Science.gov

Sample records for gulf of mexico region

  1. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; Hardin, Danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV

  2. 76 FR 61695 - Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy (Preliminary)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy (Preliminary) AGENCY: Environmental... the Gulf of Mexico Regional Ecosystem Restoration Strategy (Preliminary) for public review and... Mexico Ecosystem Restoration Strategy. Additionally, the Task Force was instructed to build upon...

  3. NASA'S SERVIR Gulf of Mexico Project: The Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quattrochi, Dale A.; Irwin, Daniel; Presson, Joan; Estes, Maury; Estes, Sue; Judd, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC) is a NASA-funded project that has as its goal to develop an integrated, working, prototype IT infrastructure for Earth science data, knowledge and models for the five Gulf U.S. states and Mexico, and to demonstrate its ability to help decision-makers better understand critical Gulf-scale issues. Within this preview, the mission of this project is to provide cross cutting solution network and rapid prototyping capability for the Gulf of Mexico region, in order to demonstrate substantial, collaborative, multi-agency research and transitional capabilities using unique NASA data sets and models to address regional problems. SERVIR Mesoamerica is seen as an excellent existing framework that can be used to integrate observational and GIs data bases, provide a sensor web interface, visualization and interactive analysis tools, archival functions, data dissemination and product generation within a Rapid Prototyping concept to assist decision-makers in better understanding Gulf-scale environmental issues.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Initiative: NASA Capacity Building in the Gulf Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D.; Graham, W. D.; Searby, N. D.

    2012-12-01

    In the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, NASA created the Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI) to help the region recover and to build the capacity of local and regional organizations to utilize NASA Earth science assets to establish effective policies, encourage sustainable natural resource management and utilization, and to expeditiously respond to crises. GOMI worked closely with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA), a regional collaboration of the five US Gulf states and 13 federal agencies, to select projects that addressed high priority issues of the region. Many capabilities developed by this initiative have been adopted by end-users and have been leveraged to respond to other natural and man made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), record breaking floods along the Mississippi River (2011), unprecedented tornado supercells (2011), and extreme drought (2012). Examples of successful capacity building projects will be presented and the lessons learned from these projects will be discussed.

  5. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... article title:  Continued Spread of Gulf of Mexico Oil Slick       View Larger ... on NASA's Terra spacecraft passed over the Deepwater Horizon oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico on May 8, 2010, at approximately 16:50 UTC ...

  6. 77 FR 22760 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Gulf of Mexico Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Region Gulf of Mexico Electronic Logbook Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...) under the Shrimp Fishery Management Plan (FMP). The electronic logbook (ELB) regulations for the Gulf... will help improve estimating bycatch in the Gulf shrimp fleet. II. Method of Collection The...

  7. KT boundary impact glasses from the Gulf of Mexico region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Claeys, Philippe; Alvarez, Walter; Smit, Jan; Hildebrand, A. R.; Montanari, Alessandro

    1993-01-01

    Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary (KTB) tektite glasses occur at several sites around the Gulf of Mexico. Contrary to rumor among KTB workers, glass fragments have been found by several researchers in the base of the spherule bed at Arroyo el Mimbral in NE Mexico. The presence of green, red, and transparent glass fragments at Mimbral only, demonstrates that the Mimbral glass is not a laboratory contamination by Beloc glass. The chemistry and ages of the glass are consistent with an origin from the Chixculub impact crater in Yucatan. No evidence supports a volcanic origin for the KTB glasses. A discussion of tektite glass from the KT boundary is presented.

  8. Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Activity in the Gulf Coast Region of Mexico, 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    Adams, A. Paige; Navarro-Lopez, Roberto; Ramirez-Aguilar, Francisco J.; Lopez-Gonzalez, Irene; Leal, Grace; Flores-Mayorga, Jose M.; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P. A.; Saxton-Shaw, Kali D.; Singh, Amber J.; Borland, Erin M.; Powers, Ann M.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.

    2012-01-01

    Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) has been the causative agent for sporadic epidemics and equine epizootics throughout the Americas since the 1930s. In 1969, an outbreak of Venezuelan equine encephalitis (VEE) spread rapidly from Guatemala and through the Gulf Coast region of Mexico, reaching Texas in 1971. Since this outbreak, there have been very few studies to determine the northward extent of endemic VEEV in this region. This study reports the findings of serologic surveillance in the Gulf Coast region of Mexico from 2003–2010. Phylogenetic analysis was also performed on viral isolates from this region to determine whether there have been substantial genetic changes in VEEV since the 1960s. Based on the findings of this study, the Gulf Coast lineage of subtype IE VEEV continues to actively circulate in this region of Mexico and appears to be responsible for infection of humans and animals throughout this region, including the northern State of Tamaulipas, which borders Texas. PMID:23133685

  9. Synthesis of Seafood Catch, Distribution, and Consumption Patterns in the Gulf of Mexico Region

    SciTech Connect

    Steimle and Associates, Inc.

    1999-08-16

    The purpose of this task was to gather and assemble information that will provide a synthesis of seafood catch, distribution and consumption patterns for the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) region. This task was part of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored project entitled ''Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations.'' Personal interviews were conducted with a total of 905 recreational fishermen and 218 commercial fishermen (inclusive of shrimpers, crabbers, oystermen and finfishermen) in Louisiana and Texas using survey questionnaires developed for the study. Results of these interviews detail the species and quantities caught, location of catch, mode of fishing, distribution of catch, family consumption patterns and demographics of the fishermen.

  10. GPS derived ground motions (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Wang, G.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates current ground motions derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root-mean-square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. GPS observations in southeastern Louisiana indicate minor (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but consistent subsidence over time and space. This poses a potential threat to the safety of costal infrastructure in the long-term.

  11. GPS-derived ground deformation (2005-2014) within the Gulf of Mexico region referred to a stable Gulf of Mexico reference frame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiangbo; Wang, Guoquan

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates current ground deformation derived from the GPS geodesy infrastructure in the Gulf of Mexico region. The positions and velocity vectors of 161 continuous GPS (CGPS) stations are presented with respect to a newly established local reference frame, the Stable Gulf of Mexico Reference Frame (SGOMRF). Thirteen long-term (> 5 years) CGPS are used to realize the local reference frame. The root mean square (RMS) of the velocities of the 13 SGOMRF reference stations achieves 0.2 mm yr-1 in the horizontal and 0.3 mm yr-1 in the vertical directions. GPS observations presented in this study indicate significant land subsidence in the coastal area of southeastern Louisiana, the greater Houston metropolitan area, and two cities in Mexico (Aguascalientes and Mexico City). The most rapid subsidence is recorded at the Mexico City International airport, which is up to 26.6 cm yr-1 (2008-2014). Significant spatial variation of subsidence rates is observed in both Mexico City and the Houston area. The overall subsidence rate in the Houston area is decreasing. The subsidence rate in southeastern Louisiana is relatively smaller (4.0-6.0 mm yr-1) but tends to be steady over time. This poses a potential threat to the safety of coastal infrastructure in the long-term.

  12. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  13. INTEGRATED COASTAL MONITORING PROGRAM FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) Office in cooperation with Gulf State agencies, EPA Regions 4 and 6, EPA's Office of Water and Office of Research and Development (ORD), and the GMP principal partners are developing an integrated coastal monitoring program for the Gulf of Mexico....

  14. GULF OF MEXICO HYPOXIA MONITORING AND MODELING FRAMEWORK

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA ORD in partnership with the Gulf of Mexico Program Office, the Office of Water and Regions 4 and 6 have developed and implemented plans for a framework that will help guide the science needed to address the hypoxia problem in the Gulf of Mexico. ORD's Gulf Ecology Divis...

  15. Regional maps of subsurface geopressure gradients of the onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, Lauri A.; Kinney, Scott A.; Dubiel, Russell F.; Pitman, Janet K.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey created a comprehensive geopressure-gradient model of the regional pressure system spanning the onshore and offshore Gulf of Mexico basin, USA. This model was used to generate ten maps that included (1) five contour maps characterizing the depth to the surface defined by the first occurrence of isopressure gradients ranging from 0.60 psi/ft to 1.00 psi/ft, in 0.10-psi/ft increments; and (2) five supporting maps illustrating the spatial density of the data used to construct the contour maps. These contour maps of isopressure-gradients at various increments enable the identification and quantification of the occurrence, magnitude, location, and depth of the subsurface pressure system, which allows for the broad characterization of regions exhibiting overpressured, underpressured, and normally pressured strata. Identification of overpressured regions is critical for exploration and evaluation of potential undiscovered hydrocarbon accumulations based on petroleum-generation pressure signatures and pressure-retention properties of reservoir seals. Characterization of normally pressured regions is essential for field development decisions such as determining the dominant production drive mechanisms, evaluating well placement and drainage patterns, and deciding on well stimulation methods such as hydraulic fracturing. Identification of underpressured regions is essential for evaluating the feasibility of geological sequestration and long-term containment of fluids such as supercritical carbon dioxide for alternative disposal methods of greenhouse gases. This study is the first, quantitative investigation of the regional pressure systems of one of the most important petroleum provinces in the United States. Although this methodology was developed for pressure studies in the Gulf of Mexico basin, it is applicable to any basin worldwide.

  16. Local and regional species diversity of benthic Isopoda (Crustacea) in the deep Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, George D. F.

    2008-12-01

    Recent studies of deep-sea faunas considered the influence of mid-domain models in the distribution of species diversity and richness with depth. In this paper, I show that separating local diversity from regional species richness in benthic isopods clarifies mid-domain effects in the distribution of isopods in the Gulf of Mexico. Deviations from the randomised implied species ranges can be informative to understanding general patterns within the Gulf of Mexico. The isopods from the GoMB study contained 135 species, with a total of 156 species including those from an earlier study. More than 60 species may be new to science. Most families of deep-sea isopods (suborder Asellota) were present, although some were extremely rare. The isopod family Desmosomatidae dominated the samples, and one species of Macrostylis (Macrostylidae) was found in many samples. Species richness for samples pooled within sites ranged from 1 to 52 species. Because species in pooled samples were highly correlated with individuals, species diversity was compared across sites using the expected species estimator ( n=15 individuals, ES 15). Six depth transects had idiosyncratic patterns of ES 15, and transects with the greatest short-range variation in topography, such as basins and canyons, had the greatest short-range disparity. Basins on the deep slope did not have a consistent influence (i.e., relatively higher or lower than surrounding areas) on the comparative species diversity. ES 15 of all transects together showed a weak mid-domain effect, peaking around 1200-1500 m, with low values at the shallowest and deepest samples (Sigsbee Abyssal Plain); no longitudinal (east-west) pattern was found. The regional species pool was analyzed by summing the implied ranges of all species. The species ranges in aggregate did not have significant patterns across longitudes, and many species had broad depth ranges, suggesting that the isopod fauna of the Gulf of Mexico is well dispersed. The summed

  17. 30 CFR 250.150 - How do I name facilities and wells in the Gulf of Mexico Region?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I name facilities and wells in the Gulf of Mexico Region? 250.150 Section 250.150 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE OIL AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF General Naming and...

  18. Processing of the marine magnetic anomalies of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico (GOM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Andreina; Dyment, Jérôme; Thébault, Erwan

    2015-04-01

    Marine magnetic anomalies are useful to better understand the structure and age of the seafloor and constrain its nature and formation. In this work, we applied a dedicated processing of the NGDC marine magnetic measurements over the Caribbean region. The number of available surveys amounts to 516 representing 2.612.994 data points between epochs 1958 and 2012. The pre-processing was done by survey. First, data associated to velocities lesser than 5 knots were rejected. Then, the data were corrected for the main internal field using the CM4 model for epochs ranging between 1960 and 2002,5 and the IGRF-11 model outside the time range of the CM4 model. A visual inspection of the anomalies allowed us to identify, to remove evident outliers and to define a priority order for each survey. We evaluated the magnetic heading effect and corrected the data for it although statistics analysis suggested that this correction brings only a marginal improvement. The cross-overs differences were estimated using the x2sys package (Wessel, 2010) and then corrected using a Matlab code. The statistics confirmed the importance of this processing and improved the internal crossovers, with in particular a clear reduction of extreme values. This processing allows us to present a marine magnetic anomaly map of the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico to 0.18 degree spatial resolution and to discuss the magnetic signature of some of the striking structures of the area.

  19. Geologic assessments and characterization of marine sand resources - Gulf of Mexico region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, S. Jeffress; Cichon, Helena A.

    1993-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts geologic surveys and research in marine areas of the United States and its territories and possessions. An objective in some of the investigations is locating and evaluating marine sand and gravel resources and interpretation of the origins of the sand body deposits. Results from such studies over the past 30 years show that many extremely large deposits are located close to expanding metropolitan areas, which have a need for aggregate materials for construction, and near-developed coastal areas, where beach replenishment may be used to mitigate coastal erosion. The Gulf of Mexico continental shelf from the Florida Peninsula to the Mexico border is an enormous area, but little attention has been directed on sand and gravel resources. Based on limited surveys, the total sand and gravel resources for the entire Gulf of Mexico is estimated to be 269 billion cubic meters. However, the sand tends to be fine-grained and is often mixed with mud; gravel deposits, except for shell, are mostly nonexistent.

  20. Deep Crustal Structure Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Eddy, D. R.; Norton, I. O.; Karner, G. D.; Johnson, C. A.; Kneller, E. A.; Snedden, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of the GUMBO (GUlf of Mexico Basin Opening) project that constrains seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Data were acquired in 2010 along four profiles 300-500 km in length, using the industry vessel R/V Iron Cat and ocean bottom seismometers at 10-12 km spacing. Plate tectonic models for the Gulf of Mexico region have rifting initiating in the Late Triassic or Early Jurassic, with seafloor spreading beginning ~166-154 Ma in the western Gulf, propagating to the eastern Gulf, and ending ~154-135 Ma. Many models include transform motion along the Florida margin during initiation of continental rifting. We observe a strong change in rifting style from west to east across the ocean basin. Our western profile, offshore Texas, images highly heterogeneous crust with sediment velocities directly overlying Moho in some locations. These observations are consistent with either sedimentary basins within rifted continental crust or ultra-slow-spreading oceanic crust. The profile offshore Lousiana images thicker, faster, and more homogeneous crust. This could suggest an eastward increase in magmatic output during rifting. The eastern profiles offshore Alabama and Florida image the ocean-continent boundary and extensive regions of oceanic crust. The thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to 6-7 km over a horizontal distance of 150 km in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The profile offshore Alabama, near a region where syn-rift volcanism has been interpreted on seismic reflection data, has

  1. Estimation of the spectral parameter kappa in the region of the Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Raúl R.; Ávila-Barrientos, Lenin

    2015-10-01

    We analyzed records from the Broadband Seismological Network of the Gulf of California (RESBAN) and from stations of the NARS-Baja array, operated by CICESE, Ensenada, Baja California, Mexico, to make estimates of the spectral decay parameter kappa ( κ). This attenuation parameter is important for evaluating the seismic risk and hazard of this region. Thirteen shallow earthquakes with focal depths less than 20 km and magnitudes between 5.1 and 6.6 were selected to calculate κ and the near-site attenuation κ 0. We used three different approaches to estimate κ 0: (a) with individual measurements of κ from vector modulus of three-component spectral amplitudes at different epicentral distances and extrapolating to zero distance to estimate κ 0, (b) with individual measurements using vertical component spectra, and (c) measuring from the high-frequency part of the site transfer function determined calculating the horizontal-to-vertical spectral ratio (HVSR) method. For most stations, the three methods give similar results. At short distances (50-60 km), κ takes values close to 0.04 s at NE76, the station located in the middle of the array. κ increases with distance taking an average value of up to 0.18 s for distances close to 500 km. κ 0 at most sites is close to 0.03 s, except for GUYB (Guaymas) that has a κ 0 = 0.05 s and NE83 (Navolato) with κ 0 = 0.065 s, both stations located in the continent, on the eastern side of the gulf, where the soils are less consolidated. Finally, we analyze if κ 0 correlates with magnitude and back azimuth, and we found that for most stations, κ 0 does not correlate with either one. However, station TOPB, located on basalt, shows a moderate correlation with magnitude, with κ 0 increasing with increasing M W in a short back-azimuth range. We also found that for station NE74, located on soft soil, κ 0 correlates with back azimuth, having lower values for azimuths near 120°.

  2. 78 FR 28146 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Texas Closure AGENCY... Texas estuaries to the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) so the shrimp may reach a larger, more valuable size and to... the Gulf of Mexico (FMP). The FMP was prepared by the Gulf of Mexico......

  3. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... pattern of land and runoff is associated with the Chandeleur Islands, which are part of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge. This refuge is ... and waterfowl. Oil is reported to have reached the islands on May 6. Eighteen days later, this image shows filaments of oil ...

  4. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... the way the surface reflects light. This change in the reflection of sunlight makes the oil slick appear lighter blue on the darker ... degree forward viewing (Af) camera. The Af camera sees the reflection of sunlight from the oil more strongly than the Aa camera, so this ...

  5. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... weaker. The views at the two different angles cover the same physical area of 42 by 30 kilometers (26 by 19 miles). Controlled burns of the ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  6. 78 FR 63946 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Revisions to Headboat Reporting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ...NMFS proposes regulations to implement management measures described in a framework action to the Fishery Management Plans for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf), as prepared by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Gulf Council); and Coastal Migratory Pelagic (CMP) Resources of the Gulf and South Atlantic Region, as prepared by the Gulf Council and the South......

  7. Prebreakup geology of the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean: Its relation to Triassic and Jurassic rift systems of the region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartok, Peter

    1993-01-01

    A review of the prebreakup geology of west central Pangea, comprising northern South America, the Gulf of Mexico, and West Africa, combined with a study of the Mesozoic rift trends of the region confirms a relation between the rift systems and the underlying older grain of deformation. The prebreakup analysis focuses attention on the Precambrian, early Paleozoic, and late Paleozoic tectonic events affecting the region and assumes a Pindell fit. Two late Precambrian orogenic belts are observed in west central Pangea. Along the northern South American margin and Yucatan a paleo northeast trending Pan-African aged fold belt is documented. A second system is observed along West Africa extending from the High Atlas to the Mauritanides and Rockelides. Similar aged orogenies in the Appalachians are compared. During the late Paleozoic, renewed orogenic activity, associated with the Gondwana-Laurentia suture, affected large segments of west central Pangea. The general trend of the system is northeast-southwest and essentially parallels the Guayana craton and West African and eastern North American cratons. Mesozoic rifling closely followed either the Precambrian trends or the late Paleozoic orogenic belt. The Triassic component focused along the western portions of the Gulf of Mexico continuing into eastern Mexico and western South America. The Jurassic rift trend followed along the separation between Yucatan and northern South America. At Lake Maracaibo the Jurassic rift system eventually overlaps the Triassic rifts. The Jurassic rift resulted in the "Hispanic Corridor" that permitted Tethyan and Pacific marine faunas to mix at a time when the Gulf of Mexico underwent continental sedimentation.

  8. GULF OF MEXICO AQUATIC MORTALITY NETWORK (GMNET)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five U.S. states share the northern coast of the Gulf, and each has a program to monitor mortalities of aquatic organisms (fish, shellfish, birds). However, each state has different standards, procedures, and documentation of mortality events. The Gulf of Mexico Aquatic Mortality...

  9. 76 FR 30705 - Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Gulf of Mexico Citizen...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Request for Nominations to the Gulf of Mexico Citizen... considered for appointment to the Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee (GMCAC). Vacancies are... Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee (GMCAC) to provide independent citizen advice to the EPA...

  10. Deep Crustal Structure Northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, Gail; Eddy, Drew; van Avendonk, Harm; Norton, Ian; Karner, Garry; Johnson, Chris; Kneller, Erik; Snedden, John

    2013-04-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of two wide-angle seismic refraction profiles in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico that constrain seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin. Profile GUMBO 3 extends 523 km from offshore Alabama south-southwest via the De Soto Canyon to the central Gulf of Mexico, while GUMBO 4 extends 507 km from the northwestern Florida peninsula across the Florida Escarpment to the central Gulf of Mexico. On both profiles, ocean bottom seismometers were positioned at 12-km spacing, and recorded air gun shots at offsets >100 km. We use a tomographic inversion of first-arrival and secondary travel time picks from these data to build a layered velocity model (water, sediments, crystalline crust, mantle) along each profile. On GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4 the thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to ~7 km (GUMBO 4) or ~8 km (GUMBO 3) over a horizontal distance of ~150 km. Velocities of 7-7.5 km/s are observed at the base of the crust along most of GUMBO 3, while velocities of 6.5-7 km/s are observed at similar depths along GUMBO 4. We suggest that higher lower crustal velocities, and thicker oceanic crust, on GUMBO 3 compared to GUMBO 4 may be explained by elevated syn-rift mantle temperatures in the vicinity of the De Soto Canyon and South Georgia Rift during rifting and continental breakup. We have integrated seismic refraction, seismic reflection, and well data to interpret sequence stratigraphic units along GUMBO 3 and GUMBO 4. We have constructed a geologic history of the late-Jurassic/early-Cretaceous, beginning first with Louann

  11. Lagrangian predictability of high-resolution regional models: the special case of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, P. C.; Ivanov, L. M.; Kantha, L. H.; Margolina, T. M.; Melnichenko, O. V.; Poberezhny, Y. A.

    2004-02-01

    The Lagrangian prediction skill (model ability to reproduce Lagrangian drifter trajectories) of the nowcast/forecast system developed for the Gulf of Mexico at the University of Colorado at Boulder is examined through comparison with real drifter observations. Model prediction error (MPE), singular values (SVs) and irreversible-skill time (IT) are used as quantitative measures of the examination. Divergent (poloidal) and nondivergent (toroidal) components of the circulation attractor at 50m depth are analyzed and compared with the Lagrangian drifter buoy data using the empirical orthogonal function (EOF) decomposition and the measures, respectively. Irregular (probably, chaotic) dynamics of the circulation attractor reproduced by the nowcast/forecast system is analyzed through Lyapunov dimension, global entropies, toroidal and poloidal kinetic energies. The results allow assuming exponential growth of prediction error on the attractor. On the other hand, the q-th moment of MPE grows by the power law with exponent of 3q/4. The probability density function (PDF) of MPE has a symmetrical but non-Gaussian shape for both the short and long prediction times and for spatial scales ranging from 20km to 300km. The phenomenological model of MPE based on a diffusion-like equation is developed. The PDF of IT is non-symmetric with a long tail stretched towards large ITs. The power decay of the tail was faster than 2 for long prediction times.

  12. Gulf of Mexico dead zone - the last 150 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osterman, Lisa; Swarzenski, P.W.; Poore, R.Z.

    2006-01-01

    'Gulf of Mexico Dead Zone-The Last 150 Years' discusses the dead zone that forms seasonally in the northern Gulf of Mexico when subsurface waters become depleted in dissolved oxygen and cannot support most life.

  13. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operation. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1995-01-18

    Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included analyses of samples. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the continued analyses of samples and field sampling at Bay de Chene. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region) activities included preparing a draft final report. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work also involved preparing a draft final report. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities included a presentation at the Minerals Management Service Information Transfer Meeting for the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  14. 78 FR 14983 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC539 Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Gulf of Mexico...

  15. Permo-Triassic reconstruction of western Pangea and the evolution of the Gulf of Mexico&solCaribbean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pindell, James; Dewey, John F.

    1982-04-01

    A Permo-Triassic reconstruction of western Pangea (North America, South America, Africa) is proposed that is characterized by (1) definition of the North Atlantic fit by matching of marginal offsets (fracture zones) along the opposing margins, (2) a South Atlantic fit that is tighter than the BuIlard fit and that is achieved by treating Africa as two plates astride the Benue Trough and related structures during the Cretaceous, (3) complete closure of the Proto-Atlantic Ocean between North and South America, accomplished by placing the Yucatan block between the Ouachita Mountains and Venezuela, (4) a proposed Hercynian suture zone that separates zones of foreland thrusting from zones of arc-related magmatic activity; to the northwest of this suture lie the Chortis block and Mexico and most of North America, and to the southeast lie South America, the Yucatan Block, Florida and Africa, and (5) satisfaction of paleomagmatic data from North America, South America, and Africa. Beginning with the proposed reconstruction, the relative motion history of South America with respect of North America is defined by using the finite difference method. Within the framework provided by the proposed relative motion history, an evolutionary model for the development of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region is outlined in a series of 13 plate boundary reconstructions at time intervals from the Jurassic to the present. The model includes (1) formation of the Gulf of Mexico by 140 Ma, (2) Pacific provenance of the Caribbean plate through the North America-South America gap during Cretaceous time, (3) Paleocene-Early Eocene back arc spreading origin for the Yucatan Basin, whereby Cuba is the frontal arc and the Nicaragua Rise-Jamaica-Southern Hispaniola is the remnant arc, and (4) 1200 km of post-Eocene cumulative offset along both the Northern and Southern Caribbean Plate Boundary Zones, allowing large-scale eastward migration of the Caribbean plate with respect to the North and

  16. Gulf of Mexico production still recovering

    SciTech Connect

    Koen, A.D.

    1992-10-12

    This paper reports that the extent of damage caused by Hurricane Andrew to Gulf of Mexico oil and gas installations continues coming into focus. A preliminary tally by Minerals Management Service offers a reasonably complete summary of gulf production and pipeline systems damage detectable at the surface. MMS requires Outer Continental Shelf operators to inspect for underwater damage all platforms, pipelines, risers, and other structures within an 85 mile corridor along the path of Andrew's eye as it churned through the gulf. OCS operators have until Oct. 16 to submit plans for the Level II surveys.

  17. Jurassic platform development, northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, C.H. Jr.

    1987-05-01

    Triassic and Early Jurassic rifting set the stage for the subsequent development of carbonate platforms in the Late Jurassic. These platforms formed along the interior margins of salt basins separated from the main ancestral Gulf of Mexico by a series of positive features. A major sea level rise, after deposition of the Louann Salt (late Callovian), drowned the interior salt basins around the margins of the Gulf of Mexico, leading to an anoxic event. Organic-rich sediments of the lower Smackover were deposited as a basin-fill sequence, forming one of the major hydrocarbon source rocks of the region. As sea level rise slowed in the late Oxfordian, carbonate production began to catch up with sea level rise along the basin margins, leading to the initial development of a rimmed carbonate platform. The platform margin was marked by high-energy ooid grainstones, while crustacean pellet muds were deposited in the platform interior. A high-energy ooid-dominated platform (upper Smackover) developed in the late Oxfordian when sea level reached a standstill. During the subsequent Kimmeridgian sea level rise, a second rimmed carbonate platform, the Haynesville, was developed. During the initial rise, grainstones were deposited on the platform margin, while the interior was dominated by evaporites (Buckner) and siliciclastics. As sea level slowed and reached a standstill, the platform margin facies extended shoreward (Gilmer) and a high-energy platform, analogous to the upper Smackover, was formed. The Smackover and Haynesville platforms of the northwestern gulf show a parallel evolution in response to cyclic changes in Upper Jurassic sea level.

  18. 76 FR 54375 - Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange Beach, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-01

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Thunder on the Gulf, Gulf of Mexico, Orange... establishing a temporary safety zone for a portion of the Gulf of Mexico for the waters off Orange Beach... Mexico, south of Orange Beach, Alabama to occur from October 6, 2011 through October 9, 2011. This...

  19. Sulfur biogeochemistry of cold seeps in the Green Canyon region of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formolo, Michael J.; Lyons, Timothy W.

    2013-10-01

    Cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico provide a natural laboratory to study biogeochemical cycling of sulfur, carbon, and oxygen at hydrate- and hydrocarbon-rich deep marine settings with obvious additional relevance to studies of diverse modern and ancient seeps. Of particular interest are the sulfur isotope signatures of microbial sulfate reduction coupled to anaerobic oxidation of methane and other non-methane liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Whereas most of the published sulfur isotope data from cold seep systems pertain to pore-water species, our study integrates both solid and dissolved sulfur: acid-volatile sulfides (SAVS), pyrite (Spy), elemental sulfur (S°), dissolved sulfate and ΣH2S. Modeled and 35SO42- reduction rates and δ13C and δ18O data for authigenic carbonates are integrated within this sulfur framework. Our results indicate extreme variability over narrow spatial and temporal scales within short distances (meters) from active seeps. High rates of microbial sulfate reduction can lead to complete consumption of the sulfate within the upper few centimeters of burial, while meters away the sulfate profile shows little depletion. Such small-scale variability must reflect the structure and temporal dynamics of hydrocarbon migration in the presence of low amounts of background organic matter. Our past work demonstrated that electron donors other than methane drive significant levels of microbial activity at these seeps, and very recent work has demonstrated that oxidation of higher chain volatile hydrocarbons can contribute to the high levels of microbial activity. These findings are consistent with our new results. Elevated concentrations of pyrite and diagenetic carbonate relative to background sediments are diagnostic of active seepage, yet the S isotopes tell more complex stories. Low levels of the transient, 'instantaneous' products of S cycling-AVS and S°-show high δ34S values that increase with depth. Most of the pyrite formation, however, seems

  20. NOAA tools to support CSC and LCC regional climate science priorities in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Marcy, D.; Robbins, K.; Shafer, M.; Stiller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is an active regional partner with the Department of Interior (DOI) in supplying and supporting the delivery of climate science and services. A primary mechanism for NOAA-DOI coordination at the regional scale is the Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) network, which is supported in part by DOI Climate Science Centers (CSC). Together, the CSCs and LCCs provide a framework to identify landscape-scale science and services priorities for conservation and management. As a key partner of the CSCs and an active member of many LCCs, NOAA is working to ensure its own regional product and service delivery efforts will help address these conservation and management challenges. Two examples of NOAA's regional efforts are highlighted here, with a focus on the coastal and interior geographies of the western Gulf of Mexico where NOAA partners with the South Central CSC and participates as a member of the Gulf Coast Prairie LCC. Along the Texas coastline, a sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts viewer, produced by NOAA's Coastal Services Center and available via its Digital Coast interface, allows constituents to visualize estimates of sea level rise, measures of uncertainty, flood frequencies, and environmental (e.g., marsh migration) and socioeconomic (e.g., tidal flooding of built environments) impacts. In the interior of Texas and Louisiana, NOAA's Southern Regional Climate Center is leading a consortium of partners in the development of a unified source of regional water reservoir information, including current conditions, a historical database, and web-based visualization tools to illustrate spatio-temporal variations in water availability to a broad array of hydrological, agricultural, and other customers. These two examples of NOAA products can, in their existing forms, support regional conservation and management priorities for CSCs and LCCs by informing vulnerability assessments and adaptation

  1. Gulf of Mexico Region - Highlighting Low-Lying Areas Derived from USGS Digital Elevation Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kosovich, John J.

    2008-01-01

    In support of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) disaster preparedness efforts, this map depicts a color shaded relief representation of the area surrounding the Gulf of Mexico. The first 30 feet of relief above mean sea level are displayed as brightly colored 5-foot elevation bands, which highlight low-elevation areas at a coarse spatial resolution. Standard USGS National Elevation Dataset (NED) 1 arc-second (nominally 30-meter) digital elevation model (DEM) data are the basis for the map, which is designed to be used at a broad scale and for informational purposes only. The NED data were derived from the original 1:24,000-scale USGS topographic map bare-earth contours, which were converted into gridded quadrangle-based DEM tiles at a constant post spacing (grid cell size) of either 30 meters (data before the mid-1990s data) or 10 meters (mid-1990s and later data). These individual-quadrangle DEMs were then converted to spherical coordinates (latitude/longitude decimal degrees) and edge-matched to ensure seamlessness. Approximately one-half of the area shown on this map has DEM source data at a 30-meter resolution, with the remaining half consisting of 10-meter contour-derived DEM data or higher-resolution LIDAR data. Areas below sea level typically are surrounded by levees or some other type of flood-control structures. State and county boundary, hydrography, city, and road layers were modified from USGS National Atlas data downloaded in 2003. The NED data were downloaded in 2005.

  2. GULF OF MEXICO HYPOXIA MONITORING AND MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Greene, Richard M. and Russell G. Kreis. In press. Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Monitoring and Modeling (Abstract). To be presented at the EPA Science Forum: Healthy Communities and Ecosystems, 1-3 June 2004, Washington, DC. 1 p. (ERL,GB R990).

    Oxygen-depleted or hypoxic bottom...

  3. 75 FR 12700 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Inseason Action to Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... FR 250), NMFS announced that the non-sandbar LCS fishery for the Gulf of Mexico region for the 2010... Species; Inseason Action to Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non-Sandbar Large Coastal Shark Fishery... coastal sharks (LCS) in the Gulf of Mexico region. This action is necessary because the quota for the...

  4. SAR observations in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheres, David

    1992-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico (GOM) exhibits a wealth of energetic ocean features; they include the Loop Current with velocities of about 2 m/s and strong shear fronts, mesoscale eddies, double vortices, internal waves, and the outflow of the 'Mighty Mississippi' river. These energetic features can have a strong impact on the economies of the states surrounding the Gulf. Large fisheries, oil and gas production as well as pollution transport are relevant issues. These circulation features in the Gulf are invisible to conventional IR and visible satellite imagery during the Summer months due to cloud cover and uniform surface temperatures. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery of the Gulf does penetrate the cloud cover and shows a rich assembly of features there year-round. Below are preliminary results from GOM SAR imagery taken by SEASAT in 1978 and by the AIRSAR program in 1991.

  5. 77 FR 62209 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-12

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Amendment 38 AGENCY.... ACTION: Notice of availability; request for comments. SUMMARY: NMFS announces that the Gulf of Mexico... for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (FMP) for review, approval, and......

  6. ESTABLISHING A NATURE CONSERVANCY GULF OF MEXICO INITIATIVE MX974946

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Conservancy will initiate a three-year pilot program to create a Gulf of Mexico Initiative within TNC to coordinate and enhance site-based conservation work at priority Gulf coastal sites. TNC would hire an ecologist to serve as the director of TNC's Gulf of Mexico Initiative...

  7. ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF ESTUARIES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico is a vast natural resource that encompasses the coastal areas of western Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas, as well as a portion of Mexico. Many estuaries flow into the Gulf of Mexico and serve as nursery grounds for fish, habitat for a wide va...

  8. Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Virginia H

    2010-01-01

    Since 1985, scientists have been documenting a hypoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico each year. The hypoxic zone, an area of low dissolved oxygen that cannot support marine life, generally manifests itself in the spring. Since marine species either die or flee the hypoxic zone, the spread of hypoxia reduces the available habitat for marine species, which are important for the ecosystem as well as commercial and recreational fishing in the Gulf. Since 2001, the hypoxic zone has averaged 16,500 km{sup 2} during its peak summer months, an area slightly larger than the state of Connecticut, and ranged from a low of 8,500 km{sup 2} to a high of 22,000 km{sup 2}. To address the hypoxia problem, the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force (or Task Force) was formed to bring together representatives from federal agencies, states, and tribes to consider options for responding to hypoxia. The Task Force asked the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy to conduct a scientific assessment of the causes and consequences of Gulf hypoxia through its Committee on Environment and Natural Resources (CENR). In 2000 the CENR completed An Integrated Assessment: Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (or Integrated Assessment), which formed the scientific basis for the Task Force's Action Plan for Reducing, Mitigating, and Controlling Hypoxia in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (Action Plan, 2001). In its Action Plan, the Task Force pledged to implement ten management actions and to assess progress every 5 years. This reassessment would address the nutrient load reductions achieved, the responses of the hypoxic zone and associated water quality and habitat conditions, and economic and social effects. The Task Force began its reassessment in 2005. In 2006 as part of the reassessment, USEPA's Office of Water, on behalf of the Task Force, requested that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Science Advisory Board (SAB) convene an independent panel to

  9. 76 FR 41723 - Atlantic Highly Migratory Species; Inseason Action To Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... December 8, 2010 (75 FR 76302), NMFS announced that the non- sandbar LCS fishery for the Gulf of Mexico... Species; Inseason Action To Close the Commercial Gulf of Mexico Non-Sandbar Large Coastal Shark Fishery... large coastal sharks (LCS) in the Gulf of Mexico region. This action is necessary because the quota...

  10. Deep Eddies in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furey, H. H.; Bower, A. S.; Perez-Brunius, P.; Hamilton, P.

    2014-12-01

    A major Lagrangian program is currently underway to map the deep (1500-2500 m) circulation of the entire Gulf of Mexico. Beginning in 2011, more than 120 acoustically tracked RAFOS floats have been released in the eastern, central and western Gulf, many in pairs and triplets. Most floats are programmed to drift for two years, obtaining position fixes and temperature/pressure measurements three times daily. More than 80 floats have completed their missions, and results from the trajectories will be described with a focus on mesoscale eddying behavior. In particular, the first-ever observations of deep energetic anticyclonic eddies (possibly lenses) forming at and separating from a northeastward-flowing boundary current west of Campeche Bank will be discussed. The existence of these eddies has major implications for exchange between the continental slope and interior Gulf. The project is being supported by the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM).

  11. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  12. Crustal Deformation in the Southwestern Gulf of Mexico: Underthrusting of the Gulf of Mexico beneath Tehuantepec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Gerardo; Aguilar, Sergio

    2016-04-01

    An array of 45 broad band sensors were installed along the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in southeastern. This experiment, called VEOX, was implemented on August 2007 to March 2009. Data were registered continuously during the whole period. In order to search in the seismic records of the data obtained for crustal events in the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, To this purpose, an STA/LTA algorithm was designed to detect earthquakes with S-P times indicating they occurred close the seismic stations, at crustal or upper mantle depths. During the 18 months that the experiment lasted, about 40 crustal earthquakes were recorded in more than three stations, allowing us to determine a hypo central location. All earthquakes occurring at depths greater than 120 km, within the subjected slab, were discarded. The majority of this crustal or upper mantle activity occurred in the northern part of the Isthmus, along the coast of the Gulf of Mexico or just inland from it. No velocity model exists in the area. Therefore, we tested three different velocity models, including one obtained in an adjacent region and based on seismic refraction data. One of these three models rendered the more stable solutions and smaller errors in the hypocentral locations and was used as the local seismic velocity model. In order to improve the quality of the locations, we experimented using a double difference hypocentral algorithm (HYPODD). There was no noticeable improvement in the quality of the hypocenters using this technique. The best located events suggest a southwestern-dipping zone of seismic seismicity, deepening from the Gulf of Mexico towards the interior of the Isthmus of Tehuantepec. The focal mechanisms of the earthquakes indicate the maximum axis of compresion (P axis) is oriented nearly horizontally and in a southwest-northeast direction. These mechanisms are similar to those observed for earthquakes previously studied in the region on the basis of teleseismic data, such as the Mw 6.9, 29 August

  13. Seismic Activity in the Gulf of Mexico: a Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franco, S. I.; Canet, C.; Iglesias, A.; Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.

    2013-05-01

    The southwestern corner of Gulf of Mexico (around the northern Isthmus of Tehuantepec) is exposed to an intense deep (> 100 km) seismic activity caused by the subduction of the Cocos plate. Aside from this, the gulf has been considered as a zone of low or no-seismicity. However, a sparse shallow seismic activity is observed across the Gulf of Mexico; some of these earthquakes have been strongly felt (e.g. 23/05/2007 and 10/09/2006), and the Jaltipan, 1959 earthquake caused fatalities and severe destruction in central and southern Veracruz. In this work we analyze 5 relevant earthquakes that occurred since 2001. At the central Gulf of Mexico focal mechanisms show inverse faults oriented approximately NW-SE with dip near 45 degrees, suggesting a link to sediment loading and/or to salt tectonics. On the other hand, in the southwestern corner of the gulf we analyzed some clear examples of strike-slip faults and activity probably related to the Veracruz Fault. One anomalous earthquake, recorded in 2007 in the western margin of the gulf, shows a strike-slip mechanism indicating a transform regime probably related with the East Mexican Fault. The recent improvement of the Mexican Seismological broadband network have allowed to record small earthquakes distributed in and around the Gulf of Mexico. Although the intermediate and large earthquakes in the region are infrequent, the historic evidence indicates that the magnitudes could reach Mw~6.4. This fact could be taken in consideration to reassess the seismic hazard for oil and industrial infrastructure in the region.

  14. 77 FR 42251 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ...NMFS proposes regulations to implement management measures described in Amendment 34 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico (FMP) prepared by the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council). If implemented, this rule would remove the income qualification requirements for renewal of Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) commercial reef fish permits and increase......

  15. 78 FR 49440 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Red Snapper Management...). If implemented, this rule would increase the 2013 commercial and recreational quotas for red snapper in the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) reef fish fishery and re-open the red snapper recreational season...

  16. Regional variation in mercury and stable isotopes of red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) in the northern Gulf of Mexico, USA.

    PubMed

    Zapp Sluis, Michelle; Boswell, Kevin M; Chumchal, Matthew M; Wells, R J David; Soulen, Brianne; Cowan, James H

    2013-02-01

    The presence of total mercury (Hg) in fish tissue and the potential associated health risks has become a global concern in marine ecosystems. Few studies have examined basin-scale variation in Hg accumulation in marine ecosystems, and determining if Hg concentrations in fish tissue vary across marine ecosystems is a key monitoring question. The present study evaluated Hg concentrations in red snapper (Lutjanus campechanus) tissue across three regions of the northern Gulf of Mexico (Alabama, Louisiana, and Texas, USA) and between two habitat types (oil and gas platforms and nonplatforms) within each region. Nitrogen (δ(15)N), carbon (δ(13)C), and sulfur (δ(34)S) stable isotopes were used to investigate ecological differences that may affect Hg concentrations among regions and between habitats. Mercury concentrations in red snapper tissue were positively correlated with fish total length. Regional differences in Hg concentrations were significant, with fish collected from Alabama having the highest concentrations and fish collected from Louisiana having the lowest. No significant difference existed in Hg concentrations between habitats, suggesting that association with platforms may not be a significant factor contributing to red snapper Hg concentrations. While δ(15)N did not differ significantly among the three regions, Texas red snapper were more enriched in δ(34)S and depleted in δ(13)C compared with Alabama and Louisiana red snapper. Although the majority of red snapper collected in the present study had Hg concentrations below safe consumption guidelines, regional differences suggest that spatially explicit monitoring programs may be important for basin-wide assessments. PMID:23180665

  17. Climate Risk and Vulnerability in the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico Region: Interactions with Spatial Population and Land Cover Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R. S.; Levy, M.; Baptista, S.; Adamo, S.

    2010-12-01

    Vulnerability to climate variability and change will depend on dynamic interactions between different aspects of climate, land-use change, and socioeconomic trends. Measurements and projections of these changes are difficult at the local scale but necessary for effective planning. New data sources and methods make it possible to assess land-use and socioeconomic changes that may affect future patterns of climate vulnerability. In this paper we report on new time series data sets that reveal trends in the spatial patterns of climate vulnerability in the Caribbean/Gulf of Mexico Region. Specifically, we examine spatial time series data for human population over the period 1990-2000, time series data on land use and land cover over 2000-2009, and infant mortality rates as a proxy for poverty for 2000-2008. We compare the spatial trends for these measures to the distribution of climate-related natural disaster risk hotspots (cyclones, floods, landslides, and droughts) in terms of frequency, mortality, and economic losses. We use these data to identify areas where climate vulnerability appears to be increasing and where it may be decreasing. Regions where trends and patterns are especially worrisome include coastal areas of Guatemala and Honduras.

  18. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region oil and gas operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 23 June 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1992-11-10

    A Sampling and Analysis Plan was prepared and submitted to a Scientific Review Committee for comment. Substantial comments relative to study objectives, sampling design, and sampling periods coupled with the passage of Hurricane Andrew precluded the scheduled initiation of sampling at offshore and coastal sites (Tasks 3 -- Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), Heavy Metals, and Organics and 4 -- Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas). A proposed revised schedule has been prepared for Tasks 3 and 4. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gulf of Mexico Region), activities have involved identification and collection of the necessary data for the economic analysis. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Region Consumption and Use Patterns), activities have included near completion of the literature review and a reevaluation of the data collection efforts relative to the wholesaler, process plant, and restaurant components. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan), work has been delayed due to the Tasks 3 and 4 delay and cancellation of the annual US Minerals Management Service Gulf of Mexico Region Information Transfer Meeting.

  19. Regional resource depletion and industry activity: The case of oil and gas in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    Stable and declining oil and gas prices have changed the industry's price expectations and, along with depletion of promising exploration prospects, has resulted in reduced exploration. Even with intensive additional exploration, production in most U.S. areas is expected to decline. What does this imply for the drilling and petroleum industry suppliers in particular regions? How should planners in government and the private sector project and incorporate the consequences of these changes in their strategies? This paper answers these questions for the industry operating in the offshore Gulf of Mexico. Future oil and gas production, as well as demand for offshore drilling and production facilities, are shown to depend on the size distribution of undiscovered fields, their associated production costs, and oil and gas prices. Declining well productivity is a consequence of development of progressively smaller fields so that long-run drilling demand should not decline in proportion to the expected production decline. Calculations show a substantial payoff to the drilling industry, in terms of potential demand increases, if it can develop and implement cost reducing technologies. Implications of these results for other offshore producing areas such as the North Sea are also discussed. ?? 1986.

  20. ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF ESTUARIES IN THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The predominantly shallow estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico are ranked highest in the Nation in terms of water surface area, freshwater inflow, and wetlands area. Estuaries are an ecologically and economically valuable resource in the Gulf of Mexico. The U.S. Environmental Protecti...

  1. 75 FR 28760 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ...In accordance with the framework procedures for adjusting management measures of the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf FMP) and the Fishery Management Plan for the Shrimp Fishery of the South Atlantic region (South Atlantic FMP) NMFS provisionally recertifies two bycatch reduction devices (BRDs) and revises the construction and installation requirements......

  2. Gulf of Mexico data being collected

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This article was written to solicit information on geophysical well logs for the Gulf of Mexico which exhibited low resistivity in the reservoir. Because petroleum is normally a poor conductor of electricity, a low resistivity measurement in the reservoir will normally indicate water. However, as most petroleum geologists know, this is not always the case and should not be used as a sole decision maker in abandoning a well site. Therefore, this author solicits the readers to submit examples of pay zones in low resistivity reservoirs. The results will be published in a future text on this subject.

  3. 2013 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 7,316 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 18,900 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 13,400 to 24,200), the 7th largest reported and about the size of New Jersey. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 74.5 km3 (95% credible interval, 51.5 to 97.0), also the 7th largest on record.

  4. 2014 Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia Forecast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scavia, Donald; Evans, Mary Anne; Obenour, Dan

    2014-01-01

    The Gulf of Mexico annual summer hypoxia forecasts are based on average May total nitrogen loads from the Mississippi River basin for that year. The load estimate, recently released by USGS, is 4,761 metric tons per day. Based on that estimate, we predict the area of this summer’s hypoxic zone to be 14,000 square kilometers (95% credible interval, 8,000 to 20,000) – an “average year”. Our forecast hypoxic volume is 50 km3 (95% credible interval, 20 to 77).

  5. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This...

  6. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This......

  7. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This......

  8. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This......

  9. 47 CFR 22.950 - Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Provision of service in the Gulf of Mexico... service in the Gulf of Mexico Service Area (GMSA) The GMSA has been divided into two areas for licensing purposes, the Gulf of Mexico Exclusive Zone (GMEZ) and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Zone (GMCZ). This...

  10. An oilspill risk analysis for the Gulf of Mexico outer continental shelf lease area; regional environmental impact statement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    LaBelle, R.P.

    1982-01-01

    An oilspill risk analysis was conducted for the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS)lease area region. Results of the analysis can be used to determine relative risks associated with oil production in different regions to be offered in OCS Lease Sales 72, 74, and 79. The analysis considered the probability of spill occurrences based on historical trends; likely movement of oil slicks based on a climatological model; and locations of major environmental resources which could be vulnerable to spilled oil. The times between spill occurrence and contact with resources were estimated to aid in estimating slick characteristics. Critical assumptions made for this particular analysis were (1) that oil exists in the lease area, and (2) that oil will be, found and produced from tracts sold in sales 72, 74, and 79. On the basis of a most likely resource estimate of 241 million barrels of oil to be produced over an 18-year production life from sales to be held in 1983 (sales 72, 74, 79), it was calculated that approximately one oilspill of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than 30 days is 41-percent. For a high resource estimate case of sales to be held in 1983, 717 million barrels are estimated to be produced over an 18-year production life with an 83-percent chance of one or more spills of 1,000 barrels or larger occurring and contacting land within 30 days. These results depend upon the routes and methods chosen to transport oil from OCS platforms to shore. Given a total development scenario in which 5.6 billion barrels of oil are estimated to be present and produced, it was calculated that 18 oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur over the 40-year production life of the proposed lease area. The estimated probability that one or more oilspills of 1,000 barrels or larger will occur and contact land after being at sea less than

  11. Nutrient Enrichment Drives Gulf of Mexico Hypoxia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesch, Donald F.; Boynton, Walter R.; Crowder, Larry B.; Diaz, Robert J.; Howarth, Robert W.; Mee, Laurence D.; Nixon, Scott W.; Rabalais, Nancy N.; Rosenberg, Rutger; Sanders, James G.; Scavia, Donald; Turner, R. Eugene

    2009-04-01

    During most summers over the past 30 years, bottom dissolved oxygen across a large area of the Louisiana and upper Texas continental shelf declined to concentrations too low (hypoxia) for most fish and large invertebrate animals to survive. This area is one of the best known “dead zones” proliferating around the world [Diaz and Rosenberg, 2008]. During July 2008, hypoxic bottom waters extended across 20,720 square kilometers (Figure 1), but they were probably even more extensive because winds from Hurricane Dolly mixed the waters off Texas before the survey could be completed. Increased inputs of nutrients (principally nitrogen and phosphorus) from the U.S. agricultural heartland within the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin (MARB) are implicated in the development and spread of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. Consequently, the causes of, and solutions for, hypoxia have been subjects of extensive debate and analysis. An integrated scientific assessment led to a 2001 Action Plan [Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, 2001] with a goal of reducing the area of the hypoxic zone to less than 5000 square kilometers by reducing nitrogen loading [Rabalais et al., 2007].

  12. Streamflow to the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Judd, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-four major streams discharging directly to the Gulf of Mexico and having drainage areas exceeding 200 square miles have been identified in the United States. Periods of record for daily values of streamflow and water quality are summarized for the lower reaches of each of these streams. Forty-four U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations along the Gulf Coast with at least 40 years of daily streamflow data also were identified. These stations include most of the major streams and comprise 95 percent of the drainage area to the Gulf from the United States. Temporal trends are determined for daily mean streamflow for selected long-term stations for each of three streamflow perspectives: mean, minimum daily mean, and maximum daily mean. Distributions of monthly streamflow are determined for each of the 44 long-term stations. Temporal trends in streamflow and variations in monthly streamflow distributions are related to factors that affect streamflow: precipitation, land use, with- drawals, reservoir operations, and other factors. Trends in streamflow and variations in streamflow distributions at many stations are coincident with expected changes in streamflow caused by these factors.

  13. Pre-breakup geology of the Gulf of Mexico-Caribbean: Its relation to Triassic and Jurassic rift systems of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Bartok, P. )

    1993-02-01

    A review of the pre-breakup geology of west-central Pangea, comprised of northern South America, Gulf of Mexico and West Africa, combined with a study of the Mesozoic rift trends of the region confirms a relation between the rift systems and the underlying older grain of deformation. The pre-breakup analysis focuses attention on the Precambrian, Early Paleozoic and Late Paleozoic tectonic events affecting the region and assumes a Pindell fit. Two Late Precambrian orogenic belts are observed in the west central Pangea. Along the northern South American margin and Yucatan a paleo northeast trending Pan-African aged fold belt is documented. A second system is observed along West Africa extending from the High Atlas to the Mauritanides and Rockelides. During the Late Paleozoic, renewed orogenic activity, associated with the Gondwana/Laurentia suture, affected large segments of west central Pangea. The general trend of the system is northeast-southwest and essentially parallels the Gyayana Shield, West African, and eastern North American cratons. Mesozoic rifting closely followed either the Precambrian trends or the Late Paleozoic orogenic belt. The Triassic component focuses along the western portions of the Gulf of Mexico continuing into eastern Mexico and western South America. The Jurassic rift trend followed along the separation between Yucatan and northern South America. At Lake Maracaibo the Jurassic rift system eventually overlaps the Triassic rifts. The Jurassic rift resulted in the [open quotes]Hispanic Corridor[close quotes] that permitted Tethyan and Pacific marine faunas to mix at a time when the Gulf of Mexico underwent continental sedimentation.

  14. Sea level rise in Louisiana and Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsey, K.; Penland, S. )

    1989-09-01

    Data from two tide-gage networks in Louisiana and the northern Gulf of Mexico were analyzed to determine local and regional trends in relative sea level rise. The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) maintains a network of 83 tide-gage stations throughout coastal Louisiana. Of these, 20 have records for two lunar nodal cycles or more, and some date back to 1933. The authors used the USACE data set to determine the local and regional character of relative sea level rise in Louisiana. The National ocean Survey (NOS) maintains nine tide gage stations throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico in Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. All of the records of these stations exceed two lunar nodal cycles, and some date back to 1908. The authors used the NOS data set to determine the character of relative sea level rise throughout the northern Gulf of Mexico. This investigation updates and extends the previous systematic regional tide gage analysis (which covered 1908-1983) to 1988.

  15. 77 FR 21955 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    .... The final rule for Amendment 5 to the FMP for the Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico (56 FR 22827..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Red Snapper Management... management measures described in a regulatory amendment to the Fishery Management Plan for the Reef...

  16. Florida lineament: Key tectonic element of eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Christenson, G. )

    1990-09-01

    The origin of the Florida lineament, a major basement lineament that strikes northwest-southeast across the West Florida Shelf and southern Florida, is a key to the history of the Gulf of Mexico. Regional magnetic and gravity trends are truncated along the Florida lineament. New geologic data from recent wells on the West Florida Shelf and magnetic anomaly data indicate that pre-Mesozoic basement terranes on opposite sides of the Florida lineament were contiguous prior to Triassic-Jurassic volcanism and exhibit only minimal lateral offset across the Florida lineament at present. The lack of major lateral offset of pre-Mesozoic basement terranes across the Florida lineament and lithologic and geophysical data suggest that the lineament represents a Triassic-Jurassic extensional rift margin. The Florida lineament is interpreted to be the southeastward continuation of the well-documented peripheral fault system, which delineates the rifted continental margin of the northern Gulf basin. The continuation of the peripheral fault system along the Florida lineament suggests that the tectonostratigraphic terranes associated with the Mesozoic producing trends of the northern Gulf basin may extend southeastward along the Florida lineament. The interpretation of the Florida lineament as an extensional rift margin places significant constraints on any tectonic model of the Gulf of Mexico region. A tectonic interpretation consistent with the constraints suggests that the West Florida Shelf and southern Florida region formed as the result of Triassic-Jurassic extension around a pole of rotation in central Florida. The central Florida pole of rotation is intermediate to the poles of rotation counterclockwise of Yucatan out of the northern Gulf basin. This suggests that the region south of the Florida lineament underwent extension synchronous with the rotation of the Yucatan block.

  17. 76 FR 54727 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Requirements Spiny Lobster Amendment 1 (July 15, 1987, 52 FR 22659) initially implemented the Federal spiny... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... Fishery Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic (FMP)...

  18. NASA's Contributions to the Gulf of Mexico Alliance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glorioso, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph document reviews the contribution that NASA has made and the plans for future missions that will assist the mission of the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA). Specific reference to the work of the Stennis Space Center is reviewed. Some of the projects are: Coastal Online Assessment and Synthesis Tool (COAST), Regional Sediment Management, Coral Reef Early Warning System, Harmful Algal Bloom, Hypoxia, Land-Use and Land-Cover (LULC) Change from 1974-2008 around Mobile Bay, AL, Satellite Estimation of Suspended Particulate Loads in and around Mobile Bay, AL, Estimating Relative Nutrient Contributions of Agriculture and Forests Using MODIS Time Series, Coastal Marsh Monitoring for Persistent Saltwater Intrusion, Standardized Remote Sensing PRoduct for Water Clarity estimation within Gulf of Mexico Coastal Waters.

  19. Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and central and eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-05-01

    Three Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, and in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico. These trends are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps, reservoirs, and hydrocarbon types. The source for the Jurassic hydrocarbons is Smackover algal mudstones. The Jurassic oil trend includes the area north of the regional peripheral fault systems in the tri-state area, and extends into the area north of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs and salt anticlines, with Smackover grainstones and dolostones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones as reservoirs. This trend has potential for Jurassic oil accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic oil and gas-condensate trend includes the onshore area between the regional peripheral fault systems and Wiggins arch and extends into the area of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs, salt related anticlines, and extensional faults. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Haynesville carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Smackover grainstones, packstones, dolostones, and marine sandstones, and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones serve as reservoirs. This trend contains most of the Jurassic fields in the eastern Gulf coastal plain. The trend has high potential for significant petroleum accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic deep natural gas trend includes the onshore area south of the Wiggins arch and extends into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf. Traps are faulted salt anticlines with basement highs as potential traps. Cotton Valley deltaic-strandplain sandstones and Norphlet eolian sandstones are the reservoirs. Several gas discoveries below 20,000 ft have been made in this trend in Mississippi and offshore Alabama. The trend has excellent potential for major gas accumulations in coastal Alabama and central Gulf of Mexico.

  20. Measuring Capacity for Resilience among Coastal Counties of the US Northern Gulf of Mexico Region

    PubMed Central

    Reams, Margaret A.; Lam, Nina S. N.; Baker, Ariele

    2016-01-01

    Many have voiced concern about the long-term survival of coastal communities in the face of increasingly intense storms and sea level rise. In this study we select indicators of key theoretical concepts from the social-ecological resilience literature, aggregate those indicators into a resilience-capacity index, and calculate an index score for each of the 52 coastal counties of Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. Building upon Cutter’s Social Vulnerability Index work [1], we use Factor Analysis to combine 43 variables measuring demographics, social capital, economic resources, local government actions, and environmental conditions within the counties. Then, we map the counties’ scores to show the spatial distribution of resilience capacities. The counties identified as having the highest resilience capacities include the suburban areas near New Orleans, Louisiana and Tampa, Florida, and the growing beach-tourist communities of Alabama and central Florida. Also, we examine whether those counties more active in oil and gas development and production, part of the region’s “energy coast”, have greater capacity for resilience than other counties in the region. Correlation analyses between the resilience-capacity index scores and two measures of oil and gas industry activity (total employment and number of business establishments within five industry categories) yielded no statistically significant associations. By aggregating a range of important contextual variables into a single index, the study demonstrates a useful approach for the more systematic examination and comparison of exposure, vulnerability and capacity for resilience among coastal communities.

  1. HIGH CYANOBACTERIAL ABUNDANCE IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic phytoplankton comprise a wide variety of taxa spanning more than 2 orders of magnitude in size, yet studies of estuarine phytoplankton often overlook the picoplankton, particularly chroococcoid cyanobacteria (c.f. Synechocococcus). Three Gulf of Mexico estuaries (Apalachi...

  2. Phytoplankton and sediments in Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Affected both by terrestrial factors like agriculture, deforestation, and erosion, and by marine factors like salinity levels, ocean temperature and water pollution, coastal environments are the dynamic interface between land and sea. In this MODIS image from January 15, 2002, the Gulf of Mexico is awash in a mixture of phytoplankton and sediment. Tan-colored sediment is flowing out into the Gulf from the Mississippi River, whose floodplain cuts a pale, wide swath to the right of center in the image, and also from numerous smaller rivers along the Louisiana coast (center). Mixing with the sediment are the multi-colored blue and green swirls that reveal the presence of large populations of marine plants called phytoplankton. Phytoplankton populations bloom and then fade, and these cycles affect fish and mammals-including humans-higher up the food chain. Certain phytoplankton are toxic to both fish and humans, and coastal health departments must monitor ecosystems carefully, often restricting fishing or harvesting of shellfish until the blooms have subsided.

  3. Hydrocarbon flux from natural deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Andrew J.; Flemings, Peter B.; Fulton, Patrick M.

    2014-06-01

    High salinities and high temperatures at the seafloor record the upward flow of water and hydrocarbons from depth at natural vents in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. We present a multiphase heat- and solute-transport model, in which water supplied from depth transports heat and salt, and hydrocarbon transports heat. We show that there is a unique water and hydrocarbon flux that simulates the observed salinity and temperature. We estimate the hydrocarbon flux to be 3.2-15×104 t yr and 1.8-8.0×104 t yr from two vents at lease blocks MC852/853 and GB425. These fluxes are 1-4 orders of magnitude greater than previous estimates from individual deepwater vents. If these results are extrapolated to the entire Gulf of Mexico, then we estimate the regional hydrocarbon flux to be at least 100× greater than previous estimates and 14-120% of the hydrocarbon flux from the Macondo oil spill. Large natural seepage may inoculate marine basins such as the Gulf of Mexico from oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout by sustaining populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

  4. Sperm whales (Physeter catodon) in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Collum, L.A.; Fritts, T.H.

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of the sperm whale, Physeter catodon, was documented in the Gulf of Mexico during 1979 to 1981 using regular aerial surveys and opportunistic sightings from ships. Most sightings were in the western Gulf of Mexico in deep waters near the edge of the continental shelf. A total of 47 adults and 12 young animals was sighted in groups containing from one to 14 animals.

  5. HABSOS INTEGRATED CASE STUDY FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project is part of a Harmful Algal Bloom Observing System Pilot Project for which the Gulf of Mexico Program is the coordinator. The Program office along with the EPA Gulf Breeze Laboratory will be working with the NOAA National Coastal Data Development Center, the National...

  6. LANDSCAPE ECOLOGY ASSESSMENT OF THE TENSAS RIVER BASIN, MISSISSIPPI RIVER DELTA REGION, AND GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    A group of landscape ecological indicators were applied to biophysical data masked to the Tensas River Basin. The indicators were use to identify and prioritize sources of nutrients in a
    Mississippi River System sub-basin. Remotely sensed data were used for change detection a...

  7. Carbon Sequestration in Wetland Soils of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Coastal Region

    EPA Science Inventory

    Coastal wetlands play an important but complex role in the global carbon cycle, contributing to the ecosystem service of greenhouse gas regulation through carbon sequestration. Although coastal wetlands occupy a small percent of the total US land area, their potential for carbon...

  8. Metals in Bone Tissue of Antillean Manatees from the Gulf of Mexico and Chetumal Bay, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Romero-Calderón, Ana G; Morales-Vela, Benjamin; Rosíles-Martínez, René; Olivera-Gómez, León D; Delgado-Estrella, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Concentrations of seven metals (As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Pb, Ni, and Zn) were analyzed in 33 bone tissue samples of Antillean manatees (Trichechus manatus manatus) found dead in lagoons and rivers of Tabasco and Campeche in the Gulf of Mexico and Chetumal Bay in the Caribbean region. The concentrations of Cr, Cu, Pb, and Zn were significantly different between regions, with greater levels found in the Gulf of Mexico group than in the Mexican Caribbean group (p < 0.05). Pb concentrations differed significantly between adults and calves. No differences were observed between sexes. Metal concentrations detected in the manatee bones were higher than most of those reported for bones in other marine mammals around the world. Future studies are necessary to establish whether the metal concentrations represent a risk to the health of the species. PMID:26519079

  9. 76 FR 18723 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Southeast Region Gulf of Mexico Red Snapper IFQ...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-05

    ... information collection instrument and instructions should be directed to Rich Malinowski, (727) 824-5305 or Rich.Malinowski@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract This request is for an extension of...

  10. 76 FR 80343 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... Plan and Amendment 11 to the Spiny Lobster Fishery Management Plan in the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Regions. DATES: Public hearings for Amendment 35 (Reef Fish) and Amendment 11 (Spiny Lobster) will... removing the fixed closed season. Spiny Lobster Amendment 11 The Gulf Council is holding two...

  11. 76 FR 59102 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Spiny Lobster Tail-Separation Permit Requirements Spiny Lobster Amendment 1 (July 15, 1987, 52 FR 22659... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and South... to implement Amendment 10 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

  12. Gulf of Mexico Oceanography Atlas available

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The second full-color volume of the Atlas Oceanogáfico del Golfo de México has recently been published by the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas of México (GEO-IIE) (see Eos, Feb. 20, 1990, for announcement of volume 1). This second of an eight-volume series describes the hydrography, baroclinic flows and transports, water masses distributions, and the kinematic properties of anticyclonic-cyclonic ring pairs (modons) of the central and western Gulf of Mexico (26°-20°40‧N, 97°40‧-93°W). The data presented and analyzed in this volume were collected during the Argos 86-1 oceanographic cruise conducted by the GEO-IIE aboard the R/V Justo Sierra during October and November 1986. Authors of the volume are Víctor M. V. Vidal, Francisco V. Vidal, and Abel Hernández. It has 16 chapters in 715 pages, including 248 full-page color plates and 35 tables.

  13. Tectonic evolution of the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean

    SciTech Connect

    Pindell, J.L.; Barrett, S.F.; Dewey, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    The authors propose a three-phase geologic-kinematic model for the evolution of the Gulf of Mexico/Caribbean region starting with a detailed Late Paleozoic (Alleghenian) plate reconstruction and using a revised relative-motion history for North America (NOAM) and South American (SOAM). The completely closed initial reconstruction incorporates the effects of Jurassic syn-rift crustal extension, an improved Equatorial Atlantic fit, and the post-rift accretion and deformation in northwestern South America. The Yucatan block and western Bahamas continental basement occupied the area of the present Gulf of Mexico. The three phases of evolution are: MIDDLE JURASSIC-CHAMPANIAN; SOAM migrated east-southeast from NOAM, and the Yucatan block rotated 43/sup 0/CCW about a pole in northern Florida reaching its present position by the Berriasian. Carbonate shelves formed along the rifted margins of the Gulf of Mexico and proto-Caribbean. Early Cretaceous crust of the Caribbean Plate (CARIB) formed in the Pacific Basin and was intruded by medial Cretaceous basalts (B'') somewhere to the west of South America. CARIB partially collided with southern Yucatan and northwest SOAM in the Late Cretaceous, and with the Bahamas in the late Paleocene-Middle Eocene. POST-MIDDLE EOCENE: Minor west-northwest NOAM-SOAM convergence occurred along preexisting Atlantic fracture zones. CARIB has migrated eastward by 1200 km, subducting proto-Caribbean crust and forming the Lesser Antilles arc. The original Greater Antilles-Aves Ridge arc has been dissected by anastomosing transforms connecting the Middle American and Lesser Antilles trenches.

  14. 77 FR 2991 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning Area (CPA), Oil and Gas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Central Planning... Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) of a Final Supplemental Environmental... Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard (MS 5410), New Orleans, Louisiana...

  15. 78 FR 14116 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Planning Area (EPA) Lease Sale 225...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-04

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Eastern Planning Area (EPA) Lease Sale 225 and 226, Oil and Gas Lease Sales AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, Public Information Office (GM 250I),...

  16. 78 FR 21969 - Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning Area (WPA) Lease Sale 233...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Gulf of Mexico (GOM), Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western Planning... MMAA104000 AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA... Management, Gulf of Mexico OCS Region, Public Information Office (GM 250G), 1201 Elmwood Park Boulevard,...

  17. 77 FR 59185 - Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee; Notice of Charter Renewal AGENCY: Environmental... Committee Act (FACA), 5 U.S.C. App.2, the Gulf of Mexico Citizen Advisory Committee (GMCAC) is a necessary... Mexico. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: LaKeshia Robertson, Designated Federal Officer, Gulf of...

  18. 78 FR 62587 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting of the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold a meeting of the Ad Hoc Red...

  19. Crust and mantle of the gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, G.W.

    1972-01-01

    A SEEMING paradox has puzzled investigators of the crustal structure of the Gulf of Mexico since Ewing et al.1 calculated that a unit area of the rather thick crust in the gulf contains less mass than does a combination of the crust and enough of the upper mantle to make a comparable thickness in the Atlantic Ocean. They also noted that the free-air gravity of the gulf is essentially normal and fails by a large factor to be low enough to reflect the mass difference that they calculated. We propose a solution to this problem. ?? 1972 Nature Publishing Group.

  20. 78 FR 61842 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC912 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Meeting of the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council) will hold meetings of the: Mackerel,...

  1. 78 FR 69649 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC992 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa,...

  2. 75 FR 72790 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA056 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Blvd, Kenner, LA 70062; telephone: (504) 467-5611. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  3. 77 FR 58527 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC245 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...; telephone: (813) 874-1234. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois......

  4. 76 FR 16385 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA313 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Beach, AL 36561; telephone: (251) 981- 9811. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management...

  5. 76 FR 45516 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA608 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico...; telephone: (512) 323-5466. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North...

  6. 76 FR 56171 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA692 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...) 348-1630. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  7. 75 FR 14427 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV47 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico...., Galveston, TX 77551. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois...

  8. 76 FR 37064 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA515 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico.... Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa,......

  9. 77 FR 8810 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB007 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... 39501. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  10. 76 FR 60807 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA720 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene a meeting of the Standing, Special Shrimp and... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  11. 75 FR 7444 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU46 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  12. 78 FR 12294 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC516 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico..., March 12, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management...

  13. 75 FR 11846 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV05 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  14. 76 FR 19750 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA357 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  15. 75 FR 43147 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX75 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  16. 77 FR 58526 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC244 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public hearings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., 2012 at eight locations throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The public hearings will begin at 6 p.m....

  17. 77 FR 25144 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  18. 75 FR 80041 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA098 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management.... on Wednesday, January 12, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico...

  19. 75 FR 19941 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XV87 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... than 2 p.m. Thursday, May 6, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico......

  20. 75 FR 39495 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX42 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  1. 76 FR 26252 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA415 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois...

  2. 78 FR 9372 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC488 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois...

  3. 75 FR 79341 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA095 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  4. 75 FR 7444 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU45 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607....

  5. 75 FR 43148 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX76 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  6. 78 FR 14980 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-08

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC540 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The scoping meetings will begin at 6 p.m. and will conclude no later than 9...

  7. 78 FR 77105 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD037 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico..., 2014 at nine locations throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The Council will also host a webinar...

  8. 77 FR 39998 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council...; telephone: (985) 787-2163. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North...

  9. 75 FR 69921 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA027 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Blvd., Webster, TX 77598; telephone: (281) 332-7952. Council Address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  10. 75 FR 32747 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XW86 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... the webinar on the Gulf of Mexico's website. Directions on how to register will be posted one...

  11. 76 FR 13130 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA281 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Tuesday, March 29, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  12. 78 FR 59656 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC892 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...; telephone: (956) 761-6511. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North...

  13. 75 FR 63146 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ65 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203...

  14. 78 FR 38951 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC735 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., New Orleans, LA 70130; telephone: (504) 561-0500. ] Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  15. 76 FR 53416 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA666 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... accessible via Internet. Please go to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's Web site at......

  16. 77 FR 42699 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC115 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public hearings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... throughout the Gulf of Mexico. The public hearings will begin at 6 p.m. and will conclude no later than 9......

  17. 76 FR 80889 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA894 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...) 348-1630. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  18. 78 FR 25955 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC656 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council,...

  19. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  20. 78 FR 78824 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XD051 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... register. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  1. 76 FR 58783 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA719 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607....

  2. 76 FR 4636 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (Council); Public Meetings; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA158 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council.... SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene public meetings. Additional items have... 39501. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  3. 75 FR 81585 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA114 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  4. 76 FR 41765 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA570 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  5. 76 FR 57023 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA702 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  6. 76 FR 37063 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA514 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...., Wednesday, July 13, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  7. 77 FR 42698 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC114 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois...

  8. 76 FR 28733 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA445 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The webinar will be accessible via Internet. Please go to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  9. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  10. 75 FR 39495 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XX44 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Thursday, July 29, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery...

  11. 76 FR 60807 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA720 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council..., 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management...

  12. 76 FR 37328 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-27

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA519 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois......

  13. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  14. 76 FR 41766 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA569 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Fisheries Service (NMFS). ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Migratory Pelagic Resources in the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico and Amendment 32 to the Reef Fish...

  15. 76 FR 58783 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA720 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois...

  16. 77 FR 76473 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC418 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery...: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's office located at 2203...

  17. 76 FR 81480 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA908 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery.... Please go to the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's Web site at www.gulfcouncil.org...

  18. 50 CFR 600.1310 - New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing Quota Referenda.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual... PROVISIONS Limited Access Privilege Programs § 600.1310 New England and Gulf of Mexico Individual Fishing... Fishery Management Council (NEFMC) and the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council (GMFMC)....

  19. 77 FR 16539 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB098 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL...

  20. 78 FR 25255 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC649 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 N. Lois Avenue, Suite...

  1. 77 FR 41376 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings...), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council's Web site at www.gulfcouncil.org for instructions....

  2. 78 FR 63966 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC930 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... meeting will be held at the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite...

  3. 78 FR 31519 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC697 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Mexico Fishery Management Council will convene a meeting of the Coastal Migratory Pelagics (CMP) Advisory... posted to the Gulf Council's Web site. Council address: Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council,...

  4. 78 FR 42755 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Hearings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC760 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; public hearings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... Gulf of Mexico. The public hearings will begin at 6 p.m. and will conclude no later than 9 p.m....

  5. Dispersion of a tracer in the deep Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledwell, James R.; He, Ruoying; Xue, Zuo; DiMarco, Steven F.; Spencer, Laura J.; Chapman, Piers

    2016-02-01

    A 25 km streak of CF3SF5 was released on an isopycnal surface approximately 1100 m deep, and 150 m above the bottom, along the continental slope of the northern Gulf of Mexico, to study stirring and mixing of a passive tracer. The location and depth of the release were near those of the deep hydrocarbon plume resulting from the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil well rupture. The tracer was sampled between 5 and 12 days after release, and again 4 and 12 months after release. The tracer moved along the slope at first but gradually moved into the interior of the Gulf. Diapycnal spreading of the patch during the first 4 months was much faster than it was between 4 and 12 months, indicating that mixing was greatly enhanced over the slope. The rate of lateral homogenization of the tracer was much greater than observed in similar experiments in the open ocean, again possibly enhanced near the slope. Maximum concentrations found in the surveys had fallen by factors of 104, 107, and 108, at 1 week, 4 months, and 12 months, respectively, compared with those estimated for the initial tracer streak. A regional ocean model was used to simulate the tracer field and help interpret its dispersion and temporal evolution. Model-data comparisons show that the model simulation was able to replicate statistics of the observed tracer distribution that would be important in assessing the impact of oil releases in the middepth Gulf.

  6. Consequences of Chixculub Impact for the Tectonic and Geodynamic Evolution of the Gulf of Mexico North Carribean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rangin, C.; Crespy, A.; Martinez-Reyes, J.

    2013-05-01

    The debate for Pacific exotic origin versus in situ inter American plate Atlantic origin of the Caribbean plate is active in the scientific community since decades. Independently of the origin of this plate, its fast motion towards the east at a present rate of 2cm/yr is accepted to have been initiated during the early-most Cenozoic. The Paleocene is a key period in the global evolution of Central America mainly marked also by the Chicxulub multiring meteor impact in Yucatan. We question here the genetic relationship between this impact event and the incipient tectonic escape of the Caribbean plate. The mostly recent published models suggest this impact has affected the whole crust down to the Moho, the upper mantle being rapidly and considerably uplifted. The crust was then fragmented 600km at least from the point of impact, and large circular depressions were rapidly filled by clastic sediments from Cantarell to Western Cuba via Chiapas and Belize. North of the impact, the whole Gulf of Mexico was affected by mass gravity sliding, initiated also during the Paleocene in Texas, remaining active in this basin up to present time. South of the impact, in the Caribbean plate, the Yucatan basin was rapidly opened, indicating a fast escape of the crustal material towards the unique free boundary, the paleo-Antilles subduction zone. Shear waves velocity data below the Caribbean plate suggest this crustal tectonic escape was enhanced by the fast eastward flowing mantle supporting a fragmented and stretched crust. The proposed model suggests Chicxulub impact (but also the hypothetic Beata impact) have fragmented brittle crust, then easily drifted towards the east. This could explain the Paleogene evolution of the Caribbean plate largely stretched during its early evolution. Geologically, this evolution could explain the absence of evident Paleogene oblique subduction along the Caribbean plate northern and southern margins, marked only by Mid Cretaceous dragged volcanic

  7. Global climate change impacts on coastal ecosystems in the Gulf of Mexico: considerations for integrated coastal management

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Day, John W.; Yáñez-Arancibia, Alejandro; Cowan, James H.; Day, Richard H.; Twilley, Robert R.; Rybczyk, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Global climate change is important in considerations of integrated coastal management in the Gulf of Mexico. This is true for a number of reasons. Climate in the Gulf spans the range from tropical to the lower part of the temperate zone. Thus, as climate warms, the tropical temperate interface, which is currently mostly offshore in the Gulf of Mexico, will increasingly move over the coastal zone of the northern and eastern parts of the Gulf. Currently, this interface is located in South Florida and around the US-Mexico border in the Texas-Tamaulipas region. Maintaining healthy coastal ecosystems is important because they will be more resistant to climate change.

  8. Perspective on eastern migration studies: stopover ecology of migratory landbirds in the Gulf Coast region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrow, W.C., Jr.; Johnson Randall, L.A.

    2004-01-01

    Millions of Nearctic-Neotropical landbirds move through the coastal habitats of the Gulf of Mexico each spring and autumn as they migrate across and around the Gulf. Migration routes in the Gulf region are not static and they shift year to year and season to season according to prevailing wind patterns. Using data from field and radar studies, we mapped patterns of migration movement and landfall in the Gulf of Mexico region. Map categories include coastal areas where migrant numbers are consistently high, consistently common, sporadically common-abundant, sporadically common, or sparse. Weather surveillance radar data indicates that habitats along the Northwest Gulf Coast are consistently used each year.

  9. Binational collaboration to study Gulf of Mexico's harmful algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Inia; Hu, Chuanmin; Steidinger, Karen; Muller-Karger, Frank; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Wolny, Jennifer; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Santamaria-del-Angel, Eduardo; Tafoya-del-Angel, Fausto; Alvarez-Torres, Porfirio; Herrera Silveira, Jorge; Allen, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis cause massive fish kills and other public health and economic problems in coastal waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico [Steidinger, 2009]. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a gulf-wide problem that require a synoptic observing system for better serving decision-making needs. The major nutrient sources that initiate and maintain these HABs and the possible connectivity of blooms in different locations are important questions being addressed through new collaborations between Mexican and U.S. researchers and government institutions. These efforts were originally organized under the U.S./Mexico binational partnership for the HABs Observing System (HABSOS), led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program (EPAGMP) and several agencies in Veracruz, Mexico, since 2006. In 2010 these efforts were expanded to include other Mexican states and institutions with the integrated assessment and management of the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem (GoMLME) program sponsored by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  10. Origin of arches in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect

    Laubach, S.E.; Jackson, M.L.W. )

    1990-07-01

    The San Marcos and Sabine arches are prominent north- to northwest-trending basement uplifts in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin that may be late Mesozoic to Cenozoic foreland or intraplate folds rather than domes over plutons or buoyant basement blocks. These arches are subparallel to and contemporaneous with orogenic episodes in the northwest-trending fold-thrust belt of Mexico. Arch movement was also contemporaneous with rapid convergence between the North American and Pacific plates. Arch development in the gulf as a result of tectonic compression is plausible in view of increasing recognition of wide zones of foreland and intraplate deformation in continents. Current tectonic models of the development of the gulf inaccurately predict gradual, decelerating subsidence when these arches were most active.

  11. Environmental and economic assessment of discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, D.A.

    1994-01-28

    Task 2 (Preparation of the Sampling and Analysis Plan) activities involved the incorporation of the offshore site selection process into the Sampling and Analysis Plan. Task 3 (Environmental Field Sampling and Analysis of NORM, Heavy Metals, and Organics) work included making decisions on tissue analyses and performing analyses of water and sediment samples. Task 4 (Monitoring of the Recovery of Impacted Wetland and Open Bay Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana and Texas) activities involved the completion of the spring benthos samples collection on pre-termination samples at Four Isle Dome and the first post-termination samples at Delacroix Island. Task 5 (Assessment of Economic Impacts of Offshore and Coastal Discharge Requirements on Present and Future Operations in the Gum of Mexico Region) activities included continued work on development of a base case production forecast, modeling future production, and determining economic impact of treatment technologies. Task 6 (Synthesis of Gulf of Mexico Seafood Consumption and Use Patterns) work involved the completion of the fall survey season and the initiation of the survey data assembly. Task 7 (Technology Transfer Plan) activities included presentations at the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry annual meeting and Minerals Management Service Information Transfer Meeting. Task 8 (Project Management and Deliverables) activities involved the submission of the necessary reports and routine management.

  12. Natural and unnatural oil slicks in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, I. R.; Garcia-Pineda, O.; Beet, A.; Daneshgar Asl, S.; Feng, L.; Graettinger, G.; French-McCay, D.; Holmes, J.; Hu, C.; Huffer, F.; Leifer, I.; Muller-Karger, F.; Solow, A.; Silva, M.; Swayze, G.

    2015-12-01

    When wind speeds are 2-10 m s-1, reflective contrasts in the ocean surface make oil slicks visible to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) under all sky conditions. Neural network analysis of satellite SAR images quantified the magnitude and distribution of surface oil in the Gulf of Mexico from persistent, natural seeps and from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) discharge. This analysis identified 914 natural oil seep zones across the entire Gulf of Mexico in pre-2010 data. Their ˜0.1 µm slicks covered an aggregated average of 775 km2. Assuming an average volume of 77.5 m3 over an 8-24 h lifespan per oil slick, the floating oil indicates a surface flux of 2.5-9.4 × 104 m3 yr-1. Oil from natural slicks was regionally concentrated: 68%, 25%, 7%, and <1% of the total was observed in the NW, SW, NE, and SE Gulf, respectively. This reflects differences in basin history and hydrocarbon generation. SAR images from 2010 showed that the 87 day DWH discharge produced a surface-oil footprint fundamentally different from background seepage, with an average ocean area of 11,200 km2 (SD 5028) and a volume of 22,600 m3 (SD 5411). Peak magnitudes of oil were detected during equivalent, ˜14 day intervals around 23 May and 18 June, when wind speeds remained <5 m s-1. Over this interval, aggregated volume of floating oil decreased by 21%; area covered increased by 49% (p < 0.1), potentially altering its ecological impact. The most likely causes were increased applications of dispersant and surface burning operations.

  13. Natural and unnatural oil slicks in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ian R. MacDonald; O. Garcia-Pineda; A. Beet; S. Daneshgar Asl; L. Feng; D. G. Graettinger; D. French-McCay; J. Holmes; C. Hu; F. Huffer; I. Leifer; F. Mueller-Karger; A. Solow; M. Silva; Swayze, Gregg A.

    2015-01-01

    When wind speeds are 2 – 10 m s−1, reflective contrasts in the ocean surface make oil slicks visible to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) under all sky conditions. Neural network analysis of satellite SAR images quantified the magnitude and distribution of surface oil in the Gulf of Mexico from persistent, natural seeps and from the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) discharge. This analysis identified 914 natural oil seep zones across the entire Gulf of Mexico in pre-2010 data. Their ∼0.1 µm slicks covered an aggregated average of 775 km2. Assuming an average volume of 77.5 m3over an 8 – 24 h lifespan per oil slick, the floating oil indicates a surface flux of 2.5 – 9.4 × 104 m3 y−1. Oil from natural slicks was regionally concentrated: 68%, 25%, 7%, and <1% of the total was observed in the NW, SW, NE and SE Gulf, respectively. This reflects differences in basin history and hydrocarbon generation. SAR images from 2010 showed that the 87-day DWH discharge produced a surface-oil footprint fundamentally different from background seepage, with an average ocean area of 11,200 km2 (SD 5,028) and a volume of 22,600 m3 (SD 5,411). Peak magnitudes of oil were detected during equivalent, ∼14-day intervals around 23 May and 18 June, when wind speeds remained <5 m s−1. Over this interval, aggregated volume of floating oil decreased by 21%; area covered increased by 49% (p < .1), potentially altering its ecological impact. The most likely causes were increased applications of dispersant and surface burning operations.

  14. The Younger Dryas Cool Episode in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, B. P.; Kennett, J. P.

    1990-12-01

    Data are presented from Orca Basin piston core EN32-PC4 in the Gulf of Mexico that confirm the existence of surface water cooling during the Younger Dry as chronozone (11-10 ka). Late glacial planktonic foraminiferal species made a reappearance between 11.4 and 9.8 ka, an episode also marked by distinctly higher oxygen isotopic values derived from the planktonic foraminifer Globigerinoides ruber. The presence of the Younger Dryas event in the gulf at 27°N demonstrates that surface water cooling extended to mid-latitude regions in the North Atlantic. The cool surface water interval is bracketed by rapid shifts in δ18O related to changes in the influx of meltwater to the Gulf of Mexico. A chronology based upon seven accelerator radiocarbon dates indicates that cooling commenced over a ˜500 year period and ended in less than 200 years. These results are among the first deep-sea sediment data documenting the climatic transitions bracketing the Younger Dryas with a rapidity observed in ice core records. A rapid decrease in δ18O values measured in the white form of Gs. ruber at 10.2 ka is explained by significant meltwater influx into the gulf and rapid increase in sea surface temperatures. Surprisingly, a similar decrease is not observed in the pink form of Gs. ruber, a summer surface water dweller in the gulf. This discrepancy may be explained by continued meltwater influx throughout the Younger Dryas during the summers only, such that there was no change in the δ18O of the pink form at the end of the episode. An additional possibility is that warming at the end of the Younger Dryas raised year-average temperatures and summer temperatures remained constant. The coincidence of rapid shifts in δ18O with the Younger Dryas strongly suggests a dynamic causal relationship and therefore supports a model for the cause of the Younger Dryas cooling based on changes in the routing of Laurentide glacial meltwater.

  15. 78 FR 76758 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-19

    ... of Mexico Recreational Season for Red Snapper AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS...: NMFS announces the closure date of the recreational season for red snapper in the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) for the 2014 fishing season through this temporary...

  16. Manatees in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonde, Robert K.; Lefebvre, Lynn W.

    2001-01-01

    The endangered Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) inhabits rivers and estuaries along both coasts of Florida and, to a lesser extent, adjacent states (Figure 1). Since 1990, documented sightings of manatees outside of Florida have been increasing. This increase in sightings probably represents northward shifts in manatee distribution made possible by man-made sources of warm water (i.e., industrial effluents), as well as a decade of relatively warm winters. The most likely source of emigrants on the Gulf coast is the population of manatees that overwinter in the headwaters of the Crystal and Homosassa Rivers, Citrus County, FL. This group of manatees has undergone a steady increase in numbers, (approximately 7% per year from 1977-1991; Eberhardt and O’Shea 1995). Some emigrants may also come from the Tampa-Ft. Myers region, where human impacts on habitat are greater. Manatees are intelligent, long-lived mammals that appear to adapt readily to new environments and situations. However, manatees have relatively low metabolic rates, and cold winter temperatures restrict their northern distribution.

  17. Evidence of multidecadal climate variability in the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, Richard Z.; Brock, John C.

    2011-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico coastal region is vulnerable to a variety of natural hazards, many of which are linked to climate and climate variability. Hurricanes, which are one such climate-related hazard, are a major recurring problem, and the active hurricane seasons of 2004 and 2005 raised interest in better understanding the controls and risks of hurricanes. Examination of historical records reveals intervals of alternating low and high hurricane activity that appear to be related to changes in average sea-surface temperature in the North Atlantic Ocean. Analyses of instrumental temperature records from the North Atlantic show decadal-scale oscillations of slightly higher versus slightly lower average temperature extending back in time for over 100 years. This oscillation is known as the Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation (AMO).

  18. Marine and Estuarine Ecology. Man and the Gulf of Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Bobby N.; And Others

    "Man and the Gulf of Mexico (MGM)" is a marine science curriculum developed to meet the marine science needs of tenth through twelfth grade students in Mississippi and Alabama schools. This MGM unit, which focuses on marine and estuarine ecology, is divided into six sections. The first section contains unit objectives, discussions of the estuarine…

  19. The Gulf of Mexico loop current and deepwater drilling

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, S.P.; Vermersch, J.A. ); Barker, J.W. )

    1991-09-01

    This paper reviews petroleum industry knowledge of the Gulf of Mexico circulation feature known as the Loop Current. Data obtained in Green Canyon in 1989 indicate how the Loop Current influences drilling operations. The paper also discusses the analytic and operational considerations for drilling-riser and station-keeping system management when these currents are of concern.

  20. Marine Habitats. Man and the Gulf of Mexico Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, Bobby N.; And Others

    "Man and the Gulf of Mexico (MGM)" is a marine science curriculum developed to meet the marine science needs of tenth through twelfth grade students in Mississippi and Alabama schools. This MGM unit, which focuses on marine habitats, contains an introduction (with unit objectives and brief introductory comments) followed by five sections, each…

  1. Toxiological Considerations in the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Deep Water Horizon oil rig exploded on April 20, 2010, resulting in an ongoing release of light sweet petroleum crude oil and methane into Gulf of Mexico waters. The release from the deepwater wellhead 41 miles from Louisiana is at approximately 1 mile depth, and flow rates e...

  2. 78 FR 46292 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... abbreviated framework and requested public comment (78 FR 37500). The proposed rule and abbreviated framework... framework to the Fishery Management Plans (FMPs) for the Reef Fish Resources of the Gulf of Mexico prepared... fisheries are managed under their respective FMPs. The Gulf reef fish FMP was prepared by the Gulf...

  3. THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF ESTUARIES: A FOCUS ON THE ATLANTIC OCEAN AND GULF OF MEXICO COASTS OF THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Monitoring the estuaries of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico coastlines was performed annually from 1990 to 1997 to assess ecological conditions on a regional basis for four biogeographic provinces. These province estimates - Virginian, Carolinian, West Indian, and Louisiani...

  4. 76 FR 75488 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... Amendment 10 and requested public comment (76 FR 54227). On September 23, 2011, NMFS published a proposed rule for Amendment 10 and requested public comment (76 FR 59102). The proposed rule and Amendment 10... Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Spiny Lobster Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico and...

  5. SYNOPTIC SURVEY OF TOTAL MERCURY IN RECREATIONAL FINFISH OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    In association with the Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) and the Gulf States Marine Fisheries Commission (GSMFC), the National Seafood Inspection Laboratory (NSIL) will design a synoptic survey to determine the mercury (Hg) concentration in selected Gulf of Mexico fisheries species. ...

  6. Early results from the Northern Gulf of Mexico Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brock, John C.; Lavoie, Dawn L.; Poore, Richard Z.

    2011-01-01

    The northern Gulf of Mexico coastal region and its diverse ecosystems are threatened by population and development pressure and by the impacts of rising sea level and severe storms such as the series of hurricanes that has impacted the northern Gulf in recent years. In response to the complex management issues facing the region, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) organized a multidisciplinary research program to coordinate the activities of USGS and other scientists working in the northern Gulf of Mexico region (fig. 1). The Northern Gulf of Mexico (NGOM) Ecosystem Change and Hazard Susceptibility Project aims to develop a thorough understanding of the dynamic coastal ecosystems on the northern Gulf coast, the impact of human activities on these ecosystems, and the vulnerability of ecosystems and human communities to more frequent and more intense hurricanes in the future. A special issue of Geo-Marine Letters published in December 2009 is devoted to early results of studies completed as part of this project. These studies, which have been conducted at sites throughout the northern Gulf region, from the Chandeleur Islands to Apalachicola Bay, have focused on three themes: (1) The underlying geologic framework that exerts controls over coastal processes (2) The impact of human activities on nearshore water quality (3) Hurricanes and associated effects

  7. Lithosphere thickness and rupture mode variation along the Gulf of California, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Campos, X.; Fernández, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the lithosphere thickness along the Baja California peninsula and continental northwestern Mexico in order to identify the different rupture modes along the Gulf of California. We use receiver functions (RFs) of 29 seismological stations from three networks: NARS-Baja (Network of Autonomously Recording Seismographs), RESBAN (Broadband seismic network from the Gulf of California), and SSN (National Seismological Service, Mexico). Thickness of the lithosphere varies from 43 to 89 km. The largest values are found at stations located east of Sierra Madre Occidental, and are consistent with a continental lithosphere. The thinner lithosphere is found at station NE70 (Mexicali, Mexico), consistent with a pre-rift region that has experimented serveral extension episodes. From RFs retroprojected along various profiles, we can distinguish the different rupture modes along the Gulf and identify a region under the center of the peninsula where the listhosphere has been removed by the former subduction of the Guadalupe plate.

  8. 76 FR 64327 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... Fish, Shrimp, and Coral and Coral Reefs Fishery Management Plans (Generic ACL Amendment) for purposes... Register on September 26, 2011 (76 FR 59373). As part of this amendment, the GMFMC has selected to remove..., and South Atlantic; Gulf of Mexico Reef Fish Fishery; South Atlantic Snapper-Grouper Fishery...

  9. 75 FR 75173 - Gulf of Mexico Executive Council Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-02

    ... AGENCY Gulf of Mexico Executive Council Notice of Charter Renewal AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... (FACA), 5 U.S.C. App. 2, the Gulf of Mexico Executive Council (GMEC) is a necessary committee which is... associated with plans to improve and protect the water quality and living resources of the Gulf of......

  10. Summary Report on Information Technology Integration Activities For project to Enhance NASA Tools for Coastal Managers in the Gulf of Mexico and Support Technology Transfer to Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Gulbransen, Thomas C.

    2009-04-27

    Deliverable to NASA Stennis Space Center summarizing summarizes accomplishments made by Battelle and its subcontractors to integrate NASA's COAST visualization tool with the Noesis search tool developed under the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative project.

  11. Mapping the Intricacies of the Gulf of Mexico's Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo-Fernández, Alexis; Green, Rebecca E.

    2011-01-01

    From hosting key shipping lines, drilling platforms, and commercial fisheries, to sustaining mangrove swamps that shelter the coastline from the hurricanes that churn its waters, the Gulf of Mexico is important to the nations surrounding it for socio-economic, ecological, military, political, and scientific reasons. Critical to all of these sectors is the Gulf's circulation—it controls hurricane tracks and intensity, biological productivity, and larvae dispersal. Since 1982, the Environmental Studies Program (ESP) of the U.S. Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) has invested more than $67 million in field and numerical modeling studies to improve our understanding of the Gulf's circulation (see Figure 1). ESP-funded research has covered a broad array of topics, some applied and some basic. Studies carried out on behalf of the bureau reflect the bureau's information needs, stakeholder input, and offshore energy exploration and development trends. All ESP studies culminate in a technical report—127 technical reports on physical oceanography are publicly available (see http://www.gomr.boemre.gov/homepg/regulate/environ/techsumm/rec_pubs.html). Additionally, more than 100 peer-reviewed publications have been issued on the Gulf's physical oceanography and circulation. The AGU Geophysical Monograph Circulation in the Gulf of Mexico: Observations and Models, the very first circulation overview since 1972, was funded by ESP. Additionally, data collected during fieldwork are deposited in national archives for public dissemination.

  12. Sources, trends and regional impacts of fine particulate matter in southern Mississippi valley: significance of emissions from sources in the Gulf of Mexico coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C.; McElroy, B.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2013-04-01

    The sources of fine particles over a 10 yr period at Little Rock, Arkansas, an urban area in the southern Mississippi Valley, were identified by positive matrix factorization. The annual trends of PM2.5 and its sources, and their associations with the pathways of air mass backward trajectories were examined. Seven sources were apportioned, namely, primary traffic particles, secondary nitrate and sulphate, biomass burning, diesel particles, aged/contaminated sea salt and mineral/road dust, accounting for more than 90% of measured PM2.5 (particles with aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm) mass. The declining trend of PM2.5 mass (0.4 μg m-3 per year) was related to lower levels of SO42- (0.2 μg m-3 per year) due to SO2 reductions from point and mobile sources. The slower decline for NO3- particles (0.1 μg m-3 per year) was attributed to the increasing NH3 emissions in the Midwest. The annual variation of biomass burning particles was associated with fires in the southeast and northwest US. Of the four regions within 500 km from the receptor site, the Gulf Coast and the southeast US accounted cumulatively for more than 65% of PM2.5 mass, nitrate, sulphate and biomass burning aerosol. Overall, more than 50% of PM2.5 and its components originated from sources outside the state. Sources within the Gulf Coast and western Gulf of Mexico include 65% of the busiest ports in the US, intense marine traffic within 400 km of the coast burning rich in S diesel, and a large number of offshore oil and natural gas platforms and many refineries. This approach allowed for the quantitative assessment of the impacts of transport from regions representing diverse mixtures of sources and weather conditions for different types of particles. The findings of this effort demonstrated the influences of emission controls on SO2 and NOx on PM2.5 mass, the potential effect of events (i.e. fires) sensitive to climate change phenomena on air pollution and the potential of offshore activities

  13. Sources, trends and regional impacts of fine particulate matter in southern Mississippi Valley: significance of emissions from sources in the Gulf of Mexico coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalbot, M.-C.; McElroy, B.; Kavouras, I. G.

    2013-01-01

    The sources of fine particles over a 10 yr period at Little Rock, Arkansas, an urban area in southern Mississippi Valley, were identified by positive matrix factorization. The annual trends of PM2.5 and its sources and their associations with the pathways of air mass backward trajectories were examined. Seven sources were apportioned, namely, primary traffic particles, secondary nitrate and sulphate, biomass burning, diesel particles, aged/contaminated sea salt and mineral/road dust, accounting for more than 90% of measured PM2.5 mass. The declining trend of PM2.5 mass (0.4 μg m-3 yr-1) was related to lower levels of SO42- (0.2 μg m-3 yr-1) due to SO2 reductions from point and mobile sources. The slower decline for NO3- particles (0.1 μg m-3 yr-1) was attributed to the spatial variability of NH3 in Midwest. The annual variation of biomass burning particles was associated with wildland fires in southeast and northwest US that are sensitive to climate changes. The four regions within 500 km from the receptor site, the Gulf Coast and southeast US accounted cumulatively for more than 65% of PM2.5 mass, nitrate, sulphate and biomass burning aerosol. Overall, more than 50% of PM2.5 and its sources originated from sources outside the state. Sources within the Gulf Coast and western Gulf of Mexico include 65% of the busiest ports in the US, intense marine traffic within 400 km of the coast burning rich in S diesel, and a large number of offshore oil and natural gas platforms and many refineries along the coast. This approach allowed for quantitatively assessing the impacts of transport from regions representing diverse mixtures of sources and weather conditions for different types of particles. The findings of this effort demonstrated the influences of emission controls on SO2 and NOx on PM2.5 mass, the potential effect of events (i.e. fires) sensitive to climate change phenomena on air pollution and the potential of offshore activities and shipping emissions to

  14. EAARL Coastal Topography - Northern Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nayegandhi, Amar; Brock, John C.; Sallenger, Abby; Wright, C. Wayne; Travers, Laurinda J.; Lebonitte, James

    2008-01-01

    These remotely sensed, geographically referenced elevation measurements of Lidar-derived coastal topography were produced as a collaborative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC), St. Petersburg, FL and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Wallops Flight Facility, VA. One objective of this research is to create techniques to survey areas for the purposes of geomorphic change studies following major storm events. The USGS Coastal and Marine Geology Program's National Assessment of Coastal Change Hazards project is a multi-year undertaking to identify and quantify the vulnerability of U.S. shorelines to coastal change hazards such as effects of severe storms, sea-level rise, and shoreline erosion and retreat. Airborne Lidar surveys conducted during periods of calm weather are compared to surveys collected following extreme storms in order to quantify the resulting coastal change. Other applications of high-resolution topography include habitat mapping, ecological monitoring, volumetric change detection, and event assessment. The purpose of this project is to provide highly detailed and accurate datasets of the northern Gulf of Mexico coastal areas, acquired on September 19, 2004, immediately following Hurricane Ivan. The datasets are made available for use as a management tool to research scientists and natural resource managers. An innovative airborne Lidar instrument originally developed at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and known as the Experimental Airborne Advanced Research Lidar (EAARL), was used during data acquisition. The EAARL system is a raster-scanning, waveform-resolving, green-wavelength (532 nanometer) Lidar designed to map near-shore bathymetry, topography, and vegetation structure simultaneously. The EAARL sensor suite includes the raster-scanning, water-penetrating full-waveform adaptive Lidar, a down-looking RGB (red-green-blue) digital camera, a high-resolution multi

  15. 77 FR 74213 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy Management... miles from the nearest Louisiana shoreline. GOM Shelf LLC, Structure Removal, Grand Isle, Block 46,...

  16. 75 FR 41818 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN: 0648-XX59 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 4, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  17. 75 FR 74008 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA068 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... teleconference call (1-888) 450-5996. At the prompt enter passcode 6273501. Council address: Gulf of...

  18. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... the Gulf of Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.720 Gulf...

  19. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... the Gulf of Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.720 Gulf...

  20. 78 FR 4130 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC449 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery..., 3101 Airport Boulevard, Mobile, AL 36606; telephone: (251) 476-6400. Council address: Gulf of...

  1. 33 CFR 334.720 - Gulf of Mexico, south from Choctawhatchee Bay; Missile test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico, south from... the Gulf of Mexico south from Choctawhatchee Bay within an area described as follows: Beginning at a..., DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.720 Gulf...

  2. 78 FR 43146 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC763 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; Public Meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management... until 12 noon on Thursday, August 8, 2013. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  3. 76 FR 80343 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA890 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... by 12 p.m., Thursday, January 12, 2012. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  4. 75 FR 72793 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA055 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... 3 p.m. on Wednesday, December 15, 2010. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf of...

  5. 78 FR 15707 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC548 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Hotel, 2900 Bayport Drive, Tampa, FL 33607; telephone: (813) 874-1234. Council address: Gulf of...

  6. 77 FR 26745 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting...), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene public meetings. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management..., Eastern time. ADDRESSES: The webinar will be accessible via Internet. Please go to the Gulf of...

  7. 76 FR 39857 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA549 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Council to convene a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... and conclude by 3 p.m., Thursday, July 28, 2011. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Gulf...

  8. Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas: Digital Data Discovery and Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, K.

    2014-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas is an online data discovery and access tool that allows users to browse a growing collection of ecosystem-related datasets visualized as map plates. Thematically, the Atlas includes updated long-term assessments of the physical, biological, environmental, economic and living marine resource characteristics that indicate baseline conditions of the Gulf of Mexico ecosystems. These data are crucial components of integrated ecosystem assessments and modeling and support restoration and monitoring efforts in the Gulf. A multi-agency executive steering committee including members from international, federal, state, and non-governmental organizations was established to guide Atlas development and to contribute data and expertise. The Atlas currently contains over 235 maps in 70 subject areas. Each map plate is accompanied by a descriptive summary authored by a subject matter expert and each data set is fully documented by metadata in Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC)-compliant standards. Source data are available in native formats and as web mapping services (WMS). Datasets are also searchable through an accompanying Map Catalog and RSS feed. The Gulf of Mexico Data Atlas is an operational example of the philosophy of leveraging resources among agencies and activities involved in geospatial data as outlined in the US Department of Interior and FGDC "Geospatial Platform Modernization Roadmap v4 - March 2011". We continue to update and add datasets through existing and new partnerships to ensure that the Atlas becomes a truly ecosystem-wide resource.

  9. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  10. A suggested local regions in the Southern Gulf of Mexico using a diatom database (1979-2002) and oceanic hidrographic features.

    PubMed

    Licea, Sergio; Zamudio, Ma E; Moreno-Ruiz, J L; Luna, R

    2011-07-01

    A diatom data-base of 255 species obtained from 14 oceanographic cruises (14801 entries of 647 sampling sites) together with the analysis of oceanic features were used to establish four local regions in the southern Gulf of Mexico. In addition, common species for each region were designated. This study is based on the application of cluster analysis and the species frequency data. Material for this undertaking consisted of water and net samples obtained between June 1979 and December 2002. Results show that the most frequent species (> 40%) were: Asterionellopsis glacialis, Bacteriastrum delicatulum, B. hyalinum, Chaetoceros affinis, C. coarctatus, C. compresus, C. curvisetus, C. danicus, C. decipiens, C. diversus, C. lorenzianus, C. pelagicus, C. peruvianus, Coscinodiscus radiatus, Cylindrotheca closterium, Guinardia flaccida, Hemiaulus hauckii, H. membranaceus, H. sinensis, Leptocylindrus danicus, Neocalyptrella robusta, Nitzschia bicapitata, Pleurosigma diverse-striatum, Proboscia alata, Pseudo-nitzschia pungens, Pseudosolenia calcar-avis, Rhizosolenia imbricata, R. setigera, Skeletonema costatum, Thalassionema bacillare, T frauenfeldii, T nitzschioides and Thalassiosira eccentrica. The species composition for each region and season are discussed. Itis concluded that sampling site assemblages are related to oceanographic conditions. A total list of species composition is given, forty-seven species taxa being new records for this area. PMID:22315823

  11. Aging and sediment characteristics of northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Isphording, W.C. ); Imsand, F.D. ); Flowers, G.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Eight major estuarine systems present along the northern margin of the Gulf of Mexico serve as primary depositional basins for all rivers draining into the gulf from central Louisiana eastward to the Florida peninsula. These estuaries consist of Apalachicola Bay, St. Andrews Bay, Choctawhatchee Bay, Pensacola Bay, Perdido Bay, Mobile Bay, Mississippi sound, and Lake Pontchartrainn. Because each receives sediment from a different river system (or systems), each estuary is characterized by sediments that are both physically and mineralogically distinct. Estuaries in the eastern Gulf, for example, possess a clay mineral suite dominated by kaolinite (derived from deeply weathered piedmont rocks), whereas those from the western Gulf are rich in smectite and mixed layer clays (reflecting a Western Interior or provenance from Paleozoic or older coastal plain sources). Similarly, weathering of rocks in the southern piedmont has provided eastern Gulf estuarine sediments with a suite of largely metamorphic rock-derived heavy minerals, whereas those in the western Gulf contain a mixed suite of both igneous- and metamorphic-derived minerals. Equally distinctive, however, are the textures of the bottom sediments themselves for each estuary when plotted on standard sand-silt-clay ternary diagrams. The relative percentages of these components are uniquely different for most of the estuaries and reflect both natural and anthropogenic conditions that exist in the watershed areas that drain into each estuary.

  12. Region-wide impairment of Atlantic croaker testicular development and sperm production in the northern Gulf of Mexico hypoxic dead zone.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Peter; Rahman, Md Saydur

    2010-01-01

    Recently evidence has been obtained for reproductive impairment in estuarine populations of Atlantic croaker exposed to seasonal hypoxia. However, it is not known whether a similar disruption of reproductive function occurs in croaker inhabiting a much larger hypoxic area, the extensive dead zone in coastal regions of the northern Gulf of Mexico extending from the Mississippi Delta to East Texas. Gonadal development in male Atlantic croaker collected in September 2008 at six sites in the dead zone was compared to that in male fish sampled from three reference sites east of the Mississippi Delta which do not experience persistent hypoxia. Croaker testes collected from the dead zone were at an earlier stage of spermatogenesis than those from the reference sites. Histological examination of the testes collected from the dead zone showed that their tubules had small lumens that contained very little sperm compared to the lumens of the reference fish. Overall, sperm production was 26.2% that of the control fish at the reference sites. This decrease in spermatogenesis at the dead zone sites was accompanied by an approximately 50% decrease in testicular growth compared to that in the reference fish. The results suggest that reproductive impairment can occur over regional scales in marine fish populations exposed to extensive seasonal hypoxia in dead zones with potential long-term impacts on population abundance. PMID:19931178

  13. Acoustic estimates of methane gas flux from the seabed in a 6000 km2 region in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Thomas C.; Mayer, Larry; Jerram, Kevin; Beaudoin, Jonathan; Rzhanov, Yuri; Lovalvo, Dave

    2014-05-01

    of free methane gas escaping the seabed can be found throughout the ocean basins. To understand the role of methane gas seeps in the global carbon cycle—including both gas added to the atmosphere and that which is dissolved and potentially oxidized in the ocean volume—it is important to quantify the amount of methane escaping the seabed. Few large-scale mapping projects of natural methane seeps have been undertaken, however, and even among these, quantitative estimates of flux are rare. Here we use acoustic mapping techniques to survey 357 natural methane seeps in a large region (6000 km2) of the northern Gulf of Mexico and outline a general approach for methane seep mapping using a combination of multibeam and split-beam echo sounders. Using additional measurements collected with a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) together with the acoustic mapping results, we estimate the total gas flux within the 6000 km2 region to be between 0.0013 and 0.16 Tg/yr, or between 0.003 and 0.3% of the current estimates for global seabed methane seepage rates.

  14. MAGSAT correlations with geoid anomalies. [magnetic anomalies in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowin, C. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    A digital data library of MAGSAT data is described and its applications and capabilities are reviewed. Polynomial trends were removed from each half-orbit in order to estimate and remove ring current effects from the data. The MAGSAT data in the Gulf of Mexico region was analyzed to define better the possible relation of the negative MAGSAT anomaly there to the negative residual geoid anomaly in the western Gulf of Mexico. Since the shape and location of the negative magnetic anomaly are variable depending upon the particular polynomial surface and curve orders used, no definitive conclusion as to the degree of correspondance between the residual geoid and MAGSAT lithosphere anomalies is offered.

  15. Macro-Ecology of Gulf of Mexico Cold Seeps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cordes, Erik E.; Bergquist, Derk C.; Fisher, Charles R.

    2009-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of chemosynthetic ecosystems at deep-sea hydrothermal vents, similar ecosystems were found at cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico. Over the past two decades, these sites have become model systems for understanding the physiology of the symbiont-containing megafauna and the ecology of seep communities worldwide. Symbiont-containing bivalves and siboglinid polychaetes dominate the communities, including five bathymodiolin mussel species and six vestimentiferan (siboglinid polychaete) species in the Gulf of Mexico. The mussels include the first described examples of methanotrophic symbiosis and dual methanotrophic/thiotrophic symbiosis. Studies with the vestimentiferans have demonstrated their potential for extreme longevity and their ability to use posterior structures for subsurface exchange of dissolved metabolites. Ecological investigations have demonstrated that the vestimentiferans function as ecosystem engineers and identified a community succession sequence from a specialized high-biomass endemic community to a low-biomass community of background fauna over the life of a hydrocarbon seep site.

  16. Minimum extreme temperature in the gulf of mexico: is there a connection with solar activity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maravilla, D.; Mendoza, B.; Jauregui, E.

    Minimum extreme temperature ( MET) series from several meteorological stations of the Gulf of Mexico are spectrally analyzed using the Maximum Entrophy Method. We obtained periodicities similar to those found in the sunspot number, the magnetic solar cycle, comic ray fluxes and geomagnetic activity which are modulated by solar activity. We suggested that the solar signal is perhaps present in the MET record of this region of Mexico.

  17. Principles of pleistocene stratigraphy, applied to the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Fillon, R.H.; Healy-Williams, N.; Ledbetter, M.T.; Thunell, R.C.; Williams, D.F.

    1984-01-01

    This study of one of the world's major oil provinces is an examination of advances made in the past decade in high resolution stratigraphy of Pleistocene marine sediments. Topics covered include magnetostratigraphy, planktonic foraminiferal biostratigraphy, oxygen isotope stratigraphy, tephrochronology and a review and updating of terrestrial-marine correlations during the Pleistocene. The emphasis is on the Gulf of Mexico, but the techniques described can be applied to other marine sedimentary basins.

  18. Estimating the Provision of Ecosystem Services by Gulf of Mexico Coastal Wetlands.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gulf of Mexico (GOM) coastal wetlands contribute to human well-being by providing many ecosystem services (e.g., commercial and recreational fishery support, protection of coastal communities from storm surge, water quality improvement, and carbon sequestration). The GOM region c...

  19. Metagenomics of Water Column Microbes Near Brine Pool NR1 and adjacent regions of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Collected in Fall 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, A. M.; Goodwin, K. D.; Brami, D.; Schwartz, A.; Toledo, G.

    2012-12-01

    High-throughput sequencing was applied to eight water column samples collected from the Gulf of Mexico in 2009 in regions SW and west of the 2010 Macondo oil spill. Samples were collected by Niskin-equipped CTD (~200 and ~650 m depths) at two locations, including a site over a methane brine pool (Brine Pool NR1). In addition, seawater was collected ~3m lateral of the pool (649m depth) via Niskin bottle equipped on the Johnson-Sea-Link submersible. Unassembled reads were submitted to the Synthetic Genomics bioinformatics pipeline for taxonomic analysis. The distribution of Bacteria (56-73%), Archae (7-16%), Eukaryotes (12-23%), and unclassified sequences (6-10%) were similar for all samples. However, certain taxonomic classifications were relatively more abundant in deeper samples, and differences were noted for samples collected by submersible. For example, Methylophaga was classified as 38% of the order Thiotrichales for the Niskin/submersible sample compared to 0% in the 200m-depth samples and 3-11% in the 650m samples. Methylophaga is a genus of indigenous methylotrophs reported to respond during the Deepwater Horizon event of 2010. In contrast, sequence abundance for Oceanospirillales, also reported to respond during the event, was similar for all samples (6-9% of the gamma-proteobacteria).

  20. 77 FR 29594 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC028 Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of a public meeting. SUMMARY: The Gulf of Mexico Fishery... Mexico Fishery Management Council, 2203 North Lois Avenue, Suite 1100, Tampa, FL 33607; telephone:...

  1. Gulf of Mexico dissolved oxygen model (GoMDOM) research and quality assurance project plan

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated high resolution mathematical modeling framework is being developed that will link hydrodynamic, atmospheric, and water quality models for the northern Gulf of Mexico. This Research and Quality Assurance Project Plan primarily focuses on the deterministic Gulf of Me...

  2. Digital archive of drilling mud weight pressures and wellbore temperatures from 49 regional cross sections of 967 well logs in Louisiana and Texas, onshore Gulf of Mexico basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burke, Lauri A.; Kinney, Scott A.; Kola-Kehinde, Temidayo B.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides the digital archive of in-situ temperature and drilling mud weight pressure data that were compiled from several historical sources. The data coverage includes the states of Texas and Louisiana in the Gulf of Mexico basin. Data are also provided graphically, for both Texas and Louisiana, as plots of temperature as a function of depth and pressure as a function of depth. The minimum, arithmetic average, and maximum values are tabulated for each 1,000-foot depth increment for temperature as well as pressure in the Texas and Louisiana data.

  3. A FRAMEWORK FOR AN INTEGRATED MONITORING PLAN FOR THE GULF OF MEXICO ECOSYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Gulf of Mexico Program (GMP) Office in cooperation with its principal partners (Gulf State agencies, Federal agencies, private industry, etc.) and the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) are developing an integrated c...

  4. Gulf of Mexico Helicopter Offshore System Technologies Recommended Development Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenke, Edmund J.; Williams, Larry; Calafa, Caesar

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Advanced Air Transportation Technologies (AATT) project in cooperation with the Department of Transportation (DOT) Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (VNTSC) contracted with the System Resources Corporation (SRC) for the evaluation of the existing environment and the identification of user and service provider needs in the Gulf of Mexico low-altitude Offshore Sector. The results of this contractor activity are reported in the Gulf of Mexico Helicopter Offshore System Technologies Engineering Needs Assessment. A recommended system design and transition strategy was then developed to satisfy the identified needs within the constraints of the environment. This work, also performed under contract to NASA, is the subject of this report.

  5. Volatile organic compounds in Gulf of Mexico sediments

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, T.J.

    1988-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOC), concentrations and compositions were documented for estuarine, coastal, shelf, slope, and deep water sediments from the Gulf of Mexico. VOC were measured (detection limit >0.01 ppb) using a closed-loop stripping apparatus with gas chromatography (GC) and flame ionization, flame photometric, and mass spectrometric detectors. The five primary sources of Gulf of Mexico sediment VOC are: (1) planktonic and benthic fauna and flora; (2) terrestrial material from riverine and atmospheric deposition; (3) anthropogenic inputs: (4) upward migration of hydrocarbons; and (5) transport by bottom currents or slumping. Detected organo-sulfur compounds include alkylated sulfides, thiophene, alkylated thiophenes, and benzothiophenes. Benzothiophenes are petroleum related. Low molecular weight organo-sulfur compounds result from the biological oxidation of organic matter. A lack of organosulfur compounds in the reducing environment of the Orca Basin may result from a lack of free sulfides which are necessary for their production.

  6. Gulf of Mexico Air Quality: CALIPSO Support for Gulf of Mexico Air Quality Relating to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Myngoc T.; Lapointe, Stephen; Jennings, Brittney; Zoumplis, Angela

    2011-01-01

    On April 20, 2010, an oil platform belonging to BP exploded and leaked a huge volume of oil into the Gulf of Mexico. In an effort to control the spread of the oil, BP applied dispersants such as Corexit and conducted in-situ burnings of the oil. This catastrophe created a complex chain of events that affected not only the fragile water and land ecosystems, but the humans who breathe the air every day. Thousands of people were exposed to fumes associated with oil vapors from the spill, burning of the oil, and the toxic mixture of dispersants. While aiding in clean-up efforts, local fishermen were directly exposure to fumes when working on the Gulf. A notable amount of Gulf Coast residents were also exposed to the oil fumes as seasonal southeasterly winds blew vapors toward land. The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) found in oil vapors include: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, xylene, naphthalene, hydrogen sulfide and particulate matter (PM). Increases in water temperature and sunlight due to the summer season allow for these VOCs and PM to evaporate into the air more rapidly. Aside from the VOCs found in oil vapors, the dispersant being used to break up the oil is highly toxic and is thought to be even more toxic than the oil itself (EPA website, 2010). To protect human health, the environment, and to make informed policy decisions relevant to the spill, the EPA Region 6 has continuously monitored the affected areas carefully for levels of pollutants in the outdoor air that are associated with petroleum products and the burning of oil along the coast. In an effort to prevent, prepare for, and respond to future oil spills that occur in and around inland waters of the United States, the EPA has been working with local, state, and federal response partners. Air quality measurements were collected by the EPA at five active monitoring systems stationed along the coast.

  7. Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study Overview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Gulf of Mexico Integrated Science - Tampa Bay Study combines the expertise of federal, state, and local partners to address some of the most pressing ecological problems of the Tampa Bay estuary. This project serves as a template for integrated research projects in other coastal ecosystems in the nation. The Tampa Bay Study focuses on the scientific needs of the Bay, as identified by resource managers.

  8. Patterns of the loop current system and regions of sea surface height variability in the eastern Gulf of Mexico revealed by the self-organizing maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yonggang; Weisberg, Robert H.; Vignudelli, Stefano; Mitchum, Gary T.

    2016-04-01

    The Self-Organizing Map (SOM), an unsupervised learning neural network, is employed to extract patterns evinced by the Loop Current (LC) system and to identify regions of sea surface height (SSH) variability in the eastern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) from 23 years (1993-2015) of altimetry data. Spatial patterns are characterized as different LC extensions and different stages in the process of LC eddy shedding. The temporal evolutions and the frequency of occurrences of these patterns are obtained, and the typical trajectories of the LC system progression on the SOM grid are investigated. For an elongated, northwest-extended, or west-positioned LC, it is common for the LC anticyclonic eddy (LCE) to separate and propagate into the western GoM, while an initially separated LCE in close proximity to the west Florida continental slope often reattaches to the LC and develops into an elongated LC, or reduces intensity locally before moving westward as a smaller eddy. Regions of differing SSH variations are also identified using the joint SOM-wavelet analysis. Along the general axis of the LC, SSH exhibits strong variability on time scales of 3 months to 2 years, also with energetic intraseasonal variations, which is consistent with the joint Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF)-wavelet analysis. In the more peripheral regions, the SSH has a dominant seasonal variation that also projects across the coastal ocean. The SOM, when applied to both space and time domains of the same data, provides a powerful tool for diagnosing ocean processes from such different perspectives.

  9. Oceanic Situational Awareness Over the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan; Greenfeld, Israel

    2005-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) mandated, aircraft separations over the oceans impose a limitation on traffic capacity for a given corridor, given the projected traffic growth over the Gulf of Mexico. The separations result from a lack of acceptable situational awareness over oceans where radar position updates are not available. This study considers the use of Automatic Dependent Surveillance (ADS) data transmitted over a commercial satellite communications system as an approach to provide ATC with the needed situational awareness and thusly allow for reduced aircraft separations. This study uses Federal Aviation Administration data from a single day for the Gulf of Mexico to analyze traffic loading to be used as a benchmark against which to compare several approaches for coordinating data transmissions from the aircraft to the satellites.

  10. An integrated approach to drilling in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Peery, M.D.; Bullock, R.D.

    1993-10-01

    This case history reviews the results of a single well and subsequent geological sidetrack drilled under an integrated partnering approach in East Cameron Block 306 of the Gulf of Mexico. The project demonstrates the benefits of partnering relationships. The integrated partnering approach proved to be an efficient and cost-effective means for the operator and service company to achieve objectives. The paper describes the operator, the drilling contractor, the service company, contract formats, project objectives, project summary, and conclusions.

  11. Hydrocarbon flux from natural deepwater Gulf of Mexico vents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flemings, P. B.; Smith, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Natural vents that expel water and hydrocarbons are present on continental margins around the world. The expelled fluids support biological vent communities, escape to the ocean and atmosphere, and may contribute significantly to oceanic and atmospheric carbon budgets. We describe two vents in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GoM) at lease blocks MC852/853 and GB425 that have significant flow, high salinities, and elevated temperatures. We use a steady state multi-phase flow model and show that there is a unique water and hydrocarbon flux that simulates the observed salinity and temperature. We estimate the hydrocarbon flux at each vent to be 2.0-9.9x104 t yr-1 and 1.7-7.1x104 t yr-1, respectively. We extrapolate these results and estimate the hydrocarbon flux from the entire Gulf of Mexico to be 9.7-55x106 t yr-1. This flux is at least 50x greater than previous estimates11 and is 6-40% of the hydrocarbon flux from the Macondo oil spill. Large natural seepage may inoculate marine basins such as the Gulf of Mexico from oil spills like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout by sustaining populations of hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria.

  12. 78 FR 27365 - Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... Management Council will convene a meeting of the Standing, Special Mackerel and Ecosystem Scientific and... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Atran, Population Dynamics Statistician; Gulf of Mexico...

  13. Integrated geological, geophysical, and geochemical interpretation of Upper Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-09-01

    The petroleum potential of the Upper Jurassic strata in the eastern Gulf of Mexico region is excellent. At least three Upper Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in the region. An oil trend can be identified onshore in the area north of the regional peripheral fault trend and is interpreted to extend offshore into the area north of the Destin anticline in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. An oil and gas-condensate trend can be defined onshore between the regional peripheral fault trend and the Wiggins arch. This trend is projected to extend offshore into the area of the Destin anticline. A deep natural gas trend can be delineated onshore south of the Wiggins arch and extends offshore into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf area. These trends are recognized by hydrocarbon types, basinal position, and relationship to regional structural features. The main petroleum source rocks for the Upper Jurassic hydrocarbons are Smackover carbonate mudstones.

  14. Storm Induced Injection of the Mississippi River Plume Into the Open Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuan, Jinchun; Miller, Richard L.; Powell, Rodney T.; Dagg, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    The direct impact of the Mississippi River on the open Gulf of Mexico is typically considered to be limited due to the predominantly along-shore current pattern. Using satellite imagery, we analyzed chl a distributions in the northern Gulf of Mexico before and after the passage of two storms: Hurricane Lili and Tropical Storm Barry. Our analyses indicate that storm-induced eddies can rapidly inject large volumes of nutrient-rich Mississippi River water to the open gulf, and lead to phytoplankton blooms. Although these events last only a few weeks, they transport significant amounts of fluvial substances to the ocean. These river-ocean interactions are especially significant in tropical and subtropical regions because receiving waters are typically permanently stratified and oligotrophic.

  15. 75 FR 61705 - Fisheries of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-06

    ... Workshops for South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico goliath grouper. SUMMARY: The SEDAR assessment of the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico stock of goliath grouper consists of a Data Workshop, an Assessment...

  16. 76 FR 77491 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... 28 pre-data workshop webinar for Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Spanish mackerel and cobia. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 28 assessments of the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic stocks of Spanish mackerel...

  17. 78 FR 15708 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment, and Review (SEDAR); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... Spanish mackerel and cobia Review Workshop. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 28 assessment of the Gulf of Mexico Spanish... recommendations with respect to the stock assessments of Gulf of Mexico Spanish mackerel and cobia. Although...

  18. Formation of the Gulf of Mexico Salt Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norton, I. O.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Christeson, G. L.; Eddy, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Recently acquired seismic refraction data in the northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) have provided new insights into the basin's crustal structure. We use the four refraction profiles to build regional-scale crustal sections across the GOM, and then use these profiles as the basis for basin modeling of crustal subsidence through time. Basin modeling includes flexural backstripping of the sediment load and correction for thermal subsidence, with the aim of calculating the shape of the basin at the time (Callovian) of salt deposition. The age of salt deposition relative to rifting events is debated, with opinions ranging from salt being synrift to entirely postrift. We suggest that salt was deposited near the end of rifting, close to the time of initiation of sea floor spreading. This interpretation is based partly on reconstructing possible water depths at the start of salt deposition, using the backstripping method. If water depths were too deep, i.e. sea floor spreading already established, salt thickness based on isostatic balance would be far too large. If water depths were too shallow, i.e. little crustal thinning, salt thickness would be too thin. We can compare the outcome of this analysis with the distribution of evaporites in the Gulf of Mexico basin, which may have formed a 4 km thick layer in some areas, though these salt deposits have subsequently been remobilized. Crustal structure from the refraction data shows crustal thicknesses of 8-15 km under the salt basin. The seismic velocity structure of the thinned crust suggests that at least some of the basement was formed by magmatic intrusions. If we correct for the inferred stretching of the continental margin and thermal subsidence, we obtain a plausible depth for the margin at Callovian time. Velocity structure from the refraction data plus observations of SDRs in the eastern GOM are consistent with the margins of the GOM having a significant synrift volcanic component. We suggest that this volcanic

  19. THE MAY 23TH 2007 GULF OF MEXICO EARTHQUAKE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, J.; Jimenez, Z.

    2009-12-01

    On the 23th of May 2007 at 14:09 local time (19:09 UT) an insolated earthquake of local magnitude 5.2 occurred offshore northern Veracruz in the Gulf of Mexico. The seismic focus was located using local and regional data at 20.11° N, 97.38° W and 7.8 km depth at 175 km distance from Tuxpan a city of 134,394 inhabitants. The earthquake was widely felt along the costal states of southern Tamaulipas and Veracruz in which several schools and public buildings were evacuated. Neither Laguna Verde nuclear plant, located approximately 245 km from the epicenter, nor PEMEX petroleum company reported damage. First-motion data indicates that the rupture occurred as strike slip faulting along two possible planes, one oriented roughly north-south and the other east-west. In the present paper a global analysis of the earthquake is made to elucidate its origin and possible correlation with known geotectonic features of the region.

  20. Gulf of Mexico hypoxia: exploring increasing sensitivity to nitrogen loads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Evans, Mary Anne; Scavia, Donald

    2010-08-01

    Hypoxia is a critical issue in the Gulf of Mexico that has challenged management efforts in recent years by an increase in hypoxia sensitivity to nitrogen loads. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the recent increase in sensitivity. Two commonly cited mechanisms are bottom-water reducing conditions preventing nitrification and thus denitrification, leading to more N recycling and production of oxygen-consuming organic matter, and carryover of organic matter from previous years increasing oxygen demand, making the system more sensitive. We use models informed by these mechanisms and fit with Bayesian inference to explore changes in Gulf of Mexico hypoxia sensitivity. We show that a model including an annually fit parameter representing variation in the fraction of nutrient loading and recycling contributing to bottom water oxygen demand provides a good fit to observations and is not improved by explicit inclusion of organic matter carryover to subsequent years. Both models support two stepwise increases in system sensitivity during the period of record. This change in sensitivity has greatly increased the nutrient reduction needed to achieve the established hypoxia goal. If the Gulf remains at the current state of sensitivity, our analysis suggests a roughly 70% reduction of spring TN loads from the 1988-1996 average of 6083 ton/day may be required. PMID:20608722

  1. 78 FR 59287 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ..., NMFS implemented the final rule (65 FR 16336, March 28, 2000) that divided the king mackerel Gulf... reduces the trip limit for the commercial sector of king mackerel in the eastern zone of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) in the northern Florida west coast subzone to 500 lb (227 kg) of king mackerel per day...

  2. 77 FR 52623 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Coastal Migratory Pelagic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-30

    ..., NMFS implemented the final rule (65 FR 16336, March 28, 2000) that divided the king mackerel Gulf... reduces the trip limit for the commercial sector of king mackerel in the eastern zone of the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) in the northern Florida west coast subzone to 500 lb (227 kg) of king mackerel per day...

  3. Mesozoic Continental Sediment-dispersal Systems of Mexico Linked to Development of the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawton, T. F.; Molina-Garza, R. S.; Barboza-Gudiño, R.; Rogers, R. D.

    2013-05-01

    Major sediment dispersal systems on western Pangea evolved in concert with thermal uplift, rift and drift phases of the Gulf of Mexico Basin, and were influenced by development of a continental arc on Pangea's western margin. Existing literature and preliminary data from fieldwork, sandstone petrology and detrital zircon analysis reveal how major drainages in Mexico changed from Late Triassic through Late Jurassic time and offer predictions for the ultimate destinations of sand-rich detritus along the Gulf and paleo-Pacific margins. Late Triassic rivers drained away from and across the present site of the Gulf of Mexico, which was then the location of a major thermal dome, the Texas uplift of recent literature. These high-discharge rivers with relatively mature sediment composition fed a large-volume submarine fan system on the paleo-Pacific continental margin of Mexico. Predictably, detrital zircon age populations are diverse and record sources as far away as the Amazonian craton. This enormous fluvial system was cut off abruptly near the Triassic-Jurassic boundary by extensive reorganization of continental drainages. Early and Middle Jurassic drainage systems had local headwaters and deposited sediment in extensional basins associated with arc magmatism. Redbeds accumulated across northern and eastern Mexico and Chiapas in long, narrow basins whose locations and dimensions are recorded primarily by inverted antiformal massifs. The Jurassic continental successions overlie Upper Triassic strata and local subvolcanic plutons; they contain interbedded volcanic rocks and thus have been interpreted as part of the Nazas continental-margin arc. The detritus of these fluvial systems is volcanic-lithic; syndepositional grain ages are common in the detrital zircon populations, which are mixed with Oaxaquia-derived Permo-Triassic and Grenville age populations. By this time, interior Pangea no longer supplied sediment to the paleo-Pacific margin, possibly because the

  4. 77 FR 60967 - Fisheries of the Gulf of Mexico; Southeast Data, Assessment and Review (SEDAR); Public Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ] ACTION: Notice of SEDAR 28 Gulf of Mexico Spanish mackerel and cobia assessment webinars. SUMMARY: The SEDAR 28 assessment of the Gulf of Mexico Spanish... continue deliberations and discussions regarding modeling methodologies for the Gulf of Mexico...

  5. The origins of petroleum in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennicutt, M. C., II; McDonald, T. J.; Comet, P. A.; Denoux, G. J.; Brooks, J. M.

    1992-03-01

    The distribution and chemistry of oils in the northern Gulf of Mexico and the adjacent onshore can be explained by multiple sources, fades variations, maturation, and post-generation alteration. Genetic families include Jurassic Smackover, Flexure Trend, Upper Cretaceous, and Paleogene oils. Smackover oils have high sulfur contents, pristane/phytane ratios < 1.0, CPI < 1.0, abundant extended hopanes, C 35/C 34 hopane ratios ≥1.0, and C 30/C 29 hopane ratios usuall ≤ 1.0. Flexure Trend oils are similar and contain abundant extended hopanes, high sulfur contents, and V/(Ni + V) > 0.5; these oils are inferred to be sourced in Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous strata. Upper Cretaceous oils contain a distinctive suite of tricyclic and nonhopanoid triterpanes; oleanane is low or absent. Paleogene oils can be recognized by the presence of 18α(H) oleanane and a lack of extended hopanes. These oils occur from south Texas to southern and offshore Louisiana. Two subfamilies can be recognized based on the relative abundance of triterpanes and steranes. These oils have a presumed Paleogene source. Mixing of oil types is quite prevalent at the geographic boundaries of oil types. The initial control on the distribution of oil and gas in the northern Gulf of Mexico is provided by the areal extent of source rocks. Secondary control is due to Cenozoic deposition, which provides the thermal stress to generate, as well as destroy, oil. Salt tectonics provide conduits for migrating fluids to escape the zone of thermal destruction. Mesozoic source strata again become important in the deep Gulf of Mexico, where Cenozoic sediments thin.

  6. 49 CFR 192.612 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 192.612 Section 192.612 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep as measured from... inspections of its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6...

  7. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. (a... shall prepare and follow a procedure to identify its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets...

  8. 49 CFR 192.612 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 192.612 Section 192.612 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep as measured from... inspections of its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6...

  9. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. (a... shall prepare and follow a procedure to identify its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets...

  10. 49 CFR 192.612 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 192.612 Section 192.612 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6 meters) deep as measured from... inspections of its pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets in waters less than 15 feet (4.6...