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Sample records for gundersen flap surgery

  1. Bilobed flap in sole surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conejo-Mir, J.; Bueno Montes, J.; Moreno Gimenez, J.C.; Camacho-Martinez, F.

    1985-09-01

    The bilobed flap is a simple reconstructive technique principally used to correct substantial defects in the facial region. The authors present their experience with this local flap in the difficult plantar area, with excellent short-term functional results. They describe the special characteristics of the bilobed flap in this zone, and comment on its indications and possible complications.

  2. Microsurgery flap in endodontic surgery: case report

    PubMed Central

    CECCHETTI, F.; RICCI, S.; DI GIORGIO, G.; PISACANE, C.; OTTRIA, L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In periodontal plastic surgery it is increasingly more evident the relavance of the protection of the gingival marginal anatomy through the realization of a conservative flap. Minimizing the recession of the treated tissue. A correct healing always needs to take into account the diameter and type of the suture and the time of removal from the wound. PMID:23285354

  3. Rotational flaps in oncologic breast surgery. Anatomical and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Acea Nebril, Benigno; Builes Ramírez, Sergio; García Novoa, Alejandra; Varela Lamas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Local flaps are a group of surgical procedures that can solve the thoracic closure of large defects after breast cancer surgery with low morbidity. Its use in skin necrosis complications after conservative surgery or skin sparing mastectomies facilitates the initiation of adjuvant treatments and reduces delays in this patient group. This article describes the anatomical basis for the planning of thoracic and abdominal local flaps. Also, the application of these local flaps for closing large defects in the chest and selective flaps for skin coverage by necrosis in breast conserving surgery. PMID:27140865

  4. Intraoperative Flap Complications in LASIK Surgery Performed by Ophthalmology Residents

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Diaz-de-Leon, Lorena; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Navas, Alejandro; Graue-Hernández, Enrique O.; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the rate of flap-related complications in LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmology residents and to analyze the risk factors for these complications. Methods: We analyzed 273 flap dissections in 145 patients from March 2013 to February 2014. We included all LASIK surgeries performed by 32 ophthalmology residents using a Moria M2 microkeratome. All the flap-related complications were noted. Comparison between both groups with and without complications was performed with an independent Student's t-test and relative risks were calculated. Results: There were 19 flap-related complications out of the 273 flap dissections (6.95%). The most common complication was incomplete flap dissection (n = 10; 3.66%), followed by free-cap (n = 5; 1.83%), and flap-buttonhole (n = 2; 0.73%). There was no significant difference between the complicated and uncomplicated cases in terms of the right versus the left eye, pachymetry results, white-to-white diameter, and spherical equivalent. But this difference was significant for mean keratometry (P = 0.008), K-min (P = 0.01), and K-max (P = 0.03) between these groups. Final visual acuity after rescheduling laser treatment was similar in both groups. Relative risks for flap-related complications were 2.03 for the first LASIK surgery (CI 95% 0.64 to 6.48; P = 0.22) and 1.26 (CI 95% 0.43 to 3.69; P = 0.66) for the surgeon's flap-related complications. Female gender presented an odds ratio of 2.48 (CI 95% 0.68 to 9.00; P = 0.16) for complications. Conclusion: Flap-related complications are common intraoperative event during LASIK surgery performed by in-training ophthalmologists. Keratometries and surgeon's first procedure represent a higher probability for flap related complications than some other biometric parameters of patient's eye.

  5. Cryptogenic stroke following abdominal free flap breast reconstruction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huizhuang; Malata, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Abdominal free flap breast reconstruction is regarded as the gold standard method of post-mastectomy breast reconstruction by many. It is a major surgery which can be associated with varied systemic complications. To date, there have been no reports of cerebrovascular complications in the literature which examine the possible relation between thromboembolism and patent foramen ovale (PFO) in patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 54-year old female with a pre-existing PFO developed a stroke following bilateral mastectomies and immediate free flap breast reconstruction on postoperative day 5. This was attributed to an air embolus caused by central venous pressure line removal. After uneventful intra and early postoperative periods, the patient had collapsed suddenly on day 5 and become unresponsive immediately following the removal of a central venous line. Brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a cerebrovascular accident. This resolved within 48 h following therapeutic heparinisation. A clinical diagnosis of paradoxical embolism was made and she was subsequently referred to the cardiologists for angiographic closure of the PFO. DISCUSSION The case study herein reported gives an account that PFO can have considerable health implications in the early postoperative period and conceivably intraoperatively in patients undergoing major reconstructive surgeries. CONCLUSION Surgeons and cardiologists should be aware of this cerebrovascular complication secondary to PFO following major reconstructive surgery such as microvascular breast reconstruction. It also serves to challenge microvascular surgeons to reconsider routine use of central venous pressure lines in free flap patients who might otherwise have good peripheral vessels for postoperative fluid and antibiotic administration. PMID:25437687

  6. [The role definition of lateral arm free flap in reconstruction after head and neck cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, C; Cai, Y C; Wang, W; He, Y X; Lan, X J; Li, Q L; Zhou, Y Q; Liu, J F; Zhu, G Q; Liu, K; Wang, S X; Wang, K; Fan, J C; Sun, R H

    2016-02-01

    Application of free flap is one of the important repair means in head and neck surgery. A variety of free flaps, such as anterolateral thigh flap, have showed unique advantages in repair for tissue defects after resection of head and neck tumor, and have became increasing popularity. Lateral arm flee flap is an important repair means in plastic surgery, which has developed more than 30 years, but the application of this flap for reconstruction in head and neck surgery is relatively backward, with few reports. This review focuses on the creativity and innovation, the relationship between anatomy and clinical application, and the application status and prospects for lateral arm flee flap in individual head and neck reconstruction surgery. PMID:26898882

  7. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  8. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Baytinger, V. F. Kurochkina, O. S. Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-17

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became «re-reversed» again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  9. Management of complications and compromised free flaps following major head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Durmus, Kasim; Uysal, Ismail O; Old, Matthew; Agrawal, Amit; Arshad, Hassan; Teknos, Theodoros N; Ozer, Enver

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are preferred for most major head and neck reconstruction surgeries because of better functional outcomes, improved esthetics, and generally higher success rates. Numerous studies have investigated measures to prevent flap loss, but few have evaluated the optimal treatment for free flap complications. This study aimed to determine the complication rate after free flap reconstructions and discusses our management strategies. Medical records of 260 consecutive patients who underwent free flap reconstructions for head and neck defects between July 2006 and June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed for patient and surgical characteristics and postoperative complications. The results revealed that microvascular free flaps were extremely reliable, with a 3.5 % incidence of flap failure. There were 78 surgical site complications. The most common complication was neck wound infection, followed by dehiscence, vascular congestion, abscess, flap necrosis, hematoma, osteoradionecrosis, and brisk bleeding. Twenty patients with poor wound healing received hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which was ineffective in three patients who eventually experienced complete flap loss. Eleven patients with vascular congestion underwent medicinal leech therapy, which was effective. Among the 78 patients with complications, 44 required repeat surgery, which was performed for postoperative brisk bleeding in three. Eventually, ten patients experienced partial flap loss and nine experienced complete flap loss, with the latter requiring subsequent pectoralis major flap reconstruction. Microvascular free flap reconstruction represents an essential and reliable technique for head and neck defects and allows surgeons to perform radical resection with satisfactory functional results and acceptable complication rates. PMID:25575841

  10. Comparison of Modified Limberg Flap and Karydakis Flap Operations in Pilonidal Sinus Surgery: Prospective Randomized Study

    PubMed Central

    Tokac, Mehmet; Dumlu, Ersin Gurkan; Aydin, Murat Seyit; Yalcın, Abdussamed; Kilic, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    The best surgical technique for pilonidal sinus disease (PSD) is still disputed. The objective of this prospective randomized study is to compare the short and long-term results of modified Limberg flap and Karydakis flap surgeries that have been widely used in recent years. Ninety one patients were included in the study. The patients were divided into two groups: modified Limberg flap (MLF; n = 46) and Karydakis flap (KF; n = 45). Preoperative findings of the patients, their surgical findings, and short and long-term postoperative findings were recorded and statistically compared. While no significant difference was discovered between the groups in terms of postoperative analgesic need, hospital stay, postoperative infection rate, drain stay time, painless sitting time, painless toilet-sitting time, and painless walking time, return to work or school time was shorter in the MLF group compared with the KF group (20.61 ± 7.89 days, 23.29 ± 6.42, respectively; P < 0.05). Cosmetically, the visual analog scale (VAS) of the KF group was significantly higher than that of the MLF group (VAS score 7.12 ± 1.28, 5.45 ± 1.77, respectively; P < 0.05). Considering recurrence rates, no statistically significant difference was found between the groups. Our study found out that short and long-term results of the MLF and KF procedures are similar. We believe both methods can be safely used in surgical PSD treatment given that in the MLF procedure, shorter return-to-work time is achieved, while the procedure provides better cosmetic results. PMID:26011208

  11. Predictive risk factors of free flap thrombosis in breast reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Masoomi, Hossein; Clark, Emily G; Paydar, Keyianoosh Z; Evans, Gregory R D; Nguyen, Audrey; Kobayashi, Mark R; Wirth, Garrett A

    2014-11-01

    Vascular thrombosis is one of the major postoperative complications of free flap microvascular breast reconstruction operations. It is associated with higher morbidity, higher cost, increased length of hospital stay, and potentially flap loss. Our purpose is to evaluate the rate of this complication and whether patient characteristics play a role. Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) database, we examined the clinical data of patients who underwent free flap breast reconstruction between 2009 and 2010 in the United States. Multivariate and univariate regression analyses were performed to identify independent risk factors of flap thrombosis. A total of 15,211 patients underwent free flap breast reconstruction surgery (immediate reconstruction: 43%). The most common flap was the free deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap (53.6%), followed by free transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap (43.1%), free superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flap (2%), and free gluteal artery perforator (GAP) flap (1.3%). The overall rate of flap thrombosis was 2.4 %, with the highest rate seen in the SIEA group (11.4%) and the lowest in the TRAM group (1.7%). Peripheral vascular disease (adjusted odds ration [AOR] 10.61), SIEA flap (AOR, 4.76) and delayed reconstruction (AOR, 1.42) were found to be statistically significant risk factors for flap thrombosis. Other comorbidities were not linked. While the overall rate of flap thrombosis in free flap breast reconstruction was relatively low (2.4%), Plastic Surgeons should be aware that patients with peripheral vascular disease and those undergoing free SIEA flap are at higher risk of flap thrombosis and they should closely monitor flaps to increase the chance for early salvage. PMID:24665051

  12. Reconstructive Surgery for Severe Penile Inadequacy: Phalloplasty with a Free Radial Forearm Flap or a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    PubMed Central

    Lumen, N.; Monstrey, S.; Ceulemans, P.; van Laecke, E.; Hoebeke, P.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. Severe penile inadequacy in adolescents is rare. Phallic reconstruction to treat this devastating condition is a major challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Phallic reconstruction using the free radial forearm flap (RFF) or the pedicled anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF) has been routinely used in female-to-male transsexuals. Recently we started to use these techniques in the treatment of severe penile inadequacy. Methods. Eleven males (age 15 to 42 years) were treated with a phallic reconstruction. The RFF is our method of choice; the ALTF is an alternative when a free flap is contraindicated or less desired by the patient. The RFF was used in 7 patients, the ALTF in 4 patients. Mean followup was 25 months (range: 4–49 months). Aesthetic and functional results were evaluated. Results. There were no complications related to the flap. Aesthetic results were judged as “good” in 9 patients and “moderate” in 2 patients. Sensitivity in the RFF was superior compared to the ALTF. Four patients developed urinary complications (stricture and/or fistula). Six patients underwent erectile implant surgery. In 2 patients the erectile implant had to be removed due to infection or erosion. Conclusion. In case of severe penile inadequacy due to whatever condition, a phalloplasty is the preferred treatment nowadays. The free radial forearm flap is still the method of choice. The anterolateral thigh flap can be a good alternative, especially when free flaps are contraindicated, but sensitivity is markedly inferior in these flaps. PMID:19009034

  13. Predictable dental rehabilitation in maxillomandibular reconstruction with free flaps. The role of implant guided surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cebrian-Carretero, José L.; Sobrino, José A.; Yu, Tomás; Burgueño-García, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of maxillomandibular defects secondary to oral cancer surgery, represent a great challenge for Maxillofacial surgeons. During the last decades the reconstructive surgery has experimented a big advance due to the development of the microsurgical techniques. At present, we are able to reconstruct complex defects using free flaps that provide both soft and bone tissue. Fibula, iliac crest and scapula free flaps have been the three classic options for the maxillomandibular reconstruction owing to the amount of bone that this flaps provide, allowing the posterior dental rehabilitation with implants. Today, our objective it is not only the aesthetic reconstruction, but also the functional reconstruction of the patients enhancing their life quality. Guided implant surgery in free flap reconstructed patients has become an essential tool, helping to define the exact position of the dental implant in the flap. In this way it is possible to look for the areas with better bone conditions, avoiding the osteosynthesis material used to fixate the flap with the native bone and deciding the best biomechanical option, in terms of number and situation of the implants, for the future dental prostheses. In summary, using the guided implant surgery, it is possible to design an exact and predictable dental implant rehabilitation in patients with oral cancer who are reconstructed with free microvascular flap, resulting in an optimal aesthetic and functional result. Key words:Oral cancer, mandibulectomy, maxillectomy, microvascular reconstruction, fibula flap, dental implant, guided surgery. PMID:25129241

  14. Prospective evaluation of outcome measures in free-flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Kelly, John L; Eadie, Patricia A; Orr, David; Al-Rawi, Mogdad; O'Donnell, Margaret; Lawlor, Denis

    2004-08-01

    Free-flap failure is usually caused by venous or arterial thrombosis. In many cases, lack of experience and surgical delay also contribute to flap loss. The authors prospectively analyzed the outcome of 57 free flaps over a 28-month period (January, 1999 to April, 2001). The setting was a university hospital tertiary referral center. Anastomotic technique, ischemia time, choice of anticoagulant, and the grade of surgeon were recorded. The type of flap, medications, and co-morbidities, including preoperative radiotherapy, were also documented. Ten flaps were re-explored (17 percent). There were four cases of complete flap failure (6.7 percent) and five cases of partial failure (8.5 percent). In patients who received perioperative systemic heparin or dextran, there was no evidence of flap failure (p = .08). The mean ischemia time was similar in flaps that failed (95 +/- 29 min) and in those that survived (92 +/- 34 min). Also, the number of anastomoses performed by trainees in flaps that failed (22 percent), was similar to the number in flaps that survived (28 percent). Nine patients received preoperative radiotherapy, and there was complete flap survival in each case. This study reveals that closely supervised anastomoses performed by trainees may have a similar outcome to those performed by more senior surgeons. There was no adverse effect from radiotherapy or increased ischemia time on flap survival. PMID:15356760

  15. Combination Nasolabial Transposition Flap and Island Pedicle Flap Following Mohs Surgery of Simultaneous Basal Cell Carcinomas Involving Both Nasal Alae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chae Young; Lee, Yeong Kyu; Choi, Kyu Won; Lee, Chae Wook; Kim, Ki Ho

    2008-01-01

    The nasal ala is a challenging area for surgical reconstruction, with thick sebaceous skin, the lack of an ample tissue reservoir, and an adjacent free margin. Numerous flaps have been reported for the repair of alae defects. A 71-year-old woman with simultaneous basal cell carcinomas involving both nasal alae was treated by Mohs micrographic surgery. The surgical defects measured 1.5×1.5 cm on the center of the right nasal ala and 1.0×1.0 cm on the left nasal ala, including the alar crease and rim. The right nasal ala was used as a nasolabial transposition flap and the left nasal ala was reconstructed by an island pedicle flap. The final shape and texture were satisfactory. The flaps survived and nasal symmetry was preserved. Combined nasolabial transposition and island pedicle flaps thus offer a superior esthetic and functional result owing to minimized tension. This may be a valuable reconstructive option in the repair of bilateral nasal alae defects.

  16. Fetal reconstructive surgery: experimental use of the latissimus dorsi flap to correct myelomeningocele in utero.

    PubMed

    Meuli-Simmen, C; Meuli, M; Hutchins, G M; Harrison, M R; Buncke, H J; Sullivan, K M; Adzick, N S

    1995-10-01

    A recent study in human fetuses with myelomeningocele produced evidence that nonclosure of the spine leads to progressive damage of the exposed spinal cord during pregnancy. Thus in utero coverage might spare function. We tested the use of the latissimus dorsi flap for fetal myelomeningocele repair. In seven sheep fetuses, a lumbar myelomeningocele type of lesion was created at 75 days' gestation and was covered with a "reversed" latissimus dorsi flap at 100 days. At term, the three survivors had healed cutaneous wounds and normal hindlimb function. The vascular pedicle of the latissimus dorsi flap was patent, the viable flap covered the entire lesion, and the underlying spinal cord was grossly intact. We conclude that the latissimus dorsi flap repair is suitable for fetal surgery and provides efficient coverage of the lesion. These results have clinical implications, since fetal myelomeningocele repair may be a compelling way to reduce the severe neurologic deficit in humans. PMID:7568473

  17. Anticoagulants and Statins As Pharmacological Agents in Free Flap Surgery: Current Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Pršić, Adnan; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Caterson, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are key components of reconstructive surgery, but despite their common use and usual reliability, flap failures still occur. Many pharmacological agents have been utilized to minimize risk of flap failure caused by thrombosis. However, the challenge of most antithrombotic therapy lies in providing patients with optimal antithrombotic prophylaxis without adverse bleeding effects. There is a limited but growing body of evidence suggesting that the vasoprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of statins can be beneficial for free flap survival. By inhibiting mevalonic acid, the downstream effects of statins include reduction of inflammation, reduced thrombogenicity, and improved vasodilation. This review provides a summary of the pathophysiology of thrombus formation and the current evidence of anticoagulation practices with aspirin, heparin, and dextran. In addition, the potential benefits of statins in the perioperative management of free flaps are highlighted. PMID:26617953

  18. Sigmoid incision rescue nasoseptal flap technique for endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Hiroyuki; Tomita, Toshiki; Watanabe, Yoshihiro; Sekimizu, Mariko; Ito, Fumihiro; Ikari, Yuichi; Saito, Shin; Toda, Masahiro; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion The sigmoid-incision (S-I) rescue flap technique has the advantage of both reduced-invasiveness and providing a sufficient surgical corridor for endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery (EESBS). Objective Skull base reconstruction with nasoseptal flap (NSF) is critically important in managing post-operative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after tumor removal by EESBS. The NSF needs to be elevated before sphenoidotomy and posterior septectomy to preserve the pedicle. However, most extradural surgery without CSF leakage does not require NSF and, therefore, NSF preparation is often futile. As a result, a rescue flap technique to overcome this problem has been developed, whereby a new S-I rescue flap method is used that enables wide exposure of the sphenoidal rostrum and smooth manipulation of surgical instruments to preserve the NSF pedicle. Materials and methods Starting in April 2014, 19 cases underwent EESBS with S-I rescue flap. Results All patients underwent tumor resection under an adequate operative field with smooth manipulation of surgical instruments. Two complications were experienced. One patient had CSF leak after removal of the nasal packing, but the leakage was successfully closed by conventional NSF. Another patient had epistaxis from the septal wall, but this was controlled by electrocautery. PMID:26901123

  19. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  20. [Lateral trapezius flap in cervico-facial surgery. Apropos of 89 cases].

    PubMed

    Siberchicot, F; Barthelemy, I; Phan, E; Michelet, V; Pinsolle, J

    1995-04-01

    Described since 1976, the lateral trapezius flap is not very used in cervico facial reconstructive surgery because of its dissection which is considered as difficult and because of the variability of its vascular pedicle. This latter problem can be removed by the systematic use of preoperative arteriography. We present our retrospective experience of 89 flaps (70 cases of tumors and 19 cases of balistic pathology. We can conclude that the lateral trapezius flap owns specific indications: cutaneous and mucous defects of lips and cheeks, defects of pharyngeal area, defects of floor of the mouth considering of its thin thickness, mandibular defects where it takes place between reconstructive plates and revascularized bone transplants especially for the symphysis area. PMID:7574390

  1. Conjunctival flap in manual sutureless small-incision cataract surgery: a necessity or dogmatic.

    PubMed

    Singh, Punitkumar; Singh, Subhadra; Bhargav, Gajesh; Singh, Manju

    2012-08-01

    To compare the surgical outcomes of manual sutureless small-incision extracapsular cataract surgery (MSICS) with versus without a conjunctival flap for the treatment of cataracts. Prospective, randomized comparison of 220 consecutive patients with visually significant cataracts. Tertiary level eye clinic. 220 consecutive patients with cataracts. Patients assigned randomly to receive either SICS with a conjunctival flap or without one. Operative time, surgical complications, surgically induced astigmatism. Both surgical techniques achieved comparable surgical outcomes with comparable complication rates. The operative time was markedly less in group without flap (mean duration of 7.67 ± 1.45 min) than in group with flap (mean duration of 11.46 ± 1.69 min) (p value <0.001). In the group without a flap intraoperative pupillary miosis was significantly greater (p value 0.039) and on postoperative day 1, there were greater patients with a subconjunctival bleed involving greater than one quadrant of the bulbar conjunctiva (p value <0.0001). Also, post operative conjunctival retraction and consequent wound exposure was also significantly higher in this group (p value 0.026). However, the rate of other serious complications like any postop hyphaema, conjunctival bleb formation, iris prolapse, tunnel stability, shallow anterior chamber, post operative uveitis, malpositioned IOL, retinal detachment, cystoid macular edema, endophthalmitis were comparable in both. Both MSICS with and without a conjunctival flap achieved good surgical outcomes with comparable complication rates. But flapless MSICS is significantly faster. However it may be associated with higher intraoperative miosis and greater postoperative wound exposure. PMID:22638922

  2. Trismus Secondary Release Surgery and Microsurgical Free Flap Reconstruction After Surgical Treatment of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang-Ming; Deek, Nidal Farhan Al; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-10-01

    This article addresses trismus following head and neck cancer ablation and free flap reconstruction whether or not radiotherapy has been utilized. The focus is to achieve durable and favorable outcomes and avoid untoward results. To aid surgeons in fulfilling these goals, key factors, including adequate release surgery, optimal free flap selection and reconstruction, long-lasting results, and the untoward outcomes specific to trismus release and reconstruction surgery and how to avoid them have been investigated and discussed based on the authors' experience in this surgery. PMID:27601398

  3. A Novel Pilot Study Using Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging to Assess Oxygenation of Perforator Flaps During Reconstructive Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, John T.; Lin, Samuel J.; Tobias, Adam M.; Gioux, Sylvain; Mazhar, Amaan; Cuccia, David J.; Ashitate, Yoshitomo; Stockdale, Alan; Oketokoun, Rafiou; Durr, Nicholas J.; Moffitt, Lorissa A.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Frangioni, John V.; Lee, Bernard T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Although various methods exist for monitoring flaps during reconstructive surgery, surgeons primarily rely on assessment of clinical judgment. Early detection of vascular complications improves rate of flap salvage. Spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) is a promising new technology that provides oxygenation images over a large field of view. The goal of this clinical pilot study is to use SFDI in perforator flap breast reconstruction. Methods Three women undergoing unilateral breast reconstruction after mastectomy were enrolled for our study. The SFDI system was deployed in the operating room, and images acquired over the course of the operation. Time points included images of each hemiabdominal skin flap before elevation, the selected flap after perforator dissection, and after microsurgical transfer. Results Spatial frequency domain imaging was able to measure tissue oxy-hemoglobin concentration (ctO2Hb), tissue deoxyhemoglobin concentration, and tissue oxygen saturation (stO2). Images were created for each metric to monitor flap status and the results quantified throughout the various time points of the procedure. For 2 of 3 patients, the chosen flap had a higher ctO2Hb and stO2. For 1 patient, the chosen flap had lower ctO2Hb and stO2. There were no perfusion deficits observed based on SFDI and clinical follow-up. Conclusions The results of our initial human pilot study suggest that SFDI has the potential to provide intraoperative oxygenation images in real-time during surgery. With the use of this technology, surgeons can obtain tissue oxygenation and hemoglobin concentration maps to assist in intraoperative planning; this can potentially prevent complications and improve clinical outcome. PMID:23945533

  4. Clinical effect of tetracycline demineralization and fibrin-fibronectin sealing system application on healing response following flap debridement surgery.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Scabbia, A; Scapoli, C; Calura, G

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this controlled clinical trial was to assess the effect on healing following tetracycline (TTC) conditioning and fibrin-fibronectin sealing system (FFSS) application in association with flap debridement surgery (FDS) in 11 patients under treatment for moderate to severe periodontitis. Selection criteria included the presence of two bilateral, homologous, non-molar, interproximal sites with probing depth > or = 5 mm. The areas bilateral to the trial sites were matched for number and type of the teeth, and similar periodontal involvement. After initial therapy, a split-mouth design was used in which one area was treated by flap debridement surgery alone (control), and the contralateral area was treated following surgery with a 4-minute burnishing application of 100 mg/ml TTC solution and FFSS (test). Fibrin glue was applied with a syringe on the demineralized root surfaces and surrounding bone margins. Healing by primary intention was encouraged by flap repositioning with interrupted sutures left in place for 14 days. A monthly maintenance recall program was followed. Patients were clinically evaluated at baseline and 6 months and the following measurements were taken: gingival index, plaque control record, clinical attachment level, probing depth, recession, bleeding on probing. Statistical evaluation indicated that both approaches resulted in significant probing depth reduction and clinical attachment gain. However, the differences in healing between the test and control groups were not clinically nor statistically significant. These results suggest there is no additional benefit with TTC demineralization and topical FFSS application in conjunction with flap debridement surgery. PMID:8832480

  5. Innovative techniques in preventing and salvaging neurovascular pedicle flaps in reconstructive foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Zgonis, Thomas; Stapleton, John J

    2008-04-01

    Pedicle flaps to cover soft tissue defects of the foot, ankle, and lower extremity are invaluable. However, venous congestion and flap necrosis, a common complication, poses greater morbidity to the patient as few remaining options for attempted limb salvage remain. The authors discuss how to prevent flap failure by allowing close observation and strict offloading of the pedicle flap through current external fixation designs. This article also discusses the role of medicinal leeches in reestablishing blood flow through the pedicle flap to prevent tissue necrosis. In addition, the use of hydrosurgery as an innovative technique offers the surgeon another option if faced with pedicle flap necrosis. PMID:19825700

  6. Flapless versus Conventional Flapped Dental Implant Surgery: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chrcanovic, Bruno Ramos; Albrektsson, Tomas; Wennerberg, Ann

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the null hypothesis of no difference in the implant failure rates, postoperative infection, and marginal bone loss for patients being rehabilitated by dental implants being inserted by a flapless surgical procedure versus the open flap technique, against the alternative hypothesis of a difference. An electronic search without time or language restrictions was undertaken in March 2014. Eligibility criteria included clinical human studies, either randomized or not. The search strategy resulted in 23 publications. The I2 statistic was used to express the percentage of the total variation across studies due to heterogeneity. The inverse variance method was used for random-effects model or fixed-effects model, when indicated. The estimates of relative effect were expressed in risk ratio (RR) and mean difference (MD) in millimeters. Sixteen studies were judged to be at high risk of bias, whereas two studies were considered of moderate risk of bias, and five studies of low risk of bias. The funnel plots indicated absence of publication bias for the three outcomes analyzed. The test for overall effect showed that the difference between the procedures (flapless vs. open flap surgery) significantly affect the implant failure rates (P = 0.03), with a RR of 1.75 (95% CI 1.07–2.86). However, a sensitivity analysis revealed differences when studies of high and low risk of bias were pooled separately. Thus, the results must be interpreted carefully. No apparent significant effects of flapless technique on the occurrence of postoperative infection (P = 0.96; RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.23–4.03) or on the marginal bone loss (P = 0.16; MD −0.07 mm, 95% CI −0.16–0.03) were observed. PMID:24950053

  7. Resorbable barrier and envelope flap surgery in the treatment of human gingival recession defects. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Scabbia, A; Tatakis, D N; Checchi, L; Calura, G

    1998-01-01

    The present case report evaluates the treatment outcome following mucogingival surgery combined with a bioresorbable barrier in gingival recession defects in humans. A total of 11 buccal, Miller Class I or II, gingival recession defects in 6 patients were consecutively treated. The exposed root surface was ultrasonically scaled and conditioned with a tetracycline HCl solution (10 mg/ml) for 4 min. A buccal full/split thickness envelope flap was then elevated, and a bioresorbable matrix barrier was positioned to completely cover the exposed root surface and surrounding bone margins. A flap was then positioned at or slightly coronal to its original position. In all cases, a variable amount of membrane was intentionally left uncovered on the exposed root surface. Clinical recordings, assessed presurgery and at 6 months postsurgery, included defects-specific plaque and gingival scores, recession depth (RD), probing depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL) and keratinized tissue width (KT). Immediately postsurgery, and at weeks 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 postsurgery, the location of gingival margin or granulation tissue covering the previously exposed root surface was recorded, as well as the extent of barrier exposure. Statistical analysis showed that RD decreased from 2.3+/-0.2 mm presurgery to 0.8+/-0.5 mm at 6 months postsurgery (p=0.001), representing a mean root coverage of 65% (range: 40-100%). CAL gain paralleled RD reduction (1.5+/-0.5 mm; p=0.0009), while KT showed a slight increase (0.3+/-0.6 mm) at 6 months postsurgery. Results indicate that clinical improvement of gingival recession defects may be achieved by means of a barrier-supported envelope technique. The bioresorbable matrix barrier represented an effective scaffold to support the reconstruction of the mucogingival unit. PMID:9477016

  8. Dynamic perfusion assessment during perforator flap surgery: an up-to-date

    PubMed Central

    MUNTEAN, MAXIMILIAN VLAD; MUNTEAN, VALENTIN; ARDELEAN, FILIP; GEORGESCU, ALEXANDRU

    2015-01-01

    Flap monitoring technology has progressed alongside flap design. The highly variable vascular anatomy and the complexity associated with modern perforator flaps demands dynamic, real-time, intraoperative information about the vessel location, perfusion patterns and flap physiology. Although most surgeons still assess flap perfusion and viability based solely on clinical experience, studies have shown that results may be highly variable and often misleading. Poor judgment of intraoperative perfusion leads to major complications. Employing dynamic perfusion imaging during flap reconstruction has led to a reduced complication rate, lower morbidity, shorter hospital stay, and an overall better result. With the emergence of multiple systems capable of intraoperative flap evaluation, the purpose of this article is to review the two systems that have been widely accepted and are currently used by plastic surgeons: Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT). PMID:26609259

  9. Extending the use of the gracilis muscle flap in perineal reconstruction surgery.

    PubMed

    Goldie, Stephen J; Almasharqah, Riyadh; Fogg, Quentin A; Anderson, William

    2016-08-01

    Reconstruction of the perineum is required following oncological resections. Plastic surgical techniques can be used to restore the aesthetics and function of the perineum. The gracilis myocutaneous flap provides a substantial skin paddle, with minimal donor site morbidity. The flap is pedicled on a perforator from the medial circumflex femoral artery, giving it limited reach across the perineum. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle may free up more of the arterial pedicle, increasing its reach. On three female cadavers, bilateral gracilis flaps were raised in the standard surgical manner, giving six flaps in total. With the flaps pedicled across the perineum, the distance from the tip of each flap was measured to the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS). The flaps were then tunnelled under the adductor longus muscle. The distances to the ASIS were measured again. The average pedicle length was greater than 7 cm. Tunnelling the flap under the adductor longus muscle increased the reach by more than 4 cm on average. Cadaveric dissection has shown that tunnelling of the flap in a novel way increase its reach across the perineum. This additional flexibility improves its use clinically and is of benefit to plastic surgeons operating in perineal reconstruction. PMID:27221783

  10. Differences between Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Inhalation Anesthesia in Free Flap Surgery of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Ting; Wu, Chih-Chen; Tang, Tsung-Yung; Lu, Chun-Te; Lai, Chih-Sheng; Shen, Ching-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have evaluated risk factors associated with complications after free flap surgery, but these studies did not evaluate the impact of anesthesia management. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the differences between patients who received inhalation and total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) in free flap surgery. Methods One hundred and fifty-six patients who underwent free flap surgery for head and neck cancer were retrospectively divided into the TIVA (96 patients) and the inhalation group (87 patients). Perioperative hemodynamic data and postoperative medical complications were determined by documented medical records. Results Ninety-six patients in the TIVA group were compared with 87 patients who received inhalation anesthesia. There were no differences in gender, age, classification of physical status based on American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and cormobidities between the two groups. Patients in the TIVA group required less perioperative crystalloid (4172.46 ± 1534.95 vs. 5183.91 ± 1416.40 ml, p < 0.0001) and colloid (572.46 ± 335.14 vs. 994.25 ± 434.65 ml, p < 0.0001) to maintain hemodynamic stability. Although the mean anesthesia duration was shorter in the TIVA group (11.02 ± 2.84 vs. 11.70± 1.96 hours, p = 0.017), the blood loss was similar between groups (p = 0.71). There was no difference in surgical complication rate, but patients in the TIVA group developed fewer pulmonary complications (18 vs. 47, p = 0.0008). After multivariate regression, patients in the TIVA group had a significantly reduced risk of pulmonary complication compared with the inhalation group (Odds ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.18–0.92). Conclusions Total intravenous anesthesia was associated with significantly fewer pulmonary complications in patients who received free flap reconstruction. PMID:26849439

  11. Reconstruction of a Large Anterior Ear Defect after Mohs Micrographic Surgery with a Cartilage Graft and Postauricular Revolving Door Flap.

    PubMed

    Nemir, Stephanie; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey; Codrea, Vlad; Wagner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A novel postauricular revolving door island flap and cartilage graft combination was employed to correct a large defect on the anterior ear of an 84-year-old man who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery for an antihelical squamous cell carcinoma. The defect measured 4.6 × 2.4 cm and spanned the antihelix, scapha, a small portion of the helix, and a large segment of underlying cartilage, with loss of structural integrity and anterior folding of the ear. The repair involved harvesting 1.5 cm(2) of exposed cartilage from the scaphoid fossa and then sculpting and suturing it to the remnant of the antihelical cartilage in order to recreate the antihelical crura. The skin of the posterior auricle was then incised just below the helical rim and folded anteriorly to cover the cartilage graft. The flap remained attached by a central subcutaneous pedicle, and an island designed using the full-thickness defect as a stencil template was pulled through the cartilage window anteriorly to resurface the anterior ear. This case demonstrates the use of the revolving door flap for coverage of large central ear defects with loss of cartilaginous support and illustrates how cartilage grafts may be used in combination with the flap to improve ear contour after resection. PMID:26425374

  12. Reconstruction of a Large Anterior Ear Defect after Mohs Micrographic Surgery with a Cartilage Graft and Postauricular Revolving Door Flap

    PubMed Central

    Nemir, Stephanie; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey; Codrea, Vlad; Wagner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A novel postauricular revolving door island flap and cartilage graft combination was employed to correct a large defect on the anterior ear of an 84-year-old man who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery for an antihelical squamous cell carcinoma. The defect measured 4.6 × 2.4 cm and spanned the antihelix, scapha, a small portion of the helix, and a large segment of underlying cartilage, with loss of structural integrity and anterior folding of the ear. The repair involved harvesting 1.5 cm2 of exposed cartilage from the scaphoid fossa and then sculpting and suturing it to the remnant of the antihelical cartilage in order to recreate the antihelical crura. The skin of the posterior auricle was then incised just below the helical rim and folded anteriorly to cover the cartilage graft. The flap remained attached by a central subcutaneous pedicle, and an island designed using the full-thickness defect as a stencil template was pulled through the cartilage window anteriorly to resurface the anterior ear. This case demonstrates the use of the revolving door flap for coverage of large central ear defects with loss of cartilaginous support and illustrates how cartilage grafts may be used in combination with the flap to improve ear contour after resection. PMID:26425374

  13. Histomorphometric analysis of irradiated recipient vessels and transplant vessels of free flaps in patients undergoing reconstruction after ablative surgery.

    PubMed

    Schultze-Mosgau, S; Erbe, M; Keilholz, L; Radespiel-Tröger, M; Wiltfang, J; Minge, N; Neukam, F W

    2000-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate, histomorphometrically, quantitative and qualitative changes in irradiated neck recipient vessels and transplant vessels used for microsurgical anastomoses in free flaps in patients undergoing preoperative radiotherapy and chemotherapy. In 55 patients receiving 42 radial forearm flaps, 6 latissimus dorsi flaps, 6 osteomyocutaneous fibula grafts and 1 lateral arm flap, a total of 220 vessels were obtained from neck recipient vessels and transplant vessels during anastomosis. Three groups were formed: Group 1 (16 patients) treated with no radiotherapy or chemotherapy; Group 2 (20 patients) treated with preoperative irradiation (40-50 Gy) and chemotherapy (800 mg/m2 5-FU and 20 mg/m2 cisplatin) 1.5 months prior to surgery; Group 3 (19 patients) treated with radiotherapy (60-70 Gy) (median interval 78.7 months; IQR 31.3 months) prior to surgery. From each of the 220 vessel specimens, 3 sections each were histomorphometrically investigated, both qualitatively and quantitatively. To evaluate these changes as a function of age, radiation dose and chemotherapy, a statistical analysis was performed using analysis of covariance and chi-square tests. In Group 3, qualitative changes (intima dehiscence, hyalinosis) were found in recipient arteries significantly more frequently (25%, P=0.009) than in Groups 1 and 2. For Group 3 recipient arteries, histomorphometry revealed a significant decrease in the ratio of media area/total vessel area (median 0.53, IQR 0.10) in comparison with Group 1 (P= 0.02) (median 0.60, IQR 0.29) and Group 2 (P=0.046) (median 0.59, IQR 0.10). No significant differences were found between the vessels of Groups 1 and 2 (P= 0.48). Age and chemotherapy did not appear to have a significant influence on vessel changes in this study. PMID:10833147

  14. Postoperative Controversies in the Management of Free Flap Surgery in the Head and Neck.

    PubMed

    Cannady, Steven B; Hatten, Kyle; Wax, Mark K

    2016-08-01

    Free tissue transfer is the gold standard for reconstructing head and neck defects. Free flap success approaches 95% in centers with experience, affording unparalleled ability to restore form and function in cancer, trauma, or other major composite tissue loss. It is critical to manage the perioperative variables that predict success; several areas of controversy have not yet reached consensus. This review focuses on postoperative anticoagulation, fluid management, and flap monitoring methods. These areas of controversy potentially influence flap survival. We review published practices considered within the standard of care, why controversy remains, and future directions to reach standardization. PMID:27400844

  15. Perforator Based Propeller Flaps in Limb Reconstructive Surgery: Clinical Application and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Artiaco, Stefano; Bianchi, Pasquale; Boux, Elena; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of loss of substance due to trauma or oncological excision may have relevant functional and aesthetic implications. We report our experience in twenty-one cases of propeller flaps for the treatment of loss of substance of the upper and lower limbs. The etiology of defect was tumor excision in nine cases, trauma in seven cases, surgical wound complications in four cases, and chronic osteomyelitis in one case. Clinical results were favorable in most cases and eighteen flaps survived. We observed an overall complication rate of 33% with four cases of superficial epidermolysis that spontaneously healed and three cases of partial flap loss ranging from 10 to 50% that required surgical revision by means of skin graft (two cases) or ALT free flap (one case). Propeller flap harvesting requires great care and experience, and potential complications may occur even in expert hands. When indicated by the characteristic of the defect, these flaps can be a useful surgical option for the treatment of loss of substance of upper and lower limbs. PMID:25250327

  16. Perforator based propeller flaps in limb reconstructive surgery: clinical application and literature review.

    PubMed

    Artiaco, Stefano; Battiston, Bruno; Colzani, Giulia; Bianchi, Pasquale; Scaravilli, Gabriele; Boux, Elena; Tos, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of loss of substance due to trauma or oncological excision may have relevant functional and aesthetic implications. We report our experience in twenty-one cases of propeller flaps for the treatment of loss of substance of the upper and lower limbs. The etiology of defect was tumor excision in nine cases, trauma in seven cases, surgical wound complications in four cases, and chronic osteomyelitis in one case. Clinical results were favorable in most cases and eighteen flaps survived. We observed an overall complication rate of 33% with four cases of superficial epidermolysis that spontaneously healed and three cases of partial flap loss ranging from 10 to 50% that required surgical revision by means of skin graft (two cases) or ALT free flap (one case). Propeller flap harvesting requires great care and experience, and potential complications may occur even in expert hands. When indicated by the characteristic of the defect, these flaps can be a useful surgical option for the treatment of loss of substance of upper and lower limbs. PMID:25250327

  17. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of periodontal intrabony defects by open flap surgery alone or in combination with Biocollagen® membrane: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatat, Essam I.; Elkhatat, Amr E.; Azzeghaiby, Saleh N.; Tarakji, Bassel; Beshr, Khaled; Mossa, Hossam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is often incorporated in regenerative periodontal surgical procedures. However, the actual benefits of adding GTR to such a procedure remain undocumented. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the contribution of GTR to the outcomes of open flap debridement (OFD) in the treatment of intrabony defects. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 patients of both sexes satisfying the criteria of chronic periodontitis and each of whom displayed one intrabony defect were randomly assigned to two groups, i.e. either treated with open flap surgery and GTR (group 1) or with open flap surgery alone (group 2), in this parallel-arm study. The soft tissue and hard tissue measurements, including probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and bone mineral density were recorded at baseline and 3,6 and 12 months after surgery. The differences with a P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Results showed that the membrane group showed significant difference when compared with open flap surgery alone, in relation to the degree of periodontal pocket, clinical attachment loss, and bone density. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that biocollagen membrane could be considered as an option in the treatment of intrabony defects. Biocollagen membrane alone gives favorable clinical results in the treatment of intrabony defects. Open flap debridement resulted in acceptable clinical results in the treatment of intrabony defects. PMID:26236678

  18. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Altındas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  19. Bidirectionally positioned flap surgery: a case report with 3-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Iwano, Yoshihiro; Sato, Shuichi; Ito, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    A new technique to cover recessions to take advantage of connective tissue grafts and coronally advanced flaps is proposed. A 34-year-old woman presented with a 2-mm Class I recession on the buccal aspect of her maxillary right canine. A full-thickness flap was placed coronally to cover the exposed root, and a partial thickness flap was positioned apically. Complete root coverage was obtained, and the width of keratinized tissue had increased from 2 to 4 mm at the 6-month postoperative visit. These clinical outcomes were maintained for 3 years. This single surgical approach benefits from obtaining not only complete root coverage but also increasing width of keratinized tissue, without requiring a second surgical site. PMID:23444158

  20. Correction of pincer nail deformity with dermal flap: a new technique in pincer nail deformity surgery.

    PubMed

    Altun, Serdar; Gürger, Murat; Arpacı, Enver; İnözü, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Pincer nail deformity is the extreme, transverse, proximal-to-distal overcurvature of the finger, caused by osteophyte of the distal phalanx, and causing clamp effect on soft tissues and nail ingrowth. We report a new technique consisting of removal of the osteophyte causing clamp effect. Depressed areas of both side of the nail bed (lateral nail fold) were corrected with dermal flaps prepared from the side. Depressed areas were filled by these flaps, creating a smooth surface for the nail bed, and adequate correction was obtained. PMID:27130395

  1. [Mediastinal tracheotomy in cervicofacial oncologic surgery. Contribution of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap].

    PubMed

    Hamoir, M; Calteux, N; Robillard, T; Remacle, M; De Coninck, A; Van Den Eeckhaut, J

    1985-01-01

    Four cases of anterior mediastinal tracheostomy with myocutaneous Pectoralis Major flap are described. Resection of the manubrium, clavicular heads and the cartilages of the first and second ribs is necessary. The use of myocutaneous Pectoralis Major flap give good functional results. No infection or hemorrhage of mediastinal great vessels occurred. The indications of Anterior mediastinal tracheostomy are discussed. Stomal and peristomal recurrences following laryngectomy for carcinoma represents the indication of choice. Stomal recurrences are difficult to treat and the prognostic is poor. Prevention of the stomal recurrences is discussed. PMID:4014936

  2. Composite neuromusculo-fasciocutaneous triceps brachii free flap for complex foot reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Leclère, F-M; Casoli, V

    2016-04-01

    Since it was first described by Song in 1982, then by Katsaros in 1984, the lateral arm flap has become a workhorse technique for upper limb reconstruction. Herein we describe a clinical case of complex foot defect and bring up the possibility of using a composite neuromusculo-fasciocutaneous lateral arm/triceps free flap for its reconstruction. A 19-year-old male nonsmoker suffered ballistic trauma to his right foot with open multifragment Gustilo-IIIb fractures of the first to fifth metatarsal bones. Two weeks after debridement and V.A.C.™ therapy performed in another hospital, we decided to reconstruct the remaining defect with a neuromusculo-fasciocutaneous medial triceps/lateral arm free flap anastomosed with the anterior tibial pedicle. The posterior brachial cutaneous nerve was sutured to a sensory branch of the superficial fibular nerve. The advantages and drawbacks of this technique are discussed and other options for this type of complex foot reconstruction are reviewed. After 3 years' follow-up, the metatarsal bones were consolidated without residual defect or chronic infection. The foot had sensation with full mobility and no pain. At the donor site, there was no complaint of scarring. Elbow extension/flexion was 0-0-130. Wrist extension/flexion was 60-0-60 and there was no extension deficit of the metacarpophalangeal joints. The composite neuromusculo-fasciocutaneous triceps brachii free flap was an excellent option for this complex foot defect. The choice of this reconstructive procedure among other options was made during our reconstruction board meeting while taking the patient's specific condition and our own experiences into account. PMID:27117131

  3. Evaluation of the Ex-PRESS® P-50 implant under scleral flap in combined cataract and glaucoma surgery

    PubMed Central

    Huerva, Valentín; Soldevila, Jordi; Ascaso, Francisco J.; Lavilla, Laura; Muniesa, M. Jesús; Sánchez, M. Carmen

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the efficacy and safety of glaucoma drainage device Ex-PRESS® P-50 for combined cataract surgery and glaucoma. METHODS Patients having cataract and open angle glaucoma or patients with open advanced glaucoma which needed two or more antiglaucoma medications were included. Combined cataract surgery and glaucoma with Ex-PRESS® P-50 model placed under scleral flap was performed. RESULTS Out of 40 eyes of 40 patients (55% male and 45% female) completed the study during one-year follow-up. The mean of age was 76.6±11.02y. The intraocular pressure (IOP) decreased significantly during the 12-month follow-up from 23.5 mm Hg to 16.8 mm Hg (Wilcoxon signed ranks test, P<0.001). A 59.5% of patients did not need any topical treatment, 10.8% of them needed one active principle, 27% needed two active principles, and 2.7% of them needed three active principles for successful IOP control (<21 mm Hg). CONCLUSION Combined surgery of phacoemulsification with ExPRESS® P-50 lowers IOP from the preoperative baseline and reduces significantly the number of antiglaucoma active principles for IOP control after the operation. PMID:27162726

  4. Three-dimensional visualization of the human face using DICOM data and its application to facial contouring surgery using free anterolateral thigh flap transfer.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumiaki; Uehara, Miyuki; Oatari, Miwako; Kusatsu, Manami

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by surgeons performing reconstructive surgery in cases of facial asymmetry due to hemifacial atrophy or tumor surgery is the restoration of the natural contour of the face. Soft-tissue augmentation using free-flap transfer is one of the most commonly used methods for facial reconstruction. The most important part of a successful reconstruction is the preoperative assessment of the volume, position, and shape of the flap to be transplanted. This study focuses on three cases of facial deformity due to hemifacial progressive atrophy or tumor excision. For the preoperative assessment, digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data obtained from computed tomography was used and applied to a three-dimensional (3D) picture software program (ZedView, LEXI, Tokyo, Japan). Using computer simulation, a mirror image of the unaffected side of the face was applied to the affected side, and 3D visualization was performed. Using this procedure, a postoperative image of the face and precise shape, position, and amount of the flap that was going to be transferred was simulated preoperatively. In all cases, the postoperative shape of the face was acceptable, and a natural shape of the face could be obtained. Preoperative 3D visualization using computer simulation was helpful for estimating the reconstructive procedure and postoperative shape of the face. Using free-flap transfer, this procedure facilitates the natural shape after reconstruction of the face in facial contouring surgery. PMID:26319058

  5. The platysma myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Baur, Dale A; Williams, Jonathan; Alakaily, Xena

    2014-08-01

    Reconstructing defects of the oral mucosa or skin of the lower one-third of the face can be accomplished by a variety of techniques. This article presents two versions of the platysma myocutaneous flap, which is a reliable, axial pattern, pedicled flap capable of providing excellent one-stage reconstruction of such defects. As discussed herein, the superiorly based and posteriorly based versions of the flap have wide application in the oral and facial region. Also provided is a review of other uses of this flap in head and neck surgery. PMID:24958382

  6. Evaluation of the use of a 940 nm diode laser as an adjunct in flap surgery for treatment of chronic periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, Tanya Marguerite; Pol, Dilip Ganpat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lasers have several potential benefits such as antibacterial effect and stimulation of wound healing. In addition, hemostasis and delaying epithelial migration may facilitate the outcome of flap surgery. There is a minimal research and evidence currently available for the optimum method of use of a diode laser in flap surgery and its benefit and safety. Hence, this study aimed to investigate the adjunctive effect of diode laser irradiation in open flap debridement (OFD), while treating chronic periodontitis. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with generalized chronic moderate to severe periodontitis with pocket probing depth (PD) ≥5 mm post - Phase I therapy were selected for a split-mouth study. Flap surgery with adjunctive diode laser irradiation was performed in the test quadrant while routine OFD was done in the control quadrant. Clinical parameters including PD, clinical attachment level, gingival recession, plaque index, gingival index and tooth mobility were recorded at baseline, 3 months and 6 months following treatment. In addition, patients’ rating of procedural pain as well as the development of complications postoperatively was assessed. Results: All clinical parameters significantly improved after therapy without any statistically significant difference between the two groups for any of the parameters. The exception was a significantly greater reduction in gingival inflammation in the laser treated group. The laser treatment was acceptable to the patient and did not cause any complications. Conclusion: The diode laser can be safely and effectively used as an adjunct to the treatment of chronic periodontitis with the advantage of decreased gingival inflammation. PMID:25810592

  7. Considerations and Protocols in Virtual Surgical Planning of Reconstructive Surgery for More Accurate and Esthetic Neomandible with Deep Circumflex Iliac Artery Free Flap

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Kyoo; Kim, Hyun Young; Kim, Hyung Jun; Cha, In-Ho; Nam, Woong

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The reconstruction of mandibular defects poses many difficulties due to the unique, complex shape of the mandible and the temporomandibular joints. With development of microvascular anastomosis, free tissue transplantation techniques, such as deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap and fibular free flap (FFF), were developed. The DCIA offers good quality and quantity of bone tissue for mandibular segmental defect and implant for dental rehabilitation. Virtual surgical planning (VSP) and stereolithography-guided osteotomy are currently successfully applied in three-dimensional mandibular reconstruction, but most use FFF. There are only a few articles on reconstruction with the DCIA that assess the postoperative results. Methods: Three patients admitted during a five month period (April of 2013 to August of 2013) underwent resection of mandible and DCIA musculo-osseous reconstruction using a VSP and stereolithographic modeling and assessment of outcomes included technical accuracy, esthetic contour, and functional outcomes. Results: This technique yielded iliac bone segment with excellent apposition and duplication of the preoperative plan. Flap survival was 100 percent and all patients maintained preoperative occlusion and contour. Conclusion: Based on our experience, we offer considerations and logically consistent protocols by classification of mandibular defects, and demonstrate the benefits in VSP and stereolithographic modeling of mandibular reconstructive surgery with DCIA flap. PMID:27489828

  8. [Artificial ossification of muscular flap after plastic surgery of the bone cavity under the effect of electric current].

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, S S; Mussa, M; Rutskiĭ, V V

    1978-03-01

    Experiments in rabbits revealed that transplantation of a muscular flap on the central feeding pedicle in the tibis medullary canal and its electro-stimulation with direct microelectric current of 18-20 muA with the alternating polarity speeded up the process of reorganization of the muscular flap in the depth of which new osseous tissue was forming. Electrostimulation of osteogenesis in case of the muscular plastic transplantation promotes restoration of the anatomic integrity of the bone. PMID:667330

  9. Peculiar indications for the pedicled or free rectus abdominis flap in reconstructive surgery. A review of our experience.

    PubMed

    Sinsel, N K; Guelinckx, P J

    1995-01-01

    Among all known flaps, the rectus abdominis muscle flap possesses an unique diversity in flap designs due to the special vascular supply of the abdominal wall. The axial vascularization of the rectus abdominis muscle gives ofF several musculocutaneous perforators, which are mainly located in the periumbilical region. Abdominal wall skin perfusion is guaranteed by spoke-wheel like vessels arising from these perforators. Subsequently several designs (muscle, myocutaneous and myosubcutaneous) are possible, by varying the included tissue and the position of the skin island. We described 7 cases where the rectus abdominis muscle was used as a muscle or myocutaneous flap for reconstruction of large defects. In most cases a pedicled transfer was necessary, possible and sufficient to reconstruct the difficult defects in various body regions. Great amounts of well perfused tissue can be transferred with still possible primary closure of the donor site. Due to its rich perfusion and constancy of vascular pattern, it represents an excellent and safe pedicled reconstructive procedure for large defects of the thorax, the abdomen, the forearm or the hip and pelvis where free tissue transfers are impossible or contraindicated. No other local transposition would have achieved this goal, due to the lack of volume and mobility. Moreover the flap is ideal for reconstruction of contour deficiencies due to the abundance of fat, as for example in breast or buttock reconstruction. However the flap is not the first choice for traumatic and infected wounds where fat tissue is not desired. PMID:8571724

  10. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... skin infection Surgery for skin cancer Venous ulcers , pressure ulcers , or diabetic ulcers that do not heal After mastectomy or amputation Donor sites for grafts and flaps are chosen ... surgery than the wound due to newly exposed nerve endings.

  11. Use of Oral Mucoperiosteal and Pterygo-Masseteric Muscle Flaps as Interposition Material in Surgery of Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Anyanechi, CE; Osunde, OD; Bassey, GO

    2015-01-01

    Background: The most common complication of surgery for the release of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis is relapse of the ankylosis. To prevent re-ankylosis, a variety of interpositional materials have been used. Aim: The aim was to compare the surgical outcome of oral mucoperiosteal flap, not hitherto used as interpositional material, with pterygo-masseteric muscles flap after surgical release of TMJ ankylosis. Subjects and Methods: This was a prospective randomized study of all consecutive patients treated for the release of complete TMJ bony ankylosis, from January 2003 to December 2012, at the Oral and Maxillofacial unit of our institution. The patients were randomized into two groups: The pterygo-masseteric group comprises 22 patients while the oral mucoperiosteal group had 23 patients. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and postoperative complications over a 5 year follow-up period were obtained, and analyzed using the statistical package for social sciences (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 13, Chicago, IL, USA). A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: The age of the patients ranged from 15 to 28 mean 20.3 (3.35) years while the duration of ankylosis ranged from 2 to 16 mean 5.1 (3.4) years. The baseline demographic (gender; P = 0.92; side; P = 0.58) and clinical characteristics in terms of etiology (P = 0.60) and age (P = 0.52) were comparable in both treatment groups. All the patients presented with complete bony TMJ ankylosis with a preoperative inter-incisal distance of <0.5 cm. The intraoperative mouth opening achieved ranged from 4 cm to 5 cm, mean 4.6 (0.27) cm and this was not different for either group (P = 0.51). The patients were followed up postoperatively for a period ranging from 3 to 5 years, mean 3.4 (0.62) years. The mouth opening decreased, over the period of postoperative review, from the initial range of 4–5 cm to 2.9–3.6 cm, and this was not different in both groups (P = 0

  12. Perforator Flaps in Head and Neck Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chana, Jagdeep S.; Odili, Joy

    2010-01-01

    Free tissue transfer has revolutionized the management of complex head and neck defects. Perforator flaps represent the most recent advance in the development of free flap surgery. These flaps are based on perforating vessels and can be harvested without significant damage to associated muscles, thereby reducing the postoperative morbidity associated with muscle-based flaps. Elevation of perforator flaps requires meticulous technique and can be more challenging than raising muscle-based flaps. Use of a Doppler device enables reliable identification of the perforating vessels and aids in the design of free-style free flaps, where the flaps are designed purely according to the perforator located. The major advantage of free-style free flaps is that an unlimited number of flaps can potentially be designed on much shorter pedicles. The anterolateral thigh flap is the most commonly used perforator flap in head and neck reconstruction. Its use is described in detail, as is use of other less common perforator flaps. This article also describes head and neck reconstruction in a region-specific manner and gives a short-list of suitable flaps based on the location of the defect. PMID:22550446

  13. Flap monitoring using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alex; Wright, Leigh P.; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Mao, Jian-min

    2006-02-01

    We report results of clinical trials on flap monitoring in 65 plastic surgeries. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation of flap tissue (StO II) was monitored non-invasively by using ODISsey TM tissue oximeter, an infrared spectroscopic device. StO II measurements were conducted both intra-operatively and post-operatively. From the intra-operative measurements, we observed that StO II values dropped when the main blood vessels supplying the flap were clamped in surgery, and that StO II jumped after anastomosis to a value close to its pre-operative value. From post-operative monitoring measurements for the 65 flap cases, each lasted two days or so, we found that the StO II values approach to a level close to the baseline if the surgery was successful, and that the StO II value dropped to a value below 30% if there is a perfusion compromise, such as vascular thrombosis.

  14. A new multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap combined with fascia graft dural suturing for high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Kentaro; Nishioka, Hiroshi; Fukuhara, Noriaki; Yamaguchi-Okada, Mitsuo; Yamada, Shozo

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the usefulness and reliability of a new endoscopic multilayer reconstruction using nasal septal flap (NSF) to prevent high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leak after endoscopic endonasal surgery. This study was a retrospective review on 97 patients who underwent multilayer reconstructions using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing after endoscopic endonasal surgery between July 2012 and March 2014. Patients were divided into two groups, third ventricle opening group and nonopening group, based on the presence of a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus after tumor removal. Furthermore, we compared this procedure with our previous reconstruction after resection of craniopharyngioma. Finally, we checked the patients who had postoperative prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Postoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurred in three patients (3.1 %): one from the third ventricle opening group and the remaining two from the nonopening group. External lumbar drain was performed after surgery in only seven patients (7.2 %). The incidence of postoperative CSF leak was similar in both groups, whereas the rate of craniopharyngioma in the third ventricle opening group was significantly higher. The incidence of postoperative CSF leak after resection of craniopharyngioma was not statistically significant but obviously higher in the previous group (12.2 %) compared with that in the present group (2.3 %). Twelve patients (12.4 %) had postoperative nasal discomfort of the nasal cavity for over a year. Multilayer reconstruction using NSF combined with fascia graft dural suturing is a more reliable method for preventing postoperative high-flow CSF leakage after endoscopic endonasal surgery even if there is a direct connection between the third ventricle and the paranasal sinus. However, we should pay close attention especially to prolonged discomfort of the nasal cavity after harvesting NSF

  15. Distally based sural artery flap without sural nerve.

    PubMed

    Motamed, Sadrollah; Yavari, Masood; Mofrad, Hamid Reza Hallaj; Rafiee, Reza; Shahraki, Feaz Niazi

    2010-01-01

    The distal third of the tibia, ankle and heel area is difficult to reconstruct. For small to medium size defects, local flaps are often an easier alternative than free flap. In lower limb surgery, the sural flap is based on this principle and this flap is becoming increasingly popular. The distally based superficial sural artery flap, first described as a distally based neuro skin flap by masquelet et al., is a skin island flap supplied by the vascular axis of the sural nerve. The main disadvantage of distally based sural artery flap is sacrifice of the sural nerve because it is described the concept of neurocutaneus island flap. We describe one case of reverse sural flap without sural nerve .The aim of this paper is to establish the reliability of this flap even without sural nerve. PMID:21133008

  16. Computer-Assisted Surgery for Segmental Mandibular Reconstruction with the Osteoseptocutaneous Fibula Flap: Can We Instigate Ideological and Technological Reforms?

    PubMed

    Deek, Nidal Farhan A L; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-03-01

    Virtual surgical planning and computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling are promising technologies with a growing trend in contemporary head and neck reconstruction. Segmental mandibular reconstruction with the osteoseptocutaneous fibula flap is one of the fields in which these technologies are increasingly used. Perceived benefits are increased surgical precision, improved operative efficiency, and overall good outcomes. Nevertheless, these programs do not cover the reconstruction picture of interest thoroughly, at least in the mind of the experienced surgeon. Based on extensive experience in segmental mandibular reconstruction and comprehensive literature review, the authors attempted to identify missing dots in computer-aided mandibular reconstruction; when possible, a problem-solution approach was taken. Of these dots, pedicle reach to the recipient vessels, multiple target soft-tissue reconstruction, anatomical variations and cross-section topography of the osteoseptocutaneous fibula flap, and intraoperative modification of the surgical plan were understated or not considered in the phases of virtual surgical planning and execution. Moreover, with the relatively small experience reported in computer-aided segmental mandibular reconstruction compared with the well-appreciated challenges, further discussion of what could be a realistic and safe indication was deemed necessary. Following in the footsteps of the iPhone developer of creating software satisfying to customers (i.e., surgeons) first and armed with the evidence from the literature and accumulation of experience, this Special Topic article aims to provoke a discussion among experts in this field to instigate ideological and technological reforms in computer-aided mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26910680

  17. Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fengshan; Wang, Guangnan; Li, Gaoshan; Ping, Juan; Mao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to summarize the treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers using combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap. Patients and methods Each degloved finger was debrided under microscopic guidance and embedded in the superficial layer of the abdominal fascia. The abdominal skin was sutured to the skin on the back and side of the hand to promote circumferential healing. After removal, the only remaining injured region was on the flexor surface, and this was repaired by multiple dorsal toe flaps, toe-web flaps, and dorsalis pedis flaps to provide blood vessels and sensory nerves. All fingers had proper flap thickness 3–6 months after surgery, and required only lateral Z-plasty modification with web deepening and widening to narrow the fingers and extend their relative length. Results We completed flap-graft and finger narrowing for 25 fingers in eight patients. Abdominal skin flaps and dorsal toe flaps were grafted, and resulted in both firmness and softness, providing finger flexibility. The dorsal toe flap provided good blood circulation and sensory nerves, and was used to cover the finger-flexor surface to regain sensation and stability when holding objects. During the 1–8 years of follow-up, sensation on the finger-flexor side recovered to the S3–4 level, and patient satisfaction based on the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire was 4–5. Flap ulcers or bone/tendon necrosis were not observed. Conclusion Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap was effective and reliable. PMID:26229479

  18. Long-term results of oncoplastic breast surgery with latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction: a pilot study of the objective cosmetic results and patient reported outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong-Deok; Kim, Zisun; Kuk, Jung Cheol; Jeong, Jaehong; Choi, Kyu Sung; Hur, Sung Mo; Jeong, Gui Ae; Chung, Jun Chul; Cho, Gyu Seok; Shin, Eung Jin; Kim, Hyung Chul; Kang, Sang-Gue; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of oncoplastic breast surgery is to restore the appearance of the breast and improve patient satisfaction. Thus, the assessment of cosmetic results and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) using appropriately constructed and validated instruments is essential. The aim of the present study was to assess the long-term objective cosmetic results and corresponding PROs after oncoplastic breast surgery. Methods Cosmetic results were assessed by the patients, a medical panel, and a computer program (BCCT.core). PROs were assessed using BREAST-Q, a questionnaire that measures the perception of patients having breast surgery. The cosmetic results and PROs were analyzed in patients who underwent quadrantectomy and partial breast reconstruction utilizing the latissimus dorsi flap. Results The mean duration of the follow-up period was 91.6 months (range, 33.3–171.0 months), and mean age of the patients was 51 years old (range, 33–72 years). The mean tumor size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.9–5.5 cm). There was fair agreement between the medical panel and BCCT.core score (K = 0.32, P < 0.001), and a statistically significant correlation between the BCCT.core score and medical panel cosmetic results was identified (r = 0.606, P < 0.001). A better BCCT.core result was related to a higher PRO of each BREAST-Q domain—satisfaction with breasts (R2 = 0.070, P = 0.039), satisfaction with outcome (R2 = 0.087, P = 0.021), psychosocial well-being (R2 = 0.085, P = 0.023), sexual well-being (R2 = 0.082, P = 0.029), and satisfaction with information (R2 = 0.064, P = 0.049). Conclusion Our long-term results of oncoplastic surgery achieved a high level of patient satisfaction with good cosmetic results. The medical panel and BCCT.core results correlated well with the PROs of the patients using valid, reliable, and procedure-specific measures. PMID:26942154

  19. Unexpected flap thickness in laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Giledi, Osama; Daya, Sheraz M

    2003-09-01

    We report a case of an unexpected thick flap during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) that led to abandonment of surgery. This report illustrates the importance of stromal bed measurements after flap creation in LASIK. A thicker-than-expected flap can lead to a thinner-than-anticipated residual cornea and subsequent ectasia or even perforation during laser ablation. It is possible that reports of ectasia in normal thickness corneas reflect thicker-than-anticipated flaps. PMID:14522308

  20. Analysis of inflammatory periimplant lesions during a 12-week period of undisturbed plaque accumulation--a comparison between flapless and flap surgery in the mini-pig.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Cornelia K; Thorwarth, Michael; Schultze-Mosgau, Stefan

    2012-04-01

    This study's aim was to clarify the influence of soft tissue management on the development of periimplant infection. Four weeks after removal of all maxillary premolars in 12 mini-pigs, four BEGO Semados RI implants were inserted in each maxillary quadrant. Employing a split-mouth design, one quadrant was randomized to flapless insertion while the contralateral side was chosen for flap surgery. Following 1, 2, 4 and 12 weeks of transmucosal implant, healing biopsies were retrieved from the periimplant soft tissue and subjected to further analysis. Histomorphometrically, a significant reduction of transmigration of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (week 1, p = 0.007; week 2, p = 0.021; week 4, p = 0.023; week 12, p = 0.013) as well as the density of the subepithelial inflammatory infiltrates (week 1, p = 0.007; week 2, p = 0.046; week 4, p = 0.003; week 12, p = 0.032) was verified following flapless surgery. Quantification of inducible nitric oxide synthase showed significantly reduced expression in the flapless group 2 (p = 0.027), 4 (p = 0.005) and 12 (p = 0.004) weeks post-insertion. Analysis of CD31 and collagen I immunostained sections revealed more regular capillary distribution as well as higher vessel and collagen density in the flapless group. The data of the present study indicate that flapless placement reduces the incidence of inflammatory periimplant soft tissue lesions during a 12-week period. Considering the beneficial effects of flapless placement on early soft tissue healing and stability, the technique might be preferred in case of an uncomplicated locoregional anatomy with sufficient hard and soft tissue. However, this positive effect might disappear after manipulation of the implant and soft tissue during impression taking or try in of the prosthodontic supraconstruction. PMID:22186942

  1. Clinical outcomes of suture delay in forehead flap.

    PubMed

    Isik, Daghan; Kiroglu, Faruk; Isik, Yasemin; Goktas, Ugur; Atik, Bekir

    2012-01-01

    The delay phenomenon is a surgical procedure performed to raise a wider skin flap and to improve the survival of skin flaps. Surgery, chemicals, sutures, and lasers can be used for the delay procedure. In this study, delayed forehead flaps created by suturing were used for coverage of nasal skin defects in eleven patients. In 7 patients, the cross-paramedian forehead flap was used to increase the extent of flap lengthening. In the first session, suture delay was performed on both sides of the forehead flap margin. In the second session, the flap was elevated and sutured to its new position, 7 to 10 days after the initial surgery. All flaps were completely viable, and patient satisfaction was optimal in all cases. The positive effect of surgical delay on flap survival has been shown in experimental and clinical studies. However, experimentally, suture delay or chemical delay procedures have been shown to be beneficial in flap survival only. Suture delay seems to be an inexpensive, effective, easily performed, atraumatic, and safe technique, especially among patients with systemic diseases such as diabetes or cardiovascular diseases, smoking patients who may lose the flap, or patients who need very wide and long flaps. PMID:22337378

  2. ["Separation delay" on random flap: an experimental and clinical practice on delayed flap].

    PubMed

    Zhao, S Q

    1990-08-01

    A new technique of delayed flap, that is called "Separation delay" by the authors, has succeeded in animal experiment and clinical practice. In the years of 1985-1989, 11 cases of random skin flaps on the patients had been performed with the new method. All the flaps look like table tennis rackets. It's pedicle is very narrow, simultaneously, the flap itself is very large. So it is quite suitable for repairing a neighbouring wound surface. It can be rotated 180 degrees. "The Separation delay" is a handy way without microsurgical technique. It is also an useful and reliable technique for resurfacing wound on plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:2086104

  3. Propeller Flap Reconstruction in Post Oncological Thigh Defect: "The Move in Flap".

    PubMed

    Nambi, G I; Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the limb after tumor resection is challenging question for oncosurgeons. The management differs from reconstruction of post traumatic defects due to the complexity of the primary surgery and subsequent radiation. The conventional propeller flap is based on a perforator which is located close to the defect; but in present case the perforator was located far away from the defect. So we describe it as "Move in flap" as the flap rotated a large volume of soft tissue lying between the defect and the perforator. We present a case of post oncological thigh defect with reconstruction using a propeller flap based on distal anteromedial perforator. PMID:26405422

  4. A new classification of spreader flap techniques.

    PubMed

    Wurm, Jochen; Kovacevic, Milos

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce various spreader flap technique modifications to adjust the width of the middle nasal vault in patients who underwent rhinoplasties with humpectomy. Decisive modifications of current spreader flap techniques were performed to allow a more natural restoration of the middle nasal vault and the internal nasal valve after humpectomy. Additional steps provide tools to adjust the width and shape of the middle nasal vault according to patients' requirements. The techniques were categorized into "basic spreader flaps," "flaring spreader flaps," "support spreader flaps," and "interrupted spreader flaps." The various spreader flap techniques were used during 576 primary septorhinoplasties in patients with hump noses, hump/crooked noses, or hump/tension noses. The average follow-up was 19 months. Patients who received basic spreader flaps or a flaring spreader flaps tended to show a slightly too wide middle nasal vault, revision surgery was necessary in four of these cases. All other patients showed an appropriate width in the middle nasal vault and an aesthetically pleasing course of the dorsal aesthetic lines. No signs of inverted v deformities or collapse of the internal nasal valve were observed in any of the patients. Patients who had reported impaired nasal breathing preoperatively described clearly improved subjective symptoms. The described techniques appear to be appropriate and highly promising as a supplement to existing procedures for reconstructing the middle nasal vault and internal nasal valves. No additional cartilage grafts are needed. PMID:24327250

  5. Microsurgical free flaps: Controversies in maxillofacial reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    George, Rinku K.; Krishnamurthy, Arvind

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructive microsurgery for oral and maxillofacial (OMF) defects is considered as a niche specialty and is performed regularly only in a handful of centers. Till recently the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap (PMMC) was considered to be the benchmark for OMF reconstruction. This philosophy is changing fast with rapid advancement in reconstructive microsurgery. Due to improvement in instrumentation and the development of finer techniques of flap harvesting we can positively state that microsurgery has come of age. Better techniques, microscopes and micro instruments enable us to do things previously unimaginable. Supramicrosurgery and ultrathin flaps are a testimony to this. Years of innovation in reconstructive microsurgery have given us a reasonably good number of very excellent flaps. Tremendous work has been put into producing some exceptionally brilliant research articles, sometimes contradicting each other. This has led to the need for clarity in some areas in this field. This article will review some controversies in reconstructive microsurgery and analyze some of the most common microvascular free flaps (MFF) used in OMF reconstruction. It aims to buttress the fact that three flaps-the radial forearm free flap (RFFF), anterolateral thigh flap (ALT) and fibula are the ones most expedient in the surgeon's arsenal, since they can cater to almost all sizeable defects we come across after ablative surgery in the OMF region. They can thus aptly be titled as the workhorses of OMF reconstruction with regard to free flaps. PMID:23662264

  6. Differences in blood flow volume and vascular resistance between free flaps: assessment in 58 cases.

    PubMed

    Takanari, Keisuke; Kamei, Yuzuru; Toriyama, Kazuhiro; Yagi, Shunjiro; Torii, Shuhei

    2009-01-01

    In free-flap transfer, blood flow in the transferred flap contributes to wound healing and to resistance against infection in the recipient site. Successful reconstructions using free tissue transfers may be required to define and choose flaps with abundant blood flow in necessary cases. We investigated blood flow in the flap by transit-time ultrasound flowmeter in 58 free-flap transfers. Flow volume was compared between flap tissues as vascular resistance in the flap was calculated. Fasciocutaneous and osteocutaneous flaps had relatively low blood flow volume, myocutaneous flaps had more, and intraperitoneal flaps had still higher blood flow volume. These differences were statistically significant. Vascular resistance significantly decreased in the same order of comparison. Our findings will help in selecting the most suitable flaps for reconstructive surgery. PMID:18942044

  7. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  8. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. PMID:26652325

  9. Canine lateral thoracic fasciocutaneous flap: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Cao Minh; Hoàng, Văn Lu'o'ng; Pham, Thi Ngoc; Hoàng, Manh An

    2009-10-01

    For the purpose of reconstructive surgery training and research, we have developed a new skin flap model: canine lateral thoracic fasciocutaneous flap. Anatomical study found that the lateral thoracic arteries in dogs have similar anatomical characteristics to human's ones. Based on these vessels, if a skin flap was designed within the vessels territory (size 5 x 8 cm) it could survive completely, whereas, if designed beyond the vessels territory (size 5 x 14 cm) would result in partial necrosis of the flap. This fasciocutaneous flap model closely simulates the human surgery and could be valuable for training and research. Furthermore, this flap could be applied in the veterinary practice for reconstruction of canine forelimbs and cervical area. PMID:19638323

  10. The double opposing myomucosal cheek flap in hard palate reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Pabiszczak, Maciej; Banaszewski, Jacek; Pastusiak, Tomasz; Buczkowska, Agata; Wierzbicka, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Limited defects in the oral cavity can be treated with local and pedicled cheek flaps. It allows to preserve the functions of the resected organ. Large defects in the midline of the hard palate can be reconstructed with double opposing myomucosal cheek flaps. The aim of this study was to discuss the methodology of the flap harvest and to show our experiences of treatment in a group of 15 patients with oral cavity cancer. In 1 patient the double opposing myomucosal cheek flap was harvested due to the wider local defect. The small size of the flap with ability to use the double opposing cheek flap in more extended defects as well as short duration of the surgery procedure can lead to reduced risk of postoperative complications. Finally, cheek flaps form an effective method of treatment of defects in the oral cavity. PMID:26388355

  11. Tensor fascia lata flap versus tensor fascia lata perforator-based island flap for the coverage of extensive trochanteric pressure sores.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youn Hwan; Kim, Sang Wha; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Chang Yeon

    2013-06-01

    Tensor fascia lata (TFL) musculocutaneous flaps often require a donor site graft when harvesting a large flap. However, a major drawback is that it also sacrifices the muscle. To overcome this disadvantage, we designed a TFL perforator-based island flap that was harvested from a site near the defect and involved transposition within 90 degrees without full isolation of the pedicles. We performed procedures on 17 musculocutaneous flaps and 23 perforator-based island flaps, and compared the outcomes of these surgeries. The overall complication rate was 27.5% (11 regions). There were 7 complications related to the musculocutaneous flaps and 4 complications related to the perforator flaps. Although there were no statistical differences between those groups, lower complication rates were associated with procedures involving perforator flaps. The TFL perforator procedure is a simple and fast operation that avoids sacrificing muscle. This decreases complication rates compared to true perforator flap techniques that require dissection around the perforator or pedicle. PMID:23392259

  12. Deltopectoral Flap in the Era of Microsurgery

    PubMed Central

    Chan, R. C. L.; Chan, J. Y. W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Our study aimed to review the role of deltopectoral (DP) flap as a reconstructive option for defects in the head and neck region in the microvascular era. Methods. All patients who received DP flap reconstruction surgery at the Department of Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, between 1999 and 2011 were recruited. Demographic data, indications for surgery, defect for reconstruction, and surgical outcomes were analyzed. Results. Fifty-four patients were included. All but two patients were operated for reconstruction after tumour resection. The remaining two patients were operated for necrotizing fasciitis and osteoradionecrosis. The majority of DP flaps were used to cover neck skin defect (63.0%). Other reconstructed defects included posterior pharyngeal wall (22.2%), facial skin defect (11.1%), and tracheal wall (3.7%). All donor sites were covered with partial thickness skin graft. Two patients developed partial flap necrosis at the tip and were managed conservatively. The overall flap survival rate was 96.3%. Conclusions. Albeit the technical advancements in microvascular surgery, DP still possesses multiple advantages (technical simplicity, reliable axial blood supply, large size, thinness, and pliability) which allows it to remain as a useful, reliable, and versatile surgical option for head and neck reconstruction. PMID:25374953

  13. Segmented vortex flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    Segmented vortex flaps were suggested as a means of delaying the vortex spill-over causing thrust loss over the outboard region of single-panel flaps. Also proposed was hinge-line setback for exploiting leading-edge suction in conjunction with vortex flaps to improve the overall thrust per unit flap area. These two concepts in combination were tested on a 60-deg cropped delta wing model. Significant improvement in flap efficiency was indicated by a reduction of the flap/wing area from 11.4% of single-panel flap to 6.3% of a two segment delta flap design, with no lift/drag penalty at lift coefficients between 0.5 and 0.7. The more efficient vortex flap arrangement of this study should benefit the performance attainable with flaps of given area on wings of moderate leading-edge sweep.

  14. Rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap for primary vaginal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Carlson, J W; Soisson, A P; Fowler, J M; Carter, J R; Twiggs, L B; Carson, L F

    1993-12-01

    Reconstructive procedures are being performed with increasing frequency in conjunction with pelvic exenterations and other radical gynecologic surgeries. The most common reconstructive procedures include continent urinary diversion, rectosigmoid anastomosis, and vaginal reconstruction. Historically, the gracilis myocutaneous flap has been the procedure of choice for vaginal reconstruction. However, the gracilis myocutaneous flap has a history of partial to severe necrosis, a propensity to prolapse, and leaves ipsilateral donor scars on the thigh. In contrast, neovaginal reconstruction using a relatively new procedure, the distally based rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps, has the advantage of using a large, single flap that can be incorporated into the primary incision. This flap is mobilized on a long vascular pedicle, the rectus muscle. In relation to the underlying rectus muscle, the orientation of the cutaneous portion of this flap may be customized to accommodate the pelvic defect or the surgeon's preference. Depending on their primary orientation, they are referred to as either a vertical or transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. The versatility and reliability of the rectus flap is demonstrated here through the presentation of a small pilot series of seven patients. The technique was used for vaginal reconstruction, primarily in conjunction with pelvic exenteration. The flaps were mobilized from the supraumbilical area and had a flap viability of 100% for the 2 years that they have been followed. There were no postoperative incisional or flap infections. There was one infraumbilical fascial dehiscence. The advantages of primary pelvic reconstruction along with the description of the operative techniques are presented. PMID:8112640

  15. The keystone flap: expanding the dermatologic surgeon's armamentarium.

    PubMed

    Hessam, Schapoor; Sand, Michael; Bechara, Falk G

    2015-01-01

    First described in 2003, the keystone flap has become an established plastic and reconstructive surgery technique for the closure of soft tissue defects following the excision of skin tumors. Complex reconstruction procedures may thus be avoided [3]. In dermatosurgery, however, the keystone flap remains largely unknown.Compared to subcutaneous pedicle flaps, the keystone flap technique warrants better vascular supply by additional-ly preserving musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous perforator vessels [4]. Moreover, the flap is hyperemic compared to the surrounding skin [5]. Adequate perfusion and its specific design result in high safety of the flap. According to both published data and the authors’ experience, the keystone flap technique is associated with a low complication rate [1, 6].In summary, the keystone flap method yields good aesthetic and functional results by preserving shape and cont-our, avoiding differences in skin coloration and preserving sensitivity (Figure 1b). The flap is particularly well suited for deep defects with exposed bones or tendons, especially on the extremities or the trunk. Alternative closing options such as secondary intention healing, primary closure, or local flaps appear less adequate in these cases. In addition, skin grafting without long-term wound conditioning–for example negative pressure wound therapy–or expensive der-mal replacement products are not very promising. Thus, the keystone flap provides the dermatosurgeon with an effective alternative to reconstruction techniques. PMID:25640508

  16. Slotted variable camber flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, D. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Variable camber actuator assemblies broaden the range of speeds at which lift to drag performance is maximized for slotted flap wings. Lift is improved over a broader range of cruising speeds by varying wing camber with rotational flap movements that do not introduce wing slots and induced drag. Forward flaps are secured to forward flange links which extended from, and are a part of forward flap linkage assemblies. The forward flaps rotate about flap pivots with their rotational displacement controlled by variable camber actuator assemblies located between the forward flaps and the forward flange links. Rear flaps are held relative to the forward flaps by rear flap linkage assemblies which may act independently from the forward flap linkage assemblies and the variable camber actuator assemblies. Wing camber is varied by rotating the flaps with the variable camber actuator assemblies while the flaps are in a deployed or tucked position. Rotating the flaps in a tucked position does not introduce significant wing surface discontinuities, and reduces aircraft fuel consumption on most flight profiles.

  17. The evolving breast reconstruction: from latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap to a propeller thoracodorsal fasciocutaneous flap

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this editorial is to give an update on the use of the propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP/TDAP-flap) within the field of breast reconstruction. The TAP-flap can be dissected by a combined use of a monopolar cautery and a scalpel. Microsurgical instruments are generally not needed. The propeller TAP-flap can be designed in different ways, three of these have been published: (I) an oblique upwards design; (II) a horizontal design; (III) an oblique downward design. The latissimus dorsi-flap is a good and reliable option for breast reconstruction, but has been criticized for morbidity and complications. The TAP-flap does not seem to impair the function of the shoulder or arm and the morbidity appears to be scarce. However, an implant is often needed in combination with the TAP-flap, which results in implant related morbidity over time. The TAP-flap seems to be a promising tool for oncoplastic and reconstructive breast surgery and will certainly become an invaluable addition to breast reconstructive methods. PMID:25207206

  18. Prospective Randomized Trial on Postoperative Administration of Diet Containing Eicosapentaenoic Acid, Docosahexaenoic Acid, Gamma-linolenic Acid, and Antioxidants in Head and Neck Cancer Surgery Patients with Free-flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Kiyoaki; Motohashi, Ray; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Minoru; Ueda, Yuri; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this prospective, randomized study was to evaluate the effects of a diet containing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and antioxidants in head and neck cancer surgery patients with free-flap reconstruction. METHODS In this randomized, prospective study, 62 patients with head and neck cancers were assigned to receive a general control diet (Ensure® H; Abbott Japan, Tokyo, Japan) or the study diet (Oxepa®; Abbott Japan) containing EPA, DHA, GLA, and antioxidants (eg vitamins A, E, and C). The primary assessment item was the degree of postoperative inflammation, as assessed by measuring maximum body temperature and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin from the day of surgery to postoperative day 8. Secondary assessment items were lengths of stays in the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital. RESULTS The control diet group (n = 32) and study diet group (n = 30) showed no significant difference in energy administered through diet. No significant differences in the parameters of the primary assessment item were noted. Length of stay in the ICU was significantly shorter for the control diet group than for the study diet group (P = 0.011). No significant difference in duration of hospitalization was seen between groups. CONCLUSION No usefulness of a diet containing EPA, DHA, GLA, and antioxidants was demonstrated. PMID:25368541

  19. Unilateral Breast Reconstruction Using Bilateral Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Mayu; Ogawa, Marina; Shibuya, Mai; Yasumura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi; Maegawa, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: For reconstructing moderate-to-high projection breasts in nulliparous patients with insufficient abdominal tissue or prior abdominal surgeries, a unilateral inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) flap is an alternative procedure. In patients with slim hips, however, unilateral gluteal tissue is insufficient and inferior gluteal crease displacement may develop postoperatively. Donor-site asymmetry is also a major disadvantage. In these circumstances, bilateral IGAP flaps provide sufficient tissue without significant gluteal deformity. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using bilateral IGAP flaps by a single surgeon between November 2007 and December 2012. A quantitative outcome assessment was performed and compared with that of 22 unilateral IGAP flap patients operated on by the same surgeon. Results: Twenty patients underwent reconstruction with 40 IGAP flaps. Of the 40 flaps, 39 survived and 1 developed total necrosis due to repeated venous thrombosis. In 15 of 20 patients, the size of reconstructed breast was comparable to that of the contralateral breast. Final inset flap weight was 462.3 g for bilateral flaps and 244.3 g for unilateral flaps. Total operating time was 671.1 minutes (bilateral flaps) and 486.8 minutes (unilateral flaps). Conclusions: Use of bilateral IGAP flaps for breast reconstruction helps to avoid asymmetry of the inferior buttock volume and shape. Bilateral flaps provide sufficient tissue volume and allow for reconstruction of a breast comparable to the unaffected side. In patients with moderate-to-high projection breast whose abdominal tissue cannot be used for reconstruction, IGAP flaps may be a suitable alternative. PMID:25878925

  20. Clinical applications of basic research that shows reducing skin tension could prevent and treat abnormal scarring: the importance of fascial/subcutaneous tensile reduction sutures and flap surgery for keloid and hypertrophic scar reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Rei; Akaishi, Satoshi; Huang, Chenyu; Dohi, Teruyuki; Aoki, Masayo; Omori, Yasutaka; Koike, Sachiko; Kobe, Kyoko; Akimoto, Masataka; Hyakusoku, Hiko

    2011-01-01

    We use evidence-based algorithms to treat abnormal scarring, including keloids and hypertrophic scars (HSs). This involves a multimodal approach that employs traditional methods such as surgical removal, postoperative radiotherapy, corticosteroid injection, laser, and silicone gel sheets. As a result, the rate of abnormal scarring recurrence has decreased dramatically over the past 10 years. However, several problems remain to be solved. First, despite the optimization of a radiotherapy protocol, over 10% of cases who are treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy still recur in our facility. Second, the treatment options for cases with huge keloids are very limited. To address these problems, we performed basic research on the mechanisms that drive the formation of keloids and HSs. Extrapolation of these research observations to the clinic has led to the development of two treatment strategies that have reduced the rate of abnormal scar recurrence further and provided a means to remove large scars. Our finite element analysis of the mechanical force distribution around keloids revealed high skin tension at the keloid edges and lower tension in the keloid center. Moreover, when a sophisticated servo-controlled device was used to stretch wounded murine dorsal skin, it was observed that the stretched samples exhibited upregulated epidermal proliferation and angiogenesis, which are also observed in keloids and HSs. Real-time RT-PCR also revealed that growth factors and neuropeptides are more strongly expressed in cyclically stretched skin than in statically stretched skin. These findings support the well-established notion that mechanical forces on the skin strongly influence the cellular behavior that leads to scarring. These observations led us to focus on the importance of reducing skin tension when keloids/HSs are surgically removed to prevent their recurrence. Clinical trials revealed that subcutaneous/fascial tensile reduction sutures, which apply

  1. Superficial circumflex iliac artery pure skin perforator-based superthin flap for hand and finger reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Narushima, Mitsunaga; Iida, Takuya; Kaji, Nobuyuki; Yamamoto, Takumi; Yoshimatsu, Hidehiko; Hara, Hisako; Kikuchi, Kazuki; Araki, Jun; Yamashita, Shuji; Koshima, Isao

    2016-06-01

    For hand and finger reconstruction, thin and flexible skin coverage is ideally required. A free flap is one of the surgical options used for large defects. However, a flap containing the fat layer is bulky. Several debulking surgeries are often needed for aesthetic and functional purposes. To overcome this disadvantage, we herein report our experience of six cases of hand and finger reconstruction using a pure skin perforator (PSP) flap concept. A PSP flap is a thin skin flap that is vascularized by a perforator branch penetrating the dermis. The thickness of the PSP flap could be approximately ≤2 mm as needed. The superficial circumflex iliac artery and superficial inferior epigastric artery were used as a flap pedicle. Secondary defatting operations were not required. For the success of PSP flap elevation, we applied three techniques: the microdissection technique for vessel separation, thin flap elevation at the superficial fascial layer, and the temporary clamping method. Temporary clamping was applied for the main trunk of pedicle vessels during debulking to prevent unwanted bleeding, which allowed us to freely perform three-dimensional defatting. Using these three techniques, the PSP flap can be elevated and adjusted for complex contouring of the hand and finger. Although the use of the PSP flap requires further study, the PSP flap is an effective, superthin flap with the advantages of both skin graft and perforator flaps. PMID:27085610

  2. Cranial-base surgery: a reconstructive algorithm.

    PubMed

    Georgantopoulou, A; Hodgkinson, P D; Gerber, C J

    2003-01-01

    Skull-base surgery is associated with a high risk of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak, infection, and functional and aesthetic deformity. Appropriate reconstruction of cranial-base defects following surgery helps to prevent these complications. Between March 1998 and May 2000, 28 patients (age: 1-68 years) underwent reconstruction of the anterior and middle cranial fossae. The indications for surgery were tumours, trauma involving the anterior cranial fossa, midline dermoid cysts with intracranial extension, late post-traumatic CSF leak, craniofacial deformity and recurrent frontal mucocoele. We used local anteriorly based pericranial flaps (23 flaps, alone or in combination with other flaps), bipedicled galeal flaps (seven patients) and free flaps (nine patients; radial forearm fascial/fasciocutaneous flaps, rectus abdominis muscle flap and latissimus dorsi muscle flap). Follow-up has been 4-24 months. We had no deaths, no flap failure and no incidence of infection. Complications included two CSF leaks, three intracranial haematomas and one pulsatile enophthalmos. All patients had a very good aesthetic result. We present an algorithm for skull-base reconstruction and comment on the design and vascularity of the bipedicled galeal flap. The monitoring of intracranial flaps and the difficulties of perioperative management of free flaps in neurosurgical patients are also discussed. PMID:12706142

  3. Free Flap Elevation Times in Head and Neck Reconstruction Using the Harmonic Scalpel Shears.

    PubMed

    DeSerres, Joshua J; Barber, Brittany R; Seikaly, Hadi; Harris, Jeffrey R; O'Connell, Daniel A

    2016-05-01

    Free tissue transfer has become the mainstay of head and neck cancer (HNC) reconstructive surgery. The objective of the study is to examine the efficacy of the Harmonic Scalpel (HS) Shears on free flap elevation time and complication rates after HNC reconstruction compared with traditional electrocautery. A retrospective review of 215 HNC patients undergoing surgical ablation and free flap reconstruction from January 2010 to April 2013 at the University of Alberta Hospital was undertaken. All patients requiring free flap reconstruction with radial forearm free flap or fibula free flap were included. Overall, there was no significant difference demonstrated between the HS and electrocautery groups for free flap elevation time for RFFFs (P = 0.563) or FFFs (P = 0.087). No differences were observed in donor-site complications. The HS is a reliable, safe, and alternative method of free flap elevation in HNC reconstructive surgery. PMID:27579242

  4. Free Flap Elevation Times in Head and Neck Reconstruction Using the Harmonic Scalpel Shears

    PubMed Central

    DeSerres, Joshua J.; Barber, Brittany R.; Seikaly, Hadi; Harris, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Free tissue transfer has become the mainstay of head and neck cancer (HNC) reconstructive surgery. The objective of the study is to examine the efficacy of the Harmonic Scalpel (HS) Shears on free flap elevation time and complication rates after HNC reconstruction compared with traditional electrocautery. A retrospective review of 215 HNC patients undergoing surgical ablation and free flap reconstruction from January 2010 to April 2013 at the University of Alberta Hospital was undertaken. All patients requiring free flap reconstruction with radial forearm free flap or fibula free flap were included. Overall, there was no significant difference demonstrated between the HS and electrocautery groups for free flap elevation time for RFFFs (P = 0.563) or FFFs (P = 0.087). No differences were observed in donor-site complications. The HS is a reliable, safe, and alternative method of free flap elevation in HNC reconstructive surgery. PMID:27579242

  5. In situ monitoring of surgical flap viability using THz imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajwa, Neha; Sung, Shijun; Grundfest, Warren; Taylor, Zachary

    2016-03-01

    This paper explores the utility of reflective THz imaging to assess the viability of surgical flaps. Flap surgery is a technique where tissue is harvested from a donor site and moved to a recipient while keeping the blood supply intact. This technique is common in head and neck tumor resection surgery where the reconstruction of complex and sensitive anatomic structures is routine following the resection of large and/or invasive tumors. Successful flap surgery results in tissue that is sufficiently perfused with both blood and extracellular water. If insufficient fluid levels are maintained, the flap tissue becomes necrotic and must be excised immediately to prevent infection developing and spreading to the surrounding areas. The goal of this work is to investigate the hydration of surgical flaps and correlate image features to successful graft outcomes. Advancement flaps were created on the abdomens of rat models. One rat model was labeled control and care was taken to ensure a successful flap outcome. The flap on the second rat was compromised with restricted blood flow and allowed to fail. The flaps of both rats were imaged once a day over the course of a week at which point the compromised flap had begun to show signs of necrosis. Significant differences in tissue water content were observed between rats over the experimental period. The results suggest that THz imaging may enable early assessment of flap viability.

  6. Concomitant Correction of a Soft-Tissue Fenestration with Keratinised Tissue Augmentation By Using A Rotated Double-Pedicle Flap During Second-Stage Implant Surgery- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Kumar, P. Anoop; Sailaja, Sistla; Chakravarthy, Yshs

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue deficiencies and defects around dental implants have been observed frequently. Soft-tissue defects after implant procedures originate from the process of modelling of periimplant mucosa and often cause aesthetic disharmony, food debris accumulation and soft tissue shrinkage. Periimplant mucogingival surgery focuses on creating an optimum band of keratinized tissue resulting in soft tissue architecture similar to the gingiva around natural teeth. A 23-year-old male reported to the Department of Periodontology with a complaint of gum soreness, foul smell and food accumulation at a site where a 3.75 x 11.5mm implant was placed previously. On clinical examination, fenestration of tissue above the cover screw was observed and there appeared to be a keratinized tissue of 1mm surrounding the implant. The case was managed by use of a rotated double-pedicle flap during second-stage implant surgery to correct the soft-tissue fenestration defect and to obtain a keratinized periimplant soft tissue. A periosteal bed was prepared by giving a horizontal incision at the mucogingival junction to a depth of 4 mm. Two split-thickness keratinized pedicles were dissected from the mesial and distal interproximal tissues near the implant. After rotation, both the pedicles were sutured to each other mid-buccally and the pedicles were rigidly immobilized with sutures. At 1 month, there was a 3mm band of stable and firm keratinized tissue over the underlying tissues. The procedure resulted in an aesthetic improvement due to enhanced soft tissue architecture and optimum integration between the peri-implant soft tissue and the final prosthesis. PMID:26816998

  7. Switch Flap for Upper Eyelid Reconstruction—How Soon Should the Flap Be Divided?

    PubMed Central

    Yanai, Tetsu; Yasuta, Masato; Kawano, Hiroshige; Ishihara, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Mamoru

    2016-01-01

    Background: The results of a cohort of patients treated at one institution for upper eyelid reconstruction with the switch flap method after a defect due to excision of malignant tumor were reviewed. Methods: A retrospective data file review of all patients who had undergone total upper eyelid reconstruction with the switch flap method was conducted at the Saga University Hospital between April 2000 and October 2014. The follow-up lasted for varying periods during which the preoperative and postoperative photographs were compared as well. Results: A total of 10 patients with upper eyelid tumors, that is, 7 sebaceous carcinoma, 2 squamous cell carcinoma, and 1 basal cell carcinoma, underwent reconstructive surgery. With the switch flap technique, the defects resulting from tumor excision were completely covered in all cases. The mean of defect widths after tumor excision (A) was 18.8 mm (range, 15–25 mm), the mean of widths of switch flaps (B) was 13.3 mm (range, 8–22 mm), and the mean of B/A ratios was 0.69 (range, 0.5–0.88). When the switch flap was divided at 7 to 14 days, there was no flap loss, trichiasis, or corneal ulcer. Conclusion: Our protocol managed to make flaps with a B/A ratio of 0.5–0.7, and the flaps were divided at 7 to 14 days after surgery, the timing of which was much earlier than in the conventional method, lessening the possibility of complications. PMID:27200257

  8. Use of the serratus anterior free flap to treat a recurrent oroantral fistula.

    PubMed

    Deune, E Gene; Manson, Paul N

    2004-03-01

    We describe the successful use of the serratus anterior free muscle flap to obliterate a recurrent oroantral fistula in a 39-year old male who 19 years before this surgery had sustained a high velocity impact to his right face with multiple subsequent corrective surgeries. There was no complication from the serratus anterior free flap surgery and no postoperative scapular winging. The serratus anterior muscle is a versatile flap and ideal for various defects. It should be considered for obliteration of oroantral fistulas when no local or regional tissue is available because of previous surgery or trauma. PMID:15167258

  9. Total lower eyelid reconstruction with superficial temporal fascia flap and porous polyethylene implant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ismail; Aykan, Andac; Acikel, Cengiz; Alhan, Dogan; Isik, Selcuk

    2012-01-01

    Total reconstruction of the eyelid after serious periorbital injury is a challenging procedure for plastic and reconstructive surgery. Although several methods have been used for reconstructing the eyelids, such as advancement flap with fascia lata sling, island mucochrondrocutaneous flap, prefabricated temporal island flap, porous polyethylene and superficial temporal fascia flap, creating a supportive eyelid for housing an artificial eye without complication is still an ongoing problem. In the case presented, superficial temporal fascia flap with porous polyethylene was used for the reconstruction of total lower eyelid. PMID:21778127

  10. [Elimination of isolated gingival atrophy by laterally positioned flap and free mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap].

    PubMed

    Kovaćević, K; Leković, V

    1991-01-01

    Mucogingival surgical procedures such as laterally (horizontally) positioned flap, double papillae positioned flap and free mucogingival autografts have been recommended for the prevention and treatment of isolated gingival atrophy. These procedures can bi performed either independently or in combination with coronally positioned flap. In our study, for covering of exposed tooth roots, we applied laterally positioned flap and free mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap. The obtained therapeutic results showed that six months after the surgery the exposure of tooth necks in patients treated by laterally positioned flap, decreased by 2.54 mm. Somewhat better results were obtained in the group of patients treated by fre mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap. Within the same time interval, the total surface area of exposed tooth roots decreased by 59.76% in the group of patients treated by laterally positioned flap, i.e. by 62.25% in the group of patients treated by free mucogingival autografts in combination with coronally positioned flap. PMID:1785128

  11. What Is the Ideal Free Flap for Soft Tissue Reconstruction? A Ten-Year Experience of Microsurgical Reconstruction Using 334 Latissimus Dorsi Flaps From a Universal Donor Site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Seungki; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2015-07-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is regarded as the best available method of tissue reconstruction for intractable defects. The ideal soft tissue flap is thought to be the anterolateral thigh flap. On the basis of 334 procedures involving the latissimus dorsi (LD) flap, we discuss the advantages of the LD flap over the current universal option, and we aimed to establish whether the LD could also gain universal status in all reconstructive fields.Three hundred thirty-four reconstructive procedures using the LD flap were performed in 322 patients between September 2002 and July 2012. In accordance with defect characteristics, we performed 334 procedures using flaps, which included the LD muscle flap with skin graft, the myocutaneous flap, the muscle-sparing flap, the perforator flap, the chimeric flap, and the 2-flap technique using the serratus anterior branch.Flap-related complications occurred in 21 patients (6.3%), including total and partial flap failure. In 253 cases, the donor site was closed primarily, and in the remaining cases, we used split-thickness skin grafts. Donor-site complications occurred in 20 cases (6%). In 11 of the 182 cases, no suitable perforators were identified during surgery.The advantages of the LD as a donor site include the possibility of various harvesting positions without position change, versatility of components, availability of muscle to fill extensive defects, and presence of thick fascia to enable full abdominal reconstruction. On the basis of our experience, we concluded that this flap has the potential to be used as widely as, or in preference to, the anterolateral thigh flap in most reconstructive areas. PMID:25785382

  12. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-03-26

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  13. Traumatic flap dislocation 10 years after LASIK. Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Khoueir, Z; Haddad, N M; Saad, A; Chelala, E; Warrak, E

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of traumatic partial flap dislocation 10 years after uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). The patient was treated bilaterally for hyperopia and astigmatism with LASIK. A superior-hinged corneal flap was created using the Moria M2 microkeratome (Moria SA, Antony, France) and the surgery was uneventful. Ten years later, partial flap dislocation was diagnosed after mild trauma. This case suggests that flap dislocations can occur during recreational activities up to 10 years after surgery. Full visual recovery is achievable if the case is managed promptly. Further studies should evaluate the potential protective role of an inferior hinge during LASIK. PMID:23219507

  14. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  15. Multi-staged flap reconstruction for complex radiation thoracic ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Valença-Filipe, Rita; Horta, Ricardo; Costa, Joana; Carvalho, Jorge; Martins, Apolino; Silva, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chest wall reconstruction due to previous radiation therapy can be challenging and complex, requiring a multidisciplinary approach. PRESENTATION OF CASE The authors present the case of a 84-year-old woman with a right chest wall radionecrosis ulcer, that was submitted to an ablative surgery resulting in a full-thickness defect of 224 cm2, firstly reconstructed with a pedicled omental flap. Due to partial flap necrosis, other debridements and chest wall multi-staged flap reconstruction were performed. DISCUSSION This case highlights that the reconstructive choice should be individualized and dependent on patient and local factors. The authors advise that surgical team should work closely and be well versed in chest wall reconstruction with a variety of pedicled flaps, when a complication occurs. CONCLUSION A multi-staged flap reconstruction could be a salvage procedure for the coverage of complex, great and complicated chest wall defects due to previous radiation therapy. PMID:25437678

  16. Distally Based Abductor Hallucis Adipomuscular Flap for Forefoot Plantar Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanglim; Kim, Min Bom; Lee, Young Ho; Baek, Jeong Kook; Baek, Goo Hyun

    2015-09-01

    Soft tissue and bone defects of the lower leg, ankle, and heel region often require coverage by local or distant flaps. The authors successfully used the distally based adipomuscular abductor hallucis flap for the treatment of 7 patients with soft tissue defect on the plantar forefoot after diabetic ulcer (n = 2), excision of melanoma at the medial forefoot (n = 3), and posttraumatic defects of the plantar forefoot (n = 2). The size of the defects ranged from 6 to 36 cm. All defects were covered successfully without major complications. The distally based adipomuscular flap from the abductor hallucis muscle provides a reliable coverage for small and moderate defects of the plantar and medial forefoot. This flap is often preferable to the use of free flaps because the surgery is rapidly performed and does not require microsurgical expertise. PMID:25565013

  17. Keyhole Flap Nipple Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cash, Camille G.; Iman, Al-Haj; Spiegel, Aldona J.; Cronin, Ernest D.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Nipple-areola reconstruction is often one of the final but most challenging aspects of breast reconstruction. However, it is an integral and important component of breast reconstruction because it transforms the mound into a breast. We performed 133 nipple-areola reconstructions during a period of 4 years. Of these reconstructions, 76 of 133 nipple-areola complexes were reconstructed using the keyhole flap technique. The tissue used for the keyhole dermoadipose flap technique include transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flaps (60/76), latissimus dorsi flaps (15/76), or mastectomy skin flaps after tissue expanders (1/76). The average patient follow-up was 17 months. The design of the flap is based on a keyhole configuration. The base of the flap determines the width of the future nipple, whereas the length of the flap determines the projection. We try to match the projection of the contralateral nipple if present. The keyhole flap is simple to construct yet reliable. It provides good symmetry and projection and avoids the creation of new scars. The areola is then tattooed approximately 3 months after the nipple reconstruction.

  18. Keyhole Flap Nipple Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph I; Cash, Camille G; Iman, Al-Haj; Spiegel, Aldona J; Cronin, Ernest D

    2016-05-01

    Nipple-areola reconstruction is often one of the final but most challenging aspects of breast reconstruction. However, it is an integral and important component of breast reconstruction because it transforms the mound into a breast. We performed 133 nipple-areola reconstructions during a period of 4 years. Of these reconstructions, 76 of 133 nipple-areola complexes were reconstructed using the keyhole flap technique. The tissue used for the keyhole dermoadipose flap technique include transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flaps (60/76), latissimus dorsi flaps (15/76), or mastectomy skin flaps after tissue expanders (1/76). The average patient follow-up was 17 months. The design of the flap is based on a keyhole configuration. The base of the flap determines the width of the future nipple, whereas the length of the flap determines the projection. We try to match the projection of the contralateral nipple if present. The keyhole flap is simple to construct yet reliable. It provides good symmetry and projection and avoids the creation of new scars. The areola is then tattooed approximately 3 months after the nipple reconstruction. PMID:27579228

  19. Development of a Mouse Model of Abdominal Cutaneous Flaps for Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Womac, Daniel John; Palanisamy, Arun Prathap; Eslick, Rene; Schimpf, Dennis Kenneth; Chavin, Kenneth David

    2013-01-01

    Autologous tissue transfer, in addition to replacing tissue that was lost during injury or surgery, offers women an excellent option to improve cosmetic appearance and self-confidence following mastectomy due to breast cancer. However, flap necrosis is a complication in obese patients undergoing this procedure. We created a mouse model to study the flap-related complications that leads to decreased flap survival in autologous breast reconstruction. Methods Left superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) pedicle abdominal-cutaneous flaps were elevated in 8 week-old, obese ob/ob male mice and their lean littermates. Flaps were followed by serial photography. Area of flap necrosis was measured at 7 days. Statistical analysis was performed. Results Necrosis was observed at the distal margin of the flaps, in both lean and obese groups. Lean left SIE flaps (n = 8) had a total area flap necrosis of 9.1% at 7 days whereas obese left SIE flaps (n = 8) had a total area flap necrosis of 45.5% at 7 days. Obese flaps had a statistically significant increase in necrosis compared to the lean flaps, p = 0.001. Conclusions There was a significant difference between flap survival in lean and obese SIE pedicle flaps in our mouse model. We have developed the first flap model of obesity utilizing the superficial epigastric pedicle in the mouse. This model is optimal for future studies to dissect out mechanisms that lead to the complications related to flap survival for breast reconstruction, especially in obese subjects. PMID:23308122

  20. The Modified 3-square Flap Method for Reconstruction of Toe Syndactyly

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    Bandoh reported the 3-square-flap method as a procedure for interdigital space reconstruction in patients with minor syndactyly. We recently modified this flap design so that it could be used in the treatment of toe syndactyly involving fusion of the areas distal to the proximal interphalangeal joint. With our method, the reconstructed interdigital space consists of 4 oblong flaps (A through D). Flaps A and D are designed on the dorsal side, flap B is designed on the frontal plane of the interdigital space, and flap C is designed on the plantar side. Flaps A, B, and C are raised immediately below the dermis in a manner that allowed slight fat tissue to adhere to each flap. Flap D is freed to a degree minimally needed for dislocation, while leaving a thick subcutaneous pedicle. Flaps A, B, and C are each folded in 90 degrees; flap D is dislocated to the proximal plane of the reconstructed digit, followed by skin suturing. In this process, suturing is avoided between flaps A and C, between flaps A and D, and between flaps B and D. During the period of 2011 to 2015, we treated 8 patients of toe syndactyly involving fusion distal to the proximal interphalangeal joint. Cases of congenital syndactyly received surgery between the ages of 8 and 11 months. Using this technique, flap ischemia/necrosis was not observed. During the postoperative follow-up period, the interdigital space retained sufficient depth without developing any scar contracture. No case required additional surgery. PMID:27536472

  1. The Modified 3-square Flap Method for Reconstruction of Toe Syndactyly.

    PubMed

    Iida, Naoshige; Watanabe, Ayako

    2016-07-01

    Bandoh reported the 3-square-flap method as a procedure for interdigital space reconstruction in patients with minor syndactyly. We recently modified this flap design so that it could be used in the treatment of toe syndactyly involving fusion of the areas distal to the proximal interphalangeal joint. With our method, the reconstructed interdigital space consists of 4 oblong flaps (A through D). Flaps A and D are designed on the dorsal side, flap B is designed on the frontal plane of the interdigital space, and flap C is designed on the plantar side. Flaps A, B, and C are raised immediately below the dermis in a manner that allowed slight fat tissue to adhere to each flap. Flap D is freed to a degree minimally needed for dislocation, while leaving a thick subcutaneous pedicle. Flaps A, B, and C are each folded in 90 degrees; flap D is dislocated to the proximal plane of the reconstructed digit, followed by skin suturing. In this process, suturing is avoided between flaps A and C, between flaps A and D, and between flaps B and D. During the period of 2011 to 2015, we treated 8 patients of toe syndactyly involving fusion distal to the proximal interphalangeal joint. Cases of congenital syndactyly received surgery between the ages of 8 and 11 months. Using this technique, flap ischemia/necrosis was not observed. During the postoperative follow-up period, the interdigital space retained sufficient depth without developing any scar contracture. No case required additional surgery. PMID:27536472

  2. Extracorporeal Free Flap Perfusion in Case of Prolonged Ischemia Time

    PubMed Central

    Präbst, K.; Beier, J. P.; Meyer, A.; Horch, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: In free flap surgery, a clinically established concept still has to be found for the reduction of ischemia-related cell damage in the case of prolonged ischemia. Although promising results using extracorporeal free flap perfusion in the laboratory have been published in the past, until now this concept has not yet paved its way into clinical routine. This might be due to the complexity of perfusion systems and a lack of standardized tools. Here, we want to present the results of the first extracorporeal free flap perfusion in a clinical setting using a simple approach without the application of a complex perfusion machinery. PMID:27200244

  3. High-energy war wounds: flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stanec, Z; Skrbić, S; Dzepina, I; Hulina, D; Ivrlac, R; Unusić, J; Montani, D; Prpić, I

    1993-08-01

    In this article, we emphasize that knowledge of terminal ballistics is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of war wounds. We present our own experiences in treatment of high-energy war wounds in 75 patients treated in the Institute of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Clinical Hospital Center in Zagreb. Patients were divided into three groups with regard to the time of definite reconstruction, using local or free microvascular flaps. About 12% of patients underwent flap reconstruction in the acute phase, associated with low complication rate and the shortest hospital stay. Group II was comprised by 18% of the patients and, considering the number of complications, presented the most unfavorable time for reconstruction. Flap reconstruction in the chronic phase resulted in a substantial prolongation of the hospital stay in 82% of patients. Therefore, we advocate proper primary treatment of wounds aimed at early flap closure. This type of management results in a significantly shorter hospitalization and leads to more effective rehabilitation and recovery of patients. PMID:8215140

  4. Identification of independent risk factors for flap failure: A retrospective analysis of 1530 free flaps for breast, head and neck and extremity reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Las, David E; de Jong, Tim; Zuidam, J Michiel; Verweij, Norbert M; Hovius, Steven E R; Mureau, Marc A M

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructive microsurgery is a powerful method of treating various complex defects. However, flap loss remains a possibility, leading to additional surgery, hospitalisation and costs. Consequently, it is important to know which factors lead to an increased risk of flap failure, so that measures can be undertaken to reduce this risk. Therefore, we analysed our results over a 20-year period to identify risk factors for flap failure after breast, head and neck and extremity reconstruction. The medical files of all patients treated between 1992 and 2012 were reviewed. Patient characteristics, surgical data and post-operative complications were scored, and independent risk factors for flap loss were identified. Reconstruction with a total of 1530 free flaps was performed in 1247 patients. Partial and total flap loss occurred in 5.5% and 4.4% of all free flaps, respectively. In all flaps, signs of compromised flap circulation were a risk factor for flap failure. More specifically, the risk factors for flap failure in breast reconstruction were previous radiotherapy, venous anastomosis revision, gluteal artery perforator (GAP) flap choice and post-operative bleeding. In head and neck reconstruction, pulmonary co-morbidity and anastomosis to the lingual vein or superficial temporal artery were risk factors, whereas a radial forearm flap reduced the risk. In extremity reconstruction, diabetes, prolonged anaesthesia time and post-operative wound infection were risk factors. Independent pre-, intra- and post-operative risk factors for flap failure after microvascular breast, head and neck and extremity reconstruction were identified. These results may be used to improve patient counselling and to adjust treatment algorithms to further reduce the chance of flap failure. PMID:26980600

  5. Enhancement of flap survival and changes in angiogenic gene expression after AAV2-mediated VEGF gene transfer to rat ischemic flaps.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao Tian; Avanessian, Bella; Ma, Qiangzhong; Durfee, Heather; Tang, Yu Qing; Liu, Paul Y

    2011-01-01

    Necrosis of surgically transferred flaps due to ischemia is a serious wound problem. We evaluated the improvement of flap survival and changes in angiogenic gene expression profiles after transfer of the VEGF gene by means of adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) vector to rat ischemic flaps. Thirty rats were divided into one experimental group, one AAV2-GFP group, and one saline group. AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-GFP were injected intradermally into the rat dorsum in the AAV2-VEGF or AAV2-GFP group. The saline group received saline injection. A 3 × 10 cm flap was raised in each rat two weeks post-injection. One week after surgery, flap viability was evaluated. Angiogenesis real-time PCR array was performed to analyze the expression of angiogenesis-associated genes. The AAV2-VEGF treatment significantly improved flap survival (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical staining showed increased VEGF expression in AAV2-VEGF treated flaps. The PCR array identified remarkable changes in 6 out of the 84 angiogenesis-associated genes in AAV2-VEGF treated flaps. Particularly, EGF, PDGF-A and VEGF-B genes were up-regulated in these flaps. In contrast, FGF2 gene expression was down-regulated. In conclusion, AAV2-VEGF improves flap survival and affects the expression of a series of endogenous growth factor genes, which likely play critical roles in the enhancement of ischemic flap survival. PMID:21649787

  6. My First 100 Consecutive Microvascular Free Flaps: Pearls and Lessons Learned in First Year of Practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Microvascular reconstruction for oncologic defects is a challenging and rewarding endeavor, and successful outcomes are dependent on a multitude of factors. This study represents lessons learned from a personal prospective experience with 100 consecutive free flaps. Methods: All patients’ medical records were reviewed for demographics, operative notes, and complications. Results: Overall 100 flaps were performed in 84 consecutive patients for reconstruction of breast, head and neck, trunk, and extremity defects. Nineteen patients underwent free flap breast reconstruction with 10 patients undergoing bilateral reconstruction and 2 patients receiving a bipedicle flap for reconstruction of a unilateral breast defect. Sixty-five free flaps were performed in 61 patients with 3 patients receiving 2 free flaps for reconstruction of extensive head and neck defects and 1 patient who required a second flap for partial flap loss. Trunk and extremity reconstruction was less common with 2 free flaps performed in each group. Overall, 19 patients (22.6%) developed complications and 14 required a return to the operating room. There were no flap losses in this cohort. Thorough preoperative evaluation and workup, meticulous surgical technique and intraoperative planning, and diligent postoperative monitoring and prompt intervention are critical for flap success. Conclusions: As a young plastic surgeon embarking in reconstructive plastic surgery at an academic institution, the challenges and dilemmas presented in the first year of practice have been daunting but also represent opportunities for learning and improvement. Skills and knowledge acquired from time, experience, and mentors are invaluable in optimizing outcomes in microvascular free flap reconstruction. PMID:25289221

  7. [Experience with the s-GAP flap for autologous breast reconstruction].

    PubMed

    Werdin, F; Peek, A; Schuster, H; Baumeister, S

    2008-08-01

    In breast reconstruction with autologous tissue the DIEP flap has become the gold standard in recent years. The superior gluteal artery perforator (s-GAP) flap is an alternative harvested from the buttock. We present our experience with the s-GAP flap and discuss its role in breast reconstruction. All s-GAP flaps performed for breast reconstruction in the Department of Plastic and Hand Surgery, Behandlungszentrum Vogtareuth from June 2002 until February 2007 were retrospectively analysed. Out of 59 flaps 4 flaps failed, the success rate was 94 %. Partial or fat necrosis occurred in 2 cases. The s-GAP flap served as a safe reconstructive alternative to the DIEP flap. Advantages of the s-GAP flap are reliable perforators, the safe vascular supply and the firm fat structure which facilitates the breast reconstruction. The donor site morbidity is minimal, the gluteal muscles stay intact and the scar is easy to hide in the underwear. Disadvantages are a demanding preparation with a prolonged operating time compared to the DIEP flap. The s-GAP flap is a reliable and safe option for autologeous breast reconstruction. It is the method of choice for staged bilateral breast reconstruction or if the DIEP flap is not available, particularly in the thin patient. PMID:18716984

  8. Two-Stage Mucogingival Surgery with Free Gingival Autograft and Biomend Membrane and Coronally Advanced Flap in Treatment of Class III Millers Recession.

    PubMed

    Rath, Avita; Varma, Smrithi; Paul, Renny

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Gingival recession is an apical shift of the gingival margin with exposure of the root surface. This migration of the marginal tissue leads to esthetic concerns, dentin hypersensitivity, root caries, and cervical wear. It is, paradoxically, a common finding in patients with a high standard of oral hygiene, as well as in periodontally untreated populations with poor oral hygiene. Changing the topography of the marginal soft tissue in order to facilitate plaque control is a common indication for root coverage procedures and forms a major aspect of periodontal plastic surgeries. The regeneration of a new connective tissue attachment to denuded root surface is by allowing the selective coronal regrowth of periodontal ligament cells while excluding the gingival tissues from the root during wound healing by means of a barrier membrane. Case Presentation. This case reports a two-stage surgical technique for treatment of Miller's class III defect using free gingival autograft and type I absorbable collagen membrane (BioMend®, Zimmer Dental, USA)(§). Conclusions. The 6-month follow-up of the case showed a significant increase in attached gingiva suggesting it as a predictable alternative in the treatment of Millers class III defects. PMID:27525131

  9. Two-Stage Mucogingival Surgery with Free Gingival Autograft and Biomend Membrane and Coronally Advanced Flap in Treatment of Class III Millers Recession

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Renny

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Gingival recession is an apical shift of the gingival margin with exposure of the root surface. This migration of the marginal tissue leads to esthetic concerns, dentin hypersensitivity, root caries, and cervical wear. It is, paradoxically, a common finding in patients with a high standard of oral hygiene, as well as in periodontally untreated populations with poor oral hygiene. Changing the topography of the marginal soft tissue in order to facilitate plaque control is a common indication for root coverage procedures and forms a major aspect of periodontal plastic surgeries. The regeneration of a new connective tissue attachment to denuded root surface is by allowing the selective coronal regrowth of periodontal ligament cells while excluding the gingival tissues from the root during wound healing by means of a barrier membrane. Case Presentation. This case reports a two-stage surgical technique for treatment of Miller's class III defect using free gingival autograft and type I absorbable collagen membrane (BioMend®, Zimmer Dental, USA)§. Conclusions. The 6-month follow-up of the case showed a significant increase in attached gingiva suggesting it as a predictable alternative in the treatment of Millers class III defects. PMID:27525131

  10. Free craniotomy versus osteoplastic craniotomy, assessment of flap viability using 99mTC MDP SPECT.

    PubMed

    Shelef, Ilan; Golan, Haim; Merkin, Vladimir; Melamed, Israel; Benifla, Mony

    2016-09-01

    There are currently two accepted neurosurgical methods to perform a bony flap. In an osteoplastic flap, the flap is attached to surrounding muscle. In a free flap, the flap is not attached to adjacent tissues. The former is less common due to its complexity and the extensive time required for the surgery; yet the rate of infection is significantly lower, a clear explanation for which is unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the osteoplastic flap acts as a live implant that resumes its blood flow and metabolic activity; contrasting with the free flap, which does not have sufficient blood flow, and therefore acts as a foreign body. Seven patients who underwent craniotomy with osteoplastic flaps and five with free flaps had planar bone and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans of the skull at 3-7days postoperative, after injection of the radioisotope, 99m-technetium-methylene diphosphonate (99m-Tc-MDP). We compared radioactive uptake as a measure of metabolic activity between osteoplastic and free flaps. Mean normalized radioactive uptakes in the centers of the flaps, calculated as the ratios of uptakes in the flap centers to uptakes in normal contralateral bone, were [mean: 1.7 (SD: 0.8)] and [0.6 (0.1)] for the osteoplastic and free flap groups respectively and were [2.4 (0.8)] and [1.3 (0.4)] in the borders of the flaps. Our analyses suggest that in craniotomy, the use of an osteoplastic flap, in contrast to free flap, retains bone viability. PMID:27068014

  11. Heterogeneity of Nasolabial Flap- Role in Prevention of Morbidity Associated with Reconstruction of Orofacial Defects.

    PubMed

    Abida, Roshni; Ayyallil, Muhamed Sajid

    2015-09-01

    Reconstructive technique after surgical excision of malignancy in orofacial region should be planned in preoperative period itself. Surgery is the preferred modality of treatment if the tumour is small and located in an accessible area. Nasolabial flap is a versatile flap which is well suited to cover small defects in maxillofacial region. Nasolabial flap can be used as an alternative to other distant pedicled flaps in selected cases. A retrospective analysis of 12 cases of oral cancer treated with primary excision and reconstruction using nasolabial flap was done. Patients who underwent resection of tumour and reconstruction with nasolabial flap in selected cases reduced the morbidity associated with Distant pedicled flaps. Two selected cases are described in detail. PMID:26501027

  12. Superior gluteal artery perforator flap in bilateral breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Werdin, Frank; Peek, Alberto; Martin, Nicolas C S; Baumeister, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of bilateral breast reconstruction is increasing particularly due to genetic counseling and the option for bilateral prophylactic mastectomies. The decision to undergo a prophylactic mastectomy depends on the achievable outcomes of breast reconstruction. The free superior gluteal artery perforator flap (sGAP) flap is one option for autologous bilateral reconstruction which has rarely been reported.All bilateral sGAP flaps performed in the department of plastic surgery at the Behandlungszentrum Vogtareuth over a period of 4.5 years were retrospectively analyzed for indication, success rate, and complications.Thirty sGAP flaps were performed for bilateral breast reconstruction. The average age of the 15 women was 42 years and the average body mass index was 20.8. Indications for breast reconstruction were predominantly prophylactic mastectomies (60%). Indication for a sGAP flap was either a thin patient with insufficient abdominal tissue or a 2-staged bilateral reconstruction. 83% of the breast reconstructions were performed secondarily and 93% in 2 stages. The average operating time was 7 hours 12 minutes. Twenty-nine flaps (97%) were successful. Complications were fat necrosis (n = 3), hematoma (n = 3), and breast seroma (n = 1). Donor site complications were seroma (n = 8), infection (n = 1), and wound dehiscence (n = 1).Our results with bilateral breast reconstruction with the sGAP flap show cosmetically appealing results with high success and low complication rates on the breast. However, seromas on the donor site occurred in 27%. In addition, the sGAP flap is a technically demanding and time consuming operation. We recommend the sGAP flap when the abdomen has not enough tissue bulk to perform a deep inferior epigastric perforator flap or for a 2-staged bilateral reconstruction. This is often the case in women with a hereditary high risk of breast cancer who often present as young and slim patients. PMID:20010408

  13. Free style perforator based propeller flaps: Simple solutions for upper extremity reconstruction!

    PubMed Central

    Panse, Nikhil; Sahasrabudhe, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Background: The introduction of perforator flaps by Koshima et al. was met with much animosity in the plastic surgery fraternity. The safety concerns of these flaps following the intentional twist of the perforators have prevented widespread adoption of this technique. Use of perforator based propeller flaps in the lower extremity is gradually on the rise, but their use in upper extremity reconstruction is infrequently reported, especially in the Indian subcontinent. Materials and Methods: We present a retrospective series of 63 free style perforator flaps used for soft tissue reconstruction of the upper extremity from November 2008 to June 2013. Flaps were performed by a single surgeon for various locations and indications over the upper extremity. Patient demographics, surgical indication, defect features, complications and clinical outcome are evaluated and presented as an uncontrolled case series. Results: 63 free style perforator based propeller flaps were used for soft tissue reconstruction of 62 patients for the upper extremity from November 2008 to June 2013. Of the 63 flaps, 31 flaps were performed for trauma, 30 for post burn sequel, and two for post snake bite defects. We encountered flap necrosis in 8 flaps, of which there was complete necrosis in 4 flaps, and partial necrosis in four flaps. Of these 8 flaps, 7 needed a secondary procedure, and one healed secondarily. Although we had a failure rate of 12-13%, most of our failures were in the early part of the series indicative of a learning curve associated with the flap. Conclusion: Free style perforator based propeller flaps are a reliable option for coverage of small to moderate sized defects. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic IV. PMID:24987209

  14. Flapping of Insectile Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yangyang; Kanso, Eva

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. Yet the effects of muscle stiffness on the performance of insect wings remain unclear. Here, we construct an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring and submerged in an oscillatory flow. The wing system is free to rotate and flap. We first explore the extent to which the flyer can withstand roll perturbations, then study its flapping behavior and performance as a function of spring stiffness. We find an optimal range of spring stiffness that results in large flapping amplitudes, high force generation and good storage of elastic energy. We conclude by conjecturing that insects may select and adjust the muscle spring stiffness to achieve desired movement. These findings may have significant implications on the design principles of wings in micro air-vehicles.

  15. Oral reconstruction with submental flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Submental flap is a useful technique for reconstruction of medium to large oral cavity defects. Hair bearing nature of this flap in men makes it less appropriate. Therefore, deepithelialized variant is introduced to overcome the problem of hair with this flap. Recently, application of this flap has been introduced in maxillofacial trauma patients. Materials and Methods: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is used for the reconstruction of oral cavity mucosal defects. Results: Four cases including two trauma patients and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of oral cavity were treated using deepithelialized orthograde submental flap. There were no complications in all four patients and secondary epithelialization occurred in raw surface of the flap which was exposed to oral cavity. Conclusion: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is very effective in reconstruction of oral cavity in men. The problem of hair is readily solved using this technique without jeopardizing flap blood supply. PMID:24205473

  16. Predictive Capability of Near-Infrared Fluorescence Angiography in Submental Perforator Flap Survival

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Aya; Lee, Bernard T.; Winer, Joshua H.; Laurence, Rita G.; Frangioni, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Background Perforator flaps have become increasingly popular in reconstructive surgery as patients experience less donor-site morbidity than with conventional musculocutaneous flaps. Previously, our laboratory described the intraoperative use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence angiography for patient-specific perforator-flap design. This study evaluates the predictive capability of NIR fluorescence angiography for flap survival in submental flap reconstruction. Methods NIR angiography was performed using indocyanine green at 0, 0.5, 24, 48, and 72 h post-surgery after flap creation in 12 pigs. A single perforator artery was preserved during flap creation based on location (central or non-central) and dominance (dominant or non-dominant). Venous drainage, arterial perfusion, and perfused area as percentage of total flap were analyzed. Clinical assessments of perfusion were compared with those made using NIR imaging and histology. Results Use of NIR fluorescence angiography immediately after flap creation accurately predicted areas of perfusion at 72 h (p = 0.0013), compared to the initial clinical assessment (p = 0.3085). Identification of necrosis by histology at 72 h correlated with NIR findings of insufficient arterial perfusion immediately after flap creation. No statistically significant differences in perfusion metrics were detected based on location or dominance of the preserved perforator; however, flaps containing central perforators had a higher percent perfused area than those with non-central perforators. Conclusions The use of NIR angiography immediately after flap creation can predict areas of perfusion at 72 h. This predictive capability may permit intraoperative revision of compromised flaps that have a high likelihood of failure. PMID:21042109

  17. Control of Flap Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  18. The revascularization of pedicle skin flaps in pigs: a functional and morphologic study

    SciTech Connect

    Young, C.M.

    1982-10-01

    Functional and morphologic changes occurring during the revascularization of pedicle flaps have been investigated in the skin of pigs. The skin flaps, 16 cm long by 4 cm wide, were based on a row of segmental vessels arising from the internal mammary artery. Comparative measurements were made in flapped and normal skin. The inherent blood supply in the pedicle of the flap was unable to maintain the whole of the flap in a viable state. Flap viability was ascertained at surgery by the use of the intravital dye Disulphine blue. Injections of the dye after surgery gave a less accurate prediction of viability than when dye was injected prior to surgery. Revascularization between the flap and surrounding skin was evident 3 to 4 days postoperatively at the distal, most hypoxic part of the viable flap. The whole flap had a collateral vascular supply 7 to 10 days after surgery. Isotope clearance studies showed that the greatest functional changes occurred in the distal third of the viable flap, where, after initially slowing, the clearance rate became faster than in normal skin (day 5). Potassium extraction studies indicated similar changes. However, an increase in the red-cell volume on day 1 suggested that vascular shunting was occurring. The results of the morphologic studies indicated a correlation between the number of blood vessels per unit area, the thickness of the dermis, and the recorded functional changes. Seven days after surgery, when isotope clearance rates were very rapid, there was a significant increase in the vascular density and dermal thickness.

  19. [Tumor surgery].

    PubMed

    Hausamen, J E

    2000-05-01

    Surgery is still the primary therapeutic approach in treatment of tumors in the head and neck area, dating back to the early nineteenth century. More than 150 years ago, hemimaxillectomies and mandibular resections as well as hemiglossectomies were already performed by leading surgeons. The block principle we are now following dates back to Crile, who also established the principle of cervical lymph node dissection. Ablative oncologic surgery has always been closely linked with plastic and reconstructive surgery, rendering radical surgical interventions possible without disfiguring patients. The development of facial reconstructive surgery proceeded in stages, in the first instance as secondary reconstruction using tube pedicled flaps. The change to the concept of primary reconstruction occurred via arterialized skin flaps and myocutaneous flaps to the widely accepted and performed free tissue transfer. Free bone grafting, inaugurated earlier and still representing the majority of bone grafting, has been supplemented for certain reconstructive purposes by free vascularized bone transfer from various donor sites. Although the five-year-survival rate of carcinoma of the oral cavity has remained unchanged in the past 30 years, distinctive improvements in tumor surgery can be recorded. This is primarily based on improved diagnostics such as modern imaging techniques and the refinement of surgical techniques. The DOSAK has worked out distinctive guidelines for effective ablative oncologic surgery. Surgical approaches offering wide exposure and carrying low morbidity play a decisive role in radical resections. For this reason, midfacial degloving offers an essential improvement for the resection of midface tumors, especially from an aesthetic point of view. Tumors situated deep behind the viscerocranium at the skull base can be clearly exposed either through a lateral approach following a temporary osteotomy of the mandibular ramus or a transmandibular, transmaxillar, or

  20. Management of different kinds of head and neck defects with the submental flap for reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chun; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Lai, Wen-Sen; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Lee, Jih-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck surgeries often accompany with moderate-sized defects that require time-consuming reconstructions by free flaps. The submental flap is a versatile and time-effective option for reconstruction of orofacial defects providing acceptable cosmetic and functional results without requiring microsurgical techniques. A retrospective case series study of patients who underwent reconstruction with the submental flap between 2009 and 2013 was conducted. There were 36 patients (33 men and 3 women), with a mean age of 56.4 years, enrolled in this study. The primary lesion sites included oral cavity (24 patients), pharynx (8 patients), larynx (2 patients), neck (1 patient) as well as maxillary sinus (1 patient). All flaps were harvested as the myocutaneous flaps. All donor sites were closed primarily without the need of additional surgery. No complete loss of the flap was encountered and two cases developed marginal necrosis of the flap. The submental flap had a reliable pedicle and had minimal donor-site morbidity. It is an excellent flap option for patients with small- to medium-sized defects in head and neck region. PMID:25542248

  1. Blowing Flap Experiment: PIV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Bremmer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the flap vortex system. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  2. Microvascular medial femoral condylar flaps in 107 consecutive reconstructions in the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Brandtner, Christian; Hachleitner, Johannes; Bottini, Gian Battista; Buerger, Heinz; Gaggl, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    We have assessed the role of the medial femoral condylar flap in 107 patients who had reconstructions of the head and neck. We retrospectively reviewed their medical records for indications, complications, and outcomes. The flap was primarily used for coverage of alveolar ridge defects (n=67), secondly for defects of the facial bone, calvaria, or skull base (n=35), and thirdly for partial laryngeal defects (n=5). Two flaps were lost. One patient fractured a femur 5 weeks postoperatively. The duration of follow up ranged from 6 months to 12 years. The medial femoral condylar flap is well-suited to individual reconstructions of the alveolar ridge, midface, calvaria, skull base, and part of the larynx with poor recipient sites. The flap does not replace other wellknown flaps, but offers new solutions for solving special problems in head and neck surgery. PMID:27020752

  3. Externally blown flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Tests of the noise produced by the impingement of the jet exhaust on the wing and flap for an externally blown flap system were conducted with a CF700 turbofan engine and an F-111B wing panel. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The presence of the wing next to the test nozzles increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection angle. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested. Tests showed that the single-slotted flap deflected 60 deg, produced less noise than the double-slotted flaps. Also, maintaining the maximum distance between the exit nozzle and flap system resulted in a minor reduction in noise.

  4. The median forehead flap reviewed: a histologic study on vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Skaria, A M

    2015-05-01

    Local skin flaps can be divided into two types: random flaps and axial flaps. An axial flap is defined as a flap containing a named artery in its pedicle. For the paramedian forehead flap (PMFF) a lot of surgeons insist on the point that the pedicle must contain the supratrochlear artery. To demonstrate that median forehead flaps (MFF) need not contain a named artery, we selected first 8 patients with a PMFF and further 12 patients who had undergone reconstructive surgery using a MFF. After division, we analysed the pedicle of the flap histologically and measured the diameter of the arteries or arterioles and compared them to anatomical descriptions of the frontal arteries. In none of the 12 cases could we find a functional artery of approximately 1 mm in diameter that could correspond to the supratrochlear artery. The MFF is an axial flap but not in accordance with the current definition of this term. In contrast to published literature, we show that only in a part of cases a named artery was present in the pedicle. Despite this fact, the MFF is a secure flap for full thickness defect repair on the nose. PMID:24756613

  5. Changes of perfusion of microvascular free flaps in the head and neck: a prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Thomas; Rau, Andrea; Merezas, Andreas; Kanatas, Anastasios; Mitchell, David A; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Steiner, Timm

    2014-11-01

    Reconstruction with a free flap is routine in head and neck surgery. However, reliable assessment of perfusion can be difficult, so we prospectively evaluated it in 4 types of microvascular free flaps in the oral cavity (n=196) and assessed differences in blood flow by non-invasive monitoring with a laser Doppler flowmetry unit. We measured oxygen saturation, haemoglobin concentration, and velocity on the surface of the flap preoperatively at the donor site, and on the flap on the first, second, and seventh postoperative days, and after 4 weeks in 186/196 patients, mean (SD) age of 60 (13) years. We studied the radial forearm (n=76, 41%), fibular (n=45, 24%), anterolateral thigh (n=53, 28%), and soleus perforator (n=12, 7%) flaps. The values for the radial forearm flap differed significantly from the others. There were significant differences in haemoglobin concentrations between the fibular and soleus perforator flaps, and between the anterolateral thigh and soleus perforator flaps (p=0.002 each). Free flaps are unique in the way that perfusion develops after microvascular anastomoses. Knowledge of how each flap is perfused may indicate different patterns of healing that could potentially influence long term rehabilitation and detection of future deficits in perfusion. PMID:25149324

  6. Recent advances for FLAP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Daniel; Davidsson, Öjvind; Whatling, Carl

    2015-07-01

    A number of FLAP inhibitors have been progressed to clinical trials for respiratory and other inflammatory indications but so far no drug has reached the market. With this Digest we assess the opportunity to develop FLAP inhibitors for indications beyond respiratory disease, and in particular for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. We also show how recently disclosed FLAP inhibitors have structurally evolved from the first generation FLAP inhibitors paving the way for new compound classes. PMID:26004579

  7. 7-flap perineal urethrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Daniel C.; Morey, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Perineal urethrostomy (PU) has been performed with success for the treatment of refractory and advanced urethral stricture disease for at least the past six decades. Here, we review the indications and outcomes of PU for indications such as complex hypospadias repair and urethral stricture disease resulting from trauma, infection, and failure of prior urethroplasty. We also describe the role of 7-flap PU, a novel alternative to the conventional approach that offers the surgeon added flexibility in tailoring urethrostomy creation based on intraoperative findings. The authors’ updated experience with 7-flap PU demonstrates a comparable 95% success rate in patients with a wide variety of stricture etiology. PU through either a conventional approach or a 7-flap technique is a valuable option for improving the quality of life in patients with debilitating urethral stricture disease. PMID:26816809

  8. Externally blown flap impingement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of externally blown flap impingement noise was conducted using a full-scale turbofan engine and aircraft wing. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine exhaust system was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The daisy nozzle caused the jet velocity to decay about 35 percent at the flap. The presence of the wing next to the conical nozzle increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested.

  9. Noise Reduction of Aircraft Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V. (Inventor); Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A reduction in noise radiating from a side of a deployed aircraft flap is achieved by locating a slot adjacent the side of the flap, and then forcing air out through the slot with a suitable mechanism. One, two or even three or more slots are possible, where the slot is located at one;or more locations selected from a group of locations comprising a top surface of the flap, a bottom surface of the flap, an intersection of the top and side surface of the flap, an intersection of the bottom and side surfaces of the flap, and a side surface of the flap. In at least one embodiment the slot is substantially rectangular. A device for adjusting a rate of the air forced out through the slot can also be provided.

  10. [Reconstruction of the thumb using a forearm osseofasciocutaneous reverse flap].

    PubMed

    Jevtović, Dobrica; Dordević, Boban; Gacević, Milomir; Sijan, Goran

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents the experiences of the thumb reconstruction with osteofasciocutaneous reverse flap (OFCR flap). In the period between 1987 and 2000 the OFCR flap was used in 15 patients. The youngest of them was 18 and the oldest was 38 years of age. The average age was 25.4. All the patients had posttraumatic amputations. Defects on proximal phalangae and a part of metacarpal bone occurred in two cases. In one case there was an amputation on the base level of proximal phalanx and the metacarpophalangeal (MPH) joint was preserved. In all cases of reconstruction the OFCR flap was used, which included antebrachial skin nervs that were anastomosed with digital nerv. The flap nutrition was carried out through the reverse circulation of a. radialis, and the venous drainage through the comitant vein of a. radialis. Superficial veins were not anastomosed. Secondary defects were covered with a free skin graft. All the flaps survived. The bone graft was healed in the period of eight weeks. The sensibility of this flap was regained in the period of three to six months after the surgery. The distance of two-point discrimination (TPD) was increased for 30% compared to the same region on the other hand after six months. The opposition of the reconstructed thumb to the other fingers was possible, as well as abduction, adduction and normal grasp. The method of reconstruction of the amputated thumb with the OFCR flap was better than other classical methods because it allowed the reconstruction of all the structures in one surgical operation. The sensibility that was regained represented good protection from injuries. There were no functional damages on the secondary defect. The esthetic result was not good due to the lack of a fingernail. PMID:12557617

  11. Reconstruction of Female Urethra with Tubularized Anterior Vaginal Flap

    PubMed Central

    Sawant, Ajit; Kumar, Vikash; Pawar, Prakash; Tamhankar, Ashwin; Bansal, Sumit; Kapadnis, Lomesh; Savalia, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Female urethral injury is a rare disease. Causes of urethral injuries are prolonged obstructed labour, gynaecological surgeries like vaginoplasty and post traumatic urethral injuries. The present study was conducted to evaluate outcome of female urethral reconstruction using tubularized anterior vaginal wall flap covered with fibroadipose martius flap and autologous fascia sling in patients with urethral loss. Aim Aim of study was to evaluate outcome of reconstruction of female urethra with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Materials and Methods Retrospective analysis of all the patients with complete urethral loss was done from August 2008 to July 2015. Total seven patients were included in study. All patients presenting with total urethral loss were included. These patients were treated with tubularized anterior vaginal flap. Neourethra was covered with Martius labial flap and autologous fascia lata or rectus abdominis fascia sling. Most common cause of urethral loss was obstructed labour (57.1%). Postoperatively patients were assessed for continence, urine flow rate, ultrasound for upper urinary tract and post void residue. Results Mean operative time was 180 minutes (160-200 minutes) and Intraoperative blood loss was 220ml (170-260 ml). Mean postoperative hospital stay was eight days (seven to nine days) Mean post surgery maximum urine flow rate was more than 15ml/sec (6.7-18.2ml/sec) and mean post void residual urine was 22.5ml (10-50ml). Median follow-up time was 35 months. All patients were catheter free and continent post three weeks of surgery except one patient who developed mild stress urinary incontinence. One patient developed urethral stenosis which was managed by intermittent serial urethral dilatation. Conclusion Female neourethral reconstruction with tabularized anterior vaginal flap and autologous pubovaginal sling is feasible in patients of total urethral loss with success rate of approximately 86%. It should be considered in

  12. The effect of platelet rich plasma on angiogenesis in ischemic flaps in VEGFR2-luc mice.

    PubMed

    Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Vinogradov, Alexandra; Zor, Fatih; Kweider, Nisreen; Lippross, Sebastian; Liehn, Elisa Anamaria; Naziroglu, Mustafa; Hölzle, Frank; Wruck, Christoph; Pufe, Thomas; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh

    2013-04-01

    To improve skin flap healing, one promising strategy in reconstructive surgery might be to optimize platelet rich plasma (PRP) bioactivity and the ischemia-altered expression of genes. We studied both the effect of PRP on ischemic flaps, and whether in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a suitable method for the longitudinal monitoring of angiogenesis in surgical wounds. Axial murine skin flaps were created in four experimental groups. In vivo measurements of VEGFR2 expression levels were made every other day until the 14th day. The local VEGF level and microvessel density were quantified on the 14th day via ELISA and immunohistochemistry, and flap survival rates were measured. We demonstrated that PRP and induced ischemia have a beneficial influence on angiogenesis and flap healing. Combining the two resulted in a significantly robust increase in angiogenesis and flap survival rate that was corroborated by bioluminescence imaging of VEGFR2 activity. This study shows that angiogenic effects of PRP may be potentialized by the stimulus of induced ischemia during free flap harvesting, and thus the two procedures appear to have a synergistic effect on flap healing. This study further demonstrates that BLI of modulated genes in reconstructive surgery is a valuable model for longitudinal in vivo evaluation of angiogenesis. PMID:23352038

  13. The Deltopectoral Flap Revisited: The Internal Mammary Artery Perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Amir; Atiyeh, Bishara; Karami, Reem; Adelman, David M; Papazian, Nazareth J

    2016-03-01

    Pharyngo-esophageal and tracheostomal defects pose a challenge in head and neck reconstruction whenever microanastomosis is extremely difficult in hostile neck that is previously dissected and irradiated. The deltopectoral (DP) flap was initially described as a pedicled flap for such reconstruction with acceptable postoperative results. A major drawback is still that the DP flap is based on 3 perforator vessels leading to a decreased arc of rotation. The DP flap also left contour deformities in the donor site. The internal mammary artery perforator flap was described as a refinement of the deltopectoral flap. It is a pedicled fasciocutaneous flap based on a single perforator, with comparable and reliable blood supply compared with the DP flap, giving it the benefit of having a wide arc of rotation. It is both thin and pliable, with good skin color match and texture. The donor site can be closed primarily with no esthetic deformity and minimal morbidity. The procedure is relatively simple and does not require microvascular expertise. In this report, the authors describe a patient in whom bilateral internal mammary artery perforator flaps were used for subtotal pharyngo-esophageal reconstruction and neck resurfacing. The flaps healed uneventfully bilaterally with no postoperative complications. PMID:26854779

  14. Repeated bevacizumab injections versus mitomycin C in rotational conjunctival flap for prevention of pterygium recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Ozsutcu, Mustafa; Ayintap, Emre; Akkan, Julide C U; Koytak, Arif; Aras, Cengiz

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the efficacy of repeated bevacizumab injection in rotational conjunctival flap surgery versus rotational conjunctival flap with adjunctive mitomycin C (MMC) or rotational conjunctival flap alone. Materials and Methods: Ninety eyes of 90 patients who underwent primary pterygium surgery with rotational flap were evaluated. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo conjunctival rotational flap alone (Group A) or conjunctival rotational flap with either 0.02% MMC application (Group B) or adjunctive subconjunctival 2.5 mg/0.1 ml bevacizumab injection (Group C). Each group consisted of 30 eyes. Recurrence rates at 9 months were evaluated. Results: There were no statistically significant differences in mean size of the pterygium across the limbus in terms of length (P > 0.5). The recurrence rates at 9 months were 26.6% (n = 8) in Group A, 13.3% (n = 4) in Group B, and 10% (n = 3) in Group C. The recurrence rates in Group B and C were significantly lower than in Group A (P =0.1806). The recurrence rates were similar in Group B and C (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Subconjunctival bevacizumab injection may decrease the recurrence rate of primary pterygium surgery with rotational conjunctival flap. Further studies with a larger population and longer follow-up period are needed to supplement this study. PMID:24178405

  15. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shubham; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Agrawal, Rahul; Srivastava, Pratima; Soni, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF). This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth. PMID:26788377

  16. Nasolabial Flap in Maxillofacial Gunshot Trauma: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The nasolabial flap (NLF) has many advantages in oromaxillary reconstruction, but the majority of cases are reconstructions after pathologic resections. Its usage in trauma surgery, especially in the management of gunshot wounds, is rarely mentioned. Case Presentation Three cases involving gunshot injuries to the face are presented: one for reconstruction of the nasal ala, another for bone graft coverage in mandibular reconstruction, and the third for the repair of premaxillary hard and soft tissue avulsive defects. Conclusions The NLF is a thin, pliable flap and is useful for intraoral and facial reconstruction of trauma patients with small to moderate soft tissue loss. PMID:27148497

  17. Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Thoracic Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moya, Alejandro; Segura-Sampedro, Juan J; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Carvajo-Pérez, Francisco; Gómez-Cía, Tomás; Vázquez-Medina, Antonio; Ibáñez-Delgado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is generally the first choice for a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction. Malfunction of this gastric conduit is uncommon, but devastating when it occurs: it causes marked comorbidity to the patient, preventing oral intake and worsening quality of life. Secondary salvage thoracic esophageal reconstruction surgery is usually performed with free or pedicled jejunum flaps or colon interposition. We present a case of a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction with an externally monitored chimeric anterolateral thigh flap, extending from the cervical esophagus to the retrosternal gastroplasty remnant. Intestinal reconstructive techniques were not an available option for this patient. PMID:26694271

  18. Uncommon Flaps for Chest Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Matros, Evan; Disa, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    The omentum, external oblique musculocutaneous, and thoracoepigastric flaps are uncommonly used for chest wall reconstruction. Nevertheless, awareness and knowledge of these flaps is essential for reconstructive surgeons because they fill specific niche indications or serve as lifeboats when workhorse flaps are unavailable. The current report describes the anatomic basis, technical aspects of flap elevation, and indications for these unusual flaps. PMID:22294943

  19. Multipaddled Anterolateral Thigh Chimeric Flap for Reconstruction of Complex Defects in Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ning; Liu, Wen; Su, Tong; Chen, Xinqun; Zheng, Lian; Jian, Xinchun

    2014-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap has been the workhouse flap for coverage of soft-tissue defects in head and neck for decades. However, the reconstruction of multiple and complex soft-tissue defects in head and neck with multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps is still a challenge for reconstructive surgeries. Here, a clinical series of 12 cases is reported in which multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps were used for complex soft-tissue defects with several separately anatomic locations in head and neck. Of the 12 cases, 7 patients presented with trismus were diagnosed as advanced buccal cancer with oral submucous fibrosis, 2 tongue cancer cases were found accompanied with multiple oral mucosa lesions or buccal cancer, and 3 were hypopharyngeal cancer with anterior neck skin invaded. All soft-tissue defects were reconstructed by multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flaps, including 9 tripaddled anterolateral thigh flaps and 3 bipaddled flaps. The mean length of skin paddle was 19.2 (range: 14–23) cm and the mean width was 4.9 (range: 2.5–7) cm. All flaps survived and all donor sites were closed primarily. After a mean follow-up time of 9.1 months, there were no problems with the donor or recipient sites. This study supports that the multipaddled anterolateral thigh chimeric flap is a reliable and good alternative for complex and multiple soft-tissue defects of the head and neck. PMID:25180680

  20. Reconstruction of Heel With Propeller Flap in Postfasciotomy and Popliteal Artery Revascularization State.

    PubMed

    Kang, Jin Seok; Choi, Hwan Jun; Tak, Min Sung

    2016-06-01

    Free flaps are still the gold standard for large defects of the lower limb, but propeller perforator flaps have become a simpler and faster alternative to free flaps because of some advantages such as reliable vascular pedicle, wide mobilization and rotation, great freedom in design, low donor site morbidity, and easy harvest with no requirement for anastomosis. But when the vessels show insufficient findings in preoperative evaluation using a Doppler probe or the vessel is injured, the surgeon should avoid performing free flap surgery to prevent flap failure and should select a propeller perforator flap as an alternative method on the condition that more than one perforator is intact. In this study, we report reconstruction of soft tissue defects of the heel with a pedicled propeller flap in postfasciotomy and popliteal artery revascularization state by making an incision on the central portion above the Achilles tendon, which can be covered by the posterior tibial artery perforator or the peroneal artery perforator based flaps. In conclusion, we showed that although the popliteal artery was injured, the soft tissue defect can be reconstructed using a perforator propeller flap if intact distal flow in the anastomosis site was confirmed. PMID:25673623

  1. A 10-year retrospective study of free anterolateral thigh flap application in 872 head and neck tumour cases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Zhao, X P; Yan, T L; Wang, M; Wang, L; Wu, H J; Shang, Z J

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to report the clinical features, reliability, and various applications of free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps and to provide a 10-year retrospective review of the application of this flap in head and neck tumour patients. A retrospective study was performed of 872 patients who underwent immediate reconstruction of head and neck tumour-induced defects with ALT flaps between April 2005 and April 2014. The study sample consisted of 609 males and 263 females aged 18-79 years. The shapes and sizes of the flaps were designed individually to meet various demands of reconstruction in the head and neck region. The overall rate of successful reconstruction was 97.4%. The reasons for 57 cases of flap compromise were analyzed. The time to detection of flap crisis was often within the first 8h after surgery (64.9%). One- and two-vein anastomosis strategies in microsurgery were compared, and significant differences were observed in terms of the time to detection of flap compromise and the rate of successful flap salvage. In conclusion, the free ALT flap provides unique features for the reconstruction of oral and facial defects in a reliable and versatile approach. The ALT flap is a favourable and versatile 'workhorse' flap for head and neck reconstruction. PMID:26154948

  2. Towards an advanced vortex flap system: The cavity flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    An extension of the vortex flap concept was explored with the aim of providing high-alpha flight control capability coupled with maneuver drag reduction for highly swept wing configurations. A retractable lower surface flap mounted on a translating hinge is proposed, allowing chordwise extension as well as deflection, the two movements being independently controlled. The frontal cavity formed by the partially extended and deflected flap captures a vortex above a certain angle of attack. The cavity vortex downwash alleviates the effective incidence of the wing leading edge, thus modulating vortex lift; at the same time, the induced suction in the cavity generates thrust. These postulated aerodynamic features of the cavity flap were validated through low speed tunnel pressure and visualization tests on a 65 deg swept oblique wing model, which also provided initial trends of the leading edge vortex alleviation and cavity suction with respect to flap extension, deflection and angle of attack. Force tests on a 60 deg delta model further showed the cavity flap L/D performance to compare favorably with the conventional vortex flap. A two segment flap arrangement with independently control led segments was envisaged for exploiting the vortex modulation capability of the cavity flap for pitch, roll and yaw control, in addition to drag reduction at high angles of attack.

  3. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Schonauer, Fabrizio; Marlino, Sergio; Turrà, Francesco; Graziano, Pasquale; Dell'Aversana Orabona, Giovanni

    2014-09-01

    Superficial ulnar artery is a rare finding but shows significant surgical implications. Its thinness and pliability make this flap an excellent solution for soft tissue reconstruction, especially in the head and neck region. We hereby report a successful free superficial ulnar artery perforator forearm flap transfer for tongue reconstruction. A 64-year-old man presenting with a squamous cell carcinoma of the left tongue underwent a wide resection of the tumor, left radical neck dissection, and reconstruction of the tongue and the left tonsillar pillar with the mentioned flap. No complications were observed postoperatively. The flap survived completely; no recurrence at 6 months of follow-up was detected. Superficial ulnar artery perforator flap has shown to be a safe alternative to other free tissue flaps in specific forearm anatomic conditions. PMID:25102397

  4. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  5. Skin flaps and grafts - self-care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Regional flaps - self-care; Distant flaps - self-care; Free flap - self-care; Skin autografting - self-care ... the dressing and area around it clean and free from dirt or sweat. Don't let the ...

  6. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction Using 3-dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Koichi; Yano, Kenji; Hata, Yuki; Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging technologies allow for digital quantification of complex breast tissue. We performed 11 unilateral breast reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps (5 immediate, 6 delayed) using 3D surface imaging for easier surgery planning and 3D-printed molds for shaping the breast neoparenchyma. A single- or double-pedicle flap was preoperatively planned according to the estimated tissue volume required and estimated total flap volume. The DIEP flap was then intraoperatively shaped with a 3D-printed mold that was based on a horizontally inverted shape of the contralateral breast. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as satisfactory, as confirmed by the postoperative 3D measurements of bilateral breasts. We believe that DIEP flap reconstruction assisted with 3D surface imaging and a 3D-printed mold is a simple and quick method for rebuilding a symmetric breast. PMID:25878927

  7. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction Using 3-dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Kenji; Hata, Yuki; Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging technologies allow for digital quantification of complex breast tissue. We performed 11 unilateral breast reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps (5 immediate, 6 delayed) using 3D surface imaging for easier surgery planning and 3D-printed molds for shaping the breast neoparenchyma. A single- or double-pedicle flap was preoperatively planned according to the estimated tissue volume required and estimated total flap volume. The DIEP flap was then intraoperatively shaped with a 3D-printed mold that was based on a horizontally inverted shape of the contralateral breast. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as satisfactory, as confirmed by the postoperative 3D measurements of bilateral breasts. We believe that DIEP flap reconstruction assisted with 3D surface imaging and a 3D-printed mold is a simple and quick method for rebuilding a symmetric breast. PMID:25878927

  8. Externally blown flap noise research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorsch, R. G.

    1974-01-01

    The Lewis Research Center cold-flow model externally blown flap (EBF) noise research test program is summarized. Both engine under-the-wing and over-the-wing EBF wing section configurations were studied. Ten large scale and nineteen small scale EBF models were tested. A limited number of forward airspeed effect and flap noise suppression tests were also run. The key results and conclusions drawn from the flap noise tests are summarized and discussed.

  9. The vortex flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerge, Brandon T.

    The Vortex Flap is a new type of mechanically driven high-lift device consisting of a rotating cylinder placed underneath and near the trailing edge of an airfoil. Wind tunnel tests were designed and conducted in the Washington University Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Wind tunnel tests indicate that the Vortex Flap produces notable lift coefficient increments and increases maximum lift coefficients, particularly for the low Reynolds number range tested. The best configurations of the configurations investigated (not necessarily optimal) produce lift increments of 300-900% at low-to-moderate angles of attack, and increase the maximum lift coefficient on the order of 200%. The large lift increments found, particularly at low angles of attack, underscore the ability to drive the airfoil to high lift coefficients even at low angles of attack, a potentially useful characteristic for certain flight maneuvers. Regions of fairly high L/D (on the order of 10) as well as low L/D performance were identified. The nondimensional cylinder rotation speed was found to be the most important experimental parameter. Methods for correcting wind tunnel data were developed and outlined, and a Response Surface Method was applied to the corrected data for ease of interpretation. Performance comparisons between the Vortex Flap and other trailing-edge high-lift devices are included. To demonstrate the potential of the device, a Navy mission specification for a VTOL ship-borne UAV, currently filled by a rotary-wing aircraft, is analyzed using a hypothetical fixed wing aircraft and the Vortex Flap. It is demonstrated that, under certain reasonable wind-over-deck conditions, such an aircraft could hypothetically fill a VTOL mission.

  10. Flag flapping in a channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alben, Silas; Shoele, Kourosh; Mittal, Rajat; Jha, Sourabh; Glezer, Ari

    2015-11-01

    We study the flapping of a flag in an inviscid channel flow. We focus especially on how quantities vary with channel spacing. As the channel walls move inwards towards the flag, heavier flags become more unstable, while light flags' stability is less affected. We use a vortex sheet model to compute large-amplitude flapping, and find that the flag undergoes a series of jumps to higher flapping modes as the channel walls are moved towards the flag. Meanwhile, the drag on the flag and the energy lost to the wake first rise as the walls become closer, then drop sharply as the flag moves to a higher flapping mode.

  11. The Versatile Modiolus Perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur; Thomsen, Jorn Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Perforator flaps are well established, and their usefulness as freestyle island flaps is recognized. The whereabouts of vascular perforators and classification of perforator flaps in the face are a debated subject, despite several anatomical studies showing similar consistency. In our experience using freestyle facial perforator flaps, we have located areas where perforators are consistently found. This study is focused on a particular perforator lateral to the angle of the mouth; the modiolus and the versatile modiolus perforator flap. Methods: A cohort case series of 14 modiolus perforator flap reconstructions in 14 patients and a color Doppler ultrasonography localization of the modiolus perforator in 10 volunteers. Results: All 14 flaps were successfully used to reconstruct the defects involved, and the location of the perforator was at the level of the modiolus as predicted. The color Doppler ultrasonography study detected a sizeable perforator at the level of the modiolus lateral to the angle of the mouth within a radius of 1 cm. This confirms the anatomical findings of previous authors and indicates that the modiolus perforator is a consistent anatomical finding, and flaps based on it can be recommended for several indications from the reconstruction of defects in the perioral area, cheek and nose. Conclusions: The modiolus is a well-described anatomical area containing a sizeable perforator that is consistently present and readily visualized using color Doppler ultrasonography. We have used the modiolus perforator flap successfully for several indications, and it is our first choice for perioral reconstruction. PMID:27257591

  12. Shape-based 3D vascular tree extraction for perforator flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Quan; Gao, Jean

    2005-04-01

    Perforator flaps have been increasingly used in the past few years for trauma and reconstructive surgical cases. With the thinned perforated flaps, greater survivability and decrease in donor site morbidity have been reported. Knowledge of the 3D vascular tree will provide insight information about the dissection region, vascular territory, and fascia levels. This paper presents a scheme of shape-based 3D vascular tree reconstruction of perforator flaps for plastic surgery planning, which overcomes the deficiencies of current existing shape-based interpolation methods by applying rotation and 3D repairing. The scheme has the ability to restore the broken parts of the perforator vascular tree by using a probability-based adaptive connection point search (PACPS) algorithm with minimum human intervention. The experimental results evaluated by both synthetic and 39 harvested cadaver perforator flaps show the promise and potential of proposed scheme for plastic surgery planning.

  13. [Submental island flap: a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, B; Foletti, J-M; Noël, W; Duron, J-B; Bardot, J

    2015-02-01

    The submental island flap is a precious tool in reconstructive surgery. It was described by Martin in 1993, inspired by platysma flaps. In our days, we can find many reliable techniques for this procedure. We reviewed the main studies of the literature that described a total of 528 patients. The rate of partial necrosis was 5.1%, complete necrosis 1.7%, and reversible lesions of the marginal mandibular branch of the facial nerve 1.1%. His versatility makes this flap appropriate for the reconstruction of every part of the face: cheeks, nose, forehead, moustache, beard, and hairs. It can also be used de-epidermised with very good results, for the reconstruction of the buccal cavity, the tongue, the roof of the mouth, the larynx, and the proximal part of the esophagus. The SMAP (Submentalis Artery Perforator flap) is an alternative flap that provides even better cosmetic results. The development of indocyanine green and infrared cameras will allow in a close future to decrease the postoperative complications. PMID:25213485

  14. Robotic Assisted Implantation of Ventricular Assist Device after Sternectomy & Pectoralis Muscle Flap

    PubMed Central

    Khalpey, Zain; Sydow, Nicole; Paidy, Samata; Slepian, Marvin J.; Friedman, Mark; Cooper, Anthony; Marsh, Katherine M.; Schmitto, Jan D; Poston, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Left ventricular assist devices are increasingly important in the management of advanced heart failure. Most patients who benefit from these devices have had some prior cardiac surgery, making implantation of higher risk. This is especially true in patients who have had prior pectoralis flap reconstruction after sternectomy for mediastinitis. We outline the course of such a patient, in whom the use of robotic assistance allowed for a less invasive device implantation approach with preservation of the flap for transplantation. PMID:25072555

  15. Propeller Flaps and Its Outcomes - A Prospective Study of 15 Cases Over Two-years

    PubMed Central

    K.T., Ramesha; J., Vijay; M., Shankarappa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cover flaps are needed in management of any bodily defect involving bone, tendon, nerve & vessels. The major objective of a plastic surgeon, facing a complex soft-tissue defect, is to replace “like with like” tissues at minimal donor site “cost” and with maximal accuracy & efficacy. Aims: To study the “Propeller Flaps” utility in reconstructive surgeries, evaluate its planning and complications involving donor site morbidity. Methodology: The prospective study was conducted on 15 cases (11 males/4 females) of propeller flaps during the period of two years (2010-12) in Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute (BMCRI), Karnataka, India. The propeller flaps were performed in cases with defects due to any cause. Exclusion criteria: Cases with Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD). Flaps were performed and details recorded. Results: Overall results revealed problem resolution in 87% cases (13 cases). Comprehensive description of each flap type and its related cases are given in the table. It has been categorically found that there were 2 flap partial losses. Partial necrosis has been reported in heavy-smoker patients. Conclusion: This current study clearly justifies that careful application, optimal designing & judicious scientific application of local perforator flaps for lower-limb wounds including rest of the body is successful in many aspects providing high-quality reconstruction ensuring minimal morbidity. It is cost-effective as well as time-saving. PMID:24596732

  16. Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise - the Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Brooks, THomas F.

    2005-01-01

    A technique to reduce the noise radiating from a wing-flap side edge is being developed. As an airplane wing with an extended flap is exposed to a subsonic airflow, air is blown outward through thin rectangular chord-wise slots at various locations along the side edges and side surface of the flap to weaken and push away the vortices that originate in that region of the flap and are responsible for important noise emissions. Air is blown through the slots at up to twice the local flow velocity. The blowing is done using one or multiple slots, where a slot is located along the top, bottom or side surface of the flap along the side edge, or also along the intersection of the bottom (or top) and side surfaces.

  17. Successful reconstruction of irradiated anterior skull base defect using the dual flap technique involving local pericranial flap and radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Yeo, In Sung; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Park, Myong Chul; Lim, Hyoseob; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Lee, Il Jae

    2014-07-01

    Skull base reconstruction presents a challenging therapeutic problem requiring a multispecialty surgical approach and close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, head and neck surgeon, as well as plastic and reconstructive surgeon during all stages of treatment. The principal goal of skull base reconstruction is to separate the intracranial space from the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cavities, creating support for the brain and providing a water-tight barrier against cerebrospinal fluid leakage and ascending infection. We present a case involving a 58-year-old man with anterior skull base defects (2.5 cm × 3 cm) secondary to the removal of olfactory neuroblastoma. The patient received conventional radiation therapy at 6000 cGy in 30 fractions approximately a month before tumor removal. The patient had radiation therapy before surgery and was planned to have postoperative radiation therapy, which would lead to a higher complication rate of reconstruction. Artificial dura was used for the packing of the dural defect, which was also suspected to increase the complication rate of reconstruction. For these reasons, we chose to apply the dual flap technique, which uses both local pericranial flap and de-epithelized radial forearm free flap for anterior skull base defect to promote wound healing. During 28 months of follow-up after coverage of the anterior skull base defect, the dual flap survived completely, as confirmed through follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was free of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, and abscess, and there was minimal donor-site morbidity of the radial forearm free flap. Reconstruction of anterior skull base defects using the dual flap technique is safe, reliable, and associated with low morbidity, and it is ideal for irradiated wounds and low-volume defects. PMID:24902109

  18. Vaginal reconstruction with pedicled vertical deep inferior epigastric perforator flap (diep) after pelvic exenteration. A consecutive case series.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Gwénael; Gangloff, Dimitri; Querleu, Denis; Frigenza, Melanie; Torrent, Juan Jose; Picaud, Laetitia; Gladieff, Laurence; Delannes, Martine; Mery, Eliane; Boulet, Berenice; Balague, Gisele; Martinez, Alejandra

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal reconstruction after pelvic exenteration (PE) represents a challenge for the oncologic surgeon. Since the introduction of perforator flaps, using pedicled vertical DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator) flap allows to reduce the donor site complication rate. From November 2012 to December 2014, 27 PEs were performed in our institution. 13 patients who underwent PE with vaginal reconstruction and programmed DIEP procedure for gynecologic malignancies were registered. Nine patients underwent PE for recurrent disease and four for primary treatment. Six of the 13 patients have a preoperative fistula. Anterior PE was performed in 10 patients, and total PE in 3 patients. A vertical DIEP flap was performed in 10 patients using one or two medial perforators. The reasons for abortion of vertical DIEP flap procedure were: failure to localizing perforator vessels in two cases, and unavailability of plastic surgeon in one case. A vertical fascia-sparring rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was then harvested. Median length of surgery was 335min, and 60min for DIEP harvesting and vaginal reconstruction. No flap necrosis occurred. One patient in the VRAM (vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous) group experienced a late incisional hernia and one patient in the DIEP flap group required revision for vaginal stenosis. In our experience, DIEP flap represents our preferred choice of flap for circumferential vaginal reconstruction after PE. To achieve a high reproducibility, the technically demanding pedicled vertical DIEP flap has to be harvested by a trained surgeon, after strict evaluation of the preoperative imaging with identification and localization of perforator vessels. PMID:26121919

  19. Comparison of corneal flaps created by Wavelight FS200 and Intralase FS60 femtosecond lasers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qian; Zhou, Yue-Hua; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yan; Zhai, Chang-Bin; Liu, Jing

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess and compare the morphology of corneal flaps created by the Wavelight FS200 and Intralase FS60 femtosecond lasers in laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). METHODS Four hundred eyes of 200 patients were enrolled in this study and divided into Wavelight FS200 groups (200 eyes) and Intralase FS60 groups (200 eyes). Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (RTVue OCT) was used to measure the corneal flap thickness of 36 specified measurements on each flap one week after surgery. Results were used to analyze the regularity, uniformity and accuracy of the two types of LASIK flaps. RESULTS The mean thickness of corneal flap and central flap was 105.71±4.72 µm and 105.39±4.50 µm in Wavelight FS200 group and 109.78±11.42 µm and 109.15 ±11.59 µm in Intralase FS60 group, respectively. The flaps made with the Wavelight FS200 femtosecond laser were thinner than those created by the Intralase FS60 femtosecond laser (P=0.000). Corneal flaps in the 2 groups were uniform and regular, showing an almost planar configuration. But the Wavelight FS200 group has more predictability and uniformity of flap creation. The mean deviation between achieved and attempted flap thickness was smaller in the Wavelight FS200 group than that in the Intralase FS60 group, which were 5.18±3.71 µm and 8.68±7.42 µm respectively. The deviation of more than 20 µm was 0.2% measurements in Wavelight FS200 group and 8.29% measurements in Intralase FS60 group. CONCLUSION The morphologies of flaps created by Wavelight FS200 are more uniform and thinner than those created by Intralase FS60. PMID:27500109

  20. Optimal administration routes for adipose-derived stem cells therapy in ischaemic flaps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Won; Jeon, Yeo Reum; Cho, Eul Je; Kang, Jong Hwa; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2014-08-01

    Improvement of flap survival represents an ongoing challenge in reconstructive surgery. The angiogenic potential of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) offers a promising approach to improve the viability of random pattern flaps. Recently, to maximize the therapeutic effects of ASCs, increasing focus is being placed on how to deliver the stem cells to target lesions. The purpose of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of different administration routes of ASCs to improve the viability of the random pattern skin flap. ASCs labelled with PKH26 were applied via four methods to the cranially-based random pattern skin flaps of rats: (a) intravenous injection; (b) subcutaneous injection; (c) application with collagen sponge seeding; and (d) application with fibrin glue seeding. ASCs led to a significant increase in flap viability in the subcutaneous injection group and the collagen sponge group. Cutaneous blood flow was increased in the intravenous injection, subcutaneous injection and collagen sponge groups. Capillary density in the intravenous injection group and collagen sponge group was significantly greater than in the control group (no treatment). PKH26-positive cells via the collagen sponge were distributed more densely within the flap than in other groups. This study demonstrated that the collagen sponge method delivered ASCs most effectively within the flap and increased flap vascularity. The clinical therapeutic effects of ASCs can therefore be maximized when the optimal delivery route is chosen. PMID:22782932

  1. Obesity Should Not Prevent from TRAM Flap Breast Reconstruction in Developing Countries.

    PubMed

    Alipour, Sadaf; Omranipour, Ramesh; Akrami, Rahim

    2015-12-01

    Transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap is the most common procedure performed for breast reconstruction after mastectomy for breast cancer. Obesity is a relative contraindication, and complex modifications have been proposed in the pedicled technique for obese patients. We studied ischemic complications in our patients to investigate the effect of body weight on the outcome of TRAM flap breast reconstruction. Pertinent data from medical records of patients receiving a TRAM flap surgery from 1986 to 2011 were extracted. Patients were divided into three groups based on the body mass index (BMI): normal (<25 kg/m(2)), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m(2)), and obese (>30 kg/m(2)). Flap necrosis is defined as any visible nonviable tissue in the reconstructed breast. It was observed that 117 patients had received TRAM flap reconstruction. Fifty-eight patients were excluded. Of the remaining 59 cases, 24 had normal BMI, 21 were overweight, and 14 were obese. No patient was found to develop flap necrosis. Outcome of TRAM flap breast reconstruction in obese patients is similar to nonobese patients. No major necrosis in need of reoperation was identified in the studied obese patients. It was concluded that categorizing obesity as a relative contraindication to TRAM flap breast reconstruction should be revisited based on larger cohort studies. PMID:26730022

  2. BCL-2 and Bax Expression in Skin Flaps Treated with Finasteride or Azelaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi, Seyyed Abdulmajid; Ajami, Marjan; Reyhanfard, Hamed; Asadi, Yasin; Nassiri-Kashani, Mansour; Rashighi Firoozabadi, Mehdi; Davoodi, Sayed Hossein; Habibi, Esmaeil; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza

    2012-01-01

    Despite all modern surgical techniques, skin flap that is considered as the main method in most reconstructive surgeries puts the skin tissue at danger of necrosis and apoptosis derived from ischemia. Therefore, finding a treatment for decreasing the apoptosis derived from flap ischemia will be useful in clinic. In present study, we evaluated the effect of azelaic acid 20% and finasteride on expression of BCL-2 and bax proteins after the skin flap surgery. For this purpose, 21 rats were entered in three groups including control, azelaic acid 20% and finasteride, all experienced skin flap surgery and then flap tissue was assessed for determining the expression of proteins in 5 slices prepared from each rat that were graded between – to +++ scales. Both azelaic acid and finasteride increased the expression of BCL-2 protein (p < 0.05) and decrease the expression of bax protein (p < 0.05). These results suggested an antiapoptotic role for finasteride and azelaic acid in preserving the flap after the ischemia reperfusion insult. PMID:24250563

  3. Deep circumflex iliac perforator flap.

    PubMed

    Kimata, Yoshihiro

    2003-07-01

    The increased freedom of the DCIP flap from the harvested iliac crest facilitates correct positioning. To ensure that the DCIP flap can be safely elevated, however, the presence of perforators (approximately 1 cm in diameter) must be confirmed preoperatively and intraoperatively. PMID:12916597

  4. Reconstruction of the dynamic velopharyngeal function by combined radial forearm-palmaris longus tenocutaneous free flap, and superiorly based pharyngeal flap in postoncologic total palatal defect.

    PubMed

    Nuri, Takashi; Ueda, Koichi; Yamada, Akira; Okada, Masashi; Hara, Mai

    2015-04-01

    We attempted to reconstruct dynamic palatal function using a radial forearm-palmaris longus tenocutaneous free flap in conjunction with a pharyngeal flap for a postoncologic total-palate defect in a 67-year-old male patient. This reconstruction involved 3 important tasks, namely, separating the oral and nasal cavities, preserving the velopharyngeal space to avoid sleep apnea, and maintaining velopharyngeal closure to avoid nasal regurgitation during swallowing. In our technique, the radial forearm flap separates the oral and nasal cavities with an open rhinopharyngeal space, and a superiorly based pharyngeal flap, which is sutured to the posterior end of the forearm flap, limits the rhinopharyngeal space, and forms the bilateral velopharyngeal port. Furthermore, the palmaris longus tendon, which is attached to the forearm flap, is secured to the superior constrictor muscle to create a horizontal muscle sling. Contraction of the superior constrictor muscle leads to shrinkage of the sling, resulting in velopharyngeal closure. Swallowing therapy was started 4 weeks after the surgery. The patient could resume oral intake without any difficulties 6 months after the surgery. Speech intelligibility changed from severe to minimal hypernasality. PMID:25749212

  5. Robotic Total Pelvic Exenteration with Laparoscopic Rectus Flap: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Brian R.; Mann, Gary N.; Louie, Otway; Wright, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic exenteration is a highly morbid procedure performed for locally advanced pelvic malignancies. We describe our experience with three patients who underwent robotic total pelvic exenteration with laparoscopic rectus flap and compare perioperative characteristics to our open experience. Demographic, tumor, operative, and perioperative factors were examined with descriptive statistics reported. Mean operative times were similar between the two groups. When compared to open total pelvic exenteration cases (n = 9), median estimated blood loss, ICU stay, and hospital stay were all decreased. These data show robotic pelvic exenteration with laparoscopic rectus flap is technically feasible. The surgery was well tolerated with low blood loss and comparable operative times to the open surgery. Further study is needed to confirm the oncologic efficacy and the suggested improvement in surgical morbidity. PMID:25960911

  6. Theory of flapping flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lippisch, Alexander

    1925-01-01

    Before attempting to construct a human-powered aircraft, the aviator will first try to post himself theoretically on the possible method of operating the flapping wings. This report will present a graphic and mathematical method, which renders it possible to determine the power required, so far as it can be done on the basis of the wing dimensions. We will first consider the form of the flight path through the air. The simplest form is probably the curve of ordinary wave motion. After finding the flight curve, we must next determine the change in the angle of attack while passing through the different phases of the wave.

  7. Exposed tibial bone after burns: Flap reconstruction versus dermal substitute.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Pirayesh, Ali; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Monstrey, Stan

    2016-03-01

    A 44 years old male patient had suffered extensive 3rd degree burns on both legs, undergoing thorough surgical debridement, resulting in both tibias being exposed. Approximately 5 months after the incident he was referred to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the University Hospital Gent, Belgium, to undergo flap reconstruction. Free flap surgery was performed twice on both lower legs but failed on all four occasions. In between flap surgery, a dermal substitute (Integra(®)) was applied, attempting to cover the exposed tibias with a layer of soft tissue, but also without success. In order to promote the development of granulation tissue over the exposed bone, small holes were drilled in both tibias with removal of the outer layer of the anterior cortex causing the bone to bleed and subsequently negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was applied. The limited granulation tissue resulting from this procedure was then covered with a dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)), consisting of acellular human dermis with an average thickness of 0.25mm. This dermal substitute was combined with a NPWT-dressing, and then served as an extracellular matrix (ECM), guiding the distribution of granulation tissue over the remaining areas of exposed tibial bone. Four days after initial application of Glyaderm(®) combined with NPWT both tibias were almost completely covered with a thin coating of soft tissue. In order to increase the thickness of this soft tissue cover two additional layers of Glyaderm(®) were applied at intervals of approximately 1 week. One week after the last Glyaderm(®) application both wounds were autografted. The combination of an acellular dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)) with negative pressure wound therapy and skin grafting proved to be an efficient technique to cover a wider area of exposed tibial bone in a patient who was not a candidate for free flap surgery. An overview is also provided of newer and simpler techniques for coverage of

  8. Therapeutic Outcomes of Pectoralis Major Muscle Turnover Flap in Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Reza; Tashnizi, Mohammad Abbasi; Haghi, Seyed Ziaollah; Salehi, Maryam; Rajabnejad, Ata’ollah; Safa, Mohsen Hatami Ghale; Vejdani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic results and safety of pectoralis major muscle turnover flaps in the treatment of mediastinitis after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures. Methods Data regarding 33 patients with post-CABG deep sternal wound infections (DSWIs) who underwent pectoralis major muscle turnover flap procedures in the Emam Reza and Ghaem Hospitals of Mashhad, Iran were reviewed in this study. For each patient, age, sex, hospital stay duration, remission, recurrence, and associated morbidity and mortality were evaluated. Results Of the 2,447 CABG procedures that were carried out during the time period encompassed by our study, DSWIs occurred in 61 patients (2.5%). Of these 61 patients, 33 patients (nine females [27.3%] and 24 males [72.7%]) with an average age of 63±4.54 years underwent pectoralis major muscle turnover flap placement. Symptoms of infection mainly occurred within the first 10 days after surgery (mean, 10.24±13.62 days). The most common risk factor for DSWIs was obesity (n=16, 48.4%) followed by diabetes mellitus (n=13, 39.4%). Bilateral and unilateral pectoralis major muscle turnover flaps were performed in 20 patients (60.6%) and 13 patients (39.4%), respectively. Complete remission was achieved in 25 patients (75.7%), with no recurrence in the follow-up period. Four patients (12.1%) needed reoperation. The mean hospitalization time was 11.69±6.516 days. Four patients (12.1%) died during the course of the study: three due to the postoperative complication of respiratory failure and one due to pulmonary thromboembolism. Conclusion Pectoralis major muscle turnover flaps are an optimal technique in the treatment of post-CABG mediastinitis. In addition to leading to favorable therapeutic results, this flap is associated with minimal morbidity and mortality, as well as a short hospitalization time. PMID:26290837

  9. Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flap for Sacral Pressure Ulcer Reconstruction: A Retrospective Case Study of 11 Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Ta; Ou, Kuang-Wen; Chiao, Hao-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yu; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Lee, Tzu-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, sacral pressure ulcers continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The flap from the gluteal crease derives blood supply from the inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) and reliably preserves the entire contralateral side as a donor site. To incorporate the IGAP in the reconstruction of sacral pressure ulcers, a skin paddle over the gluteal crease was created and implemented by the authors. Data from 11 patients (8 men, 3 women; mean age 67 [range 44-85] years old) whose sacral ulcers were closed with an IGAP flap between June 2006 and May 2012 were retrieved and reviewed. All patients were bedridden; 1 patient in a vegetative state with a diagnosis of carbon monoxide intoxication was referred from a local clinic, 2 patients had Parkinson's disease, and 8 patients had a history of stroke. The average defect size was 120 cm(2) (range 88-144 cm(2)). The average flap size was 85.8 cm(2) (range 56-121 cm(2)). Only 1 flap failure occurred during surgery and was converted into V-Y advancement flap; 10 of the 11 flaps survived. After surgery, the patients' position was changed every 2 hours; patients remained prone or on their side for approximately 2 weeks until the flap was healed. After healing was confirmed, patients were discharged. Complications were relatively minor and included 1 donor site wound dehiscence that required wound reapproximation. No surgery-related mortality was noted; the longest follow-up period was 24 months. In this case series, flaps from the gluteal crease were successfully used for surgical closure of sacral pressure ulcers. This flap design should be used with caution in patients with hip contractures. Studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain which type of flap is best suited to surgically manage extensive pressure ulcers in a variety of patient populations. PMID:26779702

  10. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  11. A case report of total breast reconstruction using an inframammary adipofascial flap with an implant

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Tomoko; Yamakawa, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Prosthetic-based breast reconstruction can be used in combination with autologous flaps such as a latissimus dorsi (LD) flap or a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap to achieve symmetry. However, the LD and TDAP flaps require a different skin incision from that which is used for the mastectomy. As a new autologous flap for use in combination with prosthetic-based breast reconstruction after nipple-sparing mastectomy (NSM), we used an inframammary adipofascial flap. Presentation of case The patient was a 27-year-old female with moderate ptotic breasts, who had ductal carcinoma in situ in the lower outer quadrant of her left breast. After NSM through the inframammary fold (IMF) incision, the subcutaneous fat of the intended inframammary area was undermined, and the tongue shaped adipofascial flap was pulled up in the intended area. After inserting a tissue expander under the major pectoral muscle, this adipofascial flap was reflected back to the inferior portion of the breast area. After modeling the breast mound with this flap, the inframammary skin incision was sutured. Eleven months later, the patient underwent surgery to replace the expander with a permanent implant. Eight months after the replacement with an implant, the cosmetic result is good. Discussion This procedure can be performed through the same skin incision on the IMF as NSM. Total breast reconstruction using the inframammary adipofascial flap with an implant can be an alternative approach to achieving symmetry in some patients. Conclusion This method is useful for breast reconstruction after NSM for young patients with moderate-ptotic breasts. PMID:27107500

  12. Feasibility of a deepithelialized superior gluteal artery perforator propeller flap for various lumbosacral defects.

    PubMed

    Moon, Suk-Ho; Choi, Jang-Youn; Lee, Jung-Ho; Oh, Deuk-Young; Rhie, Jong-Won; Ahn, Sang-Tae

    2015-05-01

    Skin and soft tissue defects in the lumbosacral area are commonly encountered in the field of reconstructive surgery, and it is well documented that the superior gluteal artery perforator (SGAP) flap provides excellent coverage of these defects. In this article, we describe our experience using a modified version of the SGAP propeller flap, in which the distal redundant portion of an elevated SGAP flap is deepithelialized, thereby maximizing the effect of the soft tissue augmentation. Thirteen patients with lumbosacral soft tissue defects treated between May 2010 and June 2012 were included in this study. The wound causes were pressure ulcer (n = 9), pseudomeningocele (n = 2), and hardware exposure (n = 2). In all patients, an elevated SGAP flap was rotated 180 degrees over the defect area and the extra distal portion of the flap was deepithelialized and used as a soft tissue filler or tamponade. During the follow-up period (mean, 26 months), 12 of 13 flaps survived completely. One flap was totally necrosed due to progressive venous congestion and was reconstructed with local advancement flaps. No further complications were noted. Because of the redundancy and pliability of the tissue in the gluteal area, a flap relatively wider or longer than the defect can be elevated safely. Hence, the redundant tissue volume can be tucked inside to facilitate soft tissue augmentation of the area. We propose that the deepithelialized version of the SGAP propeller flap is an effective option for the reconstruction of various lumbosacral soft tissue defects because it offers thick and healthy soft tissue from a distant site to the defect areas. PMID:24149404

  13. Reverse Sural Artery Island Flap With Skin Extension Along the Pedicle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Il; Ha, Sung Han; Yu, Sun O; Park, Min Jong; Chae, Sang Hoon; Lee, Gi Jun

    2016-01-01

    The distally based sural flap is an efficient flap for reconstruction of soft tissues defects of lower limb. The unstable vascular pedicle, however, is prone to compression by the subcutaneous tunnel, especially when a long pedicle covers the distal area of the foot. The aim of the present study was to introduce a modified surgical technique that leaves the skin extension over the pedicle and to report the clinical results of this modification. A total of 25 consecutive patients with a mean age of 51.7 ± 14.7 years underwent surgery. We modified the conventional sural flap technique by leaving a skin extension over the entire length of the pedicle, creating a fasciocutaneous vascular pedicle. The postoperative flap survival rates, complications, and the characteristics of the flaps such as flap size, pedicle length, and the most distal area that could be covered with this modification, were reviewed. At the last clinical follow-up examination, all the flaps survived, although partial necrosis was observed in 2 (8%) cases. Four cases of venous congestion developed but healed without additional complications. The mean flap size was 5.9 ± 1.8 × 9.2 ± 2.7 cm. With this modification, the sural flap could cover the defect located in extreme distal areas, such as the medial forefoot and dorsum of the first metatarsophalangeal joint, with a longer pedicle (≤27 cm) in 7 patients (28%). A skin extension along the pedicle achieved the favorable survival rate of the sural flap and successfully extended the surgical indications to more distal areas. PMID:26810124

  14. Dancing girl flap: a new flap suitable for web release.

    PubMed

    Shinya, K

    1999-12-01

    To create a deep web, a flap must be designed to have a high elongation effect in one direction along the mid-lateral line of the finger and also to have a shortening effect in the other direction, crossing at a right angle to the mid-lateral line. The dancing girl flap is a modification of a four-flap Z-plasty with two additional Z-plasties. It has a high elongation effect in one direction (>550%) and a shortening effect in the other direction at a right angle (<33%), creating a deep, U-shaped surface. This new flap can be used to release severe scar contracture with a web, and is most suitable for incomplete syndactyly with webs as high as the proximal interphalangeal joint. PMID:10597822

  15. Effects of Venous Superdrainage and Arterial Supercharging on Dorsal Perforator Flap in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jun; Xi, Shanshan; Ding, Maochao; Li, Hong; Xu, Wei; Tang, Maolin; Chen, Shixin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To comparatively assess the effects of venous superdrainage and arterial supercharging on dorsal perforator flap survival. Materials and Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats (450–550g) were randomly divided into three groups (n = 20), including control group (Control) and experimental groups A (venous superdrainage, Exp. A) and B (arterial supercharging, Exp. B). At postoperative day 7, survival areas of the flaps were evaluated and all animals underwent angiography. Laser Doppler was used to evaluate flap perfusion from 0h to 7days after surgery. Histology with hematoxylin and eosin staining was used to count microvessels. Tissue of “Choke vessels”was excised for quantification of hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by western blot assay at 6h and 7days after surgery. Results In the Exp. A group, almost all flaps survived (98.2±1.6%); in the Exp. B and control group, survival areas accounted for 78.8±8.5% and 60.3±7.8%, respectively (P <0.001). In addition, Exp. A animals showed improved anastomosis of choke vessels 2 compared with the Exp. B and Control groups. Furthermore, flap blood flow and partial pressure of oxygen in the Exp. A group were significantly higher compared with values obtained for the Exp. B and Control groups, from 6 hours to 7 days after surgery. More microvessels were found in the Exp. A group (11.65±1.33) than in Exp. B (9.25±0.34) and control (7.25±0.91) animals on POD 7. The relative expression level of HIF-1α and VEGF were significant at 6h and 7days after surgery. Conclusions Venous superdrainage in rat dorsal perforator flap is more effective than arterial supercharging in promoting flap survival, and could effectively alter hemodynamics in the microcirculation and stimulate blood vessel formation. PMID:27513520

  16. Robotic-assisted ureteral reimplantation with Boari flap and psoas hitch: a single-institution experience.

    PubMed

    Yang, Christopher; Jones, Loren; Rivera, Marcelino E; Verlee, Graham T; Deane, Leslie A

    2011-11-01

    Robotic-assisted ureteral reimplantations were performed on 3 patients at a single institution, 2 with Boari flap and psoas hitch and 1 with psoas hitch alone. These were for urothelial carcinoma of the distal ureter, ureteral obstruction caused by distal ureteral endometriosis, and ureteral transaction during gynecologic surgery. We used intraoperative ureteroscopy to confirm tumor margins as well as a simple technique for retrograde placement of transvesicle wire prior to ureteral anastomosis. Surgery and recovery were uneventful. This illustrates that robotic-assisted ureteral reimplantation with Boari flap and psoas hitch is a safe and viable approach for ureterovesicle reconstruction. PMID:21859340

  17. Pneumococcal keratitis at the flap interface after laser in situ keratomileusis.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Manuel; Hernández-Quintela, Everardo; Beltrán, Francisco; Naranjo-Tackman, Ramón

    2002-03-01

    A 28-year-old woman had uneventful laser in situ keratomileusis in the right eye. Six days postoperatively, she reported ocular pain and a large corneal stromal infiltrate was observed at the flap interface. A second surgery including lifting and excising the flap and scraping the stromal bed was performed. Topical antibiotics were prescribed. A bacterial culture revealed Streptococcus pneumoniae. The keratitis responded well to topical vancomycin. Twelve days after the second surgery, the stromal infiltrate had regressed, the hypopyon had resolved, and visual acuity was hand movements at 0.5 m. PMID:11973108

  18. Keystone Flap: Versatile Flap for Reconstruction of Limb Defects

    PubMed Central

    Janna, Rakesh K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is always a constant search for a new solution to tackle defects in the limbs. The technique has to be simple, easily reproducible and performed within a short duration. The answer is keystone island flap keystone flap is a simple, less time consuming, durable and easily reproducible option to reconstruct most of the limb defects. Aim: The aim of this article is to study the usefulness of keystone flap in reconstruction of various upper and lower limb defects. Materials and Methods: This retrospective review involves study of 20 patients undergoing keystone flap reconstruction for various defects from 2012 to 2014. Patient demographic data, medical histories, comorbidities, surgical indications, defect characteristics and locations, hospitalization, complications and follow-up were evaluated and are presented as uncontrolled case series. Results: Ages of the patients were ranging from 18 to 65 y with an average of 38.75y. Among the defects, 10 were following trauma (50%), 5 were due to tumour resection (25%), 3 followed debridement of abscess (15%) and another 2 defects were due to surgical wound dehiscence (10%). The largest defect covered by this flap in our study measured 45 x 18 cm and the smallest defect was 8 x4 cm. The average intra-operative time was 45.5 min (range 20-90 min). Fourteen flaps were done to cover lower limb defects (70%), 4 for upper limb defects and 2 were for defects in the axilla. Partial flap necrosis was observed in one case. The average duration of hospital stay of patients was 3.45 d. All patients were followed until they achieved stable, healed wound.The overall success rate was 95%. Conclusion: Keystone flap can be safely used to cover various limb defects with minimal pain, a sensate cover and excellent cosmetic outcome, minimizing the need for microsurgical techniques or prolonged operative time. PMID:25954659

  19. Etanercept protects myocutaneous flaps from ischaemia reperfusion injury: An experimental study in a rat tram flap model.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Burak; Çevik, Özge; Çilingir, Özlem Tuğçe

    2016-08-01

    Background Being an inevitable component of free tissue transfer, ischemia-reperfusion injury tends to contribute to flap failure. TNF-α is an important proinflammatory cytokine and a prominent mediator of the ischemia-reperfusion injury. Etanercept, a soluble TNF-α binding protein, has shown anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects in animal models of renal and myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have designed an experimental study to investigate the effect of etanercept on myocutaneous ischemia-reperfusion injury on transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap model in rats. Methods Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 3 groups: In group 1 (sham), the TRAM flap was raised and sutured back without further intervention. In group 2 (control), the flap was raised and the ischemia-reperfusion protocol was followed. In group 3, etanercept (10 mg/kg, i.v.) was administered 10 minutes before reperfusion. At the end of the reperfusion period, biochemical and histolopathological evaluations were performed on serum and tissue samples. Results In the etanercept group the IMA and 8-OHdG levels (p = 0.005 and p = 0.004, respectively) were found significantly lower, and the GSH and SOD levels (p = 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively) significantly higher in comparison to the control group. The histopathological analysis has revealed a lower degree of hyalinization, degenerated muscle fibers and nuclear change in the etanercept group compared to the control group. Conclusion The results of our experimental study indicate that etanercept offers protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury in skeletal muscle tissue, enhancing the TRAM flap viability. The ability of etanercept to induce ischemic tolerance suggests that it may be applicable in free-flap surgery. PMID:26950289

  20. Anterior tibial artery perforator plus flaps for reconstruction of post-burn flexion contractures of the knee joint

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, S.; Bandyopadhyay, T.; Saha, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background. Post-burn flexion contractures of the knee may arise even with adequate treatment of the burn injury. After release of the contracture, most of these defects require flap coverage. Here we describe the application of the perforator plus flap concept in the management of these contractures. Method. Between December 2010 and December 2011 five female and two male patients with knee contractures were operated on using a perforator plus flap from the anterior tibia artery perforator. In one patient both sides were operated on and the rest had unilateral surgeries. All patients had mature scars and the aetiology was thermal burn injury. All these contractures were categorized as Category 4 and Level 3 by the ICIDH guidelines with an average contracture angle of 87.5 degrees. The flap was raised after release of the defect and a Doppler study located the perforator below the fibular head. The base of the flap was kept intact at all times. The flap was then transposed towards the defect and inset in a tensionless manner. Results. All flaps survived well with marginal necrosis in only one flap, providing stable coverage to the knee joint. The average residual contracture was around 10 degrees and the average range of flexion was 10-120 degrees. Conclusion. The perforator plus flap can be an excellent choice in defects over the posterior aspect of the knee where important neurovascular structures and tendons are exposed. Level of evidence: Level IV. PMID:23233827

  1. Outcome after pharyngeal reconstruction using pectoralis major and radial forearm flap after resection of pharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Andreas; Mansour, Naglaa; Hofauer, Benedikt; Bier, Henning; Scherer, Elias Q

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the outcome after pharyngeal reconstruction using pectoralis major and radial forearm flaps in pharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas. 90 patients who underwent flap surgery due to oro/-hypopharyngeal and laryngeal carcinomas were compared with 404 patients without pharyngeal reconstruction. Differences between the groups were analyzed using the Chi-square, Fisher exact, and the unpaired student's t test. Survival rates were calculated by Kaplan-Meier. Overall survival in oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer showed comparable results in patients with or without pharyngeal reconstruction (5-year: 53.4 vs. 64.2 %, p = 0.23; 5-year: 51.8 vs. 62.4 %, p = 0.94), while the survival time after flap surgery was significantly decreased (5-year: 44.8 vs. 62.4 %, p < 0.02; 5-year: 30.3 vs. 64.2 %, p = 0.07). Subgroup analysis attributed the worse survival after flap surgery to patients who underwent flap surgery due to functional deficits or recurrent disease (p = 0.002). In these patients, the median survival after flap surgery was 26 (hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer) or 13 months (oropharyngeal cancer) and associated with a significant increase in severe complications and hospitalization time (p < 0.0001). The hospitalization time correlated with the history of prior radiotherapy and the extent of surgery (r = 0.26; r = 0.3; p < 0.0001). Flap surgery in primary oropharyngeal and hypopharyngeal/laryngeal cancer showed an unaltered overall survival when compared with patients without reconstruction. Patients with recurrent disease or functional deficits demonstrated a significant decrease in survival combined with an increase of severe complications. PMID:26345240

  2. Novel biogeometric designs of first dorsal metacarpal artery flap in hand reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Doğan, Fatih; Çoruh, Atilla

    2014-01-01

    Reconstruction of the soft tissue defects of the first web space and proximal dorsal thumb is still one of the most challenging problems in reconstructive surgery. Depending on the defect size, various reconstructive methods have been described, including local, regional, distant and free flaps. The authors described new biogeometric designs of first dorsal metacarpal artery flap for the reconstruction of the soft tissue defects of the first web space and the proximal dorsal thumb. These modifications are bilobed and V-Y advancement first dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. Three patients had burn wound adduction contractures of the first web space and three had acute wounds resulting from electrical burns, the defects of which were located on the first web space and on the dorsum of the thumb. The defect sizes ranged from 2.5 × 2 cm to 3.5 × 4 cm, and were reconstructed with the bilobed and V-Y advancement first dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. None of these flap modifications had any problems related to the perfusion of the flap, such as arterial insufficiency or venous congestion. The mean follow-up period was 16 months and all the patients were satisfied with the functional result and the donor site scars appearance. The bilobed and V-Y advancement first dorsal metacarpal artery flaps described by the authors for the hand reconstruction are safe, easily performed, and are versatile without skin grafts at the donor site because of inherent excellent elasticity and mobility of the dorsal hand skin. PMID:25100542

  3. Full scale upper surface blown flap noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidelberg, L. J.; Homyak, L.; Jones, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A highly noise suppressed TF 34 engine was used to investigate the noise of several powered lift configurations involving upper surface blown (USB) flaps. The configuration variables were nozzle type (i.e. slot and circular with deflector), flap chord length, and flap angle. The results of velocity surveys at both the nozzle exit and the flap trailing edge are also presented and used for correlation of the noise data. Configurations using a long flap design were 4 db quieter than a short flap typical of current trends in USB flap design. The lower noise for the long flap is attributed primarily to the greater velocity decay of the jet at the flap trailing edge. The full-scale data revealed substantially more quadrupole noise in the region near the deflected jet than observed in previous sub-scale tests.

  4. Modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Song, Dajiang; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Jian; Lv, Hongbin

    2015-04-01

    The paper aims to improve the operative technique of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvesting, further minimise morbidity of donor site, and improve the effect of recipient site reconstruction. From March 2005 to March 2011, 55 cases of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvested by different methods were performed to reconstruct the defects of the extremities. Twenty-nine cases were reconstructed with a traditional deep circumflex iliac artery osteomusculocutaneous flap. Twenty-six cases were repaired with modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps. In 29 cases with a traditional DCIA osteomusculocutaneous flap, two cases showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Flapnecrosis was significant in two cases. Arterial compromise occurred in one case 5 days after operation completion and led to flap failure. Three flaps developed postoperative venous congestion, but only one flap received re-exploration. In the other two cases, some stitches were removed for decompression. All three flaps survived. In two cases, marginal flap necrosis occurred, but no secondary skin grafting was required. In 26 cases with modified flap transplantation, one case showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. All flaps survived totally. Osseous integration was achieved in all 55 cases in 3 ∼ 9 months after operation. The modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap technique enhances flap safety, provides the additional advantages of reducing donor-site morbidity, and improves the recipient-site contour. PMID:25001367

  5. Sectioned Images and Surface Models of a Cadaver for Understanding the Dorsalis Pedis Flap.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Hyung Jun; Kim, Bong Chul

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to represent the dorsalis pedis (DP) flap on sectioned images and surface models using Visible Korean for medical education and clinical training in the field of maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. Serially sectioned images of the foot were obtained from a cadaver. The important structures in the sectioned images were outlined and stacked to create a surface model. The PDF file (53 MB) of the assembled models is accessible for free download on the Department of Anatomy at Ajou University School of Medicine Web site (http://anatomy.co.kr). In this file, the significant anatomic structures of the DP flap can be inspected in the sectioned images. All surface models and stereoscopic structures of the DP flap are described in real time. We hope that these state-of-the-art sectioned images, outlined images, and surface models will help students and trainees gain a better understanding of the DP flap anatomy. PMID:26079120

  6. Transfer of free vascular cutaneous flaps by microvascular anastomosis. Results in six dogs.

    PubMed

    Fowler, J D; Miller, C W; Bowen, V; Johnston, G H

    1987-01-01

    Skin defects on the distal extremities of six dogs were reconstructed with free vascular cutaneous transfers by microvascular anastomosis. The donor flaps were based on the superficial cervical artery and vein. In five of the dogs, bone was exposed and skin was lost from half of the circumference of the limb. Two had infected fractures with sequestra and three had acute shearing injuries. The sixth dog had sensory denervation of the left antebrachium and a carpal acral lick granuloma. Before surgery, the patency of potential recipient vessels was confirmed with arteriography in five dogs and an ultrasonic doppler in one dog. Microvascular technique was used to reestablish circulation to the flaps after they were transferred to the recipient site. Total ischemic time of the flaps averaged 100 minutes. All flaps survived. Successful reconstruction of the cutaneous defects was achieved in these six cases. PMID:3507179

  7. Histological changes in radial forearm skin flaps in the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, A; Johnston, E; Badran, D H; Neilson, M; Soutar, D S; Robertson, A G; McDonald, S W

    2004-04-01

    We reported previously that skin flaps transplanted to the oral cavity in reconstructive surgery for oral cancer frequently acquired the gross appearance of buccal mucosa. The changes were shown to be reactive in nature. The "changed" flaps generally had a heavier infiltration of leukocytes in the dermis and appeared to have thicker epithelium. The present study quantifies these parameters, as well as the numbers of intraepithelial leukocytes. The flaps that had acquired the gross appearance of oral mucosa had significantly thicker epithelium, larger numbers of dermal leukocytes, and more intraepidermal inflammatory cells per unit length than flaps that retained the gross appearance of thin skin. No correlation was found between these changes and radiotherapy. PMID:15042571

  8. The Role of Muscle Flaps for Salvage of Failed Perforator Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the most heroic efforts, sometimes free flaps fail. Perforator free flaps are not invincible and can suffer the same fate. The real challenge is how to decide what is the next best choice for achieving the desired outcome. Methods: Over the past decade, 298 free perforator flaps were used in our institution. Total failure occurred in 16 patients, and partial failure requiring a second free flap occurred in an additional 6 patients for a true success rate of 93%. All failures had some form of secondary vascularized tissue transfer, which included the use of muscle flaps in 9 (41%) different patients. Results: Initial flap salvage after a failed perforator free flap was attempted with 12 perforator and 5 muscle free flaps as well as 1 perforator and 2 muscle local flaps. These were not all successful, with loss of 3 muscle free flaps and 3 perforator flaps. Tertiary free flap coverage was successful in 3 cases using 2 muscle flaps and 1 perforator free flap. Local fasciocutaneous flaps or primary wound closure was used in the remaining individuals. Conclusions: Microsurgical tissue transfers can be the most rewarding and at the same time the most challenging reconstructive endeavor. Persistence in achieving the desired outcome can require multiple steps. Perforator flaps are an important asset to obtain this goal. However, muscle flaps can still be a useful alternative, and the message is that they should not be overlooked as sometimes a viable option. PMID:26893989

  9. Experience in Reconstruction for Small Digital Defects With Free Flaps.

    PubMed

    Hung, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Chao, Wai-Nang

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the digits resulting in soft tissue or bone loss require reconstruction. Traditionally, local flaps, such as homodigital flaps, heterodigital flaps, pedicled flaps, or distant flaps, are used for digital resurfacing. However, free tissue transfers can be used in selected patients. In this study, we present the use of different free flaps including groin skin flaps, groin osteocutaneous flaps, groin chimeric flaps, second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps, and partial toe flaps for digital reconstruction. A total of 19 digits were treated with 16 free flaps in our hospital. Of the flaps used, 5 were free groin skin flaps, 4 were free partial toe flaps, 3 were free groin chimeric flaps, 2 were free groin osteocutaneous flaps, and 2 were free second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. The average flap size was 4.7 × 2.0 cm (range, 1.5 × 1 to 5 × 4 cm), and the average operative time was 6.0 hours (range, 4-9 hours). All flaps survived without partial or total necrosis. In conclusion, the free flap is a reliable and safe alternative for digital reconstruction. Moreover, the free groin flap provides not only a chimeric pattern for multiple fingers coverage but also an osteocutaneous pattern for thumb lengthening. The free second dorsal metacarpal artery flap provides a tenocutaneous pattern for tendon reconstruction and soft tissue coverage simultaneously, and the free partial toe flap is an excellent alternative for pulp reconstruction in terms of aesthetic appearance and functional outcome. PMID:26808771

  10. PIV Measurements on a Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several blowing flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main-element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the vortex system or accelerated the merging of the side vortex to the flap top surface. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  11. The Flap Sandwich Technique for a Safe and Aesthetic Skull Base Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Tanaka, Kentarou; Iida, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    For safe and reliable skull base reconstruction combined with repair of cranial bone defects, we introduce the flap sandwich technique in this study. A titanium mesh is often used to repair structural cranial bone defects because it has less donor site morbidity and is easy to handle. However, titanium mesh has disadvantages of exposure and infection postoperatively. To improve surgical outcomes, we applied the flap sandwich technique to 3 cases of skull base reconstruction combined with cranial bone defect repair. Two anterior skull base defects and 1 middle skull base defect were included in this study. The subjects were all women, aged 30, 58, and 62 years. One patient had former multiple craniotomies and another patient had preoperative radiotherapy. The flap sandwich technique involves structural cranial bone reconstruction with a titanium mesh and soft tissue reconstruction with a chimeric anterolateral thigh free flap. First, the dead space between the repaired dura and the titanium mesh is filled with vastus lateralis muscle, and then structural reconstruction is performed with a titanium mesh. Finally, the titanium mesh is totally covered with the adiposal flap of the anterolateral thigh free flap. The muscle flap protects the dead space from infection, and the adiposal flap covers the titanium mesh to reduce mechanical stress on the covered skin and thus prevent the exposure of the titanium mesh through the scalp. By applying this technique, there was no intracranial infection or titanium mesh exposure in these 3 cases postoperatively, even though 2 patients had postoperative radiotherapy. Additionally, the adiposal flap could provide a soft and natural contour to the scalp and forehead region, and this gives patients a better facial appearance even though they have had skull base surgery. PMID:25954846

  12. Video Capture of Perforator Flap Harvesting Procedure with a Full High-definition Wearable Camera.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Shimpei

    2016-06-01

    Recent advances in wearable recording technology have enabled high-quality video recording of several surgical procedures from the surgeon's perspective. However, the available wearable cameras are not optimal for recording the harvesting of perforator flaps because they are too heavy and cannot be attached to the surgical loupe. The Ecous is a small high-resolution camera that was specially developed for recording loupe magnification surgery. This study investigated the use of the Ecous for recording perforator flap harvesting procedures. The Ecous SC MiCron is a high-resolution camera that can be mounted directly on the surgical loupe. The camera is light (30 g) and measures only 28 × 32 × 60 mm. We recorded 23 perforator flap harvesting procedures with the Ecous connected to a laptop through a USB cable. The elevated flaps included 9 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps, 7 thoracodorsal artery perforator flaps, 4 anterolateral thigh flaps, and 3 superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps. All procedures were recorded with no equipment failure. The Ecous recorded the technical details of the perforator dissection at a high-resolution level. The surgeon did not feel any extra stress or interference when wearing the Ecous. The Ecous is an ideal camera for recording perforator flap harvesting procedures. It fits onto the surgical loupe perfectly without creating additional stress on the surgeon. High-quality video from the surgeon's perspective makes accurate documentation of the procedures possible, thereby enhancing surgical education and allowing critical self-reflection. PMID:27482504

  13. Video Capture of Perforator Flap Harvesting Procedure with a Full High-definition Wearable Camera

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Recent advances in wearable recording technology have enabled high-quality video recording of several surgical procedures from the surgeon’s perspective. However, the available wearable cameras are not optimal for recording the harvesting of perforator flaps because they are too heavy and cannot be attached to the surgical loupe. The Ecous is a small high-resolution camera that was specially developed for recording loupe magnification surgery. This study investigated the use of the Ecous for recording perforator flap harvesting procedures. The Ecous SC MiCron is a high-resolution camera that can be mounted directly on the surgical loupe. The camera is light (30 g) and measures only 28 × 32 × 60 mm. We recorded 23 perforator flap harvesting procedures with the Ecous connected to a laptop through a USB cable. The elevated flaps included 9 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flaps, 7 thoracodorsal artery perforator flaps, 4 anterolateral thigh flaps, and 3 superficial inferior epigastric artery flaps. All procedures were recorded with no equipment failure. The Ecous recorded the technical details of the perforator dissection at a high-resolution level. The surgeon did not feel any extra stress or interference when wearing the Ecous. The Ecous is an ideal camera for recording perforator flap harvesting procedures. It fits onto the surgical loupe perfectly without creating additional stress on the surgeon. High-quality video from the surgeon’s perspective makes accurate documentation of the procedures possible, thereby enhancing surgical education and allowing critical self-reflection. PMID:27482504

  14. Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction without Microsurgery Fellowship Training

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Busse, Brittany K.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wang, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstruction requires complex microsurgical skills. Herein, we examine whether DIEP flap breast reconstruction can be performed safely without microsurgical fellowship training. Methods: A total of 28 patients and 34 DIEP flaps were included in the study. We reviewed the medical records of patients for donor site and flap-related complications and analyzed the correlation between the complications and preoperative risk factors. We also performed a literature review to compare complication rates in our series with the literature. Results: We observed total flap necrosis in 1 patient (2.9%), partial flap necrosis in 5 patients (14.7%), infection in 1 patient (2.9%), hematoma/seroma in 3 patients (8.8%), donor site complications in 5 patients (18.5%), venous occlusion in 4 patients (11.7%), and arterial occlusion in 1 patient (2.9%). We did not observe any correlation between complications and preoperative risk factors. Literature review yielded 18 papers that met our inclusion criteria. Partial flap necrosis rate was significantly higher in our series compared with literature (14.7% vs 1.6%, P = 0.003). Venous complication rate was marginally higher in our series compared with literature (11.7% vs 3.3%, P = 0.057). However, total flap loss rate in our series was comparable with the literature (2.9% vs 2.2%, P = 0.759). Conclusion: With proper training during plastic surgery residency, DIEP flap can be performed with acceptable morbidity. PMID:26301144

  15. Experimental Study of Wake / Flap Interaction Noise and the Reduction of Flap Side Edge Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Plassman, Gerald E.

    2016-01-01

    The effects of the interaction of a wake with a half-span flap on radiated noise are examined. The incident wake is generated by bars of various widths and lengths or by a simplified landing gear model. Single microphone and phased array measurements are used to isolate the effects of the wake interaction on the noise radiating from the flap side edge and flap cove regions. The effects on noise of the wake generator's geometry and relative placement with respect to the flap are assessed. Placement of the wake generators upstream of the flap side edge is shown to lead to the reduction of flap side edge noise by introducing a velocity deficit and likely altering the instabilities in the flap side edge vortex system. Significant reduction in flap side edge noise is achieved with a bar positioned directly upstream of the flap side edge. The noise reduction benefit is seen to improve with increased bar width, length and proximity to the flap edge. Positioning of the landing gear model upstream of the flap side edge also leads to decreased flap side edge noise. In addition, flap cove noise levels are significantly lower than when the landing gear is positioned upstream of the flap mid-span. The impact of the local flow velocity on the noise radiating directly from the landing gear is discussed. The effects of the landing gear side-braces on flap side edge, flap cove and landing gear noise are shown.

  16. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  17. [1984-1994: Ten years of skin flaps. Development of transfer techniques. New methods of autoplasty described during this period].

    PubMed

    Martin, D

    1995-10-01

    Ten years of flaps represent a little and a lot. It is little compared to the 2600 years since the first flap in plastic surgery: the Susruta Indian flap, but it is a lot in view of the phenomenal acceleration of this speciality since the Second World War. In 1994 alone, more than two hundred references are listed under the heading "new flaps". As it is impossible to be exhaustive, the author has chosen to focus on two main aspects: a theoretical review of new transfer techniques, dealing successively with: the principles of reverse flow flaps, venous flaps, neurocutaneous flaps, so-called "extracorporeal" transfers, reverse flow YV technique; and practical aspects based on a review of eighteen autoplasties or donor sites selected for their surgical value, their reproductibility and their innovative nature. The author's objective is not to present a technical treatise, but rather to make the reader aware of several key points or even, in some cases, the very existence of these autoplasties. This paper is designed to be didactic, with extensive references, in order to act as a practical guide. It also demonstrates, as if there were any need, to what extent plastic surgery is able to create new solutions and the essential value of continuing research. PMID:8579301

  18. Free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flaps.

    PubMed

    Koshima, I; Moriguchi, T; Soeda, S; Tanaka, H; Umeda, N

    1992-07-01

    A free paraumbilical perforator-based flap fed by a muscle perforator from the inferior deep epigastric artery and with no muscle was used in 13 patients. Among them, a free thin paraumbilical perforator-based flap with a thin layer of fat, to protect the subdermal plexus of the vessels, was used in seven patients. The dominant pedicle perforator of this thin flap is usually located around the umbilicus and a large flap can be obtained. Its critical length-to-breath ratio is considered to be 4:3. The advantages of this flap are a long and large vascular pedicle, rare postoperative abdominal herniation, little bulkiness of the flap, and a relatively large skin territory. The disadvantages are technical difficulties in dissection of the perforator and anatomical variation in the location of the perforator. We believe this flap largely overcomes the problems of the conventional rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap. PMID:1386718

  19. Postoperative evaluation of the folded pharyngeal flap operation for cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimasu, Hidemi; Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Negishi, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Velopharyngeal function is very important for patients with cleft palate to acquire good speech. For patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency, prosthetic speech appliances and speech therapy are applied first, and then pharyngeal flap surgery to improve velopharyngeal function is performed in our hospital. The folded pharyngeal flap operation was first reported by Isshiki and Morimoto in 1975. We usually use a modification of the original method. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to introduce our method of the folded pharyngeal flap operation and report the results. Materials and Methods: The folded pharyngeal flap operation was performed for 110 patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency from 1982 to 2010. Of these, the 97 whose postoperative speech function was evaluated are reported. The cases included 61 males and 36 females, ranging in age from 7 to 50 years. The time from surgery to speech assessment ranged from 5 months to 6 years. In order to evaluate preoperative velopharyngeal function, assessment of speech by a trained speech pathologist, nasopharyngoscopy, and cephalometric radiography with contrast media were performed before surgery, and then the appropriate surgery was selected and performed. Postoperative velopharyngeal function was assessed by a trained speech pathologist. Results: Of the 97 patients who underwent the folded pharyngeal flap operation, 85 (87.6%) showed velopharyngeal competence, 8 (8.2%) showed marginal velopharyngeal incompetence, and only 2 (2.1%) showed velopharyngeal incompetence; in 2 cases (2.1%), hyponasality was present. Approximately 95% of patients showed improved velopharyngeal function. Conclusions: The folded pharyngeal flap operation based on appropriate preoperative assessment has been shown to be an effective method for the treatment of cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency. PMID:26389036

  20. Robotic transaxillary thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabinovics, Naomi; Aidan, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Recent technological advances have led to a rapid progress in endocrine surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive techniques in thyroid surgery, robot-assisted transaxillary thyroid surgery (RATS) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches. Its main advantages are improved cosmetic outcome, avoiding cervical incisions, increased patient satisfaction, improved visualization, arms articulations, eliminating surgeon's natural tremor, thereby increasing precision. The main disadvantages are longer operative time, and increased cost compared to conventional thyroidectomy, as well as potential injuries to the brachial plexus, skin flap, esophagus, and trachea. Large-scale studies, mainly from South-Korea, have proved that in skilled hands, RATS is a safe alternative to conservative thyroidectomy and should be presented to patients with aesthetic concerns. As with any new emerging technique, careful patient selection is crucial, and further evidence must be sought to confirm its indications. PMID:26425452

  1. Health-related quality of life, surgical and aesthetic outcomes following microvascular free flap reconstructions: an 8-year institutional review

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, RT; Butler, JS; Murphy, SM; Cronin, KJ

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Microvascular free flap reconstruction has revolutionised the reconstruction of complex defects of traumatic, oncological, congenital and infectious aetiologies. Complications of microvascular free flap procedures impact negatively on patient post-operative course and outcome. METHODS We performed a retrospective analysis of 102 consecutive patients undergoing 108 free flap procedures at a tertiary referral centre over an 8-year period. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors pRedictive of free flap complications. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and aesthetic outcomes were assessed using the Short Form 36 questionnaire and a satisfaction visual analogue scale respectively. RESULTS In total, 108 free tissue transfers were performed; 23% were fasciocutaneous free flaps, 69% musculocutaneous and 8% osteoseptocutaneous. The overall flap success rate was 92.6%. Over a third of patients (34.3%) had flap-related complications ranging from minor wound dehiscence to total flap loss. ASA (American Society of Anesthesiologists) grade ≥2 (OR: 16.9, 95% CI: 15.3–18.1, p<0.009), history of smoking (OR: 6.1, 95% CI: 5.5–7.2, p<0.049), body mass index ≥25kg/ m2 (OR: 21.3, 95% CI: 20.8–22.1, p<0.003), low albumin (odds ratio [OR]: 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.2–3.9, p<0.003) and peripheral vascular disease (OR: 6.9, 95% CI: 5.9–7.5, p<0.036) were identified as factors independently predictive of free flap complications. CONCLUSIONS Patients undergoing uncomplicated free flap surgery and those reporting superior post-operative flap aesthesis have higher HRQoL scores. Microvascular free tissue transfer has revolutionised our approach to the reconstruction of complex defects, providing a safe, reliable procedure to restore functionality and quality of life for patients. PMID:22524928

  2. New model of flap-gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2015-07-21

    A new modelling approach is presented for describing flap-gliding flight in birds and the associated mechanical energy cost of travelling. The new approach is based on the difference in the drag characteristics between flapping and non-flapping due to the drag increase caused by flapping. Thus, the possibility of a gliding flight phase, as it exists in flap-gliding flight, yields a performance advantage resulting from the decrease in the drag when compared with continuous flapping flight. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization for the mathematical relations describing flap-gliding flight, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that there is an energy saving of flap-gliding flight in the entire speed range compared to continuous flapping flight. The energy saving reaches the highest level in the lower speed region. The travelling speed of flap-gliding flight is composed of the weighted average of the differing speeds in the flapping and gliding phases. Furthermore, the maximum range performance achievable with flap-gliding flight and the associated optimal travelling speed are determined. PMID:25841702

  3. The bilobed flap for popliteal defect reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kelahmetoglu, Osman; Yagmur, Caglayan; Aslan, Ozan; Firinciogullari, Remzi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Bilobed flaps were first introduced to close small nasal defects. We reconstructed a defect of the popliteal fossa using a random-pattern bilobed flap. We recommend the use of random-pattern bilobed flaps as a reliable technique for covering defects of the popliteal fossa.

  4. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  5. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  6. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.701 Flap interconnection. (a) The main wing flaps and related movable surfaces as a...

  7. Regional anesthesia alone for pediatric free flaps.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, Kim A; Venkatramani, Hari; Venkateshwaran, Govindaswamy; Boopathi, Vadivel; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular surgery plays an important reconstructive role in the pediatric population. Successful outcomes rely on surgical technique as well as anesthesia. Regional anesthesia contributes to successful free tissue transfer through sympathetic blockade, postoperative pain control, and elimination of risks and costs associated with general anesthesia. While regional anesthesia in microsurgery is discussed in the literature for adult and elderly patients, no studies focus on the pediatric population. Accordingly, this paper reviews 20 pediatric patients undergoing microvascular surgery (anterolateral thigh, n = 9; gracilis, n = 3; toe transfer, n = 6; and fibula, n = 2) with regional anesthesia and sedation. All patients underwent spinal epidural anesthesia, and seven also received brachial plexus blocks. The average duration of anesthesia was 3-4 h (anterolateral thigh (ALT) and gracilis) and 6-8 h (toe transfer and fibula). No anesthesia-related complications or flap failures occurred. We conclude that regional anesthesia has important benefits in pediatric microsurgery and it is a safe and cost-effective alternative to general anesthesia. PMID:25858275

  8. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for

  9. Four-flap Breast Reconstruction: Bilateral Stacked DIEP and PAP Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, James L.; Allen, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In cases of bilateral breast reconstruction when the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) free flap alone does not provide sufficient volume for body-specific reconstruction, stacking each DIEP flap with a second free flap will deliver added volume and maintain a purely autologous reconstruction. Stacking the profunda artery perforator (PAP) flap with the DIEP flap offers favorable aesthetics and ideal operative efficiency. We present the indications, technique, and outcomes of our experience with 4-flap breast reconstruction using stacked DIEP/PAP flaps. Methods: The authors performed 4-flap DIEP/PAP breast reconstruction in 20 patients who required bilateral reconstruction without adequate single donor flap volume. The timing of reconstruction, average mastectomy/flap weights, and operative time are reported. Complications reviewed include fat necrosis, dehiscence, hematoma, seroma, mastectomy flap necrosis, and flap loss. Results: Twenty patients underwent 4-flap DIEP/PAP breast reconstruction. Surgical time averaged 7 hours and 20 minutes. The primary recipient vessels were the antegrade and retrograde internal mammary vessels. No flap losses occurred. Complications included 1 hematoma, 1 incidence of arterial and venous thrombosis successfully treated with anastomotic revision, 1 incidence of thigh donor site dehiscence, and 3 episodes of minor mastectomy skin flap necrosis. Conclusions: Four-flap breast reconstruction is a favorable autologous reconstructive option for patients requiring bilateral reconstruction without adequate single donor flap volume. Stacking DIEP/PAP flaps as described is both safe and efficient. Furthermore, this combination provides superior aesthetics mirroring the natural geometry of the breast. Bilateral stacked DIEP/PAP flaps represent our first choice for breast reconstruction in this patient population. PMID:26090273

  10. Pedicled Breast Flap for Soft Tissue Coverage of a Forearm Blast Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zuriarrain, Alexander; Brooks, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Summary: This article presents the case of a 35-year-old woman who sustained a shotgun blast injury to the left forearm and chest wall causing significant soft tissue loss of the extensor compartment. The patient suffered a Gustilo IIIB open radial shaft fracture requiring orthopedic stabilization and plastic surgery intervention. As a result, the patient eventually was reconstructed with the use of a pedicled breast flap. Because of the patient’s macromastia and her large forearm wound and morbid obesity, an individualized approach was developed such that a breast flap was designed because of its proximity to the upper extremity. The advantage of this type of reconstruction is a more natural contour to the forearm with minimal donor site morbidity. Before creation of the flap, the patient expressed interest in a reduction mammaplasty because of her symptomatic macromastia. Overall, this was a 2-step operation whereby first the breast flap was created, and then a few weeks later, once the arm healed, the reduction mammaplasty was performed. Other types of flaps for upper extremity reconstruction include the rectus abdominis myocutaneous, transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous, vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous, groin, and latissumus dorsi. The pedicled breast flap is an innovative approach to upper extremity soft tissue coverage and can be tailored to the specific needs of patients similar to our case presentation. PMID:27104108

  11. Acute vasculitis resulting in free flap failure: the importance of early recognition and options for management.

    PubMed

    Brennan, P A; Colbert, S; Spedding, A V; Herd, M K; Mellor, T K; Anand, R; McCrae, F

    2012-11-01

    Unusual or unexpected medical causes for free flap failure do occur but are uncommon. We present a rare case of a fibula free flap failure due to an acute vasculitis which was undiagnosed until after the flap had failed. In addition to two successful flap salvages and intravenous heparin, an epoprostenol infusion was commenced but a third salvage was not successful. The vasculitis resulted in marked blood vessel wall thickening, and cutaneous manifestations which presented as late signs. High peri-nuclear anti nuclear cytoplasmic antibody (pANCA) and myeloperoxidase (MOP) titres were subsequently found and histology from several blood vessels showed marked inflammation throughout the wall. A diagnosis of microscopic polyangiitis was made and high dose steroids were subsequently commenced. Interestingly, he had vasculitis several years previously treated with oral steroids but had been discharged from the rheumatology clinic. This rare case illustrates the potential hazards of free flap surgery in the vasculitides and discusses the warning signs and various management options to reduce the likelihood of flap failure in these patients. PMID:22534125

  12. Use of Postoperative Palatal Obturator After Total Palatal Reconstruction With Radial Forearm Fasciocutaneous Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Euicheol C; Jung, Young Ho; Shin, Jin-yong

    2015-07-01

    A 67-year-old-male patient visited our hospital for a mass on the soft palate of approximately 5.0 × 6.0  cm in size. He was diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma and reconstruction after total palate resection was planned. After ablative surgery, a radial forearm free flap procedure was successfully performed to cover the hard and soft palates. However, wound disruption occurred twice during the postoperative period. When a palate defect is reconstructed using a soft tissue free flap, flap drooping by gravitation and the flap itself can generate irregularity in the lower contour of the palate and, in the long-term, insufficiencies of velopharyngeal function, speech, and mastication. To complement such functional and aesthetic problems caused by flap drooping, conventional prosthetics and new operative techniques have been discussed. However, overcoming wound disruption caused by flap drooping in the acute postoperative period has not been discussed. In this case, the temporary use of a palatal obturator during the postoperative period was beneficial after soft tissue reconstruction of the palate. PMID:26114541

  13. Cholecystectomy after breast reconstruction with a pedicled autologous tram flap. Types of surgical access.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Magdalena; Kostro, Justyna; Jankau, Jerzy; Bigda, Justyna; Skorek, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    The number of breast reconstruction procedures has been increasing in recent years. One of the suggested treatment methods is breast reconstruction with a pedicled skin and muscle TRAM flap (transverse rectus abdominis muscle - TRAM). Surgical incisions performed during a cholecystectomy procedure may be located in the areas significant for flap survival. The aim of this paper is to present anatomical changes in abdominal walls secondary to pedicled skin and muscle (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction, which influence the planned access in cholecystectomy procedures. The authors present 2 cases of cholecystectomy performed due to cholelithiasis in female patients with a history of TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedures. The first patient underwent a traditional method of surgery 14 days after the reconstruction due to acute cholecystitis. The second patient underwent a laparoscopy due to cholelithiasis 7 years after the TRAM procedure. In both cases an abdominal ultrasound scan was performed prior to the operation, and surgical access was determined following consultation with a plastic surgeon. The patient who had undergone traditional cholecystectomy developed an infection of the postoperative wound. The wound was treated with antibiotics, vacuum therapy and skin grafting. After 7 weeks complete postoperative wound healing and correct healing of the TRAM flap were achieved. The patient who had undergone laparoscopy was discharged home on the second postoperative day without any complications. In order to plan a safe surgical access, it is necessary to know the changes in the anatomy of abdominal walls following a pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedure. PMID:25337177

  14. Aesthetic reconstruction of the upper antihelix in external ear with banner pull-through flap

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ebrahimi; Nasrin, Nejadsarvari; Azin, Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We can use pre auricular and post auricular skin as a pull through flap for upper antihelix defects reconstruction. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective case-series study, which was done in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Ward. In this study, 15 patients (3 women, 12 men), ranging from 45 to 72 years old (mean, 58 years) underwent operation with pull through banner flap for reconstruction of upper antihelix (7 cases) and triangular fossa with superior and inferior crura (5cases) caused by BCC or SCC excision. Reconstruction of upper antihelix defects up to 20 × 30 mm with post auricle pull through flap and reconstruction of triangular fossa up to 20 × 20 mm with pre auricle pull through flap were done. Results: Our study showed that pull through flap with superior pedicle from post auricular and preauricular area was an effective method for reconstruction of upper ear antihelix defects. Conclusion: We advocate that the pull through flap with superior pedicle from post auricle and pre auricle is an excellent choice for reconstruction of upper antihelix ear reconstruction in both crura and triangular fossa. PMID:26865786

  15. Reconstruction of low hairline microtia of Treacher Collins syndrome with a hinged mastoid fascial flap.

    PubMed

    Maeda, T; Oyama, A; Funayama, E; Yamamoto, Y

    2016-06-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare genetic disorder leading to congenital craniofacial malformations. Although this syndrome presents with various symptoms, corrective surgery for bilateral microtia with low hairline is one of the most challenging operations given the complex contours of the external ear. In this technical note, a novel, simple procedure for dealing with the low hairline by using a hinged mastoid fascial flap simultaneously with costal cartilage grafting is described. Several techniques for the reconstruction of low hairline microtia have been reported previously, such as skin graft, skin flap, and tissue expander, but the high number of repeat operations and residual scars remain problematic. As a simultaneous procedure with framework grafting, the use of a temporoparietal flap with skin grafting is popular; however, its drawbacks include the operative scar, decreased hair growth, and hair thinning. Patients with TCS show anatomical variations of the superficial temporal vessels supplying the temporoparietal flap. In contrast, due to the high vascularity of the mastoid fascia, the mastoid fascial flap can be elevated safely and easily as an anteriorly, posteriorly, superiorly, or inferiorly based flap. PMID:26744099

  16. Treatment of a Femur Nonunion with Microsurgical Corticoperiosteal Pedicled Flap from the Medial Femoral Condyle

    PubMed Central

    Guzzini, Matteo; Guidi, Marco; Civitenga, Carolina; Ferri, Germano; Ferretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The vascularized corticoperiosteal flap is harvested from the medial femoral condyle and it is nourished by the articular branch of the descending genicular artery and the superomedial genicular artery. This flap is usually harvested as a free flap for the reconstruction of bone defects at forearm, distal radius, carpus, hand, and recently at lower limb too. Case Report. A 50-year-old Caucasian man referred to our department for hypertrophic nonunion of the distal femur, refractory to the conservative treatments. The first surgical choice was the revision of the nail and the bone reconstruction with a corticoperiosteal pedicled flap from the medial femoral condyle. We considered union to have occurred 3.5 months after surgery when radiographs showed bridging of at least three of the four bony cortices and clinically the patient was able to walk with full weight bearing without any pain. At the last follow-up (25 months), the patient was completely satisfied with the procedure. Discussion. The corticoperiosteal flap allows a faster healing of fractures with a minimal morbidity at the donor site. We suggest that the corticoperiosteal pedicled flap graft is a reliable and effective treatment for distal femur nonunion. PMID:27064589

  17. [The Current Role of Salvage-Surgery of Recurrent Tumors in the Larynx and Pharynx].

    PubMed

    Stuck, B A; Rothmeier, N; Mattheis, S; Dominas, N; Lang, S

    2016-05-01

    Over the past 20 years, the therapeutic concepts for the treatment of head and neck cancer have evolved and non-surgical treatment strategies have gained in importance. However, despite improved organ preservation protocols and primary chemoradiation, tumor recurrence is still frequent. Under these conditions, salvage surgery if often the only remaining curative treatment option. Over the past 30 years, advancements in plastic-reconstructive surgery have broadened the surgical spectrum in the head and neck area, offering new treatment options for salvage surgery in recurrent cancer of the pharynx and larynx. Survival after salvage surgery mainly depends on the primary treatment modality as well as the localization and tumor stage at the time of initial diagnosis and local recurrence. For the reconstruction of defects after salvage surgery, pedicled flaps and microvascular free flaps may be utilized. The most frequently used flaps in these situations are the pectoralis major island- or the myocutaneous latissimus dorsi island flap. The radial forearm and the ALT-flap are potentially applicable free flaps. With the use of these flaps, vital tissue is transferred into the previously irradiated area, hereby allowing for reconstruction and functional preservation of the resected area and preventing complications such as fistulas. The expected morbidity and the likelihood of surgical success must be assessed thoroughly in every individual case prior to performing salvage surgery. This review aims to support decision making in these situations. PMID:27135424

  18. Periodontal Effects of a Transposed Versus a Conventional Flap in Mandibular Third Molar Extractions.

    PubMed

    Laurito, Domenica; Lollobrigida, Marco; Graziani, Filippo; Guerra, Fabrizio; Vestri, Annarita; De Biase, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare a transposed with a repositioned flap by assessing the periodontal effects on the second molar and primary healing after extraction of partially impacted lower third molars. A total of 24 patients requiring partially impacted mandibular wisdom tooth removal were enrolled in the study. The test group (n = 12) underwent a transposed flap procedure, whereas the control group (n = 12) underwent a repositioned flap procedure. Plaque index, probing depth, bleeding on probing, and width of keratinized tissue were recorded the day of surgery (T1) and after 60 days (T4). Wound dehiscence was assessed on the mesio-distal and bucco-lingual directions at days 2 (T2), 7 (T3), and T4. No significant differences have been observed in the periodontal parameters between the groups at T1 and T4 (P > 0.05). Similarly, no difference was found at T2, T3, and T4 in wound dehiscence incidence (P > 0.05). To date, no data exists on the use of transposed flaps in third molar surgery; thus a comparison of results cannot be done. Further studies with larger population are needed to investigate the potential advantages of this type of flap. PMID:27054424

  19. Delayed Cranioplasty: Outcomes Using Frozen Autologous Bone Flaps.

    PubMed

    Hng, Daniel; Bhaskar, Ivan; Khan, Mumtaz; Budgeon, Charley; Damodaran, Omprakash; Knuckey, Neville; Lee, Gabriel

    2015-09-01

    Reconstruction of skull defects following decompressive craniectomy is associated with a high rate of complications. Implantation of autologous cryopreserved bone has been associated with infection rates of up to 33%, resulting in considerable patient morbidity. Predisposing factors for infection and other complications are poorly understood. Patients undergoing cranioplasty between 1999 and 2009 were identified from a prospectively maintained database. Records and imaging were reviewed retrospectively. Demographics, the initial craniectomy and subsequent cranioplasty surgeries, complications, and outcomes were recorded. A total of 187 patients underwent delayed cranioplasty using autologous bone flaps cryopreserved at -30°C following decompressive craniectomy. Indications for craniectomy were trauma (77.0%), stroke (16.0%), subarachnoid hemorrhage (2.67%), tumor (2.14%), and infection (2.14%). There were 64 complications overall (34.2%), the most common being infection (11.2%) and bone resorption (5.35%). After multivariate analysis, intraoperative cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak was significantly associated with infection, whereas longer duration of surgery and unilateral site were associated with resorption. Cranioplasty using frozen autologous bone is associated with a high rate of infective complications. Intraoperative CSF leak is a potentially modifiable risk factor. Meticulous dissection during cranioplasty surgery to minimize the chance of breaching the dural or pseudodural plane may reduce the chance of bone flap. PMID:26269726

  20. Scrotal reconstruction with modified pudendal thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Mopuri, Nabil; O'Connor, Edmund Fitzgerald; Iwuagwu, Fortune C

    2016-02-01

    Scrotal skin loss can occur following trauma, Fournier's gangrene, post tumour excision, burns, etc. There are many techniques described in the literature including residual scrotal skin mobilization, skin grafts, pedicled and free flaps. The management is complex and challenging shown by the multiplicity of flaps and techniques described in the literature. We used a modified pudendal thigh flap to reconstruct scrotal defects in five patients. This study describes the vascularity of the flap, technique of elevation and the inset of the flap. The elevation and particularly the insetting make it different from other flaps raised on this vascular network for scrotal reconstruction. This pedicled flap is robust, reliable, resilient and produces a neo-scrotum that looks natural in appearance, offers good-quality skin cover and cushion to the testes as well as protective sensation. PMID:26774357

  1. Cost-effectiveness of monitoring free flaps.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Shiva; Sharp, David; Jardim, Christopher; Batstone, Martin D

    2016-06-01

    Methods of free flap monitoring have become more sophisticated and expensive. This study aims to determine the cost of free flap monitoring and examine its cost effectiveness. We examined a group of patients who had had free flaps to the head and neck over a two-year period, and combined these results with costs obtained from business managers and staff. There were 132 free flaps with a success rate of 99%. The cost of monitoring was Aus $193/flap. Clinical monitoring during this time period cost Aus$25 476 and did not lead to the salvage of any free flaps. Cost equivalence is reached between monitoring and not monitoring only at a failure rate of 15.8%. This is to our knowledge the first study to calculate the cost of clinical monitoring of free flaps, and to examine its cost-effectiveness. PMID:27015730

  2. The Effect of the Active Ingredient Thymoquinone on Flap Viability in Random Pattern Flaps in Rats.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Omer Faruk; Bozan, Nazim; Oksuz, Mustafa; Yuce, Serdar; Demir, Canser Yılmaz; Bulut, Gulay; Ragbetli, Murat Cetin

    2016-08-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) is a plant extract that has been shown to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, antimicrobial, and anticarcinogenic effects. The aim of this study is to research how the use of TQ affects flap viability. 42 rats were placed into 6 groups, with 7 rats in each. A 3 × 10 cm McFarlane flap model was used on the test animals. The sham group had used neither surgical nor TQ treatment. The control group had surgery but no treatment afterwards. The preoperative TQ group was given oral doses of 2 mg/kg. TQ for 10 days preoperatively with no treatment after the surgical procedure. The postoperative TQ group received oral doses of 2 mg/kg TQ for 10 days after the surgical process. The preoperative + postoperative (pre + postoperative) TQ group was given oral doses of 2 mg/kg TQ for 10 days both preoperatively and postoperatively. Finally, the dimethylsulfoxide group received 10 mg/kg dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) for 10 days both preoperatively and postoperatively. Ten days after surgery the findings were evaluated. The average rates of necrosis were found to be 29.7 % in the control group, 19.18 % in the preoperative TQ group, 13.05 % in the postoperative TQ group, 8.42 % in the pre + postoperative TQ group, and 29.03 % in the DMSO group. The experimental groups had better area measurement, histopathological, and electron microscopic results than the control group (All; p < 0.05). We believe that, because of its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and angiogenic properties, thymoquinone is an agent that can prevent ischemia-reperfusion damage and, therefore, prevent necrosis. PMID:27072137

  3. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  4. Flap--edge flowfield measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, John D.; Cantwell, Brian J.

    1997-11-01

    Recent studies of airframe noise suggest that the wing and flap trailing--edges as well as the flap side--edge are areas of significant noise generation. To identify the fluid dynamic processes associated with these noise sources, we are examining the flow--field around a NACA 63--215 Mod B main element airfoil configured with a half--span Fowler flap. The tests are performed in a low--speed wind tunnel at a Reynolds number of ~ 6.0×10^5. A hot wire traverse system is used to map the mean velocities and turbulence intensities in the near wake region of the flow. Measurements of the pressure fluctuations along the flap side--edge and in the cove of the airfoil configuration are made with pressure transducers mounted inside the airfoil. The experimental data are in good qualitative agreement with the numerical simulation of a slightly higher Reynolds number flow ( ~ 1.5×10^6) around a geometrically similar airfoil configuration.

  5. Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap after Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Morsi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Most patients after either superficial or total parotidectomy develop facial deformity and Frey syndrome, which leads to a significant degree of patient dissatisfaction. Objective Assess the functional outcome and esthetic results of the superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap after superficial or total parotidectomy. Methods A prospective cohort study for 11 patients subjected to parotidectomy using a partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap. The functional outcome (Frey syndrome, facial nerve involvement, and ear lobule sensation) and the esthetic results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. Results Facial nerve palsy occurred in 5 cases (45%), and all of them recovered completely within 6 months. The Minor starch iodine test was positive in 3 patients (27%), although only 1 (9%) subjectively complained of gustatory sweating. The designed visual analog score completed by the patients themselves ranged from 0 to 3 with a mean of 1.55 ± 0.93; the scores from the blinded evaluators ranged from 1 to 3 with a mean 1.64 ± 0.67. Conclusion The partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap offers a reasonable cosmetic option for reconstruction following either superficial or total parotidectomy by improving the facial deformity. The flap also lowers the incidence of Frey syndrome objectively and subjectively with no reported hazard of the spinal accessory nerve. PMID:26491478

  6. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  7. Role of (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate bone scan in the evaluation of the viability of the bone flap in mandibular reconstruction in patients with oromaxillofacial malignancies.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Madhur Kumar; Penumadu, Prasanth; Kumar, Dinesh; Pandit, Nandini

    2015-01-01

    Osteo-cutaneous flap are commonly used for reconstruction of bone defect after oncology surgery. The success of surgery depends on the viability of the bone flap. Bone scan is a known, but less performed method, to look for viability of bone flaps. We describe a case of 50-year-old lady, presenting with squamous cell carcinoma of left buccal mucosa (cT4N1M0) involving the skin and mandible. She underwent left segmental mandibulectomy and upper alveolectomy with neck dissection, followed by reconstruction using a fibular osteo-cutaneous flap and anterolateral thigh free flap. On postoperative day 10, the intraoral flap showed signs of nonviability. The patient was sent to nuclear medicine for assessment of viability of the free fibula flap. The patient underwent three phase (99m)Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) bone scan and single-photon emission computerized tomography. Computerized tomography showing good tracer uptake in fibula confirming viability. The case reflects the use of (99m)Tc-MDP in viability assessment of the bone flap. PMID:26170579

  8. Surgical Adhesives in Facial Plastic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Dean M; Chung, Victor K; Cappelle, Quintin M

    2016-06-01

    In facial plastic surgery, attaining hemostasis may require adjuncts to traditional surgical techniques. Fibrin tissue adhesives have broad applications in surgery and are particularly useful when addressing the soft tissue encountered in facial plastic surgery. Beyond hemostasis, tissue adhesion and enhanced wound healing are reported benefits associated with a decrease in operating time, necessity for drains and pressure dressings, and incidence of wound healing complications. These products are clinically accessible to most physicians who perform facial plastic surgery, including skin grafts, flaps, rhytidectomy, and endoscopic forehead lift. PMID:27267012

  9. Tanshinone IIA Pretreatment Renders Free Flaps against Hypoxic Injury through Activating Wnt Signaling and Upregulating Stem Cell-Related Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zihan; Zhang, Zhenxin; Wu, Lijun; Sun, Yaowen; Guo, Yadong; Qin, Gaoping; Mu, Shengzhi; Fan, Ronghui; Wang, Benfeng; Gao, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    Partial or total flap necrosis after flap transplantation is sometimes clinically encountered in reconstructive surgery, often as a result of a period of hypoxia that exceeds the tolerance of the flap tissue. In this study, we determine whether tanshinone IIA (TSA) pretreatment can protect flap tissue against hypoxic injury and improve its viability. Primary epithelial cells isolated from the dorsal skin of mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks. Cell counting kit-8 and Trypan Blue assays were carried out to examine the proliferation of TSA-pretreated cells after exposure to cobalt chloride. Then, Polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to determine the expression of β-catenin, GSK-3β, SOX2, and OCT4 in TSA-treated cells. In vivo, after mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks, a reproducible ischemic flap model was implemented, and the area of surviving tissue in the transplanted flaps was measured. Immunohistochemistry was also conducted to examine the related biomarkers mentioned above. Results show that epidermal cells, pretreated with TSA, showed enhanced resistance to hypoxia. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in TSA-pretreated cells was characterized by the upregulation of β-catenin and the downregulation of GSK-3β. The expression of SOX2 and OCT4 controlled by Wnt signaling were also found higher in TSA pretreated epithelial cells. In the reproducible ischaemic flap model, pretreatment with TSA enhanced resistance to hypoxia and increased the area of surviving tissue in transplanted flaps. The expression of Wnt signaling pathway components, stem-cell related biomarkers, and CD34, which are involved in the regeneration of blood vessels, was also upregulated in TSA-pretreated flap tissue. The results show that TSA pretreatment protects free flaps against hypoxic injury and increases the area of surviving tissue by activating Wnt signaling and upregulating stem cell-related biomarkers. PMID:25302618

  10. Benefit of HSP90α intervention on ischemia-reperfusion injury of venous blood-congested flaps

    PubMed Central

    HU, XIAO-YING; CHEN, ZHEN-YU; ZHANG, BIN; LENG, XIANG-FENG; FAN, XIAO-JIAN; LIU, TAO

    2016-01-01

    In order to decrease the incidence of flap necrosis after reconstructive surgeries, new approaches are required. In the present study, a model of venous congested flaps in rats was established to test the heat shock protein (HSP) 90α, ‘F-5’, protein as an intervention therapy to alleviate ischemia-reperfusion injury. A recombinant plasmid pET15b-F-5 carrying the HSP90α gene was constructed and the induced protein was purified from bacterial cell cultures. The rats in the study were divided into three different intervention groups: group A rats were treated with normal saline prior to flap establishment, group B rats were treated with HSP90α, ‘F-5’, protein prior to flap establishment, and group C rats were treated with the same ‘F-5’ protein after the surgical procedure. Additionally, the reperfusion time-points, ischemia for 6 or 8 h (5 rats each), were established in each group. After set periods of time, the flaps were observed for skin appearance, blood flow, survival rate and histological changes including neovascularization and re-epithelialization. The results showed that the flaps in the rats pre-treated with ‘F-5’ protein performed better than the flaps of rats in the other two groups: the blood flow was higher, flap survival rate was increased, inflammatory cell infiltration was decreased and angiogenesis increased, and new skin structure was better completed by the end of the experiment. The parameters examind were improved for all the groups when the ischemia time was 6 h instead of 8 h. In conclusion, HSP90α intervention prior to flap establishment was shown to be beneficial in the model of ischemia-reperfusion injury in venous-congested flaps. PMID:27347036

  11. Vascular Complications After Radiotherapy in Head and Neck Free Flap Reconstruction: Clinical Outcome Related to Vascular Biology.

    PubMed

    Tall, Jael; Björklund, Tinna Christersdottir; Skogh, Ann-Charlott Docherty; Arnander, Claes; Halle, Martin

    2015-09-01

    Radiotherapy as a risk factor for free flap failure has been widely debated. The purpose of this study was to investigate vascular complications in free flap surgery at a center advocating preoperative radiotherapy. On the basis of previous experimental studies, we also aimed to investigate temporal aspects of vascular complications in both arteries and veins. Furthermore, we aimed to study the effect of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), because irradiated microvascular recipient vessels are associated with impaired fibrinolysis.A retrospective review was conducted for 344 consecutive head and neck microvascular reconstructions. Radiotherapy was administered previously in 283 (82%) of the cases, median dose 64 Gy. Flap outcome, vascular complications, and salvage attempts were identified, along with time elapsed from completed radiotherapy, described as early (<6 weeks), delayed (6-15 weeks) and late (>15 weeks) reconstructions.Total flap loss was more common in irradiated cases (P = 0.035), among which flap failure increased with time elapsed from the last radiotherapy session to surgery (P = 0.021). Among 30 registered vascular complications, venous thrombosis was the most common type and increased in delayed, compared to early, reconstructions (P = 0.012). Increased salvage rates were observed when tPA was administered intraoperatively (P = 0.015).The present study indicates that previous radiotherapy is a risk factor for head and neck free flap failure, especially in delayed reconstructions. This may be linked to previous findings of impaired fibrinolysis in irradiated microvascular recipient veins, which is further supported by the beneficial effect of tPA during salvage surgery. We emphasize the importance of early reconstruction after radiotherapy and suggest that there is a role for fibrinolytic agents during free flap salvage surgery in previously irradiated subjects. PMID:25003403

  12. Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Extended Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps and Implants.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L; Børsen-Koch, Mikkel; Nielsen, Henrik T; Salzberg, Andrew; Thomsen, Jørn B

    2015-06-01

    We present our experience of bilateral total breast reconstruction using a double-sided extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap in a case series of 10 patients. Reconstruction was successfully achieved in all cases with few complications. The median time for surgery was 275 minutes (200-330), and the average implant size used was 350 cm(3) (195-650). We demonstrate how the extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap allows for a swift and reliable direct to implant bilateral total breast reconstruction in a simple setting and is a valuable adjunct to our armamentarium of techniques for single-stage bilateral breast reconstruction. PMID:26180736

  13. Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Extended Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps and Implants

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L.; Børsen-Koch, Mikkel; Nielsen, Henrik T.; Salzberg, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present our experience of bilateral total breast reconstruction using a double-sided extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap in a case series of 10 patients. Reconstruction was successfully achieved in all cases with few complications. The median time for surgery was 275 minutes (200–330), and the average implant size used was 350 cm3 (195–650). We demonstrate how the extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap allows for a swift and reliable direct to implant bilateral total breast reconstruction in a simple setting and is a valuable adjunct to our armamentarium of techniques for single-stage bilateral breast reconstruction. PMID:26180736

  14. Quadratus lumborum catheters for breast reconstruction requiring transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Spence, Nicole Z; Olszynski, Patrycja; Lehan, Anne; Horn, Jean-Lois; Webb, Christopher A J

    2016-06-01

    Patients diagnosed with breast cancer may opt to undergo surgical reconstructive flaps at the time of or after mastectomies. These surgeries leave patients with significant postoperative pain and sometimes involve large surgical beds including graft sites from the abdomen to reconstruct the breast. Consequently, multimodal methods of pain management have become highly favored. Quadratus lumborum catheters offer an opioid-sparing technique that can be performed easily and safely. We present a case of a patient who underwent a breast flap reconstruction and had bilateral quadratus lumborum catheters placed for perioperative pain control. PMID:26984687

  15. Use of Intercostal Flap for Conservative Surgical Management of Complex Lower Esophageal Fistula.

    PubMed

    du Pouget, L; Tuech, J J; Baste, J M

    2015-01-01

    Lower esophageal fistula is a rare complication after upper digestive tract surgery, but it is associated with high morbi-mortality. There is no consensus on therapeutic care, however when reoperation is necessary, a pedicled inter-costal flap from the thoracotomy can be easily harvested to patch a large defect or buttress a direct suture, saving -digestive reconstruction. This technique should be mastered by thoracic and general surgeons. We present here two cases of lower esophagus fistulas cured thanks to this intercostal flap, in which we avoided fistula recurrence with maintenance of digestive continuity. PMID:26324039

  16. [Presentation of a flap web space laterodigital in cleft foot].

    PubMed

    Szwebel, J; Haddad, R; Mitrofanoff, M

    2012-08-01

    Cleft foot deformity is characterized by the absence of one or more median rays of the foot. This rare polymorphous congenital anomaly occurs more frequently in males, with a frequent autosomal dominant type of transmission. The purpose of surgical treatment is to narrow the width of the foot, but also to improve its global aesthetic look. Toe reparation, and more specifically web space reconstruction, provide the main technical challenges. We present an adaptation to the foot of a laterodigital cutaneous flap published by Barsky in 1964 for commissural reconstruction in cleft hand syndroms. The anatomical structure of fingers and toes commisures being different, this flap seems more adapted to the surgery of the foot. We gathered seven patients' files treated for ectrodactyly of the foot with this technique by the same surgeon from 2005 to 2008. No particular postoperative complications were noted, and the patients all expressed their satisfaction regarding the improvement of the appearance of their foot. We recommend to add the use of this flap in the "tool box" of the surgeon in charge of the management of foot deformities. PMID:20947236

  17. Pediatric Arm Reconstruction after Shot-gun Injury Using Peroneal Free-flap and Pedicled Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap: Late Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz-Dominguez, Abel

    2016-01-01

    Summary: A 15-year-old patient harmed himself upon firing a shotgun that he was carrying when he slipped and fell, causing a destructive wound in the right arm with a medial entry hole and a posterolateral exit hole. The biceps, coracobrachialis, triceps, deltoids, skin cover, and humerus were injured; however, the blood vessels and major nerves of the area were surprisingly not affected. The residual skin muscle defect after debridements was 16 × 5 cm medially and posteriorly, and the bone loss was 7 cm. The wound was reconstructed during a single surgery with a free fibula flap and a pedicled flap of latissimus dorsi. Ten years after surgery, the patient presents neither functional deficit of the injured limb (shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand) nor sequelae in the donor areas; he performs his daily activities without any limitations. This case confirms that the use of free bone flaps and pedicled muscle flaps in pediatric patients can provide excellent long-term results. PMID:27622112

  18. Pediatric Arm Reconstruction after Shot-gun Injury Using Peroneal Free-flap and Pedicled Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap: Late Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Caballero, Carlos; Ortiz-Dominguez, Abel

    2016-08-01

    A 15-year-old patient harmed himself upon firing a shotgun that he was carrying when he slipped and fell, causing a destructive wound in the right arm with a medial entry hole and a posterolateral exit hole. The biceps, coracobrachialis, triceps, deltoids, skin cover, and humerus were injured; however, the blood vessels and major nerves of the area were surprisingly not affected. The residual skin muscle defect after debridements was 16 × 5 cm medially and posteriorly, and the bone loss was 7 cm. The wound was reconstructed during a single surgery with a free fibula flap and a pedicled flap of latissimus dorsi. Ten years after surgery, the patient presents neither functional deficit of the injured limb (shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand) nor sequelae in the donor areas; he performs his daily activities without any limitations. This case confirms that the use of free bone flaps and pedicled muscle flaps in pediatric patients can provide excellent long-term results. PMID:27622112

  19. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  20. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  1. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  2. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697... Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... with § 23.145(b)(3) necessitates wing flap retraction to positions that are not fully retracted,...

  3. The Use of Composite Flaps in the Management of Large Full-Thickness Defects of the Lower Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shuo; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Yuntong; Xue, Chunyu; Bi, Hongda; Dai, Haiying; Xing, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe a modified surgical procedure that uses a combination of the tarsoconjunctival flap, orbicularis myocutaneous advancement flap, and paranasal-island flap to correct extensive full-thickness lower eyelid defects in functioning eyes. From May 2010 to December 2013, a total of 15 patients had reconstructive surgeries of large to giant lower eyelid defect, with an average 19-month follow-up. The musculocutaneous flaps were harvested from both orbicularis and paranasal regions and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. No major complications were observed in any of the patients. All the patients showed aesthetic eyelid contour, good color, and texture match as well as no obvious scar formation. The mean Marginal Reflex Distance-2 measured 4 months after surgery was 4.9 ± 0.4 mm. Reconstruction of a large defect in the lower eyelid with a tarsoconjunctival flap and the composite neighboring musculocutaneous flaps is a reliable and reproducible method. With proper design and well-executed precision, excellent functional and aesthetic results can be achieved by this elegant procedure without any major complications. PMID:26765467

  4. Wound Dehiscence after Wisdom Tooth Removal in Mandibular Mesioangular Class IB Impactions: Triangular Transposition Flap versus Envelope Flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh; Ilkhani, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Wound dehiscence after lower third molar surgery extends the postoperative treatment period and may cause long-standing pain. The aim of this study was to compare wound dehiscence after removal of wisdom teeth in the most prevalent mandibular impaction (mesioangular class IB) by two different soft tissue flap designs. Materials and methods. Partially-erupted mandibular third molars with mesioangular class IB impaction (Pell and Gregory classification) were selected. Split mouth technique was used to compare the two flap designs (envelope vs. triangular transposition flap—TTF). The patients were recalled one week and a month later and rechecked for dehiscence, infection, and dry socket formation. Results. There were no cases of infection in either group. However, three cases of dry socket in the envelope group and four in the TTF group were recorded. In the envelope group, dehiscence occurred in 43% of cases during the first week, with 67% of cases being a large dehiscence (diameters of more than 5 mm). Extra appointments (those requested by the patient exclusively related to the problem of the hole distal to the second molar) were scheduled in 10% of cases in the envelope group. In the TTF group, dehiscence occurred during the first week for the same impaction in 19% of cases with large dehiscence cases occurring in 65% of cases and extra appointment rate at 4.1%. Conclusion. According to theresults in the evaluated operation, TTF may prevent postoperative wound dehiscence more probably than the envelope flap. PMID:26697150

  5. Modified superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator flap and supermicrosurgery technique for lower extremity reconstruction: a new approach for moderate-sized defects.

    PubMed

    Hong, Joon Pio; Sun, Sang Hoon; Ben-Nakhi, Muneera

    2013-10-01

    The superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) flap is an evolved form of groin flap. It overcomes the inherent disadvantages of the groin flap by preserving the deep fascia but still requires challenging skills because of short pedicles and small caliber of vessels. The use of SCIP flap was evaluated for lower extremity use.From June of 2009 to August of 2011, a total of 79 cases were performed (age range, 4-80 years) on the lower extremity using supermicrosurgical approach. All flaps were harvested above the deep fat and the pedicles were taken above or just below the deep fascia to reconstruct the defects throughout the lower extremity.Supermicrosurgery technique was used in 71 cases. A total of 75 cases were performed successfully; 1 case underwent revision but failed and 2 cases were lost within 2 days of surgery. Average size of the flap was 75.5 cm, thickness 7 mm, average length of pedicle was 5 cm, and the average caliber of artery was 0.7 mm. Donor sites were all closed primarily but complications were noted with 1 dehiscence and prolong drainage of lymphatics. Flaps provided good functional coverage and appearance. The average follow-up was 12 months.With the modification of elevating the flap on the superficial fascia, we can harvest a thin flap without additional debulking and avoid complications such as lymphorrhea. Furthermore, with the perforator to perforator or perforator to small distal vessel approach, we can apply this flap on all regions of the lower extremity overcoming the difficulties with short pedicle and small vessel caliber. In our hands, the modified SCIP flap is the flap of choice for small to moderate size defects in the lower extremity. PMID:23187712

  6. Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap For Large Traumatic Macular Holes.

    PubMed

    Abou Shousha, Mohsen Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of inverted internal limiting membrane flap as a treatment option for large traumatic macular holes.This is a prospective noncomparative study in which 12 eyes with large traumatic macular holes (basal diameter of 1300-2800 μm) since 3 to 6 months were subjected to standard 23-gauge vitrectomy with removal of the posterior hyaloid, brilliant blue G (BBG)-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling in a circular fashion keeping it attached to the edge of the hole to create a flap. At the end of the surgery, air fluid exchange was done with inversion of the internal limiting membrane flap inside the macular hole using the soft tipped cannula and sulfur hexafluoride 20% as tamponade. The main follow-up measures are the best corrected visual acuity and the optical coherence tomography for 6 to 9 months.All the included eyes had a closed hole from the first week postoperative and along the follow-up period (6-9 months). The best corrected visual acuity improved from 20/2000 to 20/200 with a median of 20/400 preoperatively to 20/400 to 20/50 with a median of 20/100 at the end of follow-up period.Inverted internal limiting membrane flap is a good adjuvant to standard vitrectomy in the management of large traumatic macular holes that led to the 100% closure rate and improvement of best corrected visual acuity. PMID:26817894

  7. The use of the pectoralis major flap for advanced and recurrent head and neck malignancy in the medically compromised patient.

    PubMed

    Avery, C M E; Crank, S T; Neal, C P; Hayter, J P; Elton, C

    2010-11-01

    A retrospective review of seventy-one PPM flaps used between 1996 and 2010 primarily for oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma presenting as either advanced stage IV primary disease (41/43), extensive recurrent (10) or metastatic (9) neck disease. The PPM flap was most commonly used following resection of the mandible (23) or the tongue/oropharynx (19). When the PPM flap was the preferred reconstruction option (54) the main indication, in addition to advanced disease, was significant medical co-morbidity (23). The majority of PPM flaps (75%) were used in the latter half of the series for an increasing number of patients in poor health with advanced disease. There was no evidence of an increase in age, ASA grade or extent of disease during this period. Approximately one quarter (17) of the flaps were used after failure of a free flap, most commonly a DCIA (7) or radial (6) flap. The 30day mortality in this group of compromised patients undergoing major surgery for advanced disease was 7% (5/71). The overwhelming majority had significant co-morbidity (94% grade 2 or higher with 63% ASA grade 3) and 90% had already undergone previous major surgery and/or radiotherapy. The 1-year, 3-year and 5-year overall survival rates were 65.5%, 39.1% and 11.0% respectively with cancer-specific survival rates of 82.0%, 65.5% and 65.5%. The majority died of disease related to the underlying co-morbidity. We recommend an aggressive approach to the surgical resection of advanced and recurrent disease but a pragmatic approach to reconstruction. The PPM major flap is reliable for reconstruction of defects of the mandible, tongue and oropharynx with a complete flap failure rate of 2.8%. Lateral defects of the mandible were managed without a plate and with an acceptable outcome in the context of limited life expectancy. This is the largest study of the use of the PPM flap for this type of patient group. The flap retains a major role in the management of advanced primary or

  8. Initial experience with breast reconstruction using the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: a study of 45 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, E.; Bond, J.; Dolan, S.; Kirk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery for breast cancer has led to an increased interest in reconstruction following mastectomy. The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been proven to give good results in terms of restoration of body symmetry with near normal contour and consistency. Furthermore, immediate reconstruction has the advantage of a single procedure with less psychological morbidity, and reduction in hospital stay and overall complication rate. The aim of this study was to review our experience with the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap procedure an initial series of 45 patients. The overall complication rate of 27% is similar to that reported in the literature, with no total flap loss and nine patients with partial flap loss. There was no delay in commencement of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy and we believe our ability to detect local recurrence has not been compromised. We consider that immediate breast reconstruction is now an integral part of the surgical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:10489808

  9. Pressure Distribution Over Airfoils with Fowler Flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzinger, Carl J; Anderson, Walter B

    1938-01-01

    Report presents the results of tests made of a Clark y airfoil with a Clark y Fowler flap and of an NACA 23012 airfoil with NACA Fowler flaps. Some of the tests were made in the 7 by 10-foot wind tunnel and others in the 5-foot vertical wind tunnel. The pressures were measured on the upper and lower surfaces at one chord section both on the main airfoils and on the flaps for several angles of attack with the flaps located at the maximum-lift settings. A test installation was used in which the model was mounted in the wind tunnel between large end planes so that two-dimensional flow was approximated. The data are given in the form of pressure-distribution diagrams and as plots of calculated coefficients for the airfoil-and-flap combinations and for the flaps alone.

  10. Davis flap: the glory still present

    PubMed Central

    El-Sabbagh, Ahmed Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Upper third defects of the ear are too large to be closed primarily without distorting the auricle. Full thickness defects can be reconstructed with local flaps. In this article, Davis flap was used to fill the upper third defects of the ear with some modifications. Patients and methods: Eight patients underwent reconstruction of full thickness auricular defects with Davis flaps from July 2012 to December 2014. The posterior surface of the flap and the raw area of conchal area were covered by full thickness graft taken from posterior surface of ear. Results: All flaps survived. No congestion was noted. The donor sites and skin grafts healed uneventfully. Conclusion: Davis flap is a simple and reproducible tool for reconstruction of upper third of ear. PMID:27274439