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Sample records for gulf stream ends

  1. Temperature of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Gulf Stream is one of the strong ocean currents that carries warm water from the sunny tropics to higher latitudes. The current stretches from the Gulf of Mexico up the East Coast of the United States, departs from North America south of the Chesapeake Bay, and heads across the Atlantic to the British Isles. The water within the Gulf Stream moves at the stately pace of 4 miles per hour. Even though the current cools as the water travels thousands of miles, it remains strong enough to moderate the Northern European climate. The image above was derived from the infrared measurements of the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on a nearly cloud-free day over the east coast of the United States. The coldest waters are shown as purple, with blue, green, yellow, and red representing progressively warmer water. Temperatures range from about 7 to 22 degrees Celsius. The core of the Gulf Stream is very apparent as the warmest water, dark red. It departs from the coast at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. The cool, shelf water from the north entrains the warmer outflows from the Chesapeake and Delaware Bays. The north wall of the Gulf Stream reveals very complex structure associated with frontal instabilities that lead to exchanges between the Gulf Stream and inshore waters. Several clockwise-rotating warm core eddies are evident north of the core of the Gulf Stream, which enhance the exchange of heat and water between the coastal and deep ocean. Cold core eddies, which rotate counter clockwise, are seen south of the Gulf Stream. The one closest to Cape Hatteras is entraining very warm Gulf Stream waters on its northwest circumference. Near the coast, shallower waters have warmed due to solar heating, while the deeper waters offshore are markedly cooler (dark blue). MODIS made this observation on May 8, 2000, at 11:45 a.m. EDT. For more information, see the MODIS-Ocean web page. The sea surface temperature image was created at the University of Miami using

  2. The Gulf Stream and Density of Fluids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landstrom, Erich

    2006-01-01

    A few kilometers from the shores of Palm Beach County, Florida, is the Gulf Stream current--a remarkable "river" within an ocean. The current's journey across the Atlantic Ocean connects southeast Florida and southwest Great Britain as it streams steadily north at speeds of 97 km a day; moving 100 times as much water as all the rivers on Earth.…

  3. Lagrangian coherent structures in the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Wilson, Chris; Green, Melissa

    2015-11-01

    Finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) is calculated to identify Lagrangian coherent structures in the Gulf Stream region. The velocity fields are determined using the geostrophic velocities derived from satellite altimetry data. The coherent structures in and around the Gulf Stream are delineated by the both positive and negative FTLE ridges, and represent boundaries between dynamically distinct regions that are important to investigate transport and mixing processes in the ocean. Alternating positive and negative FTLE ridge patterns are found to line the meandering jet, which indicate the regions of entrainment and detrainment along the jet. Results compare well with the Bower kinematic model of a meandering jet, although it is clear that the kinematic model is an over-simplification of the jet dynamics, and studying the dynamics of vortex interaction with the jet is important for understanding fluid transfer in the Gulf Stream region.

  4. Turbine under Gulf Stream: Potential energy source

    SciTech Connect

    Venezia, W.A.; Holt, J.

    1995-09-01

    Turbine under the Gulf Stream (TUGS) is a project to design, build, and deploy the prototypes necessary to demonstrate the economic and technical feasibility of generating electric power from the Gulf Stream. The project is based in part on new generator designs and emerging materials technologies. Its successful completion would demonstrate the technology and produce prototype turbines that can be mass produced and sold with service support. Past research and experimentation indicates that energy can be generated from the Gulf Stream. Problems exist such as fluctuations in the current`s axis and inconsistency. Above all, the ocean is a difficult environment in which to work. Therefore, the question is not whether or not a generator can be put in the ocean to generate electricity, but rather can it be done in an economically and environmentally sound way and still be practical?

  5. Florida, Bahamas, Cuba and Gulf Stream, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This unique photo offers a view of the Florida peninsula, western Bahamas, north central Cuba and the deep blue waters of the Gulf Stream, that hugs the east coast of Florida (27.0N, 82.0W). In addition to being an excellent photograph for showing the geographical relationships between the variety of landforms in this scene, the typical effect of the land-sea breeze is very much in evidence as few clouds over water, cumulus build up over landmass.

  6. Modeling the Gulf Stream System: How Far from Reality?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choa, Yi; Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Bryan, Frank O.; Holland, William R.

    1996-01-01

    Analyses of a primitive equation ocean model simulation of the Atlantic Ocean circulation at 1/6 deg horizontal resolution are presented with a focus on the Gulf Stream region. Among many successful features of this simulation, this letter describes the Gulf Stream separation from the coast of North America near Cape Hatteras, meandering of the Gulf Stream between Cape Hatteras and the Grand Banks, and the vertical structure of temperature and velocity associated with the Gulf Stream. These results demonstrate significant improvement in modeling the Gulf Stream system using basin- to global scale ocean general circulation models. Possible reasons responsible for the realistic Gulf Stream simulation are discussed, contrasting the major differences between the present model configuration and those of previous eddy resolving studies.

  7. The influence of the Gulf Stream on wintertime European blocking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Reilly, Christopher H.; Minobe, Shoshiro; Kuwano-Yoshida, Akira

    2015-11-01

    Wintertime blocking is responsible for extended periods of anomalously cold and dry weather over Europe. In this study, the influence of the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature (SST) front on wintertime European blocking is investigated using a reanalysis dataset and a pair of atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations. The AGCM is forced with realistic and smoothed Gulf Stream SST, and blocking frequency over Europe is found to depend crucially on the Gulf Stream SST front. In the absence of the sharp SST gradient European blocking is significantly reduced and occurs further downstream. The Gulf Stream is found to significantly influence the surface temperature anomalies during blocking periods and the occurrence of associated cold spells. In particular the cold spell peak, located in central Europe, disappears in the absence of the Gulf Stream SST front. The nature of the Gulf Stream influence on European blocking development is then investigated using composite analysis. The presence of the Gulf Stream SST front is important in capturing the observed quasi-stationary development of European blocking. The development is characterised by increased lower-tropospheric meridional eddy heat transport in the Gulf Stream region and increased eddy kinetic energy at upper-levels, which acts to reinforce the quasi-stationary jet. When the Gulf Stream SST is smoothed the storm track activity is weaker, the development is less consistent and European blocking occurs less frequently.

  8. The July 1990 Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, G. R.; Mied, R. P.; Ochadlick, A. R.; Kobrick, M.; Smith, P. M.; Askari, F.; Lai, R. J.; Sheres, D.; Morrison, J. M.; Beal, R. C.

    1991-01-01

    The specific scientific tasks addressed in the July 1990 Gulf Stream (GS) experiment were the following: (1) Kelvin wake behavior across fronts at various ship speeds, (2) the physics of temperature front/radar cross section (RCS) mismatch, (3) wave-current interactions in curvature fronts, and (4) the hydrodynamic structure and origin of synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) slick-like features. Overall, the GS Experiment was most successful, and about 60 percent of the planned data was collected. On-going efforts concentrate on the analysis and interpretation of the data. An overview of the experiment and preliminary results of the data analysis are given.

  9. Rapid evolution of a Gulf Stream warm-core ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T.; Backus, R.; Cowles, T.; Baker, K.; Blackwelder, P.; Brown, O.; Evans, R.; Olson, D.; Fryxell, G.; Mountain, D.

    1984-01-01

    Satellite images are used to show that major alterations in the structure of Gulf Stream warm-core rings can occur during very short periods of two to five days when an interaction with the Gulf Stream is particularly intense. The role of these interactions in the evolution of a ring are discussed.

  10. Gulf Stream eddies - Recent observations in the western Sargasso Sea.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, P. L.; Knauss, J. A.; Strong, A. E.

    1973-01-01

    A cyclonic Gulf Stream eddy was observed in the western Sargasso Sea by satellite infrared measurements and later confirmed by ship measurements. Fourteen months of observations indicate that the eddy moved southwestward at an average rate of 1 mile per day. The evidence suggests that the eddy was absorbed by the Gulf Stream off Florida.

  11. Gulf Stream - subtropical gyre properties across two Dansgaard-Oeschger cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogakker, B. A. A.; Downy, F.; Andersson, M. A.; Chapman, M. R.; Elderfield, H.; McCave, I. N.; Lenton, T. M.; Grützner, J.

    2013-12-01

    Salinity increase in the subtropical gyre system may have pre-conditioned the North Atlantic Ocean for a rapid return to stronger overturning circulation and high-latitude warming following meltwater events during the Last Glacial period. Here we investigate the Gulf Stream - subtropical gyre system properties over Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) cycles 14 to 12, including Heinrich ice-rafting event 5. During the Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum a positive gradient in surface dwelling planktonic foraminifera δ18O (Globigerinoides ruber) can be observed between the Gulf Stream and subtropical gyre, due to decreasing temperature, increasing salinity, and a change from summer to year-round occurrence of G. ruber. We assess whether this gradient was a common feature during stadial-interstadial climate oscillations of Marine Isotope Stage 3, by comparing existing G. ruber δ18O from ODP Site 1060 (subtropical gyre location) and new data from ODP Site 1056 (Gulf Stream location) between 54 and 46 ka. Our results suggest that this gradient was largely absent during the period studied. During the major warm DO interstadials 14 and 12 we infer a more zonal and wider Gulf Stream, influencing both ODP Sites 1056 and 1060. A Gulf Stream presence during these major interstadials is also suggested by the large vertical δ18O gradient between shallow dwelling planktonic foraminifera species, especially G. ruber, and the deep dwelling species Globorotalia inflata at site 1056, which we associate with strong summer stratification and Gulf Stream presence. A major reduction in this vertical δ18O gradient from 51 ka until the end of Heinrich event 5 at 48.5 ka suggests site 1056 was situated within the subtropical gyre in this mainly cold period, from which we infer a migration of the Gulf Stream to a position nearer to the continental shelf, indicative of a narrower Gulf Stream with possibly reduced transport.

  12. Gulf Stream model. [which considers surface elevation deviations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Surface elevation deviations in the Gulf Stream region off the eastern coast of the United States between Wallops Island, Virginia and Miami, Florida were investigated. The main causes of surface elevation deviations are geoid perturbations due to the continental shelf and the geostrophic adjustment of the density field due to the Gulf Stream. Quantitative surface elevation profiles were calculated based on geophysical measurements of gravity anomalies and hydrographic data. The results are presented graphically along with contemporaneous weather data. Comparisons are made between the profiles based on hydrographic data and a mean theoretical model. The theory of geostrophic flows including some classical Gulf Stream models is also presented briefly.

  13. Evidence for atmospheric carbon dioxide variability over the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Two airborne surveys of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration have been conducted over the Gulf Stream off the east coast of Virginia and North Carolina on September 7-8, 1983. In situ CO2 data were acquired at an aircraft altitude of 300 m on trajectories that transcected the Gulf Stream near 36 deg N 73 deg W. Data show evidence of a CO2 concentration increase by 4 ppm to 15 ppm above the nominal atmospheric background value of 345 ppm. These enhanced values were associated with the physical location of the Gulf Stream prior to the passage of a weak cold front.

  14. SAR observations of the Gulf Stream during SWADE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vachon, Paris W.; Liu, Antony K.; Mollo-Christensen, Erik

    1992-01-01

    The Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) has gathered SAR observations of the Gulf Stream that show a change in ocean surface brightness; this may be due to the effects of a change in air-sea temperature difference across the observed edge, where the boundary is defined by warm, quickly flowing Gulf Stream water and cooler, relatively stationary shelf water. The two images discussed indicate the possibility of deepening understanding of Gulf Stream front dynamics by using the abundant spatial data of SAR imagery, in conjunction with more conventional (point-like) data on hydrography and currents.

  15. New marine evidence for a Late Wisconsinan ice stream in Amundsen Gulf, Arctic Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLean, B.; Blasco, S.; Bennett, R.; Lakeman, T.; Hughes-Clarke, J.; Kuus, P.; Patton, E.

    2015-04-01

    Amundsen Gulf and adjoining Dolphin and Union Strait and Coronation Gulf form the southwestern end of the Northwest Passage adjacent to the Beaufort Sea. Extensive high resolution multibeam sonar imagery and sub-bottom profiles of the seabed have been acquired, primarily in Amundsen Gulf, by ArcticNet and the Ocean Mapping Group at the University of New Brunswick. These data reveal a variety of seabed landforms including mega-scale glacial ridge and groove lineations, drumlins, moraines, iceberg scours, bedrock outcrops, and discontinuous sediment deposits of variable thickness. The lineations are widespread, especially in southeastern Amundsen Gulf. They resemble modern and paleo bedforms reported from Antarctica, Svalbard, Greenland and other Canadian Arctic channels, where they have been ascribed to ice streams. The glacial sole marks on the seabed in Amundsen Gulf and regional data from the adjacent mainland and islands outline the configuration of a glacial ice stream from the Laurentide Ice Sheet that occupied Amundsen Gulf and adjoining waterways during the Late Wisconsinan. Part of the northwestward flowing ice stream was deflected around the Colville Mountains on Victoria Island and rejoined the main ice stream in Amundsen Gulf by way of Prince Albert Sound. The grounded Amundsen Gulf ice stream extended northwestward to the outer slope in the Beaufort Sea where it was buttressed by Arctic Shelf Ice. Maximum ice stream extent is inferred to have been coincident with the Late Glacial Maximum. Multi-sequence ice-contact sediments and stratigraphic relations with glaciomarine sediments indicate that several ice advances and retreats occurred in the northwestern part of the gulf. Final retreat from the maximum position began prior to 13,000 cal yr BP and terrestrial dates indicate that the retreating ice front had reached Dolphin and Union Strait by about 12.5 cal ka BP.

  16. Submesoscale Instabilities on the North Wall of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymak, J. M.; Shearman, R. K.; Lee, C. M.; D'Asaro, E. A.; Thomas, L. N.; Sundermeyer, M. A.; Harcourt, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Repeated kilometer-scale surveys of the north wall of the Gulf Stream made while following a Lagrangian float reveal filaments of warm water peeling off the Gulf Stream at regular intervals. Visible from satellite, these filaments have an along-front scale of over 50 km, and a cross-front scale of approximately 10 km. They consist of warm salty Gulf Stream water extruding into the cold fresh water to the north. Shipboard surveys had very high lateral and vertical resolution, and reveal that these features extend subsurface, peeling off the wall to a depth of over 150 m, and are tilted away from the wall at the surface and join it at the base of the Stream. These filaments were ubiquitous on the north wall, appearing approximately every 200 km, with a tendency to be on the trailing edge of Gulf Stream meanders. We propose that this mechanism is an important way for the Gulf Stream to lose heat to the north.Two finely sampled sections of salinity (colors) across the north wall of the Gulf Stream, showing separated warm salty filaments to the north (postive x).

  17. The role of the Gulf Stream in European climate.

    PubMed

    Palter, Jaime B

    2015-01-01

    The Gulf Stream carries the warm, poleward return flow of the wind-driven North Atlantic subtropical gyre and the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation. This northward flow drives a significant meridional heat transport. Various lines of evidence suggest that Gulf Stream heat transport profoundly influences the climate of the entire Northern Hemisphere and, thus, Europe's climate on timescales of decades and longer. The Gulf Stream's influence is mediated through feedback processes between the ocean, atmosphere, and cryosphere. This review synthesizes paleoclimate archives, model simulations, and the instrumental record, which collectively suggest that decadal and longer-scale variability of the Gulf Stream's heat transport manifests in changes in European temperature, precipitation, and storminess. Given that anthropogenic climate change is projected to weaken the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation, associated changes in European climate are expected. However, large uncertainty in the magnitude of the anticipated weakening undermines the predictability of the future climate in Europe. PMID:25560606

  18. Salinity Measurements During the Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Howden, S.; Goodberlet, M.

    2000-01-01

    The salinity of the open ocean is important for understanding ocean circulation, for understanding energy exchange with the atmosphere and for improving models to predict weather and climate. Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (1 psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approx. 0.1 psu) required to be scientifically viable. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of a compliment of airborne microwave instruments (radiometers and scatterometer) and ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the compliment of instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer. A GPS backscatter experiment was also part of the package. These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Surface salinity measurements were provided by the RN Cape Henlopen and MN Oleander (thermosalinographs) plus salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the RN Cape Henopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made

  19. Influence of the Gulf Stream on the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Minobe, Shoshiro; Kuwano-Yoshida, Akira; Komori, Nobumasa; Xie, Shang-Ping; Small, Richard Justin

    2008-03-13

    The Gulf Stream transports large amounts of heat from the tropics to middle and high latitudes, and thereby affects weather phenomena such as cyclogenesis and low cloud formation. But its climatic influence, on monthly and longer timescales, remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how the warm current affects the free atmosphere above the marine atmospheric boundary layer. Here we consider the Gulf Stream's influence on the troposphere, using a combination of operational weather analyses, satellite observations and an atmospheric general circulation model. Our results reveal that the Gulf Stream affects the entire troposphere. In the marine boundary layer, atmospheric pressure adjustments to sharp sea surface temperature gradients lead to surface wind convergence, which anchors a narrow band of precipitation along the Gulf Stream. In this rain band, upward motion and cloud formation extend into the upper troposphere, as corroborated by the frequent occurrence of very low cloud-top temperatures. These mechanisms provide a pathway by which the Gulf Stream can affect the atmosphere locally, and possibly also in remote regions by forcing planetary waves. The identification of this pathway may have implications for our understanding of the processes involved in climate change, because the Gulf Stream is the upper limb of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which has varied in strength in the past and is predicted to weaken in response to human-induced global warming in the future. PMID:18337820

  20. Influence of the Gulf Stream on the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minobe, Shoshiro; Kuwano-Yoshida, Akira; Komori, Nobumasa; Xie, Shang-Ping; Small, Richard Justin

    2008-03-01

    The Gulf Stream transports large amounts of heat from the tropics to middle and high latitudes, and thereby affects weather phenomena such as cyclogenesis and low cloud formation. But its climatic influence, on monthly and longer timescales, remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how the warm current affects the free atmosphere above the marine atmospheric boundary layer. Here we consider the Gulf Stream's influence on the troposphere, using a combination of operational weather analyses, satellite observations and an atmospheric general circulation model. Our results reveal that the Gulf Stream affects the entire troposphere. In the marine boundary layer, atmospheric pressure adjustments to sharp sea surface temperature gradients lead to surface wind convergence, which anchors a narrow band of precipitation along the Gulf Stream. In this rain band, upward motion and cloud formation extend into the upper troposphere, as corroborated by the frequent occurrence of very low cloud-top temperatures. These mechanisms provide a pathway by which the Gulf Stream can affect the atmosphere locally, and possibly also in remote regions by forcing planetary waves. The identification of this pathway may have implications for our understanding of the processes involved in climate change, because the Gulf Stream is the upper limb of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation, which has varied in strength in the past and is predicted to weaken in response to human-induced global warming in the future.

  1. Seasonal variability of the Gulf Stream from satellite altimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Lee-Lueng; Vazquez, Jorge; Parke, Michael E.

    1987-01-01

    The nearly continuous 3.5 years of altimeter data in the western North Atlantic Ocean from the GEOS 3 mission (April 1975 to November 1978) have been used to study the seasonal variability of the Gulf Stream. The differences between altimetric measurements of sea surface height made at satellite ground track intersections, called crossovers, are utilized to construct time series of sea level variations. The results indicate that the Gulf Stream in the region off Cape Hatteras has a pronounced seasonal variability. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the seasonal cycle in terms of cross-stream sea level difference is about 15 cm, with a maximum in April and a minimum in December. The result is in good agreement with historic hydrographic observations and recent direct measurements of the Gulf Stream. The mechanisms responsible for the observed seasonal variability are discussed.

  2. Symmetric instability in the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Leif N.; Taylor, John R.; Ferrari, Raffaele; Joyce, Terrence M.

    2013-07-01

    Analyses of wintertime surveys of the Gulf Stream (GS) conducted as part of the CLIvar MOde water Dynamic Experiment (CLIMODE) reveal that water with negative potential vorticity (PV) is commonly found within the surface boundary layer (SBL) of the current. The lowest values of PV are found within the North Wall of the GS on the isopycnal layer occupied by Eighteen Degree Water, suggesting that processes within the GS may contribute to the formation of this low-PV water mass. In spite of large heat loss, the generation of negative PV was primarily attributable to cross-front advection of dense water over light by Ekman flow driven by winds with a down-front component. Beneath a critical depth, the SBL was stably stratified yet the PV remained negative due to the strong baroclinicity of the current, suggesting that the flow was symmetrically unstable. A large eddy simulation configured with forcing and flow parameters based on the observations confirms that the observed structure of the SBL is consistent with the dynamics of symmetric instability (SI) forced by wind and surface cooling. The simulation shows that both strong turbulence and vertical gradients in density, momentum, and tracers coexist in the SBL of symmetrically unstable fronts. SI is a shear instability that draws its energy from geostrophic flows. A parameterization for the rate of kinetic energy (KE) extraction by SI applied to the observations suggests that SI could result in a net dissipation of 33 mW m-2 and 1 mW m-2 for surveys with strong and weak fronts, respectively. The surveys also showed signs of baroclinic instability (BCI) in the SBL, namely thermally direct vertical circulations that advect biomass and PV. The vertical circulation was inferred using the omega equation and used to estimate the rate of release of available potential energy (APE) by BCI. The rate of APE release was found to be comparable in magnitude to the net dissipation associated with SI. This result points to an

  3. Sea level differences across the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zlotnicki, Victor

    1991-01-01

    The sea level differences between the Sargasso Sea and the slope waters across the Gulf Stream region, averaged between 73 and 61 deg W, and the comparable areas across the Kuroshio extension region, averaged between 143 and 156 deg E, were estimated using the Geosat altimeter data obtained between November 1986 and December 1988. The sea-level differences between the two regions showed a strong correlation between the northwest Atlantic and Pacific, dominated by annual cycles that peak in late-September to mid-October, with about 9 cm (the Gulf Stream region) and about 6.9 cm (Kuroshio region) amplitudes.

  4. Radar Backscatter Across the Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperature Front

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Li, F. K.; Walsh, E. J.; Lou, S. H.

    1998-01-01

    Ocean backscatter signatures were measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory airborne NUSCAT K(sub u)-band scatterometer across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front. The measurements were made during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991.

  5. The Gulf Stream - Troposphere connection: warm and cold paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czaja, Arnaud; Sheldon, Luke; Vanniere, Benoit; Parfitt, Rhys

    2015-04-01

    In this talk, the role of moist processes in ocean-atmosphere coupling over the Gulf Stream will be discussed, using ERA interim reanalysis data (1979-2012) and nested simulations with the UK Met Office Unified Model. The focus is on the cold season (December through February). Two types of moist processes will be highlighted. First, shallow convection driven by surface fluxes of heat and moisture, usually found behind the cold front of extra-tropical cyclones. It will be shown that the warm flank of the Gulf Stream is instrumental in amplifying these convective events. In addition, it will be suggested that they are also responsible for simulated changes in precipitation found in numerical experiments with Atmospheric General Circulation Models forced with smoothed and realistic sea surface temperature (SST) distributions. The impact of this type of air-sea interaction on the larger scale is however unclear as it mostly affects low levels (below 700hPa). The second type of moist processes of relevance is that of moist inertial ascent along the cold front of extra-tropical cyclones. It will be shown that such ascent typically occurs 10% of the time in winter and that it is preferentially rooted over the warm flank of the Gulf Stream. The moist inertial ascent is intense and narrow, and not compensated within a given synoptic system. As a result, and despite being infrequent, it will be shown to contribute crucially to the time mean upward motion over the Gulf Stream at middle (500hPa) and upper tropospheric levels (300 hPa). This result suggests that warm advection by the Gulf Stream acts in effect as a horizontally broad, downward push, on air masses above the boundary layer, a push required to compensate for the upward mass flux in the moist inertial ascent.

  6. Gulf Stream-Subtropical Gyre Properties Across Two Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogakker, B.; Chapman, M.; Elderfield, H.; McCave, I. N. N.; Gruetzner, J.

    2014-12-01

    It has been suggested that salinity increases in the subtropical gyre system may have pre-conditioned the North Atlantic Ocean for a rapid return to stronger overturning circulation and high-latitude warming following meltwater events during the Last Glacial period (Schmidt et al., 2006). Planktonic foraminifera oxygen isotopes (δ18O) measured on the surface dwelling Globigerinoides ruber show a positive gradient going from the Gulf Stream into the subtropical gyre during the Holocene as well as the Last Glacial Maximum (Keigwin, 2004). This gradient is due to decreasing temperatures, increasing salinity and a change from a summer to year round occurrence of G. ruber(Keigwin, 2004). During rapid climate oscillations between 54 and 46 ka of Marine Isotope Stage 3, including Heinrich ice-rafting event 5, this gradient may have been largely absent; G. ruber δ18O of ODP Site 1060 (subtropical gyre location) and ODP Site 1056 (Gulf Stream location) are virtually identical. Lower G. ruber δ18O that characterize the major warm DO interstadials 14 and 12 suggest a mainly summer occurrence of this species and indicate a more zonal and wider Gulf Stream influencing both ODP Sites. A large vertical δ18O gradient between shallow dwelling G. ruber and the deep dwelling species Globorotalia inflataat site 1056 is associated with strong summer stratification, supporting a Gulf Stream presence during these major interstadials. From about 51 ka until the end of Heinrich event 5 G. ruber δ18O is increased and the δ18O gradient between G. ruber and G. inflata is greatly reduced, suggesting a more year round occurrence of G. ruber and absence of summer stratification at site 1056, associated with subtropical gyre conditions. From this we infer that the Gulf Stream may have taken up a position nearer to the continental shelf during this cold period, where it may have been narrower with reduced transport.

  7. Gulf Stream Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Observations for North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muglia, M.; Edge, B.; Lowcher, C.

    2014-12-01

    North Carolina and Florida are likely the only two states on the US east coast that have practical access to energy extraction from the Gulf Stream. After leaving the Florida Straits, the Gulf Stream in the region offshore of Cape Hatteras, NC exhibits the least variability in position of any location on the east coast, while simultaneously being closest to land. These important characteristics have made this area the focus of observations to quantify the hydrokinetic energy that may be available from the Gulf Stream for the state of North Carolina. Three types of observations to quantify the energy resource off NC began in 2013. A 150 kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was moored on the 225 meter isobath at the location estimated to be best for energy extraction, and recovered after a 9-month continuous deployment. Another ADCP was moored in nearly the same location to continue observations, and will be retrieved this fall. Currents from the first deployment averaged 1.15 m/s, and the average Betz Power was 0.8 kW/m2 at a depth of 30 meters over the 9-month duration. Significant variability in current speed, and thus power, occurred over the deployment period. Additionally, current measurements from a vessel mounted 300 kHz ADCP were made from water depths of 100m to 1000 m on a cross-isobath transect that included the location of the ADCP mooring. Currents from the ship transects are still under evaluation and comparison with the 150 kHz ADCP mooring, and will provide valuable information about the spatial variability of the current and its dependence on depth. A coastal ocean radar was added to an existing radar network to provide hourly surface current measurements over the larger study area. Methods to use the relative vorticity in the surface currents to identify the shoreward front of the Gulf Stream are being developed and compared with existing frontal determinations such as Navy Gulf Stream frontal charts produced bi-daily. Frontal estimates are

  8. A census of Gulf Stream rings, spring 1975

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, P. L.; Worthington, L. V.; Cheney, R. E.

    1978-01-01

    During 1975 several shipboard expendable bathythermograph surveys plus satellite infrared imagery provided a nearly synoptic view of the distribution and number of Gulf Stream rings in the western North Atlantic. Twelve rings were identified; nine were cyclonic (cold core) rings and three were anticyclonic (warm core) rings. This is the largest number of rings ever observed during a short period of time (4 months). Evidence suggests that the mean movement of these rings was southwestward.

  9. Investigation of AIRSAR signatures of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, G. R.; Lee, J. S.; Schuler, D. L.; Marmorino, G. O.; Askari, F.; Hoppel, K.; Kaiser, J. A. C.; Keller, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    Extensive Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (AIRSAR) measurements were made on 20 July 1990 during the NRL Gulf Stream (GS) experiment which addressed a number of scientific questions relating to SAR imaging of the ocean surface in the presence of variable currents and the background thermohaline circulation. The nature of the electromagnetic (e.m.) backscatter from the North edge of the GS using polarimetric signatures and amplitude imagery from the AIRSAR data is addressed.

  10. Submesoscale Phenomena and Consequences around the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McWilliams, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Using the computational technique of downscaling a basin-scale,mesoscale-resolving Atlantic circulation simulation though multiplynested subdomains, we see a variety of submesoscale phenomena thatarise in the strong current environment of the Gulf Stream. Theseinclude submesoscale coherent vortices that detach from bottomboundary layers on continental and island slopes, intrusive densefilaments near the surface, frontogenesis along the eastern/northernwalls of the Stream, streamers that detach from meander crests, commainstabilities that develop after meander troughs, and diabatic watermass transformations and injections into the pycnocline. Theorganizing questions are what is missing in conventionalmesoscale-resolving simulations, and how might it need to beparameterized.

  11. Effects of the Gulf Stream on ocean waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holthuijsen, L. H.; Tolman, H. L.

    1991-01-01

    In the present study a third-generation numerical wave model is used to study effects of a straight Gulf Stream ring on ocean waves in swell and storm conditions. The model accounts for all relevant processes of propagation, generation, and dissipation of the waves (including current effects) without imposing a priori restraints on the spectral development of the waves. The dominating mechanism affecting the waves appears to be current-induced refraction even though the short-crestedness of the incoming waves tends to mask its effects (also in swell conditions). Depending on wind and wave conditions, refraction may trap locally generated waves in the straight Gulf Stream or it may reflect wave energy back to the open ocean. In the Gulf Stream ring, refraction induces a considerable variation in significant wave height and short-crestedness, but it hardly affects the mean wave direction. In storm conditions the processes of generation and dissipation are considerably enhanced in countercurrent situations and reduced following-current situations.

  12. The dynamics of oceanic fronts. I - The Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, T. W.

    1980-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of the mean hydrographic properties of large-scale density fronts in the upper ocean is considered. The dynamics is studied by posing an initial value problem starting with a near-surface discharge of buoyant water with a prescribed density deficit into an ambient stationary fluid of uniform density; full time dependent diffusion and Navier-Stokes equations are then used with constant eddy diffusion and viscosity coefficients, together with a constant Coriolis parameter. Scaling analysis reveals three independent scales of the problem including the radius of deformation of the inertial length, buoyancy length, and diffusive length scales. The governing equations are then suitably scaled and the resulting normalized equations are shown to depend on the Ekman number alone for problems of oceanic interest. It is concluded that the mean Gulf Stream dynamics can be interpreted in terms of a solution of the Navier-Stokes and diffusion equations, with the cross-stream circulation responsible for the maintenance of the front; this mechanism is suggested for the maintenance of the Gulf Stream dynamics.

  13. Gulf Stream Slope Eddies and their Submesocale Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gula, J.; Molemaker, M. J.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Slope eddies are commonly observed and understood as the product of an instability of the Gulf Stream along the U.S. seaboard. Here we address the finite-amplitude behavior of a slope eddy after formation as a cut-off meander over the Charleston Bump, including its structure, propagation, and emergent submesoscale interior and neighboring substructure, as simulated in very high resolution simulations (dx=150m) of the Gulf Stream along the U.S. seaboard. A very rich submesoscale structure is revealed inside the slope eddy. Meander-induced frontogenesis sharpens the gradients and triggers submesoscale barotropic shear instability on the rim of the eddy. The small scale meandering perturbations become rolled up vortices which are advected back in the interior of the slope eddy. The slope eddy also locally creates a strong southward flow against the shelf leading to boundary generation of centrifugal instability. To illustrate and quantify the impact of a slope eddy in trapping material, generating cross-shelf exchanges and in mixing tracer properties, virtual Lagrangian particles are deployed in the model solutions. We discuss in particular diabatic mixing by the submesoscale processes.

  14. Dryden Fllight Reseach Facility, Edwards, California STA (Shuttle Training Aircraft, Gulf Stream II)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Dryden Fllight Reseach Facility, Edwards, California STA (Shuttle Training Aircraft, Gulf Stream II) flys chase as STS-41returns from it's mission to Deploy Ulysses Spacecraft... Discovery's main gear is about to touch down at Edwards Air Foce Base to end a four-day mission in space for it's five-man crew. The vehicle landed at 6:57 a.m. Onboard the spacecraft were Astronauts Richard N. Richards, Robert D Cabana, William M Sheperd, Bruce E. Melnick and Thomas D. Akers.

  15. Large-scale penetration of Gulf Stream water onto the continental shelf north of Cape Hatteras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gawarkiewicz, Glen; Church, Thomas M.; Luther, George W., III; Ferdelman, Timothy G.; Caruso, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The presence of Gulf Stream water on the continental shelf as much as 60 km north of Cape Hatteras was observed during a hydrographic cruise in the summer of 1990. Gulf Stream water was concentrated at mid-depth between 10 and 30 m and penetrated the shelfbreak front which normally separates the shelf water from slope water and Gulf Stream water. Velocities of Gulf Stream water in the upper 110 m of the water column along the 1000 m isobath indicated a flow of 18 to 25 cm/s directed towards the northwest. Gulf Stream water on the shelf is considered to be associated with low values of fluorescence, transmissivity, and nutrient concentrations relative to adjacent shelf water.

  16. Sea turtle distribution along the boundary of the Gulf Stream current off eastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, W.; Fritts, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    Aerial surveys, out to 222 km off the east coast of central Florida during August 1980, revealed that marine turtles were distributed in a narrow zone west of the Gulf Stream. Of 255 loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta, only three were observed east of the western boundary of the Gulf Stream. Radiometric thermometry revealed that the waters occupied by most Caretta were markedly cooler than the nearby waters of the Gulf Stream. Of 18 leatherback turtles, Dermochelys coriacea, all were seen west of the Gulf Stream in waters less than 70 m in depth. Marine turtles off eastern Florida are confined seasonally to nearshore waters west of the Gulf Stream. The records of Dermochelys in nearshore waters are in contrast with a deep water oceanic ecology often hypothesized for this species.

  17. Gulf Stream surface convergence imaged by synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Jansen, R. W.; Valenzuela, G. R.; Trump, C. L.; Lee, J. S.; Kaiser, J. A. C.

    1994-09-01

    On July 20, 1990, the north edge of the Gulf Stream (36.7°N, 72.0°W) was sampled by the R/V Cape Henlopen and simultaneously imaged by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Hydrographic measurements show an abrupt surface front separating warm, salty Gulf Stream water in the south from a filament of cool, fresh (<33 practical salinity unit (psu)) water to the north. The filament lies within the stream and is likely water entrained from the continental shelf. The southern boundary of the filament is marked by increased surface wave breaking in a 100- to 200-m-wide zone, accumulations of Sargassum, and an orthogonal velocity change of 20 cm/s. The front is manifested in a sequence of SAR images as a narrow line having returns 1-2 dB higher than background. (A second, transient SAR line occurs near the northern filament boundary.) The observations are compared with model calculations of the surface wave hydrodynamics and radar scattering. The ocean waves are driven by southwesterly 8-m/s winds and interact with the front to produce primarily an enhancement of 2- to 3-m waves over a ≲200-m-wide region centered downwind of the front. Using a composite scattering radar model along with measured breaking-wave statistics, we show that the observed modulations in the radar backscatter can be accounted for through breaking-wave and tilted Bragg wave scattering effects. These results further show that SAR images of the ocean surface can be exploited for detailed study of particular ocean processes.

  18. Remote sensing of Gulf Stream using GEOS-3 radar altimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Radar altimeter measurements from the GEOS-3 satellite to the ocean surface indicated the presence of expected geostrophic height differences across the the Gulf Stream. Dynamic sea surface heights were found by both editing and filtering the raw sea surface heights and then referencing these processed data to a 5 minute x 5 minute geoid. Any trend between the processed data and the geoid was removed by subtracting out a linear fit to the residuals in the open ocean. The mean current velocity of 107 + or - 29 cm/sec calculated from the dynamic heights for all orbits corresponded with velocities obtained from hydrographic methods. Also, dynamic topographic maps were produced for August, September, and October 1975. Results pointed out limitations in the accuracy of the geoid, height anomaly deteriorations due to filtering, and lack of dense time and space distribution of measurements.

  19. Strong eddy compensation for the Gulf Stream heat transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saenko, Oleg A.

    2015-12-01

    Using a high-resolution ocean model forced with high-resolution atmospheric fields, a 5 year mean heat budget of the upper ocean in the Gulf Stream (GS) region is analyzed. The heat brought to the region with the mean flows along the GS path is 2-3 times larger than the heat loss to the atmosphere, with the difference being balanced by a strong cooling effect due to lateral eddy heat fluxes. However, over a broad area off the Grand Banks, the eddies warm the uppermost ocean layers, partly compensating for the loss of heat to the atmosphere. The upward eddy heat flux, which brings heat from the deeper ocean to the upper layers, is 30-80% of the surface heat loss.

  20. Eighteen Degree Water formation within the Gulf Stream during CLIMODE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Terrence M.; Thomas, Leif N.; Dewar, William K.; Girton, James B.

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of wintertime CLIMODE data for 2007 indicates that a substantial portion of new Eighteen Degree Water (EDW) is likely ventilated within the eastward flowing Gulf Stream (GS) between 67°W and 52°W longitudes, possibly exceeding that formed elsewhere in the northern Sargasso Sea. Use of some global air-sea interaction data sets applied to the study region for Feb/Mar of 2007 indicate that this winter may have been anomalously energetic in air-sea exchange compared to the mean of the prior 19 yr. The largest heat and freshwater fluxes found directly over the meandering warm core of the Gulf Stream are capable of removing most of the subtropical heat anomaly of the GS, but cross-frontal fluxes of salinity are required to account for the observed regional salinity structure. An isopycnal diffusivity of ˜100 m2 s-1 is inferred from the salinity balance. This mixing would also account for the observation that EDW formed in the GS is slightly fresher than that formed in northern Sargasso Sea. The lateral flux of heat across the GS north wall also acts to cool the resulting EDW water, but the heat balance for EDW production is largely determined from GS advection and air-sea fluxes, in contrast to salinity. Based on oxygen saturation data, we estimate that 1.8-3.0 Sv-yr of new EDW is formed in the GS for the winter of 2007. EDW originating from the GS is generated in a separate location from where it is accumulated in the northern Sargasso Sea. This manner of EDW formation will produce unique characteristics of EDW found in the northern Sargasso Sea: ones that differ in T/S properties from that formed south of the GS under the more traditional 1D, cooling-driven convection process.

  1. Recurring Cold Winters over the Gulf Stream and Implications for Northern Hemisphere Ocean Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strey, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    As polar amplification of climate warming continues, the potential for increased blocking patterns in the Northern Hemisphere jet stream in conjunction with Arctic climate change exists. During such blocking events the Gulf Stream may be exposed to repeated Cold Air Outbreak (CAO) events, especially during winter. Hypothesizing, based upon basic physical and thermodynamic properties of seawater, one would expect increased CAO events to lead alteration of key characteristics of the Gulf Stream. As the Gulf Stream is a well-known participant in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), and the Gulf Stream feeds the North Atlantic Current into the Arctic Ocean, interesting consequences to alterations of this local system into the large-scale general climate circulation are expected. This study uses CESM's POP to examine 30 years of CAO intensive winters alongside 30 years of repeated winter warm events to quantify potential subsequent changes in the AMOC and North Atlantic Arctic Ocean inflow.

  2. On th meridional surface profile of the Gulf Stream at 55 deg W

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallock, Zachariah R.; Teague, William J.

    1995-01-01

    Nine-month records from nine inverted echo sounders (IESs) are analyzed to describe the mean baroclinic Gulf Stream at 55 deg W. IES acoustic travel times are converted to thermocline depth which is optimally interpolated. Kinematic and dynamic parameters (Gulf Stream meridional position, velocity, and vorticity) are calculated. Primary Gulf Stream variabiltiy is attributed to meandering and and changes in direction. A mean, stream-coordinate (relative to Gulf Stream instantaneous position and direction) meridional profile is derived and compared with results presented by other investigators. The mean velocity is estimated at 0.84 m/s directed 14 deg to the right eastward, and the thermocline (12 c) drops 657 m (north to south), corresponding to a baroclinic rise of the surface of 0.87 m. The effect of Gulf Stream curvature on temporal mean profiles is found to be unimportant and of minimal importance overall. The derived, downstream current profile is well represented by a Gaussian function and is about 190 km wide where it crosses zero. Surface baroclinic transport is estimated to be 8.5 x 10(exp 4) sq m/s, and maximum shear (flanking the maximum) is 1.2 x 10(exp -5). Results compare well with other in situ observational results from the same time period. On the other hand, analyses (by others) of concurrent satellite altimetry (Geosat) suggest a considerable narrower, more intense mean Gulf Stream.

  3. Passive Microwave Measurements of Salinity: The Gulf Stream Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LeVine, D. M.; Koblinsky, C.; Haken, M.; Howden, S.; Bingham, F.; Hildebrand, Peter H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Passive microwave sensors at L-band (1.4 GHz) operating from aircraft have demonstrated that salinity can be measured with sufficient accuracy (I psu) to be scientifically meaningful in coastal waters. However, measuring salinity in the open ocean presents unresolved issues largely because of the much greater accuracy (approximately 0.2 psu) required of global maps to be scientifically viable. The development of a satellite microwave instrument to make global measurements of SSS (Sea Surface Salinity) is the focus of a joint JPL/GSFC/NASA ocean research program called Aquarius. In the summer of 1999 a series of measurements called, The Gulf Stream Experiment, were conducted as part of research at the Goddard Space Flight Center to test the potential for passive microwave remote sensing of salinity in the open ocean. The measurements consisted of airborne microwave instruments together with ships and drifters for surface truth. The study area was a 200 km by 100 km rectangle about 250 km east of Delaware Bay between the continental shelf waters and north wall of the Gulf Stream. The primary passive instruments were the ESTAR radiometer (L-band, H-pol) and the SLFMR radiometer (L-band, V-pol). In addition, the instruments on the aircraft included a C-band radiometer (ACMR), an ocean wave scatterometer (ROWS) and an infrared radiometer (for surface temperature). These instruments were mounted on the NASA P-3 Orion aircraft. Sea surface measurements consisted of thermosalinograph data provided by the R/V Cape Henlopen and the MN Oleander, and data from salinity and temperature sensors on three surface drifters deployed from the R/V Cape Henlopen. The primary experiment period was August 26-September 2, 1999. During this period the salinity field within the study area consisted of a gradient on the order of 2-3 psu in the vicinity of the shelf break and a warm core ring with a gradient of 1-2 psu. Detailed maps were made with the airborne sensors on August 28 and 29 and

  4. Evidence of a Weakening Gulf Stream from In-situ Expendable Bathythermograph Data, 1996-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roupe, L.; Baringer, M. O.

    2014-12-01

    A weakening of the Gulf Stream, the upper branch of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation system, has been hypothesized to accelerate sea level rise on the east coast of the United States, caused by changes in the Gulf Stream strength and, hence, sea level difference across the current. It still remains unclear if the Gulf Stream has in fact weakened or remains stable, along with the potential role of natural long-term variability. Tide gauges along the east coast show an accelerated sea level rise from Cape Hatteras to Cape Cod that is 3-4 times higher than global sea level rise. Satellite altimetry shows a weakening gradient in Gulf Stream sea surface height that is highly correlated (r=-0.85) with east coast sea level rise, however, direct velocity measurements showed no significant decrease in Gulf Stream strength over a similar time period. We introduce another in-situ dataset to examine the issues between these conflicting results. Expendable bathythermographs (XBTs) measure temperature at depth directly, and then depth and salinity can be inferred, along with geostrophic velocity and transport. XBT data has been used to measure transport in various current systems, however, the Gulf Stream transport has not been analyzed using the newest high-density XBT data made available since 1996. The trend in sea level difference is determined to be 3.3 +/- 3.2 mm/yr, resulting in an overall decrease of 5.2 cm in sea level from 1996-2013. This result agrees with satellite altimetry results that show a significant decrease in recent years. This data also shows a changing Gulf Stream core position, based on the 15°C isotherm at 200 m, of 0.03°N/yr that is negatively correlated with surface transport (r=-0.25). Issues remain in defining the core and width of the Gulf Stream and with eliminating the possibility of natural variability in the current system.

  5. A non-hydrostatic modeling study of the mesoscale circulations induced by the Gulf Stream filament

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, L.; Raman, S.; Madala, R.V.

    1994-12-31

    The Gulf Stream filament (GSF) is a warm SST anomaly associated with the Gulf Stream (GS) offshore of the eastern US. The size of a typical GSF is about 50 km in width and about 200 km in length. Despite its relatively small scale, the GSF may have a significant impact on the local weather. In this study effort is made to understand the effect of the GSF on the atmospheric mesoscale circulation through numerical experiments.

  6. Wave-current interaction near the Gulf Stream during the surface wave dynamics experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, David W.; Liu, Antony K.; Peng, Chih Y.; Meindl, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study on the wave-current interaction near the local curvature of a Gulf Stream meander. The wave data were obtained from in situ measurements by a pitch-roll discus buoy during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment (SWADE) conducted off Wallops Island, Virginia, from October 1990 to March 1991. Owing to the advection of the Gulf Stream by the semidiurnal tide, the discus buoy was alternately located outside and inside the Gulf Stream. The directional wave measurements from the buoy show the changes in wave direction, wave energy, and directional spreading when waves encountered the current in the Gulf Stream meanders. A wave refraction model, using the ray-tracing method with an estimated Gulf Stream velocity field and meandering condition, was used to simulate wave refraction patterns and to estimate wave parameters at relative locations corresponding to buoy measurements. The numerical simulation shows that a focusing zone of wave rays was formed near the boundary and behind the crest of a simulated Gulf Stream meander. The focusing of wave rays causes changes in wave direction, increases in wave energy, and decreases in wave directional spreading, which are in good agreement with the results from the buoy measurements.

  7. Gulf Stream Meanders: Observations on Propagation and Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, D. Randolph; Johns, William E.

    1982-11-01

    We present a new method for continuously tracking the location of the Gulf Stream using a moored array of inverted echo sounders. Time series of lateral displacements of the front, shown accurate to ± 8 km, have been collected along three sections spaced 100, 150, and 200 km downstream (NE) of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, for a period of 12 months. These records are highly coherent at all periodicities longer than 4 days. From the observed phase lags, a dispersion relationship is presented for the meanders: As the period and wavelength (T, λ) increase from (4 days, 180 km) to (30 days, 600 km), the phase speed decreases smoothly from 40 to 20 km d-1. The meanders exhibited rapid growth at periods longer than 4 days, doubling in variance in each 50-km step downstream. This downstream growth is most appropriately described by a spatial e-folding scale κ-1 ˜400 km for (T, λ) ≲ (9 days, 300 km), and a temporal e-folding scale σ-1 ˜ 6 days for (T, λ) ≳ (14 days, 400 km).

  8. Intrinsic low-frequency variability of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quattrocchi, G.; Pierini, S.; Dijkstra, H. A.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper a process study aimed at analyzing the low-frequency variability of intrinsically oceanic origin of the Gulf Stream (GS) and GS extension (GSE) is presented. An eddy-permitting reduced-gravity nonlinear shallow water model is implemented in an idealized North Atlantic Ocean, with schematic boundaries including the essential geometric features of the coastline and a realistic zonal basin width at all latitudes. The forcing is provided by a time-independent climatological surface wind stress obtained from 41 years of monthly ECMWF fields. The model response yields strong intrinsic low-frequency fluctuations on the interannual to decadal time scales. The modelled time-averaged GS/GSE flows are found to exhibit several features that can also be deduced from satellite altimeter data, such as the Florida Current seaward deflection, the GS separation at Cape Hatteras, and the overall structure of the GSE. The intrinsic low-frequency variability yields two preferred states of the GSE differing in latitudinal location that also have their counterpart in the altimeter data. A preliminary analysis of the variability in terms of dynamical systems theory is carried out by using the lateral eddy viscosity as the control parameter. A complex transition sequence from a steady state to irregular low-frequency variability emerges, in which Hopf and global bifurcations can be identified.

  9. Ocean backscatter across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front

    SciTech Connect

    Nghiem, S.V.; Li, F.K.

    1997-06-01

    Ocean backscatter was measured by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with the airborne NUSCAT K{sub u}-band scatterometer, across the Gulf Stream sea surface temperature front during the Surface Wave Dynamics Experiment off the coast of Virginia and Maryland in the winter of 1991. Backscatter across the front between the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration experimental coastal buoy A (44024) on the cold side and Discus C buoy (44023) on the warm side shows a difference of more than 5 dB for vertical polarization in many cases. This large frontal backscatter change is observed in all upwind, downwind, and crosswind directions. The sea surface temperature difference measured by the buoys was about 9{degrees}C. The corresponding difference in wind speed cannot account for the large backscatter change in view of geophysical model functions depending only on neutral wind velocity such as SASS. The measured backscatter also has larger upwind-downwind and upwind-crosswind ratios compared to the model results. Furthermore, NUSCAT data reveal that upwind backscatter on the cold side was smaller than or close to crosswind backscatter on the warm side for incidence angles between 30{degrees} to 50{degrees}. This suggests that the temperature front can be detected by the scatterometer at these incidence angles for different wind directions in the cold and warm sides.

  10. Contrasting responses of the extended Gulf Stream to severe winter forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Z.; Grist, J. P.; Marsh, R.; Josey, S. A.; Sinha, B.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the path and strength of the extended Gulf Stream, downstream of Cape Hatteras, and the North Atlantic Current (GSNAC), are associated with strong wintertime air-sea interactions that can further influence the atmospheric storm track. The GSNAC response to anomalous air-sea heat fluxes in particular is dependent on the location of excess heat loss, in turn related to meteorological circumstances. Outbreaks of cold continental air may lead to excess cooling over the Sargasso Sea, as in 1976-77. Under these circumstances, the Gulf Stream may intensify through a steepening of cross-stream density gradients. An alternative scenario prevailed during the cold outbreak of 2013-14 where excess cooling occurred over the central subpolar gyre and may have influenced the extreme storminess experienced in western Europe. An objectively-analysed temperature and salinity product (EN4) is used to investigate the variability of the GSNAC. Temperature and salinity profiles are used to obtain geostrophic transport at selected GSNAC transects, confirming strong horizontal temperature gradients and a positive geostrophic velocity anomaly at 70oW in spring 1977, the strongest spring transport seen in the 1970s at this location. In addition to observations, an eddy-resolving model hindcast spanning 1970-2013, is used to further characterise GSNAC transport variability, allowing a fuller assessment of the relationship between the winter surface heat flux, end-of-winter mixed layer depth, subtropical mode water volume and GSNAC transports. Preliminary results reveal a significant negative correlation between the winter surface heat flux over the Sargasso Sea and the GSNAC transport in the following spring.

  11. Gulf Stream frontal statistics from Florida Straits to Cape Hatteras derived from satellite and historical data

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, D.B.; Brown, O.B.; Emmerson, S.R.

    1983-05-30

    A 5 year record (1976 1980) of weekly Gulf Stream paths digitized from the U.S. Navy Ocean Frontal Analysis is analyzed to define a mean Gulf Stream path and weekly space-time series of fluctuations about the mean between the Florida Straits and Cape Hatteras. This satellite-derived Gulf Stream frontal mean locus is used as a natural coordinate system in which NODC historical expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data is averaged to determine the mean cross stream thermal structure. The results show that the satellite-derived front; that is, the cold wall of the stream as derived from IR imagery is in good agreement with a classical definition of the stream path. The Gulf Stream path is discussed in relationship to the bottom topography. Frontal location time series at various locations along the Gulf Stream are analyzed to generate occupation statistics and spectra for stream position. A steady increase in the variance of stream position occurs from Cape Canaveral to the Charleston Bump. This trend is followed by a sharp increase in variance just downstream of the bump and then a gradual decay from approximately 33'N to Cape Hatteras. A similar distribution of variance is found in the depth of the 15/sup 0/C isotherm. An annual signal is seen in the path data all along the U.S. east coast. The stream front north of Charleston (approx.32/sup 0/N) exhibits the strongest annual variation with the surface front being further offshore in the late winter and early spring. This annual signal is not obvious at the thermocline level (15/sup 0/C). It is consistent however, with observed shifts in the isotherm patterns in the upper 100 m.

  12. The effect of Gulf Stream-induced baroclinicity on US East Coast winter cyclones

    SciTech Connect

    Cione, J.J.; Raman, S.; Pietrafesa, L.J. )

    1993-02-01

    Midlatitude cyclones develop off the Carolinas during winters and move north producing gale-force winds, ice, and heavy snow. It is believed that boundary-layer and air-sea interaction processes are very important during the development stages of these East Coast storms. The marine boundary layer (MBL) off the mid-Atlantic coastline is highly baroclinic due to the proximity of the Gulf Stream just offshore. Typical horizontal distances between the Wilmington coastline and the western edge of the Gulf Stream vary between 90 and 250 km annually, and this distance can deviate by over 30 km within a single week. While similar weekly Gulf Stream position standard deviations also exist at Cape Hatteras, the average annual distance to the Gulf Stream frontal zone is much smaller off Cape Hatteras, normally ranging between 30 and 100 km. This research investigates the low-level baroclinic conditions present prior to observed storm events. The examination of nine years of data on the Gulf Stream position and East Coast winter storms seems to indicate that the degree of low-level baroclinicity and modification existing prior to a cyclonic event may significantly affect the rate of cyclonic deepening off the mid-Atlantic coastline. Statistical analyses linking the observed surface-pressure decrease with both the Gulf Stream frontal location and the prestorm coastal baroclinic conditions are presented. These results quantitatively indicate that Gulf Stream-induced wintertime baroclinicity may significantly affect the regional intensification of East Coast winter cyclones. 20 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Water discharged from the gulf stream north of Cape Hatteras. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Churchill, J.H.; Cornillon, P.C.

    1991-12-31

    Satellite radiometer-derived sea surface temperature images together with moored instrument and hydrographic survey data indicate that water ejected from the Gulf Stream often occupies the upper 200 m of the water column over the continental slope between Cape Hatteras and Hudson Canyon. At times this water resembles the energetic Gulf Stream frontal eddies commonly seen to the south of Cape Hatteras. However, many of the observed parcels of this water differ markedly from frontal eddies and Gulf Stream warm-core rings and so appear to form a class of discharged Gulf Stream water distinct from any previously reported. These parcels generally cover a broad area (compared with frontal eddies), contain relatively weak currents (generally < 40 cm/s at 100 m), and are remarkably long-lived (sometimes distinguishable for more than 2 months). Sanity anomaly distributions indicate that despite their persistence, these water masses contain intrusions of and mix with surrounding lower-salinity water, particularly in the upper So m. Continuity of various tracers along surfaces reveals that the discharged Gulf Stream water observed near the sea surface originated within the nutrient-bearing stratum of the Gulf Stream, having upwelled hundreds of meters along density surfaces. As a result, it tends to enhance nutrient concentrations over the continental slope, to a significant extent at 100 m depth but only marginally at 50 m depth. By contrast, this water does not carry unusually large kinetic energy densities into the slope region, but apparently gives up a good deal of kinetic energy, on the order of 10,000 sq cm/sec sq. per unit mass, while leaving the Gulf Stream.

  14. Evidence for baroclinic instability in the Gulf Stream recirculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogg, Nelson G.

    Long term current measurements from Polymode Array 2 are analyzed using the technique of empirical orthogonal functions applied in the frequency domain. The region of especially good instrument coverage and clearest decomposition into empirical modes is also in the Gulf Stream recirculation (∼ 36°N 55°W). On theoretical grounds, this is expected to be an area actively unstable to baroclinic disturbances ( GILL, GREEN and SIMMONS, 1974). Both the horizontal and vertical structure of motions with periods ranging from 10 to 120 days are studied. Spectra reveal that kinetic energy is peaked at 30 day periods with a weaker peak at 12 days. The most energetic empirical mode accounts for about 50% of the measured energy although somewhat less than this at higher subinertial frequencies. Consistent with the theoretical calculations of Gill, Green and Simmons it is found that the zonal phase propagation is nearly independent of frequency and averages about 12 cm s -1 toward the west. The 30 and 12 day energy peaks correspond to wavenumbers (wavelengths) of -0.18 km -1 (350 km) and -.033 km -1 (190 km) respectively. These are almost identical to the predicted scales for secondary and primary growth rate maxima for baroclinically unstable disturbances to a zonal current which is horizontally uniform but whose strength decreases exponentially with depth. Energy in these motions increases toward the west at a rate which is statistically indistinguishable from zero but also from the predicted rate. The vertical structure of these motions is also qualitatively similar to the theoretical modes. Phase for velocity decreases with depth, whereas temperature phase increases leading to energy release concentrated in the thermocline near the steering level which is projected to be somewhere above the shallowest observational level (600 m). The 30 day wave is much less depth dependent in amplitude than the 12 day wave and is responsible for the intense deep eddy field observed in

  15. Topographic vorticity generation, submesoscale instability and vortex street formation in the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gula, J.; Molemaker, M. J.; McWilliams, J. C.

    2015-05-01

    Meanders and eddies are routinely observed in the Gulf Stream along the South Atlantic Bight. We analyze here the instability processes that lead to the formation of submesoscale eddies on the cyclonic side of the Gulf Stream at the exit of the Florida Straits using very high resolution realistic simulations. The positive relative vorticity and potential vorticity on the cyclonic side of the Gulf Stream are strongly intensified in the Straits due to topographic drag along the continental slope. The bottom drag amplifies the cyclonic shear by generating large positive vertical vorticity values within the sloped turbulent bottom boundary layer. Downstream from the Straits the current becomes unstable to horizontal shear instability, rolls up, and forms a street of submesoscale vortices. The vortices expand as they propagate northward along the shelf, where they can generate large vertical displacements and enhance cross-shelf exchanges.

  16. Large-scale Gulf Stream frontal study using GEOS 3 radar altimeter data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, N. E.; Leitao, C. D.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    From data obtained by the GEOS 3 radar altimeter, sea surface heights are found by both editing and filtering the raw sea surface height measurements and then referencing these processed data to a 5 foot by 5 foot geoid. Any trend between the processed data and the geoid is removed by subtracting out a linear fit to the residuals in the open ocean. Data from individual passes are further processed by applying a minimum variance technique at the subsatellite crossing points to produce surface topography maps for the 6 months and an overall mean map which reveal important details about the Gulf Stream system. The differences between the monthly mean and the overall mean are calculated for each of the 6 months to show the temporal and spatial changes of the Gulf Stream front and spawned eddies. The standard deviation map is even more informative and shows preferred locations of Gulf Stream meanders.

  17. Blake Plateau: control of Miocene sedimentation patterns by large- scale shifts of the Gulf Stream axis.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pinet, P.R.; Popenoe, P.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of buried channel networks within Cenozoic sequences of the Blake Plateau and their correlation with global sea-level oscillations indicate that the Gulf Stream axis shifted landward against the Florida-Hatteras Slope during sea-level highstands and seaward across the central Blake Plateau during sea-level lowstands. A sedimentation model incorporating axial shifts of the Gulf Stream successfully predicts the Miocene stratigraphy of the Florida-Hatteras Slope and Blake Plateau as defined by seismic and drill-hole data. -Authors Cenozoic sequences Blake Plateau sea level oscillations North Atlantic

  18. The Gulf Stream front - A comparison between Seasat altimeter observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, T. W.; Cheney, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative comparison is made between a model which gives a universal shape and width of the sea surface height rise anomaly across the Gulf Stream and six Gulf Stream altimeter profiles representing a range of conditions. The closeness of the fit obtained reinforces the validity of both the model and the role of satellite altimetry in ocean dynamics. Further comparisons of the data with the theories of Stommel (1966) and Charney (1955) show that the former is incomplete, accepting only one altimeter-derived parameter.

  19. Physical aspects of a length scale for the Gulf Stream front

    SciTech Connect

    Kao, T.W.

    1983-07-20

    A discussion is presented of the physical interpretation of the length scale, lambda, introduced in a recent paper by Kao and Cheney (1982) to scale the sea surface height anomaly across the Gulf Stream front. Additional results of sea-surface height anomaly profiles computed from the hydrographic data from Fuglister's GULF STREAM 60 are also included. In all cases the width of the anomaly is spanned rather precisely by 2lambda. The relationship between lambda and the internal Rossby radius of deformation lambda, is discussed.

  20. Gulf stream frontal eddy influence on productivity of the southeast U.S. continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.M.; Yoder, J.; Atkinson, L.

    1991-01-01

    Weekly period meanders and eddies are persistent features of Gulf Stream frontal dynamics from Miami, FL, to Cape Hatteras, NC. Satellite imagery and moored current and temperature records reveal a spatial pattern of preferred regions for growth and decay of frontal disturbances. Growth regions occur off Miami, Cape Canaveral and Cape Fear due to baroclinic instability, and decay occurs in the confines of the Straits of Florida between Miami and Palm Beach, between 30{degrees} and 32{degrees}N where the Stream approaches the topographic feature known as the Charleston bump and between 34{degrees}N and Cape Hatteras. Eddy decay regions are associated with elongation of frontal features, offshore transport of momentum and heat and onshore transport of nutrients. Onshore transport of new nitrogen from the nutrient bearing strata beneath the Gulf Stream indicates that frontal eddies serve as a {open_quotes}nutrient pump{close_quotes} for the shelf. Annual carbon production on the shelf due to Gulf Stream input is estimated at 7{times}10{sup 12} g C year{sup -1} or about 7 million tons carbon per year. Seasonal carbon cycles are estimated for the outer, mid and inner shelf regions from Gulf Stream nutrient input, carbon production, and carbon export.

  1. Key Signatures in the Barotropic Vorticity Budget within Ocean Western Boundary Currents : Understanding the Gulf Stream Pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonover, J. A.; Dewar, W. K.; Wienders, N.; Gula, J.; McWilliams, J. C.; Molemaker, M. J.; Bates, S. C.; Danabasoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    A suite of ocean simulations are conducted at resolutions of 1 degree down to 1/36 degree using the MIT General Circulation Model, Regional Ocean Modeling System, and the Community Earth Systems Model. The 1 degree simulations in the CESM exhibit warm sea surface temperature biases (upwards of 8 C) from the Mid-Atlantic Bight through the Gulf of Maine. In a coupled climate simulation the bias can lead to misplaced heat fluxes which drastically reduce the fidelity of the climate simulation. These observed errors are typical of coarsely resolved ocean simulations and are directly linked to the improper location of the Gulf Stream. Thus, determing a the cause of this error requires a detailed study of a more well-behaved numerical Gulf Stream. 1/12 degree and 1/36 degree simulations show an improvement in the modelled Gulf Stream when compared with observations. All of the simulations show an agreement in the leading balance in the barotropic vorticity budget within the Gulf Stream, dominantly between planetary vorticity advection and bottom pressure torques. This suggests that this inviscid balance is not the only requirement for proper Gulf Stream pathway, since this signature appears in the poorly separating scenario. However, it is shown that the free surface and baroclinic contributions to the bottom pressure torque largely cancel where the modelled Gulf Stream separates. This compensation is necessary for the transport and the upper layer Gulf Stream to cross the edge of the continental shelf. Scaling arguments owe this cancellation to the relative strength between the Gulf Stream and Deep Western Boundary Current. Hence, weak shear may not allow for the appropriate compensation to allow the transport to cross at Cape Hatteras where the bathymetric gradients are upwards of 20%. It is supposed that the sea surface temperature bias is directly caused by the weak vertical shear between the Gulf Stream and Deep Western Boundary Current which disallows decoupling

  2. Direct interaction between the Gulf Stream and the shelfbreak south of New England.

    PubMed

    Gawarkiewicz, Glen G; Todd, Robert E; Plueddemann, Albert J; Andres, Magdalena; Manning, James P

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature imagery, satellite altimetry, and a surface drifter track reveal an unusual tilt in the Gulf Stream path that brought the Gulf Stream to 39.9°N near the Middle Atlantic Bight shelfbreak--200 km north of its mean position--in October 2011, while a large meander brought Gulf Stream water within 12 km of the shelfbreak in December 2011. Near-bottom temperature measurements from lobster traps on the outer continental shelf south of New England show distinct warming events (temperature increases exceeding 6°C) in November and December 2011. Moored profiler measurements over the continental slope show high salinities and temperatures, suggesting that the warm water on the continental shelf originated in the Gulf Stream. The combination of unusual water properties over the shelf and slope in late fall and the subsequent mild winter may affect seasonal stratification and habitat selection for marine life over the continental shelf in 2012. PMID:22870382

  3. Direct interaction between the Gulf Stream and the shelfbreak south of New England

    PubMed Central

    Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.; Todd, Robert E.; Plueddemann, Albert J.; Andres, Magdalena; Manning, James P.

    2012-01-01

    Sea surface temperature imagery, satellite altimetry, and a surface drifter track reveal an unusual tilt in the Gulf Stream path that brought the Gulf Stream to 39.9°N near the Middle Atlantic Bight shelfbreak—200 km north of its mean position—in October 2011, while a large meander brought Gulf Stream water within 12 km of the shelfbreak in December 2011. Near-bottom temperature measurements from lobster traps on the outer continental shelf south of New England show distinct warming events (temperature increases exceeding 6°C) in November and December 2011. Moored profiler measurements over the continental slope show high salinities and temperatures, suggesting that the warm water on the continental shelf originated in the Gulf Stream. The combination of unusual water properties over the shelf and slope in late fall and the subsequent mild winter may affect seasonal stratification and habitat selection for marine life over the continental shelf in 2012. PMID:22870382

  4. Gulf stream ground truth project - Results of the NRL airborne sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Chen, D. T.; Hammond, D. L.

    1980-01-01

    Results of an airborne study of the waves in the Gulf Stream are presented. These results show that the active microwave sensors (high-flight radar and wind-wave radar) provide consistent and accurate estimates of significant wave height and surface wind speed, respectively. The correlation between the wave height measurements of the high-flight radar and a laser profilometer is excellent.

  5. Gulf Stream variability and Meanders over the Blake Plateau at 30/sup 0/N

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.N.; Waddell, E.

    1983-05-30

    Current and temperature variability of the Gulf Stream at 30/sup 0/N was observed with a subsurface array of current meter moorings from August 1980 to October 1981. Energetic current fluctuations in the 2-14 day period band accounted for 45--70% of the total observed variability. Flow perturbations in the cyclonic shear zone tended to have a cyclonic sense of rotation and were 180/sup 0/ out of phase from anticyclonic flow perturbations within the anticyclonic shear region. These fluctuations appear to result from northward propagating wave-like meanders of the Gulf Stream axis. The fluctuations do not appear to be directly related to local wind forcing. Observations of near-bottom flow on the Blake Plateau east of the Gulf Stream showed periods of prolonged southward currents lasting up to 40 days with speeds in excess of 30 cm s/sup -1/. The mean flow was also southward due to these strong events. The source of the southward flow is unknown. It may be connected to cold-core eddies that are not detectable in the surface with remote sensing or possibly a remnant of the southward undercurrent that has been observed beneath the Gulf Stream off Cape Hatteas and on the deep slope of the Blake Escarpment.

  6. Subsurface energetics of the Gulf Stream cyclonic frontal zone off Onslow Bay, North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Hood, C.A.; Bane, J.M. Jr.

    1983-05-30

    It has been shown with the use of 4-month-long time series of velocity, temperature, and conductivity that fluctuating kinetic and potential energy was converted into kinetic and potential energy of the mean flow following a fluid particle in the subsurface Gulf Stream cyclonic frontal zone off Onslow Bay, North Carolina, during early 1979. This result agrees well with earlier measurements made in the surface layer off Onslow Bay. These flux calculations represent an important step in verifying the direction of the net cross-stream energy flux within the stream of Onslow Bay. According to an hypothesis presented for the growth and decay of Gulf Stream meanders along the continental margin of the southeastern United States. Onslow Bay is an area of decreasing meander amplitude. The direction of the energy conversion from meanders to the mean flow, determined from our calculations, is consistent with this hypothesis. Relatively low velocity covariances were found to be associated with relatively small transfers of kinetic energy during a period of low meander activity. This finding supports the notion that meanders play a significant role in the energy transformation processes. The presence of such 'quiet' periods may indicate a low-frequency modulation of Gulf Stream meander activity.

  7. Seasat altimeter observations of dynamic topography in the Gulf Stream region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheney, R. E.; Marsh, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    A straightforward approach to altimeter data analysis in the Gulf Stream system is presented, using a detailed geoid model to remove the gravitational component. The resulting sea surface height profiles compare remarkably well with independent oceanographic observations. Specific features such as cold rings, warm rings, and no anomaly regions are analyzed and it is shown that known positions of cyclonic and anticyclonic rings correspond with depressions and elevations, respectively, with amplitudes as large as 95 cm. The apparent fluctuation of the Gulf Stream is indicated by the results, as in the finding that on time scales of a few days, surface transport indicated by the sea surface height difference across the stream varied by nearly 30%

  8. Gulf Stream marine hydrokinetic energy resource characterization off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muglia, M.; He, R.; Lowcher, C.; Bane, J.; Gong, Y.; Taylor, P.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf Stream off North Carolina has current velocities that approach 3 m/s and an average volume transport of 90 Sv (1 Sv= 106 m3/s) off of Cape Hatteras, making it the most abundant MHK (Marine Hydrokinetic Energy) resource for the state. Resource availability at a specific location depends primarily on the variability in Gulf Stream position, which is least offshore of Cape Hatteras after the stream exits the Florida Straits. Proximity to land and high current velocities in relatively shallow waters on the shelf slope make this an optimal location to quantify the MHK energy resource for NC. 3.5 years of current measurements beginning in August of 2013 from a moored 150 kHz ADCP (Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler) at an optimal location for energy extraction quantify the available energy resource and its variability, and establish the skill of a Mid-Atlantic Bight and South Atlantic Bight Regional Ocean Model in predicting the MHK energy resource. The model agrees well with long-term observed current averages and with weekly to monthly fluctuations in the current speeds. Model and observations over the first 9 months of the ADCP deployment period both averaged 1.15 m/s thirty meters below the surface. The model under estimates observed current speeds for the higher frequency current fluctuations of days to weeks. Comparisons between the model and ADCP observed currents, and velocity derived power density over the entire 3.5 years of observations demonstrate the significant inter-annual variability in power density. Shipboard 300 kHz ADCP cross-stream transects and hourly surface currents measurements off Cape Hatteras from a network of land based HF (high frequency) radars further quantify available MHK energy and assess model skill. Cross-stream transects were made with a vessel-mounted 300 kHz ADCP on a line from the 100-1000m isobaths, and measured currents in the top 100m. These measurements demonstrate the variability in the resource with water depth, and

  9. The branching of the Gulf Stream southeast of the Grand Banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, W.; KäSe, R. H.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.

    1990-08-01

    During March-April 1987, 101 hydrographic stations were occupied on three sections spanning a triangle between the Azores (Faial), the southern tip of the Grand Banks of Newfoundland, and Bermuda. Information on the near-surface processes in the interior of the triangle were obtained from 32 satellite-tracked buoys deployed during the cruise and a composite infrared image based on cloud-free NOAA 9 data during April 1987. The data were combined to analyze the eddy field and the branching of the Gulf Stream into the North Atlantic Current and the Azores Current. Calculations of mass transports through the legs of the triangle gave a total of 46 Sv supplied by the Gulf Stream, 31 Sv of which left the area as the North Atlantic Current and westwind drift north of the Azores. The remaining 14 Sv continued towards east-southeast as the Azores Current and southern recirculation. Additional conductivity-temperature-depth stations from a cruise in April 1986 into the same area allowed also study of the large-scale circulation within that triangle in deeper layers. The Azores Current appears as a baroclinic stream which reaches down to approximately 1000 m. Intensive mixing was observed at the continental slope of Newfoundland between water of the Labrador Current and the Gulf Stream (mixed water). Owing to cabbeling and consecutive convective mixing, this water penetrates down to 2000 m depth and creates horizontal density gradients to the surrounding Gulf Stream water, which intensifies the North Atlantic Current. This process is considered to be an important energy source for this current.

  10. Surface Vector Velocity Estimates and Gulf Stream Observations From the UMass Dual Beam Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkovic, D.; Toporkov, J. V.; Sletten, M. A.; Farquharson, G.; Frasier, S. J.; Marmorino, G. O.; Judd, K. P.

    2004-12-01

    The Dual Beam Interferometer (DBI) developed by University of Massachusetts (UMass) consists of two C-band along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radars (ATI-SAR). The beams of this airborne system are squinted 20 degrees forward and aft of broadside allowing surface vector velocity estimation in a single aircraft pass. The instrument has been deployed several times over the period of last two years off coastal areas of Florida on a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) WP-3D plane in collaboration with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). During 2002-2003 the instrument has undergone a series of tests and engineering flights with the August 2003 data producing the first interferogram. March 2004 flights were mainly focused on the western boundary of the Gulf Stream off Cape Canaveral, Florida. Simultaneous imagery of the sea-surface temperature field were obtained using NRL's Infrared (IR) camera, which was mounted in belly of the aircraft. Multiple passes over the Gulf Stream were made under a range of environmental conditions and viewing geometries relative to the Gulf Stream current and the wind. Additional flights were made over the barrier islands west of Ft. Meyers, Florida at times of near maximum ebb tidal flow. This paper will present initial estimates of the surface vector velocities for each area. The Gulf Stream velocity estimates show a current maximum of 1.5 m/s across the edge of the Stream which is consistent with estimates of the current from IR imagery using feature tracking. Estimates of the flow between the barrier islands are of the order of 1.5 to 2 m/s, which agrees well with the predicted tidal flow.

  11. Miocene paleooceanography event in the eastern Gulf of Mexico: implications for stratigraphic evolution and Gulf Stream circulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gardulski, A.; Mullins, H.T.

    1985-01-01

    A profound change in the oceanographic regime of the eastern Gulf of Mexico occurred during the middle to late Miocene. Seismic reflection profiles along the west Florida slope depict an abrupt transition from seaward prograding clinoforms to transparent pelagic deposits that thicken seaward and onlap the antecedent platform margin. These two supersequences are separated by a high-amplitude reflector that defines a major unconformity. Pre-unconformity sediments contain displaced, shallow-water allochems and high insoluble resides; younger sediments are mainly pelagic-derived. The dramatic change in depositional systems in the mid-late Miocene is interpreted as a consequence of increased flow velocity and volume of the Loop Current. Subsequent high-energy ocean circulation has established a dynamic boundary that restricts off-platform transport and stimulates pelagic sedimentation. These results support the concept of a mid-late Miocene intensification of the Gulf Stream system controlled by tectonic closure of the Isthmus of Panama and/or global climatic deterioration augmented by sea-level oscillations. This paleooceanography event also marks a major stratigraphic turning point in the eastern Gulf of Mexico.

  12. Temporal variation of meandering intensity and domain-wide lateral oscillations of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Tong; Cornillon, Peter

    1995-01-01

    The path of the Gulf Stream exhibits two modes of variability: wavelike spatial meanders associated with instability processes and large-sale lateral shifts of the path presumably due to atmospheric forcing. The objectives of this study are to examine the temporal variation of the intensity of spatial meandering in the stream, to characterize large-scale lateral oscillations in the stream's path, and to study the correlation betwen these two dynamically distinct modes of variability. The data used for this analysis are path displacemets ofthe Gulf Stream between 75 deg and 60 deg W obtained from AVHRR-derived (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) infrared images for the period April 1982 through December 1989. Meandering intensity, measured by the spatial root-mean-sqaure displacement of the stream path, displays a 9-month dominant periodicity which is persistent through the study period. The 9-month fluctuation in meandering intensity may be related to the interaction of Rosseby waves with the stream. Interannual variation of meandering intensity is also found to be significant, with meandering being mich more intense during 1985 than it was in 1987. Annual variation, however,is weak and not well-defined.The spatially averaged position of the stream, which reflects nonmeandering large-scale lateral oscillations of the stream path, is dominated by an annual cycle. On average, the mean position is farthest north in November and farthest south in April. The first empirical orthogonal function mode of the space-time path displacements represents lateral oscillatins that are in-phase over the space-time domain. Interannual oscillations are also observed and are found to be weaker than the annual oscillation. The eigenvalue of the first mode indicates that about 21.5% of the total space-time variability of the stream path can be attibuted to domain-wide lateral oscillation. The correlation between meandering intensity and domain-wide lateral oscillations is very

  13. Gulf stream velocity structure through combined inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Near-surface velocities from an acoustic Doppler instrument are used in conjunction with CTD/O2 data to produce estimates of the absolute flow field off Cape Hatteras. The data set consists of two transects across the Gulf Stream made by the R/V Endeavor cruise EN88 in August 1982. An inverse procedure is applied which makes use of both the acoustic Doppler data and property conservation constraints. Velocity sections at approximately 73 deg. W and 71 deg. W are presented with formal errors of 1-2 cm/s. The net Gulf Stream transports are estimated to be 116 + or - 2 Sv across the south leg and 161 + or - 4 Sv across the north. A Deep Western Boundary Current transport of 4 + or - 1 Sv is also estimated. While these values do not necessarily represent the mean, they are accurate estimates of the synoptic flow field in the region.

  14. A note on the Charleston Gyre. [Gulf Stream deflection off Georgia-South Carolina coast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Atkinson, L. P.

    1985-01-01

    The deflection of the Gulf Stream caused by a topographic feature - the Charleston Bump, located offshore of Savannah, Georgia - results in a quasi-stationary cyclonic eddy - the Charleston Gyre which is situated over the continental slope east of Charleston and Cape Romain. Occasionally, the upwelling associated with this eddy produces an enhancement in the surface layer primary production that is great enough to be detected by the Nimbus 7 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS). In this note a CZCS image with simultaneous hydrography, current, and wind observations is presented that documents an unusual manifestation of the gyre. In addition to the CZCS image a Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image is included that clearly indicates the presence of the eddy adjacent to the Gulf Stream front.

  15. Synoptic Gulf Stream velocity profiles through simultaneous inversion of hydrographic and acoustic Doppler data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Wunsch, C.; Pierce, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    Data from a shipborne acoustic profiling device have been combined with conductivity, temperature, depth/O2 sections across the Gulf Stream to form estimates of the absolute flow fields. The procedure for the combination was a form of inverse method. The results suggest that at the time of the observations (June 1982) the net Gulf Stream transport off Hatteras was 107 + or - 11 Sv and that across a section near 72.5 W it had increased to 125 + or - 6 Sv. The transport of the deep western boundary current was 9 + or - 3 Sv. For comparison purposes an inversion was done using the hydrographic/O2 data alone as in previously published results and obtained qualitative agreement with the combined inversion. Inversion of the acoustic measurements alone, when corrected for instrument biases, leaves unacceptably large mass transport residuals in the deep water.

  16. Benthic enrichment in the Georgia Bight related to Gulf Stream intrusions and estuarine outwelling

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.B.; Tenore, K.R.; Bishop, S.; Chamberlain, C.; Pamatmat, M.M.; Tietjen, J.

    1981-01-01

    Twelve stations in the Georgia Bight were sampled in June 1977. Bottom sediments were collected at depths of 20-25 cm at inner, middle and outer shelf regions. Results suggest that the shelf break benthos is enriched by intrusion of nutrient-rich deep Gulf Stream waters off Florida. However, the mid shelf benthos is, in general, impoverished because of sporadic and patchy nutrient inputs from intrusions and meager nutrient enrichments from estuarine outwelling beyond the outer shelf. (JMT)

  17. Diurnal precipitation and high cloud frequency variability over the Gulf Stream and over the Kuroshio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minobe, Shoshiro; Takebayashi, Shogo

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies show mid-latitude western boundary currents (WBCs) substantially influence the atmosphere aloft, and an important feature is enhanced rain band over the WBCs in climatological mean field. However, how such long-term, climate phenomena are related to shorter, weather timescale phenomena are generally remained to be explored. In this paper, diurnal precipitation and cloud variations are investigated global mid-latitude oceans with emphasis on air-sea interactions over WBCs using satellite-derived precipitation and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) datasets. Strong 24-h period components of precipitations are found over the Gulf Stream in summer and over the Kuroshio in the East China Sea in early summer (Baiu-Meiyu season), respectively. Similar diurnal precipitations are not observed in WBCs in the Southern Hemisphere year around. The diurnal precipitation cycles over the Gulf Stream and the Kuroshio exhibit peak phases in the early to late morning for the Gulf Stream and late morning to early afternoon for the Kuroshio, with southeastward phase propagations. High cloud frequency derived from OLR data exhibit consistent diurnal cycles. A substantial difference of diurnal cycles between the Gulf Stream and the Kuroshio regions are associated with the large-scale Baiu-Meiyu rain and cloud bands for the latter region. Diurnal precipitation and high cloud variability is found in the vicinity of the Kuroshio itself, embedded in the Baiu-Meiyu rain and cloud bands distributing in a wider area without a strong diurnal component. The spatial and seasonal distributions of the diurnal variability over these WBCs strongly suggests that the diurnal precipitation and cloud cycles are essential aspects of deep heating mode of atmospheric response recently reported for these WBCs. These results indicate that these WBCs in the Northern Hemisphere play an important role in modulating short-term precipitation variations, and on the other hand diurnal variability can be

  18. Gulf stream meanders in the South Atlantic Bight 1. Scaling and energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.L.; Lee, T.N.

    1995-04-15

    As the Gulf Stream flows along the outer edge of the southeastern United States` continental shelf, it meanders on and offshore, creating frontal eddies which influence the exchange of water between the shelf and the adjacent Atlantic Ocean on weekly timescales. The dynamics controlling the development of such features in this region, the {open_quotes}South Atlantic Bight{close_quotes} or SAB, is the subject of this pair of papers. In the present paper the authors provide the background on the subject, summarize the length, time, and velocity scales associated with these features, and discuss meander energetics as simulated by a numerical model. The scaling indicates that significant ageostgrophic dynamics may be crucial to the development of these flows and that the semigeostrophic equations may provide the simplest description of the system. These nonlinear dynamics may permit complex interactions among meander modes and with topography resulting in the observed behavior of the Gulf Stream in the SAB. The Princeton Ocean Model was tuned for conditions which prevail in the southern South Atlantic Bight, and idealized numerical simulations of Gulf Stream meanders and associated frontal eddies were performed. The system was found to be sensitive to both the amplitude and period of a small perturbation applied at the southern boundary. The energetics indicate that the development of these features is controlled by a mixture of both baroclinic and barotropic instabilities of the mean Gulf Stream flow. Tantalizing hints of a period-doubling phenomenon are present in the energy conversion time series. 47 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Preliminary estimates of Gulf Stream characteristics from TOPEX data and a precise gravimetric geoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rapp, Richard H.; Smith, Dru A.

    1994-01-01

    TOPEX sea surface height data has been used, with a gravimetric geoid, to calculate sea surface topography across the Gulf Stream. This topography was initially computed for nine tracks on cycles 21 to 29. Due to inaccurate geoid undulations on one track, results for eight tracks are reported. The sea surface topography estimates were used to calculate parameters that describe Gulf Stream characteristics from two models of the Gulf Stream. One model was based on a Gaussian representation of the velocity while the other was a hyperbolic representation of velocity or the sea surface topography. The parameters of the Gaussian velocity model fit were a width parameter, a maximum velocity value, and the location of the maximum velocity. The parameters of the hyperbolic sea surface topography model were the width, the height jump, position, and sea surface topography at the center of the stream. Both models were used for the eight tracks and nine cycles studied. Comparisons were made between the width parameters, the maximum velocities, and the height jumps. Some of the parameter estimates were found to be highly (0.9) correlated when the hyperbolic sea surface topography fit was carried out, but such correlations were reduced for either the Gaussian velocity fits or the hyperbolic velocity model fit. A comparison of the parameters derived from 1-year TOPEX data showed good agreement with values derived by Kelly (1991) using 2.5 years of Geosat data near 38 deg N, 66 deg W longitude. Accuracy of the geoid undulations used in the calculations was of order of +/- 16 cm with the accuracy of a geoid undulation difference equal to +/- 15 cm over a 100-km line in areas with good terrestrial data coverage. This paper demonstrates that our knowledge or geoid undulations and undulation differences, in a portion of the Gulf Stream region, is sufficiently accurate to determine characteristics of the jet when used with TOPEX altimeter data. The method used here has not been shown to

  20. Submesoscale streamers exchange water on the north wall of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klymak, Jody M.; Shearman, R. Kipp; Gula, Jonathan; Lee, Craig M.; D'Asaro, Eric A.; Thomas, Leif N.; Harcourt, Ramsey R.; Shcherbina, Andrey Y.; Sundermeyer, Miles A.; Molemaker, Jeroen; McWilliams, James C.

    2016-02-01

    The Gulf Stream is a major conduit of warm surface water from the tropics to the subpolar North Atlantic. Here we observe and simulate a submesoscale (<20 km) mechanism by which the Gulf Stream exchanges water with subpolar water to the north. Along isopycnals, the front has a sharp compensated temperature-salinity contrast, with distinct mixed water between the two water masses 2 and 4 km wide. This mixed water does not increase downstream despite substantial energy available for mixing. A series of streamers detrain this water at the crest of meanders. Subpolar water replaces the mixed water and resharpens the front. The water mass exchange accounts for a northward flux of salt of 0.5-2.5 psu m2 s-1, (large-scale diffusivity O (100 m2 s-1)). This is similar to bulk-scale flux estimates of 1.2 psu m2 s-1 and supplies fresher water to the Gulf Stream required for the production of 18° subtropical mode water.

  1. Dynamic variability of the Gulf Stream front in the Carolina Capes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.C.; Pietrafesa, L.J.; Janowitz, G.S.

    1986-01-01

    A theoretical investigation of the stability of a two-layer Gulf Stream model by a numerical technique is presented. This study is based on the hypothesis that the dynamic variability of the time-dependent baroclinic jet, which is assumed to be in geostrophic equilibrium to the lowest order, may be due to subinertial frequency disturbances propagating along the coast and acting as a time-dependent perturbation to the geostrophic jet. Our present model investigates the combined baroclinic-barotropic instability problem. The numerical results show that the baroclinic process transfers kinetic energy from the mean flow to the perturbation, while the barotropic process transfers kinetic energy from the perturbation to the mean flow. The former is more dominant than the latter, so the baroclinic process destabilizes the system, and a net transfer of kinetic energy is formed from the mean flow to the perturbation. The numerical results also show a release of potential energy from the mean flow to the perturbation, providing the energy necessary for the existence of a baroclinically unstable disturbance. The observational formation of the sinuous meander or folded-back filament on the Gulf Stream front is theoretically explained by the presence of southward/northward traveling disturbances with phase speeds less than the mean northward speed of the Gulf Stream, so that the manifestation of sense of propagation of the frontal feature is to the north.

  2. Interannual variability of Gulf Stream warm-core rings in response to the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhuri, Ayan H.; Gangopadhyay, Avijit; Bisagni, James J.

    2009-04-01

    Analysis of a quality-controlled database of Gulf Stream warm-core rings (WCRs) between 75° and 50°W during 1978-1999 demonstrates a significant correlation between WCR occurrences and variations in large-scale atmospheric forcing related to the state of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). The mechanisms for linking the NAO with the rate of WCR occurrences are two-fold: (1) the influence of the NAO on Gulf Stream (GS) position, which could affect the interaction of the Gulf Stream with the New England Seamounts chain and thus allow for a higher/lower number of WCR occurrences; (2) the NAO-induced eddy kinetic energy (EKE) variability in the Gulf Stream region (GSR), which is indicative of the baroclinic instability processes necessary for WCR formation. Variability in GS movement is studied by analyzing annual mean positions of the Gulf Stream North Wall obtained from satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) frontal charts. Response of GSR EKE to fluctuations in the state of the NAO is examined with a numerical simulation of the North Atlantic basin from 1980-1999. The North Atlantic basin is simulated using a 1/6°-resolution eddy-resolving Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model that spins up with Southampton Oceanography Center (SOC) ocean-atmosphere atlas-derived atmospheric forcing fields. Model-derived EKE estimates are observed to be in good agreement with TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter-based EKE estimates as well as with results from other modeling studies for the North Atlantic basin. We suggest that lateral movement of the GS may not be the primary mechanism causing variation in the rate of WCR occurrences, because GS position is observed to respond at a lag of one year, whereas annual rates of WCR occurrences respond at 0-year lag to the NAO. Based on results from numerical simulations of the North Atlantic basin, adjustment to NAO-induced wind forcing is seen to impact the GSR EKE intensity and possibly the related baroclinic instability

  3. Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-05-01

    Data from three independent and extensive field programs in the Straits of Florida, the Mid-Atlantic Bight, and near the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge are reanalyzed and compared with results from other historical studies to highlight the downstream evolution of several characteristics of the Gulf Stream's mean flow and variability. The three locations represent distinct dynamical regimes: a tightly confined jet in a channel; a freely meandering jet; and a topographically controlled jet on a boundary. Despite these differing dynamical regimes, the Gulf Stream in these areas exhibits many similarities. There are also anticipated and important differences, such as the loss of the warm core of the current by 42°N and the decrease in the cross-frontal gradient of potential vorticity as the current flows northward. As the Gulf Stream evolves it undergoes major changes in transport, both in magnitude and structure. The rate of inflow up to 60°W and outflow thereafter are generally uniform, but do exhibit some remarkable short-scale variations. As the Gulf Stream flows northward the vertical coherence of the flow changes, with the Florida Current and North Atlantic Current segments of the Gulf Stream exhibiting distinct upper and deep flows that are incoherent, while in the Mid-Atlantic Bight the Gulf Stream exhibits flows in three layers each of which tends to be incoherent with the other layers at most periods. These coherence characteristics are exhibited in both Eulerian and stream coordinates. The observed lack of vertical coherence indicates that great caution must be exercised in interpreting proxies for Gulf Stream structure and flow from vertically-limited or remote observations.

  4. Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    Data from three independent and extensive field programs in the Straits of Florida, the Mid-Atlantic Bight, and near the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge are reanalyzed and compared with results from other historical studies to highlight the downstream evolution of several characteristics of the Gulf Stream's mean flow and variability. The three locations represent distinct dynamical regimes: a tightly confined jet in a channel; a freely meandering jet; and a topographically controlled jet on a boundary. Despite these differing dynamical regimes, the Gulf Stream in these areas exhibits many similarities. There are also anticipated and important differences, such as the loss of the warm core of the current by 42°N and the decrease in the cross-frontal gradient of potential vorticity as the current flows northward. As the Gulf Stream evolves it undergoes major changes in transport, both in magnitude and structure. The rate of inflow up to 60°W and outflow thereafter are generally uniform, but do exhibit some remarkable short-scale variations. As the Gulf Stream flows northward the vertical coherence of the flow changes, with the Florida Current and North Atlantic Current segments of the Gulf Stream exhibiting distinct upper and deep flows that are incoherent, while in the Mid-Atlantic Bight the Gulf Stream exhibits flows in three layers each of which tends to be incoherent with the other layers at most periods. These coherence characteristics are exhibited in both Eulerian and stream coordinates. The observed lack of vertical coherence indicates that great caution must be exercised in interpreting proxies for Gulf Stream structure and flow from vertically-limited or remote observations.

  5. Distributions of pigments and primary production in a Gulf Stream meander

    SciTech Connect

    Lohrenz, S.E.; Cullen, J.J.; Phinney, D.A.; Olson, D.B.; Yentsch, C.S.

    1993-08-15

    An investigation was made of physical effects of Gulf Stream meandering on the vertical and horizontal distributions of photosynthetic pigments and primary production. Cruises were conducted in the vicinity of a meander east of 73{degrees}W and north of 37{degrees}N from September 21 to October 5 (leg 1) and October 12-21, 1988 (leg 2), on the R/V Cape Hatteras. Relationships of photosynthesis (normalized to chlorophyll) to irradiance (P-I) did not show large horizontal variation, and water column composite P-I curves from leg 1 and leg 2 were similar. Therefore, a single P-I curve derived from pooled data was used to model distributions of primary production. Distributions of photosynthetic pigments were characterized on the basis of in vivo fluorescence profiles and empirical relationships with extracted pigment concentrations. Subsurface irradiance was described using a spectral irradiance model. Cross sections of the Gulf Stream revealed consistently higher pigment concentrations and primary production on the slope water side. Along-stream variations in pigment distributions and primary production were apparently related to density structure influenced by meander circulation. Such variations were less pronounced during leg 2, which came after a transition from a well-defined meander interacting with a warm-core ring (leg 1) to a more linear stream (leg 2). Higher water-column-integrated primary production during leg 2 was attributed to mixing-induced nutrient injection and redistribution of chlorophyll in the photic zone. 47 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Effect of stream channel size on the delivery of nitrogen to the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.

    2000-01-01

    An increase in the flux of nitrogen from the Mississippi river during the latter half of the twentieth century has caused eutrophication and chronic seasonal hypoxia in the shallow waters of the Louisiana shelf in the northern Gulf of Mexico. This has led to reductions in species diversity, mortality of benthic communities and stress in fishery resources. There is evidence for a predominantly anthropogenic origin of the increased nitrogen flux, but the location of the most significant sources in the Mississippi basin responsible for the delivery of nitrogen to the Gulf of Mexico have not been clearly identified, because the parameters influencing nitrogen-loss rates in rivers are not well known. Here we present an analysis of data from 374 US monitoring stations, including 123 along the six largest tributaries to the Mississippi, that shows a rapid decline in the average first-order rate of nitrogen loss with channel size-from 0.45 day-1 in small streams to 0.005 day-1 in the Mississippi river. Using stream depth as an explanatory variable, our estimates of nitrogen-loss rates agreed with values from earlier studies. We conclude that the proximity of sources to large streams and rivers is an important determinant of nitrogen delivery to the estuary in the Mississippi basin, and possibly also in other large river basins.

  7. Strong impacts of the Gulf Stream anomalies on the large-scale atmospheric state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Mototaka; Yamane, Shozo

    2010-05-01

    Geological data and climate simulation models suggest that the North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) that plays a critical role in the global thermohaline circulation may have gone through major fluctuations in the past, bringing with them major climatic anomalies around the basin. A future collapse of the NADW formation has been a concern, as theories and climate simulation models suggest freshening of the North Atlantic as a result of the carbon dioxide increase in the atmosphere. Meanwhile, attempts to find strong impacts of SST anomalies in the North Atlantic on the large-scale atmospheric state in the data and simulation experiments had not been very successful, casting some doubt on the extent to which the thermohaline circulation fluctuations affect the Northern Hemispheric climate. In an attempt to find evidence of strong impacts of the SST anomalies along the Gulf Stream on the regional and Northern Hemispheric climates, we analyzed the ERA40 reanalysis data and Hadley Centre SST data with the near-surface baroclinicity as the key parameter that connects the extra-tropical SST anomalies with the large-scale atmospheric anomalies. We first calculated EOFs of the near-surface baroclinicity for the domain that covers the North Atlantic storm track for each month. We then compiled anomaly composites of the SST, net surface heat flux, and various atmospheric fields for the positive and negative phases of the first two EOFs for each month. We also compiled composites of the anomalies for the preceding and following months for the first two EOFs. From the above diagnoses, we identified strong impacts of the SST anomalies in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream on the large-scale atmospheric state, mostly in cold months. The scale of the atmospheric anomalies generated is very large, on the order of 1000km to 10000km, spanning the entire hemisphere. Roughly speaking, there are two patterns of atmospheric anomalies. One is characterized by a meridional shift in the

  8. The Gulf Stream pathway and the impacts of the eddy-driven abyssal circulation and the Deep Western Boundary Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurlburt, Harley E.; Hogan, Patrick J.

    2008-08-01

    A hydrodynamic model of the subtropical Atlantic basin and the Intra-Americas Sea (9-47°N) is used to investigate the dynamics of Gulf Stream separation from the western boundary at Cape Hatteras and its mean pathway to the Grand Banks. The model has five isopycnal Lagrangian layers in the vertical and allows realistic boundary geometry, bathymetry, wind forcing, and a meridional overturning circulation (MOC), the latter specified via ports in the northern and southern boundaries. The northward upper ocean branch of the MOC (14 Sv) was always included but the southward Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC) was excluded in some simulations, allowing investigation of the impacts of the DWBC and the eddy-driven mean abyssal circulation on Gulf Stream separation from the western boundary. The result is resolution dependent with the DWBC playing a crucial role in Gulf Stream separation at 1/16° resolution but with the eddy-driven abyssal circulation alone sufficient to obtain accurate separation at 1/32° resolution and a realistic pathway from Cape Hatteras to the Grand Banks with minimal DWBC impact except southeast of the Grand Banks. The separation from the western boundary is particularly sensitive to the strength of the eddy-driven abyssal circulation. Farther to the east, between 68°W and the Grand Banks, all of the 1/16° and 1/32° simulations with realistic topography (with or without a DWBC) gave similar generally realistic mean pathways with clear impacts of the topographically constrained eddy-driven abyssal circulation versus very unrealistic Gulf Stream pathways between Cape Hatteras and the Grand Banks from otherwise identical simulations run with a flat bottom, in reduced-gravity mode, or with 1/8° resolution and realistic topography. The model is realistic enough to allow detailed model-data comparisons and a detailed investigation of Gulf Stream dynamics. The corresponding linear solution with a Sverdrup interior and Munk viscous western boundary

  9. Polarization and wavelength diversities of Gulf Stream fronts imaged by AIRSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. S.; Jansen, R. W.; Marmorino, G. O.; Chubb, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    During the 1990 Gulf Stream Experiment, NASA/JPL AIRSAR imaged the north edge of the Gulf Stream near the coast of Virginia. Simultaneous in-situ measurements of currents, temperatures, salinities, etc. were made for several crossings of the north edge by the R/V Cape Henlopen. Measurements identified two fronts with shearing and converging flows. The polarimetric SAR images from the fronts showed two bright linear features. One of them corresponds to the temperature front, which separated the warm Gulf Stream water to the south from a cool, freshwater filament to the north. The other line, located about 8 km north of the temperature front, is believed to correspond to the velocity front between the filament and the slope water. At these fronts, wave-current interactions produced narrow bands of steep and breaking waves manifesting higher radar returns in polarimetric SAR images. In general, our AIRSAR imagery shows that the signal-to-clutter ratio of radar cross sections for the temperature front is higher than that of the velocity front. In this paper, we study the polarization and wavelength diversities of radar response of these two fronts using the P-, L-, and C-Band Polarimetric SAR data. The north-south flight path of the AIRSAR crossed the temperature front several times and provided valuable data for analysis. Three individual passes are investigated. We found that for the temperature front, the cross-pol (HV) responses are much higher than co-pol responses (VV and HH), and that P-Band HV has the highest signal to clutter ratio. For the velocity front, the ratio is the strongest in P-Band VV, and it is indistinguishable for all polarizations in C-Band. The radar cross sections for all three polarization (HH, HV, and VV) and for all three bands are modelled using an ocean wave model and a composite Bragg scattering model. In our initial investigations, the theoretical model agrees qualitatively with the AIRSAR observations.

  10. Mesoscale eddies in the South Atlantic Bight and the Gulf Stream Recirculation region: Vertical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelao, Renato M.

    2014-03-01

    Sea level anomalies from altimeters are combined with decade-long potential temperature and salinity profiles from Argo floats to investigate the vertical structure of mesoscale eddies in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB) and the Gulf Stream Recirculation region. Eddy detection and eddy tracking algorithms are applied to the satellite observations, and hydrography profiles from floats that surfaced inside eddies are used to construct three-dimensional composites of cyclones and anticyclones. Eddies are characterized by large temperature and salinity anomalies at 500-1000 m depth and near the surface, and by small anomalies at 200-400 m below the surface at the depth of the North Atlantic Subtropical Mode Water. Anomalies associated with anticyclones are generally larger and found deeper in the water column compared to those due to the presence of cyclones. Geostrophic velocities around eddies generally exceed their translation speed in the top 1000 m of the water column. As such, these eddies can trap water in their interior as they propagate westward. Combining the volume of water inside eddies above their trapping depths with the number of eddies that propagate into the SAB each year, it is estimated that cyclones and anticyclones transport 3.5 ± 0.9 Sv and 4.1 ± 1.7 Sv onshore toward the Gulf Stream, respectively. The total volume transport of 7.6 ± 2.2 Sv represents an important fraction of previous estimates of the onshore transport in the Gulf Stream Recirculation gyre. Since eddies are characterized by large temperature and salinity anomalies, they also contribute significantly to the onshore transport of heat and salt.

  11. Fluctuations of Gulf Stream frontal position between Cape Hatteras and the Straits of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.L. )

    1994-03-15

    Low-frequency variations in the onshore/offshore position of the Gulf Stream thermal front have been examined at 10 cross-isobath transects spaced along the South Atlantic Bight between the Straits of Florida and Cape Hatteras. The data were obtained from the U.S. Navy's frontal analysis charts for the 12-year period, 1976-1988. A time domain empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis revealed two modes of fluctuation about the mean Gulf Stream Position, which together explain the well-known [open quotes]weakly and strongly deflected[close quotes] frontal position states which occur on timescales of a few months in the vicinity of the Charleston Bump. Analyses of fluctuations at the annual period revealed a 3-month phase lag between frontal position, as shown by the most significant time domain EOF mode, and volume transport through the Straits of Florida. In addition, frequency domain EOF and cross-spectral analysis of frontal position revealed annual waves which appear to propagate to the south (north) in the region south (north) of the bump. For transect pairs having significant coherence and nonzero phase estimates, the phase speed and wavelength were about 10 cm/s southward (7 cm/s northward) and 3000 km (2000 km) in the southern (northern) region. This suggests an annual generation of a perturbation in the vicinity of the bump which radiates away as a long annual wave and which may be related to, or part of, the mechanism which produces the annual modulation of Gulf Stream transport. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Gulf Stream variability in western North Atlantic off Cape Lookout, North Carolina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, A. B.; Seidenkrantz, M.-S.; Mienis, F.; Fischel, A.; Frank, N.; Hebbeln, D.

    2012-04-01

    Cold-water coral mounds are common on the SE slope of the US (SEUS) from Florida to Cape Hatteras between depths of 400-600 m. The coral areas lie in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream, which is characterized by strong currents transporting relatively warm water northwards along the SEUS slope. Thus far little is known about the environmental conditions inside the SEUS coral communities and particularly the effects of the nearby Gulf Stream. Near Cape Lookout (North Carolina margin) cold-water corals have formed mound structures, which have a teardrop shape with a sediment tail at the lee side of the mounds, indicating the presence of a strong uni-directional current. The mounds were found to be partly covered with living Lophelia pertusa colonies and partly with sediment and dead coral framework. A 3.4 m long piston core was collected in 2010 during a cruise with the RV Pelagia. This pistoncore was used to determine the changes of the current strength in time in the study area. Different measurements including foraminiferal counts, stable oxygen and carbon isotopes, XRF and magnetic susceptibility were carried out to determine the changes in current strength in the area. Furthermore, cold-water coral fragments were dated with U/Th and foraminifera from the same depth intervals were dated with C14. Datings show that all corals have the same age around 5500 years. However, the sediment in between the corals showed ages ranging between 4700 and 13000 years. Based on the foraminifera data three zones could be observed in the core. Zone 1 ranges between 13000 and 10000 years, zone 2 between 10000-7200 years and zone 3 between 7200-4700 years. These zones all show the gradual onshore movement of the Gulf Stream, that can be related to a rapid rise in sea level as a response to the last deglaciation. This movement has gradually widened the band of the Gulf Stream, thereby compressing the surface and deeper water masses. The strength of the current decreased when fresh water

  13. Observation of the surface circulation in a Gulf Stream frontal perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovich, F.M.; Maul, G.A.

    1983-07-01

    In the period of 3--16 June 1979, a satellite-tracked, free-drifting buoy passed through a Gulf Stream frontal perturbation and was entrained into a warm filament on the shoreward side of the perturbation. Significant speed convergence was noted as the buoy passed through the perturbation and approached the counterclockwise turn into the warm filament. In the warm filament, the buoy drifted to the southwest at speeds of about 0.1 to 0.3 m/sec. Eventually, the buoy drifted out of the filament and went westward in an apparent response to wind-induced surface drift.

  14. Management of end-stage heart failure: a perspective on the Arab Gulf states

    PubMed Central

    Al Habeeb, Waleed; Stewart, Garrick C.; Mudge, Gilbert H.

    2009-01-01

    The ever expanding epidemic of end-stage heart failure represents one of the greatest challenges of modern cardiovascular medicine. With medical treatments hampered by significant limitations, physicians caring for patients with advanced heart disease have turned to cardiac transplantation and durable mechanical circulatory assist devices as definitive therapies. These advanced therapeutic modalities are not widely available outside the United States and Europe, but nevertheless offer enormous potential for patients in the Arab Gulf suffering from end-stage heart failure. This review will discuss the management of end-stage heart failure in the Gulf States, with an emphasis on therapies best utilized within a framework of regional cooperation and coordination. PMID:19847084

  15. Dynamics of the direct intrusion of Gulf Stream ring water onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weifeng G.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.

    2015-09-01

    Onshore intrusions of offshore waters onto the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf can greatly affect shelf circulation, biogeochemistry, and fisheries. Previous studies have concentrated on onshore intrusions of slope water. Here we present a direct intrusion of Gulf Stream warm-core ring water onto the shelf representing a previously unknown exchange process at the shelfbreak. Impingement of warm-core rings at the shelfbreak generates along-isobath intrusions that grow like Pinocchio's nose, extending hundreds of kilometers to the southwest. By combining satellite and Ocean Observatory Initiative Pioneer Array data and idealized numerical simulations, we discover that the intrusion results from topographically induced vorticity variation of the ring water, rather than from entrainment of the shelfbreak frontal jet. This intrusion of the Gulf Stream ring water has important biogeochemical implications and could facilitate migration of marine species across the shelfbreak barrier and transport low-nutrient surface Gulf Stream ring water to the otherwise productive shelfbreak region.

  16. Variations in transport derived from satellite altimeter data over the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molinelli, E.; Lambert, R. B.

    1981-01-01

    Variations in total change of sea surface height (delta h) across the Gulf Stream are observed using Seasat radar altimeter data. The sea surface height is related to transport within the stream by a two layer model. Variations in delta h are compared with previously observed changes in transport found to increase with distance downstream. No such increase is apparent since the satellite transports show no significant dependence on distance. Though most discrepancies are less than 50 percent, a few cases differ by about 100 percent and more. Several possible reasons for these discrepancies are advanced, including geoid error, but only two oceanographic contributions to the variability are examined, namely, limitations in the two layer model and meanders in the current. It is concluded that some of the discrepancies could be explained as changes in the density structure not accounted for by the two layer model.

  17. Observations on the long-period variability of the Gulf Stream downstream of Cape Hatteras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Jorge

    1993-01-01

    To examine the long-period variability of the Gulf Stream, sea level residuals relative to a 2-year mean sea level in the Gulf Stream downstream of Cape Hatteras (between 75 deg W and 60 deg W longitude) are used. Residuals, as derived from Geosat altimetry between November 1986 and December 1988, were gridded in space and time at a temporal resolution of 10 days and spatial resolution of 1/4 deg. Complex empirical orthogonal function (CEOF) analysis was applied to the data set to extract the spatially correlated signal with the original data subsampled to 1/2 deg. In addition to determining the space-time scales and propagation characterisitics of the different modes, wavenumber-frequency spectral techniques were used to separate the variability into propagating and stationary components. The CEOF technique applied to the data set indicated that the first four CEOF modes accounted for 60% of the variability and were found to be above the noise leve 99% of the time. CEOF 1 was associated with westward propagation at 5 km/d at a wavelength of 2000 km and eastward propagation at 1-2 km/d centered at a 500-km wavelength. This first CEOF is in good agreement with thin-jet equivalent barotropic models which predict westward propagation for wavelengths greater than 1130 km. A deflection of the wavelike pattern at 65 deg W also indicates a possible topographic effect. A simple scaling of the effect of topography indicates that for length scales longer than the internal Rossby radius of deformation, the topographic term is at least of the same order of magnitude as the beta effect. The second CEOF was more broadbanded in wavenumber space, with eastward propagation occurring in a wavenumber-frequency band between 300 and 1400 km and 0.5 and 2.0 cycles/yr. The third CEOF is similar in structure to the first, but with less energy. CEOF 4 was clearly identifiable with higher frequencies than the first three with westward propagation at 4 km/d. The spatial location of this mode

  18. Detecting the surface salinity signature of Gulf Stream cold-core rings in Aquarius synergistic products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umbert, M.; Guimbard, S.; Lagerloef, G.; Thompson, L.; Portabella, M.; Ballabrera-Poy, J.; Turiel, A.

    2015-02-01

    New sea surface salinity (SSS) observations derived from satellite remote sensing platforms provide a comprehensive view of salt exchanges across boundary currents such as the Gulf Stream. The high resolution (45 km spatial resolution and 3 day repeat subcycle) of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) observations allows detection (and tracking) of meander and ring structures of the Gulf Stream from SSS maps. These structures are, however, not resolved by the relatively lower resolution (100 km and 7 day repeat subcycle) of Aquarius observations. A recently developed fusion technique, based on singularity analysis, is applied in this study to reconstruct these mesoscale (from 100 km and 3 days) features in Aquarius-derived products. New quarter-degree SSS maps are obtained by fusing Aquarius data with three different geophysical templates: sea surface height (SSH) from AVISO, SSS from SMOS, and sea surface temperature (SST) from AVHRR. The proposed method exploits the theoretical correspondence among the singularity exponents of different maps of ocean-surface remotely sensed scalar fields. The analysis results over the year 2012 show that merging Aquarius with SSH data provides a series of negative salinity anomalies that better collocate with the position of the cyclonic eddies identified from sea level anomaly maps. This result is consistent with the hypothesis that this SLA derived cyclonic eddies in this area are indeed CCRs shed off the GS.

  19. Objective analysis of the Gulf Stream thermal front: methods and accuracy. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Tracey, K.L.; Friedlander, A.I.; Watts, R.

    1987-12-01

    The objective-analysis (OA) technique was adapted by Watts and Tracey in order to map the thermal frontal zone of the Gulf Stream. Here, the authors test the robustness of the adapted OA technique to the selection of four control parameters: mean field, standard deviation field, correlation function, and decimation time. Output OA maps of the thermocline depth are most affected by the choice of mean field, with the most-realistic results produced using a time-averaged mean. The choice of the space-time correlation function has a large influence on the size of the estimated error fields, which are associated with the OA maps. The smallest errors occur using the analytic function based on 4 years of inverted echo sounder data collected in the same region of the Gulf Stream. Variations in the selection of the standard deviation field and decimation time have little effect on the output OA maps. Accuracy of the output OA maps is determined by comparing them with independent measurements of the thermal field. Two cases are evaluated: standard maps and high-temporal-resolution maps, with decimation times of 2 days and 1 day, respectively. Standard deviations (STD) between the standard maps at the 15% estimated error level and the XBTs (AXBTs) are determined to be 47-53 m. Comparisons of the high-temporal-resolution maps at the 20% error level with the XBTs (AXBTs) give STD differences of 47 m.

  20. Gulf Stream-related warm filaments inshore of the Charleston Bump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seim, Harvey; Edwards, Catherine

    2015-04-01

    As the Gulf Stream flows along the shelfbreak of the southeast US it is prone to frontal instabilities. Warm filaments often form along the shelfbreak, extending equatorward from the onshore crests of meanders. Moored current profiler observations, shipboard towed body and current profiler observations, and glider observations collected over the first few months of 2012 are used to describe the structure of energetic warm filaments off the coast of northern South Carolina, USA, inshore of the deflection region of the Gulf Stream known as the Charleston Bump. These filaments were found to extend to more than 100m depth, translate southwestward, and produce strong SW currents (>0.6 m/s at the surface), in contrast to previous studies which documented shallower, non-translating, filaments with weaker currents to the northeast of the study area. Filaments strongly influence the mass field on the outer shelf and upper slope, causing a depression of isosurfaces, possibly enhancing near-bottom offshore flow in frictional boundary layers. A simple geostrophic representation of the near-surface properties of a filament is compared to the observations.

  1. Existence of solutions to the stommel-charney model of the gulf stream

    SciTech Connect

    Barcilon, V. ); Constantin, P. ); Titi, E.S. )

    1988-11-01

    This paper discusses the existence of weak solutions to the equations as a model of the Gulf Stream. The method of artificial viscosity is also discussed. Key words: Navier-Stokes equation, artificial viscosity, ocean circulation, DOE. The authors examine the mathematical properties of an equation arising in the theory of ocean circulation. In order to understand the role of this problem in oceanography, a brief review of the subject is given. The first successful attempt to provide a mathematical description of the mid-latitude ocean currents was made by other investigators. It was shown conclusively that a Gulf Stream-like intensification on the western side of an ocean basin could be explained by the so-called ..beta..-effect. This is the geophysical terminology for the latitudinal variation of the normal component of the earth's rotation. Aside from this variable Coriolis force, the other forces which entered into Stommel's model were those due to the pressure gradient, the surface winds, and friction. For the sake of simplicity, this last force was taken to be proportional to the velocity fields. All the effects of density stratification were neglected by making the assumption that the ocean was homogeneous. Finally, by working with vertical averages, Stommel essentially treated the ocean circulation as a two-dimensional horizontal motion. Somewhat surprisingly, Stommel's ad hoc, linear model was shown later to provide an accurate description of an actual experimental setup.

  2. Airborne dual laser excitation and mapping of phytoplankton photopigments in a Gulf Stream Warm Core Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoge, F. E.; Swift, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    Utilization of a two-color airborne lidar system in the systematic study of a major oceanographic feature is reported here for the first time. An excimer pumped dye laser was optically and electronically integrated into the NASA Airborne Oceanographic Lidar for simultaneous use with a frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser. The output beams exit the laser system along parallel paths after being produced on an alternating pulse basis at a combined rate of 12.5 pps. Results are presented for missions flown over a Gulf Stream Warm Core Ring (WCR) as well as over shelf, slope, Gulf Stream, and Sargasso Sea waters. From the airborne data a high coherence is shown between the two-color chlorophyll a data and between the Nd:YAG chlorophyll a and phycoerythrin responses within each of these water masses. However, distinct differences in the response patterns of these photopigments are shown to exist between the differing water masses. At certain of the boundaries separating the water masses a sharp transition is seen to occur, while at others a wider transition zone was observed in which the correlation between the photopigments appears to degrade.

  3. Small-scale cyclones on the periphery of a Gulf Stream warm-core ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennelly, M. A.; Evans, R. H.; Joyce, T. M.

    1985-01-01

    Small-scale cyclones found around Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B are investigated by using infrared satellite images and current information obtained with an acoustic-Doppler velocimeter. Currents in these cyclones reveal speeds ranging from 20 to 80 cm/s. One small cyclone or 'ringlet' found in June 1982 was studied extensively by removing the basic rotational velocities of 82B. The azimuthal velocity field for this ringlet was used with the gradient current equation to calculate the absolute dynamic topography at 100 dbar. It was found that the ringlet was 13 dyn-cm lower than its surroundings. In addition, neglect of the centrifugal term would have changed the dynamic topography of the ringlet by 30 percent. From a comparison with CTD data the absolute reference level was determined, and a vertical profile of horizontal currents was calculated for the ringlet. Other cyclones were found throughout the slope water region around warm-core ring 82B with observable lifetimes of 1 to 2 weeks. The northeast quadrant of 82B was a favored generation site for ringlets. Two cyclones were observed to form in this region and were advected anticyclonically around 82B. Typically, at any one time, six cyclones with diameters of approximately 40 to 50 km can be detected north of the Gulf Stream by using satellite images.

  4. Quantitative Estimates of Cloudiness over the Gulf Stream Locale Using GOES VAS Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alliss, Randall J.; Raman, Sethu

    1995-02-01

    Fields of cloudiness derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite VISSR (Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer) Atmospheric Sounder are analyzed over the Gulf Stream locale (GSL) to investigate seasonal and geographical variations. The GSL in this study is defined as the region bounded from 31° to 38°N and 82° to 66°W. This region covers an area that includes the United States mid-Atlantic coast states, the Gulf Stream, and portions of the Sargasso Sea. Clouds over the GSL are found approximately three-quarters of the time between 1985 and 1993. However, large seasonal variations in the frequency of cloudiness exist. These seasonal variations show a distinct relationship to gradients in sea surface temperature (SST). For example, during winter when large SST gradients are present, large gradients in cloudiness are found. Clouds are observed least often during summer over the ocean portion of the GSL. This minimum coincides with an increase in atmospheric stability due to large-scale subsidence. Cloudiness is also found over the GSL in response to mesoscale convergence areas induced by sea surface temperature gradients. Geographical variations in cloudiness are found to be related to the meteorology of the region. During periods of cold-air advection, which are found most frequently in winter, clouds are found less often between the coastline and the core of the Gulf Stream and more often over the Sargasso Sea. During cyclogenesis, large cloud shields often develop and cover the entire domain.Satellite estimates of cloudiness are found to be least reliable over land at night during the cold months. In these situations, the cloud retrieval algorithm often mistakes clear sky for low clouds. Satellite-derived cloudiness over land is compared with daytime surface observations of cloudiness. Results indicate that retrieved cloudiness agrees well with surface observations. Relative humidity fields taken from global analyses are compared with

  5. Estimating uncertainties on a Gulf Stream mixed-layer heat budget from stochastic modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayoub, Nadia K.; Lucas, Marc; De Mey, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to explore the robustness of the mixed-layer heat budget as estimated from an eddy-permitting model with respect to uncertainties in atmospheric forcing. We illustrate how statistics from an ensemble can be used in a first step towards the calculation of error bars of any simulated quantity, such as the mixed-layer heat budget. The statistics from an ensemble of 33 simulations are derived in order to infer information on the model errors space and time variability of the main terms of the heat budget. The ensemble is generated by perturbing the wind forcing and the incoming solar radiation as uncertainties on these fields are expected to be a main source of errors for the surface layer representation in the model at monthly to seasonal scales. We focus on the mixed-layer in the Gulf Stream system during the deepening period (Sept.-March). The results indicate that large errors are expected at the Gulf Stream front location and just north of it. The largest errors are found on the zonal and meridional advection and vertical diffusion terms: they can locally reach values that are larger than the terms themselves. We observe a rapid increase with time of the errors for both these terms. The error growth is mainly due to the mesoscale decorrelation. The impact of wind errors on southward Ekman transport and surface turbulence generates uncertainties on the vertical diffusion term just north of the Gulf Stream front. We work with an eddy-permitting configuration similar to those used in ocean reanalysis projects (e.g. SODA, and GLORYS). Our results suggest that for such configurations, at monthly to seasonal time scales, the impact of uncertainties in the atmospheric forcing is weak on the mixed-layer cooling but very large on the zonal and meridional advection and vertical diffusion heat budget terms. In consequence, the estimate of these quantities from ocean reanalyses is not robust with respect to the atmospheric forcing and should be provided with

  6. Significant bed elevation changes related to Gulf Stream dynamics on the South Carolina continental shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, G.; Noble, M.

    1993-01-01

    Photographs of the seabed taken from an instrumented bottom tripod located approximately 100 km east of Charleston, South Carolina, reveal bed elevation changes of over 20 cm between July and November 1978. The tripod was in 85 m of water and was equipped with two current meters at 38.7 and 100 cm from the bed, a pressure sensor, a transmissometer, which fouled early during the deployment, a temperature sensor and a camera. The sediment under the tripod was composed of poorly sorted sand, some shell debris and numerous small biological tubes. Bed roughness varied throughout the deployment from biologically-produced mounds (2-5 cm high and 5-20 cm diameter) to streaks to a smooth bed, depending upon the frequency and magnitude of the sediment transporting events. Even though these events were common, especially during the later part of the deployment, the bed was rarely rippled, and there was no evidence of large bedforms such as dunes or sand waves migrating through the field of view of the camera. Photographs did clearly show, however, a gradual net deposition of the bed of nearly 20 cm, followed by erosion of approximately 5 cm. The flow field near the bed was dominated by sub-tidal period currents. Hourly-averaged currents at 100 cm from the bed typically varied between 10 and 30 cm s-1 and occasionally were as high as 60 cm s-1. The large flow events were predominantly toward the southwest along the shelf in the opposite direction of the northeast flowing Gulf Stream. The cross-shore component of the flow near the bed was predominantly directed offshore due to a local topographic steering effect. Current, temperature and satellite data suggest that the largest flow events were associated with the advection of Gulf Stream filaments past the tripod. Erosion events, as seen from the photographs, were highly correlated with the passage of these Gulf Stream filaments past the tripod. Gradual deposition of sediment, which occurred during the first half of the

  7. Seasonal fluctuations in sea level on the South Carolina shelf and their relationship to the Gulf Stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, Marlene A.; Gelfenbaum, Guy R.

    1992-01-01

    Near-bottom pressure measurements obtained over a 9-month period in 1978 on the outer continental shelf off South Carolina document that sea level rose 35 to 50 cm between July and October. Records of coastal sea level showed a similar rise. When the pressure and coastal sea level records were corrected for the effects of wind stress and temperature, the largest portion of the rise in the two variables remained. The amplitude of the change in residual sea level was largest at the shelf break, 28 cm, and decayed to 22 cm at the coast. The relatively small magnitude of the decay suggests that alongshelf pressure gradients imposed at the shelf break have minimum alongshelf wavelengths of 2000 km. The changes in residual sea level were seasonal and associated with seasonal changes in the transport of the Gulf Stream. The 3 years of residual sea level records examined here indicate that the amplitude of a typical decrease in transport of the Gulf Stream off South Carolina between July and October has a strong interannual variability. The change in transport can be 50% lower to over 100% higher than the historical average. The residual sea level records also suggest that a change in transport of the Gulf Stream is not strongly related to the onshore/offshore position of the Gulf Stream.

  8. Large and small scale circulation signatures of the ERS-1 SAR over the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, R.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Thompson, D.; Grodsky, S.; Tilley, D.; Dulov, V.

    1994-01-01

    Since September 1991, the ERS-1 SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) has collected approximately 170 frames of ocean imagery on 28 passes over the western Gulf Stream in support of ESA experiment US8-2c. SAR signatures of the north wall are seen on nearly all passes, with modulation depth varying from 3% to 35% for 100 m samples. Many small and mesoscale circulation features associated with the Stream are evident. The detailed form of the signature varies considerably, however. Narrow bright or dark linear features appear to follow streamlines, and on one occasion a strong dark line was associated with an in situ measurement of a sharp current shear. Similarly, larger spatial scale changes in backscatter over the Stream were associated with in situ measurements of atmospheric stability transitions. Physical explanations for the narrow features are not so obvious. However, the accumulation of surfactants along converging current boundaries or local short wave straining and breaking appear plausible. These preliminary results strongly suggest that a wide swath (approximately 500 km) SAR with at least 100 m resolution would be a useful adjunct to existing satellite AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) imagery.

  9. GEOS-3 ocean current investigation using radar altimeter profiling. [Gulf Stream surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leitao, C. D.; Huang, N. E.; Parra, C. G.

    1978-01-01

    Both quasi-stationary and dynamic departures from the marine geoid were successfully detected using altitude measurements from the GEOS-3 radar altimeter. The quasi-stationary departures are observed either as elevation changes in single pass profiles across the Gulf Stream or at the crowding of contour lines at the western and northern areas of topographic maps generated using altimeter data spanning one month or longer. Dynamic features such as current meandering and spawned eddies can be monitored by comparing monthly mean maps. Comparison of altimeter inferred eddies with IR detected thermal rings indicates agreement of the two techniques. Estimates of current velocity are made using derived slope estimates in conjunction with the geostrophic equation.

  10. The atmospheric frontal response to SST perturbations in the Gulf Stream region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parfitt, Rhys; Czaja, Arnaud; Minobe, Shoshiro; Kuwano-Yoshida, Akira

    2016-03-01

    The link between sea surface temperature (SST) gradients and atmospheric fronts is explored in a general circulation model across the Gulf Stream (GS) region from December to February 1981-2000. Two model experiments are analyzed, one with a realistic control SST distribution and one with a spatially smoothed SST distribution. The analysis shows a noticeable change in regional atmospheric frontal frequency between the two experiments (up to 30%), with the distribution of change exhibiting a clear imprint of the GS SST front. Further analysis of the surface sensible heat flux gradient across cold fronts reveals the pattern of change to be mediated by a thermal interaction between the oceanic and atmospheric fronts ("thermal damping and strengthening"). These results not only emphasize the significance of the GS SST gradient for storm development in the North Atlantic but also highlight the importance of resolution in assessing the role of frontal air-sea interaction in midlatitude climate variability.

  11. Calcareous nannofossil evidence for the existence of the Gulf Stream during the late Maastrichtian

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watkins, D.K.; Self-Trail J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Upper Maastrichtian calcareous nannofossil assemblages, from eight cores on the South Carolina Coastal Plain (onshore set) and three deep sea drilling sites from the continental slope and abyssal hills (offshore set), were analyzed by correlation and principal component analysis to examine the ancient surface water thermal structure. In addition, a temperature index derived from independently published paleobiogeographic information was applied to the sample data. All three methods indicate a strong separation of the samples into onshore and offshore sets, with the offshore data set exhibiting significantly warmer paleotemperatures. The great disparity between these two sample sets indicates that there was a strong thermal contrast between the onshore and offshore surface water masses that persisted throughout the late Maastrichtian despite evident shortterm changes in fertility, productivity, and community structure. This suggests the Gulf Stream was present as a major oceanographic feature during the late Maastrichtian. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Gulf stream meanders in the South Atlantic Bight 2: Momentum balances

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.L.; Lee, T.N.

    1995-04-15

    Gulf Stream meanders and their associated frontal eddies have been numerically simulated using a model tuned to the southern portion of the South Atlantic Bight. A run which produced events most similar to those observed in nature was identified, and the dynamics of a particular meander event were examined in detail. A complex array of momentum balances are obtained, and they vary with position within the feature. While the along-isobath flow is predominantly in geostrophic balance, several of the nonlinear advection terms in both horizontal momentum equations play important roles in the space-time development of the flow. In particular, the vertical advection of horizontal momentum as well as frictional dissipation are now recognized as important contributors to the dynamical balances in the vicinity of the steep continental slope. It would appear that the semigeostrophic equations constitute the simplest description of this system. 10 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Upper-ocean velocity structure of Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Kennelly, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Acoustic-Doppler current profiling of warm-core ring (WCR) 82B revealed changes in the velocity structure over much of the ring's 7-month lifespan. As ring diameter decreased, peak speeds in the high-velocity region decreased from 0.8 m/s in April 1982 to 0.5 m/s in August 1982. Azimuthally averaged velocities revealed the core of WCR 82B to be in near solid-body rotation, with little measurable horizontal divergence at 100 m. In addition, potential vorticity was conserved in the ring core despite interactions with the Gulf Stream and large changes in ring size. Deviations from symmetry in WCR 82B were caused by superposition with the shelf-slope front, small cyclonic eddies, and upper-layer mean flow.

  14. Multiplatform sampling (ship, aircraft, and satellite) of a Gulf Stream warm core ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Raymond C.; Brown, Otis B.; Hoge, Frank E.; Baker, Karen S.; Evans, Robert H.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the ability to meet the need to measure distributions of physical and biological properties of the ocean over large areas synoptically and over long time periods by means of remote sensing utilizing contemporaneous buoy, ship, aircraft, and satellite (i.e., multiplatform) sampling strategies. A mapping of sea surface temperature and chlorophyll fields in a Gulf Stream warm core ring using the multiplatform approach is described. Sampling capabilities of each sensing system are discussed as background for the data collected by means of these three dissimilar methods. Commensurate space/time sample sets from each sensing system are compared, and their relative accuracies in space and time are determined. The three-dimensional composite maps derived from the data set provide a synoptic perspective unobtainable from single platforms alone.

  15. On the Observed Relationships between Variability in Gulf Stream Sea Surface Temperatures and the Atmospheric Circulation in the North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wills, Samantha; Thompson, David; Ciasto, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The advent of increasingly high-resolution satellite observations and numerical models has led to a series of advances in our understanding of the role of midlatitude sea surface temperature (SST) in climate variability, especially near western boundary currents (WBC). Observational analyses have suggested that ocean dynamics play a central role in driving interannual SST variability over the Kuroshio-Oyashio and Gulf Stream extensions. Numerical experiments have suggested that variations in the SST field within these WBC regions may have a much more pronounced influence on the atmospheric circulation than previously thought. In this study, the authors examine the observational support for (or against) a robust atmospheric response to midlatitude SST variability in the Gulf Stream extension. To do so, lead/lag analysis based on daily-mean data is applied to assess the evidence for two-way coupling between SST anomalies and the atmospheric circulation on transient timescales, building off of previous studies that have utilized weekly data. A novel decomposition approach is employed to demonstrate that atmospheric circulation anomalies over the Gulf Stream extension can be separated into two distinct patterns of midlatitude atmosphere/ocean interaction: 1) a pattern that peaks 2-3 weeks before the largest SST anomalies in the Gulf Stream extension, which can be viewed as the "atmospheric forcing" and 2) a pattern that peaks several weeks after the largest SST anomalies, which the authors argue can be viewed as the "atmospheric response". The latter pattern is linearly independent of the former, and is interpreted as the potential response of the atmospheric circulation to SST variability in the Gulf Stream extension.

  16. Interglacial occurrence of cold-water corals off Cape Lookout (NW Atlantic): First evidence of the Gulf Stream influence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Lélia; Mienis, Furu; Wienberg, Claudia; Frank, Norbert; Kwiatkowski, Cornelia; Groeneveld, Jeroen; Thil, François; Abrantes, Fatima; Cunha, Marina R.; Hebbeln, Dierk

    2015-11-01

    Climatic and oceanographic changes, as occurring at a glacial-interglacial scale, may alter the environmental conditions needed for the development of prolific cold-water coral reefs and mounds. Studies constraining the temporal distribution of cold-water corals in the NE Atlantic suggested the cyclic changes of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation as the main driver for the development and dispersal of cold-water coral ecosystems. However, conclusions were hindered by lack of data from the NW Atlantic. Aiming to overcome this lack of data, the temporal occurrence of cold-water corals in the Cape Lookout area along the southeastern US margin was explored by U-series dating. Furthermore, the local influence of the regional water masses, namely the Gulf Stream, on cold-water coral proliferation and occurrence since the Last Glacial Maximum was examined. Results suggest that the occurrence of cold-water corals in the Cape Lookout area is restricted to interglacial periods, with corals being present during the last ~7 kyr and also during the Eemian (~125 ka). The reconstructed local environmental conditions suggest an offshore displacement of the Gulf Stream and increased influence from the Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters during the last glacial period. During the deglacial sea level rise, the Gulf Stream moved coastward providing present-day-like conditions to the surface waters. Nevertheless, present-day conditions at the ocean sea floor were not established before 7.5 cal ka BP once the ultimate demise of the Laurentide ice-sheet caused the final sea level rise and the displacement of the Gulf Stream to its present location. Occasional presence of the Gulf Stream over the site during the Mid- to Late Holocene coincides with enhanced bottom current strength and a slightly higher bottom water temperature, which are environmental conditions that are favorable for cold-water coral growth.

  17. Dissolved organic matter export in glacial and non-glacial streams along the Gulf of Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, E. W.; Scott, D.; Jeffery, A.; Schreiber, S.; Heavner, M.; Edwards, R.; D'Amore, D. V.; Fellman, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Gulf of Alaska drainage basin contains more than 75,000 km2 of glaciers, many of which are rapidly thinning and receding. We are using a paired watershed approach to evaluate how changes in glacier ecosystems will impact the export dissolved organic matter (DOM) into the Gulf of Alaska. Our primary study watersheds, Lemon Creek and Montana Creek, are similar in size, bedrock lithology and elevation range and extend from near sea level to the margin or interior of the Juneau Icefield. Lemon Creek has a glacial coverage of ~60%, while Montana Creek is free of glacier ice. Our goal is to evaluate seasonal differences in the quantity, chemical character and reactivity of DOM being exported from these watersheds to downstream near-shore marine ecosystems. In addition, we are monitoring a variety of physical parameters that influence instream DOM metabolism in both watersheds. Our initial results from the 2009 runoff season indicate that concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are substantially higher in the non-glacial watershed. However, fluorescence analyses indicate that DOM from the glacier watershed has a higher protein and lower humic material content compared to DOM from the non-glacial watershed. After the spring snowmelt season, physical parameters between the two watersheds diverged, with higher streamflow and turbidity as well as colder water temperatures in the glacial watershed. Although our previous yield calculations show significantly higher DOC fluxes from the forested watershed, our results here suggest that glacier watersheds may be an important source of labile carbon to the near shore marine ecosystem. The contrast in the physical habitat between the two rivers (e.g glacier stream = cold, low light penetration, unstable substrate) supports the hypothesis that that in-stream DOM processing is limited within glacier dominated rivers, therefore delivering a higher percentage of labile DOM downstream.

  18. Detection and interpretation of ocean roughness variations across the Gulf Stream inferred from radar cross section observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissman, D. E.; Thompson, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Radar cross section data shows that the Gulf Stream has a higher cross section per unit area (interpreted here as a greater roughness) than the water on the continental shelf. A steep gradient in cross section was often seen at the expected location of the western boundary. There were also longer-scale (10-20 km) gradual fluctuations within the stream of significant magnitude. These roughness variations are correlated with the surface shear stress that the local wind imposes on the sea. Using the available surface-truth information concerning the wind speed and direction, an assumed Gulf Stream velocity profile, and high-resolution ocean-surface temperature data obtained by the VHRR onboard a NOAA-NESS polar-orbiting satellite, the present study demonstrates that the computed surface stress variation bears a striking resemblance to the measured radar cross-section variations.

  19. Sea level variabilities in the Gulf Stream between Cape Hatteras and 50 deg W - A Geosat study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, Jorge; Zlotnicki, Victor; Fu, Lee-Lueng

    1990-01-01

    Sea level variabilities in the Gulf Stream between Cape Hatteras and 50 deg W were examined by studying sea level residuals, relative to a 2-yr mean sea level, obtained from Geosat altimetry data for the period between November 1986 and December 1988. An array of sea-level time series was constructed for a region bounded by 30 deg N and 45 deg N in latitude and by 80 deg W and 50 deg W longitude. It is shown that the spectral characteristics of this time series varies with geographic location along the Gulf Stream path. Concurrent NOAA IR images are used to aid in the interpretation of sea level observations in terms of the variability of the stream's path, demonstrating the synergistic value of the combination of satellite-altimeter and IR data.

  20. Circulation on the continental shelf of the southeastern United States. Part I. Subtidal response to wind and gulf stream forcing during winter

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.N.; Jei Ho, W.; Kourafalou, V.; Wang, J.D.

    1984-06-01

    Subtidal current and sea leavel response to wind and Gulf Stream forcing are investigated for the South Atlantic Bight shelf during winter conditions. Low-frequency flow variability in the outer shelf results primarily from wavelike meanders and eddies in the Gulf Stream front that occur in a 2-day to 2-week period band. Current meter derived vertically integrated momentum balances indicated that these large amplitude flow events are in approximate geostropic balance with baroclinic pressure gradients induced by northward propagating Gulf Stream disturbances.

  1. Reconstruction of the Gulf Stream since 1900 and correlation with the North Atlantic Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watelet, Sylvain; Beckers, Jean-Marie; Barth, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    Prevailing winds over the North Atlantic (NA) have a direct influence on the location and intensity of the Gulf Stream (GS) by the transfer of momentum between atmosphere and ocean. Therefore, the study of interannual variability of the GS requires the identification of sources of variability within the atmospheric circulation. Various studies have highlighted the impact of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) on the variability of the GS transport. However, there is still no scientific consensus thereupon. On the one hand, several scientific papers exhibit a decrease of the GS transport during low NAO periods, as well as a higher transport during high NAO phases. On the second hand, other authors suggest a lower transport during positive phases of the NAO. Finally, one study obtained a more complex conclusion, whereby the influence of the NAO is different upstream and downstream of Cape Hatteras. Considering the influence of the NAO on the GS position, studies are more convergent and show a more northern GS during a high NAO phase, while discrepancies remains on the existence and the quantification of the time lag between a specific NAO phase and its consequence on the GS position. This currently limited understanding of the links between the NAO and the GS impels us to further analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of the GS. Our main purpose in this study is to reconstruct a spatially continuous field of ocean (sub)surface circulation in the NA from in situ time series of discrete steps, in order to accurately quantify the position and intensity of the GS since 1900. From there, we are able to examine the correlation of this current with the NAO. To this end, we used the DIVA (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis) tool, which is a numerical implementation of the variational inverse method (VIM) using the finite elements method to reconstruct continuous fields from discrete measurements. These measurements of temperature and salinity since the beginning

  2. Variation of flow properties during a collision event of two mesoscale eddies in the Gulf Stream region from numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yeon S.; Park, Young-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    The temporal variation of the flow structure and consequent mixing process during the collision of two counter-rotating mesoscale eddies are investigated by analyzing the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model simulation for the Gulf Stream region using Eulerian parameters—Okubo-Weiss parameters and horizontal kinetic energy ( KE)—and Lagrangian parameters—finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) and relative dispersion coefficients ( K r ). During the collision process, a transport barrier constructed by FSLE ridges develops between the two eddies and hyperbolic points are formed at both ends of the barrier. High values of the shear components of strain (> mean + standard deviation) are observed around the hyperbolic points, indicating possible deformation of the eddy. The magnitudes of spatially averaged KE and FSLE values increase (~20% and ~25%, respectively) during the collision as the flows around the main eddy become more energetic and dispersive. The Eulerian measures—the relative vorticity and the shear components of strain—show different temporal evolutions. The former does not significantly vary (~3%) while the latter has a peak value (~34%) at the time of maximum impact of the collision. In contrast, the Lagrangian measures show a similar pattern of temporal variations as both FSLE and K r values generally increase (~25% and ~35%, respectively) during the collision, which indicates increased mixing due to the collision.

  3. Sources and Delivery of Nutrients to the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico from Streams in the South-Central United States.

    PubMed

    Rebich, Richard A; Houston, Natalie A; Mize, Scott V; Pearson, Daniel K; Ging, Patricia B; Evan Hornig, C

    2011-10-01

    SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were developed to estimate nutrient inputs [total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP)] to the northwestern part of the Gulf of Mexico from streams in the South-Central United States (U.S.). This area included drainages of the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf hydrologic regions. The models were standardized to reflect nutrient sources and stream conditions during 2002. Model predictions of nutrient loads (mass per time) and yields (mass per area per time) generally were greatest in streams in the eastern part of the region and along reaches near the Texas and Louisiana shoreline. The Mississippi River and Atchafalaya River watersheds, which drain nearly two-thirds of the conterminous U.S., delivered the largest nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico, as expected. However, the three largest delivered TN yields were from the Trinity River/Galveston Bay, Calcasieu River, and Aransas River watersheds, while the three largest delivered TP yields were from the Calcasieu River, Mermentau River, and Trinity River/Galveston Bay watersheds. Model output indicated that the three largest sources of nitrogen from the region were atmospheric deposition (42%), commercial fertilizer (20%), and livestock manure (unconfined, 17%). The three largest sources of phosphorus were commercial fertilizer (28%), urban runoff (23%), and livestock manure (confined and unconfined, 23%). PMID:22457582

  4. Sources and Delivery of Nutrients to the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico from Streams in the South-Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rebich, R.A.; Houston, N.A.; Mize, S.V.; Pearson, D.K.; Ging, P.B.; Evan, Hornig C.

    2011-01-01

    SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were developed to estimate nutrient inputs [total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP)] to the northwestern part of the Gulf of Mexico from streams in the South-Central United States (U.S.). This area included drainages of the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf hydrologic regions. The models were standardized to reflect nutrient sources and stream conditions during 2002. Model predictions of nutrient loads (mass per time) and yields (mass per area per time) generally were greatest in streams in the eastern part of the region and along reaches near the Texas and Louisiana shoreline. The Mississippi River and Atchafalaya River watersheds, which drain nearly two-thirds of the conterminous U.S., delivered the largest nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico, as expected. However, the three largest delivered TN yields were from the Trinity River/Galveston Bay, Calcasieu River, and Aransas River watersheds, while the three largest delivered TP yields were from the Calcasieu River, Mermentau River, and Trinity River/Galveston Bay watersheds. Model output indicated that the three largest sources of nitrogen from the region were atmospheric deposition (42%), commercial fertilizer (20%), and livestock manure (unconfined, 17%). The three largest sources of phosphorus were commercial fertilizer (28%), urban runoff (23%), and livestock manure (confined and unconfined, 23%). ?? 2011 American Water Resources Association. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. An approximate Kalman filter for ocean data assimilation: An example with an idealized Gulf Stream model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukumori, Ichiro; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola

    1995-01-01

    A practical method of data assimilation for use with large, nonlinear, ocean general circulation models is explored. A Kalman filter based on approximation of the state error covariance matrix is presented, employing a reduction of the effective model dimension, the error's asymptotic steady state limit, and a time-invariant linearization of the dynamic model for the error integration. The approximations lead to dramatic computational savings in applying estimation theory to large complex systems. We examine the utility of the approximate filter in assimilating different measurement types using a twin experiment of an idealized Gulf Stream. A nonlinear primitive equation model of an unstable east-west jet is studied with a state dimension exceeding 170,000 elements. Assimilation of various pseudomeasurements are examined, including velocity, density, and volume transport at localized arrays and realistic distributions of satellite altimetry and acoustic tomography observations. Results are compared in terms of their effects on the accuracies of the estimation. The approximate filter is shown to outperform an empirical nudging scheme used in a previous study. The examples demonstrate that useful approximate estimation errors can be computed in a practical manner for general circulation models.

  6. Polarimetric SAR image signatures of the ocean and gulf stream features

    SciTech Connect

    Schuler, D.L.; Lee, Jong Sen; Hoppel, K.W.

    1993-11-01

    Polarimetric signatures and related polarimetric properties of microwave ocean backscatter have been analyzed for both the ambient ocean and for ocean features such as those associated with the Gulf Stream. Interpretation of the polarimetric signatures for the ocean surface was accomplished using a tilted-Bragg theoretical model. This model was used to calculate the EM fields, to second order, necessary to compute the full Stokes matrix and, ultimately, the polarimetric signature. The polarimetric studies led to a technique for potentially improving the visibility of all azimuthally traveling waves in real-aperture radar (RAR) images and, very long waves in synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) images. This technique utilizes linear polarization signatures to maximize the instrument sensitivity to azimuthally traveling waves. Wave tilts create a modulation of the cell polarization orientation which, in turn, modulates the backscatter. Critical to the success of this technique are the properties that ocean polarimetric signatures are sharply peaked (i.e., returns are highly polarized). The polarimetric contribution to the overall modulation transfer function has also been evaluated.

  7. Characteristics and Seasonality of the Submesoscale Regime in the Gulf Stream Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mensa, J. A.; Garraffo, Z. D.; Griffa, A.; Ozgokmen, T. M.; Haza, A. C.; Veneziani, C.

    2014-12-01

    Frontogenesis and frontal instabilities in the mixed layer are known to be important processes in the formation of submesoscale features. We study the seasonality of such processes in the Gulf Stream (GS) region. To approach this problem, a realistic simulation with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is integrated for 18 months at two horizontal resolutions: a high resolution (1/48th deg) simulation able to resolve part of the submesoscale regime and the full range of mesoscale dynamics, and a coarser resolution (1/12th deg) case, in which submesoscales are not resolved. Results provide an insight into submesoscale dynamics in the complex GS region. A clear seasonal cycle is observed, with submesoscale features mostly present during the winter season in the mixed layer. The submesoscale field is characterized in terms of deviation from geostrophy and 2D dynamics. The limiting and controlling factor in the formation of submesoscales appears to be the depth of the mixed layer, that controls the release of APE stored in the mesoscale fronts present most of the year. Atmospheric forcings are the main energy source behind submesoscale formation, but mostly indirectly through mixed layer deepening. The mixed layer instability scaling proposed by Fox-Kemper et al. 2008 appears to hold, indicating that the parametrization is appropriate even in this complex and mesoscale dominated area.

  8. Observations on the propagation, growth, and predictability of Gulf Stream meanders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vazquez, J.; Watts, D. R.

    1985-01-01

    During a three-year period, Gulf Stream positions determined by satellite infrared imagery on a grid northeast of Cape Hatteras have been correlated against 'inlet' path parameters (displacement from the mean position, angle, and curvature) monitored by an array of inverted echo sounders. By cross-spectral calculations between these measurements, the downstream coherences, phase speeds, and spatial growth rates were determined. The downstream path predictability from these inlet parameters was tested in a multiple input linear response model. The most energetic meanders, with periods of 33-50 days, remained highly coherent for 300 km downstream, roughly the dominant wavelength, with marginal coherence again at 500-575 km. Phase speeds are frequency dependent and decrease with distance downstream. For the 50- (33) day meanders, phase speeds decreased from 10 (17) km/d at the inlet to 6 (8) km/d at a distance downstream of about 550 km. The average growth rate (spatial e-folding wave number) over the entire region is 1.3 x 10 to the -3rd per km. Within 300 km of the inlet, the multiple coherence accounts for 55-65 percent of the total path-displacement variance, with displacement and angle being the best individual predictors in the first and last halves of this region, respectively.

  9. AIRSAR observations of the Gulf Stream with interpretation from sea truth and modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valenzuela, G. R.; Chubb, S. R.; Marmorino, G. O.; Trump, C. L.; Lee, J. S.; Cooper, A. L.; Askari, F.; Keller, W. C.; Kaiser, J. A. C.; Mied, R. P.

    1991-01-01

    On 20 Jul., JPL/DC-8 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) participated in the 17-21 Jul. 1990 NRL Gulf Stream (GS) experiment in preparation for SIR-C missions in 1993, 1994, and 1996 for calibration purposes and to check modes and techniques for operation at our experimental site off the east coast of the US. During this experiment, coordinated and near simultaneous measurements were performed from ship (R/V Cape Henlopen) and other aircraft (NADC/P-3 and NRL/P-3) to address scientific questions relating to the origin of 'slick-like' features observed by Scully-Power, the refraction and modulation of waves by variable currents, the effect of current and thermal fronts on radar imagery signatures and the modification of Kelvin ship wakes by fronts. The JPL/DC-8 and NADC/P-3 SAR's are fully polarimetric systems. Their composite frequency range varies between P- and X-band. We describe in detail the Airborne SAR (AIRSAR) participation in the Jul. 1990 GS experiment and present preliminary results of the ongoing analysis and interpretation of the radar imagery in the context of ground truth, other remote measurements, and modeling efforts.

  10. Two modes of Gulf Stream variability revealed in 17 years of satellite altimeter data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Hernández, María Dolores; Joyce, Terrence M.

    2013-04-01

    Monthly mapped sea level anomalies (MSLA) of the NW Atlantic in the region immediately downstream of the Gulf Stream (GS) separation point reveal a leading mode in which the path shifts ca.100km meridionally about a nominal latitude of 39° N, producing coherent sea level anomaly (SLA) variability from 72° W to 50° W. This mode can be captured by use of a simple 16 point index based on SLA data taken along the maximum of the observed variability in the region 33-46° N and 45-75° W. The second group of EOF modes of variability describe GS meanders, which propagate mainly westward interrupted by brief periods of eastward or stationary meanders. These meanders have wavelengths of ca. 400km and can be seen in standard EOFs by spatial phase shifting of a standing meander pattern in the SLA data. The spectral properties of these modes indicate strong variability at interannual and longer periods for the first mode, and periods of a few to several months for the meanders. While the former is quite similar to a previous use of the altimeter for GS path shifts Peña-Molino and Joyce [2008] the simple index suggested by the data could be a useful measure of future shifts of the GS path. The meander time scales, however, are generally shorter than indicated in the work of Lee and Cornillon [1995].

  11. Atlantic near-term climate variability and the role of a resolved Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siqueira, Leo; Kirtman, Ben P.

    2016-04-01

    There is a continually increasing demand for near-term (i.e., lead times up to a couple of decades) climate information. This demand is partly driven by the need to have robust forecasts and is partly driven by the need to assess how much of the ongoing climate change is due to natural variability and how much is due to anthropogenic increases in greenhouse gases or other external factors. Here we discuss results from a set of state-of-the-art climate model experiments in comparison with observational estimates that show that an assessment of predictability requires models that capture the variability of major oceanic fronts, which are, at best, poorly resolved and may even be absent in the near-term prediction of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change class models. This is the first time that air-sea interactions associated with resolved Gulf Stream sea surface temperature have been identified in the context of a state-of-the-art global coupled climate model with inferred near-term predictability.

  12. Nonlinear Gulf Stream Interaction with the Deep Western Boundary Current System: Observations and a Numerical Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, David E.; Mehra, Avichal; Haney, Robert L.; Bowman, Malcolm J.; Tseng, Yu-Heng

    2003-01-01

    Gulf Stream (GS) separation near its observed Cape Hatteras (CH) separation location, and its ensuing path and dynamics, is a challenging ocean modeling problem. If a model GS separates much farther north than CH, then northward GS meanders, which pinch off warm core eddies (rings), are not possible or are strongly constrained by the Grand Banks shelfbreak. Cold core rings pinch off the southward GS meanders. The rings are often re-absorbed by the GS. The important warm core rings enhance heat exchange and, especially, affect the northern GS branch after GS bifurcation near the New England Seamount Chain. This northern branch gains heat by contact with the southern branch water upstream of bifurcation, and warms the Arctic Ocean and northern seas, thus playing a major role in ice dynamics, thermohaline circulation and possible global climate warming. These rings transport heat northward between the separated GS and shelf slope/Deep Western Boundary Current system (DWBC). This region has nearly level time mean isopycnals. The eddy heat transport convergence/divergence enhances the shelfbreak and GS front intensities and thus also increases watermass transformation. The fronts are maintained by warm advection by the Florida Current and cool advection by the DWBC. Thus, the GS interaction with the DWBC through the intermediate eddy field is climatologically important.

  13. Numerical simulation of the Gulf Stream and Mid-Ocean eddies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Semtner, A. J., Jr.; Mintz, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Oceanographic field measurements have revealed intense, transient mesoscale motions in many parts of the world ocean. The circulation of the western North Atlantic, considered in the present study as a rectangular basin, is simulated with a primitive equation model that has five levels and a horizontal grid size of 37 km. The model ocean is driven by a 2.5 gyre pattern of steady zonal wind stress and by a Newtonian-type surface heating. Two cases are considered: the first uses a Laplacian formulation for the subgrid-scale lateral diffusions of heat and momentum; the second uses a highly scale-selective biharmonic formulation for these diffusions. An analysis of the heat transport, in the biharmonic experiment, shows that the horizontal transport of heat by eddies is much larger than the subgrid-scale horizontal heat diffusion. In the Gulf Stream region, the eddy heat transport is comparable to the effect of a lateral diffusion coefficient of 10 to the 7th sq cm/s.

  14. The meandering Gulf Stream as seen by the Geosat altimeter - Surface transport, position, and velocity variance from 73 deg to 46 deg W

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of an analysis of the surface geostrophic velocity field for the Gulf Stream region for the position, structure, and surface transport of the Gulf Stream for 2.5 yr of the Geosat altimeter Exact Repeat Mission. Synthetic data using a Gaussian velocity profile were generated and fit to the sea surface residual heights to create a synthetic mean sea surface height field and profiles of absolute geostrophic currents. An analysis of the model parameters and the actual geostrophic velocity profiles revealed two different flow regimes for the Gulf Stream connected by a narrow transition region coincident with the New England Seamount Chain. The upstream region was found to exhibit relatively straight Gulf Stream paths, long Eulerian time scales, and eastward propagating meanders. The downstream region had more large meanders, no consistent propagation direction, and shorter Eulerian time scales. A 25-percent reduction in surface transport occurred in the transition region, with a corresponding reduction in current speed and no change in Gulf Stream width.

  15. A space maintainability experiment aboard the Ben Franklin submersible during the 30-day Gulf Stream drift mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kappler, J. R.; May, C. B.

    1972-01-01

    In the summer of 1969, a deep submersible drifted for 30 days below the surface of the Gulf Stream, while operated by a six man crew. The main purpose of the mission was oceanographic research. The crew's activities and completely self-contained environment resembled those of a space station such as Skylab. Because of these similarities aspects of onboard vehicle maintenance during the actual conduct of a scientific mission were investigated. The maintainability study was accomplished in six distinct phases. Two useful plots of manpower distribution were developed. A maintenance action summary is presented in a table.

  16. Variability of Winter Extreme Heat Flux Events in Kuroshio Extension and Gulf Stream Extension Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Chang, P.; Wu, D.; Lin, X.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed extreme surface heat flux events, defined by daily sensible (latent) heat flux greater than 80 percentile value (hereafter referred to as high-flux events) associated with boreal winter (NDJFM) cold-air outbreaks (CAOs) in the Kuroshio Extension Region (KER) of the Northwestern Pacific, using the high-resolution NCEP-CFSR (1979-2009) and NCEP-NCAR (1948-2009) reanalysis, and compared the results to those in the Gulf Stream Region (GSR) of the Northwestern Atlantic. The average accumulated number of days of the Pacific high-flux events, which typically last fewer than 3 days, is only less than 20% of the winter period but contributes significantly (>30%) to the total sensible and latent heat fluxes during the entire winter season in the KER. These high flux events are characterized by "cold storms" with a positive geopotential height anomaly (anti-cyclone) over Japan and a negative geopotential height anomaly (cyclone) further downstream, in between which there is an anomalous northerly wind that brings cold and dry air from the Eurasian continent to the KER. In contrast, non-event days are characterized by "warm storms" that have a cyclone (an anti-cyclone) to the west (east) of the KER, bringing warm and moist air from the subtropics to the KER. There are important differences between the Pacific and Atlantic CAOs. Generally, the Atlantic CAOs occur more frequently with stronger intensity and shorter duration than those in the Pacific. The "cold storms" in the KER also differ from those in the GSR in terms of their detailed structure and orientation relative to geographic location. However, in both the Pacific and Atlantic, interannual and longer term variations of sensible and latent heat flux are determined by the high flux events, suggesting that extreme winter storm events play an important role in the mid-latitude climate system. In the Pacific basin, decadal variability dominates the low-frequency variability of total and event-day sensible and

  17. Spatial and temporal patterns in pigment biomass in Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B and its environs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. C.; Baker, K. S.

    1985-01-01

    A chronology of the horizontal and vertical distribution of phytoplankton pigment biomass provides a biological life history of Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B. Development of ring 82B is followed through three distinct periods: a winter/early spring period of deep convective overturn with uniform and relatively high pigment concentrations to depths of 400 m, a late spring stratification period with subsurface (20-30 m) pigment maxima and relatively high ring center values compared to surrounding waters, and a Gulf Stream interaction period when ring characteristics are dominated by intrusions of low pigment concentration waters. While the ring maintains a unique identity throughout these periods of its life, prolonged deep vertical mixing as well as episodic interactions with its surrounding have a significant influence on pigment distributions within the ring. These interactions generally enhance pigment biomass compared to the water mass from which it is derived. A consistent feature of pigment distribution is the remarkable coherence between this measure of phytoplankton biomass and the corresponding physical hydrodynamic structure of the upper water column.

  18. Monthly Maps of Sea Surface Height in the North Atlantic and Zonal Indices for the Gulf Stream Using TOPEX/Poseidon Altimeter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sandipa; Kelly, Kathryn A.

    1997-01-01

    Monthly Maps of sea surface height are constructed for the North Atlantic Ocean using TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data. Mean sea surface height is reconstructed using a weighted combination of historical, hydrographic data and a synthetic mean obtained by fitting a Gaussian model of the Gulf Stream jet to altimeter data. The resultant mean shows increased resolution over the hydrographic mean, and incorporates recirculation information that is absent in the synthetic mean. Monthly maps, obtained by adding the mean field to altimeter sea surface height residuals, are used to derive a set of zonal indices that describe the annual cycle of meandering as well as position and strength of the Gulf Stream.

  19. Measurement of Gulf Stream and wind induced shelf circulation in the South Atlantic Bight. Final report, June 1, 1982-May 31,1985

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    The report discusses a study to determine the relative importance of the forces driving shelf circulation and exchange in the South Atlantic Bight and to measure the shelf waters' response over variable time and space scales. Results indicate the outer shelf is controlled by Gulf Stream frontal disturbances such as wave-like meanders and eddy motions, the midshelf by local wind forcing with occasional Gulf Stream intrusions and density induced motions, and the inner shelf by density effects from fresh water river runoff. (ACR)

  20. Trends in nutrient inflows to the Gulf of Mexico from streams draining the conterminous United States, 1972-93

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dunn, David E.

    1996-01-01

    Trends are computed for nutrient inflows from 37 streams discharging into the Gulf of Mexico. The drainage areas of these streams represent about 86 percent of the drainage area to the Gulf from the conterminous United States. The period analyzed varies for each stream, but generally includes water years 1972-93. Stations included in this analysis primarily are part of the National Stream Quality Accounting Network operated by the U.S. Geological Survey. Short-term trends for each station are indicated by LOWESS smooth lines superimposed on graphs of the relations between flow-adjusted residuals of concentration and time or load and time. Long-term trends were evaluated using Kendall's tau and the slope of the Kendall-Theil robust line. Long- term trends for each station are indicated by Kendall-Theil robust lines superimposed on the aforementioned graphs. Annual loads are estimated with regression analysis and corrected for log-transformation bias with the Minimum Variance Unbiased Estimator. Trends in annual streamflow are presented to aid in the interpretation of trends in nutrient inflows. Statistically significant, long-term increases in flow-adjusted residual concentrations of total nitrogen were detected at 19 stations, decreases were detected at 7 stations, and no significant trends were detected at 11 stations. Long-term increases in total nitrogen load were detected at 3 stations, decreases were detected at 4 stations, and no significant trends were detected at 30 stations. Long-term increases in flow-adjusted residual concentrations of total phosphorus were detected at 7 stations, decreases were detected at 11 stations, and no significant trends were detected at 19 stations. Long-term increases in total phosphorus load were detected at 3 stations, decreases were detected at 12 stations, and no significant trends were detected at 22 stations. The median yields (mean annual 10ad divided by drainage area) of total nitrogen and total phosphorus were

  1. Progress in Modeling the Gulf Stream in a Duo Grid North Atlantic Ocean/Caribbean Sea/Gulf of Mexico model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, A.; Dietrich, D. E.; Haney, R. L.; Bowman, M. J.; Lai, C. A.

    2003-12-01

    The DieCAST ocean model is applied to the combined North Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico, using two two-way coupled grids between 10 deg N and 75 deg N. Open boundary conditions derived from a one degree resolution global adaptation of DieCAST are applied at 10 deg N. Climatology based open conditions are applied at 75 deg N and combined with a northern sponge layer. The two grid resolutions are: 1/2 deg east of 60 deg W; and 1/6 deg west of 60 deg W. Vertical resolution is 30 levels. Annual cycle wind stress climatology and surface heat and freshwater fluxes are applied at the surface. The fluxes are derived from surface temperature and salinity climatology, using no unphysical transient damping (restoring toward climatology). The derived fluxes are such that the model multi-year ensemble mean annual cycle matches the observed surface annual cycle climatology. An idealized shelfbreak near the open northern lateral boundaries avoids unphysical vortex stretching effects caused by conventional vertical walls. Using annual cycle Hellerman wind stress climatology, the model results give: correct Gulf Stream (GS) separation and path; vigorous transients including cold- and warm-core GS rings; and a steep front in the Denmark Strait between a northward flowing fragment of North Atlantic Gyre water near Iceland and southward flowing East Greenland Current that feeds into the Deep Western Boundary Current (DWBC). The model DWBC strongly affects the GS separation and path. Labrador-Sea-modified dense DWBC water arrives in the Grand Banks shelfbreak area after ˜ 10 model years, leading to: GS separation and path much closer to observations; offshore thermocline outcropping along an intense GS front; and relatively flat time mean isopycnals between the strongly sloping GS and DWBC isopycnals. Such flattening is clearly seen in Yashayaev's non-diffused climatology, and indicates eddy dynamics characteristic of baroclinic instability rather than diffusive

  2. A multi-model analysis of the resolution influence on precipitation climatology in the Gulf Stream region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xuelei; Huang, Bohua; Kirtman, Ben P.; Kinter, James L.; Chiu, Long S.

    2016-05-01

    Using climate simulations from coupled and uncoupled general circulation models, this study investigates the influence of horizontal resolution in both atmospheric and oceanic model components on the mean precipitation over the Gulf Stream (GS) region. For this purpose, three sets of model experiments are analyzed. The first two examine the effects of increasing horizontal resolution of an atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) gradually from 100 to 10 km under fixed oceanic settings. Specifically, the AGCM is either forced with prescribed observed sea surface temperature (SST) (the first case) or coupled to a non-eddy-resolving ocean general circulation model (OGCM) at a fixed horizontal resolution near 100 km (the second case). The third set of experiments examines the effects of the oceanic resolution with a pair of long-term simulations by another coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model (CGCM), in which the OGCM is run respectively at non-eddy-resolving (100 km) and eddy-resolving (10 km) resolutions, while the AGCM resolution remains fixed at 50 km for both runs. In general, all simulations qualitatively reproduce the gross features of the mean GS precipitation and its annual cycle. At similar AGCM resolutions, the uncoupled models produce a GS rain band that is more realistic in both structure and strength compared to the coupled models with non-eddy-resolving oceans. This is because the prescribed observed SST better represents the gradient near the oceanic front than the non-eddy-resolving OGCMs simulate. An increase from the baseline AGCM resolution produces enhanced climatological GS precipitation, both large-scale and convective, with the latter more tightly confined to the oceanic front. The enhancement, however, is moderate and further increases in resolution achieves diminishing results. On the other hand, an increase in oceanic resolution from non-eddy-resolving to eddy resolving scheme results in more consistent simulations with

  3. Comment on: Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, by Meinen and Luther

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savidge, Dana K.

    2016-06-01

    Remarkably low vertical coherences in downstream velocities have been reported recently for three alongstream locations in the Gulf Stream, a Western Boundary Current with known three-dimensional dynamics of a baroclinically and barotropically unstable jet. This comment addresses the possibility that spatial averaging of coherences may be contributing to the low values estimated.

  4. High-resolution seismic stratigraphy of North Carolina continental margin, Cape Fear Terrace: sea level cyclicity, Paleobathymetry, and Gulf Stream dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Matteucci, T.D.; Hine, A.C.; Snyder, S.W.; Riggs, S.

    1985-02-01

    A high-resolution seismic stratigraphic study of the Cape Fear Terrace (outer continental shelf off North Carolina) combined with biolithostratigraphic data has yielded a chronostratigraphic framework of the Quaternary sequences that comprise this portion of the North American continental margin. The Cape Fear Terrace is an anomalous, point-source, prograding, shelf-margin feature that has experienced positive relief through much of the Quaternary. This upbuilding or outbuilding followed a period of active, early Pliocene, submarine erosion in which the ancestral Gulf stream cut an erosional path beneath the presence shelf margin. The terrace was originally built up during a relative lowstand of sea level with the construction of a shelf-edge deltaic feature. Severe modification of this delta front occurred during a relative highstand of sea level as the Gulf Stream began to impinge upon the margin. The anomalously thick accumulation of shelf-edge sediments acted as a barrier to flow, inducing complex flow patterns of the Gulf Stream. Excavation of these sediments yielded a terrace feature with preferential erosion on the upstream side. Subsequent deposition in the terrace region may have resulted during fairly highstands of sea level, as evidenced by the presence of active seaward-prograding sand waves in the terrace region today. Once this shelf-edge bathymetric irregularity (the terrace) had been established, the Gulf Stream acted as a dynamic force inducing cellular flow structures within the shelf environment, which enabled sediments to be transported seaward along the paleo-shoals complex.

  5. Diagnosis of an eddy-resolving Atlantic Ocean model simultation in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream. Part I: Potential voracity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, M.; Chao, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Output of an eddy-resolving model of the North Atlantic is diagnosed in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream (GA), using quasigeostrophic potential voracity (QGPV), Ertel's potential voracity (PV), and particle trajectories. Time series of QGPV show strong input of QGPV by the GS in the top 100 m of the model ocean.

  6. Present and past Gulf Stream variability in a cold-water coral area off Cape Lookout, West Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mienis, F.; Pedersen, A.; Duineveld, G.; Seidenkrantz, M.; Fischel, A.; Matos, L.; Bane, J. M.; Frank, N.; Hebbeln, D.; Ross, S.

    2012-12-01

    Cold-water coral mounds are common on the SE slope of the US from Florida to Cape Hatteras between depths of 400-600 m. All coral areas lie in the vicinity of the Gulf Stream, which is characterized by strong currents transporting relatively warm water northwards. Thus far little is known about the recent and past environmental conditions inside the cold-water coral habitats on the SE US slope and particularly the effect of changing patterns of the Gulf Stream. Near Cape Lookout, which is the northern most cold-water coral area on the SE US slope, cold-water corals have formed mounds up to 60 m high with a tear drop shape, which are oriented in a SSW-NNE direction. Past explorations of major reef sites of N Carolina using remote and manned submersibles have shown living Lophelia pertusa colonies on the current facing side of the mound structures and a high biodiversity of associated fauna, especially fish. Two autonomous benthic landers were deployed amidst Lophelia reefs off Cape Lookout (NC) for a period of 6 months to define oceanographic patterns that are relevant for the development and persistence of cold-water coral ecosystems. Furthermore, a 3.6 m long piston core was collected in 2010 during a cruise with the R.V. Pelagia. This pistoncore was used to determine the changes of current strength through time, using foraminiferal counts, stable oxygen and carbon isotopes on foraminifera, XRF and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Cold-water coral fragments were dated with U/Th and foraminifera from the same depth interval were dated with C14. Bottom landers have recorded a number of events that are characterized by of peaks in temperature and salinity, coinciding with increased flow and turbidity. The current during these events was directed to the NNE. During some of these events temperature rose up to 9 degrees in one day. The temporary replacement of the colder bottom water by warm (and saline) water in combination with the strong currents to the NNE

  7. An Experiment to Evaluate Skylab Earth Resources Sensors for Detection of the Gulf Stream. [Straits of Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maul, G. A. (Principal Investigator); Gordon, H. R.; Baig, S. R.; Mccaslin, M.; Devivo, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An experiment to evaluate the Skylab earth resources package for observing ocean currents was performed in the Straits of Florida in January 1974. Data from the S190 photographic facility, S191 spectroradiometer and S192 multispectral scanner, were compared with surface observations. The anticyclonic edge of the Gulf Stream could be identified in the Skylab S190A and B photographs, but the cyclonic edge was obscured by clouds. The aircraft photographs were judged not useful for spectral analysis because vignetting caused the blue/green ratios to be dependent on the position in the photograph. The spectral measurement technique could not identify the anticyclonic front, but mass of Florida Bay water which was in the process of flowing into the Straits could be identified and classified. Monte Carlo simulations of the visible spectrum showed that the aerosol concentration could be estimated and a correction technique was devised.

  8. Verification of Geosat sea surface topography in the Gulf Stream extension with surface drifting buoys and hydrographic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willebrand, J.; KäSe, R. H.; Stammer, D.; Hinrichsen, H.-H.; Krauss, W.

    1990-03-01

    Altimeter data from Geosat have been analyzed in the Gulf Stream extension area. Horizontal maps of the sea surface height anomaly relative to an annual mean for various 17-day intervals were constructed using an objective mapping procedure. The mean sea level was approximated by the dynamic topography from climatological hydrographic data. Geostrophic surface velocities derived from the composite maps (mean plus anomaly) are significantly correlated with surface drifter velocities observed during an oceanographie experiment in the spring of 1987. The drifter velocities contain much energy on scales less than 100 km which are not resolved in the altimetric maps. It is shown that the composite sea surface height also agrees well with ground verification from hydrographic data along sections in a triangle between the Azores, Newfoundland, and Bermuda, except in regions of high mean gradients.

  9. Heat fluxes and roll circulations over the western Gulf Stream during an intense cold-air outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Shu-Hsien; Ferguson, Michael P.

    1991-01-01

    Turbulence and heat fluxes in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) for three aircraft stacks near the western Gulf Stream front, observed during the Genesis of Atlantic Lows Experiment (GALE) January 28, 1986 cold-air outbreak, has been studied using mixed-layer scaling. The GOES image and stability parameter indicates that these three stacks were in the roll vortex regime. The turbulence structure in the MABL is studied for this case, as well as the significance of roll vortices to heat fluxes. The roll circulations are shown to contribute significantly to the sensible (temperature) and latent heat (moisture) fluxes with importance increasing upward. The results suggest that the entrainment at the MABL top might affect the the budgets of temperature and humidity fluxes in the lower MABL, but not in the unstable surface layer.

  10. The dynamics and energetics of midlatitude western boundary currents: A comparison of the Kuroshio Extension and the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, James L.; Hallock, Z. R.; Hurlburt, H. E.; Johnson, D. R.; Kindle, J. C.; Teague, W. J.; Thompson, J. D.; Schmitz, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    We will use TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry in combination with ongoing and planned efforts, including data from the European Remote Sensing satellite (ERS-1), in situ measurements designed specifically to complement satellite altimetry, and assimilation of these several data types into eddy-resolving numerical models in order to understand the dynamics and energetics of midlatitude western boundary currents (specifically, the Gulf Stream and the Kuroshio Extension). A better understanding of the recirculation of midlatitude gyres can best be undertaken in the format of such regional, eddy-resolving experiments. Such regional programs will enhance and be enhanced by the larger scale circulation studies of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) as well as by global-scale eddy-resolving models that we will develop prior to the TOPEX/POSEIDON mission. This effort includes participation on the TOPEDX/POSEIDON Science Team.

  11. Preliminary Research on the Potential Effects of Gulf Stream Energy Turbines on Rates of Productivity and Nutrient Cycling in Pelagic Sargassum Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbs, L. L.; Piehler, M.

    2014-12-01

    Sargassum is an important and protected genus of pelagic macroalgae that serves as habitat for numerous bacteria, fungi, invertebrates, fish, and sea turtles. Sargassum and its associated communities are also a significant source of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus to the otherwise deficient oligotrophic pelagic waters of the Atlantic Ocean. The densest concentration of pelagic Sargassum, primarily comprised of Sargassum natans and S. fluitans, is found in the North Atlantic Central Gyre of the Sargasso Sea, but large quantities are also found in the waters of the continental shelf of the southeastern United States and especially the western edge of the Florida Current/Gulf Stream, including off the coast of North Carolina. This western edge of the Gulf Stream off the North Carolina coast is also of interest for renewable current energy exploration and development because of the constant flow of the Gulf Stream current in close proximity to land at this location, which presents a potential source of substantial baseload power for the east coast of the United States. Marine hydrokinetic turbines placed in the Gulf Stream will likely be placed at depths of 30 to 50 m below the surface of the water, far removed from buoyant Sargassum that floats at the surface of the water and associated fish assemblages that extend to a depth of 3 m. Nonetheless, Gulf Stream turbines may influence the functional roles of Sargassum and its epibionts because the wakes generated by turbines will change turbulence conditions in the water column, which are in turn likely to affect nutrient cycling and productivity. Our research begins to examine how alterations of the Sargassum environment presented by increased turbulence will affect the productivity, nitrogen fixation, and organic matter fluxes of Sargassum macroalgae and their associated epibiotic communities. We have conducted field and laboratory experiments aimed at quantifying the influence of increased turbulence on the

  12. Seismic Images of the Gulf Stream Front off the Coast of North Carolina from the 2014 ENAM Community Seismic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blacic, T. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Eastern North America Margin (ENAM) Community Seismic Experiment (CSE) is scheduled to collect on- and offshore active source seismic data including more than 2500 km of multichannel seismic (MCS) reflection profiles in the fall of 2014. The project was designed to address a wide array of questions related to the evolution and modification of the eastern North American rifted margin in conjunction with the arrival of the Earthscope transportable array on the US East Coast. The planned rifting-parallel profiles north and south of Cape Hatteras are expected to cross the front between the warm water of the Gulf Stream western boundary current and colder North Atlantic water providing the opportunity to image mesoscale features related to the front and their associated fine structure. Standard MCS data has been shown to be well-tuned to image ocean fine structure resulting from abrupt vertical changes in temperature and salinity in the ocean. Thus, the same seismic data that is collected to investigate the sub-seafloor geology can also be processed to image reflections in the water that reveal ocean processes with a horizontal resolution of ~10 m and vertical resolution of ~4 m. As an add-on to the ENAM CSE, 30 additional expendable bathythermographs and 3 conductivity temperature depth probes belonging to the University of Wyoming are planned for deployment during the collection of the MCS profiles resulting in an average hydrographic profile spacing of ~33 km. We present a first look at this new seismic oceanography data set providing 2-D images of ocean acoustic reflectivity correlated with closely spaced hydrographic measurements across the Gulf Stream front.

  13. Particulate manganese dynamics in Gulf Stream warm-core rings and surrounding waters of the NW Atlantic

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, J.K.B.; Fleisher, M.Q. )

    1987-10-01

    Manganese has been measured in size-fractionated particulate matter profiles obtained by large volume in situ filtration of the upper 1000 m of the N.W. Atlantic as part of the Warm Core Rings Experiment (WCRE) in 1982. Environments sampled included Warm Core Rings (WCR) 82B and 82H, the entrainment zone at the edge of these rings, the Slope Water surrounding rings, and the Gulf Stream (GS) and Sargasso Sea (SS) from which the rings formed. Manganese concentrations ranged from 10 pmol kg{sup {minus}1} to 10,000 pmol kg{sup {minus}1} with the extreme values observed in the quasi-isolated core waters of WCR 82B and in a tongue of shelf water at the periphery of WCR 82B, respectively. The majority of the Mn was in the 1-53 {mu}m particle size fraction and most Mn was probably close to 1 {mu}m in size. Mn showed no correlation with major biogenic phases indicating that formation by local biological processes was not an important source. Instead, most particulate Mn present in the waters sampled originated in reducing sediments at the continental margin. Calculations show that WCRs cause offshore particulate Mn transports from the continental margin between 66{degree}W and Cape Hatteras of 8.5 {times} 10{sup 4} to 14 {times} 10{sup 4} mol d{sup {minus}1} with most derived from the continental shelf. Only 4% of the shelf derived Mn becomes entrained in WCRs and the rest is left 8to disperse in the Slope Water or enter the circulation of the Gulf stream. The WCR-induced offshore Mn transports may account for a large fraction of the Mn flux to sediments on the continental slope and upper continental rise.

  14. Corals deep under the stream: how the Gulf Stream is driving the interglacial occurrence of cold-water corals off Cape Lookout, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, L.; Mienis, F.; Frank, N.; Thil, F.; Wienberg, C.; Hebbeln, D.

    2012-12-01

    North Carolina resembles the pattern found much further north in the Eastern Atlantic. Furthermore, we found no record of off-mound sedimentation since approx. 5 kyr, suggesting that the studied area is, currently, a sediment starved region. Both, sediment grain-size variation and appearance of CWC at the Cape Lookout mound area seem to indicate an on-shore movement of the Gulf Stream after the Younger Dryas and a strengthening of the current around 5 kyr BP. Our results also suggest that the Gulf Stream path during the MIS5e was similar to the present one.

  15. Evaluation of community-level end points used in ecological risk assessments for Rocky Mountain streams impacted by mining

    SciTech Connect

    Clements, W.H.; Kiffney, P.M.; Medley, N.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this research was to measure sensitivity and variability of community-level end points (e.g., species diversity, richness, abundance of dominant taxa) used in ecological risk assessments for Rocky Mountain streams impacted by mining. The authors used results from stream microcosm experiments and field biomonitoring studies to examine community responses of periphyton and benthic macroinvertebrates to heavy metals. In addition, they measured effects of potential confounding variables (e.g., stream size, elevation, discharge) on these responses. Field studies were conducted at six metal-impacted streams in central Colorado. Although all community end points were significantly affected at stations with the highest metal levels, results of multiple regression analysis showed that most variables were also affected by elevation. To validate benthic community end points and to measure sensitivity of these end points to metals, exposed periphyton and benthic macroinvertebrate communities to Cd, Cu, and Zn in stream microcosms. Results support findings of field studies and show that abundance of sensitive macroinvertebrates and tolerant diatoms were most useful for distinguishing among reference, impacted, and recovery sites. Because stream elevation confounds benthic community responses to metals, the authors suggest that experimental studies are necessary to validate the usefulness of community end points.

  16. Maintenance of Baroclinicity in the Atlantic Storm Track and its Relation to the Sea Surface Temperature Gradient along the Gulf Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spengler, Thomas; Papritz, Lukas; Dahl-Eriksen, Ståle

    2016-04-01

    The maintenance of baroclinicity along mid- and high-latitude storm tracks is a matter of ongoing debate. We devise a diagnostic based on the tendency equation for the slope of isentropic surfaces - a measure of the baroclinicity. The tendency comprises contributions from dynamic processes, latent heat release, radiation and subgrid-scale turbulence, which incorporates the effect of sensible heat fluxes. We present a climatology (for winter 2009 and 2010) of these tendencies over the North Atlantic and discuss the relevance of the SST gradient associated with the Gulf Stream. We find that adiabatic tilting flattens the isentropic surfaces, reflecting the action of growing baroclinic cyclones. This tendency is balanced climatologically by the generation of isentropic slope by diabatic processes. In the lower troposphere, the most intense diabatic increase of slope is found along the oceanic frontal zone associated with the Gulf Stream and at higher latitudes in the Labrador Sea, the Nordic Seas and the Barents Sea. Latent heat release and sensible heat fluxes both contribute substantially in these regions. A quantitative analysis of cold-air outbreaks emphasizes their important role in restoring the slope in the lower troposphere over the Gulf Stream region and off the sea-ice edge at high latitudes. We also present composites of strong events of slope tendency and latent heating as well as surface fluxes, pinpointing the relative contribution of the cold or warm sector of a cyclone to the slope tendency in the Gulf Stream region. In the upper troposphere, latent heat release due to cloud microphysical processes is the dominant mechanism maintaining the slope.

  17. Sources and Delivery of Nutrients to the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico from Streams in the South-Central United States1

    PubMed Central

    Rebich, Richard A; Houston, Natalie A; Mize, Scott V; Pearson, Daniel K; Ging, Patricia B; Evan Hornig, C

    2011-01-01

    Abstract SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were developed to estimate nutrient inputs [total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP)] to the northwestern part of the Gulf of Mexico from streams in the South-Central United States (U.S.). This area included drainages of the Lower Mississippi, Arkansas-White-Red, and Texas-Gulf hydrologic regions. The models were standardized to reflect nutrient sources and stream conditions during 2002. Model predictions of nutrient loads (mass per time) and yields (mass per area per time) generally were greatest in streams in the eastern part of the region and along reaches near the Texas and Louisiana shoreline. The Mississippi River and Atchafalaya River watersheds, which drain nearly two-thirds of the conterminous U.S., delivered the largest nutrient loads to the Gulf of Mexico, as expected. However, the three largest delivered TN yields were from the Trinity River/Galveston Bay, Calcasieu River, and Aransas River watersheds, while the three largest delivered TP yields were from the Calcasieu River, Mermentau River, and Trinity River/Galveston Bay watersheds. Model output indicated that the three largest sources of nitrogen from the region were atmospheric deposition (42%), commercial fertilizer (20%), and livestock manure (unconfined, 17%). The three largest sources of phosphorus were commercial fertilizer (28%), urban runoff (23%), and livestock manure (confined and unconfined, 23%). PMID:22457582

  18. Observations of Gulf Stream-induced and wind-driven upwelling in the Georgia Bight using ocean color and infrared imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclain, C. R.; Pietrafesa, L. J.; Yoder, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Ocean color and infrared imagery from U2 aircraft and satellite sensors are used to study upwelling interaction between Gulf Stream and continental shelf waters in the Georgia Bight. The photographic data are combined with in situ measurements of currents, chlorophyll, temperature, salinity, coastal winds, and sea-level in observations of five different upwelling events including a near-short wind-driven upwelling caused by topographic effects, three filament-induced upwellings in the Gulf Stream, and a possible meander-induced upwelling event in the Gulf Stream. Chlorophyll distributions are used to trace the circulation and propagation of filaments along the advective routes by which the water moves offshore. Photographic and mooring array measurements of temperature time series are found to provide nearly identical results for the phase speeds of each event. Field measurements of surface pigments, and Nimbus/7 coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) estimates are found to agree well over the range of concentrations 0.1 to 0.7 mg/m to the third. Examples of U2/Ocean Color Scanner and Nimbus 7 CZCS photographs are provided.

  19. Application of acoustic-Doppler current profiler and expendable bathythermograph measurements to the study of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joyce, T. M.; Dunworth, J. A.; Schubert, D. M.; Stalcup, M. C.; Barbour, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    The degree to which Acoustic-Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and expendable bathythermograph (XBT) data can provide quantitative measurements of the velocity structure and transport of the Gulf Stream is addressed. An algorithm is used to generate salinity from temperature and depth using an historical Temperature/Salinity relation for the NW Atlantic. Results have been simulated using CTD data and comparing real and pseudo salinity files. Errors are typically less than 2 dynamic cm for the upper 800 m out of a total signal of 80 cm (across the Gulf Stream). When combined with ADCP data for a near-surface reference velocity, transport errors in isopycnal layers are less than about 1 Sv (10 to the 6th power cu m/s), as is the difference in total transport for the upper 800 m between real and pseudo data. The method is capable of measuring the real variability of the Gulf Stream, and when combined with altimeter data, can provide estimates of the geoid slope with oceanic errors of a few parts in 10 to the 8th power over horizontal scales of 500 km.

  20. Data assimilative modeling investigation of Gulf Stream Warm Core Ring interaction with continental shelf and slope circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ke; He, Ruoying; Powell, Brian S.; Gawarkiewicz, Glen G.; Moore, Andrew M.; Arango, Hernan G.

    2014-09-01

    A data assimilative ocean circulation model is used to hindcast the interaction between a large Gulf Stream Warm Core Ring (WCR) with the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf and slope circulation. Using the recently developed Incremental Strong constraint 4D Variational (I4D-Var) data assimilation algorithm, the model assimilates mapped satellite sea surface height (SSH), sea surface temperature (SST), in situ temperature, and salinity profiles measured by expendable bathythermograph, Argo floats, shipboard CTD casts, and glider transects. Model validations against independent hydrographic data show 60% and 57% error reductions in temperature and salinity, respectively. The WCR significantly changed MAB continental slope and shelf circulation. The mean cross-shelf transport induced by the WCR is estimated to be 0.28 Sv offshore, balancing the mean along-shelf transport by the shelfbreak jet. Large heat/salt fluxes with peak values of 8900 W m-2/4 × 10-4 kg m-2 s-1 are found when the WCR was impinging upon the shelfbreak. Vorticity analysis reveals the nonlinear advection term, as well as the residual of joint effect of baroclinicity and bottom relief (JEBAR) and advection of potential vorticity (APV) play important roles in controlling the variability of the eddy vorticity.

  1. The effect of the Gulf Stream current field on wave propagation onto South East Florida reefs, studied with SWAN model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    gravois, U.; Rogers, W. E.; Sheremet, A.; Jensen, T. G.

    2012-12-01

    This study focuses on the prediction of waves and surf on the nearshore reefs of South East Florida. The edge of this reefs tract, outside of Biscayne Bay, Miami, has a steep transition (1:30) from deep to shallow water and also marks the western wall of the Gulf Stream. Geographically the area is bordered by Florida, Cuba and the Bahamas Islands which block the propagation of swell energy and limit the fetch length in all directions except from the North. Related work by the authors on model hindcast validation for this area using HF radar and in situ data exposed the tendency for the wave model SWAN to over predict wave heights on these nearshore reefs for some NE swell events. Based on the findings of the hindcast validation, a series of theoretical SWAN simulations are set up to investigate the sensitivity of nearshore modeled wave heights to the deep water wave direction and also the effect of coupling with the Gulf Stream surface currents. SWAN is run on an outer wave grid centered about the nearshore reefs of interest and forced with a JONSWAP spectrum that is uniform across all of the boundaries for a suite of wave directions and frequencies. The output of the outer grid is used to force a higher resolution inner grid, run with and without Gulf Stream surface current coupling. Bulk wave parameters are output at a nearshore point location on the reef tract for analysis. There are several interesting findings as a result this study. First, there is only a narrow swell window that allows waves to propagate into the nearshore study location. This implies that a relatively small error in deep water swell angle could result in significant differences in the nearshore wave heights and is likely the source of error for the hindcast validation. Secondly, the swell window significantly shifts with the inclusion of the Gulf Stream current field. Gulf Stream refraction has more effect on shorter period wave forcing, so much so, that the optimal swell window is from the

  2. Collozoum caudatum sp. nov.: A giant colonial radiolarian from equatorial and Gulf Stream waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanberg, N. R.; Anderson, O. R.

    1981-09-01

    Collozoum caudatum is a cylindrical colonial radiolarian reaching lengths of up to 2 m and characterized by the production of a tail-like strand of waste material (prey shells, etc.) at each end of the colony. The fine structure is typical for the genus Collozoum with the exception of the consistent appearance of dense, fibrillar bodies in the endoplasmic reticulum and occasional osmiophilic pigment granules in vacuoles at the periphery of the intracapsular cytoplasm near the capsular membrane. Several different forms of the species suggest ontogeny analagous to that of Thalassophysa sanguinolenta.

  3. Assimilation of Altimeter Data into a Quasigeostrophic Model of the Gulf Stream System. Part 1; Dynamical Considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capotondi, Antonietta; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola; Holland, William R.

    1995-01-01

    The dynamical consequences of constraining a numerical model with sea surface height data have been investigated. The model used for this study is a quasigeostrophic model of the Gulf Stream region. The data that have been assimilated are maps of sea surface height obtained as the superposition of sea surface height variability deduced from the Geosat altimeter measurements and a mean field constructed from historical hydrographic data. The method used for assimilating the data is the nudging technique. Nudging has been implemented in such a way as to achieve a high degree of convergence of the surface model fields toward the observations. The assimilation of the surface data is thus equivalent to the prescription of a surface pressure boundary condition. The authors analyzed the mechanisms of the model adjustment and the characteristics of the resultant equilibrium state when the surface data are assimilated. Since the surface data are the superposition of a mean component and an eddy component, in order to understand the relative role of these two components in determining the characteristics of the final equilibrium state, two different experiments have been considered: in the first experiment only the climatological mean field is assimilated, while in the second experiment the total surface streamfunction field (mean plus eddies) has been used. It is shown that the model behavior in the presence of the surface data constraint can be conveniently described in terms of baroclinic Fofonoff modes. The prescribed mean component of the surface data acts as a 'surface topography' in this problem. Its presence determines a distortion of the geostrophic contours in the subsurface layers, thus constraining the mean circulation in those layers. The intensity of the mean flow is determined by the inflow/outflow conditions at the open boundaries, as well as by eddy forcing and dissipation.

  4. Assimilation of Altimeter Data into a Quasigeostrophic Model of the Gulf Stream System. Part 2; Assimilation Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Capotondi, Antonietta; Holland, William R.; Malanotte-Rizzoli, Paola

    1995-01-01

    The improvement in the climatological behavior of a numerical model as a consequence of the assimilation of surface data is investigated. The model used for this study is a quasigeostrophic (QG) model of the Gulf Stream region. The data that have been assimilated are maps of sea surface height that have been obtained as the superposition of sea surface height variability deduced from the Geosat altimeter measurements and a mean field constructed from historical hydrographic data. The method used for assimilating the data is the nudging technique. Nudging has been implemented in such a way as to achieve a high degree of convergence of the surface model fields toward the observations. Comparisons of the assimilation results with available in situ observations show a significant improvement in the degree of realism of the climatological model behavior, with respect to the model in which no data are assimilated. The remaining discrepancies in the model mean circulation seem to be mainly associated with deficiencies in the mean component of the surface data that are assimilated. On the other hand, the possibility of building into the model more realistic eddy characteristics through the assimilation of the surface eddy field proves very successful in driving components of the mean model circulation that are in relatively good agreement with the available observations. Comparisons with current meter time series during a time period partially overlapping the Geosat mission show that the model is able to 'correctly' extrapolate the instantaneous surface eddy signals to depths of approximately 1500 m. The correlation coefficient between current meter and model time series varies from values close to 0.7 in the top 1500 m to values as low as 0.1-0.2 in the deep ocean.

  5. Observations of storm-induced mixing and Gulf Stream Ring incursion over the southern flank of Georges Bank: Winter and summer 1997

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Craig M.; Brink, Kenneth H.

    2010-08-01

    High-resolution hydrographic measurements collected along the southern edge of Georges Bank during March and June-July 1997 focused on characterizing processes that drive fluxes of material between the slope and bank. Wintertime sampling characterized changes driven by a strong storm. A Scotian Shelf crossover event produced a ribbon of anomalously fresh water along the bank's southern flank that was diluted during the storm. Comparison of prestorm and poststorm sections shows that over the bank changes in heat and salt inventories are consistent with those expected solely from local surface fluxes. In deeper waters, advective effects, likely associated with frontal motion and eddies, are clearly important. Summertime surveys resolve the development of a massive intrusion of Gulf Stream-like waters onto the bank. East of the intrusion, a thin extrusion of bank water is drawn outward by the developing ring, exporting fresher water at a rate of about 7 × 104 m3/s. A large-amplitude Gulf Stream meander appears to initiate the extrusion, but it quickly evolves, near the bank edge, into a warm core ring. Ring water intrudes to approximately the 80 m isobath, 40 km inshore from the bank edge. The intrusion process seems analogous to the development of Gulf Stream shingles (a hydrodynamic instability) in the South Atlantic Bight. It appears that, once the intruded water is established on the bank, it remains there and dissipates in place. Although the intrusion is an extremely dramatic event, it is probably not actually a major contributor to shelf edge exchanges over a seasonal time scale.

  6. 75 years after mining ends stream insect diversity is still affected by heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Lefcort, Hugh; Vancura, James; Lider, Edward L

    2010-11-01

    A century of heavy metal mining in the western United States has left a legacy of abandoned mines. While large operations have left a visible reminder, smaller one and two-man operations have been overgrown and largely forgotten. We revisited an area of northern Idaho that has not had active mining since at least 1932 and probably since 1910. At three sites along each of 10 mountain streams we sampled larval stream insects and correlated their community diversity to stream levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, zinc, pH, temperature, oxygen content, and conductivity. Although the streams appear pristine, multivariate statistics indicated that cadmium and zinc levels were significantly correlated with fewer animals, fewer families, a smaller percentage of plecopterans (stoneflies), and lower Shannon H diversity values. After at least 75 years, abandoned mines appear to be still influencing stream communities. PMID:20680454

  7. Glacially-megalineated limestone terrain of Anticosti Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada; onset zone of the Laurentian Channel Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nick; Putkinen, Niko

    2014-03-01

    Anticosti is a large elongate island (240 km long, 60 km wide) in eastern Canada within the northern part of a deep water trough (Gulf of St. Lawrence) that terminates at the Atlantic continental shelf edge. The island's Pleistocene glaciological significance is that its long axis lay transverse to ice from the Quebec and Labrador sectors of the Laurentide Ice Sheet moving south from the relatively high-standing Canadian Shield. Recent glaciological reconstructions place a fast-flowing ice stream along the axis of the Gulf of St. Lawrence but supporting geologic evidence in terms of recognizing its hard-bedded onset zone and downstream streamlined soft bed is limited. Anticosti Island consists of gently southward-dipping limestone plains composed of Ordovician and Silurian limestones (Vaureal, Becscie and Jupiter formations) with north-facing escarpments transverse to regional ice flow. Glacial deposits are largely absent and limestone plains in the higher central plateau of the island retain a relict apparently ‘preglacial’ drainage system consisting of deeply-incised dendritic bedrock valleys. In contrast, the bedrock geomorphology of the lower lying western and eastern limestone plains of the island is strikingly different having been extensively modified by glacial erosion. Escarpments are glacially megalineated with a distinct ‘zig-zag’ planform reflecting northward-projecting bullet-shaped ‘noses’ (identified as rock drumlins) up to 2 km wide at their base and 4 km in length with rare megagrooved upper surfaces. Drumlins are separated by southward-closing, funnel-shaped ‘through valleys’ where former dendritic valleys have been extensively altered by the streaming of basal ice through gaps in the escarpments. Glacially-megalineated bedrock terrain such as on the western and eastern flanks of Anticosti Island is elsewhere associated with the hard-bedded onset zones of fast flowing ice streams and provides important ground truth for the

  8. The thermohaline driving mechanism of oceanic jet streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csanady, G. T.

    1982-01-01

    In a series of publications dealing with the circulation of the North Atlantic, Worthington (1959, 1972, 1976, 1977) has challenged the widely accepted notion that the Gulf Stream system is entirely wind-driven. He was able to demonstrate that the Gulf Stream over its most intense portion south of New England generally intensifies in winter. Worthington postulates that strong surface cooling in winter is the cause of Gulf Stream intensification, i.e., he believes that a thermal mechanism is partially responsible for driving the Gulf Stream. Worthington speaks of 'anticyclogenesis' and of a 'fresh charge of energy' which the Gulf Stream receives at the end of each (severe) winter. A pattern of thermoline circulation arising in the upper layers of the Stream could play a role similar to that of the Hadley circulation in the atmosphere, which derives the subtropical jet stream. The present investigation is concerned with the examination of such a possibility, taking into account the employment of a two-layer model.

  9. Epidemiology of end-stage renal disease in the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hassanien, Amal A.; Al-Shaikh, Fahdah; Vamos, Eszter P.; Yadegarfar, Ghasem; Majeed, Azeem

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe the epidemiology of end stage renal disease (ESRD). Design Mixed-methods systematic review. Setting The countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) which consist of Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Qatar, Bahrain, and Oman. Participants Defined to have ESRD or patients on regular dialysis for a minimum dialysis period of at least three months. Since many outcomes were reviewed, studies that estimated the incidence and prevalence of ESRD as outcomes should not have defined the study population as ESRD population or patients on regular dialysis. Studies where the study population mainly comprised children or pregnant woman were excluded. Main outcome measures The trends of the incidence, prevalence, and mortality rate of ESRD; also, causes of mortality, primary causes and co-morbid conditions associated with ESRD. Results 44 studies included in this review show that the incidence of ESRD has increased while the prevalence and mortality rate of ESRD in the GCC has not been reported sufficiently. The leading primary causes of ESRD recorded in the countries of the GCC is diabetes with the most prevalent co-morbid conditions being Hypertension and Hepatitis C Virus infection; the most common cause of death was cardiovascular disease and sepsis. Conclusions This review highlights that the lack of national renal registries data is a critical issue in the countries of the GCC. The available data also do not provide an accurate and updated estimate for relevant outcomes. Additionally, considering the increasing burden of chronic kidney disease (CKD), these results stressed the needs and the importance of preventative strategies for leading causes of ESRD. Furthermore, more studies are needed to describe the epidemiology of ESRD and for assessing the overall quality of renal care. PMID:22768372

  10. The spatial distribution of silicoflagellates in the region of the Gulf Stream warm-core ring 82B: application to water mass tracer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kozo; Blackwelder, Patricia L.

    1992-03-01

    To delineate potential water mass affinities, we investigated silicoflagellates from the region of Gulf Stream warm-core ring (WCR) 82B in the northwestern Atlantic. Silicoflagellates from 202 samples from N-S and an E-W transects across WCR 82B during late April were analysed. Shelf to Sargasso Sea transects, one completed in early May and the other in June 1982 were also examined. Eight to 11 vertical profiles to 200 m comprised each of the transects. Six taxa of silicoflagellates were found in the samples studied and a total of more than 8000 specimens were encountered. Three major taxa dominated standing stocks: Distephanus speculum, Dictyocha messanensis (intermediate-sized form) and D. mandrai. D. speculum, considered a cold-water taxon in the literature, showed a higher standing stock in the cooler high-velocity region (HVR) of the warm-core ring, continental shelf (SH) and slope (SL) waters. Fewer were present in the wanner ring center (RC), Gulf Stream (GS) and Sargasso Sea (SS). D. mandrai showed a similar distribution to that of D. speculum, but its preference for slightly warmer waters (>~10°C) was noted. In contrast, Dictyocha messanensis (intermediate-sized) and Distephanus pulchra, known to be warm-water taxa, were relatively abundant in the warm ring center. In contrast to standing stock data, ratios between cold- and warm-water taxa correlate well with temperature and salinity in the warm-core ring. Since these ratios are not effected by convective loss, they are excellent water mass tracers in this system. Distribution of the silicoflagellate taxa suggests that WCR82B April had a higher affinity with the Gulf Stream than the Sargasso Sea. Scores derived from factor analysis indicate that silicoflagellate species distributions are highly correlative with water masses. This was evident from correlations with temperature, salinity and with distance from ring center. Nutrients were generally not correlated with species data. This may be due to deep

  11. Reply to "Comment on: Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, by Meinen and Luther" by Dana K. Savidge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-06-01

    Savidge (2016) raises a concern about how the spatial averaging embodied in our Gulf Stream analysis of vertical coherence (Meinen and Luther, 2016) might contribute to the low coherence found. This response addresses the concerns raised in the Savidge (2016) short comment.

  12. Reply to "Comment on: Structure, transport, and vertical coherence of the Gulf Stream from the Straits of Florida to the Southeast Newfoundland Ridge, by Meinen and Luther" by Dana K. Savidge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinen, Christopher S.; Luther, Douglas S.

    2016-05-01

    Savidge (2016) raises a concern about how the spatial averaging embodied in our Gulf Stream analysis of vertical coherence (Meinen and Luther, 2016) might contribute to the low coherence found. This response addresses the concerns raised in the Savidge (2016) short comment.

  13. Tracking the evolution of stream DOM source during storm events using end member mixing analysis based on DOM quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liyang; Chang, Soon-Woong; Shin, Hyun-Sang; Hur, Jin

    2015-04-01

    The source of river dissolved organic matter (DOM) during storm events has not been well constrained, which is critical in determining the quality and reactivity of DOM. This study assessed temporal changes in the contributions of four end members (weeds, leaf litter, soil, and groundwater), which exist in a small forested watershed (the Ehwa Brook, South Korea), to the stream DOM during two storm events, using end member mixing analysis (EMMA) based on spectroscopic properties of DOM. The instantaneous export fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), chromophoric DOM (CDOM), and fluorescent components were all enhanced during peak flows. The DOC concentration increased with the flow rate, while CDOM and humic-like fluorescent components were diluted around the peak flows. Leaf litter was dominant for the DOM source in event 2 with a higher rainfall, although there were temporal variations in the contributions of the four end members to the stream DOM for both events. The contribution of leaf litter peaked while that of deeper soils decreased to minima at peak flows. Our results demonstrated that EMMA based on DOM properties could be used to trace the DOM source, which is of fundamental importance for understanding the factors responsible for river DOM dynamics during storm events.

  14. Impact of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation on the decadal variability of the Gulf Stream path and regional chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez-Franks, A.; Zhang, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we show that the underlying physical driver for the decadal variability in the Gulf Stream (GS) path and the regional biogeochemical cycling is linked to the low frequency variability in the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). There is a significant anticorrelation between AMOC variations and the meridional shifts of the GS path at decadal time scale in both observations and two Earth system models (ESMs). The chlorophyll and nutrient concentrations in the GS region are found significantly correlated with the AMOC fingerprint and anticorrelated with the GS path at decadal time scale through coherent isopycnal changes in the GS front in the ESMs. Our results illustrate how changes in the large-scale ocean circulation, such as AMOC, are teleconnected with regional decadal physical and biogeochemical variations near the North American east coast. Such linkages are useful for predicting future physical and biogeochemical variations in this region.

  15. Phytoplankton bloom in Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    There is a large amount of sediment clearly visible in the true-color image of the Persian Gulf, acquired on November 1, 2001, by MODIS. Carried by the confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers (at center), the sediment-laden waters appear light brown where they enter the northern end of the Persian Gulf and then gradually dissipate into turquoise swirls as they drift southward. The nutrients these sediments carry are helping to support a phytoplankton bloom in the region, which adds some darker green hues in the rich kaleidoscope of colors on the surface (see the high resolution image). The confluence of the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers marks the southernmost boundary between Iran (upper right) and Iraq (upper left). South of Iraq are the countries of Kuwait and Saudi Arabia. The red dots indicate the probable locations of fires burning at oil refineries. Thin black plumes of smoke can be seen streaming away from several of these.

  16. Accelerated flooding along the U.S. East Coast: On the impact of sea-level rise, tides, storms, the Gulf Stream, and the North Atlantic Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Tal; Atkinson, Larry P.

    2014-08-01

    Recent studies identified the U.S. East Coast north of Cape Hatteras as a "hotspot" for accelerated sea-level rise (SLR), and the analysis presented here shows that the area is also a "hotspot for accelerated flooding." The duration of minor tidal flooding [defined as 0.3 m above MHHW (mean higher high water)] has accelerated in recent years for most coastal locations from the Gulf of Maine to Florida. The average increase in annual minor flooding duration was ˜20 h from the period before 1970 to 1971-1990, and ˜50 h from 1971-1990 to 1991-2013; spatial variations in acceleration of flooding resemble the spatial variations of acceleration in sea level. The increase in minor flooding can be predicted from SLR and tidal range, but the frequency of extreme storm surge flooding events (0.9 m above MHHW) is less predictable, and affected by the North Atlantic Oscillations (NAO). The number of extreme storm surge events since 1960 oscillates with a period of ˜15 year and interannual variations in the number of storms are anticorrelated with the NAO index. With higher seas, there are also more flooding events that are unrelated to storm surges. For example, it is demonstrated that week-long flooding events in Norfolk, VA, are often related to periods of decrease in the Florida Current transport. The results indicate that previously reported connections between decadal variations in the Gulf Stream (GS) and coastal sea level may also apply to short-term variations, so flood predictions may be improved if the GS influence is considered.

  17. Merging two waste streams, wood ash and biowaste, results in improved composting process and end products.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Delgado Juárez, M; Gómez-Brandón, M; Insam, H

    2015-04-01

    A trial was carried out to evaluate the influence of wood ash admixture on biowaste composting. The aim was to find the optimal dosage of ash addition to enhance the composting process without endangering the final compost characteristics and use. Six treatments including an unamended control (K0) and composts with additions of 3% (K3), 6% (K6), 9% (K9), 12% (K12) and 15% (K15) of wood ash (w/w) were studied. The composting process was monitored in situ for 49days, by measuring temperature, CO2, O2, and CH4 in the piles and pH, electric conductivity (EC), and inorganic N in the laboratory. At the end of the process, the products were tested for Reifegrad (maturity), toxicity and quality. The addition of up to 15% of wood ash to biowaste did not negatively affect the composting process, and the initial differences found between both the low and high ash-treated composts were attenuated with the ongoing process development. Nevertheless, and mainly due to Cd level, composts with higher ash amendment did not comply with the highest quality standards established by the Austrian Compost Ordinance. The failure of obtaining class A+ quality after ash amendment emphasizes the need for a rigid quality selection of (bottom) ashes and thus reducing environmental risks related to high pollutant loads originating from the ashes. PMID:25536175

  18. Can the Gulf Stream induce coherent short-term fluctuations in sea level along the US East Coast? A modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Tal

    2016-02-01

    Much attention has been given in recent years to observations and models that show that variations in the transport of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and in the Gulf Stream (GS) can contribute to interannual, decadal, and multi-decadal variations in coastal sea level (CSL) along the US East Coast. However, less is known about the impact of short-term (time scales of days to weeks) fluctuations in the GS and their impact on CSL anomalies. Some observations suggest that these anomalies can cause unpredictable minor tidal flooding in low-lying areas when the GS suddenly weakens. Can these short-term CSL variations be attributed to changes in the transport of the GS? An idealized numerical model of the GS has been set up to test this proposition. The regional model uses a 1/12° grid with a simplified coastline to eliminate impacts from estuaries and small-scale coastal features and thus isolate the GS impact. The GS in the model is driven by inflows/outflows, representing the Florida Current (FC), the Slope Current (SC), and the Sargasso Sea (SS) flows. Forcing the model with an oscillatory FC transport with a period of 2, 5, and 10 days produced coherent CSL variations from Florida to the Gulf of Maine with similar periods. However, when imposing variations in the transports of the SC or the SS, they induce CSL variations only north of Cape Hatteras. The suggested mechanism is that variations in GS transport produce variations in sea level gradient across the entire GS length and this large-scale signal is then transmitted into the shelf by the generation of coastal-trapped waves (CTW). In this idealized model, the CSL variations induced by variations of ˜10 Sv in the transport of the GS are found to resemble CSL variations induced by ˜5 m s-1 zonal wind fluctuations, though the mechanisms of wind-driven and GS-driven sea level are quite different. Better understanding of the relation between variations in offshore currents and CSL will help

  19. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart U of... - Group 1 Batch Front-End Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Group 1 Batch Front-End Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to Subpart U of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS...

  20. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart U of... - Group 1 Batch Front-End Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 10 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Group 1 Batch Front-End Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to Subpart U of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS...

  1. A numerical analysis of shipboard and coastal zone color scanner time series of new production within Gulf Stream cyclonic eddies in the South Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pribble, J. Raymond; Walsh, John J.; Dieterle, Dwight A.; Mueller-Karger, Frank E.

    1994-01-01

    Eddy-induced upwelling occurs along the western edge of the Gulf Stream between Cape Canaveral, Florida, and Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, in the South Atlantic Bight (SAB). Coastal zone color scanner images of 1-km resolution spanning the period April 13-21, 1979, were processed to examine these eddy features in relation to concurrent shipboard and current/temperature measurements at moored arrays. A quasi-one-dimensional (z), time dependent biological model, using only nitrate as a nutrient source, has been combined with a three-dimensional physical model in an attempt to replicate the observed phytoplankton field at the northward edge of an eddy. The model is applicable only to the SAB south of the Charleston Bump, at approximately 31.5 deg N, since no feature analogous to the bump exists in the model bathymetry. The modeled chlorophyll, nitrate, and primary production fields of the euphotic zone are very similar to those obtained from the satellite and shipboard data at the leading edges of the observed eddies south of the Charleston Bump. The horizontal and vertical simulated fluxes of nitrate and chlorophyll show that only approximately 10% of the upwelled nitrate is utilized by the phytoplankton of the modeled grid box on the northern edge of the cyclone, while approximately 75% is lost horizontally, with the remainder still in the euphotic zone after the 10-day period of the model. Loss of chlorophyll due to sinking is very small in this strong upwelling region of the cyclone. The model is relatively insensitive to variations in the sinking parameterization and the external nitrate and chlorophyll fields but is very sensitive to a reduction of the maximum potential growth rate to half that measured. Given the success of this model in simulating the new production of the selcted upwelling region, other upwelling regions for which measurements or successful models of physical and biological quantities and rates exist could be modeled similarly.

  2. Revisiting the problem of the Gulf Stream separation: on the representation of topography in ocean models with different types of vertical grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Tal

    2016-08-01

    The difficulty of simulating a realistic Gulf Stream (GS) that separates from the coast at Cape Hatteras has troubled numerical ocean modelers for a long time, and the problem is evident in different models, from the early models of the 1980s to the modern models of today. The source of the problem is not completely understood yet, since GS simulations are sensitive to many different factors, such as numerical parameterization, model grid, treatment of topography and forcing fields. A curious result of early models is that models with terrain-following vertical grids (e.g., "sigma" or "s" coordinates) seem to achieve a better GS separation than z-level models of similar resolution, so the impact of the vertical grid type on GS simulations is revisited here. An idealized generalized coordinate numerical model is used to compare between a sigma-coordinate grid and a z-level grid while maintaining the same numerical code and model parameters. Short-term diagnostic-prognostic calculations focus on the initial dynamic adjustment of the GS from a given initial condition and imposed boundary conditions. In diagnostic calculations, wherein the three-dimensional flow field is adjusted to time-invariant temperature and salinity data, the GS is quite realistic independent of the grid type. However, when switching to prognostic calculations, the GS in the z-level model tends to immediately develop an unrealistic GS branch that continues along the continental slope instead of separating from the coast at Cape Hatteras. The GS is more realistic in either a sigma-coordinate model or in a z-level model with a vertical wall replacing the continental slope. Increasing the vertical resolution in the z-level model reduces numerical noise, but it does not solve the GS separation problem. Vorticity balance analysis shows that the Joint Effect of Baroclinicity and bottom Relief (JEBAR) and its associated bottom pressure torque are very sensitive to the choice of vertical grid. A stepped

  3. Ice stream behaviour in the western sector of the North Sea during the end of the last glacial cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, David; Evans, David; Clark, Chris; Bateman, Mark; Livingstone, Stephen; Medialdea, Alicia; Cofaigh, Colm O.; Grimoldi, Elena; Callard, Louise; Dove, Dayton; Stewart, Heather; Davies, Bethan; Chiverell, Richard

    2016-04-01

    During the last glacial cycle the East coast of the UK was overrun by the British-Irish Ice Sheet (BIIS) flowing eastwards and southwards. In recent years it has become evident that several ice streams including the Tweed, Tyne, and Stainmore Gap ice streams, as well as the late stage North Sea Lobe (NSL), all played a role in shaping the glacial landscape during this period, but understanding the flow phasing of these ice streams during advance and collapse has proved challenging. Here we present new data from the seafloor collected during recent work undertaken by the Britice Chrono and Glanam project teams during cruise JC123 in the North Sea. Sub-bottom seafloor data together with new swath data clearly show that the final phases of the collapse of the NSL were controlled by ice sourced from the Firth of Forth ice stream which deglaciated in a NNW trajectory. Other ice streams being fed from the west (e.g. Stainmore, Tyne, Tweed) were not influential in final phase ice retreat from the southern North Sea. The Forth ice imprint is characterised by several grounding zone/till wedges marking dynamic, oscillatory retreat of the ice as it retreated along an offshore corridor between North Yorkshire and Northumberland. Repeated packages of tills, ice marginal and glaciomarine sediments, which drape glacially scoured bedrock terrain and drumlins along this corridor, point to marine inundation accompanying ice retreat. New TCN ages suggest decoupling of the Tyne Gap ice stream and NSL between 17.8 and 16.5 ka and this coincides with rapid, regional collapse of the NSL between 17.2 and 16.0 ka along the Yorkshire and Durham coasts (new OSL ages; Britice Chrono). Hence, both the central and northern sectors of the BIIS were being strongly influenced by marine margin instability during the latter phases of the last glacial cycle.

  4. Analyzing peatland discharge to streams in an Alaskan watershed: An integration of end-member mixing analysis and a water balance approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracz, Michael B.; Moffett, Mary F.; Siegel, Donald I.; Glaser, Paul H.

    2015-11-01

    Peatlands are the dominant landscape element in many northern watersheds where they can have an important influence on the hydrology of streams. However, the capacity of peatlands to moderate stream flow during critical dry periods remains uncertain partly due to the difficulty of estimating discharge from extensive peat deposits. We therefore used two different approaches to quantify diffuse pore water contributions from peatlands to a creek within a small watershed in Southcentral Alaska. A sensitivity analysis of a water budget for a representative peatland within this watershed showed that a substantial surplus of pore water may remain available for subsequent discharge during a dry period after accounting for water losses to evapotranspiration. These findings were supported by end member mixing analysis (EMMA), which indicated that 55% of the stream flow during a dry period originated from the near-surface layers of peatlands within the watershed. Contributions from peatlands to stream flow in northern coastal regions may therefore provide an important buffer against the potentially harmful effects of changing climatic conditions on commercially important fish species.

  5. Identifying The Ends Of High-Speed Streams Near 1 AU With In Situ Data From STEREO/PLASTIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simunac, K. D. C.; Galvin, A. B.; Barry, J.; Farrugia, C.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Lee, M. A.; Liu, Y. C.-M.; Möbius, E.; Popecki, M. A.

    2010-03-01

    The transition from fast to slow solar wind has not been studied to the same extent as the transition from slow to fast streams: the stream interface. The fast-to-slow transition has been reported as a smaller-scale mirror image of a stream interface. It is characterized by changes in speed, density, temperature, and composition (Geiss et al. 1995; Zurbuchen et al. 1999; Burlaga, Mish, and Whang 1990; Siscoe and Intriligator 1993; Burton et al. 1999). In this study we use solar wind ion data from STEREO/PLASTIC to further investigate the fast-to-slow wind interface, with particular emphasis on possible correlations between changes in the proton specific entropy argument and the solar wind's flow direction. The data were obtained during solar minimum near 1 AU and in the ecliptic plane. We find the fast-to-slow transition derived from the change in flow angle is neither as extended as the change in compositional signatures near 1 AU, nor as abrupt as that based on entropy at 4.5 to 5 AU.

  6. Phylogeography of Pteronotropis signipinnis, P. euryzonus, and the P. hypselopterus Complex (Teleostei: Cypriniformes), with Comments on Diversity and History of the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Streams.

    PubMed

    Mayden, Richard L; Allen, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The cyprinid genus Pteronotropis is endemic to southeastern Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean of North America. Never before has the genus been demonstrated to be monophyletic. We investigate both the phylogenetic relationships and the phylogeography of some species in the genus using mitochondrial ND2 sequences. In no analysis is the genus resolved as monophyletic if Notropis harperi is not included in the genus. Biogeographic and phylogeographic evaluations are conducted with Pteronotropis, including P. signipinnis, P. euryzonus, and the P. hypselopterus complex. Patterns of relationships and population genetic analyses support divergences within multiple clades both at the species level and within species that are tied to abiotic changes in the region. Replicated patterns across clades are observed, as well as patterns previously found in other taxa. Pteronotropis hypselopterus is likely not a natural grouping as populations from some drainages form clades more closely related to other species of the genus. The general patterns of relationships indicate likely cryptic species not currently recognized. Finally, the patterns of species relationships and clades and population structuring within species serve as another example of replicated divergences in the biodiversity east and west of the Mobile Bay. PMID:26114110

  7. Phylogeography of Pteronotropis signipinnis, P. euryzonus, and the P. hypselopterus Complex (Teleostei: Cypriniformes), with Comments on Diversity and History of the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Streams

    PubMed Central

    Mayden, Richard L.; Allen, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The cyprinid genus Pteronotropis is endemic to southeastern Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean of North America. Never before has the genus been demonstrated to be monophyletic. We investigate both the phylogenetic relationships and the phylogeography of some species in the genus using mitochondrial ND2 sequences. In no analysis is the genus resolved as monophyletic if Notropis harperi is not included in the genus. Biogeographic and phylogeographic evaluations are conducted with Pteronotropis, including P. signipinnis, P. euryzonus, and the P. hypselopterus complex. Patterns of relationships and population genetic analyses support divergences within multiple clades both at the species level and within species that are tied to abiotic changes in the region. Replicated patterns across clades are observed, as well as patterns previously found in other taxa. Pteronotropis hypselopterus is likely not a natural grouping as populations from some drainages form clades more closely related to other species of the genus. The general patterns of relationships indicate likely cryptic species not currently recognized. Finally, the patterns of species relationships and clades and population structuring within species serve as another example of replicated divergences in the biodiversity east and west of the Mobile Bay. PMID:26114110

  8. Detecting changes in the transport of the Gulf Stream and the Atlantic overturning circulation from coastal sea level data: The extreme decline in 2009-2010 and estimated variations for 1935-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezer, Tal

    2015-06-01

    Recent studies reported weakening in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and in the Gulf Stream (GS), using records of about a decade (RAPID project) or two (altimeter data). Coastal sea level records are much longer, so the possibility of detecting climatic changes in ocean circulation from sea level data is intriguing and thus been examined here. First, it is shown that variations in the AMOC transport from the RAPID project since 2004 are consistent with the flow between Bermuda and the U. S. coast derived from the Oleander measurements and from sea level difference (SLDIF). Despite apparent disagreement between recent studies on the ability of data to detect weakening in the GS flow, estimated transport changes from 3 different independent data sources agree quite well with each other on the extreme decline in transport in 2009-2010. Due to eddies and meandering, the flow representing the GS part of the Oleander line is not correlated with AMOC or with the Florida Current, only the flow across the entire Oleander line from the U.S. coast to Bermuda is correlated with climatic transport changes. Second, Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) analysis shows that SLDIF can detect (with lag) the portion of the variations in the AMOC transport that are associated with the Florida Current and the wind-driven Ekman transport (SLDIF-transport correlations of ~ 0.7-0.9). The SLDIF has thus been used to estimate variations in transport since 1935 and compared with AMOC obtained from reanalysis data. The significant weakening in AMOC after ~ 2000 (~ 4.5 Sv per decade) is comparable to weakening seen in the 1960s to early 1970s. Both periods of weakening AMOC, in the 1960s and 2000s, are characterized by faster than normal sea level rise along the northeastern U.S. coast, so monitoring changes in AMOC has practical implications for coastal protection.

  9. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart U of... - Group 1 Batch Front-End Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins Pt. 63, Subpt. U, Table 6 Table... = Notification of Compliance Status described in § 63.506(e)(5). d PR = Periodic Reports described in §...

  10. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart U of... - Group 1 Batch Front-End Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins Pt. 63, Subpt. U, Table 6 Table... = Notification of Compliance Status described in § 63.506(e)(5). d PR = Periodic Reports described in §...

  11. 40 CFR Table 6 to Subpart U of... - Group 1 Batch Front-End Process Vents and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Aggregate Batch Vent Streams-Monitoring, Recordkeeping, and Reporting Requirements 6 Table 6 to... Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant Emissions: Group I Polymers and Resins Pt. 63, Subpt. U, Table 6 Table... = Notification of Compliance Status described in § 63.506(e)(5). d PR = Periodic Reports described in §...

  12. Eutrophication: State of the Gulf of Maine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cultural eutrophication is an ecosystem response to increases in nutrient (primarily nitrogen and phosphorus) inputs from human sources. Estuaries, bays and nearshore coastal waters in the Gulf of Maine receive nutrient inputs from land-based sources via rivers and streams, dir...

  13. Gulf Stream Protection Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Sen. Nelson, Bill [D-FL

    2011-02-17

    02/17/2011 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources. (text of measure as introduced: CR S907-908) (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  14. The Puzzling Ophiuchus Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Dwarf galaxies or globular clusters orbiting the Milky Way can be pulled apart by tidal forces, leaving behind a trail of stars known as a stellar stream. One such trail, the Ophiuchus stream, has posed a serious dynamical puzzle since its discovery. But a recent study has identified four stars that might help resolve this streams mystery.Conflicting TimescalesThe stellar stream Ophiuchus was discovered around our galaxy in 2014. Based on its length, which appears to be 1.6 kpc, we can calculate the time that has passed since its progenitor was disrupted and the stream was created: ~250 Myr. But the stars within it are ~12 Gyr old, and the stream orbits the galaxy with a period of ~350 Myr.Given these numbers, we can assume that Ophiuchuss progenitor completed many orbits of the Milky Way in its lifetime. So why would it only have been disrupted 250 million years ago?Fanning StreamLed by Branimir Sesar (Max Planck Institute for Astronomy), a team of scientists has proposed an idea that might help solve this puzzle. If the Ophiuchus stellar stream is on a chaotic orbit common in triaxial potentials, which the Milky Ways may be then the stream ends can fan out, with stars spreading in position and velocity.The fanned part of the stream, however, would be difficult to detect because of its low surface brightness. As a result, the Ophiuchus stellar stream could actually be longer than originally measured, implying that it was disrupted longer ago than was believed.Search for Fan StarsTo test this idea, Sesar and collaborators performed a search around the ends of the stream, looking for stars thatare of the right type to match the stream,are at the predicted distance of the stream,are located near the stream ends, andhave velocities that match the stream and dont match the background halo stars.Histogram of the heliocentric velocities of the 43 target stars. Six stars have velocities matching the stream velocity. Two of these are located in the main stream; the other

  15. Gulf Coast Wetlands

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    article title:  Wetlands of the Gulf Coast     View Larger ... highlights coastal areas of four states along the Gulf of Mexico: Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and part of the Florida panhandle. The ... date:  Oct 15, 2001 Images:  Gulf Coast location:  United States Gulf of ...

  16. Streamflow to the Gulf of Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Judd, L.J.

    1995-01-01

    Fifty-four major streams discharging directly to the Gulf of Mexico and having drainage areas exceeding 200 square miles have been identified in the United States. Periods of record for daily values of streamflow and water quality are summarized for the lower reaches of each of these streams. Forty-four U.S. Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations along the Gulf Coast with at least 40 years of daily streamflow data also were identified. These stations include most of the major streams and comprise 95 percent of the drainage area to the Gulf from the United States. Temporal trends are determined for daily mean streamflow for selected long-term stations for each of three streamflow perspectives: mean, minimum daily mean, and maximum daily mean. Distributions of monthly streamflow are determined for each of the 44 long-term stations. Temporal trends in streamflow and variations in monthly streamflow distributions are related to factors that affect streamflow: precipitation, land use, with- drawals, reservoir operations, and other factors. Trends in streamflow and variations in streamflow distributions at many stations are coincident with expected changes in streamflow caused by these factors.

  17. CONNECTICUT STREAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer of named streams in Connecticut. It includes two Shapefiles with line and polygon features. Both Shapefiles should be used together. The polygon shapefile fills in open water streams such as the Connecticut River as well as Long Island Sound. T...

  18. Stream Processors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Mattan; Dally, William J.

    Stream processors, like other multi core architectures partition their functional units and storage into multiple processing elements. In contrast to typical architectures, which contain symmetric general-purpose cores and a cache hierarchy, stream processors have a significantly leaner design. Stream processors are specifically designed for the stream execution model, in which applications have large amounts of explicit parallel computation, structured and predictable control, and memory accesses that can be performed at a coarse granularity. Applications in the streaming model are expressed in a gather-compute-scatter form, yielding programs with explicit control over transferring data to and from on-chip memory. Relying on these characteristics, which are common to many media processing and scientific computing applications, stream architectures redefine the boundary between software and hardware responsibilities with software bearing much of the complexity required to manage concurrency, locality, and latency tolerance. Thus, stream processors have minimal control consisting of fetching medium- and coarse-grained instructions and executing them directly on the many ALUs. Moreover, the on-chip storage hierarchy of stream processors is under explicit software control, as is all communication, eliminating the need for complex reactive hardware mechanisms.

  19. Gulf Arabic: Intermediate Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qafisheh, Hamdi A.

    This Gulf Arabic text is designed for those who want to acquire a conversational tool beyond the basic level; it is also of interest to Arabists, anthropologists, and Arabic dialectologists. The language in this text is used in informal situations by the indigenous populations of the southern coast of the Persian Gulf. The text contains 21 lessons…

  20. Gulf of Mexico

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-15

    ... article title:  Continued Spread of Gulf of Mexico Oil Slick       View Larger ... on NASA's Terra spacecraft passed over the Deepwater Horizon oil slick in the Gulf of Mexico on May 8, 2010, at approximately 16:50 UTC ...

  1. GulfSnow Peach

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    GulfSnow peach is jointly released for grower trial by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service (Byron, GA), Georgia Agricultural Experiment Station and Florida Agricultural Experiment Station. GulfSnow was previously tested as AP06-09W and originated from a cross of AP98-3...

  2. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  3. CENTRIFUGE END CAP

    DOEpatents

    Beams, J.W.; Snoddy, L.B.

    1960-08-01

    An end cap for ultra-gas centrifuges is designed to impart or remove angular momentum to or from the gas and to bring the entering gas to the temperature of the gas inside the centrifuge. The end cap is provided with slots or fins for adjusting the temperature and the angular momentum of the entering gas to the temperature and momentum of the gas in the centrifuge and is constructed to introduce both the inner and the peripheral stream into the centrifuge.

  4. UAVSAR_Gulf_Oil

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Gulfstream III research aircraft carrying the Jet Propulsion Laboratory’s sophisticated UAVSAR synthetic aperture radar under its belly surveyed the spread of the Gulf of Mexico oil spill du...

  5. Gulf of Alaska, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This MODIS true-color image shows the Gulf of Alaska and Kodiak Island, the partially snow-covered island in roughly the center of the image. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

  6. Mortality among US veterans of the Persian Gulf War: 7-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Kang, H K; Bullman, T A

    2001-09-01

    To assess the long-term health consequences of the 1991 Persian Gulf War, the authors compared cause-specific mortality rates of 621,902 Gulf War veterans with those of 746,248 non-Gulf veterans, by gender, with adjustment for age, race, marital status, branch of service, and type of unit. Vital status follow-up began with the date of exit from the Persian Gulf theater (Gulf veterans) or May 1, 1991 (control veterans). Follow-up for both groups ended on the date of death or December 31, 1997, whichever came first. Cox proportional hazards models were used for the multivariate analysis. For Gulf veterans, mortality risk was also assessed relative to the likelihood of exposure to nerve gas at Khamisiyah, Iraq. Among Gulf veterans, the significant excess of deaths due to motor vehicle accidents that was observed during the earlier postwar years had decreased steadily to levels found in non-Gulf veterans. The risk of death from natural causes remained lower among Gulf veterans compared with non-Gulf veterans. This was mainly accounted for by the relatively higher number of deaths related to human immunodeficiency virus infection among non-Gulf veterans. There was no statistically significant difference in cause-specific mortality among Gulf veterans relative to potential nerve gas exposure. The risk of death for both Gulf veterans and non-Gulf veterans stayed less than half of that expected in their civilian counterparts. The authors conclude that the excess risk of mortality from motor vehicle accidents that was associated with Gulf War service has dissipated after 7 years of follow-up. PMID:11532780

  7. NASA Gulf of Mexico Initiative Hypoxia Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Curtis D.

    2012-01-01

    The Applied Science & Technology Project Office at Stennis Space Center (SSC) manages NASA's Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI). Addressing short-term crises and long-term issues, GOMI participants seek to understand the environment using remote sensing, in-situ observations, laboratory analyses, field observations and computational models. New capabilities are transferred to end-users to help them make informed decisions. Some GOMI activities of interest to the hypoxia research community are highlighted.

  8. Gulf of Mexico Initiative: NASA Capacity Building in the Gulf Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, D.; Graham, W. D.; Searby, N. D.

    2012-12-01

    In the wake of hurricanes Katrina and Rita, NASA created the Gulf of Mexico Initiative (GOMI) to help the region recover and to build the capacity of local and regional organizations to utilize NASA Earth science assets to establish effective policies, encourage sustainable natural resource management and utilization, and to expeditiously respond to crises. GOMI worked closely with the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA), a regional collaboration of the five US Gulf states and 13 federal agencies, to select projects that addressed high priority issues of the region. Many capabilities developed by this initiative have been adopted by end-users and have been leveraged to respond to other natural and man made disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (2010), record breaking floods along the Mississippi River (2011), unprecedented tornado supercells (2011), and extreme drought (2012). Examples of successful capacity building projects will be presented and the lessons learned from these projects will be discussed.

  9. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; Hardin, Danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV

  10. Toxicological assessments of Gulf War veterans

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Concerns about unexplained illnesses among veterans of the 1991 Gulf War appeared soon after that conflict ended. Many environmental causes have been suggested, including possible exposure to depleted uranium munitions, vaccines and other drugs used to protect troops, deliberate or accidental exposure to chemical warfare agents and pesticides and smoke from oil-well fires. To help resolve these issues, US and UK governments have sought independent expert scientific advice from prestigious, independent scientific and public health experts, including the US National Academies of Science and the UK Royal Society and Medical Research Council. Their authoritative and independent scientific and medical reviews shed light on a wide range of Gulf War environmental hazards. However, they have added little to our understanding of Gulf War veterans' illnesses, because identified health effects have been previously well characterized, primarily in the occupational health literature. This effort has not identified any new health effects or unique syndromes associated with the evaluated environmental hazards. Nor do their findings provide an explanation for significant amounts of illnesses among veterans of the 1991 Gulf War. Nevertheless, these independent and highly credible scientific reviews have proven to be an effective means for evaluating potential health effects from deployment-related environmental hazards. PMID:16687269

  11. Stream Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton City Board of Education (Ontario).

    This manual provides teachers with some knowledge of ecological study methods and techniques used in collecting data when plants and animals are studied in the field. Most activities deal with the interrelatedness of plant and animal life to the structure and characteristics of a stream and pond. Also included in this unit plan designed for the…

  12. Stream Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Outlines a science curriculum reform effort aimed at enabling students to collect original data concerning an environmental parameter such as water quality on a yearly basis. Students track the overall health of the stream by analyzing both biotic and abiotic factors. (DDR)

  13. Physical oceanography of the US Atlantic and eastern Gulf of Mexico. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Milliman, J.D.; Imamura, E.

    1992-06-01

    The report provides a summary of the physical oceanography of the U.S. Atlantic and Eastern Gulf of Mexico and its implication to offshore oil and gas exploration and development. Topics covered in the report include: meteorology and air-sea interactions, circulation on the continental shelf, continental slope and rise circulation, Gulf Stream, Loop Current, deep-western boundary current, surface gravity-wave climatology, offshore engineering implications, implications for resource commercialization, and numerical models of pollutant dispersion.

  14. Decadal changes in Gulf of Alaska upwelling source waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo Buil, Mercedes; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele

    2015-03-01

    Decadal changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in the Gulf of Alaska are linked to long-term transitions in the marine ecosystem. While previous studies have identified the atmospheric variability of the Aleutian Low as an important driver of Ekman pumping and low-frequency SST anomalies, the role of subsurface gyre-scale dynamics remains unexplored. Using a set of reanalysis data sets from 1958 to the present, we find that subsurface temperature anomalies generated along the North Pacific Current significantly contribute through mean upwelling to decadal changes of SST in the Gulf of Alaska. This influence is comparable to the contribution associated with variations in atmospheric winds. Given the exceptional low-frequency character of the propagation of subsurface anomalies (e.g., multidecadal) along the gyre, monitoring subsurface temperature anomalies up stream along the North Pacific Current may enhance the decadal predictability of SST in the Gulf of Alaska and its impact on local marine ecosystems.

  15. Exxon's Hondo Field goes on stream - at last

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-04

    After more than 10 years of frustrating regulatory delays and an outlay of $600 million, Exxon Co. USA has brought on stream its rich Hondo Oil Field in the Santa Ynez Unit of California's Santa Barbara Channel. The first wells on Hondo Platform A are delivering crude into a storage and treating vessel anchored nearby. The first carrier tanker arrived in mid-April 1981, to take on the first cargo of produced oil. The crude will travel in 5 dedicated shuttle tankers through the Panama Canal to Exxon's Baytown, Texas Refinery. Seventeen wells have been drilled so far from the 945 ft tall platform, installed in 850 ft of water near the western end of the channel. That water depth ranks second in US offshore development to a platform in the Gulf of Mexico. By the end of this year Hondo Field will be producing 30,000 bpd. In 1982, when 24 wells are producing and 4 injection wells are returning water and natural gas to the reservoir, production will rise to its peak of 35,000 to 40,000 bpd.

  16. Obesity in gulf countries.

    PubMed

    ALNohair, Sultan

    2014-01-01

    Globally obesity has reached to epidemic proportions, and the people of the Gulf countries have also affected, especially high-income, oil-producing countries. The prevalence of obesity in Gulf Countries among children and adolescents ranges from 5% to 14% in males and from 3% to 18% in females. In adult females there is a significant increase of obesity with a prevalence of 2%-55% and in adult males 1%-30% in countries of gulf region. Over the last two decades there is increased consumption of fast foods and sugar-dense beverages (e.g., sodas). Simultaneously, technological advances - cars, elevators, escalators, and remotes have lead to a decrease in level of activity. Traditional dependence on locally grown natural products such as dates, vegetables, wheat and has also shifted. Changes in food consumption, socioeconomic and demographic factors, physical activity, and urbanization are being important factors that contribute to the increased prevalence of obesity in the region. PMID:24899882

  17. Methods of separating particulate residue streams

    DOEpatents

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Kenney, Kevin L.; Wright, Christopher T.; Hess, J. Richard

    2011-04-05

    A particulate residue separator and a method for separating a particulate residue stream may include an air plenum borne by a harvesting device, and have a first, intake end and a second, exhaust end; first and second particulate residue air streams that are formed by the harvesting device and that travel, at least in part, along the air plenum and in a direction of the second, exhaust end; and a baffle assembly that is located in partially occluding relation relative to the air plenum and that substantially separates the first and second particulate residue air streams.

  18. Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Schuetz, K.I. )

    1988-08-01

    The Gulf of Suez is an intracratonic rift basin which originated in the early Miocene on the once-continuous Arabo-African plate. The Precambrian crystalline basement is overlain by a platform cover of Early Cambrian to Eocene age. There is no evidence of tectonic precursors to the Miocene breakup. Marine transgressions, for example during the Carboniferous and Cretaceous, followed wide embayments caused by long-wavelength oscillations trending northwest-southeast on the North African craton. This article discusses the geologic history of the Gulf.

  19. "Going Mobile" in Business Communication at an Arabian Gulf University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapanta, Chrysi; Nickerson, Catherine; Goby, Valerie Priscilla

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we describe a project in which undergraduate business seniors at a university in the Arabian Gulf created or evaluated the chapters of an iBook as part of their final course in business communication. Students were surveyed throughout the project, and they also participated in a focus group discussion at the end. The aim was to…

  20. 78 FR 20292 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Reef Fish Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... individual states (78 FR 17882, March 25, 2013). The closure dates off each Gulf state would be based on the... red snapper experiencing overfishing. DATES: Written comments must be received on or before April 19... overfishing had ended for the red snapper stock, and that the acceptable biological catch (ABC) may...

  1. Hurricane slams gulf operations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-07

    This paper reports that reports of damage by Hurricane Andrew escalated last week as operators stepped up inspections of oil and gas installations in the Gulf of Mexico. By midweek, companies operating in the gulf and South Louisiana were beginning to agree that earlier assessments of damage only scratched the surface. Damage reports included scores of lost, toppled, or crippled platforms, pipeline ruptures, and oil slicks. By midweek the U.S. coast Guard had received reports of 79 oil spills. Even platforms capable of resuming production in some instances were begin curtailed because of damaged pipelines. Offshore service companies the another 2-4 weeks could be needed to fully assess Andrew's wrath. Lack of personnel and equipment was slowing damage assessment and repair.

  2. Deep Crustal Structure Northern Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christeson, G. L.; Van Avendonk, H. J.; Eddy, D. R.; Norton, I. O.; Karner, G. D.; Johnson, C. A.; Kneller, E. A.; Snedden, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is a small ocean basin between the US and Mexico that opened up soon after the breakup of Pangea. Although the area has been heavily surveyed with seismic reflection profiles, the deep structure of the region is poorly understood because of lack of penetration beneath the thick sediments and salt. We present the results of the GUMBO (GUlf of Mexico Basin Opening) project that constrains seismic velocities and thicknesses of the sediments and crust from the continental shelf to deep ocean basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Data were acquired in 2010 along four profiles 300-500 km in length, using the industry vessel R/V Iron Cat and ocean bottom seismometers at 10-12 km spacing. Plate tectonic models for the Gulf of Mexico region have rifting initiating in the Late Triassic or Early Jurassic, with seafloor spreading beginning ~166-154 Ma in the western Gulf, propagating to the eastern Gulf, and ending ~154-135 Ma. Many models include transform motion along the Florida margin during initiation of continental rifting. We observe a strong change in rifting style from west to east across the ocean basin. Our western profile, offshore Texas, images highly heterogeneous crust with sediment velocities directly overlying Moho in some locations. These observations are consistent with either sedimentary basins within rifted continental crust or ultra-slow-spreading oceanic crust. The profile offshore Lousiana images thicker, faster, and more homogeneous crust. This could suggest an eastward increase in magmatic output during rifting. The eastern profiles offshore Alabama and Florida image the ocean-continent boundary and extensive regions of oceanic crust. The thickness of crystalline crust from the continental shelf to the deep basin decreases from ~25 km to 6-7 km over a horizontal distance of 150 km in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The profile offshore Alabama, near a region where syn-rift volcanism has been interpreted on seismic reflection data, has

  3. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar imagery of the Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ainsworth, T. L.; Cannella, M. E.; Jansen, R. W.; Chubb, S. R.; Carande, R. E.; Foley, E. W.; Goldstein, R. M.; Valenzuela, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The advent of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (INSAR) imagery brought to the ocean remote sensing field techniques used in radio astronomy. Whilst details of the interferometry differ between the two fields, the basic idea is the same: Use the phase information arising from positional differences of the radar receivers and/or transmitters to probe remote structures. The interferometric image is formed from two complex synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images. These two images are of the same area but separated in time. Typically the time between these images is very short -- approximately 50 msec for the L-band AIRSAR (Airborne SAR). During this short period the radar scatterers on the ocean surface do not have time to significantly decorrelate. Hence the two SAR images will have the same amplitude, since both obtain the radar backscatter from essentially the same object. Although the ocean surface structure does not significantly decorrelate in 50 msec, surface features do have time to move. It is precisely the translation of scattering features across the ocean surface which gives rise to phase differences between the two SAR images. This phase difference is directly proportional to the range velocity of surface scatterers. The constant of proportionality is dependent upon the interferometric mode of operation.

  4. The dynamics of oceanic fronts. Part 1: The Gulf Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, T. W.

    1970-01-01

    The establishment and maintenance of the mean hydrographic properties of large scale density fronts in the upper ocean is considered. The dynamics is studied by posing an initial value problem starting with a near surface discharge of buoyant water with a prescribed density deficit into an ambient stationary fluid of uniform density. The full time dependent diffusion and Navier-Stokes equations for a constant Coriolis parameter are used in this study. Scaling analysis reveals three independent length scales of the problem, namely a radius of deformation or inertial length scale, Lo, a buoyance length scale, ho, and a diffusive length scale, hv. Two basic dimensionless parameters are then formed from these length scales, the thermal (or more precisely, the densimetric) Rossby number, Ro = Lo/ho and the Ekman number, E = hv/ho. The governing equations are then suitably scaled and the resulting normalized equations are shown to depend on E alone for problems of oceanic interest. Under this scaling, the solutions are similar for all Ro. It is also shown that 1/Ro is a measure of the frontal slope. The governing equations are solved numerically and the scaling analysis is confirmed. The solution indicates that an equilibrium state is established. The front can then be rendered stationary by a barotropic current from a larger scale along-front pressure gradient. In that quasisteady state, and for small values of E, the main thermocline and the inclined isopycnics forming the front have evolved, together with the along-front jet. Conservation of potential vorticity is also obtained in the light water pool. The surface jet exhibits anticyclonic shear in the light water pool and cyclonic shear across the front.

  5. 75 FR 69122 - Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), Western and Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... Central Planning Areas, Gulf of Mexico (GOM) Oil and Gas Lease Sales for the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program...) Lease Sale 222 in the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program. The proposed sales are in the Gulf of Mexico's WPA... 2012, before the end of the 2007-2012 5-Year OCS Program. A SEIS is deemed appropriate to...

  6. 49 CFR 195.413 - Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... days after discovery, mark the location of the pipeline in accordance with 33 CFR Part 64 at the ends... the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets. 195.413 Section 195.413 Transportation Other Regulations Relating... Maintenance § 195.413 Underwater inspection and reburial of pipelines in the Gulf of Mexico and its inlets....

  7. Recent patterns of sulfate variability in pristine streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lins, H.F.

    1986-01-01

    Systematic modes of spatial and temporal variation in a 13-y record of stream sulfate from a nationwide network of headwater sampling stations are defined using principal components. Based on the undisturbed nature of the sampling network, it is suggested that these modes of stream sulfate variability are analogues for variations in acid deposition. Three statistically significant components, accounting for approximately 50% of the total stream sulfate variance, are identified. Analysis of component loadings and scores indicates that a major transition occurred in the early 1970s when stream sulfate concentrations in the northeast changed from persistently above mean levels to persistently below. At the same time concentrations of sulfate in Gulf and Southeast Atlantic coast streams shifted from persistently below to persistently above mean concentrations. Significantly, these changes occurred contemporaneously with regional trends in sulfate emissions which can generally be characterized as decreasing in the northeast and increasing in the southeast.Systematic modes of spatial and temporal variation in a 13-y record of stream sulfate from a nationwide network of headwater sampling stations are defined using principal components. Based on the undisturbed nature of the sampling network, it is suggested that these modes of stream sulfate variability are analogues for variations in acid deposition. Three statistically significant components, accounting for approximately 50% of the total stream sulfate variance, are identified. Analysis of component loadings and scores indicates that a major transition occurred in the early 1970s when stream sulfate concentrations in the northeast changed from persistently above mean levels to persistently below. At the same time concentrations of sulfate in Gulf and Southeast Atlantic coast streams shifted from persistently below to persistently above mean concentrations.

  8. Exploring Linkages Between Gulf of Mexico Sea Surface Conditions and North American Hydroclimate during the Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richey, J. N.; Thirumalai, K.; Quinn, T. M.; Poore, R. Z.

    2015-12-01

    The Gulf of Mexico is part of the Atlantic Warm Pool, a feature that drives oceanic moisture flux to the surrounding continent. It is connected to the North Atlantic Ocean via the loop current, which transports salt and heat from the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico poleward via the Gulf Stream. As such, variations in Gulf of Mexico sea surface temperature (SST) and salinity (SSS) are linked to changes in North Atlantic Ocean circulation and North American hydroclimate. Although SST and SSS variability in the Gulf of Mexico are well understood on inter-annual and glacial-interglacial timescales, little is known about centennial scale variability in these sea surface parameters through the Holocene. We present here the first continuous multi-decadal resolution time series of SST and SSS spanning the entire Holocene from the Gulf of Mexico. This proxy reconstruction is based on paired measurements of Mg/Ca and δ18O in the planktic foraminifer, Globigerinoides ruber (white variety) in the Garrison Basin. Using these data, in combination with additional Gulf of Mexico SST and SSS records from the late Holocene, we explore linkages between North American precipitation patterns and ocean circulation on centennial timescales.

  9. Streaming Media Seminar--Effective Development and Distribution of Streaming Multimedia in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainhart, Robert; Gerraughty, James; Anderson, Kristine M.

    2004-01-01

    Concisely defined, "streaming media" is moving video and/or audio transmitted over the Internet for immediate viewing/listening by an end user. However, at Saint Francis University's Center of Excellence for Remote and Medically Under-Served Areas (CERMUSA), streaming media is approached from a broader perspective. The working definition includes…

  10. Gulf of Aqaba, Sinai Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Gulf of Aqaba separates the Sinai peninsula from Saudi Arabia in this scene of the Middle East (29.0N, 34.5E) showing the geomorphology and geology of this region including portions of Egypt, Israel, Jordon and Saudi Arabia. A small portion of the Gulf of Suez can be seen on the opposite side of the Sinai peninsula.

  11. Experimental investigation of acoustic streaming in a cylindrical wave guide up to high streaming Reynolds numbers.

    PubMed

    Reyt, Ida; Bailliet, Hélène; Valière, Jean-Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of streaming velocity are performed by means of Laser Doppler Velocimetry and Particle Image Velociimetry in an experimental apparatus consisting of a cylindrical waveguide having one loudspeaker at each end for high intensity sound levels. The case of high nonlinear Reynolds number ReNL is particularly investigated. The variation of axial streaming velocity with respect to the axial and to the transverse coordinates are compared to available Rayleigh streaming theory. As expected, the measured streaming velocity agrees well with the Rayleigh streaming theory for small ReNL but deviates significantly from such predictions for high ReNL. When the nonlinear Reynolds number is increased, the outer centerline axial streaming velocity gets distorted towards the acoustic velocity nodes until counter-rotating additional vortices are generated near the acoustic velocity antinodes. This kind of behavior is followed by outer streaming cells only and measurements in the near wall region show that inner streaming vortices are less affected by this substantial evolution of fast streaming pattern. Measurements of the transient evolution of streaming velocity provide an additional insight into the evolution of fast streaming. PMID:24437742

  12. Methane generation at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect

    Carver, M.L.

    1995-09-01

    The methane generation at Grand Gulf has been brought to light twice. The initial event occurred in February 1990 and the second in December 1993. Both events involved the receipt of a cask at Barnwell Waste Management Facility that when opened indicated a gas escaping. The gas was subsequently sampled and indicated a percentage of explosive gas. Both events involved powdered resin and indicated that the generation was from a bacterial attack of the organic materials (cellulose in the powdered resin mixture). The first event occurred and was believed to be isolated in a particular waste stream. The situation was handled and a biocide was found to be effective in treatment of liners until severe cross contamination of another waste stream occurred. This allowed the shipment of a liner that was required to be sampled for explosive gases. The biocide used by GGNS was allowed reintroduction into the floor drains and this allowed the buildup of immunity of the bacterial population to this particular biocide. The approval of a new biocide has currently allowed GGNS to treat liners and ship them offsite.

  13. Central Saudi Arabia, Persian Gulf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This panoramic view of Central Saudi Arabia and the Persian Gulf (28.0N, 47.0E) dramatically illustrates the stark beauty of the deserts. Riyadh, the capital city, lies in the foreground, with the Persian Gulf in the middle and Iran in the background. The coastal oil terminals of Al Hufuf and Ad Dammam are also visible. Black smudges of soot from the oil fires set during the Gulf War can be seen on the sands to the north and south of Kuwait City.

  14. Differences in phosphorus and nitrogen delivery to the Gulf of Mexico from the Mississippi River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, R.B.; Smith, R.A.; Schwarz, G.E.; Boyer, E.W.; Nolan, J.V.; Brakebill, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Seasonal hypoxia in the northern Gulf of Mexico has been linked to increased nitrogen fluxes from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya River Basins, though recent evidence shows that phosphorus also influences productivity in the Gulf. We developed a spatially explicit and structurally detailed SPARROW water-quality model that reveals important differences in the sources and transport processes that control nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) delivery to the Gulf. Our model simulations indicate that agricultural sources in the watersheds contribute more than 70% of the delivered N and P. However, corn and soybean cultivation is the largest contributor of N (52%), followed by atmospheric deposition sources (16%); whereas P originates primarily from animal manure on pasture and rangelands (37%), followed by corn and soybeans (25%), other crops (18%), and urban sources (12%). The fraction of in-stream P and N load delivered to the Gulf increases with stream size, but reservoir trapping of P causes large local- and regional-scale differences in delivery. Our results indicate the diversity of management approaches required to achieve efficient control of nutrient loads to the Gulf. These include recognition of important differences in the agricultural sources of N and P, the role of atmospheric N, attention to P sources downstream from reservoirs, and better control of both N and P in close proximity to large rivers. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  15. Inventory of miscellaneous streams

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, R.D.

    1998-08-14

    Miscellaneous streams discharging to the soil column on the Hanford Site are subject to requirements of several milestones identified in Consent Order No. DE 9INM-177 (Ecology and DOE 1991). The Plan and Schedule for Disposition and Regulatory Compliance for Miscellaneous Stream (DOE/RL-93-94) provides a plan and schedule for the disposition of miscellaneous streams to satisfy one of the Section 6.0 requirements of the Consent Order. One of the commitments (Activity 6-2.2) established in the plan and schedule is to annually update, the miscellaneous streams inventory. This document constitutes the 1998 revision of the miscellaneous streams inventory. Miscellaneous stream discharges were grouped into four permitting categories (Table 1). The first miscellaneous streams Permit (ST 4508) was issued May 30, 1997, to cover wastewater discharges from hydrotesting, maintenance, and construction activities. The second miscellaneous streams Permit (ST4509) covers discharges from cooling water and condensate discharges. The third permit application for category three waste streams was eliminated by recategorizing waste streams into an existing miscellaneous streams permit or eliminating stream discharges. Elimination of the third categorical permit application was approved by Ecology in January 1997 (Ecology 1997). The fourth permit application, to cover storm water, is due to Ecology in September 1998. Table 1 provides a history of the miscellaneous streams permitting activities.

  16. End-to-End Commitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomb, John

    2004-01-01

    The end-to-end test would verify the complex sequence of events from lander separation to landing. Due to the large distances involved and the significant delay time in sending a command and receiving verification, the lander needed to operate autonomously after it separated from the orbiter. It had to sense conditions, make decisions, and act accordingly. We were flying into a relatively unknown set of conditions-a Martian atmosphere of unknown pressure, density, and consistency to land on a surface of unknown altitude, and one which had an unknown bearing strength.

  17. Regex-Stream

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2012-09-01

    Log files are typically semi-or un-structured. To be useable, they need to be parsed into a standard, structured format. Regex-Stream facilitates parsing text files into structured data (JSON) in streams of data.

  18. Prioritized Contact Transport Stream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, Walter Lee, Jr. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A detection process, contact recognition process, classification process, and identification process are applied to raw sensor data to produce an identified contact record set containing one or more identified contact records. A prioritization process is applied to the identified contact record set to assign a contact priority to each contact record in the identified contact record set. Data are removed from the contact records in the identified contact record set based on the contact priorities assigned to those contact records. A first contact stream is produced from the resulting contact records. The first contact stream is streamed in a contact transport stream. The contact transport stream may include and stream additional contact streams. The contact transport stream may be varied dynamically over time based on parameters such as available bandwidth, contact priority, presence/absence of contacts, system state, and configuration parameters.

  19. The Marine Inorganic Carbon System along the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Coast of the United States: Shelf-ocean exchange and Ocean Acidification Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Wanninkhof, R. H.; Cai, W.; Byrne, R. H.; Hu, X.; Peng, T.; Huang, W.

    2011-12-01

    The inorganic carbon system of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and the Atlantic Coast of the United States (U.S.) was comprehensively surveyed in the summer of 2007 to obtain synoptic baseline conditions, carbon fluxes, and biogeochemistry. Most surveyed areas released CO2 to the atmosphere. The mean CO2 flux of surveyed waters was 1.6 mmol m^-2 d^-1. In contrast, the Mississippi River plume in the GOM and the Merrimack River plume in the Gulf of Maine (GoME) were strong biologically-driven CO2 sinks. The mean aragonite saturation state (ΩA) decreased latitudinally more than two fold (4.1 to 1.8) from northern GOM shelf waters to waters in the GoME. This change was accompanied by a 0.4-unit decrease in mean shelf-water pH (at 25 °C). The influence of biologically mediated processes on dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), nutrients, and O2 in Gulf Stream Water (GSW) varied substantially with location. In the GOM, the GSW receives approximately 1.4 - 1.6 × 10^11 gC d^-1 of DIC exported from the shelf. Biologically induced chemical changes in GSW along the southeastern U.S. coast were dominated by physical mixing from North Atlantic sub-tropical recirculation. Southward, along-shore transport of the Labrador Coastal Current in the Mid-Atlantic Bight creates a mid-salinity end-member on the shelf. Mixing of the slope and shelf waters with this coastal current accounts for 47% of the total north-south gradient in the mean salinity-normalized DIC, while biological processes account for about 14%. Northeastern U.S. coastal water is vulnerable to ocean acidification due to its low ΩA and low buffer capacity.

  20. 78 FR 28146 - Fisheries of the Caribbean, Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ..., Gulf of Mexico, and South Atlantic; Shrimp Fishery of the Gulf of Mexico; Texas Closure AGENCY... Texas estuaries to the Gulf of Mexico (Gulf) so the shrimp may reach a larger, more valuable size and to... the Gulf of Mexico (FMP). The FMP was prepared by the Gulf of Mexico......

  1. Streaming visualization for collaborative environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Hereld, M.; Olson, E.; Papka, M. E.; Uram, T. D.

    2008-01-01

    Connecting expensive and scarce visual data analysis resources to end-users is a major challenge today. We describe a flexible mechanism for meeting this challenge based on commodity compression technologies for streaming video. The advantages of this approach include simplified application development, access to generic client components for viewing, and simplified incorporation of improved codecs as they become available. In this paper we report newly acquired experimental results for two different applications being developed to exploit this approach and test its merits. One is based on a new plugin for ParaView that adds video streaming cleanly and transparently to existing applications. The other is a custom volume rendering application with new remote capabilities. Using typical datasets under realistic conditions, we find the performance for both is satisfactory.

  2. Floodplain restoration enhances denitrification and reach-scale nitrogen removal in an agricultural stream

    EPA Science Inventory

    Streams of the agricultural Midwest export large quantities of nitrogen, which impairs downstream water quality, most notably in the Gulf of Mexico. The two-stage ditch is a novel restoration practice, in which floodplains are constructed alongside channelized ditches. During hi...

  3. Gulf Petro Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Fathi Boukadi

    2011-02-05

    In this report, technologies for petroleum production and exploration enhancement in deepwater and mature fields are developed through basic and applied research by: (1) Designing new fluids to efficiently drill deepwater wells that can not be cost-effectively drilled with current technologies. The new fluids will be heavy liquid foams that have low-density at shallow dept to avoid formation breakdown and high density at drilling depth to control formation pressure. The goal of this project is to provide industry with formulations of new fluids for reducing casing programs and thus well construction cost in deepwater development. (2) Studying the effects of flue gas/CO{sub 2} huff n puff on incremental oil recovery in Louisiana oilfields bearing light oil. An artificial neural network (ANN) model will be developed and used to map recovery efficiencies for candidate reservoirs in Louisiana. (3) Arriving at a quantitative understanding for the three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) geophysical response of typical Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon reservoirs. We will seek to make available tools for the qualitative, rapid interpretation of marine CSEM signatures, and tools for efficient, three-dimensional subsurface conductivity modeling.

  4. Upper Paleocene and lowermost Eocene angiosperm pollen biostratigraphy of the eastern Gulf Coast and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frederiksen, N.O.

    1998-01-01

    Strata comprising most of the upper Paleocene in eastern North America are divided into two new pollen zones, the Carya and Platycarya platycaryoides Interval Zones. Pollen data have proven to be important for correlations between Alabama-western Georgia and eastern Mississippi and between the eastern Gulf Coast and Virginia. Migration of tropical plant taxa from the Caribbean to the Gulf Coast began at least 4 m.y. before the end of the Paleocene. The Terminal Paleocene Extinction Event, accompanied by a distinct pulse of plant immigration from Europe, began several hundred thousand years before the end of the Paleocene.

  5. NOAA Ecosystem Data Assembly Center for the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, A. R.; Beard, R. H.; Arnone, R. A.; Cross, S. L.; Comar, P. G.; May, N.; Strange, T. P.

    2006-12-01

    Through research programs at the NOAA Northern Gulf of Mexico Cooperative Institute (CI), NOAA is establishing an Ecosystem Data Assembly Center (EDAC) for the Gulf of Mexico. The EDAC demonstrates the utility of integrating many heterogeneous data types and streams used to characterized and identify ecosystems for the purpose of determining the health of ecosystems and identifying applications of the data within coastal resource management activities. Data streams include meteorological, physical oceanographic, ocean color, benthic, biogeochemical surveys, fishery, as well as fresh water fluxes (rainfall and river flow). Additionally the EDAC will provide an interface to the ecosystem data through an ontology based on the Coastal/Marine Ecological Classification System (CMECS). Applications of the ontological approach within the EDAC will be applied to increase public knowledge on habitat and ecosystem awareness. The EDAC plans to leverage companion socioeconomic studies to identify the essential data needed for continued EDAC operations. All data-management architectures and practices within the EDAC ensure interoperability with the Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) national backbone by incorporating the IOOS Data Management and Communications Plan. Proven data protocols, standards, formats, applications, practices and architectures developed by the EDAC will be transitioned to the NOAA National Data Centers.

  6. In-Stream Metabolism Differences Between Glacial and Non-Glacial Streams in Southeast Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassry, M. Q.; Scott, D.; Vermilyea, A.; Hood, E. W.

    2011-12-01

    As glacier ice gives way to successional vegetation, streams located in glacier-containing watersheds receive decreased contributions from glacial meltwater and increased contributions from terrestrial landscapes. These changes result in increased water temperature, increased shading from vegetation, and changes in the composition and concentration of organic matter delivered to the stream from the landscape. Organic matter and source water contributions from the surrounding landscape can influence in-stream metabolism through both biotic and abiotic factors. The impact of these landscape controls on the in-stream cycling of carbon and nutrients is not well understood in glacial systems. Here, we are focusing on understanding the differences in processing of organic carbon by heterotrophic microbial communities between glacial and non-glacial streams. In this study, the metabolism in streams receiving glacial meltwater was compared to the metabolism of streams located in nearby non-glaciated watersheds to determine the effect of changing inputs of glacial meltwater on stream metabolism. In particular, we tested the hypothesis that decreased inputs of glacier meltwater will result in increased net ecosystem metabolism (NEM) in coastal streams in southeast Alaska. Dissolved oxygen and carbon dioxide measurements as well as temperature and PAR values were collected at 10-minute increments at each study site for 4 days. This data was used to generate diel curves to establish community respiration (CR24) and gross primary production (GPP) estimates. Lab-scale mesocosms containing sediment and stream water from each end-member stream were used to quantify the relative importance of glacial contributions to respiration rates in the surface sediments. Ultimately, this will provide a better understanding of the changing in-stream processing capabilities in watersheds affected by land cover changes resulting from glacial recession.

  7. Blood Biomarkers of Chronic Inflammation in Gulf War Illness

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gerhard J.; Slater, Billie C. S.; Leis, Linda A.; Rector, Thomas S.; Bach, Ronald R.

    2016-01-01

    Background More than twenty years following the end of the 1990–1991 Gulf War it is estimated that approximately 300,000 veterans of this conflict suffer from an unexplained chronic, multi-system disorder known as Gulf War Illness (GWI). The etiology of GWI may be exposure to chemical toxins, but it remains only partially defined, and its case definition is based only on symptoms. Objective criteria for the diagnosis of GWI are urgently needed for diagnosis and therapeutic research. Objective This study was designed to determine if blood biomarkers could provide objective criteria to assist diagnosis of GWI. Design A surveillance study of 85 Gulf War Veteran volunteers identified from the Department of Veterans Affairs Minnesota Gulf War registry was performed. All subjects were deployed to the Gulf War. Fifty seven subjects had GWI defined by CDC criteria, and 28 did not have symptomatic criteria for a diagnosis of GWI. Statistical analyses were performed on peripheral blood counts and assays of 61 plasma proteins using the Mann-Whitney rank sum test to compare biomarker distributions and stepwise logistic regression to formulate a diagnostic model. Results Lymphocyte, monocyte, neutrophil, and platelet counts were higher in GWI subjects. Six serum proteins associated with inflammation were significantly different in GWI subjects. A diagnostic model of three biomarkers—lymphocytes, monocytes, and C reactive protein—had a predicted probability of 90% (CI 76–90%) for diagnosing GWI when the probability of having GWI was above 70%. Significance The results of the current study indicate that inflammation is a component of the pathobiology of GWI. Analysis of the data resulted in a model utilizing three readily measurable biomarkers that appears to significantly augment the symptom-based case definition of GWI. These new observations are highly relevant to the diagnosis of GWI, and to therapeutic trials. PMID:27352030

  8. Method for removing particulate matter from a gas stream

    DOEpatents

    Postma, Arlin K.

    1984-01-01

    Particulate matter is removed from a stream of pressurized gas by directing the stream of gas upwardly through a bed of porous material, the porous bed being held in an open ended container and at least partially submerged in liquid. The passage of the gas through the porous bed sets up a circulation in the liquid which cleans the particulate matter from the bed.

  9. Gas stream purifier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adam, Steven J.

    1994-01-01

    A gas stream purifier has been developed that is capable of removing corrosive acid, base, solvent, organic, inorganic, and water vapors as well as particulates from an inert mixed gas stream using only solid scrubbing agents. This small, lightweight purifier has demonstrated the ability to remove contaminants from an inert gas stream with a greater than 99 percent removal efficiency. The Gas Stream Purifier has outstanding market and sales potential in manufacturing, laboratory and science industries, medical, automotive, or any commercial industry where pollution, contamination, or gas stream purification is a concern. The purifier was developed under NASA contract NAS9-18200 Schedule A for use in the international Space Station. A patent application for the Gas Stream Purifier is currently on file with the United States Patent and Trademark Office.

  10. Evidence against a late Wisconsinan ice shelf in the Gulf of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oldale, R.N.; Williams, R.S., Jr.; Colman, Steven M.

    1990-01-01

    Proposals for the formation of a late Wisconsinan ice shelf in the Gulf of Maine during the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet are considered to be inappropriate. An Antarctic-type ice shelf does not fit the field data that indicate temperate glacial, terrestrial, and marine climates for the region between 18 ka and 12 ka. A temperate ice shelf has no modern analogues and may be physically impossible. The preponderance of stratified drift in the Gulf of Maine region supports temperate climates during late Wisconsinan time. It also indicates that glacial meltwater, rather than ice in either an ice sheet or ice shelf, was the primary transport mechanism of glacial sediment and the source for the glaciomarine mud. For these reasons we have proposed glacial analogues for the deglaciation of the Gulf of Maine that consist of temperate or subpolar marine-based glaciers, characterized by depositional environments dominated by meltwater discharge directly to the sea or the sea by way of subaerial meltwater streams. These analogues include Alaskan fjord glaciers, glaciers on the Alaskan continental shelf that discharged meltwater directly into the sea in the not too distant past, and Austfonna (Nordaustandet, Svalbard, Norway) that is presently discharging meltwater in the sea along a grounded ice wall. This last example is the best modern-day analogue for the depositional environment for most of the glaciomarine mud in the Gulf of Maine and deglaciation of the Gulf. ?? 1990.