of Mexico and western Atlantic coasts of the United States. The objective was t...

  9. 75 FR 12169 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-15

    ... Atlantic; Commercial King and Spanish Mackerel Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Control Date AGENCY... Spanish mackerel components of the coastal migratory pelagic fishery operating in the exclusive economic... control date for Spanish mackerel. These dates may serve to determine eligibility of catch histories...

  10. Development and application of an observation-based light attenuation equation for northern Gulf of Mexico

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solar radiation is one of the main factors controlling the rate of primary production on the Louisiana Shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This work seeks to improve on previously published empirical equations through the use of statistical data transformation and the incorpora...

  11. Least-cost control of agricultural nutrient contributions to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2007, the hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico, measuring 20,720 km**2, was one of the two largest reported since measurement of the zone began in 1985. The extent of the hypoxic zone is related to nitrogen and phosphorous loadings originating on agricultural fields in the upper Midwest. This stud...

  12. TREATED WASTEWATER AS A SOURCE OF SEDIMENT CONTAMINATION IN GULF OF MEXICO NEAR-COASTAL AREAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The primary objective of this baseline survey was to provide some needed perspective on the magnitude of sediment contamination associated with wastewater outfalls discharged to Gulf of Mexico near-coastal areas. The chemical quality and toxicities of whole sediments and pore wa...

  13. Improved Hypoxia Modeling for Nutrient Control Decisions in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Habib, Shaid; Pickering, Ken; Tzortziou, Maria; Maninio, Antonio; Policelli, Fritz

    2010-01-01

    As required by the Harmful Algal Bloom and Hypoxia Research Control Act of 1998, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force issued the 2001 Gulf Hypoxia Action Plan (updated in 2008). In response to the Gulf Hypoxia Action Plan of 2001 (updated in 2008), the EPA Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Modeling and Monitoring Project has established a detailed model for the Mississippi-Attchafalaya River Basin which provides a capability to forecast the multi-source nutrient loading to the Gulf and the subsequent bio-geochemical processes leading to hypoxic conditions and subsequent effects on Gulf habitats and fisheries. The primary purpose of the EPA model is to characterize the impacts of nutrient management actions, or proposed actions on the spatial and temporal characteristics of the Gulf hypoxic zone. The model is expected to play a significant role in determining best practices and improved strategies for incentivizing nutrient reduction strategies, including installation of on-farm structures to reduce sediment and nutrient runoff, use of cover crops and other agricultural practices, restoration of wetlands and riparian buffers, improved waste water treatment and decreased industrial nitrogen emissions. These decisions are currently made in a fragmented way by federal, state, and local agencies, using a variety of small scale models and limited data. During the past three years, EPA has collected an enormous amount of in-situ data to be used in the model. We believe that the use of NASA satellite data products in the model and for long term validation of the model has the potential to significantly increase the accuracy and therefore the utility of the model for the decision making described above. This proposal addresses the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) priority issue of reductions in nutrient inputs to coastal ecosystem. It further directly relates to water quality for healthy beaches and shellfish beds and wetland and coastal conservation

  14. Diversity of Marine Plants. Man and the Gulf of Mexico Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Bobby N., Comp.; And Others

    "Man and the Gulf of Mexico" (MGM) is a marine science curriculum series developed to meet the needs of 10th through 12th grade students in Mississippi and Alabama schools. This MGM unit on the diversity of marine plants is divided into 12 sections. The first section introduces the unit by providing objectives and activities on why people classify…

  15. Summer Fish Communities in Northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: Indices of Ecological Condition

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used fish community data from trawl samples in >100 estuaries, bayous, and coastal lagoons of the Louisianan Biogeographic Province (Gulf of Mexico) to develop indicators of ecological condition. One data set, from which we derived reference values for fish community indicator...

  16. 77 FR 4272 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... 3.87 million lb (1.76 million kg) for the Atlantic migratory group of Spanish mackerel (65 FR 41015... reduces the commercial trip limit of Atlantic migratory group Spanish mackerel in or from the exclusive... mackerel, Spanish mackerel, cero, cobia, little tunny, dolphin, and, in the Gulf of Mexico only,...

  17. 78 FR 15642 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... (65 FR 16336, March 28, 2000) that divided the Florida west coast subzone of the Gulf of Mexico... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Temporary rule; trip limit reduction. SUMMARY:...

  18. FATTY ACID AND STEROL COMPOSITION OF A KARENIA BREVIS BLOOM IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Gulf of Mexico, recurring algal blooms, caused by Karenia brevis (formerly known as Gymnodinium breve), have significant adverse health and economic impacts. K. brevis is one member of a small group of dinoflagellates, related morphologically and by DNA-based phylogenetic ...

  19. Diversity of Marine Animals. Man and the Gulf of Mexico Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Bobby N., Comp.; And Others

    "Man and the Gulf of Mexico" (MGM) is a marine science curriculum series developed to meet the needs of 10th through 12th grade students in Mississippi and Alabama schools. This MGM unit on the diversity of marine animals is divided into 16 sections. These sections focus on: marine protozoans; sponges; coelenterates; ctenophores; polychaetes;…

  20. 77 FR 66818 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Assessment...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Assessment Process Webinar for Gulf of Mexico Spanish Mackerel... the Assessment portion of the SEDAR process. DATES: The SEDAR 28 Assessment Workshop Webinar will be... necessary to accommodate the timely completion of discussion relevant to the assessment process....

  1. Subsurface gas hydrates in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boswell, Ray; Collett, Timothy S.; Frye, Matthew; Shedd, William; McConnell, Daniel R.; Shelander, Dianna

    2012-01-01

    The northernGulf of Mexico (GoM) has long been a focus area for the study of gashydrates. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, work focused on massive gashydrates deposits that were found to form at and near the seafloor in association with hydrocarbon seeps. However, as global scientific and industrial interest in assessment of the drilling hazards and resource implications of gashydrate accelerated, focus shifted to understanding the nature and abundance of "buried" gashydrates. Through 2005, despite the drilling of more than 1200 oil and gas industry wells through the gashydrate stability zone, published evidence of significant sub-seafloor gashydrate in the GoM was lacking. A 2005 drilling program by the GoM GasHydrate Joint Industry Project (the JIP) provided an initial confirmation of the occurrence of gashydrates below the GoM seafloor. In 2006, release of data from a 2003 industry well in Alaminos Canyon 818 provided initial documentation of gashydrate occurrence at high concentrations in sand reservoirs in the GoM. From 2006 to 2008, the JIP facilitated the integration of geophysical and geological data to identify sites prospective for gashydrate-bearing sands, culminating in the recommendation of numerous drilling targets within four sites spanning a range of typical deepwater settings. Concurrent with, but independent of, the JIP prospecting effort, the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted a preliminary assessment of the GoM gashydratepetroleum system, resulting in an estimate of 607 trillion cubic meters (21,444 trillion cubic feet) gas-in-place of which roughly one-third occurs at expected high concentrations in sand reservoirs. In 2009, the JIP drilled seven wells at three sites, discovering gashydrate at high saturation in sand reservoirs in four wells and suspected gashydrate at low to moderate saturations in two other wells. These results provide an initial confirmation of the complex nature and occurrence of gashydrate-bearing sands in

  2. 1400 yr multiproxy record of climate variability from the northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richey, J.N.; Poore, R.Z.; Flower, B.P.; Quinn, T.M.

    2007-01-01

    A continuous decadal-scale resolution record of climate variability over the past 1400 yr in the northern Gulf of Mexico was constructed from a box core recovered in the Pigmy Basin, northern Gulf of Mexico. Proxies include paired analyses of Mg/Ca and δ18O in the white variety of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber and relative abundance variations of G. sacculifer in the foraminifer assemblages. Two multi-decadal intervals of sustained high Mg/Ca indicate that Gulf of Mexico sea surface temperatures (SSTs) were as warm or warmer than near-modern conditions between 1000 and 1400 yr B.P. Foraminiferal Mg/Ca during the coolest interval of the Little Ice Age (ca. 250 yr B.P.) indicate that SST was 2–2.5 °C below modern SST. Four minima in the Mg/Ca record between 900 and 250 yr B.P. correspond with the Maunder, Spörer, Wolf, and Oort sunspot minima, suggesting a link between changes in solar insolation and SST variability in the Gulf of Mexico. An abrupt shift recorded in both δ18Ocalcite and relative abundance of G. sacculifer occurred ca. 600 yr B.P. The shift in the Pigmy Basin record corresponds with a shift in the sea-salt-sodium (ssNa) record from the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 ice core, linking changes in high-latitude atmospheric circulation with the subtropical Atlantic Ocean.

  3. Horizontal movements of Atlantic blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraus, R.T.; Wells, R.J.D.; Rooker, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    We examined movements of Atlantic blue marlin (Makaira nigricans) from the Gulf of Mexico based upon 42 pop-up archival transmitting (PAT) tags. Long deployments (including one 334-day track) revealed diverse movement patterns within the Gulf of Mexico. North-south seasonal changes in blue marlin distribution showed strong correspondence with established seasonal patterns of sea surface temperature and primary production. During the summer spawning season, blue marlin utilized outer shelf and shelf edge waters in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and longer duration tracks indicated overwintering habitats in the Bay of Campeche. Egress occurred throughout the year and was difficult to determine because some tracks ended in the Straits of Florida (n = 3) while other tracks recorded movement through it or the Yucatan Channel (n = 4). Our results indicate that Atlantic blue marlin have a more restricted geographic range of habitats than previously recognized and that the Gulf of Mexico provides spatially dynamic suitable habitat that is utilized year-round through seasonal movements. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  4. SEDIMENT HABITAT ASSESSMENT FOR TARGETED NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO: A SUMMARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A. In press. Sediment Habitat Assessment for Targeted Near-Coastal Areas of the Gulf of Mexico: A Summary. In: Estuarine Indicators Workshop Proceedings. CRC Press, Boca Raton, FL. 25 p. (ERL,GB 1201).

    Sediment chemical and biological quality is summarized ...

  5. Field Characterization of Potential Reference Sediments in the Gulf of Mexico: Chemical and Biological Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A., Jed G. Campbell, Peggy S. Harris, Darrin D. Dantin, Steve S. Foss, Robert L. Quarles, James C. Moore and Cynthia A. Chancy. Submitted. Characterization of Potential Reference Areas in the Gulf of Mexico: Near-Coastal Sediment Chemical and Biological Quality. En...

  6. USEFULNESS OF CURRENT SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS TO INDICATE CONTAMINATION IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment toxicity evaluations were conducted during a three-year period in several Gulf of Mexico near-coastal areas using a variety of laboratory and field methods. The sediments were collected adjacent to Superfund sites, urban runoff discharges, treated municipal and industria...

  7. SEDIMENT HAZARD ASSESSMENT FOR NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment contamination is a major problem in many coastal areas in the U.S. and has emerged as an important ecological issue for several geographic areas. Sediment chemical and biological quality is unknown in many areas of the Gulf of Mexico. To provide some information on this ...

  8. DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED ASSESSMENT OF HYPOXIA IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hypoxia is the condition in which dissolved oxygen levels are below that necessary to sustain most animal life. The largest zone of oxygen depletion in the US coastal waters is found in the northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) on the LA/TX continental shelf. In response to growing publ...

  9. Predicted effects of climate change on northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxia

    EPA Science Inventory

    U.S. state and federal partners are working cooperatively to develop nutrient management strategies to reduce hypoxia (O2 < 63 mmol m-3) in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Numerical models that represent eutrophication and hypoxia development processes have been an important too...

  10. BACTERIAL SOURCE TRACKING (BST) INITIATIVE FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will sponsor several meetings to enable scientists to discuss mutual problems and solutions regarding bacterial source tracking methods. Issues common to all the Gulf states include but are not limited to beach closures, TMDL analysis, longevity of indicator organism...

  11. Fishery Resources and Threatened Coastal Habitats in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Abstract)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have explored relationships between selected fishery species of the northern Gulf of Mexico and important features of their habitats. The principal goal of our research is to predict the cumulative effects of habitat alterations on coastal resources and ecosystems. Pink shrimp...

  12. Early Mesozoic reconstructions, tectonics and paleogeography of Caribbean-Gulf of Mexico-Atlantic area

    SciTech Connect

    Wiener, R.W.; Norton, I.O.

    1985-01-01

    Five plate reconstructions with paleogeography show the evolution of the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean-Atlantic from Late Triassic through Late Jurassic time. The reconstructions are constrained by oceanic geophysical data, by the distribution of Paleozoic tectonic belts and early Mesozoic sedimentary and igneous rocks, and by restoration of post-Jurassic faulting. Late Triassic rifting formed grabens in which continental sediments and tholeiitic volcanics accumulated. Overlying salt was deposited from ingression of Tethyan waters into circum-Atlantic grabens. Oceanic crust formed in the Atlantic about 165 m.y. ago, followed by a spreading-center jump about 160 m.y. ago. The NA/SA-Africa plate boundary was a zone of intracontinental faulting from the left-lateral Bahama fracture zone to a zone of normal and strike-slip faulting in the Gulf, to the left-lateral Mojave-Sonora megashear. Sea-floor spread in began in the proto-Caribbean in the middle Jurassic, while only rifting occurred in the Gulf of Mexico, where the Louann salt was deposited from Pacific waters. In the late Jurassic, steepening of the Pacific subduction zone resulted ion back-arc extension in Mexico. At the same time, sea-floor spreading began in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting in marine transgression. In the late Oxfordian, spreading center reorganization occurred in the Gulf. Movement ceased on the Mojave-Sonora megashear and began on the Salina Cruz right-lateral fault. In latest Jurassic spreading ceased in the Gulf, but continued in the proto-Caribbean.

  13. Marine Maladies? Worms, Germs, and Other Symbionts from the Northern Gulf of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overstreet, Robin M.

    Parasites and related symbionts of marine and estuarine hosts of the northern Gulf of Mexico are described in this guidebook. It is meant primarily to serve as a teaching aid for the novice student, but it also contains more technical aspects for the experienced parasitologist. Forms and examples of symbiosis are explained in an introductory…

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (EMAP): NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT, GULF OF MEXICO, AND INDICATOR DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The estuaries and coastal waters of the U.S. represent a complex set of ecosystems along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico and Pacific Ocean. These ecosystems are affected by effluents and nutrients entering the coastal waters, as well as global stressors and anthr...

  15. New deep-sea Paratanaoidea (Crustacea: Peracarida: Tanaidacea) from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Drumm, David T; Bird, Graham J

    2016-01-01

    One new genus is erected and four new species of paratanaoidean tanaidaceans are described from deep waters in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico: one in each of the genera Collettea, Tanaella, and Pseudomacrinella, and one as a new genus in the family Anarthruridae. Keys to species in the genera Collettea, Tanaella, and the genera of the Anarthruridae are provided. PMID:27615848

  16. 33 CFR 100.720 - Annual Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL. 100.720 Section 100.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.720 Annual Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix;...

  17. 33 CFR 100.720 - Annual Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Annual Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix; Gulf of Mexico, Sarasota, FL. 100.720 Section 100.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.720 Annual Suncoast Offshore Grand Prix;...

  18. 75 FR 47267 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-05

    ... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE..., 2010. ADDRESSES: The meetings will be held at the Crowne Plaza, 200 E. Gregory St., Pensacola, FL...

  19. 76 FR 62042 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-06

    ... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... future amendments, e.g., Bag Limit Sales, Trip Limits, Transit, and Latent Gill Net Permits. 10 a.m.-11...

  20. 76 FR 12340 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... amendment will address crew size regulations for dually permitted vessels, i.e., vessels with a charter...

  1. 76 FR 3616 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... will be held at the Courtyard Marriott, 1600 E. Beach Blvd, Gulfport, MS 39501. Council address:...

  2. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC). These... jurisdiction of the NEFMC or GMFMC, except for certain provisions that only apply to a fishery...

  3. Apollo 7 prime crew during water egress training in Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    The prime crew of the first manned Apollo space mission, Apollo 7, stands on the deck of the NASA Motor Vessel Retriever after suiting up for water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. Left to right, are Astronauts Walter Cunningham, Donn F. Eisele, and Walter M. Schirra Jr.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Research Program Data Report 2002-2007

    EPA Science Inventory

    The work described in this report summarizes the data collected during 12 oceanographic cruises conducted from 2002-2007. The project was supported by the US EPA Office of Research and Development, in partnership with the US EPA Gulf of Mexico Program Office, the Office of Water,...

  5. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: An update by the EPA Science Advisory Board

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report was prepared by the authors serving as part of an EPA Science Advisory Board (SAB) panel. The report reaffirms the major finding of theIntegrated Assessment, namely that contemporary changes in the hypoxic area in the northern Gulf of Mexico are primarily related to nutrient loads from t...

  6. Reconnaissance Strategy for Seep Chemosynthetic Communities in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Roberts, H. H.; Fisher, C. R.; Bernard, B. B.; Joye, S.; Carney, R.; Hunt, J.; Shedd, W.

    2007-05-01

    The Continental Slope of the Gulf of Mexico hosts diverse chemosynthetic communities at oil and gas seeps. Exploration is needed to extend knowledge of the Gulf of Mexico chemosynthetic ecosystem in the zones anticipated to receive energy exploration and production activities over the coming decades. A nested survey approach can be used to identify representative sampling sites within this vast offshore area. Potential sites where chemosynthetic community could occur are selected on the basis geophysical, geochemical, and satellite remote-sensing indicators. Photo-reconnaissance using cost-effective camera systems is then used to confirm the presences or absence of chemosynthetic communities at high-probability sites. Follow-up sampling can then proceed with submersibles or ROVs to acquire tissue and or geochemical samples. However, because access is limited, submersible dives may not be possible at all sites. Two examples of this approach have recently been applied in the northern and southern Gulf of Mexico, respectively. We compared community characterizations obtained from the initial reconnaissance with more detailed characterizations forthcoming from submersible sampling. Our results show that major differences in community type and geochemical substrata are evident from preliminary reconnaissance, while details of animal densities and species compositions require targeted sampling with submersibles. However, given the limited access to submersibles, cost-effective surveys with deep-sea camera systems would greatly expand understanding of the zoogeography of chemosynthetic fauna in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea.

  7. Environmental Conditions in Northern Gulf of Mexico Estuaries: Before and After the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    When conducting an environmental assessment to determine the ecological effects of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) Oil Spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), baseline environmental data is essential to establish ecosystem condition prior to the incident. EPA’s National Coastal Assessment...

  8. 78 FR 57840 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... history (e.g., longer-lived species get a larger buffer) c. Modify the Tier 1 spreadsheet to develop...

  9. 77 FR 4282 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE... whether data uncertainties acknowledged/reported are within normal or expected levels, e.g.,...

  10. SULFATE REDUCTION RATES IN A THALASSIA TESTUDINUM SEAGRASS BED, NORTHWEST FLORIDA USA GULF OF MEXICO COAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Devereux, R., D.F. Yates and Robert L. Quarles. In press. Sulfate Reduction Rates in a Thalassia testudinum Seagrass Bed, Northwest Florida USA Gulf of Mexico Coast (Abstract). To be presented at the ASLO 2004 Summer Meeting: The Changing Landscapes of Oceans and Freshwater, 13-1...

  11. Apollo 14 prime crew during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The prime crewmen of the Apollo 14 lunar landing mission are shown inside a Command Module trainer during water egress training in the Gulf of Mexico. Left to right, are Astronauts Stuart A. Roosa, command module pilot; Alan B. Shepard Jr., commander; and Edgar D. Mitchell, lunar module pilot.

  12. Tiered collaborative strategies for reducing hypoxia and restoring the Gulf of Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Gulf of Mexico is more than just a water body south of the United States. It is an international marine ecosystem, the ninth largest water body in the world (USEPA 2007), and it receives drainage from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB), the third largest drainage basin in the world. The combine...

  13. A PILOT PROJECT TO DETECT AND FORECAST HARMFUL ALGAL BLOOMS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    More timely access to data and information on the initiation, evolution and effects of harmful algal blooms can reduce adverse impacts on valued natural resources and human health. To achieve this in the northern Gulf of Mexico, a pilot project was initiated to develop a user-dr...

  14. 33 CFR 166.200 - Shipping safety fairways and anchorage areas, Gulf of Mexico.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Navigation or danger markings must be installed as required by 33 CFR Subchapter C. (c) Special Conditions...: For Federal Register citations affecting § 166.200, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which... anchorage areas, Gulf of Mexico. 166.200 Section 166.200 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  15. Manatee occurrence in the northern Gulf of Mexico, west of Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fertl, D.; Schiro, A. J.; Regan, G. T.; Beck, Cathy A.; Adimey, N.; Price-May, L.; Amos, A.; Worthy, Graham A.J.; Crossland, R.

    2005-01-01

    Reports of West Indian manatees (Trichechus manatus) in the US Gulf of Mexico west of Florida have increased during the last decade. We reviewed all available manatee sighting, capture, and carcass records (n = 377) from Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas since the early 1900s; only 40 of these were previously published. Manatees were reported most often in estuarine habitats, usually either near a freshwater source or natural or industrial warm-water springs/runoffs during winter months. The recent increase in manatee records may be due to a combination of increased public awareness and dispersal of manatees, most likely seasonal migrants from Florida. We caution that the presence of artificial warm-water sources outside of the manatee’s traditional range may attract an increasing number of manatees and could increase the incidence of cold-related mortality in this region.

  16. 76 FR 23909 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-29

    ... issued a final rule (73 FR 38139) to implement Amendment 30A to the FMP (Amendment 30A). Amendment 30A... for Gulf greater amberjack on October 28, 2010 (75 FR 64171), when NMFS projected that the 373,072 lb... 30A. A notice of availability for the FSEIS was published on April 18, 2008 (73 FR 21124). A copy...

  17. 76 FR 78245 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... for the Generic ACL Amendment was published in the Federal Register on September 26, 2011 (76 FR 59373... Register on October 25, 2011 (76 FR 66021). As part of this amendment, the Gulf Council has selected to... published a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 64327) requesting public comment on the proposed...

  18. 77 FR 56168 - Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... fish fishery (71 FR 67447, November 22, 2006). Amendment 29 to the FMP established an IFQ program for the commercial grouper and tilefish components of the Gulf reef fish fishery (74 FR 44732, August 31... Amendment 26 to the FMP (71 FR 67447, November 22, 2006) and Amendment 29 to the FMP (74 FR 44732, August...

  19. FISHERY RESOURCES AND THREATENED HABITATS IN THE NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jordan, Steve and Darrin Dantin. 2004. Fishery Resources and Threatened Habitats in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Abstract). Presented at the Aquatic Stressors All-Investigators Meeting, 9-11 March 2004, Washington, DC. 1 p. (ERL,GB R996).

    We have explored relationships be...

  20. Microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activity in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study explores the relationship between sediment chemistry (TC, TN, TP) and microbial respiration (DHA) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hypoxic zone. TC, TN, and TP were all positively correlated with each other (r=0.19-0.68). DHA was ...