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Sample records for gundersen flap surgery

  1. Flaps in nail surgery.

    PubMed

    Jellinek, Nathaniel J

    2012-01-01

    Nail surgery, particularly when it involves the matrix, may lead to permanent nail deformity, with associated disruption in digital function. Soft tissue rearrangement of the nail tissues, nail flaps, can be used to reconstruct the nail to preserve a more normal nail plate. Other nail flaps can also be used to correct congenital malalignment, to cover full thickness nail unit defects, and for nail fold reconstruction. The indications and techniques for successful flap reconstruction are reviewed. PMID:23210752

  2. Bilobed flap in sole surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Conejo-Mir, J.; Bueno Montes, J.; Moreno Gimenez, J.C.; Camacho-Martinez, F.

    1985-09-01

    The bilobed flap is a simple reconstructive technique principally used to correct substantial defects in the facial region. The authors present their experience with this local flap in the difficult plantar area, with excellent short-term functional results. They describe the special characteristics of the bilobed flap in this zone, and comment on its indications and possible complications.

  3. Forehead flap in maxillofacial surgery: Our experiences

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Syed S.; Ghassemi, Alireza; Rehman, Sajjad A.; Ansari, Md. Kaleem

    2015-01-01

    The forehead flap is a commonly used technique to reconstruct the deep and large nasal defects. It can be conveniently performed under local or general anesthesia and provides a very good color and texture matching to the nasal skin, which makes it a suitable graft harvesting site for nasal reconstruction. It has only single disadvantage disadvantagethat it is a two-stage procedure and finishing surgeries are needed occasionally for best surgical and cosmetic outcome. In this paper, we describe three different applications of forehead flaps. PMID:26668457

  4. Forehead flap in maxillofacial surgery: Our experiences.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Syed S; Ghassemi, Alireza; Rehman, Sajjad A; Ansari, Md Kaleem

    2015-01-01

    The forehead flap is a commonly used technique to reconstruct the deep and large nasal defects. It can be conveniently performed under local or general anesthesia and provides a very good color and texture matching to the nasal skin, which makes it a suitable graft harvesting site for nasal reconstruction. It has only single disadvantage disadvantagethat it is a two-stage procedure and "finishing" surgeries are needed occasionally for best surgical and cosmetic outcome. In this paper, we describe three different applications of forehead flaps. PMID:26668457

  5. [Renaissance of pedicled flaps in oral and maxillofacial surgery].

    PubMed

    Twieg, M; Reich, W; Dempf, R; Eckert, A W

    2014-06-01

    A retrospective analysis in the period 2007 to 2011 included 71 surgically treated patients for carcinoma of the head and neck region and subsequent reconstruction with 36 pedicled distant flaps and 47 free flaps. Patient specific parameters of data collection with SPSS 17.0 were age and sex distribution, TNM stage and treatment. The specific type of flap reconstruction, duration of surgery, complications, intensive care and inpatient treatment were recorded. The results showed that the healing process was uneventful in 26 (72.2 %) pedicled flaps, 14 (38.9 %) pedicled flaps were transplanted in a preoperatively irradiated area of the head and neck region and in 86.0 % with a positive healing process. Tumor stage, general physical condition of the patient and type of therapy are the key parameters for the choice of reconstruction. PMID:24449079

  6. The Institute of Surgery and Innovation Trunk Flap Dissection Course.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Sabrina Helena; Mestak, Ondrej; Stampolidis, Nektarios; Vasconcelos, Ins

    2015-11-01

    The Institute of Surgery and Innovation Trunk Flap Dissection Course is a biannual two day course, which covers dissection of flaps in the anterior and posterior trunk on fresh-frozen cadavers. The event is run by the Institute of Surgery and Innovation, and it was held for the first time in November 2013, at the Nottingham City Hospital Training Centre. The course was taught in English by senior faculty from the Department of Plastic Surgery of Nottingham University.The first day was dedicated to raising 8 flaps in the anterior chest and abdomen, while the second day was dedicated to 6 flaps in the posterior trunk and buttocks.There were 3 participants per dissection table and the faculty to participant ratio was 2:1, allowing close supervision and one-on-one teaching. Each flap was briefly introduced by a 10-minute presentation, followed by a live demonstration of how to raise the flap by one of the faculty. The main advantage of this course is that the focus is on practical dissection, rather than lectures. The presentations that were given had a very personal feel, describing real cases encountered in the faculty's previous experience. This served as a platform to discuss dissection tips, tricks, and common pitfalls. Flaps represent the basis of reconstructive surgery; however, they are often taught late in the professional course of a residency as they are technically challenging. This course offers the opportunity to practice skills and receive very comprehensive feedback from experienced faculty.The event is open to trainees of all levels, and it attracted very junior as well as senior trainees from across Europe, thus offering an international prospective.The course's affordability is a luring feature and the excellent content and quality of teaching makes it a highly valuable experience, which I would widely recommend to trainees of all levels. PMID:25003434

  7. Refinements and secondary surgery after flap reconstruction of the traumatized hand.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Grace J; Chang, James

    2014-05-01

    The traumatized hand often has soft tissue loss requiring flap reconstruction. Before proceeding with flap selection, the need for future refinement and secondary surgery should be taken into consideration. Although muscle flaps may offer better contour, fasciocutaneous flaps allow easier secondary flap elevation. After the initial flap reconstruction, indications for secondary procedures may be managed according to tissue type: bone, joint, tendon, nerve, and soft tissue. PMID:24731611

  8. Cryptogenic stroke following abdominal free flap breast reconstruction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Huizhuang; Malata, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Abdominal free flap breast reconstruction is regarded as the gold standard method of post-mastectomy breast reconstruction by many. It is a major surgery which can be associated with varied systemic complications. To date, there have been no reports of cerebrovascular complications in the literature which examine the possible relation between thromboembolism and patent foramen ovale (PFO) in patients undergoing microvascular breast reconstruction. PRESENTATION OF CASE A 54-year old female with a pre-existing PFO developed a stroke following bilateral mastectomies and immediate free flap breast reconstruction on postoperative day 5. This was attributed to an air embolus caused by central venous pressure line removal. After uneventful intra and early postoperative periods, the patient had collapsed suddenly on day 5 and become unresponsive immediately following the removal of a central venous line. Brain magnetic resonance imaging confirmed a cerebrovascular accident. This resolved within 48h following therapeutic heparinisation. A clinical diagnosis of paradoxical embolism was made and she was subsequently referred to the cardiologists for angiographic closure of the PFO. DISCUSSION The case study herein reported gives an account that PFO can have considerable health implications in the early postoperative period and conceivably intraoperatively in patients undergoing major reconstructive surgeries. CONCLUSION Surgeons and cardiologists should be aware of this cerebrovascular complication secondary to PFO following major reconstructive surgery such as microvascular breast reconstruction. It also serves to challenge microvascular surgeons to reconsider routine use of central venous pressure lines in free flap patients who might otherwise have good peripheral vessels for postoperative fluid and antibiotic administration. PMID:25437687

  9. The possibility for use of venous flaps in plastic surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baytinger, V. F.; Kurochkina, O. S.; Selianinov, K. V.; Baytinger, A. V.; Dzyuman, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The use of venous flaps is controversial. The mechanism of perfusion of venous flaps is still not fully understood. The research was conducted on 56 white rats. In our experimental work we studied two different models of venous flaps: pedicled venous flap (PVF) and pedicled arterialized venous flap (PAVF). Our results showed that postoperative congestion was present in all flaps. However 66.7% of all pedicled venous flaps and 100% of all pedicled arterialized venous flaps eventually survived. Histological examination revealed that postoperatively the blood flow in the skin of the pedicled arterialized venous flap became re-reversed again; there were no differences between mechanism of survival of venous flaps and other flaps. On the 7-14th day in the skin of all flaps were processes of neoangiogenesis and proliferation. Hence the best scenario for the clinical use of venous flaps unfolds when both revascularization and skin coverage are required.

  10. [The role definition of lateral arm free flap in reconstruction after head and neck cancer surgery].

    PubMed

    Li, C; Cai, Y C; Wang, W; He, Y X; Lan, X J; Li, Q L; Zhou, Y Q; Liu, J F; Zhu, G Q; Liu, K; Wang, S X; Wang, K; Fan, J C; Sun, R H

    2016-02-01

    Application of free flap is one of the important repair means in head and neck surgery. A variety of free flaps, such as anterolateral thigh flap, have showed unique advantages in repair for tissue defects after resection of head and neck tumor, and have became increasing popularity. Lateral arm flee flap is an important repair means in plastic surgery, which has developed more than 30 years, but the application of this flap for reconstruction in head and neck surgery is relatively backward, with few reports. This review focuses on the creativity and innovation, the relationship between anatomy and clinical application, and the application status and prospects for lateral arm flee flap in individual head and neck reconstruction surgery. PMID:26898882

  11. Management of complications and compromised free flaps following major head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Kucur, Cuneyt; Durmus, Kasim; Uysal, Ismail O; Old, Matthew; Agrawal, Amit; Arshad, Hassan; Teknos, Theodoros N; Ozer, Enver

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are preferred for most major head and neck reconstruction surgeries because of better functional outcomes, improved esthetics, and generally higher success rates. Numerous studies have investigated measures to prevent flap loss, but few have evaluated the optimal treatment for free flap complications. This study aimed to determine the complication rate after free flap reconstructions and discusses our management strategies. Medical records of 260 consecutive patients who underwent free flap reconstructions for head and neck defects between July 2006 and June 2010 were retrospectively reviewed for patient and surgical characteristics and postoperative complications. The results revealed that microvascular free flaps were extremely reliable, with a 3.5% incidence of flap failure. There were 78 surgical site complications. The most common complication was neck wound infection, followed by dehiscence, vascular congestion, abscess, flap necrosis, hematoma, osteoradionecrosis, and brisk bleeding. Twenty patients with poor wound healing received hyperbaric oxygen therapy, which was ineffective in three patients who eventually experienced complete flap loss. Eleven patients with vascular congestion underwent medicinal leech therapy, which was effective. Among the 78 patients with complications, 44 required repeat surgery, which was performed for postoperative brisk bleeding in three. Eventually, ten patients experienced partial flap loss and nine experienced complete flap loss, with the latter requiring subsequent pectoralis major flap reconstruction. Microvascular free flap reconstruction represents an essential and reliable technique for head and neck defects and allows surgeons to perform radical resection with satisfactory functional results and acceptable complication rates. PMID:25575841

  12. Reconstructive Surgery for Severe Penile Inadequacy: Phalloplasty with a Free Radial Forearm Flap or a Pedicled Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    PubMed Central

    Lumen, N.; Monstrey, S.; Ceulemans, P.; van Laecke, E.; Hoebeke, P.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives. Severe penile inadequacy in adolescents is rare. Phallic reconstruction to treat this devastating condition is a major challenge to the reconstructive surgeon. Phallic reconstruction using the free radial forearm flap (RFF) or the pedicled anterolateral thigh flap (ALTF) has been routinely used in female-to-male transsexuals. Recently we started to use these techniques in the treatment of severe penile inadequacy. Methods. Eleven males (age 15 to 42 years) were treated with a phallic reconstruction. The RFF is our method of choice; the ALTF is an alternative when a free flap is contraindicated or less desired by the patient. The RFF was used in 7 patients, the ALTF in 4 patients. Mean followup was 25 months (range: 449 months). Aesthetic and functional results were evaluated. Results. There were no complications related to the flap. Aesthetic results were judged as good in 9 patients and moderate in 2 patients. Sensitivity in the RFF was superior compared to the ALTF. Four patients developed urinary complications (stricture and/or fistula). Six patients underwent erectile implant surgery. In 2 patients the erectile implant had to be removed due to infection or erosion. Conclusion. In case of severe penile inadequacy due to whatever condition, a phalloplasty is the preferred treatment nowadays. The free radial forearm flap is still the method of choice. The anterolateral thigh flap can be a good alternative, especially when free flaps are contraindicated, but sensitivity is markedly inferior in these flaps. PMID:19009034

  13. Predictable dental rehabilitation in maxillomandibular reconstruction with free flaps. The role of implant guided surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cebrian-Carretero, José L.; Sobrino, José A.; Yu, Tomás; Burgueño-García, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of maxillomandibular defects secondary to oral cancer surgery, represent a great challenge for Maxillofacial surgeons. During the last decades the reconstructive surgery has experimented a big advance due to the development of the microsurgical techniques. At present, we are able to reconstruct complex defects using free flaps that provide both soft and bone tissue. Fibula, iliac crest and scapula free flaps have been the three classic options for the maxillomandibular reconstruction owing to the amount of bone that this flaps provide, allowing the posterior dental rehabilitation with implants. Today, our objective it is not only the aesthetic reconstruction, but also the functional reconstruction of the patients enhancing their life quality. Guided implant surgery in free flap reconstructed patients has become an essential tool, helping to define the exact position of the dental implant in the flap. In this way it is possible to look for the areas with better bone conditions, avoiding the osteosynthesis material used to fixate the flap with the native bone and deciding the best biomechanical option, in terms of number and situation of the implants, for the future dental prostheses. In summary, using the guided implant surgery, it is possible to design an exact and predictable dental implant rehabilitation in patients with oral cancer who are reconstructed with free microvascular flap, resulting in an optimal aesthetic and functional result. Key words:Oral cancer, mandibulectomy, maxillectomy, microvascular reconstruction, fibula flap, dental implant, guided surgery. PMID:25129241

  14. Closure of oroantral communication with buccal fat pad flap in zygomatic implant surgery: a case report.

    PubMed

    de Moraes, Eduardo Jose

    2008-01-01

    The scientific literature has demonstrated the use of the buccal fat pad (BFP) flap to cover bone grafts in the correction of maxillary osseous defects and in the closure of oroantral communications. The use of the pedicled BFP flap to provide an immediate blood supply to a recipient site is recommended to provide closure of oroantral communications. The author presents a case report of zygomatic implant surgery in which the BFP flap technique was used in the closure of an oroantral communication caused by maxillofacial surgery. PMID:18416426

  15. Reconstruction of open wounds as a complication of spinal surgery with flaps: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chieng, Lee Onn; Hubbard, Zachary; Salgado, Christopher J; Levi, Allan D; Chim, Harvey

    2015-10-01

    OBJECT A systematic review of the available evidence on the prophylactic and therapeutic use of flaps for the coverage of complex spinal soft-tissue defects was performed to determine if the use of flaps reduces postoperative complications and improves patient outcomes. METHODS A PubMed database search was performed to identify English-language articles published between 1990 and 2014 that contained the following phrases to describe postoperative wounds ("wound," "complex back wound," "postoperative wound," "spine surgery") and intervention ("flap closure," "flap coverage," "soft tissue reconstruction," "muscle flap"). RESULTS In total, 532 articles were reviewed with 17 articles meeting the inclusion criteria of this study. The risk factors from the pooled analysis of 262 patients for the development of postoperative complex back wounds that necessitated muscle flap coverage included the involvement of instrumentation (77.6%), a previous history of radiotherapy (33.2%), smoking (20.6%), and diabetes mellitus (17.2%). In patients with instrumentation, prophylactic coverage of the wound with a well-vascularized flap was shown to result in a lower incidence of wound complications. One study showed a statistically significant decrease in complications compared with patients where prophylactic coverage was not performed (20% vs 45%). The indications for flap coverage after onset of wound complications included hardware exposure, wound infection, dehiscence, seroma, and hematoma. Flap coverage was shown to decrease the number of surgical debridements needed and also salvage hardware, with the rate of hardware removal after flap coverage ranging from 0% to 41.9% in 4 studies. CONCLUSIONS Prophylactic coverage with flaps in high-risk patients undergoing spine surgery reduces complications, while therapeutic coverage following wound complications allows the salvage of hardware in the majority of patients. PMID:26424341

  16. Assessment of free microvascular flap perfusion by intraoperative fluorescence angiography in craniomaxillofacial surgery.

    PubMed

    Preidl, Raimund H M; Schlittenbauer, Tilo; Weber, Manuel; Neukam, Friedrich W; Wehrhan, Falk

    2015-06-01

    Microsurgical tissue transfer represents a standard technique for reconstruction in craniomaxillofacial surgery. The transferred tissue is anastomosed to vessels of varying diameters and different physiological conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the blood flow in free flaps at their origin and compare this with the flow after reperfusion. In 24 patients undergoing microsurgical procedures (13 radial forearm free flaps (RFFF) and 11 parascapular/scapular free flaps (PSFF)), blood flow was evaluated by intraoperative fluorescence angiography after flap raising and again after reperfusion in the neck area (Flow800, Carl Zeiss AG, Oberkochen, Germany). Flow is expressed by the blood flow index (BFI), maximum intensity (MaxInt) and half-time to MaxInt (t1/2) and was measured in the flap pedicle itself, as well as in the supplying vessels. Following anastomosis of the free flaps in the head and neck area, both the arterial and the venous BFI and MaxInt significantly increased, whereas t1/2 decreased significantly. There was no significant difference in the perfusion parameters between RFFF and PSFF. Intraoperative fluorescence angiography is a reliable method for assessing the perfusion of free microvascular flaps. In the head and neck area, free flaps undergo a significant increase in perfusion but show no differences between varying flap types. PMID:25913628

  17. Anticoagulants and Statins As Pharmacological Agents in Free Flap Surgery: Current Rationale

    PubMed Central

    Pršić, Adnan; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Caterson, Stephanie A.

    2015-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are key components of reconstructive surgery, but despite their common use and usual reliability, flap failures still occur. Many pharmacological agents have been utilized to minimize risk of flap failure caused by thrombosis. However, the challenge of most antithrombotic therapy lies in providing patients with optimal antithrombotic prophylaxis without adverse bleeding effects. There is a limited but growing body of evidence suggesting that the vasoprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of statins can be beneficial for free flap survival. By inhibiting mevalonic acid, the downstream effects of statins include reduction of inflammation, reduced thrombogenicity, and improved vasodilation. This review provides a summary of the pathophysiology of thrombus formation and the current evidence of anticoagulation practices with aspirin, heparin, and dextran. In addition, the potential benefits of statins in the perioperative management of free flaps are highlighted. PMID:26617953

  18. Use of Martius flap in the complex female urethral surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tupikina, Nataliya; Pushkar, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Objectives were to evaluate safety and patient reported perception of the Martius fibroadipose flap for complex female urethra reconstruction. Material and methods Patients operated with a Martius flap were contacted again via telephone to rate their selfperception on cosmetic appearance, pain or numbness of the flap harvest site. Results 37 women (mean age of 46.8 yrs.) were operated with Martius flaps. Complications were limited to bleeding from the flap bed in 19% (7/37); hematomas 5.4% (2/37); and lymphorrhea from the labial incision in 13.5% (5/37) and labial wound infection in 5.4% of cases (2/37). For selfperception 65% of patients (24/37) were phone interviewed (mean follow up 54.2 months). Only 17% of women (4/24) complained to cosmetic problems. Two patients (8%) complained to a periodical mild pain. And 12.5% (3/24) of the women had decreased sensation or numbness at the labia. Conclusions Martius flap is safe and it is not causing significant complications during female urethral reconstruction. However, an informed consent for decreased sensation and numbness at the flap harvesting area should be obtained. PMID:25140241

  19. Evaluation of foot perfusion after fibula flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao-Feng; Ouyang, Si-Yuan; Cai, Zhi-Gang; Zhang, Jie

    2014-07-01

    Fibula flap is widely used in reconstruction work, whereas the low extremity blood supply alteration was unclear. This study would observe the blood oxygen saturation change of foot after harvesting fibula flap. The regional tissue oxygen saturation (rSO2) of the lateral side and inner side of feet was measured using near-infrared spectroscopy oxygen monitoring system (NIRS) before operation and in postoperative day 1 to 7, and the foot of the control side was measured as control. The rSO2 of the donor side foot decreased less than 5% (P < 0.05) in the first 8 hours after operation and recovered to the level of the control side later. NIRS is ideal for measuring rSO2 of donor side foot after fibula flap. The rSO2 of the donor side foot decreased less than 5% after fibula flap harvesting. PMID:24892418

  20. Previous Multiple Abdominal Surgeries: A Valid Contraindication to Abdominal Free Flap Breast Reconstruction?

    PubMed Central

    Di Candia, Michele; Asfoor, Ahmed Al; Jessop, Zita M.; Kumiponjera, Devor; Hsieh, Frank; Malata, Charles M.

    2012-01-01

    Presented in part at the following Academic Meetings: 57th Meeting of the Italian Society of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, September 24-27, 2008, Naples, Italy.45th Congress of the European Society for Surgical Research (ESSR), June 9-12, 2010, Geneva, Switzerland.British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons Summer Scientific Meeting, June 30-July 2, 2010, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield, UK. Background: Patients with previous multiple abdominal surgeries are often denied abdominal free flap breast reconstruction because of concerns about flap viability and abdominal wall integrity. We therefore studied their flap and donor site outcomes and compared them to patients with no previous abdominal surgery to find out whether this is a valid contraindication to the use of abdominal tissue. Patients and Methods: Twenty patients with multiple previous abdominal operations who underwent abdominal free flap breast reconstruction by a single surgeon (C.M.M., 2000-2009) were identified and retrospectively compared with a cohort of similar patients without previous abdominal surgery (sequential allocation control group, n = 20). Results: The index and control groups were comparable in age, body mass index, comorbidities, previous chemotherapy, and RT exposure. The index patients had a mean age of 54 years (r, 42-63) and an average body mass index of 27.5 kg/m2 (r, 22-38). The main previous surgeries were Caesarean sections (19), hysterectomies (8), and cholecystectomies (6). They underwent immediate (n = 9) or delayed (n = 11) reconstructions either unilaterally (n = 18) or bilaterally (n = 2) and comprising 9 muscle-sparing free transverse rectus abdominis muscle and 13 deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps. All flaps were successful, and there were no significant differences in flap and donor site outcomes between the 2 groups after an average follow up of 26 months (r, 10-36). Conclusion: Multiple previous abdominal surgeries did not predispose to increased flap or donor site morbidity. On the basis of our experience, we have proposed some recommendations for successful abdominal free flap breast reconstruction in patients with previous multiple scars. Careful preoperative planning and the use of some intraoperative adaptations can allow abdominal free flap breast reconstruction to be reliably undertaken in such patients. PMID:22848775

  1. Incidence and types of complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary microvascular free flap reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lodders, Johannes N.; Parmar, Satyesh; Stienen, Niki LM.; Martin, Timothy J.; Karagozoglu, K. Hakki; Heymans, Martijn W.; Nandra, Baljeet

    2015-01-01

    Background The aims of the study were 1) to evaluate the incidence and types of postoperative complications after ablative oral cancer surgery with primary free flap reconstruction and 2) identify prognostic variables for postoperative complications. Material and Methods Desired data was retrieved from a computer database at the department of Oral and Maxillofacial Department, Queen Elisabeth hospital Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. Logistic regression was used to study relationships between preoperative variables and postoperative outcomes. Results The study population consisted 184 patients, comprising 189 composite resections with reconstruction. Complications developed in 40.2% of the patients. Three patients (1.6%) died, 11.1% returned to the operating room, 5.3% developed donor site complications and 6.9% flap complications of which 3.2% total flap failure. In the multivariable analysis systemic complications were associated with anaesthesia time and hospital stay with red cell transfusion. Conclusions A significant proportion of the patients with primary free flap reconstructions after oral cancer surgery develops postoperative complications. Prolonged anaesthesia time and red cell transfusion are possible predictors for systemic complications and hospital stay respectively. Preoperative screening for risk factors is advocated for patient selection and to have realistic information and expectations. Key words:Free flap, complications, oral cancer, risk factors, reconstruction. PMID:26116846

  2. Surgery for pterygium using a conjunctival pedunculated flap slide.

    PubMed Central

    Lei, G

    1996-01-01

    Eight hundred and eighty patients (913 eyes) with primary pterygium who were surgically treated from 1983-93 were followed up for 5.7 years on average. Based on the large number of cases and a 10 year period of practice, it was found that pterygium excised with a pedunculated conjunctival flap slide was effective and safe in the treatment of primary pterygium. The recurrence rate of 1.6% (15 out of 913 eyes) in this series compared favourably with other reports. The characteristics and techniques concerning the operating process are described in detail. PMID:8664228

  3. Computer-Aided Mandibular Reconstruction With Vascularized Iliac Crest Bone Flap and Simultaneous Implant Surgery.

    PubMed

    Modabber, Ali; Mhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Ayoub, Nassim; Hajji, Mohammad; Raith, Stefan; Dds, Sven Reich; Steiner, Timm; Ghassemi, Alireza; Hlzle, Frank

    2015-10-01

    The intention of oral rehabilitation in patients with mandibular defects is an early prosthetic treatment with maximum possible functionality and high accuracy. The present study describes a new computer-aided technique for mandibular reconstruction using a free vascularized iliac flap and simultaneous insertion of dental implants into the flap while it is still pedicled at the donor site. Based on preoperative computerized tomography data of the facial skeleton and the iliac crest donor site, a surgical guide transferred the virtual plan including information on the transplant dimensions and shape as well as the position of the dental implants into real-time surgery. Using postoperative computerized tomography scans, the actual situation were compared with the preoperative simulation. A mean difference of 0.75 mm (SD 0.72) for the flap shape and 0.70 mm (SD 0.44) for the implant position analysis was determined. A calculation of the closest point distance showed a surface deviation of <2 mm for the shape analysis in 93.3% of the values and <1 mm for implant position in 75.2% of the values. The mean angular deviation was 3.65. Virtual surgical planning is a suitable method for mandibular reconstruction with vascularized iliac crest flaps and simultaneous implant surgery. It can be used to restore the anatomy of the mandible with a high accuracy and can help to shorten subsequent dental rehabilitation. PMID:24945242

  4. Delayed buccal fat pad herniation: An unusual complication of buccal flap in cleft surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tuli, Puneet; Parashar, Atul; Nanda, Vipul; Sharma, Ramesh K.

    2009-01-01

    Buccal musculomucosal flap is commonly used in cleft palate surgery for providing additional lining when nasal mucosa is inadequate. We report an unusual complication of progressively increasing fat herniation from the sutured donor site which started appearing on the third postoperative day. This necessitated excision of the protruding fat pad on the seventh postoperative day. The possible mechanism and precautions for prevention of this complication are discussed. PMID:19881029

  5. MR Imaging Appearances of Soft Tissue Flaps Following Reconstructive Surgery of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Gandikota; Jacobson, Jon A; Kim, Sung Moon; Brigido, Monica K; Dong, Qian; Jamadar, David A

    2015-01-01

    MR imaging appearances of different types of reconstructive muscle flaps following reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity with associated post-surgical changes due to altered anatomy, radiation, and potential complications, can be challenging. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach to tumors allows for limb salvage therapy in a majority of the patients. Decision-making for specific types of soft tissue reconstruction is based on the body region affected, as well as the size and complexity of the defect. Hematomas and infections are early complications that can jeopardize flap viability. The local recurrence of a tumor within six months after a complete resection with confirmed tumor-free margins and adjuvant radiation therapy is rare. Identification of a new lesion similar to the initial tumor favors a finding of tumor recurrence. PMID:25598685

  6. The use of glycerol-preserved skin allograft in conjunction with reconstructive and flap surgery: seven years of experience.

    PubMed

    Saad, Arman Zaharil Mat; Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Khoo, Teng Lye

    2011-02-01

    Major reconstructive surgery may be extensive and prolonged, and it may cause edema and compromise the flap pedicle if closed under tension. Glycerol-preserved skin allograft (GPA) can provide a means for tension-free closure and temporary cover of the wound. Seven years of analysis on GPA used in conjunction with major reconstruction was undertaken to highlight its indications, results, and outcomes. Forty-seven patients were included, aged between 9 and 73 years. Majority of patients had reconstruction following tumor resection and trauma. The main indication for use of GPA was temporary, loose cover of the wound in 44% of cases; flap pedicle protection in 31% of cases; donor site wound cover in 10%; flap monitoring in one case; and management of flap-related complications in 6% of cases. Free flap reconstruction was performed in 72% of cases. In conclusion, GPA is a useful adjunct in reconstructive surgery. It can be used temporarily to allow tension-free wound closure, as well as to protect the flap pedicle until edema subsides and the pedicle becomes stable. This latter approach allows secondary wound closure and good esthetic outcome. PMID:20976667

  7. Changes in Transforming Growth Factor-?1 in Gingival Crevicular Fluid of Patients with Chronic Periodontitis Following Periodontal Flap Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, T.; Anilkumar, K.; Ambalavanan, N.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the study was to assess changes in Transforming Growth Factor ?1 (TGF-?1) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) and examine correlation of TGF-?1 levels and periodontal parameters: probing pocket depth (PPD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) in sites with chronic periodontitis at various time intervals before and after periodontal surgery. Materials and Methods: The effects of non-surgical and surgical therapy on periodontal parameters and GCF TGF-?1 levels in 18 sites affected with chronic periodontitis were assessed upto 6 weeks post conventional flap surgery. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Baseline. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Pre-surgery and flap surgery performed. GCF was collected from all sites at Two Weeks Post-surgery. GCF was collected and PPD, CAL recorded at Six Weeks Post-surgery. The concentration of TGF-?1 in GCF was determined using a human TGF-?1 enzyme immunometric assay kit. Results: Mean TGF-?1 concentrations were significantly reduced at Pre-surgery, at Two Weeks Post-surgery and at Six Weeks Post-surgery (p<0.05) when compared to Baseline TGF-?1 values. There was a statistically significant reduction in PPD and gain in CAL following non-surgical and surgical therapy when compared to baseline (p<0.05). Conclusion: Results indicate that TGF-?1 may play a role in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of periodontal disease and could be considered as a disease predictive biomarker. PMID:25859517

  8. Use of the Volar Plate of the Distal Interphalangeal Joint as a Distally Based Flap in Flexor Tendon Surgery.

    PubMed

    Al-Qattan, Mohammed M

    2016-02-01

    The usual treatment for flexor digitorum profundus (FDP) avulsions as well as FDP lacerations in the distal part of zone I is tendon reinsertion into bone. Although there are several different techniques of FDP tendon reinsertion into bone, they are generally complex and have a weak tensile strength. A technique for treating these injuries is to use the volar plate of the distal interphalangeal joint as a distally based flap for tendon repair. The current communication discusses the technique and its potential complications. Initial clinical experience is encouraging and the volar plate flap technique may take its place in flexor tendon surgery. PMID:26684715

  9. Dynamic perfusion assessment during perforator flap surgery: an up-to-date

    PubMed Central

    MUNTEAN, MAXIMILIAN VLAD; MUNTEAN, VALENTIN; ARDELEAN, FILIP; GEORGESCU, ALEXANDRU

    2015-01-01

    Flap monitoring technology has progressed alongside flap design. The highly variable vascular anatomy and the complexity associated with modern perforator flaps demands dynamic, real-time, intraoperative information about the vessel location, perfusion patterns and flap physiology. Although most surgeons still assess flap perfusion and viability based solely on clinical experience, studies have shown that results may be highly variable and often misleading. Poor judgment of intraoperative perfusion leads to major complications. Employing dynamic perfusion imaging during flap reconstruction has led to a reduced complication rate, lower morbidity, shorter hospital stay, and an overall better result. With the emergence of multiple systems capable of intraoperative flap evaluation, the purpose of this article is to review the two systems that have been widely accepted and are currently used by plastic surgeons: Indocyanine green angiography (ICGA) and dynamic infrared thermography (DIRT). PMID:26609259

  10. Drug-Induced Atrial Fibrillation Complicates the Results of Flap Surgery in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Sakisaka, Masanobu; Kurita, Masakazu; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Kagaya, Yu; Takushima, Akihiko; Harii, Kiyonori

    2016-02-01

    The relationship between atrial fibrillation (AF) and flap survival has not been fully characterized. Therefore, the goal of this study was to investigate the effect of AF on survival areas of pedicled flap and survival rates of free flap in an experimental rat AF model.An aconitine-induced rat AF model was established without intubation anesthesia. Survival areas of the pedicled rectangular epigastric flap were compared between AF rats (n = 7) and control rats (n = 7), and survival rates of the free epigastric flap were compared between AF rats (n = 10) and control rats (n = 10). Animals that died during the study or in which AF was not induced were excluded from study. A total of 64 rats were assessed in this study.Atrial fibrillation was induced with a success rate of 77.8% (21/27) throughout the study. Pedicled flap survival area was significantly higher in controls (75.1 9.0%; n = 7) than that in AF animals (55.7 13.0%; n = 7) (P < 0.01, nonpaired Student t test). Free flap survival rates were 80% in controls and 40% in AF animals (P = 0.07, ? test).This is the first study to develop an aconitine-induced model of AF in rats. Atrial fibrillation has a detrimental effect on survival areas of the pedicled flap and survival rates of the free flap. PMID:26756601

  11. Differences between Total Intravenous Anesthesia and Inhalation Anesthesia in Free Flap Surgery of Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yi-Ting; Wu, Chih-Chen; Tang, Tsung-Yung; Lu, Chun-Te; Lai, Chih-Sheng; Shen, Ching-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Many studies have evaluated risk factors associated with complications after free flap surgery, but these studies did not evaluate the impact of anesthesia management. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the differences between patients who received inhalation and total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) in free flap surgery. Methods One hundred and fifty-six patients who underwent free flap surgery for head and neck cancer were retrospectively divided into the TIVA (96 patients) and the inhalation group (87 patients). Perioperative hemodynamic data and postoperative medical complications were determined by documented medical records. Results Ninety-six patients in the TIVA group were compared with 87 patients who received inhalation anesthesia. There were no differences in gender, age, classification of physical status based on American Society for Anesthesiologists (ASA) score, and cormobidities between the two groups. Patients in the TIVA group required less perioperative crystalloid (4172.46 1534.95 vs. 5183.91 1416.40 ml, p < 0.0001) and colloid (572.46 335.14 vs. 994.25 434.65 ml, p < 0.0001) to maintain hemodynamic stability. Although the mean anesthesia duration was shorter in the TIVA group (11.02 2.84 vs. 11.70 1.96 hours, p = 0.017), the blood loss was similar between groups (p = 0.71). There was no difference in surgical complication rate, but patients in the TIVA group developed fewer pulmonary complications (18 vs. 47, p = 0.0008). After multivariate regression, patients in the TIVA group had a significantly reduced risk of pulmonary complication compared with the inhalation group (Odds ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.180.92). Conclusions Total intravenous anesthesia was associated with significantly fewer pulmonary complications in patients who received free flap reconstruction. PMID:26849439

  12. Reconstruction of a Large Anterior Ear Defect after Mohs Micrographic Surgery with a Cartilage Graft and Postauricular Revolving Door Flap.

    PubMed

    Nemir, Stephanie; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey; Codrea, Vlad; Wagner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A novel postauricular revolving door island flap and cartilage graft combination was employed to correct a large defect on the anterior ear of an 84-year-old man who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery for an antihelical squamous cell carcinoma. The defect measured 4.6 2.4?cm and spanned the antihelix, scapha, a small portion of the helix, and a large segment of underlying cartilage, with loss of structural integrity and anterior folding of the ear. The repair involved harvesting 1.5?cm(2) of exposed cartilage from the scaphoid fossa and then sculpting and suturing it to the remnant of the antihelical cartilage in order to recreate the antihelical crura. The skin of the posterior auricle was then incised just below the helical rim and folded anteriorly to cover the cartilage graft. The flap remained attached by a central subcutaneous pedicle, and an island designed using the full-thickness defect as a stencil template was pulled through the cartilage window anteriorly to resurface the anterior ear. This case demonstrates the use of the revolving door flap for coverage of large central ear defects with loss of cartilaginous support and illustrates how cartilage grafts may be used in combination with the flap to improve ear contour after resection. PMID:26425374

  13. Reconstruction of a Large Anterior Ear Defect after Mohs Micrographic Surgery with a Cartilage Graft and Postauricular Revolving Door Flap

    PubMed Central

    Nemir, Stephanie; Hunter-Ellul, Lindsey; Codrea, Vlad; Wagner, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A novel postauricular revolving door island flap and cartilage graft combination was employed to correct a large defect on the anterior ear of an 84-year-old man who underwent Mohs micrographic surgery for an antihelical squamous cell carcinoma. The defect measured 4.6 × 2.4 cm and spanned the antihelix, scapha, a small portion of the helix, and a large segment of underlying cartilage, with loss of structural integrity and anterior folding of the ear. The repair involved harvesting 1.5 cm2 of exposed cartilage from the scaphoid fossa and then sculpting and suturing it to the remnant of the antihelical cartilage in order to recreate the antihelical crura. The skin of the posterior auricle was then incised just below the helical rim and folded anteriorly to cover the cartilage graft. The flap remained attached by a central subcutaneous pedicle, and an island designed using the full-thickness defect as a stencil template was pulled through the cartilage window anteriorly to resurface the anterior ear. This case demonstrates the use of the revolving door flap for coverage of large central ear defects with loss of cartilaginous support and illustrates how cartilage grafts may be used in combination with the flap to improve ear contour after resection. PMID:26425374

  14. Oncoplastic breast surgery combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap for Paget's disease.

    PubMed

    Kijima, Yuko; Yoshinaka, Heiji; Hirata, Munetsugu; Nakajo, Akihiro; Arima, Hideo; Okumura, Hiroshi; Arigami, Takaaki; Ishigami, Sumiya; Natsugoe, Shoji

    2014-09-01

    Oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS), which combines the concepts of oncologic and plastic surgery, is becoming more common worldwide. We herein report the results of OBS in Japanese patients with Paget's disease. We performed OBS combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap in two patients. In these two patients, who were diagnosed as having Paget's disease with a restricted intraductal component in the central area of their non-ptotic breast, we performed oncoplastic surgery combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap. Neither of the two patients received contralateral surgery to produce symmetrical breasts. The observation period ranged from 6 to 12months, and the bilateral breast volumes and inframammary lines were symmetric. OBS combining partial mastectomy with immediate breast reshaping using a keyhole-shaped skin glandular flap was successfully performed in two patients with Paget's disease. PMID:23925716

  15. Computer-assisted teaching of skin flap surgery: validation of a mobile platform software for medical students.

    PubMed

    de Sena, David P; Fabricio, Daniela D; Lopes, Maria Helena I; da Silva, Vinicius D

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a multimedia software application for mobile platforms to assist in the teaching and learning process of design and construction of a skin flap. Traditional training in surgery is based on learning by doing. Initially, the use of cadavers and animal models appeared to be a valid alternative for training. However, many conflicts with these training models prompted progression to synthetic and virtual reality models. Fifty volunteer fifth- and sixth-year medical students completed a pretest and were randomly allocated into two groups of 25 students each. The control group was exposed for 5 minutes to a standard text-based print article, while the test group used multimedia software describing how to fashion a rhomboid flap. Each group then performed a cutaneous flap on a training bench model while being evaluated by three blinded BSPS (Brazilian Society of Plastic Surgery) board-certified surgeons using the OSATS (Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill) protocol and answered a post-test. The text-based group was then tested again using the software. The computer-assisted learning (CAL) group had superior performance as confirmed by checklist scores (p<0.002), overall global assessment (p?=?0.017) and post-test results (p<0.001). All participants ranked the multimedia method as the best study tool. CAL learners exhibited better subjective and objective performance when fashioning rhomboid flaps as compared to those taught with standard print material. These findings indicate that students preferred to learn using the multimedia method. PMID:23935818

  16. Platysma myocutaneous flap - its current role in reconstructive surgery of oral soft tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of oral soft-tissue defects following resection of oral carcinomas can be achieved using various techniques including microsurgical tissue transfer. However, there seems to be a role for regional or local flaps. Small to medium-size defects can be functionally reconstructed with the platysma myocutaneous flap as an excellent choice particularly in medically compromised patients not being eligible for free tissue transfer. The present paper reviews the indication, surgical technique, and complications following reconstruction of defects of the oral cavity with the platysma myocutaneous flap. PMID:24471010

  17. An evaluation of surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery using a modified Millards (Fork Flap) technique

    PubMed Central

    Adeyemo, W. L.; James, O.; Adeyemi, M. O.; Ogunlewe, M. O.; Ladeinde, A. L.; Butali, A.; Taiwo, O. A.; Emeka, C. I.; Ayodele, A. O. S; Ugwumba, C. U.

    2014-01-01

    Background The central third of the face is distorted by the bilateral cleft of the lip and palate and restoring the normal facial form is one of the primary goals for the reconstructive surgeons. The history of bilateral cleft lip repair has evolved from discarding the premaxilla and prolabium and approximating the lateral lip elements to a definitive lip and primary cleft nasal repair utilising the underlying musculature. The aim of this study was to review surgical outcome of bilateral cleft lip surgery (BCLS) done at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. Materials and Methods A review of all cases of BCLS done between January 2007 and December 2012 at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital was done. Data analysis included age and sex of patients, type of cleft deformity and type of surgery (primary or secondary) and whether the cleft deformity was syndromic and non-syndromic. Techniques of repair, surgical outcome and complications were also recorded. Results A total of 39 cases of BCLS involving 21 males and 18 females were done during the period. This constituted 10% (39/390) of all cases of cleft surgery done during the period. There were 5 syndromic and 34 non-syndromic cases. Age of patients at time of surgery ranged between 3 months and 32 years. There were 24 bilateral cleft lip and palate deformities and 15 bilateral cleft lip deformities. Thirty-one of the cases were primary surgery, while 8 were secondary (revision) surgery. The most common surgical technique employed was modified Fork flap (Millard) technique, which was employed in 37 (95%) cases. Conclusion Bilateral cleft lip deformity is a common cleft deformity seen in clinical practice, surgical repair of which can be a challenge to an experienced surgeon. A modified Fork flap for repair of bilateral cleft lip is a reliable and versatile technique associated with excellent surgical outcome. PMID:24469478

  18. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of periodontal intrabony defects by open flap surgery alone or in combination with Biocollagen® membrane: A randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Elkhatat, Essam I.; Elkhatat, Amr E.; Azzeghaiby, Saleh N.; Tarakji, Bassel; Beshr, Khaled; Mossa, Hossam

    2015-01-01

    Background: Guided tissue regeneration (GTR) is often incorporated in regenerative periodontal surgical procedures. However, the actual benefits of adding GTR to such a procedure remain undocumented. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the contribution of GTR to the outcomes of open flap debridement (OFD) in the treatment of intrabony defects. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 patients of both sexes satisfying the criteria of chronic periodontitis and each of whom displayed one intrabony defect were randomly assigned to two groups, i.e. either treated with open flap surgery and GTR (group 1) or with open flap surgery alone (group 2), in this parallel-arm study. The soft tissue and hard tissue measurements, including probing pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level (CAL), and bone mineral density were recorded at baseline and 3,6 and 12 months after surgery. The differences with a P < 0.05 were considered significant. Results: Results showed that the membrane group showed significant difference when compared with open flap surgery alone, in relation to the degree of periodontal pocket, clinical attachment loss, and bone density. Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that biocollagen membrane could be considered as an option in the treatment of intrabony defects. Biocollagen membrane alone gives favorable clinical results in the treatment of intrabony defects. Open flap debridement resulted in acceptable clinical results in the treatment of intrabony defects. PMID:26236678

  19. Technique of Dorsal Transversely Oriented Transposition Flap for Web Reconstruction in Toe Syndactyly Surgery.

    PubMed

    Saito, Susumu; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    In toe desyndactyly, a dorsal or plantar commissural flap, combined with skin grafts, will ensure an acceptable result. However, the parallel unsightly scars in the longitudinal direction on the dorsum of the toes will sometimes fail to satisfy the patient's and/or the parents' aesthetic expectations. To address this issue, we developed a technique using a transversely oriented transposition flap for web reconstruction, which can spare the dorsal interdigital skin maximally to shift the dorsal scars plantarly such that they become inconspicuous. The design of the flap is simple and uncomplicated surgically. Moreover, the donor site morbidity is minimal, owing to the good healing potential of the transverse scars. This technique could be an alternative in web reconstruction of toe desyndactyly, especially in cases with high cosmetic priority. PMID:25998477

  20. A Novel and Alternative Treatment Method for Diabetic Heel Ulceration Exposing the Calcaneus Which Is Not Suitable for Flap Surgery: Vacuum Assisted Sandwich Dermal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bingol, Ugur A.; Cinar, Can; Arslan, Hakan; Alt?ndas, Muzaffer

    2015-01-01

    Background. Currently, free flaps and pedicled flaps are the first treatment choices for large heel ulcer reconstruction. However, flap reconstruction of heel ulcerations cannot be performed in all diabetics especially with concurrent severe peripheral vascular disease because of higher flap failure rate. In recent years, the use of acellular dermal matrix (ADM) has emerged as an alternative treatment option for extremity ulcers. Methods. We present 13 diabetic patients with a large heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus, who were not eligible for flap surgery due to the presence of only one patent artery of trifurcation. These cases were treated with the vacuum assisted sandwich dermal matrix (VASDEM) method. Results. None of the patients required amputation. Skin grafting was successful in ten patients. Although partial losses were observed in three patients, they were healed spontaneously without surgical interventions. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed ulceration on the treatment area. All patients maintained their preoperative ambulatory ability. Conclusion. VASDEM is a novel method offering opportunity for treatment before proceeding to amputation in diabetic heel ulceration exposing the calcaneus which is not suitable for flap surgery. It also has the potential to close wounds of all sizes independent of the vessel status and wound size in selected diabetic patients. PMID:26516626

  1. A case of nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap for below-knee amputation stump wound: treatment option for compartment syndrome after fibular free flap surgery.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Ha; Kim, Kwang Seog; Lee, Sam Yong

    2014-02-01

    Despite the frequent use of the fibular free flap, there have been no reports of severe compartment syndrome of the donor leg that necessitated limb amputation. A 66-yr-old man had a fibular osseous free flap transfer from the left leg to the mandible that was complicated by postoperative compartment syndrome. An extensive chronic leg wound resulted, which was treated with multiple debridements and finally with below-knee amputation. Successful coverage of the below-knee amputation stump was accomplished with a nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap. Various foot fillet flaps may be used acutely as a free or an island pedicled flap, but dissection of the vascular pedicle may be difficult in a chronically inflamed wound because of inflammation and adhesions to surrounding tissue. The nonisland pedicled foot fillet flap may be considered as a useful option for treatment of a chronically inflamed stump wound after below-knee amputation. PMID:24550664

  2. Determination of a perfusion threshold in experimental perforator flap surgery using indocyanine green angiography.

    PubMed

    Monahan, John; Hwang, Brian H; Kennedy, James M; Chen, Wen; Nguyen, Gerard K; Schooler, Wesley G; Wong, Alex K

    2014-11-01

    Indocyanine green (ICG) angiography has been used in the evaluation of flap perfusion but the viability threshold has not been elucidated. In this study, we determined the threshold by comparing perfusion, using ICG imaging (SPY imaging system, LifeCell Corporation), to clinical evidence of nonviability in rat abdominal perforator flaps. Abdominal flaps, based on a single perforator, were elevated and re-inset in Sprague-Dawley rats. ICG imaging and clinical assessments were conducted preoperatively, as well as 0, 24, and 48 hours postoperatively. SPY-Q software allowed standardization of the perforator's perfusion for comparison purposes. A total of 278 random percentage measurements were made from postoperative day 0 giving a mean (SE) percentage perfusion of 26.8% (1.6%) and 59.1% (1.3%), respectively, for necrosis and survival (P<0.05). We demonstrate that ICG angiography can be readily analyzed in a perforator flap environment allowing a determination of the perfusion threshold. PMID:24625512

  3. Three-dimensional visualization of the human face using DICOM data and its application to facial contouring surgery using free anterolateral thigh flap transfer.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumiaki; Uehara, Miyuki; Oatari, Miwako; Kusatsu, Manami

    2016-01-01

    One of the main challenges faced by surgeons performing reconstructive surgery in cases of facial asymmetry due to hemifacial atrophy or tumor surgery is the restoration of the natural contour of the face. Soft-tissue augmentation using free-flap transfer is one of the most commonly used methods for facial reconstruction. The most important part of a successful reconstruction is the preoperative assessment of the volume, position, and shape of the flap to be transplanted. This study focuses on three cases of facial deformity due to hemifacial progressive atrophy or tumor excision. For the preoperative assessment, digital imaging and communications in medicine (DICOM) data obtained from computed tomography was used and applied to a three-dimensional (3D) picture software program (ZedView, LEXI, Tokyo, Japan). Using computer simulation, a mirror image of the unaffected side of the face was applied to the affected side, and 3D visualization was performed. Using this procedure, a postoperative image of the face and precise shape, position, and amount of the flap that was going to be transferred was simulated preoperatively. In all cases, the postoperative shape of the face was acceptable, and a natural shape of the face could be obtained. Preoperative 3D visualization using computer simulation was helpful for estimating the reconstructive procedure and postoperative shape of the face. Using free-flap transfer, this procedure facilitates the natural shape after reconstruction of the face in facial contouring surgery. PMID:26319058

  4. Neurotrophins and Nerve Regeneration-associated genes are expressed in the Cornea after Lamellar Flap Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Namavari, Abed; Chaudhary, Shweta; Yco, Lisette; Chang, Jin-Hong; Sonawane, Snehal; Khanolkar, Vishakha; Sarkar, Joy; Jain, Sandeep

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine the in vivo expression of neurotrophins (NTs) and nerve regeneration-associated genes (RAGs) after surgically creating a hinged lamellar corneal flap in thy1-YFP mice. Methods Lamellar corneal flaps with multiple hinges were created in thy1-YFP mice. Mice were sacrificed weeks 2, 4, and 8. Quantitative PCR was performed to determine the expression of NTs and RAGs in the corneas following lamellar transection. Nerve growth factor (Ngf), Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf), Glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf), Neurotrophin-3 (Ntf3), Neurotrophin 5 (Ntf5), Small proline-rich repeat protein 1A (Sprr1a), Growth-associated protein 43 (Gap43) and Beta III tubulin (Tubb3) gene expressions were analyzed. Whole-mount confocal immunofluorescence and Western analyses were performed for localization and abundance of robustly expressed genes. Results Sprouts of fine YFP positive fronds emanating from transected (injured) nerve bundles were seen in the flap area at 2 weeks onwards. Bdnf and Sprr1a were robustly and significantly expressed at 2 weeks postoperatively (> 2 folds increase in expression and p < 0.05). Bdnf localized to thy1-YFP+ cells in operated corneas. Sprr1a localized to corneal epithelial cell membranes. At 8 weeks, none of the NTs and RAGs had increased expression. Bdnf (ρ = 0.73, p = 0.001) and Sprr1a (ρ = 0.76, p = 0.001) showed a significant positive correlation with Tubb3. Conclusion The neurotrophin Bdnf and regeneration-associated gene Sprr1a are robustly and significantly expressed during corneal nerve regeneration in vivo. PMID:22673847

  5. Breast surgery under local anesthesia: second-stage implant exchange, nipple flap reconstruction, and breast augmentation.

    PubMed

    Koumanis, Dimitri J; Colque, Alex; Eisemann, Michael L; Smith, Jenna

    2013-10-01

    Breast reconstruction can be performed safely with local anesthesia. Utilization of the star flap method in conjunction with tattooing successfully provides optimal aesthetic results without the need for an additional donor site. When tissue expander to silicon implant exchange is part of the operative plan, use of triple antibiotic irrigation as well as the Keller Funnel is recommended. Breast augmentation and breast augmentation-mastopexy can also be performed with good results under local anesthetic in a private operating room setting. All other operative conditions, including sterility and sound operative surgical techniques, should be the mainstay of any practice. PMID:24093654

  6. Increased Postoperative Bleeding Risk among Patients with Local Flap Surgery under Continued Clopidogrel Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eichhorn, Wolfgang; Haase, Martina; Kluwe, Lan; Zeuch, Jrgen; Smeets, Ralf; Hanken, Henning; Wehrmann, Manfred; Grbe, Alexander; Heiland, Max; Birkelbach, Moritz; Rendenbach, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the influence of a continued antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel on postoperative bleeding risk in patients undergoing skin tumor resection and reconstruction with local flaps or skin grafts under outpatient conditions. Patients and Methods. The authors designed and implemented a retrospective clinical cohort study at the General Hospital Balingen. The primary endpoint was the bleeding ratio in patients with clopidogrel treatment in comparison to patients without any anticoagulant or antiplatelet therapy. Wound healing was evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14. Results. 650 procedures were performed, 123 of them under continued clopidogrel therapy. There were significantly more postoperative bleeding complications among patients with continued antiplatelet therapy. Regarding the whole study population, malignant lesions, a larger defect size, and skin grafts were accompanied by a higher rate of bleeding incidents. However, there were no significant findings in the univariate analysis of the clopidogrel group. All bleeding incidents were easily manageable. Conclusion. Despite an increased bleeding ratio among patients under continued clopidogrel therapy, the performance of simple surgical procedures can be recommended. However, cautious preparation and careful hemostasis are indispensable. PMID:26345612

  7. Musculocutaneous flaps in head and neck reconstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    The introduction of musculocutaneous flaps to head and neck reconstructive surgery is described. The flaps available are listed, and the most important ones described and illustrated. Both the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major flaps are felt to have a role in head and neck reconstruction, though they have largely been superseded by microvascular free flaps such as the radial forearm flap. Images fig. 1 fig. 2 fig. 3 fig. 4 fig. 5 fig. 6 fig. 7 fig. 8 PMID:2686511

  8. Flex flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currey, N. S.; Perry, J. T.

    1973-01-01

    To provide flap with large upper surface radius as required for airplanes with over-the-wing blowing, distort upper surface of flap by actuator. Flap can be used as control surface at leading as well as trailing edges and, with minor modification, as variant of Jacobs-Hurkamp air flap.

  9. Flap monitoring using infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Alex; Wright, Leigh P.; Elmandjra, Mohamed; Mao, Jian-min

    2006-02-01

    We report results of clinical trials on flap monitoring in 65 plastic surgeries. Hemoglobin oxygen saturation of flap tissue (StO II) was monitored non-invasively by using ODISsey TM tissue oximeter, an infrared spectroscopic device. StO II measurements were conducted both intra-operatively and post-operatively. From the intra-operative measurements, we observed that StO II values dropped when the main blood vessels supplying the flap were clamped in surgery, and that StO II jumped after anastomosis to a value close to its pre-operative value. From post-operative monitoring measurements for the 65 flap cases, each lasted two days or so, we found that the StO II values approach to a level close to the baseline if the surgery was successful, and that the StO II value dropped to a value below 30% if there is a perfusion compromise, such as vascular thrombosis.

  10. Technical tips in perforator flap harvest.

    PubMed

    Celik, Naci; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2003-07-01

    Advances in the field of microsurgical reconstruction have focused on decreasing donor site morbidity and increasing the function and aesthetics of the reconstructed site. Since the advent of perforator flap surgery, most of these expectations have been satisfied. On the other hand, we need refinements in the surgical techniques and clinical reports studying these flaps. In the future, the clinical use of these flaps and the familiarity of surgeons will increase; perforator flap reconstruction will be as reliable as other types of free flaps. PMID:12916601

  11. Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap

    PubMed Central

    Han, Fengshan; Wang, Guangnan; Li, Gaoshan; Ping, Juan; Mao, Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Background Our aim was to summarize the treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers using combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap. Patients and methods Each degloved finger was debrided under microscopic guidance and embedded in the superficial layer of the abdominal fascia. The abdominal skin was sutured to the skin on the back and side of the hand to promote circumferential healing. After removal, the only remaining injured region was on the flexor surface, and this was repaired by multiple dorsal toe flaps, toe-web flaps, and dorsalis pedis flaps to provide blood vessels and sensory nerves. All fingers had proper flap thickness 36 months after surgery, and required only lateral Z-plasty modification with web deepening and widening to narrow the fingers and extend their relative length. Results We completed flap-graft and finger narrowing for 25 fingers in eight patients. Abdominal skin flaps and dorsal toe flaps were grafted, and resulted in both firmness and softness, providing finger flexibility. The dorsal toe flap provided good blood circulation and sensory nerves, and was used to cover the finger-flexor surface to regain sensation and stability when holding objects. During the 18 years of follow-up, sensation on the finger-flexor side recovered to the S34 level, and patient satisfaction based on the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire was 45. Flap ulcers or bone/tendon necrosis were not observed. Conclusion Treatment of degloving injury involving multiple fingers with combined abdominal superficial fascial flap, dorsalis pedis flap, dorsal toe flap, and toe-web flap was effective and reliable. PMID:26229479

  12. Computer-Assisted Surgery for Segmental Mandibular Reconstruction with the Osteoseptocutaneous Fibula Flap: Can We Instigate Ideological and Technological Reforms?

    PubMed

    Deek, Nidal Farhan A L; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-03-01

    Virtual surgical planning and computer-aided design and computer-aided modeling are promising technologies with a growing trend in contemporary head and neck reconstruction. Segmental mandibular reconstruction with the osteoseptocutaneous fibula flap is one of the fields in which these technologies are increasingly used. Perceived benefits are increased surgical precision, improved operative efficiency, and overall good outcomes. Nevertheless, these programs do not cover the reconstruction picture of interest thoroughly, at least in the mind of the experienced surgeon. Based on extensive experience in segmental mandibular reconstruction and comprehensive literature review, the authors attempted to identify missing dots in computer-aided mandibular reconstruction; when possible, a problem-solution approach was taken. Of these dots, pedicle reach to the recipient vessels, multiple target soft-tissue reconstruction, anatomical variations and cross-section topography of the osteoseptocutaneous fibula flap, and intraoperative modification of the surgical plan were understated or not considered in the phases of virtual surgical planning and execution. Moreover, with the relatively small experience reported in computer-aided segmental mandibular reconstruction compared with the well-appreciated challenges, further discussion of what could be a realistic and safe indication was deemed necessary. Following in the footsteps of the iPhone developer of creating software satisfying to customers (i.e., surgeons) first and armed with the evidence from the literature and accumulation of experience, this Special Topic article aims to provoke a discussion among experts in this field to instigate ideological and technological reforms in computer-aided mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26910680

  13. Freestyle Local Perforator Flaps for Facial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jun Yong; Kim, Ji Min; Kwon, Ho; Jung, Sung-No; Shim, Hyung Sup; Kim, Sang Wha

    2015-01-01

    For the successful reconstruction of facial defects, various perforator flaps have been used in single-stage surgery, where tissues are moved to adjacent defect sites. Our group successfully performed perforator flap surgery on 17 patients with small to moderate facial defects that affected the functional and aesthetic features of their faces. Of four complicated cases, three developed venous congestion, which resolved in the subacute postoperative period, and one patient with partial necrosis underwent minor revision. We reviewed the literature on freestyle perforator flaps for facial defect reconstruction and focused on English articles published in the last five years. With the advance of knowledge regarding the vascular anatomy of pedicled perforator flaps in the face, we found that some perforator flaps can improve functional and aesthetic reconstruction for the facial defects. We suggest that freestyle facial perforator flaps can serve as alternative, safe, and versatile treatment modalities for covering small to moderate facial defects. PMID:26236734

  14. Reconstruction of Facial Defect Using Deltopectoral Flap.

    PubMed

    Aldelaimi, Tahrir N; Khalil, Afrah A

    2015-11-01

    Reconstruction of the head and neck is a challenge for otolarygology surgeons, maxillofacial surgeons as well as plastic surgeons. Defects caused by the resection and/or trauma should be closed with flaps which match in color, texture and hair bearing characteristics with the face. Deltopectoral flap is a one such flap from chest and neck skin mainly used to cover the facial defects. This study report a patient presenting with tragic Road Traffic Accident (RTA) admitted to maxillofacial surgery department at Ramadi Teaching Hospital, Anbar province, Iraq. An incision, medially based, was done and deltopectoral fascio-cutaneous flap was used for surgical exposure and closure of defects after RTA. There was no major complication. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved. Deltopectoral flap is an excellent alternative for the reconstruction of head and neck. Harvesting and application of the flap is rapid and safe. Only a single incision is sufficient for dissection and flap elevation. PMID:26595007

  15. [Eponychial flap].

    PubMed

    Bakhach, J

    1998-06-01

    The author describes an original and new method to lengthen the fingernail plate in distal digital amputation. After digital amputation, the loss of substance concerns the pulp tissue and fingernail apparatus. Generally, most palmar falp techniques can restore functional and aesthetic pulp. The fingernail defect is obviously not tolerated by the patient and needs to be corrected. The eponychial flap is a backward cutaneous translation flap. This flap lengthens the nail plate and restores normal dimensions of the nail apparatus. Two clinical cases are reported. This technique should be reserved for reconstruction of stage I and II distal digital amputations. PMID:9768069

  16. Long-term results of oncoplastic breast surgery with latissimus dorsi flap reconstruction: a pilot study of the objective cosmetic results and patient reported outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeong-Deok; Kim, Zisun; Kuk, Jung Cheol; Jeong, Jaehong; Choi, Kyu Sung; Hur, Sung Mo; Jeong, Gui Ae; Chung, Jun Chul; Cho, Gyu Seok; Shin, Eung Jin; Kim, Hyung Chul; Kang, Sang-Gue; Lee, Min Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goal of oncoplastic breast surgery is to restore the appearance of the breast and improve patient satisfaction. Thus, the assessment of cosmetic results and patient-reported outcomes (PROs) using appropriately constructed and validated instruments is essential. The aim of the present study was to assess the long-term objective cosmetic results and corresponding PROs after oncoplastic breast surgery. Methods Cosmetic results were assessed by the patients, a medical panel, and a computer program (BCCT.core). PROs were assessed using BREAST-Q, a questionnaire that measures the perception of patients having breast surgery. The cosmetic results and PROs were analyzed in patients who underwent quadrantectomy and partial breast reconstruction utilizing the latissimus dorsi flap. Results The mean duration of the follow-up period was 91.6 months (range, 33.3–171.0 months), and mean age of the patients was 51 years old (range, 33–72 years). The mean tumor size was 2.1 cm (range, 0.9–5.5 cm). There was fair agreement between the medical panel and BCCT.core score (K = 0.32, P < 0.001), and a statistically significant correlation between the BCCT.core score and medical panel cosmetic results was identified (r = 0.606, P < 0.001). A better BCCT.core result was related to a higher PRO of each BREAST-Q domain—satisfaction with breasts (R2 = 0.070, P = 0.039), satisfaction with outcome (R2 = 0.087, P = 0.021), psychosocial well-being (R2 = 0.085, P = 0.023), sexual well-being (R2 = 0.082, P = 0.029), and satisfaction with information (R2 = 0.064, P = 0.049). Conclusion Our long-term results of oncoplastic surgery achieved a high level of patient satisfaction with good cosmetic results. The medical panel and BCCT.core results correlated well with the PROs of the patients using valid, reliable, and procedure-specific measures. PMID:26942154

  17. Free flaps in reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Soutar, D. S.

    1989-01-01

    Advances in technique, training and instrumentation have improved the patency rates for small vessel anastomosis. This, together with the introduction of more reliable donor sites for free tissue transfer, have resulted in success rates in excess of 90%. The technique is not associated with an increase in mortality or morbidity; on the contrary there is the advantage of primary reconstruction with a wide choice of donor sites offering the correct amount and type of tissue required. Single-stage, effective reconstruction, aimed at primary wound healing remains the aim of the reconstructive surgeon and free tissue transfer offers the most versatile and reliable method currently available. Images fig. 1 fig. 2 fig. 3 fig. 4 PMID:2589783

  18. Assessment of the abdominal wall function after pedicled TRAM flap surgery for breast reconstruction: Use of modified mesh repair for the donor defect

    PubMed Central

    Cyriac, Chacko; Sharma, Ramesh Kumar; Singh, Gurpreet

    2010-01-01

    Background: The pedicled TRAM flap has been a workhorse of autologous breast reconstruction for decades. However, there has been a rising concern about the abdominal wall donor site morbidity with the use of conventional TRAM flap. This has generally been cited as one of the main reasons for resorting to “abdominal wall friendly” techniques. This study has been undertaken to assess the abdominal wall function in patients with pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction. The entire width of the muscle and the overlying wide disk of anterior rectus sheath were harvested with the TRAM flap in all our patients and the anterior rectus sheath defect was repaired by a Proline mesh. Materials and Methods: Abdominal wall function was studied in 21 patients who underwent simultaneous primary unipedicled TRAM flap reconstruction after mastectomy for cancer. In all the patients, the abdominal wall defect was repaired using wide sheet of Proline mesh both as inlay and onlay. The assessment tools included straight and rotational curl ups and a subjective questionnaire. The abdominal wall was also examined for any asymmetry, bulge, or hernia. The minimal follow-up was 6 months postoperative. The objective results were compared with normal unoperated volunteers. Results and Conclusions: The harvesting the TRAM flap certainly results in changes to the anterior abdominal wall that can express themselves to a variable degree. A relatively high incidence of asymptomatic asymmetry of the abdomen was seen. There was total absence of hernia in our series even after a mean follow-up period of 15.5 months. A few patients were only able to partially initiate the sit up movement and suffered an important loss of strength. In most patients, synergists took over the functional movement but as the load increased, flexion and rotation performances decreased. The lack of correlation between exercise tests and the results of the questionnaire suggests that this statistically significant impairment was functionally not important. The patients encountered little or no difficulty in theis day-to-day activities. Our modification of use of a wide mesh as inlay and onlay repair minimizes the donor site morbidity. This also avoids maneuvers meant for primary closure of the rectus sheath defects, which can result in distortion of umbilicus. Therefore, in conclusion, the unipedicled TRAM flap should be regarded as a valuable option in breast reconstruction provided careful repair of the abdominal wall defect is undertaken using Proline mesh. PMID:21217974

  19. Modified free pectoral skin flaps in rats.

    PubMed

    Pabst, Andreas Max; Jger, Lukas; Ackermann, Maximilian; Konerding, Moritz Anton

    2015-11-01

    Various types of murine free flaps have been developed for microsurgical training and research. We present a new modification of the free pectoral skin flap in Sprague-Dawley rats. Twelve free pectoral skin flaps were raised according to the standard protocol except that we deviated from it by transecting the common thoracic vessels at the origin of the axillary vessels and anastomosing them end-to-side to the femoral vessels in the groin. This reduced operating time and complications as well as postoperative morbidity and mortality. Overall, it simplified the procedure considerably and therefore made the model more attractive to beginners in microvascular surgery. PMID:26243385

  20. Development of a Mouse Model of Abdominal Cutaneous Flaps for Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Womac, Daniel John; Palanisamy, Arun Prathap; Eslick, Rene; Schimpf, Dennis Kenneth; Chavin, Kenneth David

    2013-01-01

    Autologous tissue transfer, in addition to replacing tissue that was lost during injury or surgery, offers women an excellent option to improve cosmetic appearance and self-confidence following mastectomy due to breast cancer. However, flap necrosis is a complication in obese patients undergoing this procedure. We created a mouse model to study the flap-related complications that leads to decreased flap survival in autologous breast reconstruction. Methods Left superficial inferior epigastric (SIE) pedicle abdominal-cutaneous flaps were elevated in 8 week-old, obese ob/ob male mice and their lean littermates. Flaps were followed by serial photography. Area of flap necrosis was measured at 7 days. Statistical analysis was performed. Results Necrosis was observed at the distal margin of the flaps, in both lean and obese groups. Lean left SIE flaps (n?=?8) had a total area flap necrosis of 9.1% at 7 days whereas obese left SIE flaps (n?=?8) had a total area flap necrosis of 45.5% at 7 days. Obese flaps had a statistically significant increase in necrosis compared to the lean flaps, p?=?0.001. Conclusions There was a significant difference between flap survival in lean and obese SIE pedicle flaps in our mouse model. We have developed the first flap model of obesity utilizing the superficial epigastric pedicle in the mouse. This model is optimal for future studies to dissect out mechanisms that lead to the complications related to flap survival for breast reconstruction, especially in obese subjects. PMID:23308122

  1. Complications of surgery for radiotherapy skin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph, R.

    1982-08-01

    Complications of modern surgery for radiotherapy skin damage reviewed in 28 patients who had 42 operations. Thin split-thickness skin grafts for ulcer treatment had a 100 percent complication rate, defined as the need for further surgery. Local flaps, whether delayed or not, also had a high rate of complications. Myocutaneous flaps for ulcers had a 43 percent complication rate, with viable flaps lifting off radiated wound beds. Only myocutaneous flaps for breast reconstruction and omental flaps with skin grafts and Marlex mesh had no complications. The deeper tissue penetration of modern radiotherapy techniques may make skin grafts and flaps less useful. In reconstruction of radiation ulcers, omental flaps and myocutaneous flaps are especially useful, particularly if the radiation damage can be fully excised. The pull of gravity appears detrimental to myocutaneous flap healing and, if possible, should be avoided by flap design.

  2. Tunnelled tensor fascia lata flap for complex abdominal wall reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Frederick; Buonocore, Samuel; Narayan, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the treatment of two patients with recurrent, infected abdominal wall defects using bilateral delayed and tunnelled pedicled tensor fascia lata (TFL) myofascial flaps. TFL flaps were elevated and delayed for 4 weeks in both cases. In the second case, Parietex Composite mesh was positioned underneath the TFL flap and allowed to incorporate. After a delay of 4 weeks, the flaps were harvested and tunnelled subcutaneously to repair the abdominal wall defect. Both patients have stable repairs but had donor site seromas requiring drainage. Cadaver dissection was also performed to identify structures related to TFL flap harvest. We identified a variant of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve that traversed the TFL flap, necessitating meticulous dissection during surgery. In summary, we describe a new technique of incorporating mesh into the TFL prior to flap harvest for reconstruction of complex abdominal wall. PMID:22707661

  3. The use of the fascia of the lower leg as a roll-over flap: its possible clinical applications in reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Thatte, R L; Laud, N

    1984-01-01

    In two patients we have used the fascia of the lower leg as a roll-over flap to heal defects of the skin and subcutaneous tissues. The case reports are preceded by the description of an experimental anatomical model to illustrate the attachments, blood supply and the potential range of movement of the fascia of the medial intermuscular compartment of the leg. The rationale for the procedures that were performed and the problems encountered are discussed. PMID:6692067

  4. [Locoregional flaps for the hand: functional anatomy and case examples. An overview].

    PubMed

    Bahm, J; Schoofs, M

    1995-01-01

    Among the multitude of actually proposed loco-regional flaps and their variants, we describe our options and technical viewpoints for common coverage problems in hand surgery, according to the guidelines of functional anatomy. Special emphasis is placed on newer techniques such as microsurgical free flaps, venous flaps, and reverse flow vascularisation. PMID:7705723

  5. Eight free flaps in 24 hours: a training concept for postgraduate teaching of how to raise microvascular free flaps.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Florian; Koerdt, Steffen; Hlzle, Frank; Mitchell, David A; Wolff, Klaus-D

    2016-01-01

    Microvascular free flaps are complex but important tools in oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS), and though techniques to raise flaps are challenging surgeons often have little structured training. In this study we have evaluated a structured, three-day, hands-on, practical training course on raising flaps. Five human, Thiel-embalmed cadavers were used for training in how to raise the following flaps: radial forearm, anterolateral thigh, lateral arm, fibular, latissimus dorsi, scapular, iliac crest, and rectus abdominis. The total duration of the course was 24hours over three days. All participants were asked to evaluate the design and conduct of the course, their own learning curve, and general questions about their knowledge of how to raise flaps and microsurgery. There was a significant increase in participants' assessments of how they raised all free flaps, except the lateral arm flap (4.74 (0.68) compared with 2.42 (0.81); p=0.052) before and after the course. The radial forearm flap was thought to be the most relevant in clinical practice (n=40; 75%), followed by the anterolateral thigh (n=5; 9%) and fibular (n=4; 8%) flaps. Comparisons between residents and consultants showed unsurprising differences in experience with microsurgery and self-assessment in raising particular free flaps before the course. We have shown that a structured, hands-on course using a well-established simulation model can significantly improve postgraduate surgeons' skills in raising free flaps. PMID:26628198

  6. Lower Extremity Reconstruction Using Vastus Lateralis Myocutaneous Flap versus Anterolateral Thigh Fasciocutaneous Flap

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min Jae; Yun, In Sik; Rah, Dong Kyun

    2012-01-01

    Background The anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator flap has become a popular option for treating soft tissue defects of lower extremity reconstruction and can be combined with a segment of the vastus lateralis muscle. We present a comparison of the use of the ALT fasciocutaneous (ALT-FC) and myocutaneous flaps. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients in whom free-tissue transfer was performed between 2005 and 2011 for the reconstruction of lower extremity soft-tissue defects. Twenty-four patients were divided into two groups: reconstruction using an ALT-FC flap (12 cases) and reconstruction using a vastus lateralis myocutaneous (VL-MC) flap (12 cases). Postoperative complications, functional results, cosmetic results, and donor-site morbidities were studied. Results Complete flap survival was 100% in both groups. A flap complication was noted in one case (marginal dehiscence) of the ALT-FC group, and no complications were noted in the VL-MC group. In both groups, one case of partial skin graft loss occurred at the donor site, and debulking surgeries were needed for two cases. There were no significant differences in the mean scores for either functional or cosmetic outcomes in either group. Conclusions The VL-MC flap is able to fill occasional dead space and has comparable survival rates to ALT-FC with minimal donor-site morbidity. Additionally, the VL-MC flap is easily elevated without myocutaneous perforator injury. PMID:22872841

  7. Rescue of Primary Incomplete Microkeratome Flap with Secondary Femtosecond Laser Flap in LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Razgulyaeva, E. A.

    2014-01-01

    For laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) retreatments with a previous unsuccessful mechanical microkeratome-assisted surgery, some surgical protocols have been described as feasible, such as relifting of the flap or the creation of a new flap and even the change to a surface ablation procedure (photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)). This case shows the use of femtosecond technology for the creation of a secondary flap to perform LASIK in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap obtained with a mechanical microkeratome. As we were unable to characterize the interface of the first partial lamellar cut, a thick flap was planned and created using a femtosecond laser platform. As the primary cut was very thick in the nasal quadrant, a piece of loose corneal tissue appeared during flap lifting which was fitted in its position and not removed. Despite this condition and considering the regularity of the new femtosecond laser cut, the treatment was uneventful. This case report shows the relevance of a detailed corneal analysis with an advanced imaging technique before performing a secondary flap in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap. The femtosecond laser technology seems to be an excellent tool to manage such cases successfully. PMID:25506449

  8. Rescue of primary incomplete microkeratome flap with secondary femtosecond laser flap in LASIK.

    PubMed

    Razgulyaeva, E A

    2014-01-01

    For laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) retreatments with a previous unsuccessful mechanical microkeratome-assisted surgery, some surgical protocols have been described as feasible, such as relifting of the flap or the creation of a new flap and even the change to a surface ablation procedure (photorefractive keratectomy (PRK)). This case shows the use of femtosecond technology for the creation of a secondary flap to perform LASIK in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap obtained with a mechanical microkeratome. As we were unable to characterize the interface of the first partial lamellar cut, a thick flap was planned and created using a femtosecond laser platform. As the primary cut was very thick in the nasal quadrant, a piece of loose corneal tissue appeared during flap lifting which was fitted in its position and not removed. Despite this condition and considering the regularity of the new femtosecond laser cut, the treatment was uneventful. This case report shows the relevance of a detailed corneal analysis with an advanced imaging technique before performing a secondary flap in a cornea with a primary incomplete flap. The femtosecond laser technology seems to be an excellent tool to manage such cases successfully. PMID:25506449

  9. The evolving breast reconstruction: from latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap to a propeller thoracodorsal fasciocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Jørn Bo; Gunnarsson, Gudjon Leifur

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this editorial is to give an update on the use of the propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap (TAP/TDAP-flap) within the field of breast reconstruction. The TAP-flap can be dissected by a combined use of a monopolar cautery and a scalpel. Microsurgical instruments are generally not needed. The propeller TAP-flap can be designed in different ways, three of these have been published: (I) an oblique upwards design; (II) a horizontal design; (III) an oblique downward design. The latissimus dorsi-flap is a good and reliable option for breast reconstruction, but has been criticized for morbidity and complications. The TAP-flap does not seem to impair the function of the shoulder or arm and the morbidity appears to be scarce. However, an implant is often needed in combination with the TAP-flap, which results in implant related morbidity over time. The TAP-flap seems to be a promising tool for oncoplastic and reconstructive breast surgery and will certainly become an invaluable addition to breast reconstructive methods. PMID:25207206

  10. Unilateral Breast Reconstruction Using Bilateral Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Mayu; Ogawa, Marina; Shibuya, Mai; Yasumura, Kazunori; Kobayashi, Shinji; Ishikawa, Takashi; Maegawa, Jiro

    2015-01-01

    Background: For reconstructing moderate-to-high projection breasts in nulliparous patients with insufficient abdominal tissue or prior abdominal surgeries, a unilateral inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) flap is an alternative procedure. In patients with slim hips, however, unilateral gluteal tissue is insufficient and inferior gluteal crease displacement may develop postoperatively. Donor-site asymmetry is also a major disadvantage. In these circumstances, bilateral IGAP flaps provide sufficient tissue without significant gluteal deformity. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 20 patients who underwent unilateral breast reconstruction using bilateral IGAP flaps by a single surgeon between November 2007 and December 2012. A quantitative outcome assessment was performed and compared with that of 22 unilateral IGAP flap patients operated on by the same surgeon. Results: Twenty patients underwent reconstruction with 40 IGAP flaps. Of the 40 flaps, 39 survived and 1 developed total necrosis due to repeated venous thrombosis. In 15 of 20 patients, the size of reconstructed breast was comparable to that of the contralateral breast. Final inset flap weight was 462.3 g for bilateral flaps and 244.3 g for unilateral flaps. Total operating time was 671.1 minutes (bilateral flaps) and 486.8 minutes (unilateral flaps). Conclusions: Use of bilateral IGAP flaps for breast reconstruction helps to avoid asymmetry of the inferior buttock volume and shape. Bilateral flaps provide sufficient tissue volume and allow for reconstruction of a breast comparable to the unaffected side. In patients with moderate-to-high projection breast whose abdominal tissue cannot be used for reconstruction, IGAP flaps may be a suitable alternative. PMID:25878925

  11. Prospective Randomized Trial on Postoperative Administration of Diet Containing Eicosapentaenoic Acid, Docosahexaenoic Acid, Gamma-linolenic Acid, and Antioxidants in Head and Neck Cancer Surgery Patients with Free-flap Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Tsukahara, Kiyoaki; Motohashi, Ray; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Minoru; Ueda, Yuri; Nakamura, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The purpose of this prospective, randomized study was to evaluate the effects of a diet containing eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), and antioxidants in head and neck cancer surgery patients with free-flap reconstruction. METHODS In this randomized, prospective study, 62 patients with head and neck cancers were assigned to receive a general control diet (Ensure H; Abbott Japan, Tokyo, Japan) or the study diet (Oxepa; Abbott Japan) containing EPA, DHA, GLA, and antioxidants (eg vitamins A, E, and C). The primary assessment item was the degree of postoperative inflammation, as assessed by measuring maximum body temperature and levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and procalcitonin from the day of surgery to postoperative day 8. Secondary assessment items were lengths of stays in the intensive care unit (ICU) and hospital. RESULTS The control diet group (n = 32) and study diet group (n = 30) showed no significant difference in energy administered through diet. No significant differences in the parameters of the primary assessment item were noted. Length of stay in the ICU was significantly shorter for the control diet group than for the study diet group (P = 0.011). No significant difference in duration of hospitalization was seen between groups. CONCLUSION No usefulness of a diet containing EPA, DHA, GLA, and antioxidants was demonstrated. PMID:25368541

  12. Modification of the Elevation Plane and Defatting Technique to Create a Thin Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyu Nam; Hong, Joon Pio; Park, Chae Ri; Yoon, Chi Sun

    2016-02-01

    Background?Perforator flaps have been used extensively in the field of reconstruction, and the thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap is very popular. However, the perforator flap can be relatively bulky in some cases, depending on the defect's location. Thus, several methods have been developed to address this bulkiness, including modification of the flap elevation, application of an ultrathin flap using microdissection, and the defatting technique. However, these methods have various disadvantages, so we developed an adjustable thin TDAP flap using modification of the flap elevation and defatting technique. Methods?Between January 2012 and February 2015, 13 patients underwent reconstruction of defects of their upper and lower extremities using TDAP flaps. We measured all the flap dimensions, except for thickness, because it was adjusted for the target defect. Results?The mean flap size was 94 cm(2) (range: 48-210 cm(2)), and all flaps were ?10 cm wide to facilitate primary donor-site closure. Two subjects with a history of diabetes exhibited partial flap loss, so we performed secondary skin graft surgery. Conclusions?The TDAP flap elevation was modified at the superficial fascia plane, and the defatting technique was used to adjust the flap volume. This technique provided more natural contours and minimized the need for secondary debulking. PMID:26322492

  13. Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for hypopharyngeal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Spriano, Giuseppe; Pellini, Raul; Roselli, Raffaele

    2002-11-01

    The reconstruction of total or subtotal defects after surgical treatment for hypopharyngeal cancer is a challenging problem in head and neck surgery. The authors discuss reconstructive surgery performed in 37 patients affected by advanced hypopharyngeal cancer using the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap. In 22 cases of total pharyngolaryngectomy, the reconstructive procedure originally proposed by the authors was based on the use of a pectoralis major myocutaneous flap directly sutured to the pharyngeal and esophageal stumps and the prevertebral fascia, which eventually represented the posterior wall of the neohypopharynx. In 15 cases of subtotal pharyngolaryngectomy, the posterior wall of the neohypopharynx consisted of a residual strip of pharyngeal mucosa. In each patient, removal of the tumor and reconstruction were performed during the same operation, with only a few complications. Neither flap necrosis nor strictures were encountered; five patients had pharyngeal fistula and one patient died because of massive pneumonia. Although the use of microvascular free flaps is a reliable procedure, the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap is still applicable for hypopharyngeal reconstruction, thanks to its feasibility and low complication rate. The other reconstructive options require surgical transgression of the abdomen and/or thorax in patients affected by malnutrition and other chronic systemic disorders. PMID:12409757

  14. Flexible Curved V-Y Subcutaneous Flap for Facial Skin Defects

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Kawazoe, Takeshi; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2015-01-01

    Background and Methods: We devised an improved type of the V-Y subcutaneous pedicle flap with the elements of both advancement and rotation flaps. This flexible curved V-Y subcutaneous flap was used for facial skin defect reconstruction in 15 patients. Curved flaps were designed according to the elasticity of the surrounding skin and the postoperative scar direction. Results: In all the 15 patients, the flap survived without circulatory impairment, and follow-up for more than 1 year indicated an inconspicuous scar and good course. Conclusions: With elements of both advancement and rotation flaps, transfer and wound closure of the flexible curved V-Y subcutaneous flap are easy. In addition, the postoperative scar can be positioned along natural wrinkle lines and relaxed skin tension lines. This may be a useful local flap for facial and general plastic surgery. PMID:26579337

  15. Assessment of skin flap viability using visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and auto-fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Caigang; Chen, Shuo; Chui, Christopher Hoe-Kong; Liu, Quan

    2012-12-01

    The accurate assessment of skin flap viability is vitally important in reconstructive surgery. Early identification of vascular compromise increases the change of successful flap salvage. The ability to determine tissue viability intraoperatively is also extremely useful when the reconstructive surgeon must decide how to inset the flap and whether any tissue must be discarded. Visible diffuse reflectance and auto-fluorescence spectroscopy, which yield different sets of biochemical information, have not been used in the characterization of skin flap viability simultaneously to our best knowledge. We performed both diffuse reflectance and fluorescence measurements on a reverse MacFarlane rat dorsal skin flap model to identify the additional value of auto-fluorescence spectroscopy to the assessment of flap viability. Our result suggests that auto-fluorescence spectroscopy appears to be more sensitive to early biochemical changes in a failed flap than diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, which could be a valuable complement to diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for the assessment of flap viability.

  16. Sural Versus Perforator Flaps for Distal Medial Leg Wounds.

    PubMed

    Schannen, Andrew P; Truchan, Lisa; Goshima, Kaoru; Bentley, Roger; DeSilva, Gregory L

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue coverage of distal medial ankle wounds is a challenging problem in orthopedic surgery because of the limited local tissues and prominent instrumentation. Traditionally, these wounds required free tissue transfer to achieve suitable coverage and subsequent bony union. To better respect the reconstructive ladder and to avoid the inherent difficulty of free flap coverage, rotational flaps have been used to cover these wounds. Both sural fasciocutaneous flaps and rotational fasciocutaneous perforator (propeller) flaps have been described for distal medial soft tissue coverage. The authors performed a retrospective chart review of patients who underwent distal medial leg coverage with the use of either sural flaps or rotational fasciocutaneous perforator flaps. The authors identified 14 patients by Current Procedural Terminology code who met the study criteria. The average age and degree of medical comorbidities were comparable in the 2 groups. The authors reviewed their medical records to evaluate fracture healing, flap size, complications, and return to normal shoe wear. All 7 sural flaps healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. Of the 7 perforator flaps, 6 healed without incident, with underlying fracture healing. One perforator-based flap was complicated by superficial tip necrosis and went on to heal with local wound care. All patients returned to normal shoe wear. Both sural artery rotational flaps and posterior tibial artery-based rotational flaps are viable options for coverage of the distal medial leg. Coverage can be achieved reliably without microsurgery, anticoagulation, or monitoring in the intensive care unit. [Orthopedics. 2015; 38(12):e1059-e1064.]. PMID:26652325

  17. Concomitant Correction of a Soft-Tissue Fenestration with Keratinised Tissue Augmentation By Using A Rotated Double-Pedicle Flap During Second-Stage Implant Surgery- A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Kumar, P Anoop; Sailaja, Sistla; Chakravarthy, Yshs; Chandra, Rampalli Viswa

    2015-12-01

    Soft tissue deficiencies and defects around dental implants have been observed frequently. Soft-tissue defects after implant procedures originate from the process of modelling of periimplant mucosa and often cause aesthetic disharmony, food debris accumulation and soft tissue shrinkage. Periimplant mucogingival surgery focuses on creating an optimum band of keratinized tissue resulting in soft tissue architecture similar to the gingiva around natural teeth. A 23-year-old male reported to the Department of Periodontology with a complaint of gum soreness, foul smell and food accumulation at a site where a 3.75 x 11.5mm implant was placed previously. On clinical examination, fenestration of tissue above the cover screw was observed and there appeared to be a keratinized tissue of 1mm surrounding the implant. The case was managed by use of a rotated double-pedicle flap during second-stage implant surgery to correct the soft-tissue fenestration defect and to obtain a keratinized periimplant soft tissue. A periosteal bed was prepared by giving a horizontal incision at the mucogingival junction to a depth of 4 mm. Two split-thickness keratinized pedicles were dissected from the mesial and distal interproximal tissues near the implant. After rotation, both the pedicles were sutured to each other mid-buccally and the pedicles were rigidly immobilized with sutures. At 1 month, there was a 3mm band of stable and firm keratinized tissue over the underlying tissues. The procedure resulted in an aesthetic improvement due to enhanced soft tissue architecture and optimum integration between the peri-implant soft tissue and the final prosthesis. PMID:26816998

  18. Concomitant Correction of a Soft-Tissue Fenestration with Keratinised Tissue Augmentation By Using A Rotated Double-Pedicle Flap During Second-Stage Implant Surgery- A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Aileni Amarender; Kumar, P. Anoop; Sailaja, Sistla; Chakravarthy, Yshs

    2015-01-01

    Soft tissue deficiencies and defects around dental implants have been observed frequently. Soft-tissue defects after implant procedures originate from the process of modelling of periimplant mucosa and often cause aesthetic disharmony, food debris accumulation and soft tissue shrinkage. Periimplant mucogingival surgery focuses on creating an optimum band of keratinized tissue resulting in soft tissue architecture similar to the gingiva around natural teeth. A 23-year-old male reported to the Department of Periodontology with a complaint of gum soreness, foul smell and food accumulation at a site where a 3.75 x 11.5mm implant was placed previously. On clinical examination, fenestration of tissue above the cover screw was observed and there appeared to be a keratinized tissue of 1mm surrounding the implant. The case was managed by use of a rotated double-pedicle flap during second-stage implant surgery to correct the soft-tissue fenestration defect and to obtain a keratinized periimplant soft tissue. A periosteal bed was prepared by giving a horizontal incision at the mucogingival junction to a depth of 4 mm. Two split-thickness keratinized pedicles were dissected from the mesial and distal interproximal tissues near the implant. After rotation, both the pedicles were sutured to each other mid-buccally and the pedicles were rigidly immobilized with sutures. At 1 month, there was a 3mm band of stable and firm keratinized tissue over the underlying tissues. The procedure resulted in an aesthetic improvement due to enhanced soft tissue architecture and optimum integration between the peri-implant soft tissue and the final prosthesis. PMID:26816998

  19. Total lower eyelid reconstruction with superficial temporal fascia flap and porous polyethylene implant: a case report.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Ismail; Aykan, Andac; Acikel, Cengiz; Alhan, Dogan; Isik, Selcuk

    2012-01-01

    Total reconstruction of the eyelid after serious periorbital injury is a challenging procedure for plastic and reconstructive surgery. Although several methods have been used for reconstructing the eyelids, such as advancement flap with fascia lata sling, island mucochrondrocutaneous flap, prefabricated temporal island flap, porous polyethylene and superficial temporal fascia flap, creating a supportive eyelid for housing an artificial eye without complication is still an ongoing problem. In the case presented, superficial temporal fascia flap with porous polyethylene was used for the reconstruction of total lower eyelid. PMID:21778127

  20. Speech benefits of posterior pharyngeal flap are preserved after surgical flap division for obstructive sleep apnea: experience with division of 12 flaps.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tripti; Sloan, Gerald M; Zajac, David; Uhrich, Kim S; Meadows, William; Lewchalermwong, J Amera

    2003-09-01

    Attachment of a posterior pharyngeal flap is commonly performed for the surgical management of velopharyngeal insufficiency. Obstructive sleep apnea has been found to occur in as many as 38% of patients undergoing posterior pharyngeal flap attachment. Often, this is temporary in the early postoperative period. When it occurs later after surgery, however, it can require active treatment. Many patients improve with the use of nighttime nasal C-PAP. Those patients who do not improve sufficiently with nasal C-PAP may require surgical flap division. We report surgical flap division in 12 such patients. All patients had preoperative and postoperative perceptual speech evaluations, and most had preoperative and postoperative pressure flow studies. In 11 of the 12 patients who underwent surgical flap division, velopharyngeal function did not deteriorate. We hypothesized that the persistence of the speech improvement in those patients is either secondary to the bulk of tissue from the flap, which remains in the posterior pharyngeal wall and provides a pad to assist with velopharyngeal closure, or is secondary to the speech mechanisms that the patients learned with the flap in place and were able to continue even after flap division. PMID:14501320

  1. What Is the Ideal Free Flap for Soft Tissue Reconstruction? A Ten-Year Experience of Microsurgical Reconstruction Using 334 Latissimus Dorsi Flaps From a Universal Donor Site.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Sang Wha; Youn, Seungki; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2015-07-01

    Microsurgical free tissue transfer is regarded as the best available method of tissue reconstruction for intractable defects. The ideal soft tissue flap is thought to be the anterolateral thigh flap. On the basis of 334 procedures involving the latissimus dorsi (LD) flap, we discuss the advantages of the LD flap over the current universal option, and we aimed to establish whether the LD could also gain universal status in all reconstructive fields.Three hundred thirty-four reconstructive procedures using the LD flap were performed in 322 patients between September 2002 and July 2012. In accordance with defect characteristics, we performed 334 procedures using flaps, which included the LD muscle flap with skin graft, the myocutaneous flap, the muscle-sparing flap, the perforator flap, the chimeric flap, and the 2-flap technique using the serratus anterior branch.Flap-related complications occurred in 21 patients (6.3%), including total and partial flap failure. In 253 cases, the donor site was closed primarily, and in the remaining cases, we used split-thickness skin grafts. Donor-site complications occurred in 20 cases (6%). In 11 of the 182 cases, no suitable perforators were identified during surgery.The advantages of the LD as a donor site include the possibility of various harvesting positions without position change, versatility of components, availability of muscle to fill extensive defects, and presence of thick fascia to enable full abdominal reconstruction. On the basis of our experience, we concluded that this flap has the potential to be used as widely as, or in preference to, the anterolateral thigh flap in most reconstructive areas. PMID:25785382

  2. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models.

    PubMed

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-03-26

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals. PMID:27022440

  3. Role of adipose-derived stromal cells in pedicle skin flap survival in experimental animal models

    PubMed Central

    Foroglou, Pericles; Karathanasis, Vasileios; Demiri, Efterpi; Koliakos, George; Papadakis, Marios

    2016-01-01

    The use of skin flaps in reconstructive surgery is the first-line surgical treatment for the reconstruction of skin defects and is essentially considered the starting point of plastic surgery. Despite their excellent usability, their application includes general surgical risks or possible complications, the primary and most common is necrosis of the flap. To improve flap survival, researchers have used different methods, including the use of adipose-derived stem cells, with significant positive results. In our research we will report the use of adipose-derived stem cells in pedicle skin flap survival based on current literature on various experimental models in animals.

  4. Improved technique for evaluating oral free flaps by pinprick testing assisted by indocyanine green near-infrared fluorescence angiography.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Tetsuji; Masumoto, Kazuma; Uchiyama, Yoshiyuki; Watanabe, Yoshiko; Azuma, Ryuichi; Morimoto, Yuji; Katou, Fuminori

    2014-10-01

    In head and neck surgery, free-flap reconstruction using a microvascular anastomosis is an indispensable option after tumor ablation. Because the success of free-flap reconstruction is enhanced by rapid identification and salvage of failing flaps, postoperative monitoring of free flaps is essential. We describe a new technique using indocyanine green (ICG) near-infrared angiography and pinprick testing to monitor intraoral free flaps. A solution of ICG (Diagnogreen, 5 ml) was intravenously injected, and scanning was performed with a near-infrared video camera system. Thirty seconds after ICG injection, a pinprick test was performed by placing a 24-gage needle through the dermis to the subcutaneous fat of the flap. Pinprick testing during ICG fluorescence imaging was performed in 30 patients. Flap perfusion was confirmed in all patients, and all flaps survived postoperatively. ICG fluorescence imaging demonstrated that flap perfusion was maintained. PMID:24530073

  5. Facial cutaneous reconstructive surgery: general aesthetic principles.

    PubMed

    Summers, B K; Siegle, R J

    1993-11-01

    The performance of cutaneous reconstructive surgery requires understanding and application of many important principles. This article reviews the critical factors to consider in the management of surgical wounds by second-intention healing, primary closure, skin grafting, and repair with local flaps. For certain defects, reconstruction with local flaps offers several advantages over other alternatives. Key concepts useful in flap choice and implementation are discussed, and surgical techniques that maximize the aesthetic outcome of reconstructive surgery are reviewed. PMID:8227538

  6. Mechanical endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy with mucosal flaps

    PubMed Central

    Tsirbas, A; Wormald, P J

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To describe and assess the efficacy of mechanical endonasal dacryocystorhinostomy (MENDCR). This is a new technique that involves creation of a large rhinostomy and mucosal flaps. The study involved a prospective non-randomised interventional case series with short perioperative follow up. Method: A prospective series of 104 consecutive endonasal DCRs performed from January 1999 to December 2001 were entered into the study. Patients included in the study had nasolacrimal duct obstruction and had not had previous lacrimal surgery. The technique involved anastomosis of nasal mucosal and lacrimal sac flaps and a large bony ostium. Surgery was performed by two surgeons (AT/PJW). Follow up assessment included nasoendoscopy as well as symptom evaluation. Success was defined as anatomical patency with fluorescein flow on nasoendoscopy and patency to lacrimal syringing. The average follow up time was 9.7 months (range 228, SD 6.7 months). Results: There were 104 DCRs performed on 86 patients (30 male, 56 female). The average age of the patients was 59 years (range 389, SD 24.1 years). Common presentations were epiphora (77%) and/or mucocele (19%). Septoplasty (SMR) was required in 48 DCRs (46%) and 13 DCRs (12.5%) needed other endoscopic surgery in conjunction with the lacrimal surgery. The surgery was successful in 93 cases (89%). Of the 11 cases that were classified as a failure six patients was anatomically patent but still symptomatic and another two had preoperative canalicular problems. The anatomical patency with this new technique was thus 95% (99 of 104 DCRs). Conclusion: MENDCR involves creation of a large ostium and mucosal preservation for the construction of flaps. The anatomical success is 95% and is similar to external DCR and better then other endonasal approaches. The authors suggest that creation of a large ostium as well as mucosal flaps improves the efficacy of this endonasal technique. PMID:12488261

  7. [Surgery].

    PubMed

    Roulin, D; Hbner, M; Demartines, N

    2013-01-16

    In 2012, an innovative approach for staged in situ liver transection was proposed that could allow for even more aggressive major hepatectomies. Otherwise, after 25 years, laparoscopy became "traditional" and other minimally invasive techniques continue to be developed but their indications deserve further investigation. Less aggressive treatment in non-complicated diverticulitis becomes more popular, and even antibiotic treatment has been challenged by a randomized study. In colorectal oncology, local resection or observation only seems to become a valuable approach in selected patients with complete response after neo adjuvant chemoradiation. Finally, enhanced recovery pathways (ERAS) have been validated and is increasingly accepted for colorectal surgery and ERAS principles are successfully applied in other surgical fields. PMID:23409643

  8. Computational modeling of skin: Using stress profiles as predictor for tissue necrosis in reconstructive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tepole, Adrin Buganza; Gosain, Arun K.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Local skin flaps have revolutionized reconstructive surgery. Mechanical loading is critical for flap survival: Excessive tissue tension reduces blood supply and induces tissue necrosis. However, skin flaps have never been analyzed mechanically. Here we explore the stress profiles of two common flap designs, direct advancement flaps and double back-cut flaps. Our simulations predict a direct correlation between regions of maximum stress and tissue necrosis. This suggests that elevated stress could serve as predictor for flap failure. Our model is a promising step towards computer-guided reconstructive surgery with the goal to minimize stress, accelerate healing, minimize scarring, and optimize tissue use. PMID:25225454

  9. A study of the blown flap/jet flap analogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hough, G. R.

    1979-01-01

    A study of the blown flap/jet flap analogy has been undertaken. Analytical predictions were made using both improved lifting line and optimized vortex lattice models for the jet flap. Results were compared with experimental data for three propulsive lift systems; the jet augmented flap, the externally blown flap, and the upper surface blown flap. Force increments due to changes in geometry and jet parameters were well approximated in most cases, although the absolute values of the aerodynamic forces were usually underestimated. The relatively simple jet-flap models gave performance predictions of accuracy comparable to more complex analyses.

  10. My First 100 Consecutive Microvascular Free Flaps: Pearls and Lessons Learned in First Year of Practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Microvascular reconstruction for oncologic defects is a challenging and rewarding endeavor, and successful outcomes are dependent on a multitude of factors. This study represents lessons learned from a personal prospective experience with 100 consecutive free flaps. Methods: All patients medical records were reviewed for demographics, operative notes, and complications. Results: Overall 100 flaps were performed in 84 consecutive patients for reconstruction of breast, head and neck, trunk, and extremity defects. Nineteen patients underwent free flap breast reconstruction with 10 patients undergoing bilateral reconstruction and 2 patients receiving a bipedicle flap for reconstruction of a unilateral breast defect. Sixty-five free flaps were performed in 61 patients with 3 patients receiving 2 free flaps for reconstruction of extensive head and neck defects and 1 patient who required a second flap for partial flap loss. Trunk and extremity reconstruction was less common with 2 free flaps performed in each group. Overall, 19 patients (22.6%) developed complications and 14 required a return to the operating room. There were no flap losses in this cohort. Thorough preoperative evaluation and workup, meticulous surgical technique and intraoperative planning, and diligent postoperative monitoring and prompt intervention are critical for flap success. Conclusions: As a young plastic surgeon embarking in reconstructive plastic surgery at an academic institution, the challenges and dilemmas presented in the first year of practice have been daunting but also represent opportunities for learning and improvement. Skills and knowledge acquired from time, experience, and mentors are invaluable in optimizing outcomes in microvascular free flap reconstruction. PMID:25289221

  11. Heterogeneity of Nasolabial Flap- Role in Prevention of Morbidity Associated with Reconstruction of Orofacial Defects

    PubMed Central

    Ayyallil, Muhamed Sajid

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructive technique after surgical excision of malignancy in orofacial region should be planned in preoperative period itself. Surgery is the preferred modality of treatment if the tumour is small and located in an accessible area. Nasolabial flap is a versatile flap which is well suited to cover small defects in maxillofacial region. Nasolabial flap can be used as an alternative to other distant pedicled flaps in selected cases. A retrospective analysis of 12 cases of oral cancer treated with primary excision and reconstruction using nasolabial flap was done. Patients who underwent resection of tumour and reconstruction with nasolabial flap in selected cases reduced the morbidity associated with Distant pedicled flaps. Two selected cases are described in detail. PMID:26501027

  12. [Delayed deltoid-pectoral flap].

    PubMed

    Zapater, E; Ferrandis, E; Vendrell, J B

    2002-01-01

    Delayed flaps include surgical techniques performed in order to diminish the blood supply of a flap before placing it at the definitive location. The purpose is to improve the irrigation of the distal region of the flap. Three cases of head and neck reconstructions with delayed deltopectoral flaps are reported. Literature about anatomic and physiologic phenomenon occurred during the delay period is reviewed, as well as the different surgical techniques described to delay a flap. We think that the deltopectoral flap remains an adequate technique, being indicated when the reconstruction is impossible with local flaps. That is the case of defects or irradiated regions. In our opinion, if the deltoid region of the flap is necessary to the reconstruction it is recommended to delay the flap, to increase the probability of complete survival at the distal region. In our cases the delay period has been one week, obtaining a complete survival of the flap in all of them. PMID:12462920

  13. Superior gluteal artery perforator flap in bilateral breast reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Werdin, Frank; Peek, Alberto; Martin, Nicolas C S; Baumeister, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    The incidence of bilateral breast reconstruction is increasing particularly due to genetic counseling and the option for bilateral prophylactic mastectomies. The decision to undergo a prophylactic mastectomy depends on the achievable outcomes of breast reconstruction. The free superior gluteal artery perforator flap (sGAP) flap is one option for autologous bilateral reconstruction which has rarely been reported.All bilateral sGAP flaps performed in the department of plastic surgery at the Behandlungszentrum Vogtareuth over a period of 4.5 years were retrospectively analyzed for indication, success rate, and complications.Thirty sGAP flaps were performed for bilateral breast reconstruction. The average age of the 15 women was 42 years and the average body mass index was 20.8. Indications for breast reconstruction were predominantly prophylactic mastectomies (60%). Indication for a sGAP flap was either a thin patient with insufficient abdominal tissue or a 2-staged bilateral reconstruction. 83% of the breast reconstructions were performed secondarily and 93% in 2 stages. The average operating time was 7 hours 12 minutes. Twenty-nine flaps (97%) were successful. Complications were fat necrosis (n = 3), hematoma (n = 3), and breast seroma (n = 1). Donor site complications were seroma (n = 8), infection (n = 1), and wound dehiscence (n = 1).Our results with bilateral breast reconstruction with the sGAP flap show cosmetically appealing results with high success and low complication rates on the breast. However, seromas on the donor site occurred in 27%. In addition, the sGAP flap is a technically demanding and time consuming operation. We recommend the sGAP flap when the abdomen has not enough tissue bulk to perform a deep inferior epigastric perforator flap or for a 2-staged bilateral reconstruction. This is often the case in women with a hereditary high risk of breast cancer who often present as young and slim patients. PMID:20010408

  14. New flap for the reconstruction of the perinasal region.

    PubMed

    Do?an, Fatih; zyazgan, ?rfan

    2014-12-01

    Various reconstructive methods ranging from secondary healing to free flap applications are used for the reconstruction of perinasal defects caused by trauma or tumor surgery. The method to be used for the reconstruction of this region is chosen considering many factors because of specific determining structures. The number of studies on the subcutaneous tissue and vascular configurations of this region are gradually increasing along with the accumulation of knowledge in this region. Herein, we describe the nasal superficial musculoaponeurotic system-pedicled island skin flap for the reconstruction of the nasal tip, supratip, lateral nasal margin, and infraorbital area. The described skin flap was performed for defects resulting from basal cell carcinoma excision in all the patients. Of the patients, 12 were females and 5 were males. The mean age was 67.8 years (range, 56-82 years). All patients were operated on under general anesthesia. The flap donor areas were closed primarily. None of the patients developed flap necrosis. Although mild edema and venous insufficiency were observed in the flaps in the acute period only in patients who underwent nasal tip reconstruction, these improved during follow-up. In the operated patients, no problem was observed in the donor area and nasal dorsal skin. The nasal superficial musculoaponeurotic system-pedicled island skin flap which we describe for the perinasal area reconstruction is a safe, easily performed and versatile flap. The multidimensional use of this flap together with a relatively easy reconstruction plan and surgical procedure would be effective in flap choice. PMID:25536136

  15. The Gracilis Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Azizzadeh, Babak; Pettijohn, Kelly J

    2016-02-01

    The gracilis free flap is the ideal modality of emotive and spontaneous facial reanimation in patients with a viable contralateral facial nerve. A 2-stage procedure with a cross-face nerve graft followed by gracilis free flap inset is advocated. In this article, the anatomy of the gracilis muscle, alternative neural sources (including the masseteric nerve), and technical aspects of the procedure are discussed. The literature regarding outcomes and complications is reviewed. PMID:26611701

  16. Reconstructive management of the rare bilateral oral submucos fibrosis using nasolabial flap in comparison with free radial forearm flap - a randomised prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Oral sub mucous fibrosis is a rare chronic, progressive, pre malignant collagen disorder of oral mucosa in people of Asian descent characterized by trismus, blanching and stiffness of mucosa, burning sensation in mouth and hypomobility of soft palate and tongue with loss of gustatory sensation. Betel nut chewing is the most common etiological agent. Surgery remains the main stay in severe cases and aims at release of fibrotic bands and resurfacing the raw areas with different options. Reconstruction can be done by using nasolabial flap or radial free forearm flap. The purpose of this study was to compare the mouth opening after the reconstruction with either nasolabial flap or radial free forearm flap. Methods This study was carried out on fifty (50) patients with oral sub mucous fibrosis. Twenty five (25) of these were reconstructed by nasolabial flap and twenty five (25) were reconstructed by radial free forearm flap. At different intervals of their post-operative visits, they were evaluated for the interincisal distance and the difference between the two groups was assessed. Results Average increase in interincisal distance was greater in patients reconstructed with radial free forearm flap compared with patient reconstructed by nasolabial flap i.e. 18.96 mm and 15.16 mm respectively with ‘P’ value > 0.05. Conclusion Based on this study radial forearm free flap is a superior method compared to transposition of nasolabial flap to cover the surgical wound of oral submucous fibrosis. PMID:23915701

  17. Oral reconstruction with submental flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Submental flap is a useful technique for reconstruction of medium to large oral cavity defects. Hair bearing nature of this flap in men makes it less appropriate. Therefore, deepithelialized variant is introduced to overcome the problem of hair with this flap. Recently, application of this flap has been introduced in maxillofacial trauma patients. Materials and Methods: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is used for the reconstruction of oral cavity mucosal defects. Results: Four cases including two trauma patients and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of oral cavity were treated using deepithelialized orthograde submental flap. There were no complications in all four patients and secondary epithelialization occurred in raw surface of the flap which was exposed to oral cavity. Conclusion: Deepithelialized orthograde submental flap is very effective in reconstruction of oral cavity in men. The problem of hair is readily solved using this technique without jeopardizing flap blood supply. PMID:24205473

  18. Control of Flap Vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2005-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was carried out on a semi-span wing model to assess the feasibility of controlling vortices emanating from outboard flaps and tip-flaps by actively varying the degree of boundary layer separation. Separation was varied by means of perturbations produced from segmented zero-efflux oscillatory blowing slots, while estimates of span loadings and vortex sheet strengths were obtained by integrating wing surface pressures. These estimates were used as input to inviscid rollup relations as a means of predicting changes to the vortex characteristics resulting from the perturbations. Surveys of flow in the wake of the outboard and tip-flaps were made using a seven-hole probe, from which the vortex characteristics were directly deduced. Varying the degree of separation had a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size for both outboard and tip-flaps. Qualitative changes in vortex characteristics were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations, while the failure to account for viscosity was presumed to be the main reason for observed discrepancies. Introducing perturbations near the outboard flap-edges or on the tip-flap exerted significant control over vortices while producing negligible lift excursions.

  19. Endoscopic-assisted temporoparietal fascial flap dissection and harvesting: a feasibility preliminary cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, J A; Shenaq, J; Ayala, J; Shenaq, S

    1998-12-01

    Endoscopic procedures in plastic surgery have been applied in various aesthetic and reconstructive surgical techniques. The authors describe, in this preliminary report, a new surgical technique of endoscopic dissection of the temporoparietal fascial flap. A series of 6 fresh human cadavers (12 flaps) were dissected endoscopically. The surgical incisions, flap anatomy applicable to endoscopy, endoscopic surgical technique, and type of endoscopic setup is standardized for all flaps, allowing direct identification of the temporoparietal fascial layers and the major vascular pedicle. This endoscopic manipulation of the flap, without the traditional large scalp incision, permits local and free transfer of the temporoparietal fascial flap. Exposure of the flap by means of the conventional T or Y temporal incisions has several possible disadvantages, including an increased risk of blood loss, alopecia, and facial nerve injury. Endoscopic dissection and mobilization of the temporoparietal fascial flap can obviate the direct flap incision and yield a flap accessible to dissection and mobilization for additional clinical applications. This new, innovative, and minimally invasive endoscopic procedure may prove particularly applicable to future clinical applications of this type of fascial flap. PMID:9869132

  20. Heel reconstruction with free instep flap: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Reconstruction of weight-bearing heel defects remains a challenge because of the unique characteristics of the plantar skin. Though numerous surgical reconstructive options have been reported, the instep flap represents an ideal option and seems to be more acceptable to patients than others. However, when the heel defect expands to the instep area, the ipsilateral instep is not available for flap elevation. A free instep flap harvested from the contralateral foot can be a good solution, but this method has been scarcely reported. Case presentation A 41-year-old Asian man presented to our institution with a soft-tissue lesion in the weight-bearing heel and instep area. His heel was reconstructed with a free instep flap from the other foot, end-to-side anastomosis of its medial plantar artery to the recipient posterior tibial artery and end-to-side coaptation of the cutaneous sensory fascicles of the flap to the medial plantar nerve. Conclusion The flap survived successfully, and no ulceration occurred in the flap. At the last follow-up appointment at 30 months post-surgery, a very good functional and aesthetic outcome was verified, indicating that the suggested approach may prove to be the treatment of choice in selected cases of weight-bearing heel reconstruction. PMID:25260532

  1. Keystone Island Flap: Effects of Islanding on Vascularity

    PubMed Central

    Nottle, Tim; Mills, John

    2016-01-01

    Background: Based on his clinical observations the “red dot sign” and hyperemic flare, Behan has advocated the superior vascularity of the island flap design for at least 2 decades. The aim of this study was to determine whether (1) surgical islanding of a flap alters the vascularity or blood supply of the flap and (2) these changes in blood supply explain Behan’s clinical observations of “red dot sign” and hyperemic flare. Methods: Patients undergoing local island fasciocutaneous flaps or anterolateral thigh fasciocutaneous free flaps were recruited for this trial from a single institution over a 10-month period (September 2013 to July 2014). Three adjacent specimens of skin and subcutaneous fat (control, non-island, and island) were harvested from each patient at various stages of their surgery for histological assessment. A pathologist reviewed randomized specimens for microvascular variables, including arteriole wall thickness, arteriole diameter, venule wall thickness, and venule diameter. Results: Thirteen patients (with 14 sets of specimen) were recruited for this study. When compared with the control state, both arteriole diameter and venule diameter in island flaps were significantly increased. Conclusions: These results validate Behan’s clinical observations of “red dot sign” and hyperemic flare. Further studies are required to directly compare island and non-island flap designs. PMID:27014546

  2. The accuracy of computer-assisted primary mandibular reconstruction with vascularized bone flaps: iliac crest bone flap versus osteomyocutaneous fibula flap

    PubMed Central

    Modabber, Ali; Ayoub, Nassim; Mhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Goloborodko, Evgeny; Snmez, Tolga Taha; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz; Loberg, Christina; Lethaus, Bernd; Ghassemi, Alireza; Hlzle, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Background The intention of mandibular reconstruction is to restore the complex anatomy with maximum possible functionality and high accuracy. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of computer-assisted surgery in primary mandibular reconstruction with an iliac crest bone flap compared with an osteomyocutaneous fibula flap. Materials and methods Preoperative computed tomography data of the mandible and the iliac crest or fibula donor site were imported into a specific surgical planning software program. Surgical guides were manufactured using a rapid prototyping technique for translating the virtual plan, including information on the transplant dimensions and shape, into real-time surgery. Using postoperative computed tomography scans and an automatic surface-comparison algorithm, the actual postoperative situation was compared with the preoperative virtual simulation. Results The actual flap position showed a mean difference from the virtual plan of 2.43 mm (standard deviation [SD] 1.26) and a surface deviation of 39% <2 mm and 15% <1 mm for the iliac crest bone flap, and a mean difference of 2.18 mm (SD 1.93) and a surface deviation of 60% <2 mm and 37% <1 mm for the osteomyocutaneous fibula flap. The position of the neomandible reconstructed with an osteomyocutaneous fibula flap indicated a mean difference from the virtual plan of 1.25 mm (SD 1.31) and a surface deviation of 82% <2 mm and 57% <1 mm, in contrast to a mean difference of 1.68 mm (SD 1.25) and a surface deviation of 63% <2 mm and 38% <1 mm for the neomandible after reconstruction with an iliac crest bone flap. For shape analysis, a similarly high accuracy could be calculated for both flaps. Conclusion Virtual surgical planning is an effective method for mandibular reconstruction with vascularized bone flaps, and can help to restore the anatomy of the mandible with high accuracy in position and shape. It seems that primary mandibular reconstruction with the osteomyocutaneous fibula flap is more accurate compared with the vascularized iliac crest bone flap. PMID:24966700

  3. Blowing Flap Experiment: PIV Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.; Bremmer, David M.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the flap vortex system. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  4. The saphenous neurovascular free flap.

    PubMed

    Acland, R D; Schusterman, M; Godina, M; Eder, E; Taylor, G I; Carlisle, I

    1981-06-01

    A new neurovascular free-flap donor area on the medial side of the knee is described. The flap is supplied by the saphenous artery, a branch of the descending genicular artery. It is drained both by the long saphenous vein and by the saphenous venae comitantes. Its nerve supply is from the medial femoral cutaneous nerve above the knee and the saphenous nerve below the knee. The flap is thin, has a long vascular pedicle (up to 15 cm) and a dependable nerve supply, and can be made quite large. The principal disadvantage is the donor wound, which requires grafting in most cases. We describe the anatomy of the saphenous flap, the method of raising it, and our early clinical experience with it both as a free flap and as a pedicled flap. Potential uses of the saphenous flap and its broader significance in relation to flaps on the lower extremity are briefly discussed. PMID:7243977

  5. Externally blown flap impingement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lasagna, P. L.; Putnam, T. W.

    1972-01-01

    Tests of the noise produced by the impingement of the jet exhaust on the wing and flap for an externally blown flap system were conducted with a CF700 turbofan engine and an F-111B wing panel. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The presence of the wing next to the test nozzles increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection angle. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested. Tests showed that the single-slotted flap deflected 60 deg, produced less noise than the double-slotted flaps. Also, maintaining the maximum distance between the exit nozzle and flap system resulted in a minor reduction in noise.

  6. Management of different kinds of head and neck defects with the submental flap for reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wan-Chun; Yang, Jinn-Moon; Liu, Shao-Cheng; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Lai, Wen-Sen; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Lee, Jih-Chin

    2015-12-01

    Head and neck surgeries often accompany with moderate-sized defects that require time-consuming reconstructions by free flaps. The submental flap is a versatile and time-effective option for reconstruction of orofacial defects providing acceptable cosmetic and functional results without requiring microsurgical techniques. A retrospective case series study of patients who underwent reconstruction with the submental flap between 2009 and 2013 was conducted. There were 36 patients (33 men and 3 women), with a mean age of 56.4 years, enrolled in this study. The primary lesion sites included oral cavity (24 patients), pharynx (8 patients), larynx (2 patients), neck (1 patient) as well as maxillary sinus (1 patient). All flaps were harvested as the myocutaneous flaps. All donor sites were closed primarily without the need of additional surgery. No complete loss of the flap was encountered and two cases developed marginal necrosis of the flap. The submental flap had a reliable pedicle and had minimal donor-site morbidity. It is an excellent flap option for patients with small- to medium-sized defects in head and neck region. PMID:25542248

  7. Latissimus Dorsi Flap Invasion by Ductal Breast Carcinoma after Lipofilling

    PubMed Central

    Alharbi, Muhannad; Garrido, Ignacio; Vaysse, Charlotte; Chavoin, Jean Pierre; Grolleau, Jean Louis

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Autologous fat grafting is commonly performed in reconstructive breast surgery but also increasingly in breast augmentation surgery. On the international level, we are witnessing an important increased confidence for this procedure. Nevertheless, it continues to raise questions on the risks of cancer. A 66-year-old patient benefited from a lipofilling to improve a latissimus dorsi flap breast reconstruction, 7 years after initial cancer management. Two years later, constant pain in the flap leads to reoperation. The flap showed a major retraction with histologically massive infiltration of the muscle by an undifferentiated carcinoma of breast origin. The tumor cells were displayed directly in contact with lipofilling inside the muscle. Without establishing any causal link between these 2 events, this case raises the question once more of the risks of breast cancer and encourages us to continue being careful. PMID:25289263

  8. Alveolar Bone, Upper Lip and Columellar Reconstruction With Composite Abbe Flap.

    PubMed

    Eser, Cengiz; Gencel, Eyüphan

    2016-03-01

    Bilateral cleft lip and palate repair usually requires secondary corrective intentions. Abbe flap is a useful option and has many modifications for revision surgeries of cleft lip nose deformities. Study evaluated a 23-year-old woman for secondary cleft lip nose correction. The authors performed a composite Abbe flap, which included mental bone for repairing the upper lip harmony, maintaining the columellar elongation and bridging central alveolar bone cleft. No complications were observed and aesthetic and functional improvement was maintained. Presented new modification of Abbe flap maintains not only upper lip relaxation (additional skin soft tissue replacement) and columellar lengthening (extended designed flap) but also alveolar cleft reconstruction (vascularized mental bone) by a composite flap. Also, this modification prevents additional surgeries for alveolar cleft repair in cleft lip nose patients. PMID:26967094

  9. 7-flap perineal urethrostomy

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Daniel C.; Morey, Allen F.

    2015-01-01

    Perineal urethrostomy (PU) has been performed with success for the treatment of refractory and advanced urethral stricture disease for at least the past six decades. Here, we review the indications and outcomes of PU for indications such as complex hypospadias repair and urethral stricture disease resulting from trauma, infection, and failure of prior urethroplasty. We also describe the role of 7-flap PU, a novel alternative to the conventional approach that offers the surgeon added flexibility in tailoring urethrostomy creation based on intraoperative findings. The authors updated experience with 7-flap PU demonstrates a comparable 95% success rate in patients with a wide variety of stricture etiology. PU through either a conventional approach or a 7-flap technique is a valuable option for improving the quality of life in patients with debilitating urethral stricture disease.

  10. Changes of perfusion of microvascular free flaps in the head and neck: a prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Mücke, Thomas; Rau, Andrea; Merezas, Andreas; Kanatas, Anastasios; Mitchell, David A; Wagenpfeil, Stefan; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Steiner, Timm

    2014-11-01

    Reconstruction with a free flap is routine in head and neck surgery. However, reliable assessment of perfusion can be difficult, so we prospectively evaluated it in 4 types of microvascular free flaps in the oral cavity (n=196) and assessed differences in blood flow by non-invasive monitoring with a laser Doppler flowmetry unit. We measured oxygen saturation, haemoglobin concentration, and velocity on the surface of the flap preoperatively at the donor site, and on the flap on the first, second, and seventh postoperative days, and after 4 weeks in 186/196 patients, mean (SD) age of 60 (13) years. We studied the radial forearm (n=76, 41%), fibular (n=45, 24%), anterolateral thigh (n=53, 28%), and soleus perforator (n=12, 7%) flaps. The values for the radial forearm flap differed significantly from the others. There were significant differences in haemoglobin concentrations between the fibular and soleus perforator flaps, and between the anterolateral thigh and soleus perforator flaps (p=0.002 each). Free flaps are unique in the way that perfusion develops after microvascular anastomoses. Knowledge of how each flap is perfused may indicate different patterns of healing that could potentially influence long term rehabilitation and detection of future deficits in perfusion. PMID:25149324

  11. The median forehead flap reviewed: a histologic study on vascular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Skaria, A M

    2015-05-01

    Local skin flaps can be divided into two types: random flaps and axial flaps. An axial flap is defined as a flap containing a named artery in its pedicle. For the paramedian forehead flap (PMFF) a lot of surgeons insist on the point that the pedicle must contain the supratrochlear artery. To demonstrate that median forehead flaps (MFF) need not contain a named artery, we selected first 8 patients with a PMFF and further 12 patients who had undergone reconstructive surgery using a MFF. After division, we analysed the pedicle of the flap histologically and measured the diameter of the arteries or arterioles and compared them to anatomical descriptions of the frontal arteries. In none of the 12 cases could we find a functional artery of approximately 1 mm in diameter that could correspond to the supratrochlear artery. The MFF is an axial flap but not in accordance with the current definition of this term. In contrast to published literature, we show that only in a part of cases a named artery was present in the pedicle. Despite this fact, the MFF is a secure flap for full thickness defect repair on the nose. PMID:24756613

  12. Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap in head and neck reconstruction: An experience in 100 consecutive cases

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Mayank; Parshad, Sanjeev; Karwasra, Rajender Kumar; Singh, Virender

    2015-01-01

    Background: The pectoralis major myocutaneous (PMMC) flap has been used as a versatile and reliable flap since its first description by Ariyan in 1979. In India head and neck cancer patients usually present in the advanced stage making PMMC flap a viable option for reconstruction. Although free flap using microvascular technique is the standard of care, its use is limited by the availability of expertise and resources in developing world. The aim of this study is to identify the outcomes associated with PMMC flap reconstruction. Patients and Methods: After ethical approval we retrospectively analyzed 100 PMMC flap at a tertiary care hospital from 2006 to 2013. A total of 137 PMMC flap reconstructions were performed out of which follow-up data of 100 cases were available in our record. Results: A total of 100 patients were reviewed of these 86% were of oral cavity and oropharyngeal lesions, 8% were of hypopharyngeal, 3% were of laryngeal malignancies and 3 cases were of salivary gland tumor. Most tumors (83%) were advanced (T3 or T4 lesion). 95 PMMC flap reconstruction were done as a primary procedure, and 5 were salvage procedure. PMMC flap was used to cover mucosal defect in 84 patients, skin defects in 10 patient and both in 6 patients. Overall flap related complications were 40% with a major complication in 10% and minor complications in 30%. No total flap loss occurred in any patient, major flap occurred in 6% and minor flap loss in 12%. In minor flap loss patients, necrotic changes were mostly limited to skin. Orocutaneous and pharyngocutaneous fistula developed in 12 patients. 10% patients required re-surgery after developing various flap related complications Pleural empyema developed in 3 patients. Other minor complications such as neck skin dehiscence and intra-oral flap dehiscence developed in 26 patients. Conclusion: PMMC flap is a versatile flap with an excellent reach to face oral cavity and neck region. With limited expertise and resources, it is still a workhorse flap in head and neck reconstruction. PMID:26668451

  13. Externally blown flap impingement noise.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Putnam, T. W.; Lasagna, P. L.

    1972-01-01

    An investigation of externally blown flap impingement noise was conducted using a full-scale turbofan engine and aircraft wing. The noise produced with a daisy nozzle installed on the engine exhaust system was greater than that produced by a conical nozzle at the same thrust. The daisy nozzle caused the jet velocity to decay about 35 percent at the flap. The presence of the wing next to the conical nozzle increased the noise, as did increasing the flap deflection. Compared with the conical nozzle, the daisy nozzle produced slightly less noise at a flap deflection of 60 deg but produced more noise at the lower flap deflections tested.

  14. [Basic techniques of flap formation and their application (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Zehm, S

    1980-10-01

    The different type of soft tissue defect in the face can be rehabilitated by means of classical local flaps, either by advancement, rotation or transposition. The excellent blood supply of the face permits of create a flap by its length which may extended up to 5 times of its diameter, and secondarily, may be turned up to an angle of 180 degree (median forehead flap). Typical donar areas besides the forehead are the nasolabial and submandibular area with the advantage of closure in correlation to the skin tension lines. By using a flap and transposing to the neighbourhood disfigurement of natural apertura, like mouth, nose and eyes, can be eadily avoided. Typical smaller and larger defects are demonstrated on patients following excisional tumor surgery in the forehead, naso-frontal-orbital angle, at the nose, the naso-labial-buccal region. Different ways of flap rehabilitation are analyzed for te same or similar type of defect, which is followed by the surgical and functional end-result. Attention is paid to the W-plasty, whereby a rhomboid defect is created and which can be eliminated with additional W-type incision lines. The results are excellent. Combinations of different types of flaps are possible, when f.e. a total loss of the upper lip and a most subtotal loss of the nose is present. PMID:7005569

  15. Noise Reduction of Aircraft Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V. (Inventor); Brooks, Thomas F. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A reduction in noise radiating from a side of a deployed aircraft flap is achieved by locating a slot adjacent the side of the flap, and then forcing air out through the slot with a suitable mechanism. One, two or even three or more slots are possible, where the slot is located at one;or more locations selected from a group of locations comprising a top surface of the flap, a bottom surface of the flap, an intersection of the top and side surface of the flap, an intersection of the bottom and side surfaces of the flap, and a side surface of the flap. In at least one embodiment the slot is substantially rectangular. A device for adjusting a rate of the air forced out through the slot can also be provided.

  16. Transverse thoracodorsal artery perforator flaps: experience with 31 free flaps.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo-Hyang; Mun, Goo-Hyun

    2008-01-01

    The conventional design of free thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flaps is orientated vertically along the long axis of the latissimus dorsi muscle, i.e. along the course of the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. However, this method does not consider perforators derived from the transverse branch of the thoracodorsal artery, and leaves a long scar that runs perpendicular to the relaxed skin tension line. Accordingly, scar widening and hypertrophy are frequently encountered problems. From April 2004 to December 2005, 31 free TDAP flap transfers were performed in 29 patients for reconstruction of the lower extremity (16 flaps), head and neck (12 flaps), and upper extremity (three flaps). Flap long axes were laid transversely following the relaxed skin tension line and paddles were designed to include proximal perforators from both branches of the thoracodorsal artery. Flap sizes ranged from 7x5 cm to 22x12 cm with a mean thickness of 7.5mm (range 3-13 mm). Among the 40 perforators employed as pedicles, 34 were derived from the descending branch and six were from the transverse branch of the thoracodorsal artery. Except for a single case of total flap loss, the other flaps were successfully transferred. Donor scars ranged from 6 to 28 mm in width after a minimum follow-up period of 10 months. The transverse design may be preferred whilst planning free TDAP flap transfer, because the surgeon has a wider choice of perforators and the final donor scar has a less disfiguring appearance. PMID:18082478

  17. Propeller Flaps and Its Outcomes - A Prospective Study of 15 Cases Over Two-years

    PubMed Central

    K.T., Ramesha; J., Vijay; M., Shankarappa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Cover flaps are needed in management of any bodily defect involving bone, tendon, nerve & vessels. The major objective of a plastic surgeon, facing a complex soft-tissue defect, is to replace like with like tissues at minimal donor site cost and with maximal accuracy & efficacy. Aims: To study the Propeller Flaps utility in reconstructive surgeries, evaluate its planning and complications involving donor site morbidity. Methodology: The prospective study was conducted on 15 cases (11 males/4 females) of propeller flaps during the period of two years (2010-12) in Department of Plastic Surgery and Burns, Bangalore Medical College and Research Institute (BMCRI), Karnataka, India. The propeller flaps were performed in cases with defects due to any cause. Exclusion criteria: Cases with Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD). Flaps were performed and details recorded. Results: Overall results revealed problem resolution in 87% cases (13 cases). Comprehensive description of each flap type and its related cases are given in the table. It has been categorically found that there were 2 flap partial losses. Partial necrosis has been reported in heavy-smoker patients. Conclusion: This current study clearly justifies that careful application, optimal designing & judicious scientific application of local perforator flaps for lower-limb wounds including rest of the body is successful in many aspects providing high-quality reconstruction ensuring minimal morbidity. It is cost-effective as well as time-saving. PMID:24596732

  18. Periosteal Pedicle Flap Harvested during Vestibular Extension for Root Coverage

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shubham; Gupta, Krishna Kumar; Agrawal, Rahul; Srivastava, Pratima; Soni, Shalabh

    2015-01-01

    Root exposure along with inadequate vestibular depth is a common clinical finding. Treatment option includes many techniques to treat such defects for obtaining predictable root coverage. Normally, the vestibular depth is increased first followed by a second surgery for root coverage. The present case report describes a single-stage technique for vestibular extension and root coverage in a single tooth by using the Periosteal Pedicle Flap (PPF). This technique involves no donor site morbidity and allows for reflection of sufficient amount of periosteal flap tissue with its own blood supply at the surgical site, thus increasing the chances of success of root coverage with simultaneous increase in vestibular depth. PMID:26788377

  19. Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Flap for Total Thoracic Esophageal Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Moya, Alejandro; Segura-Sampedro, Juan J; Sicilia-Castro, Domingo; Carvajo-Prez, Francisco; Gmez-Ca, Toms; Vzquez-Medina, Antonio; Ibez-Delgado, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Gastric pull-up is generally the first choice for a total thoracic esophageal reconstruction. Malfunction of this gastric conduit is uncommon, but devastating when it occurs: it causes marked comorbidity to the patient, preventing oral intake and worsening quality of life. Secondary salvage thoracic esophageal reconstruction surgery is usually performed with free or pedicled jejunum flaps or colon interposition. We present a case ofa total thoracic esophageal reconstruction with an externally monitored chimeric anterolateral thigh flap, extending from the cervical esophagus to the retrosternal gastroplasty remnant. Intestinal reconstructive techniques were not an available option for this patient. PMID:26694271

  20. Usefulness of a "puzzle" flap; more than an advancement flap for surgical reconstruction of nasal ala defects: Review of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Padilla Espana, Laura; Fernandez-Canedo, Ines; De Troya Martin, Magdalena

    2015-01-01

    Reconstructive surgery in nasal pyramid can be a challenge for surgeons. Moreover this anatomic area is one the most common sites for non-melanoma skin cancer. The "puzzle" flap was described to repair surgical defects located just on the nasal ala affecting melolabial sulcus. We have seen this flap can be also very useful to repair defects located on nasal sidewall and cheek without dysfunctional effects and with a good cosmetic result. PMID:26632927

  1. Free DIEP-flap reconstruction of tumour related defects in head and neck.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, H; Mai, R; Pradel, W; Markwardt, J; Pinzer, T; Spassov, A; Lauer, G

    2008-11-01

    The free deep inferior epigastric perforator flap (DIEP) is a well-established therapy for plastic reconstruction of the breast or defects of the lower extremity without distinct donor site morbidity. Because of its particular qualities we started to apply the DIEP-flap also in reconstruction of defects in the cranio-maxillofacial area. A series of 10 consecutive patients, who received a DIEP-flap for reconstruction of large soft tissue defects after ablative tumour surgery, was reviewed. Nine of the 10 flaps survived and uneventfully healing was observed in 8 of the 10 flaps. Primary layered closure of the abdominal wall was achieved in all cases and no complications at the donor site were observed. In our experience the DIEP may serve as a well considerable alternative to the rectus abdominis flap and the latissimus dorsi flap for bridging extensive reconstructions in the cranio-maxillofacial region. It offers the possibility for flap elevation simultaneously to the surgical procedures in the head and neck area. A special advantage of the DIEP-flap is the very low donor site morbidity. PMID:19075325

  2. Harmonic Scalpel versus electrocautery and surgical clips in head and neck free-flap harvesting.

    PubMed

    Dean, Nichole R; Rosenthal, Eben L; Morgan, Bruce A; Magnuson, J Scott; Carroll, William R

    2014-06-01

    We sought to determine the safety and utility of Harmonic Scalpel-assisted free-flap harvesting as an alternative to a combined electrocautery and surgical clip technique. The medical records of 103 patients undergoing radial forearm free-flap reconstruction (105 free flaps) for head and neck surgical defects between 2006 and 2008 were reviewed. The use of bipolar electrocautery and surgical clips for division of small perforating vessels (n = 53) was compared to ultrasonic energy (Harmonic Scalpel; Ethicon Endo-Surgery, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio) (n = 52) free-tissue harvesting techniques. Flap-harvesting time was reduced with the use of the Harmonic Scalpel when compared with electrocautery and surgical clip harvest (31.4 vs. 36.9 minutes, respectively; p = 0.06). Two patients who underwent flap harvest with electrocautery and surgical clips developed postoperative donor site hematomas, whereas no donor site complications were noted in the Harmonic Scalpel group. Recipient site complication rates for infection, fistula, and hematoma were similar for both harvesting techniques (p = 0.77). Two flap failures occurred in the clip-assisted radial forearm free-flap harvest group, and none in the Harmonic Scalpel group. Median length of hospitalization was significantly reduced for patients who underwent free-flap harvest with the Harmonic Scalpel when compared with the other technique (7 vs. 8 days; p = 0.01). The Harmonic Scalpel is safe, and its use is feasible for radial forearm free-flap harvest. PMID:24932828

  3. Functional assessment: Free thin anterolateral thigh flap versus free radial forearm reconstruction for hemiglossectomy defects

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mingxing; Hu, Qingang; Tang, Enyi; Wang, Yujia

    2015-01-01

    Background To compare free thin anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap with free radial forearm (FRF) flap in the reconstruction of hemiglossectomy defects, and to introduce our methods and experience in the tongue reconstruction with free thin ALT flap. Material and Methods The clinicopathologic data of 46 tongue carcinoma cases hospitalized from December 2009 to April 2014 were obtained from Nangjing Stomatological Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University. All the subjects were evaluated for the articulation and the swallowing function 3 months after the surgery. Results Among these 46 patients, 12 patients underwent tongue reconstruction after hemiglossectomy with ALT flap; 34 patients underwent tongue reconstruction with FRF flap. The differences in the incidence of vascular crisis, the speech and the swallowing function between two groups were not significant (P>0.05). Conclusions Thin ALT flap could be one of the ideal flaps for hemiglossectomy defect reconstruction with its versatility in design, long pedicle with a suitable vessel diameter, and the neglectable donor site morbidity. Key words:Free thin anterolateral thigh flap, free radial forearm flap, hemiglossectomy, reconstruction, morbidity. PMID:26449437

  4. The vortex flap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerge, Brandon T.

    The Vortex Flap is a new type of mechanically driven high-lift device consisting of a rotating cylinder placed underneath and near the trailing edge of an airfoil. Wind tunnel tests were designed and conducted in the Washington University Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. Wind tunnel tests indicate that the Vortex Flap produces notable lift coefficient increments and increases maximum lift coefficients, particularly for the low Reynolds number range tested. The best configurations of the configurations investigated (not necessarily optimal) produce lift increments of 300-900% at low-to-moderate angles of attack, and increase the maximum lift coefficient on the order of 200%. The large lift increments found, particularly at low angles of attack, underscore the ability to drive the airfoil to high lift coefficients even at low angles of attack, a potentially useful characteristic for certain flight maneuvers. Regions of fairly high L/D (on the order of 10) as well as low L/D performance were identified. The nondimensional cylinder rotation speed was found to be the most important experimental parameter. Methods for correcting wind tunnel data were developed and outlined, and a Response Surface Method was applied to the corrected data for ease of interpretation. Performance comparisons between the Vortex Flap and other trailing-edge high-lift devices are included. To demonstrate the potential of the device, a Navy mission specification for a VTOL ship-borne UAV, currently filled by a rotary-wing aircraft, is analyzed using a hypothetical fixed wing aircraft and the Vortex Flap. It is demonstrated that, under certain reasonable wind-over-deck conditions, such an aircraft could hypothetically fill a VTOL mission.

  5. Engineered Vascularized Muscle Flap.

    PubMed

    Egozi, Dana; Shandalov, Yulia; Freiman, Alina; Rosenfeld, Dekel; Ben-Shimol, David; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2016-01-01

    One of the main factors limiting the thickness of a tissue construct and its consequential viability and applicability in vivo, is the control of oxygen supply to the cell microenvironment, as passive diffusion is limited to a very thin layer. Although various materials have been described to restore the integrity of full-thickness defects of the abdominal wall, no material has yet proved to be optimal, due to low graft vascularization, tissue rejection, infection, or inadequate mechanical properties. This protocol describes a means of engineering a fully vascularized flap, with a thickness relevant for muscle tissue reconstruction. Cell-embedded poly L-lactic acid/poly lactic-co-glycolic acid constructs are implanted around the mouse femoral artery and vein and maintained in vivo for a period of one or two weeks. The vascularized graft is then transferred as a flap towards a full thickness defect made in the abdomen. This technique replaces the need for autologous tissue sacrifications and may enable the use of in vitro engineered vascularized flaps in many surgical applications. PMID:26779840

  6. Innervated thenar pedicle flap with the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve for treating a thumb pulp defect: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kanaya, Kohei; Wada, Takuro; Iba, Kosuke; Yamashita, Toshihiko

    2014-06-01

    A 51-year-old male plumber with a thumb pulp defect was treated with a reversed innervated thenar pedicle flap. The flap was based on the radial digital artery originating from the princeps pollicis artery with the palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve. The flap survived and achieved good innervation with a moving 2-point discrimination of 6 mm at 12 months after surgery. This flap is indicated for patients who hesitate to have tissue taken from the foot. We believe that this flap is a feasible option for reconstructing thumb pulp defects. PMID:24399693

  7. Acute effects of cigarette smoke exposure on experimental skin flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, J.; Jenkins, R.A.; Kurihara, K.; Schultz, R.C.

    1985-04-01

    Random vascular patterned caudally based McFarlane-type skin flaps were elevated in groups of Fischer 344 rats. Groups of rats were then acutely exposed on an intermittent basis to smoke generated from well-characterized research filter cigarettes. Previously developed smoke inhalation exposure protocols were employed using a Maddox-ORNL inhalation exposure system. Rats that continued smoke exposure following surgery showed a significantly greater mean percent area of flap necrosis compared with sham-exposed groups or control groups not exposed. The possible pathogenesis of this observation as well as considerations and correlations with chronic human smokers are discussed. Increased risks of flap necrosis by smoking in the perioperative period are suggested by this study.

  8. Secondary mobilization of the first dorsal metacarpal artery flap for first web space reconstruction in a child: A case report.

    PubMed

    Trimaille, A; Kerfant, N; Le Nen, D; Fenoll, B; Hu, W

    2015-12-01

    The authors report the case of an iterative mobilization of a skin flap based on the first dorsal metacarpal artery. This flap was initially associated with a toe-to-hand transfer to provide adequate skin coverage in the reconstruction of a post-traumatic thumb defect in a 5-year-old child. More than 8years after initial surgery, this flap was mobilized again for recovery of the first web space opening, which was retracted. This case illustrates the possibility of remobilizing the first dorsal metacarpal artery flap to reduce donor site sequelae in children. PMID:26344598

  9. DIEP Flap Breast Reconstruction Using 3-dimensional Surface Imaging and a Printed Mold

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Kenji; Hata, Yuki; Nishibayashi, Akimitsu; Hosokawa, Ko

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Recent advances in 3-dimensional (3D) surface imaging technologies allow for digital quantification of complex breast tissue. We performed 11 unilateral breast reconstructions with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps (5 immediate, 6 delayed) using 3D surface imaging for easier surgery planning and 3D-printed molds for shaping the breast neoparenchyma. A single- or double-pedicle flap was preoperatively planned according to the estimated tissue volume required and estimated total flap volume. The DIEP flap was then intraoperatively shaped with a 3D-printed mold that was based on a horizontally inverted shape of the contralateral breast. Cosmetic outcomes were assessed as satisfactory, as confirmed by the postoperative 3D measurements of bilateral breasts. We believe that DIEP flap reconstruction assisted with 3D surface imaging and a 3D-printed mold is a simple and quick method for rebuilding a symmetric breast. PMID:25878927

  10. Supermicrosurgical free sensate intercostal artery perforator flap based on the lateral cutaneous branch for plantar reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iida, Takuya; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Hara, Hisako; Yamamoto, Takumi; Yoshimatsu, Hidehiko; Morizaki, Yutaka; Uehara, Kosuke; Koshima, Isao

    2014-07-01

    The use of an intercostal artery perforator (ICAP) flap has recently become popular in reconstructive surgery. We have developed a novel free sensate ICAP flap based on the lateral cutaneous branch (LCB) and applied it to a case with a plantar defect. To the best of our knowledge, this case is the first to describe a free sensate ICAP flap based on the LCB. This method has several advantages: (1) a sensate flap is possible because the LCB neurovascular bundle is consistently available; (2) the long neurovascular pedicle can be harvested in the supine position without the risk of pneumothorax; (3) the donor-site morbidity is low; and (4) conversion or combination with a superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP) or a superficial inferior epigastric artery (SIEA) flap is readily possible. We believe that this method represents a new option for soft-tissue reconstruction. PMID:24491457

  11. Shape-based 3D vascular tree extraction for perforator flaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Quan; Gao, Jean

    2005-04-01

    Perforator flaps have been increasingly used in the past few years for trauma and reconstructive surgical cases. With the thinned perforated flaps, greater survivability and decrease in donor site morbidity have been reported. Knowledge of the 3D vascular tree will provide insight information about the dissection region, vascular territory, and fascia levels. This paper presents a scheme of shape-based 3D vascular tree reconstruction of perforator flaps for plastic surgery planning, which overcomes the deficiencies of current existing shape-based interpolation methods by applying rotation and 3D repairing. The scheme has the ability to restore the broken parts of the perforator vascular tree by using a probability-based adaptive connection point search (PACPS) algorithm with minimum human intervention. The experimental results evaluated by both synthetic and 39 harvested cadaver perforator flaps show the promise and potential of proposed scheme for plastic surgery planning.

  12. Effects of Buflomedil and Pentoxifylline on Hamster Skin-Flap Microcirculation: Prediction of Flap Viability Using Orthogonal Polarization Spectral Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Coelho da Mota, Denise Salles; Furtado, Eliane; Bottino, Daniel Alexandre; Bouskela, Eliete

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE This study investigated the effects of buflomedil and pentoxifylline, both of which are used in reconstructive surgery of hamster skin flap microcirculation, and evaluated the skin flap survival rate by orthogonal polarization spectral imaging. METHOD Twenty-four adult male Syrian golden hamsters were divided into three groups: a control (C, 0.1 ml 0.9% saline), buflomedil (B, 3 mg/kg/day), and pentoxifylline group (P, 14.5 mg/kg/day). Treatments administered intraperitoneally were initiated 1 hour before skin flap preparation and continued for 7 days post-operatively at 12-hour intervals. Preparations (skin flaps) were divided into 12 fields, which were organized into six bands. Functional capillary density (FCD, in mm/mm2), distance from the skin flap base to blood flow cessation (Distwith flow, in cm), percentage of viable skin (VA, in%), and qualitative analysis of blood flow by orthogonal polarization spectral imaging were performed at 1 and 24 hours and on the seventh post-operative day. RESULT Bands IV, V, and VI presented no flow independent of time. The functional capillary density group B was higher than that of groups C and P, primarily after 24 hours. All groups showed an increase in D with time but reached similar final distances (C = 2.73, B = 2.78 and P = 2.70 cm). Moreover, the percentage of viable areas remained at approximately 50%. The orthogonal polarization spectral imaging was useful to assess viability by counting fields with and without blood flow. CONCLUSIONS Functional capillary density values were higher in the buflomedil group compared to the control and pentoxifylline groups in this model. Functional capillary density did not influence D or the percentage of VA, and the technique showed favorable potential to assess/predict the viability of skin flaps within 1 h after surgery. PMID:19690666

  13. Comparison of corneal flap thickness using a FS200 femtosecond laser and a moria SBK microkeratome

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Shi-Sheng; Yu, Qing; Wu, Jiang-Xiu; Lian, Jing-Cai

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate differences in flap thickness resulting from use of an Alcon Wavelight FS200 femtosecond laser and a MORIA SBK microkeratome when making a 110-m-thick corneal flap and to identify the potential factors that affect corneal flap thickness. METHODS A prospective case study was performed on 120 eyes of 60 patients who were divided into two groups for LASIK, each group consisting of 60 eyes (30 patients). The corneal flaps were created using an Alcon Wavelight FS200 femtosecond laser or a MORIA SBK microkeratome. The central corneal flap thickness was calculated by subtraction pachymetry. Age, central corneal thickness (CCT), spherical equivalent refraction, mean keratometry, and corneal diameter were recorded preoperatively for analysis. RESULTS Cutting of all flaps was easily performed without intraoperative complications. In the Alcon Wavelight FS200 femtosecond laser group, the mean right and left corneal flap thicknesses were 114.06.6 m (range: 98-126) and 111.47.6 m (range: 98-122), respectively. The difference (2.69.1 m) in the corneal flap thickness between the right and left eyes was not significant (t=1.59, P=0.12). Stepwise regression analysis indicated that the resulting corneal flap thickness was unrelated to the patient's age, preoperative CCT, spherical equivalent refraction, mean keratometry, or corneal diameter. In the MORIA SBK microkeratome group, the mean right and left corneal flap thicknesses were 110.67.4 m (range: 97-125 m) and 108.26.1 m (range: 78-123 m), respectively. The difference in the corneal flap thickness between the right and left eyes (2.46.5m) was not significant (t=2.039, P=0.0506). The corneal flap thickness was positively correlated with the preoperative CCT through stepwise regression analysis (r=0.297, P=0.021). The corneal flap thickness was not related to age, spherical equivalent refraction, mean keratometry, or corneal diameter. The corneal flap thickness was estimated using the following equation: Tflap=67.77+0.076 CCT (F=5.63, P=0.021). CONCLUSION Both the Alcon Wavelight FS200 femtosecond laser and the MORIA SBK microkeratome produced 110-m-thick corneal flaps. The central corneal flap thickness was positively correlated with the preoperative CCT in MORIA SBK microkeratome surgery. PMID:24790869

  14. Successful reconstruction of irradiated anterior skull base defect using the dual flap technique involving local pericranial flap and radial forearm free flap.

    PubMed

    Yeo, In Sung; Kim, Se-Hyuk; Park, Myong Chul; Lim, Hyoseob; Kim, Joo Hyoung; Lee, Il Jae

    2014-07-01

    Skull base reconstruction presents a challenging therapeutic problem requiring a multispecialty surgical approach and close cooperation between the neurosurgeon, head and neck surgeon, as well as plastic and reconstructive surgeon during all stages of treatment. The principal goal of skull base reconstruction is to separate the intracranial space from the nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal cavities, creating support for the brain and providing a water-tight barrier against cerebrospinal fluid leakage and ascending infection. We present a case involving a 58-year-old man with anterior skull base defects (2.5 cm 3 cm) secondary to the removal of olfactory neuroblastoma. The patient received conventional radiation therapy at 6000 cGy in 30 fractions approximately a month before tumor removal. The patient had radiation therapy before surgery and was planned to have postoperative radiation therapy, which would lead to a higher complication rate of reconstruction. Artificial dura was used for the packing of the dural defect, which was also suspected to increase the complication rate of reconstruction. For these reasons, we chose to apply the dual flap technique, which uses both local pericranial flap and de-epithelized radial forearm free flap for anterior skull base defect to promote wound healing. During 28 months of follow-up after coverage of the anterior skull base defect, the dual flap survived completely, as confirmed through follow-up magnetic resonance imaging. The patient was free of cerebrospinal fluid leakage, meningitis, and abscess, and there was minimal donor-site morbidity of the radial forearm free flap. Reconstruction of anterior skull base defects using the dual flap technique is safe, reliable, and associated with low morbidity, and it is ideal for irradiated wounds and low-volume defects. PMID:24902109

  15. The Effect of Enoxaparin and Clopidogrel on Survival of Random Skin Flap in Rat Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Fatemi, Mohammad Javad; S Forootan, Kamal; S Jalali, Seyed Ziaaddin; Mousavi, Seyed Jaber; Pedram, Mir Sepehr

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Necrosis of skin flaps is considered as an important complication in reconstructive surgery. We conducted an experimental study to investigate the efficacy of low-molecular weight heparin, clopidogrel and their combination to improve the flap survival. METHODS Forty male, adult Sprague-Dawlay rats were divided randomly into 4 groups. Standard rectangular, distally based dorsal random pattern skin flap was elevated. To prevent the graft effect, a sterile sheet was put under the flap. No pharmacological agent was administered for the control group. In group 2, single subcutaneous dose of enoxaparin (3.2 mg/kg) was immediately administrated after surgery. In group 3, clopidogrel (25 mg/kg) was given orally for 7 days. In group 4, both enoxaparin and clopidogrel were administrated. The rats were evaluated on post-operative day 7 for viable and necrotic portions of flaps. RESULTS The mean and SD of necrosis was 17.79+2.5 cm in the control group, 16.203.1 cm in low-molecular weight heparin, 15.25+3.8 cm in combined therapy group and 13.69+2.7 cm in clopidogrel group. Clopidogrel was the only pharmaceutical agent that produced a significant increase in the flap survival area. CONCLUSION Clopidogrel may be an effective pharmaceutical agent that significantly increases viability of random skin flaps in rats, but low-molecular weight heparin and their combination did not have any significant beneficial effects. PMID:25734046

  16. Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap for reconstruction of large palatal-alveolar fistulas in cleft patients

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Large palatal fistula in cleft patients is a difficult situation, especially with previous multiple surgeries, which have led to severe scars in the palatal mucosa. Tongue flaps are useful aids in such situations. Materials and Methods: Seven cleft patients who were reconstructed by posteriorly based lateral tongue flap between 2005 and 2012 were studied. Variables such as flap-ability to close the fistula, remaining tongue shape at least 1 year after operation, and speech improvement (patients’ self-assessment) were evaluated. Results: Age range of the patients was 14‒45 years. The male-to-female ratio was 2/7. Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap effectively closed the large fistula in 6/7 of patients. The largest dimensions of fistula closed by this flap was 5 cm × 1.5 cm. Follow-up of 2‒7 years showed that the tongue never returned to the original size and remained asymmetrical. In addition, the nasal speech did not improve dramatically after the closure of large palatal/alveolar fistulas in this age group. Conclusion: Posteriorly based lateral tongue flap is an effective method to solve the problem of large palatal fistulas in adult cleft patients. The most useful indication for this flap is a large longitudinal palatal fistula, extending to the alveolar process. Asymmetrical tongue shape after surgery is the rule and speech improvement depends on patient's age and location of fistula.

  17. Island flaps in the repair of medial canthus: report of 8 cases.

    PubMed

    Cecchi, Roberto; Fancelli, Laura; Troiano, Michela

    2013-06-01

    Reconstruction of the medial canthus following skin cancer excision is often challenging because of the complex anatomy and the cosmetic relevance of that region. The island pedicle advancement flap is an extremely versatile flap, which is commonly used to close defects in different body areas, including face, trunk, and extremities. We report our favourable experience with the use of island flaps, mobilized from the nasal saddle or lateral nasal side wall in 8 patients who had skin defects on the medial canthus region after Mohs micrographic surgery for basal cell carcinomas. PMID:24011325

  18. Usefulness of Simple-Designed Bilobed Flap for Reconstruction of Ischial Decubitus Ulcer

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Ayako

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The pressure ulcer of the ischial region is often accompanied by complete paraplegia in patients with spinal cord injury and is attributable to the compression and breakdown of tissue arising from constant sitting. Characteristically, a pressure ulcer of this region is circular and deep. We recently reconstructed ischial decubitus ulcer of 8 patients using simple-designed bilobed flap. In all cases, the flap survived completely without any complication. Moreover, none of the patients in this group experienced any pressure ulcer relapse during the postoperative follow-up from 1 year 1 month to 9 years. In the vicinity of the ischial region, the buttock contains the most abundant amount of fatty tissue. Therefore, for our technique, we create the first flap in the buttock neighboring the defect and the second flap on the posterior thigh. Using this approach, it is possible to cover the skin or soft tissue defect of the ischial region with the flap from the buttock having a thickness large enough to bear the patients weight during sitting. The first flap is arranged parallel to the gluteal sulcus, and the second flap from the thigh is moved to the first-flap donation site. This technique allows closure of the wound without producing tension along the suture line. The bilobed flap, which does not require the artery to be included in the flap, is applicable for patients with relapsing pressure ulcer having a history of surgery. Our flap operative procedure is particularly useful in the reconstruction of ischial decubitus ulcer. PMID:26495238

  19. Vaginal reconstruction with pedicled vertical deep inferior epigastric perforator flap (diep) after pelvic exenteration. A consecutive case series.

    PubMed

    Ferron, Gwénael; Gangloff, Dimitri; Querleu, Denis; Frigenza, Melanie; Torrent, Juan Jose; Picaud, Laetitia; Gladieff, Laurence; Delannes, Martine; Mery, Eliane; Boulet, Berenice; Balague, Gisele; Martinez, Alejandra

    2015-09-01

    Vaginal reconstruction after pelvic exenteration (PE) represents a challenge for the oncologic surgeon. Since the introduction of perforator flaps, using pedicled vertical DIEP (deep inferior epigastric perforator) flap allows to reduce the donor site complication rate. From November 2012 to December 2014, 27 PEs were performed in our institution. 13 patients who underwent PE with vaginal reconstruction and programmed DIEP procedure for gynecologic malignancies were registered. Nine patients underwent PE for recurrent disease and four for primary treatment. Six of the 13 patients have a preoperative fistula. Anterior PE was performed in 10 patients, and total PE in 3 patients. A vertical DIEP flap was performed in 10 patients using one or two medial perforators. The reasons for abortion of vertical DIEP flap procedure were: failure to localizing perforator vessels in two cases, and unavailability of plastic surgeon in one case. A vertical fascia-sparring rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap was then harvested. Median length of surgery was 335min, and 60min for DIEP harvesting and vaginal reconstruction. No flap necrosis occurred. One patient in the VRAM (vertical rectus abdominis myocutaneous) group experienced a late incisional hernia and one patient in the DIEP flap group required revision for vaginal stenosis. In our experience, DIEP flap represents our preferred choice of flap for circumferential vaginal reconstruction after PE. To achieve a high reproducibility, the technically demanding pedicled vertical DIEP flap has to be harvested by a trained surgeon, after strict evaluation of the preoperative imaging with identification and localization of perforator vessels. PMID:26121919

  20. Microdialysis: characterisation of haematomas in myocutaneous flaps by use of biochemical agents.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Danja Lykke; Ladefoged, Sren A; Sloth, Erik; Aagaard, Rasmus; Birke-Srensen, Hanne

    2013-03-01

    Metabolic markers are measured by microdialysis to detect postoperative ischaemia after reconstructive surgery with myocutaneous flaps. If a haematoma develops around the microdialysis catheter, it can result in misinterpretation of the measurements. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether a haematoma in a flap can be identified and dissociated from ischaemia, or a well-perfused flap, by a characteristic chemical profile. In 7 pigs, the pedicled rectus abdominal muscle flap was mobilised on both sides. A haematoma was made in each flap and two microdialysis catheters were placed, one in the haematoma, and the other in normal tissue. One flap was made ischaemic by ligation of the pedicle. For 6 hours, the metabolism was monitored by measurement every half-an-hour of the concentrations of glucose, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol from all 4 catheters. After 3 hours of monitoring, intravenous glucose was given as a challenge test to identify ischaemia. The non-ischaemic flap could be differentiated from the ischaemic flap by low glucose, and high lactate, concentrations. It was possible to identify a catheter surrounded by a haematoma in ischaemic as well as non-ischaemic muscle from a low or decreasing concentration of glucose together with a low concentration of lactate. All four sites could be completely dissociated when the concentrations of glucose and lactate were evaluated and combined with the lactate:glucose ratio and a flow chart. The challenge test was useful for differentiating between haematomas in ischaemic and non-ischaemic tissue. PMID:22521587

  1. Robotic Total Pelvic Exenteration with Laparoscopic Rectus Flap: Initial Experience

    PubMed Central

    Winters, Brian R.; Mann, Gary N.; Louie, Otway; Wright, Jonathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Total pelvic exenteration is a highly morbid procedure performed for locally advanced pelvic malignancies. We describe our experience with three patients who underwent robotic total pelvic exenteration with laparoscopic rectus flap and compare perioperative characteristics to our open experience. Demographic, tumor, operative, and perioperative factors were examined with descriptive statistics reported. Mean operative times were similar between the two groups. When compared to open total pelvic exenteration cases (n = 9), median estimated blood loss, ICU stay, and hospital stay were all decreased. These data show robotic pelvic exenteration with laparoscopic rectus flap is technically feasible. The surgery was well tolerated with low blood loss and comparable operative times to the open surgery. Further study is needed to confirm the oncologic efficacy and the suggested improvement in surgical morbidity. PMID:25960911

  2. Autobuttressing of colorectal anastomoses using a mesenteric flap.

    PubMed

    Mohan, H M; Winter, D C

    2013-12-01

    Anastomotic leakage is a common and dreaded complication of colorectal surgery. Many different approaches have been tried to attempt to reduce leakage and associated morbidity. The concept of reinforcement of an anastomosis by buttressing is well established. Techniques described include using sutures, native omentum, animal or synthetic material. We report a technique for buttressing using a mesenteric flap to envelope the anastomosis. The primary rationale is to reduce clinical sequelae of anastomotic leakage by promoting local containment, as well as providing a scaffold for healing. Using autologous tissue provides a safe, time-efficient and cost-effective buttress without the risks of infection or reaction associated with foreign material. A mesenteric flap is particularly useful in patients in whom omentum is not available due to previous surgery, or to fill the dead space posterior to a low anastomosis within the pelvis. PMID:23980021

  3. Reconstruction of a Columellar Defect With a Nasolabial Island Flap

    PubMed Central

    Kang, IL Gyu; Jung, Joo Hyun; Kim, Seon Tae

    2014-01-01

    Columellar skin defects may be caused by excision of cutaneous malignancy, trauma, or tissue necrosis associated with surgery. Although columellar skin necrosis rarely occurs following rhinoplasty, this condition might be more common when using an external approach than a closed approach. Columellar skin incision performed with exaggerated tip augmentation may cause columellar necrosis. The nasolabial island flap, used unilaterally to cover columellar skin defects, is used for a single-stage reconstruction procedure and is generally not associated with the need for secondary surgeries. This technique is well suited for repairing columellar skin defects. We experienced a patient with columellar skin necrosis occurring after rhinoplasty which was reconstructed using a unilateral single-stage nasolabial island flap. PMID:24917913

  4. Muscle flaps or omental flap in the management of deep sternal wound infection.

    PubMed

    van Wingerden, Jan J; Lapid, Oren; Boonstra, Piet W; de Mol, Bas A J M

    2011-08-01

    The primary question addressed was whether muscle flaps (MFs) offer a significant advantage over an omental flap (OF) in the management of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) following cardiovascular surgery in terms of outcome (morbidity and mortality). Altogether, 333 citations (from PubMed and EMBASE and using a manual search, without language restriction) were identified using the reported strategy. Focusing on publications from single institutions with experience with both types of flap in the treatment of DSWI, 16 studies represented the best evidence on the topic. The author, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes, results and study weaknesses were tabulated. These 16 observational studies covered 1046 patients, and all reported mortality rates. Unadjusted data from five of six studies investigating a possible association between mortality and flap type suggested a higher mortality rate following reconstruction with MFs. A meta-analysis of all six studies indicates a slight, but not significant, survival advantage for reconstruction with an OF [overall relative risk 1.29 (95% confidence interval 0.58-2.88)]. Thirteen studies reported on the number of individual postoperative complications for a total of 964 patients. Data, unadjusted for potentially confounding surgical factors, on complications following flap closure, such as complete or partial flap loss, haematoma, arm or shoulder weakness and chronic chest wall pain, suggested that these complications were more common following MF reconstruction. Four studies evaluated patients with recurrent sternal wound infection (n=521). Two of these were associated with a high incidence (>17.5%) of re-exploration for recurrent sternal infection following MF reconstruction. The most commonly reported complications following an OF were abdominal or diaphragmatic hernias, with an incidence of <5%. We conclude that the weight of current evidence is insufficient to prove the superiority of reconstruction with MFs to a laparotomy-harvested, OF in the treatment of DSWI. The results suggest that use of the omentum may be associated with lower mortality and fewer complications. PMID:21543366

  5. Total Columella Reconstruction Using Nasocheek Flap and Septal Cartilage Graft

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary: The use of the nasocheek sulcus flap with a cartilage strut provides an aesthetically pleasing result in total columella reconstruction. This provides thin hairless skin appropriate for the subunit. Mohs surgery aids in limiting the excision to the tumor involved area, providing a complete clearance and conserving precious units, which have an impact on the reconstructive options. The method of reconstruction described here is simple and easily reproducible, providing an optimal result with almost no donor site morbidity.

  6. Superior vena cava repair with left brachiocephalic vein flap

    PubMed Central

    Tsubochi, Hiroyoshi; Endo, Shunsuke; Minegishi, Kentaro; Endo, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    Interposition with a vascular prosthesis or patch closure using autologous pericardium has been applied for superior vena cava (SVC) reconstruction during surgery for thoracic malignancies such as thymic epithelial tumors or lymphadenopathy that invade the SVC. We herein report a novel and simple method for repair of the SVC using a left brachiocephalic vein flap. This procedure is useful to repair the anterior wall of the distal portion of the SVC, which is a common site of invasion of thoracic malignancies. PMID:26932999

  7. Radiated noise from an externally blown flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, N. N.; Yu, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The far field noise from subsonic jet impingement on a wing-flap with a 45 deg bend was experimentally investigated. The test parameters are jet Mach number and flap length. For long flaps, the primary source mechanisms are found to be turbulent mixing and flow impingement. For short flaps, the interaction of turbulent flow with the flap trailing edge appears to strongly influence the radiated noise.

  8. Exposed tibial bone after burns: Flap reconstruction versus dermal substitute.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Pirayesh, Ali; Van Landuyt, Koenraad; Monstrey, Stan

    2016-03-01

    A 44 years old male patient had suffered extensive 3rd degree burns on both legs, undergoing thorough surgical debridement, resulting in both tibias being exposed. Approximately 5 months after the incident he was referred to the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery of the University Hospital Gent, Belgium, to undergo flap reconstruction. Free flap surgery was performed twice on both lower legs but failed on all four occasions. In between flap surgery, a dermal substitute (Integra(®)) was applied, attempting to cover the exposed tibias with a layer of soft tissue, but also without success. In order to promote the development of granulation tissue over the exposed bone, small holes were drilled in both tibias with removal of the outer layer of the anterior cortex causing the bone to bleed and subsequently negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) was applied. The limited granulation tissue resulting from this procedure was then covered with a dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)), consisting of acellular human dermis with an average thickness of 0.25mm. This dermal substitute was combined with a NPWT-dressing, and then served as an extracellular matrix (ECM), guiding the distribution of granulation tissue over the remaining areas of exposed tibial bone. Four days after initial application of Glyaderm(®) combined with NPWT both tibias were almost completely covered with a thin coating of soft tissue. In order to increase the thickness of this soft tissue cover two additional layers of Glyaderm(®) were applied at intervals of approximately 1 week. One week after the last Glyaderm(®) application both wounds were autografted. The combination of an acellular dermal substitute (Glyaderm(®)) with negative pressure wound therapy and skin grafting proved to be an efficient technique to cover a wider area of exposed tibial bone in a patient who was not a candidate for free flap surgery. An overview is also provided of newer and simpler techniques for coverage of exposed bone that could question the universal plastic surgery paradigm that flap surgery is the only way to cover these defects. PMID:26376411

  9. Flap Edge Noise Reduction Fins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, Mehdi R. (Inventor); Choudhan, Meelan M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A flap of the type that is movably connected to an aircraft wing to provide control of an aircraft in flight includes opposite ends, wherein at least a first opposite end includes a plurality of substantially rigid, laterally extending protrusions that are spaced apart to form a plurality of fluidly interconnected passageways. The passageways have openings adjacent to upper and lower sides of the flap, and the passageways include a plurality of bends such that high pressure fluid flows from a high pressure region to a low pressure region to provide a boundary condition that inhibits noise resulting from airflow around the end of the flap.

  10. Dancing girl flap: a new flap suitable for web release.

    PubMed

    Shinya, K

    1999-12-01

    To create a deep web, a flap must be designed to have a high elongation effect in one direction along the mid-lateral line of the finger and also to have a shortening effect in the other direction, crossing at a right angle to the mid-lateral line. The dancing girl flap is a modification of a four-flap Z-plasty with two additional Z-plasties. It has a high elongation effect in one direction (>550%) and a shortening effect in the other direction at a right angle (<33%), creating a deep, U-shaped surface. This new flap can be used to release severe scar contracture with a web, and is most suitable for incomplete syndactyly with webs as high as the proximal interphalangeal joint. PMID:10597822

  11. Free anterolateral thigh flaps for upper extremity soft tissue reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Spindler, Nick; Al-Benna, Sammy; Ring, Andrej; Homann, Heinz; Steinsträsser, Lars; Steinau, Hans-Ulrich; Langer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Limb-threatening wounds of the upper extremity pose a challenge to the micro vascular surgeon. The aim of this study is to analyze the outcome of free anterolateral thigh flaps for upper extremity soft tissue reconstruction. Methods: A retrospective review of patients undergoing this procedure from 2005 to 2012 was performed. Case note analysis was performed to determine demographic and perioperative factors, and complications and outcomes. Results: Thirty-two patients with a mean age of 53 years (9–84 yrs) underwent upper extremity reconstruction with an anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap. There were 24 (75%) males and 8 (25%) females. The etiology of the soft tissue defects was: infection (44.6%); post-tumor ablation (40%); and trauma (15.6%). The defect site was most commonly in the forearm (53.1%), followed by the elbow (12.5 %), arm (12.5%) and hand (21.9%). The mean timing of free flap transfer was 6.8 days after admission to our institution (minimum 1 days, maximum 9 days). Mean operative time of surgery was 4 h 39 min (minimum 3 h 2 min, maximum 6 h 20 min). The mean hospitalization was 24.8 days (minimum 5, maximum 85). The ALT success rate was at 92.3%. Partial flap necrosis was documented in five cases (15.6%). Complete flap loss occurred in two post-traumatic cases who both lost their limbs. Discussion: This flap, in the hands of experienced surgeons, provides reliable coverage of upper extremity defects. PMID:26504734

  12. Therapeutic Outcomes of Pectoralis Major Muscle Turnover Flap in Mediastinitis

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri, Reza; Tashnizi, Mohammad Abbasi; Haghi, Seyed Ziaollah; Salehi, Maryam; Rajabnejad, Ataollah; Safa, Mohsen Hatami Ghale; Vejdani, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic results and safety of pectoralis major muscle turnover flaps in the treatment of mediastinitis after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) procedures. Methods Data regarding 33 patients with post-CABG deep sternal wound infections (DSWIs) who underwent pectoralis major muscle turnover flap procedures in the Emam Reza and Ghaem Hospitals of Mashhad, Iran were reviewed in this study. For each patient, age, sex, hospital stay duration, remission, recurrence, and associated morbidity and mortality were evaluated. Results Of the 2,447 CABG procedures that were carried out during the time period encompassed by our study, DSWIs occurred in 61 patients (2.5%). Of these 61 patients, 33 patients (nine females [27.3%] and 24 males [72.7%]) with an average age of 634.54 years underwent pectoralis major muscle turnover flap placement. Symptoms of infection mainly occurred within the first 10 days after surgery (mean, 10.2413.62 days). The most common risk factor for DSWIs was obesity (n=16, 48.4%) followed by diabetes mellitus (n=13, 39.4%). Bilateral and unilateral pectoralis major muscle turnover flaps were performed in 20 patients (60.6%) and 13 patients (39.4%), respectively. Complete remission was achieved in 25 patients (75.7%), with no recurrence in the follow-up period. Four patients (12.1%) needed reoperation. The mean hospitalization time was 11.696.516 days. Four patients (12.1%) died during the course of the study: three due to the postoperative complication of respiratory failure and one due to pulmonary thromboembolism. Conclusion Pectoralis major muscle turnover flaps are an optimal technique in the treatment of post-CABG mediastinitis. In addition to leading to favorable therapeutic results, this flap is associated with minimal morbidity and mortality, as well as a short hospitalization time. PMID:26290837

  13. Thoracodorsal artery perforator flap: Indeed a versatile flap

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Leena; Kumta, Samir M.; Purohit, Shrirang K.; Raut, Rashmi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap has emerged as one of the ideal perforator flaps. We, hereby, describe its versatility in indications (free/pedicled), methods of harvest (patient position and paddle orientation) and perforator consistency. Materials and Methods: We have performed a total of six TDAP flaps-five free and one pedicled, over a period of 1-year from March 2014 to February 2015 at a single centre. Our indications have been: Reconstruction of oral cavity, breast and upper and lower extremities. Results: We had neither any failures nor any re-explorations. The average perforator length is about 6 cm and the pedicle length can be extended to 12-14 cm by including the thoracodorsal artery. There is inconsistency in perforator position; however, the presence of a perforator is certain. It can be harvested in lateral, prone or supine position, thus, does not require any position change allowing a two-team approach to reconstruction. The paddle can be oriented vertically or horizontally, both healing with scars in inconspicuous locations. Apart from providing a good colour match for extremities, this flap can be thinned primarily. Conclusion: The versatility of TDAP has several advantages that make it a workhorse flap for most reconstructions requiring soft tissue cover. Further, the ease of harvest makes it a good perforator flap for beginners. Its use in chimerism with the underlying latissimus dorsi muscle provides reconstruction for coverage and volume replacement. PMID:26424978

  14. Effects of Rosmarinus officinalis on the survivability of random-patterned skin flaps: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Ince, Bilsev; Yildirim, Alpagan Mustafa; Okur, Mehmet Ihsan; Dadaci, Mehmet; Yoruk, Ebru

    2015-04-01

    Improving survival of skin flaps used in soft-tissue reconstruction is clinically an important goal, and several systemic and local agents have been used for this purpose. However, a substance that prevents the flap necrosis has not yet been defined. This study aimed to investigate whether a Rosmarinus officinalis extract could improve the skin flap survival. In this study, 21 Wistar albino rats were divided into three groups. Rectangular 8 × 2 cm random-pattern flaps were elevated from the back of the rats. Group I was considered the control group. In Group II, a 0.5-cc of Rosmarinus officinalis oil was applied with an ear bud to the flap area 30 minutes before the flap elevation. After suturing the flaps to their location, the oil was administered twice a day for a week. In Group III, 0.5 cc of the oil was applied twice a day to the area that was elevated for a week until surgery. At the end of the week, the flaps were sutured to their location, and wiped postoperatively twice a day for a week with the oil. Mean percentage of these areas was found to be 29.81%, 58.99%, and 67.68% in Group I, Group II, and Group III, respectively. The mean percentage of the flap survival areas and vessel diameters were significantly greater in the Groups II and III than in the control group (p < 0.05). The results revealed that the topical use of the Rosmarinus officinalis extract can increase the flap survivability. PMID:24702647

  15. Surgical Outcome of Urethroplasty Using Penile Circular Fasciocutaneous Flap for Anterior Urethral Stricture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung Rok; Suh, Jun-Gyo; Paick, Jae-Seung

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Penile circular fasciocutaneous flap urethroplasty is a useful technique for a long anterior urethral stricture due to the flap's hairless nature and ample length. We investigated the surgical outcomes of urethroplasty for a complex anterior urethral stricture, performed using a penile circular fasciocutaneous flap. Materials and Methods Between 2008 and 2013, we performed a retrospective review of 29 patients who underwent urethroplasty using a penile circular fasciocutaneous flap and had at least 6 months of follow-up. A total of 20 cases utilized only a fasciocutaneous flap, while 9 cases combined a fasciocutaneous flap with other surgery. Success was defined as no requirement of additional urethral instrumentation. Results The overall success rate was 68.9% (20 out of 29 cases) at a median follow-up of 19 months. Furthermore, fasciocutaneous flap urethroplasty rendered the actual stricture-free rate of 79.3%. The location of recurrence was mostly at the junction of the flap. Among 9 surgical failures, 5 cases were treated successfully by using an additional surgical procedure. Fistula repair was needed in 1 case 4 months later. Further, periodic urethral dilation was performed in the remaining 3 cases. The failure rate was significantly higher in patients with suprapubic cystostomy than in patients without suprapubic cystostomy. The most common complication was post-micturition dribbling. Conclusions Penile circular fasciocutaneous flap urethroplasty is a useful method for the reconstruction of a long anterior urethral stricture. A sufficient healthy margin should be acquired for better surgical results due to the fact that most recurrence occurs at the junction of the flap. PMID:25237658

  16. New developments in flap techniques.

    PubMed

    Levin, L Scott

    2006-01-01

    Limb reimplantation techniques using composite free-tissue transfer and microsurgical salvage of traumatized extremities have become standard reconstructive methods. Mechanisms for working with free-tissue transfers have advanced, specifically in regard to the use of thin-wire fixators: combining microsurgical techniques and thin-wire fixators helps in salvaging limbs that otherwise might be amputated. Also, combining the Ilizarov method with microsurgical techniques for limb salvage provides a new use for flaps. A further development in the use of flaps is the application of free-tissue transfers to preserve amputation levels in the war-injured. So-called fillet flaps serve as "spare parts" and can be customized for specific recipient sites. The so-called perforator flap makes use of feeder vessels, thus providing cutaneous and other composite flaps without sacrificing major vessels. Finally, the advent of the sural flap has made it possible to avoid microsurgical reconstruction but still provide adequate, well-vascularized cover, particularly in the distal third of the leg. PMID:17003218

  17. Modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Song, Dajiang; Li, Jinsong; Xu, Jian; Lv, Hongbin

    2015-04-01

    The paper aims to improve the operative technique of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvesting, further minimise morbidity of donor site, and improve the effect of recipient site reconstruction. From March 2005 to March 2011, 55 cases of osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap harvested by different methods were performed to reconstruct the defects of the extremities. Twenty-nine cases were reconstructed with a traditional deep circumflex iliac artery osteomusculocutaneous flap. Twenty-six cases were repaired with modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flaps. In 29 cases with a traditional DCIA osteomusculocutaneous flap, two cases showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. Flapnecrosis was significant in two cases. Arterial compromise occurred in one case 5 days after operation completion and led to flap failure. Three flaps developed postoperative venous congestion, but only one flap received re-exploration. In the other two cases, some stitches were removed for decompression. All three flaps survived. In two cases, marginal flap necrosis occurred, but no secondary skin grafting was required. In 26 cases with modified flap transplantation, one case showed the injured lateral femoral cutaneous nerve. All flaps survived totally. Osseous integration was achieved in all 55 cases in 3 ? 9 months after operation. The modified osteomyocutaneous iliac crest flap technique enhances flap safety, provides the additional advantages of reducing donor-site morbidity, and improves the recipient-site contour. PMID:25001367

  18. Inverted Internal Limiting Membrane Flap For Large Traumatic Macular Holes.

    PubMed

    Abou Shousha, Mohsen Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the role of inverted internal limiting membrane flap as a treatment option for large traumatic macular holes.This is a prospective noncomparative study in which 12 eyes with large traumatic macular holes (basal diameter of 1300-2800 ?m) since 3 to 6 months were subjected to standard 23-gauge vitrectomy with removal of the posterior hyaloid, brilliant blue G (BBG)-assisted internal limiting membrane peeling in a circular fashion keeping it attached to the edge of the hole to create a flap. At the end of the surgery, air fluid exchange was done with inversion of the internal limiting membrane flap inside the macular hole using the soft tipped cannula and sulfur hexafluoride 20% as tamponade. The main follow-up measures are the best corrected visual acuity and the optical coherence tomography for 6 to 9 months.All the included eyes had a closed hole from the first week postoperative and along the follow-up period (6-9 months). The best corrected visual acuity improved from 20/2000 to 20/200 with a median of 20/400 preoperatively to 20/400 to 20/50 with a median of 20/100 at the end of follow-up period.Inverted internal limiting membrane flap is a good adjuvant to standard vitrectomy in the management of large traumatic macular holes that led to the 100% closure rate and improvement of best corrected visual acuity. PMID:26817894

  19. The Abb island flap for the reconstruction of severe secondary cleft lip deformities.

    PubMed

    Erol, Onur O; Pence, Murat; Agaoglu, Galip

    2007-07-01

    Primary repair of the cleft lip is often associated with secondary deformities, which require revision and secondary reconstruction. Patients with one or all of the following, a tight lip restricting use of orthodontic appliances, absence of a Cupid's bow, or absence of vermilion tubercle, were treated with the Abb island flap. A triangular muco-musculo-cutaneous island flap was designed in the central segment of the lower lip. A full-thickness incision of skin, muscle, and mucosa was made in the midline of the upper lip, dividing the lip into two segments, and the island Abb flap was inserted. One week after surgery, the pedicle of the island flap was divided and the inset of the flap completed. Sixty patients with severe secondary cleft lip deformities (36 males and 24 females) were treated. Good aesthetic and functional results were achieved during 1 to 17 years of follow-up. Insertion of the Abb flap resulted in release of the tight upper lip and a new, inconspicuous scar. Use of orthodontic appliances was facilitated, and tightness of the tissue, which restricted the expansion of the alveolar process, was eliminated. Adequate tissue was transferred to the upper lip, which improved the bulk of the lip and vermilion tubercle. The retrusion of the midface and the projection of the upper lip were also improved, and the upper and lower lips became better balanced. Donor site morbidities were insignificant. Use of the Abb flap in selected patients resulted in successful reconstruction of secondary cleft lip deformities. PMID:17667662

  20. An engineered muscle flap for reconstruction of large soft tissue defects

    PubMed Central

    Shandalov, Yulia; Egozi, Dana; Koffler, Jacob; Dado-Rosenfeld, Dekel; Ben-Shimol, David; Freiman, Alina; Shor, Erez; Kabala, Aviva; Levenberg, Shulamit

    2014-01-01

    Large soft tissue defects involve significant tissue loss, requiring surgical reconstruction. Autologous flaps are occasionally scant, demand prolonged transfer surgery, and induce donor site morbidity. The present work set out to fabricate an engineered muscle flap bearing its own functional vascular pedicle for repair of a large soft tissue defect in mice. Full-thickness abdominal wall defect was reconstructed using this engineered vascular muscle flap. A 3D engineered tissue constructed of a porous, biodegradable polymer scaffold embedded with endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and/or myoblasts was cultured in vitro and then implanted around the femoral artery and veins before being transferred, as an axial flap, with its vascular pedicle to reconstruct a full-thickness abdominal wall defect in the same mouse. Within 1 wk of implantation, scaffolds showed extensive functional vascular density and perfusion and anastomosis with host vessels. At 1 wk posttransfer, the engineered muscle flaps were highly vascularized, were well-integrated within the surrounding tissue, and featured sufficient mechanical strength to support the abdominal viscera. Thus, the described engineered muscle flap, equipped with an autologous vascular pedicle, constitutes an effective tool for reconstruction of large defects, thereby circumventing the need for both harvesting autologous flaps and postoperative scarification. PMID:24711414

  1. The role of the anterolateral thigh flap in complex defects of the scalp and cranium.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pao-Yuan; Miguel, Ros; Chew, Khong-Yik; Kuo, Yur-Ren; Yang, Johnson Chia-Shen

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we introduced scalp reconstruction using free anterolateral thigh (ALT) flaps and evaluated postoperative outcomes in nine patients between March 2000 and April 2012. Five patients had problems of exposed prosthesis, three required reconstruction after resection of scalp tumor and one patient presented with third degree flame burns of the scalp. All flaps survived without re-exploration, except three flaps with tip necrosis requiring secondary procedures of debridement and small Z-plasty reconstructions. The superficial temporal artery and its concomitant vein were used as recipient vessels, apart from two cases where previous surgery and flame burns excluded these choices, for which facial arteries and veins were used instead. Primary closure of the donor-site was possible in six cases; with skin grafting performed for the other three patients. All donor sites healed without complications. The ALT flap offers the advantage of customizable size, option of fascia lata as vascularized dural replacement, and minimal flap atrophy typical of muscle flaps. Indications include very large defects, defects with exposed prosthesis, or defects with bone or dural loss. Our experience lends credible support to the use of customized free ALT flaps to achieve functional and cosmetically superior result for the reconstruction of large scalp defects, especially with bone exposure. PMID:23640870

  2. Vascularized rotational temporal bone flap for repair of anterior skull base defects: a novel operative technique.

    PubMed

    Zeiler, Frederick A; Kaufmann, Anthony M

    2015-11-01

    Repair of anterior skull base defects with vascularized grafts poses a significant challenge, given the location and small number of adequately sized vessels for free-flap anastomosis. This is particularly the case in the setting of redo surgery or in patients with preexisting soft-tissue trauma. Even more difficult is achieving a vascularized bone flap closure of such bony defects. The authors report a novel technique involving a rotational temporal bone flap with a temporalis muscle vascularized pedicle, which was used to repair an anterior fossa bony and soft-tissue defect created by recurrent malignancy. A 55-year-old man with history of scalp avulsion during a motor vehicle accident, anterior fossa/nasopharyngeal malignant neuroendocrine carcinoma postresection, and bone flap infection presented with a recurrence of his skull base malignancy. The tumor was located in the anterior fossa, extending interhemispherically and down through the cribriform plate, ethmoid air cells, and extending into the nasopharyngeal cavity. Resection of the recurrent tumor was performed. The bony defect in the anterior skull base was repaired with a novel vascularized rotational temporal bone flap, with acceptable separation of the nasopharynx from the intracranial cavity. The vascularized rotational temporal bone flap, in which a temporalis muscle pedicle is used, provides a novel and easily accessible means of vascularized bone closure of anterior skull base defects without the need for microsurgical free-flap grafting. PMID:25955877

  3. The Role of Muscle Flaps for Salvage of Failed Perforator Free Flaps

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the most heroic efforts, sometimes free flaps fail. Perforator free flaps are not invincible and can suffer the same fate. The real challenge is how to decide what is the next best choice for achieving the desired outcome. Methods: Over the past decade, 298 free perforator flaps were used in our institution. Total failure occurred in 16 patients, and partial failure requiring a second free flap occurred in an additional 6 patients for a true success rate of 93%. All failures had some form of secondary vascularized tissue transfer, which included the use of muscle flaps in 9 (41%) different patients. Results: Initial flap salvage after a failed perforator free flap was attempted with 12 perforator and 5 muscle free flaps as well as 1 perforator and 2 muscle local flaps. These were not all successful, with loss of 3 muscle free flaps and 3 perforator flaps. Tertiary free flap coverage was successful in 3 cases using 2 muscle flaps and 1 perforator free flap. Local fasciocutaneous flaps or primary wound closure was used in the remaining individuals. Conclusions: Microsurgical tissue transfers can be the most rewarding and at the same time the most challenging reconstructive endeavor. Persistence in achieving the desired outcome can require multiple steps. Perforator flaps are an important asset to obtain this goal. However, muscle flaps can still be a useful alternative, and the message is that they should not be overlooked as sometimes a viable option. PMID:26893989

  4. Propeller flaps: classification and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Ayestaray, B; Ogawa, R; Ono, S; Hyakusoku, H

    2011-04-01

    Propeller flaps feature a highly reliable reconstructive method, based on a perforator vessel. Since their introduction in 1991, a great variety of propeller flaps have been described, according to their shape and their potential of coverage. Indeed, these flaps have progressively been refined and modified, concerning their vascularity and space design. The authors present a classification of propeller flaps. This anatomical classification is necessary to understand the dissection procedure and the differences between the numerous types of propeller flaps nowadays described. It is the international classification, which should be used for the description and conception of these flaps. PMID:21236544

  5. Sectioned Images and Surface Models of a Cadaver for Understanding the Dorsalis Pedis Flap.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Hyung Jun; Kim, Bong Chul

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to represent the dorsalis pedis (DP) flap on sectioned images and surface models using Visible Korean for medical education and clinical training in the field of maxillofacial reconstructive surgery. Serially sectioned images of the foot were obtained from a cadaver. The important structures in the sectioned images were outlined and stacked to create a surface model. The PDF file (53 MB) of the assembled models is accessible for free download on the Department of Anatomy at Ajou University School of Medicine Web site (http://anatomy.co.kr). In this file, the significant anatomic structures of the DP flap can be inspected in the sectioned images. All surface models and stereoscopic structures of the DP flap are described in real time. We hope that these state-of-the-art sectioned images, outlined images, and surface models will help students and trainees gain a better understanding of the DP flap anatomy. PMID:26079120

  6. The ratio in choosing access flap for surgical endodontics: a review

    PubMed Central

    GRANDI, C.; PACIFICI, L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In Surgical Endodontics we face complex situations that require the knowlflap and application of both principles of endodontics (cleansing shaping and filling) in the root management, and the principles of surgery (asepsis, non harmfulness and hemostasis) in the phase of access to the root. Among the factors of surgical relevance that for which have been proposed with the largest number of alternatives is the design of access flap. That clearly indicates that not only one flap design can be ideal in all clinical situations. In this article all proposed access flap designs are evaluated in the light of their degree of compliance with ideal requirements in different circumstances. A clear pattern in the decision-making criteria for the selection of access flaps is proposed. PMID:23285356

  7. Enhancement of venous drainage with vein stripper for reversed pedicled neurocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Sonmez, Erhan; Silistireli, zlem Karata?; Karaaslan, nder; Kamburo?lu, Haldun Onuralp; Safak, Tunc

    2013-05-01

    The flaps based on the vascular axis of superficial sensitive cutaneous nerves had gained increased popularity in reconstructive surgery because of such major advantages as preservation of major extremity arteries and avoidance of microsurgical procedures. However, postoperative venous congestion resulting in partial or total necrosis is still a common problem for these flaps. The aim of the current study is to introduce a new method for reducing the postoperative venous congestion of neural island flap with the results of reconstruction of the soft tissue defects of foot and ankle. This method was used to treat 19 patients with various chronic soft tissue defects of the foot and ankle between 2011 and 2012. We observed that the novel method presented in this report enables effective venous drainage, solving the postoperative venous congestion problem of these flaps. PMID:23329601

  8. An Inferiorly Based Rotation Flap for Defects Involving the Lower Eyelid and Medial Cheek.

    PubMed

    Lewin, Jesse M; Sclafani, Anthony P; Carucci, John A

    2015-08-01

    We report a series of 20 patients who underwent inferiorly based rotation flaps for reconstruction of defects of the medial and infraorbital cheek and lower eyelid following Mohs micrographic surgery for nonmelanoma skin cancer. Defects ranged from 1.2 to 3.2 cm in longest diameter and patients ranged from 27 to 91 years of age. All 20 patients had excellent functional and cosmetic outcome with up to 2-year follow-up and no subsequent surgical or laser revision. There were no instances of partial or complete flap necrosis, hematoma, or ectropion. Our series includes defects that originated on the cheek as far laterally as directly below the lateral canthus, and terminated as far medially as the nasal sidewall. An inferiorly based rotation flap is a viable alternative to a laterally based rotation flap and should be in the armamentarium of reconstructive dermatologic and facial plastic surgeons. PMID:26372717

  9. Wound Dehiscence after Wisdom Tooth Removal in Mandibular Mesioangular Class IB Impactions: Triangular Transposition Flap versus Envelope Flap

    PubMed Central

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh; Ilkhani, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Wound dehiscence after lower third molar surgery extends the postoperative treatment period and may cause long-standing pain. The aim of this study was to compare wound dehiscence after removal of wisdom teeth in the most prevalent mandibular impaction (mesioangular class IB) by two different soft tissue flap designs. Materials and methods. Partially-erupted mandibular third molars with mesioangular class IB impaction (Pell and Gregory classification) were selected. Split mouth technique was used to compare the two flap designs (envelope vs. triangular transposition flapTTF). The patients were recalled one week and a month later and rechecked for dehiscence, infection, and dry socket formation. Results. There were no cases of infection in either group. However, three cases of dry socket in the envelope group and four in the TTF group were recorded. In the envelope group, dehiscence occurred in 43% of cases during the first week, with 67% of cases being a large dehiscence (diameters of more than 5 mm). Extra appointments (those requested by the patient exclusively related to the problem of the hole distal to the second molar) were scheduled in 10% of cases in the envelope group. In the TTF group, dehiscence occurred during the first week for the same impaction in 19% of cases with large dehiscence cases occurring in 65% of cases and extra appointment rate at 4.1%. Conclusion. According to theresults in the evaluated operation, TTF may prevent postoperative wound dehiscence more probably than the envelope flap. PMID:26697150

  10. PIV Measurements on a Blowing Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutcheson, Florence V.; Stead, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    PIV measurements of the flow in the region of a flap side edge are presented for several blowing flap configurations. The test model is a NACA 63(sub 2)-215 Hicks Mod-B main-element airfoil with a half-span Fowler flap. Air is blown from small slots located along the flap side edge on either the top, bottom or side surfaces. The test set up is described and flow measurements for a baseline and three blowing flap configurations are presented. The effects that the flap tip jets have on the structure of the flap side edge flow are discussed for each of the flap configurations tested. The results indicate that blowing air from a slot located along the top surface of the flap greatly weakened the top vortex system and pushed it further off the top surface. Blowing from the bottom flap surface kept the strong side vortex further outboard while blowing from the side surface only strengthened the vortex system or accelerated the merging of the side vortex to the flap top surface. It is concluded that blowing from the top or bottom surfaces of the flap may lead to a reduction of flap side edge noise.

  11. Experience in Reconstruction for Small Digital Defects With Free Flaps.

    PubMed

    Hung, Min-Hsiang; Huang, Kuo-Feng; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Chao, Wai-Nang

    2016-03-01

    Traumatic injuries to the digits resulting in soft tissue or bone loss require reconstruction. Traditionally, local flaps, such as homodigital flaps, heterodigital flaps, pedicled flaps, or distant flaps, are used for digital resurfacing. However, free tissue transfers can be used in selected patients. In this study, we present the use of different free flaps including groin skin flaps, groin osteocutaneous flaps, groin chimeric flaps, second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps, and partial toe flaps for digital reconstruction. A total of 19 digits were treated with 16 free flaps in our hospital. Of the flaps used, 5 were free groin skin flaps, 4 were free partial toe flaps, 3 were free groin chimeric flaps, 2 were free groin osteocutaneous flaps, and 2 were free second dorsal metacarpal artery flaps. The average flap size was 4.7 2.0 cm (range, 1.5 1 to 5 4 cm), and the average operative time was 6.0 hours (range, 4-9 hours). All flaps survived without partial or total necrosis. In conclusion, the free flap is a reliable and safe alternative for digital reconstruction. Moreover, the free groin flap provides not only a chimeric pattern for multiple fingers coverage but also an osteocutaneous pattern for thumb lengthening. The free second dorsal metacarpal artery flap provides a tenocutaneous pattern for tendon reconstruction and soft tissue coverage simultaneously, and the free partial toe flap is an excellent alternative for pulp reconstruction in terms of aesthetic appearance and functional outcome. PMID:26808771

  12. Pedicled perforator flap of stellate design.

    PubMed

    Mun, Goo-Hyun; Jo, Yong-Woo; Lim, So-Young; Hyon, Won-Sok; Bang, Sa-Ik; Oh, Kap-Sung

    2008-11-01

    The perforator flap has proven to be effective as both a free flap and a pedicled flap in the reconstruction of a variety of regions. Usually, a V-Y advancement pattern or simple ellipse is the design selected for pedicled perforator island flaps. On the other hand, the transposition of multiple perforator flaps or skin grafting on the donor sites is required for larger defects. The authors used a stellate design to elevate a perforator flap with large dimensions, whilst allowing the easier closure of the donor defect. This method was used for reconstructing the sacral (six cases), trochanteric (one case), and lower leg (three cases) regions. Although minor wound dehiscence at the donor sites was encountered in three cases, all the defects were reconstructed successfully using a single perforator flap. This design would be a valuable option for planning a pedicled perforator flap, particularly when a difficult donor closure is expected. PMID:18029241

  13. The Flap Sandwich Technique for a Safe and Aesthetic Skull Base Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Tanaka, Kentarou; Iida, Hideo

    2016-02-01

    For safe and reliable skull base reconstruction combined with repair of cranial bone defects, we introduce the flap sandwich technique in this study. A titanium mesh is often used to repair structural cranial bone defects because it has less donor site morbidity and is easy to handle. However, titanium mesh has disadvantages of exposure and infection postoperatively. To improve surgical outcomes, we applied the flap sandwich technique to 3 cases of skull base reconstruction combined with cranial bone defect repair. Two anterior skull base defects and 1 middle skull base defect were included in this study. The subjects were all women, aged 30, 58, and 62 years. One patient had former multiple craniotomies and another patient had preoperative radiotherapy. The flap sandwich technique involves structural cranial bone reconstruction with a titanium mesh and soft tissue reconstruction with a chimeric anterolateral thigh free flap. First, the dead space between the repaired dura and the titanium mesh is filled with vastus lateralis muscle, and then structural reconstruction is performed with a titanium mesh. Finally, the titanium mesh is totally covered with the adiposal flap of the anterolateral thigh free flap. The muscle flap protects the dead space from infection, and the adiposal flap covers the titanium mesh to reduce mechanical stress on the covered skin and thus prevent the exposure of the titanium mesh through the scalp. By applying this technique, there was no intracranial infection or titanium mesh exposure in these 3 cases postoperatively, even though 2 patients had postoperative radiotherapy. Additionally, the adiposal flap could provide a soft and natural contour to the scalp and forehead region, and this gives patients a better facial appearance even though they have had skull base surgery. PMID:25954846

  14. Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap Breast Reconstruction without Microsurgery Fellowship Training

    PubMed Central

    Orbay, Hakan; Busse, Brittany K.; Stevenson, Thomas R.; Wang, Howard T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flap breast reconstruction requires complex microsurgical skills. Herein, we examine whether DIEP flap breast reconstruction can be performed safely without microsurgical fellowship training. Methods: A total of 28 patients and 34 DIEP flaps were included in the study. We reviewed the medical records of patients for donor site and flap-related complications and analyzed the correlation between the complications and preoperative risk factors. We also performed a literature review to compare complication rates in our series with the literature. Results: We observed total flap necrosis in 1 patient (2.9%), partial flap necrosis in 5 patients (14.7%), infection in 1 patient (2.9%), hematoma/seroma in 3 patients (8.8%), donor site complications in 5 patients (18.5%), venous occlusion in 4 patients (11.7%), and arterial occlusion in 1 patient (2.9%). We did not observe any correlation between complications and preoperative risk factors. Literature review yielded 18 papers that met our inclusion criteria. Partial flap necrosis rate was significantly higher in our series compared with literature (14.7% vs 1.6%, P = 0.003). Venous complication rate was marginally higher in our series compared with literature (11.7% vs 3.3%, P = 0.057). However, total flap loss rate in our series was comparable with the literature (2.9% vs 2.2%, P = 0.759). Conclusion: With proper training during plastic surgery residency, DIEP flap can be performed with acceptable morbidity. PMID:26301144

  15. Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flap for Sacral Pressure Ulcer Reconstruction: A Retrospective Case Study of 11 Patients.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Ta; Ou, Kuang-Wen; Chiao, Hao-Yu; Wang, Chi-Yu; Chou, Chang-Yi; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Lee, Tzu-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in reconstruction techniques, sacral pressure ulcers continue to present a challenge to the plastic surgeon. The flap from the gluteal crease derives blood supply from the inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) and reliably preserves the entire contralateral side as a donor site. To incorporate the IGAP in the reconstruction of sacral pressure ulcers, a skin paddle over the gluteal crease was created and implemented by the authors. Data from 11 patients (8 men, 3 women; mean age 67 [range 44-85] years old) whose sacral ulcers were closed with an IGAP flap between June 2006 and May 2012 were retrieved and reviewed. All patients were bedridden; 1 patient in a vegetative state with a diagnosis of carbon monoxide intoxication was referred from a local clinic, 2 patients had Parkinson's disease, and 8 patients had a history of stroke. The average defect size was 120 cm2 (range 88-144 cm2). The average flap size was 85.8 cm2 (range 56-121 cm2). Only 1 flap failure occurred during surgery and was converted into V-Y advancement flap; 10 of the 11 flaps survived. After surgery, the patients' position was changed every 2 hours; patients remained prone or on their side for approximately 2 weeks until the flap was healed. After healing was confirmed, patients were discharged. Complications were relatively minor and included 1 donor site wound dehiscence that required wound reapproximation. No surgeryrelated mortality was noted; the longest follow-up period was 24 months. In this case series, flaps from the gluteal crease were successfully used for surgical closure of sacral pressure ulcers. This flap design should be used with caution in patients with hip contractures. Studies with larger sample sizes are needed to ascertain which type of flap is best suited to surgically manage extensive pressure ulcers in a variety of patient populations. PMID:26779702

  16. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Scar Contracture-bearing Axilla and Digital Webs Using the Square Flap Method

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chenyu

    2014-01-01

    Background: Joint scar contractures are characterized by tight bands of soft tissue that bridge the 2 ends of the joint like a web. Classical treatment methods such as Z-plasties are mainly based on 2-dimensional designs. Our square flap method is an alternative surgical method that restores the span of the web in a stereometric fashion, thereby reconstructing joint function. Methods: In total, 20 Japanese patients with joint scar contractures on the axillary (n = 10) or first digital web (n = 10) underwent square flap surgery. The maximum range of motion and commissure length were measured before and after surgery. A theoretical stereometric geometrical model of the square flap was established to compare it to the classical single (60 degree), 4-flap (45 degree), and 5-flap (60 degree) Z-plasties in terms of theoretical web reconstruction efficacy. Results: All cases achieved 100% contracture release. The maximum range of motion and web space improved after square flap surgery (P = 0.001). Stereometric geometrical modeling revealed that the standard square flap (? = 45 degree; ? = 90 degree) yields a larger flap area, length/width ratio, and postsurgical commissure length than the Z-plasties. It can also be adapted by varying angles ? and ?, although certain angle thresholds must be met to obtain the stereometric advantages of this method. Conclusions: When used to treat joint scar contractures, the square flap method can fully span the web space in a stereometric manner, thus yielding a close-to-original shape and function. Compared with the classical Z-plasties, it also provides sufficient anatomical blood supply while imposing the least physiological tension on the adjacent skin. PMID:25289342

  17. In situ Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap: A Rat Model of Myocutaneous Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Marie-Claire; Wigmore, Stephen; Kluth, David

    2013-01-01

    Free tissue transfer is the gold standard of reconstructive surgery to repair complex defects not amenable to local options or those requiring composite tissue. Ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) is a known cause of partial free flap failure and has no effective treatment. Establishing a laboratory model of this injury can prove costly both financially as larger mammals are conventionally used and in the expertise required by the technical difficulty of these procedures typically requires employing an experienced microsurgeon. This publication and video demonstrate the effective use of a model of IRI in rats which does not require microsurgical expertise. This procedure is an in situ model of a transverse abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap where atraumatic clamps are utilized to reproduce the ischemia-reperfusion injury associated with this surgery. A laser Doppler Imaging (LDI) scanner is employed to assess flap perfusion and the image processing software, Image J to assess percentage area skin survival as a primary outcome measure of injury. PMID:23770929

  18. Colon bypass with a colon-flap augmentation pharyngoesophagoplasty.

    PubMed

    Tettey, Mark; Edwin, Frank; Aniteye, Ernest; Tamatey, Martin; Entsua-Mensah, Ekow; Offosu-Appiah, Ernest; Adzamli, Innocent

    2015-01-01

    Extensive caustic stricture of the upper aero-digestive system (oro- and hypo-pharynx) is a severe injury with limited surgical options. We adopted augmentation of the cicatrized upper aero-digestive tract with colon as our preferred management option. The aim of this report is to describe our initial experience with the technique of colon-flap augmentation pharyngo-esophagoplasty (CFAP) for selected patients with severe pharyngo-esophageal stricture. Between October 2011 and June 2013, three male patients (aged 16, 4 and 18 years respectively) underwent CFAP following extensive pharyngo-esophageal stricture. Postoperative recovery was uneventful in all three cases and all started swallowing within 7-10 days after surgery without significant dysphagia. Colon-flap augmentation pharyngo-esophagoplasty is an effective procedure for reconstruction of the pharynx and the hypopharynx after extensive caustic pharyngoesophageal structure in selected cases. PMID:26587125

  19. Colon bypass with a colon-flap augmentation pharyngoesophagoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Tettey, Mark; Edwin, Frank; Aniteye, Ernest; Tamatey, Martin; Entsua-Mensah, Ekow; Offosu-Appiah, Ernest; Adzamli, Innocent

    2015-01-01

    Extensive caustic stricture of the upper aero-digestive system (oro- and hypo-pharynx) is a severe injury with limited surgical options. We adopted augmentation of the cicatrized upper aero-digestive tract with colon as our preferred management option. The aim of this report is to describe our initial experience with the technique of colon-flap augmentation pharyngo-esophagoplasty (CFAP) for selected patients with severe pharyngo-esophageal stricture. Between October 2011 and June 2013, three male patients (aged 16, 4 and 18 years respectively) underwent CFAP following extensive pharyngo-esophageal stricture. Postoperative recovery was uneventful in all three cases and all started swallowing within 7 - 10 days after surgery without significant dysphagia. Colon-flap augmentation pharyngo-esophagoplasty is an effective procedure for reconstruction of the pharynx and the hypopharynx after extensive caustic pharyngoesophageal structure in selected cases. PMID:26587125

  20. Freestyle perforator flaps: an innovative approach to soft tissue reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Brunetti, Beniamino; Campa, Stefano; Tenna, Stefania; Pallara, Tiziano; Persichetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Resurfacing of soft tissue defects consequent to skin cancer, melanoma, or sarcoma excision in different anatomical districts represents a difficult challenge for the plastic surgeon. Classic reconstructive procedures are frequently charged by unsatisfactory results. The introduction of perforator flaps in the clinical practice represented a revolution in the field of reconstructive plastic surgery. The technique further evolved with the introduction of the freestyle concept, allowing one to harvest a skin flap from any region of the body where an appropriate and detectable Doppler signal is present and to resurface soft tissue defects mobilizing the surrounding tissues, which present similar features compared with the recipient site in terms of color and texture, on a consistent vascular source and in a tension-free manner. The authors present their personal approach to the reconstruction of soft tissue defects after excision for a basal cell carcinoma involving the medial tibial region. PMID:25649898

  1. Current Practice: The Bilobed Flap from the Classic Indication to Cover a Small Defect on Face to Covering a Large Defect on the Chest.

    PubMed

    Bast, Florian; Roos, Susann; Weikert, Sebastian; Schrom, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    A variety of flaps are available to cover skin defects after surgery or trauma in the head and neck area. The bilobed flap is a double transposition flap commonly used in reconstruction of small-to-medium skin defects of the face where skin is less mobile. However, larger defects can also be effectively treated with a bilobed flap in certain cases. The classic indication to cover a small defect on the nose and covering a large skin-defect after tumour resection in the jugular notch. After sufficient mobilization, the defects could easily be closed with no wound complications and with very good aesthetic and functional outcome. The bilobed flap, as a local flap, is possible in suitable locations even for larger skin defects. In addition to the simplicity of the procedure, good aesthetic results can be expected. PMID:26975956

  2. Reconstruction with a 180-degree Rotationally Divided Latissimus-dorsi-musculocutaneous Flap after the Removal of Locally Advanced Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kirita, Miho; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Summary: This study described a technique for reconstruction of a large lateral thoracic region defect after locally advanced breast cancer resection that allows for full coverage of the defect and primary closure of the flap donor site. The authors performed reconstruction using the newly designed 180-degree rotationally-divided latissimus-dorsi-musculocutaneous flap in a 42-year-old woman for coverage of a large skin defect (18 15 cm) following extensive tissue resection for locally advanced breast cancer. The latissimus-dorsi-musculocutaneous flap, consisting of two rotated skin islands (18 7.5 cm each) that were sutured to form a large skin island, was used for coverage of the defect. The flap was sutured without causing excessive tension in the recipient region and the donor site was closed with simple reefing. No skin grafting was necessary. The flap survived completely, shoulder joint function was intact, and esthetic outcome was satisfactory. Quick wound closure allowed postoperative irradiation to be started 1 month after surgery. The technique offered advantages over the conventional pedicled latissimus-dorsi-musculocutaneous flap, but the flap was unable to be used, when the thoracodorsal artery and vein were damaged during extensive tissue removal. Detailed planning before surgery with breast surgeons would be essential. PMID:25426400

  3. The Sternohyoid Flap for Facial Reanimation.

    PubMed

    Alam, Daniel S

    2016-02-01

    This article discusses the use of the sternohyoid muscle for facial reanimation. The report outlines the rationale for use, the technical aspects of flap harvest, and early clinical outcomes. The utility of the flap and its comparative attributes relative to the gracilis flap are discussed. PMID:26611702

  4. New model of flap-gliding flight.

    PubMed

    Sachs, Gottfried

    2015-07-21

    A new modelling approach is presented for describing flap-gliding flight in birds and the associated mechanical energy cost of travelling. The new approach is based on the difference in the drag characteristics between flapping and non-flapping due to the drag increase caused by flapping. Thus, the possibility of a gliding flight phase, as it exists in flap-gliding flight, yields a performance advantage resulting from the decrease in the drag when compared with continuous flapping flight. Introducing an appropriate non-dimensionalization for the mathematical relations describing flap-gliding flight, results and findings of generally valid nature are derived. It is shown that there is an energy saving of flap-gliding flight in the entire speed range compared to continuous flapping flight. The energy saving reaches the highest level in the lower speed region. The travelling speed of flap-gliding flight is composed of the weighted average of the differing speeds in the flapping and gliding phases. Furthermore, the maximum range performance achievable with flap-gliding flight and the associated optimal travelling speed are determined. PMID:25841702

  5. Efficient flapping flight of pterosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strang, Karl Axel

    In the late eighteenth century, humans discovered the first pterosaur fossil remains and have been fascinated by their existence ever since. Pterosaurs exploited their membrane wings in a sophisticated manner for flight control and propulsion, and were likely the most efficient and effective flyers ever to inhabit our planet. The flapping gait is a complex combination of motions that sustains and propels an animal in the air. Because pterosaurs were so large with wingspans up to eleven meters, if they could have sustained flapping flight, they would have had to achieve high propulsive efficiencies. Identifying the wing motions that contribute the most to propulsive efficiency is key to understanding pterosaur flight, and therefore to shedding light on flapping flight in general and the design of efficient ornithopters. This study is based on published results for a very well-preserved specimen of Coloborhynchus robustus, for which the joints are well-known and thoroughly described in the literature. Simplifying assumptions are made to estimate the characteristics that can not be inferred directly from the fossil remains. For a given animal, maximizing efficiency is equivalent to minimizing power at a given thrust and speed. We therefore aim at finding the flapping gait, that is the joint motions, that minimize the required flapping power. The power is computed from the aerodynamic forces created during a given wing motion. We develop an unsteady three-dimensional code based on the vortex-lattice method, which correlates well with published results for unsteady motions of rectangular wings. In the aerodynamic model, the rigid pterosaur wing is defined by the position of the bones. In the aeroelastic model, we add the flexibility of the bones and of the wing membrane. The nonlinear structural behavior of the membrane is reduced to a linear modal decomposition, assuming small deflections about the reference wing geometry. The reference wing geometry is computed for the membrane subject to glide loads and pretension from the wing joint positions. The flapping gait is optimized in a two-stage procedure. First the design space is explored using a binary genetic algorithm. The best design points are then used as starting points in a sequential quadratic programming optimization algorithm. This algorithm is used to refine the solutions by precisely satisfying the constraints. The refined solutions are found in generally less than twenty major iterations and constraints are violated generally by less than 0.1%. We find that the optimal motions are in agreement with previous results for simple wing motions. By adding joint motions, the required flapping power is reduced by 7% to 17%. Because of the large uncertainties for some estimates, we investigate the sensitivity of the optimized flapping gait. We find that the optimal motions are sensitive mainly to flight speed, body accelerations, and to the material properties of the wing membrane. The optimal flight speed found correlates well with other studies of pterosaur flapping flight, and is 31% to 37% faster than previous estimates based on glide performance. Accounting for the body accelerations yields an increase of 10% to 16% in required flapping power. When including the aeroelastic effects, the optimal flapping gait is only slightly modified to accommodate for the deflections of stiff membranes. For a flexible membrane, the motion is significantly modified and the power increased by up to 57%. Finally, the flapping gait and required power compare well with published results for similar wing motions. Some published estimates of required power assumed a propulsive efficiency of 100%, whereas the propulsive efficiency computed for Coloborhynchus robustus ranges between 54% and 87%.

  6. Fibrin glue and transanal rectal advancement flap for high transsphincteric perianal fistulas; is there any advantage?

    PubMed Central

    van Koperen, Paul J.; Wind, Jan; Bemelman, Willem A.

    2008-01-01

    Backgrounds and aim In recent decades, fibrin glue has appeared as an alternative treatment for high perianal fistulas. Early results seemed promising, with high success rates being reported. However, with increasing follow-up, the enthusiasm was tempered because of disappointing results. The aim of this retrospective study was to assess the additional value of fibrin glue in combination with transanal advancement flap, compared to advancement flap alone, for the treatment of high transsphincteric fistulas of cryptoglandular origin. Materials and methods Between January 1995 and January 2006, 127 patients were operated for high perianal fistulas with an advancement flap. After exclusion of patients with inflammatory bowel disease or HIV, 80 patients remained. A consecutive series of 26 patients had an advancement flap combined with obliteration of the fistula tract with fibrin glue. Patients were matched for prior fistula surgery, and the advancement was performed identically in all patients. In the fibrin glue group, glue was installed retrogradely in the fistula tract after the advancement was completed and the fistula tract had been curetted. Results Minimal follow-up after surgery was 13 months [median of 67 months (range, 13127)]. The overall recurrence rate was 26% (n = 21). Recurrence rates for advancement flap alone vs the combination with glue were 13% vs 56% (p = 0.014) in the group without previous fistula surgery and 23% vs 41% (p = 0.216) in the group with previous fistula surgery. Conclusion Obliterating the fistula tract with fibrin glue was associated with worse outcome after rectal advancement flap for high perianal fistulas. PMID:18322659

  7. Postoperative evaluation of the folded pharyngeal flap operation for cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimasu, Hidemi; Sato, Yutaka; Mishimagi, Takashi; Negishi, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Velopharyngeal function is very important for patients with cleft palate to acquire good speech. For patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency, prosthetic speech appliances and speech therapy are applied first, and then pharyngeal flap surgery to improve velopharyngeal function is performed in our hospital. The folded pharyngeal flap operation was first reported by Isshiki and Morimoto in 1975. We usually use a modification of the original method. Purpose: The purpose of this research was to introduce our method of the folded pharyngeal flap operation and report the results. Materials and Methods: The folded pharyngeal flap operation was performed for 110 patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency from 1982 to 2010. Of these, the 97 whose postoperative speech function was evaluated are reported. The cases included 61 males and 36 females, ranging in age from 7 to 50 years. The time from surgery to speech assessment ranged from 5 months to 6 years. In order to evaluate preoperative velopharyngeal function, assessment of speech by a trained speech pathologist, nasopharyngoscopy, and cephalometric radiography with contrast media were performed before surgery, and then the appropriate surgery was selected and performed. Postoperative velopharyngeal function was assessed by a trained speech pathologist. Results: Of the 97 patients who underwent the folded pharyngeal flap operation, 85 (87.6%) showed velopharyngeal competence, 8 (8.2%) showed marginal velopharyngeal incompetence, and only 2 (2.1%) showed velopharyngeal incompetence; in 2 cases (2.1%), hyponasality was present. Approximately 95% of patients showed improved velopharyngeal function. Conclusions: The folded pharyngeal flap operation based on appropriate preoperative assessment has been shown to be an effective method for the treatment of cleft palate patients with velopharyngeal insufficiency. PMID:26389036

  8. The UK National Flap Registry (UKNFR): A National Database for all pedicled and free flaps in the UK.

    PubMed

    Hazari, Anita; Walton, Peter

    2015-12-01

    The UK National Flap Registry (UKNFR) is a cross-speciality National Clinical Audit with participation by the British Association of Plastic Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons (BAPRAS), British Association of Head and Neck Oncologists (BAHNO), British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons (BAOMS) and Association of Breast Surgery (ABS). The aim of UKNFR is to collect information about all major pedicled and free flap operations carried out in the UK and through that, assess the quality of care we provide for patients. This audit will allow appropriate comparison of clinical performance with national standards and provide useful data on changing trends. Participation in audit is integral to appraisal and revalidation in the UK. PMID:26617340

  9. Regional anesthesia alone for pediatric free flaps.

    PubMed

    Bjorklund, Kim A; Venkatramani, Hari; Venkateshwaran, Govindaswamy; Boopathi, Vadivel; Raja Sabapathy, S

    2015-05-01

    Microvascular surgery plays an important reconstructive role in the pediatric population. Successful outcomes rely on surgical technique as well as anesthesia. Regional anesthesia contributes to successful free tissue transfer through sympathetic blockade, postoperative pain control, and elimination of risks and costs associated with general anesthesia. While regional anesthesia in microsurgery is discussed in the literature for adult and elderly patients, no studies focus on the pediatric population. Accordingly, this paper reviews 20 pediatric patients undergoing microvascular surgery (anterolateral thigh, n = 9; gracilis, n = 3; toe transfer, n = 6; and fibula, n = 2) with regional anesthesia and sedation. All patients underwent spinal epidural anesthesia, and seven also received brachial plexus blocks. The average duration of anesthesia was 3-4 h (anterolateral thigh (ALT) and gracilis) and 6-8 h (toe transfer and fibula). No anesthesia-related complications or flap failures occurred. We conclude that regional anesthesia has important benefits in pediatric microsurgery and it is a safe and cost-effective alternative to general anesthesia. PMID:25858275

  10. Rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps for perineal reconstruction: modifications to the technique based on a large single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    McMenamin, DM; Clements, D; Edwards, TJ; Fitton, AR; Douie, WJP

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Perineal wound breakdown with delayed wound healing represents a significant cause of morbidity following surgery and radiotherapy to the perineum. The rectus abdominis myocutaneous (RAM) flap has been used increasingly to reconstruct the perineum with good effect. We describe our six-year experience of reconstruction of the perineum with the RAM flap and share some surgical adjuncts we believe are useful. METHODS We conducted a retrospective case note review of all patients who underwent a reconstruction of the perineum using the RAM flap between August 2003 and October 2009. Indications for the flap, complication rates and outcomes were all observed. RESULTS We conducted 16 RAM flap procedures, 15 of which (94%) were primary repairs and 1 (6%) a secondary repair. Three (19%) developed donor site hernias, two (12.5%) developed minor perineal wound infections, eight (50%) developed minor perineal wound breakdown and in one (6%) flap failure was observed. No perineal hernias were observed. There were no surgical mortalities. CONCLUSIONS The RAM flap has a high success rate and an acceptable morbidity rate and is a useful tool in the reconstruction of complex perineal wounds. Modifications to the standard surgical technique may reduce complications and improve the versatility of this flap. PMID:21943461

  11. Regrafting of nipple areolar complex during pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kudva, Adarsh; Hemavathi, U; Patil, B R

    2014-06-01

    Pectoralis major myocutaneous flap is one of the most popular reconstructive methods employed in head and neck reconstruction.cosmesis and symmetry are important components of any surgery. Here we report a simple and effective method to restore cosmesis and symmetry. PMID:24822015

  12. Nipple reconstruction using the "inchworm" flap.

    PubMed

    Puckett, C L; Concannon, M J; Croll, G H; Welsh, C F

    1992-01-01

    A new method of nipple reconstruction called the "inchworm" flap is described. The name comes from the manipulation method used to position the flap for nipple projection. Experience with over 50 patients and including 58 breasts has been reviewed. There was adequate followup for 36 breasts in which overall maintenance of projection was 78% for this technique. When used after submuscular expansion for breast reconstruction, maintenance of projection reached 89%. The technique of flap manipulation is described in detail. This flap appears to be a reliable method for obtaining moderate nipple projection, particularly in the submuscular expansion breast reconstruction cases. It is not recommended for use in TRAM flap cases. PMID:1570773

  13. Fibular flap for mandibular reconstruction: are there old tricks for an old dog?

    PubMed

    Pitak-Arnnop, P; Hemprich, A; Dhanuthai, K; Pausch, N C

    2013-02-01

    Fibular free flap is considered as an "old dog" in reconstructive surgery because it was first described by Taylor and his colleagues in 1975, and was then introduced for mandibular reconstruction by Hidalgo in 1989. There are some "tricks" for fibular free flap that have been used and recognized in many European maxillofacial surgical units over the past decade. These include: 1) harvesting the distal fibula when recipient vessels are distant; 2) flap selection based on the anatomy of perforators; 3) use of the skin paddle for postoperative flap monitoring; 4) protection of the flap's soft-tissue cuff; 5) preventing venous thrombosis which is essential to reduce flap complications; 6) aligning fibular struts and protecting the vascular pedicle when the double-barrel technique is used; 7) minimizing the gap between the double-barrel struts and implementing a long-term follow-up of dental implants; 8) selecting osteosynthesis materials; and 9) learning curve and clinical competence in microvascular reconstruction. We also reviewed current data from the literature, which would be useful for maxillofacial reconstructive surgeons. With these tricks, one can teach an "old dog" "old tricks". PMID:23714213

  14. Aesthetic reconstruction of the upper antihelix in external ear with banner pull-through flap

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Ebrahimi; Nasrin, Nejadsarvari; Azin, Ebrahimi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: We can use pre auricular and post auricular skin as a pull through flap for upper antihelix defects reconstruction. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective case-series study, which was done in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Ward. In this study, 15 patients (3 women, 12 men), ranging from 45 to 72 years old (mean, 58 years) underwent operation with pull through banner flap for reconstruction of upper antihelix (7 cases) and triangular fossa with superior and inferior crura (5cases) caused by BCC or SCC excision. Reconstruction of upper antihelix defects up to 20 30 mm with post auricle pull through flap and reconstruction of triangular fossa up to 20 20 mm with pre auricle pull through flap were done. Results: Our study showed that pull through flap with superior pedicle from post auricular and preauricular area was an effective method for reconstruction of upper ear antihelix defects. Conclusion: We advocate that the pull through flap with superior pedicle from post auricle and pre auricle is an excellent choice for reconstruction of upper antihelix ear reconstruction in both crura and triangular fossa.

  15. Use of Postoperative Palatal Obturator After Total Palatal Reconstruction With Radial Forearm Fasciocutaneous Free Flap.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Euicheol C; Jung, Young Ho; Shin, Jin-yong

    2015-07-01

    A 67-year-old-male patient visited our hospital for a mass on the soft palate of approximately 5.0 6.0? cm in size. He was diagnosed with adenoid cystic carcinoma and reconstruction after total palate resection was planned. After ablative surgery, a radial forearm free flap procedure was successfully performed to cover the hard and soft palates. However, wound disruption occurred twice during the postoperative period. When a palate defect is reconstructed using a soft tissue free flap, flap drooping by gravitation and the flap itself can generate irregularity in the lower contour of the palate and, in the long-term, insufficiencies of velopharyngeal function, speech, and mastication. To complement such functional and aesthetic problems caused by flap drooping, conventional prosthetics and new operative techniques have been discussed. However, overcoming wound disruption caused by flap drooping in the acute postoperative period has not been discussed. In this case, the temporary use of a palatal obturator during the postoperative period was beneficial after soft tissue reconstruction of the palate. PMID:26114541

  16. Combination of fillet and triangular flaps for the web reconstruction in pollicization: a case report.

    PubMed

    Karacaoglu, Ercan; Baran, Cihat N; Baran, Namik Kemal

    2008-01-01

    Thumb hypoplasia represents a major disability requiring sophisticated reconstructive procedures. One of the basic criteria of the pollicization to construct a functional thumb is scar free web reconstruction. In this article, a technique to avoid excessive scarring in the first web space reconstruction by filleting out the hypoplasic thumb combining with a triangular flap is presented. A 5-year-old girl was presented. She had a Back-Gramcko type IV thumb hypoplasia. A triangular flap was planned on radial border of the long finger. Floating thumb was filleted out with preservation of the neurovascular bundle and transferred to the first web space while cooperating with triangular flap. Patient was followed up for 18 months. No early or late major complication was seen. Flap healed without any necrosis. The ratio of active motion in pollicized finger was measured 60% after cerebral reorientation. A satisfactory grip and pinch were seen in pollicized finger. Patient as well as her parents was satisfied with the results. Filleting out the floating thumb and combining with a triangular flap harvested by a V-Y flap design is a good option to avoid excessive scarring in reconstruction of the first web space in pollicization. It is strongly recommended that floating thumb should be preserved for future pollicization, and any attempt to amputate it in early years of life should be postponed till the time of definitive surgery. PMID:18561267

  17. Cholecystectomy after breast reconstruction with a pedicled autologous tram flap. Types of surgical access.

    PubMed

    Graczyk, Magdalena; Kostro, Justyna; Jankau, Jerzy; Bigda, Justyna; Skorek, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    The number of breast reconstruction procedures has been increasing in recent years. One of the suggested treatment methods is breast reconstruction with a pedicled skin and muscle TRAM flap (transverse rectus abdominis muscle - TRAM). Surgical incisions performed during a cholecystectomy procedure may be located in the areas significant for flap survival. The aim of this paper is to present anatomical changes in abdominal walls secondary to pedicled skin and muscle (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction, which influence the planned access in cholecystectomy procedures. The authors present 2 cases of cholecystectomy performed due to cholelithiasis in female patients with a history of TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedures. The first patient underwent a traditional method of surgery 14 days after the reconstruction due to acute cholecystitis. The second patient underwent a laparoscopy due to cholelithiasis 7 years after the TRAM procedure. In both cases an abdominal ultrasound scan was performed prior to the operation, and surgical access was determined following consultation with a plastic surgeon. The patient who had undergone traditional cholecystectomy developed an infection of the postoperative wound. The wound was treated with antibiotics, vacuum therapy and skin grafting. After 7 weeks complete postoperative wound healing and correct healing of the TRAM flap were achieved. The patient who had undergone laparoscopy was discharged home on the second postoperative day without any complications. In order to plan a safe surgical access, it is necessary to know the changes in the anatomy of abdominal walls following a pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction procedure. PMID:25337177

  18. Repair of Large Lip Vermilion defects with Mutual Cross Lip Musculomucosal Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Manafi, Ali; Ahmadi Moghadam, Mohammad; Mansouri, Maryam; Bateni, Hamed; Arshad, Mahnaz

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Vermilion irregularities are common secondary deformities after cleft lip repair, regressed or resected hemangiomas, trauma and tumor surgeries. Vermilion deficiency attracts considerable attention and detracts from an otherwise excellent lip repair. Minor and moderate vermilion defects can be corrected with upper lip advancement, rotation flaps, tongue flaps or grafts. Major defects defy correction with local flaps. A technique is described for correction of large absolute tissue defects of the vermilion using Mutual Cross-Lip Musculomucosal Flaps (MCLMF) Or Ahmad-Ali's flaps. METHODS This technique was applied in eight patients with major vermilion defects secondary to hemangioma regression, neoplasia, and trauma. Reconstruction with MCLMF led to create a balanced donor and recipient lips appearance and function. RESULTS There were no postoperative complications. Surgical results were satisfactory in all patients, and sufficient lip mobility with adequate bulk was maintained. One patient demonstrated minimal transient lip tightening. CONCLUSION Use of Ahmad-Ali's flaps in selected patients resulted in successful reconstruction of severe vermilion defects. PMID:25734037

  19. Scrotal reconstruction with modified pudendal thigh flaps.

    PubMed

    Mopuri, Nabil; Fitzgerald O'Connor, Edmund; Iwuagwu, Fortune C

    2016-02-01

    Scrotal skin loss can occur following trauma, Fournier's gangrene, post tumour excision, burns, etc. There are many techniques described in the literature including residual scrotal skin mobilization, skin grafts, pedicled and free flaps. The management is complex and challenging shown by the multiplicity of flaps and techniques described in the literature. We used a modified pudendal thigh flap to reconstruct scrotal defects in five patients. This study describes the vascularity of the flap, technique of elevation and the inset of the flap. The elevation and particularly the insetting make it different from other flaps raised on this vascular network for scrotal reconstruction. This pedicled flap is robust, reliable, resilient and produces a neo-scrotum that looks natural in appearance, offers good-quality skin cover and cushion to the testes as well as protective sensation. PMID:26774357

  20. Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap after Parotidectomy.

    PubMed

    Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Morsi

    2015-10-01

    Introduction Most patients after either superficial or total parotidectomy develop facial deformity and Frey syndrome, which leads to a significant degree of patient dissatisfaction. Objective Assess the functional outcome and esthetic results of the superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap after superficial or total parotidectomy. Methods A prospective cohort study for 11 patients subjected to parotidectomy using a partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap. The functional outcome (Frey syndrome, facial nerve involvement, and ear lobule sensation) and the esthetic results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. Results Facial nerve palsy occurred in 5 cases (45%), and all of them recovered completely within 6 months. The Minor starch iodine test was positive in 3 patients (27%), although only 1 (9%) subjectively complained of gustatory sweating. The designed visual analog score completed by the patients themselves ranged from 0 to 3 with a mean of 1.55 ± 0.93; the scores from the blinded evaluators ranged from 1 to 3 with a mean 1.64 ± 0.67. Conclusion The partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap offers a reasonable cosmetic option for reconstruction following either superficial or total parotidectomy by improving the facial deformity. The flap also lowers the incidence of Frey syndrome objectively and subjectively with no reported hazard of the spinal accessory nerve. PMID:26491478

  1. Sternocleidomastoid Muscle Flap after Parotidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Mohamed, Morsi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction?Most patients after either superficial or total parotidectomy develop facial deformity and Frey syndrome, which leads to a significant degree of patient dissatisfaction. Objective?Assess the functional outcome and esthetic results of the superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM) flap after superficial or total parotidectomy. Methods?A prospective cohort study for 11 patients subjected to parotidectomy using a partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap. The functional outcome (Frey syndrome, facial nerve involvement, and ear lobule sensation) and the esthetic results were evaluated subjectively and objectively. Results?Facial nerve palsy occurred in 5 cases (45%), and all of them recovered completely within 6 months. The Minor starch iodine test was positive in 3 patients (27%), although only 1 (9%) subjectively complained of gustatory sweating. The designed visual analog score completed by the patients themselves ranged from 0 to 3 with a mean of 1.55??0.93; the scores from the blinded evaluators ranged from 1 to 3 with a mean 1.64??0.67. Conclusion?The partial-thickness superiorly based SCM flap offers a reasonable cosmetic option for reconstruction following either superficial or total parotidectomy by improving the facial deformity. The flap also lowers the incidence of Frey syndrome objectively and subjectively with no reported hazard of the spinal accessory nerve. PMID:26491478

  2. Lift production through asymmetric flapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalikop, Shreyas; Sreenivas, K. R.

    2009-11-01

    At present, there is a strong interest in developing Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) for applications like disaster management and aerial surveys. At these small length scales, the flight of insects and small birds suggests that unsteady aerodynamics of flapping wings can offer many advantages over fixed wing flight, such as hovering-flight, high maneuverability and high lift at large angles of attack. Various lift generating mechanims such as delayed stall, wake capture and wing rotation contribute towards our understanding of insect flight. We address the effect of asymmetric flapping of wings on lift production. By visualising the flow around a pair of rectangular wings flapping in a water tank and numerically computing the flow using a discrete vortex method, we demonstrate that net lift can be produced by introducing an asymmetry in the upstroke-to-downstroke velocity profile of the flapping wings. The competition between generation of upstroke and downstroke tip vortices appears to hold the key to understanding this lift generation mechanism.

  3. Force Generation by Flapping Foils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, P. R.; Donnelly, M.

    1996-11-01

    Aquatic animals like fish use flapping caudal fins to produce axial and cross-stream forces. During WW2, German scientists had built and tested an underwater vehicle powered by similar flapping foils. We have examined the forces produced by a pair of flapping foils. We have examined the forced produced by a pair of flapping foils attached to the tail end of a small axisymmetric cylinder. The foils operate in-phase (called waving), or in anti-phase (called clapping). In a low-speed water tunnel, we have undertaken time-dependent measurements of axial and cross-stream forces and moments that are exerted by the vortex shedding process over the entire body. Phase-matched LDV measurements of vorticity-velocity vectors, as well as limited flow visualization of the periodic vortex shedding process have also been carried out. The direction of the induced velocity within a pair of shed vortices determines the nature of the forces produced, viz., thrust or drag or cross-stream forces. The clapping mode produces a widely dispersed symmetric array of vortices which results in axial forces only (thrust and rag). On the other hand, the vortex array is staggered in the waving mode and cross-stream (maneuvering) forces are then generated.

  4. [A case of Fournier's gangrene reconstructed using a rectus abdominis muscle flap].

    PubMed

    Yanagi, Masato; Nishimura, Taiji; Kondo, Yukihiro; Yamazaki, Keiichi; Sakai, Shigeki; Ishii, Naohiro; Kojo, Ken; Hosoda, Kei

    2011-07-01

    We encountered a case of Fournier's gangrene complicated with vesicorectocutaneous fistula that was treated with a pedicled rectus abdominis muscle flap (pedicled RA m-c flap). A 75-year-old man was admitted with consciousness disorder and swelling of the scrotum. The patient had noticed swelling of the scrotum 4 days before admission, but he had ignored this condition. The scrotum and the penis appeared necrotic. On the basis of clinical and radiological findings, we diagnosed this condition as Fournier's gangrene. Surgical debridement was performed in conjunction with the use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. After the patient's general condition was improved, the broad defect in the perineal tissue was covered with a pedicled rectus abdominis muscle flap. The flap was successful. In Japan, this is the first case of Fournier's gangrene complicated with vesicorectocutaneous fistula that was treated with a pedicled RA m-c flap. In order to determine whether plastic surgery after debridement shortens the duration of hospitalization, we reviewed the cases of 120 patients with Fournier's gangrene in Japan. We conclude that plastic surgery after debridement does not shorten the duration of hospitalization, however, this procedures is very useful to deep and broad defects by Fournier's gangrene. PMID:21961279

  5. Surgical revirgination: Four vaginal mucosal flaps for reconstruction of a hymen

    PubMed Central

    Saraiya, Hemant A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Over centuries, virginity has been given social, religious and moral importance. It is widely believed as a state of a female who has never engaged in sexual intercourse, and her hymen is intact. Hymenoplasty for torn hymen is carried out not only for the sake of cultural and religious traditions but also for the social status and interpersonal relationships. Materials and Methods: 2.5 cm long and 1 cm wide four vaginal mucosal flaps were raised from the anterior vaginal wall just behind labia minora. Two flaps were based proximally, and their two opposing flaps were based distally. These flaps were overlapped in a crisscross fashion and were sutured with 5/0 Polyglactin (Vicryl®) sutures leaving no area raw. The donor area was closed primarily. When some remains of a torn hymen were found, one to three vaginal mucosal flaps were added to its remains as per the need for reconstruction. Results: We operated upon 11 patients. In nine cases, the hymen was reconstructed with four flaps. In remaining two, it was reconstructed from the remains using vaginal mucosal flaps. All flaps healed without any infection or disruption. Sutures got absorbed in 25-35 days. In all cases, this newly constructed barrier broke with only moderate pressure at the time of penetrative sex serving the purpose of the surgery completely. Conclusion: Erasing evidence of the sexual history simply by ‘Surgical Revirgination’ is extremely important to women contemplating marriage in cultures where a high value is placed on virginity. PMID:26424986

  6. Robotic transaxillary thyroid surgery.

    PubMed

    Rabinovics, Naomi; Aidan, Patrick

    2015-10-01

    Recent technological advances have led to a rapid progress in endocrine surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive techniques in thyroid surgery, robot-assisted transaxillary thyroid surgery (RATS) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches. Its main advantages are improved cosmetic outcome, avoiding cervical incisions, increased patient satisfaction, improved visualization, arms articulations, eliminating surgeon's natural tremor, thereby increasing precision. The main disadvantages are longer operative time, and increased cost compared to conventional thyroidectomy, as well as potential injuries to the brachial plexus, skin flap, esophagus, and trachea. Large-scale studies, mainly from South-Korea, have proved that in skilled hands, RATS is a safe alternative to conservative thyroidectomy and should be presented to patients with aesthetic concerns. As with any new emerging technique, careful patient selection is crucial, and further evidence must be sought to confirm its indications. PMID:26425452

  7. Transoral Robotic Reconstructive Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Selber, Jesse C.; Sarhane, Karim A.; Ibrahim, Amir E.; Holsinger, Floyd C.

    2014-01-01

    Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has emerged as a technique that allows head and neck surgeons to safely resect large and complex oropharyngeal tumors without dividing the mandible or performing a lip-split incision. These resections provide a reconstructive challenge because the cylinder of the oropharynx remains closed and both physical access and visualization of oropharyngeal anatomy is severely restricted. Transoral robotic reconstruction (TORRS) of such defects allows the reconstructive surgeon to inset free flaps or perform adjacent tissue transfer while seeing what the resecting surgeon sees. Early experience with this technique has proved feasible and effective. Robotic reconstruction has many distinct advantages over conventional surgery, and offers patients a less morbid surgical course. In this review, we discuss the clinical applicability of transoral robotic surgery in head and neck reconstruction, highlighting the benefits and limitations of such an approach, and outlining the guidelines for its utilization. PMID:24872777

  8. Robotic transaxillary thyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rabinovics, Naomi

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances have led to a rapid progress in endocrine surgery. With the advent of minimally invasive techniques in thyroid surgery, robot-assisted transaxillary thyroid surgery (RATS) has emerged as one of the most promising approaches. Its main advantages are improved cosmetic outcome, avoiding cervical incisions, increased patient satisfaction, improved visualization, arms articulations, eliminating surgeons natural tremor, thereby increasing precision. The main disadvantages are longer operative time, and increased cost compared to conventional thyroidectomy, as well as potential injuries to the brachial plexus, skin flap, esophagus, and trachea. Large-scale studies, mainly from South-Korea, have proved that in skilled hands, RATS is a safe alternative to conservative thyroidectomy and should be presented to patients with aesthetic concerns. As with any new emerging technique, careful patient selection is crucial, and further evidence must be sought to confirm its indications. PMID:26425452

  9. Robotic surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Robot-assisted surgery; Robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery; Laparoscopic surgery with robotic assistance ... Robotic surgery is similar to laparoscopic surgery. It can be performed through smaller cuts than open surgery. ...

  10. A simple "fishtail flap" for surgical correction of microstomia.

    PubMed

    Monteiro, Diana Isabel Moreira; Horta, Ricardo; Silva, Pedro; Amarante, Jos Manuel; Silva, Alvaro

    2011-11-01

    Treatment of microstomia, whether congenital or acquired, has long challenged the ingenuity of surgeons. In all instances, the challenge remains the ability to preserve function and provide and maintain reasonable aesthetics. The following case report presents 2 different cases of surgical correction of microstomia, resulting from flap reconstructions after perioral tumor surgery. We developed a technique that uses pericommissural mucomuscular advancement flap, "a simple fishtail flap," and used this to correct deformed oral commissures in an attempt to elongate the oral aperture in a functional and aesthetically acceptable manner without recurrence. Results have shown that, with the use of our fishtail design, we can restore the unique architecture of the oral commissure with the postoperative intercommissural distance improved by more than 10 mm and the interincisal width enlarged by approximately 5 mm. Our solution was functional and aesthetically acceptable, as well as simpler and cheaper, in comparison with the traditional surgical methods that are usually expensive, complex, and less practical. We believe that, in cases in which either the contracture is mild or a commissurotomy can be expected to increase the width and the general size of the oral aperture, this relatively conservative technique, if judiciously used, can be performed with ease and safety with good results. PMID:22134260

  11. Double scalping flap: a versatile technique in scalp reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, Othon; Karypidis, Dimitrios; Moustaki, Margarita; Chrisostomidis, Chrisostomos; Grigorios, Champsas; Epaminondas, Kostopoulos; Frangoulis, Marios

    2009-09-01

    Scalp reconstruction is a challenging area in plastic surgery. The susceptibility of potentially exposed brain tissue is almost always a concern along with the provision of adequate soft tissue coverage in cases of full-thickness defects. The applied reconstructive strategy also affects efficiency in malignant disease treatment providing both local control of the disease and vigorous monitoring for recurrence or metastasis. The general condition of the patients presenting with malignant lesions of the scalp is often impaired because of old age or concomitant disease. Therefore, demanding, long-lasting, or multistage procedures may often be undesirable. The double scalping flap comprises a 1-stage procedure, which can be used in most full-thickness defects of the vertex of the scalp. Some of the primary advantages of the double scalping flap procedure are its versatility and arc of rotation, its minimal donor site morbidity, being relatively simple, and being a short technique. Disadvantages that may be considered are the loss of hair-bearing skin at the occipital region and the poor color and texture match between scalp skin and the split-thickness skin graft that is used on the donor site. We present 2 patients with exemplary case of neglected malignancy of the scalp and their successful treatment using the double scalping flap. Comparison and contrast of alternative reconstructive procedures are also included to further investigate scalp reconstruction. PMID:19816283

  12. Endoscopic ICG perfusion imaging for flap transplants: technical development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepp, Herbert; Schachenmayr, Hilmar; Ehrhardt, Andr; Gbel, Werner; Zhorzel, Sven; Betz, Christian Stephan

    2010-02-01

    Objective: Following tumour surgery in the head and neck region, skin flap transplants are usually required to cover the resection area. The purpose of the development was to provide a simple and reliable means to assess whether the transplanted flap is sufficiently perfused. Methods: Fluorescence of intravenously injected Indocyanine green (ICG) was detected with a slightly modified 3-chip CCD camera. Appropriately coated optical filters allow for excitation of ICG with NIR light and detection of NIR ICGfluorescence with the blue channel of the camera. In addition, low intensities of white light can be transmitted to allow for simultaneous display of a remission image in the green and red channels of the camera. Further processing was performed with a LabVIEW program. Results: A satisfactory white light image (red, green and blue display (RGB)) could be calculated from the remission images recorded with the green and red channels of the camera via a look-up table. The look-up table was programmed to provide an optimized blue intensity value for each combination of red and green values. This was generated using a reference image. Implementation of image tracking and intensity measurements in regions of interest (ROIs) in the images is useful to reliably monitor perfusion kinetics of flap and adjacent normal tissue.

  13. Tanshinone IIA Pretreatment Renders Free Flaps against Hypoxic Injury through Activating Wnt Signaling and Upregulating Stem Cell-Related Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zihan; Zhang, Zhenxin; Wu, Lijun; Sun, Yaowen; Guo, Yadong; Qin, Gaoping; Mu, Shengzhi; Fan, Ronghui; Wang, Benfeng; Gao, Wenjie

    2014-01-01

    Partial or total flap necrosis after flap transplantation is sometimes clinically encountered in reconstructive surgery, often as a result of a period of hypoxia that exceeds the tolerance of the flap tissue. In this study, we determine whether tanshinone IIA (TSA) pretreatment can protect flap tissue against hypoxic injury and improve its viability. Primary epithelial cells isolated from the dorsal skin of mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks. Cell counting kit-8 and Trypan Blue assays were carried out to examine the proliferation of TSA-pretreated cells after exposure to cobalt chloride. Then, Polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis were used to determine the expression of ?-catenin, GSK-3?, SOX2, and OCT4 in TSA-treated cells. In vivo, after mice were pretreated with TSA for two weeks, a reproducible ischemic flap model was implemented, and the area of surviving tissue in the transplanted flaps was measured. Immunohistochemistry was also conducted to examine the related biomarkers mentioned above. Results show that epidermal cells, pretreated with TSA, showed enhanced resistance to hypoxia. Activation of the Wnt signaling pathway in TSA-pretreated cells was characterized by the upregulation of ?-catenin and the downregulation of GSK-3?. The expression of SOX2 and OCT4 controlled by Wnt signaling were also found higher in TSA pretreated epithelial cells. In the reproducible ischaemic flap model, pretreatment with TSA enhanced resistance to hypoxia and increased the area of surviving tissue in transplanted flaps. The expression of Wnt signaling pathway components, stem-cell related biomarkers, and CD34, which are involved in the regeneration of blood vessels, was also upregulated in TSA-pretreated flap tissue. The results show that TSA pretreatment protects free flaps against hypoxic injury and increases the area of surviving tissue by activating Wnt signaling and upregulating stem cell-related biomarkers. PMID:25302618

  14. "Naked microvascular bone flap" in oral reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Paolo; Della Monaca, Marco; Aboh, Ikenna Valentine; Priore, Paolo; Facchini, Arianna; Valentini, Valentino

    2014-08-01

    Since the 1980s, bone free flaps have been used to reconstruct the maxilla and the mandible. The vascular pedicle, through the supply of nutritional substances and drugs from the bloodstream, ensures the vitality of the flap, rapid bone integration, and reduced risk of infection.However, due to many surgeons' concerns about orocervical and orosinusal fistulas and infections, bone flaps are usually buried and protected by mucosal flaps or a second skin flap whenever it is not possible to harvest a skin paddle together with the bone flap.The authors, convinced that naked bone free flaps, if well vascularized, are capable of healing and repairing the osteomucosal deficit on their own, with no risk of infection or fistulas, began to harvest, for oral reconstructions, naked bone flaps, that is, bone flaps covered only by a muscle layer 5 to 20 mm thick.In this study, the authors present a review of their experience in oral cavity reconstructions by harvesting naked and covered bone free flaps, retrospectively evaluating the occurrence of major and minor, early and late complications, associated with the different reconstructive technique. PMID:24691338

  15. A new flap model in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ozcan, G; Shenaq, S; Spira, M

    1991-10-01

    Standardized skin flap models in the rat, such as the McFarlane and Finseth flaps, have suggested placement on the rat of only a single flap. The single flap, because of variations in skin vasculature among rats, may be problematic and require prohibitively large numbers of rats to obtain statistically significant results. In this study of 60 Sprague-Dawley rats, we have developed a flap model designed to be paired in a single rat and standardized to serve as the experimental flap and the control. At the level of the symphysis pubis, symmetrical, three-sided, caudally based, bilateral skin flaps, 2 cm in width, were extended to different bony landmarks. Only the length of the flaps was varied. The inferior epigastric pedicle was then divided. The flap length, which optimally produced predictable and persistent necrosis, was found midway between the xiphoid and the sternal notch. The model was pharmacologically manipulated with the injection of superoxide dismutase through the epigastric vein before division of the inferior epigastric pedicle; this scavenger did not effect the survival of the random pattern flaps. PMID:1772224

  16. Ipsilateral pedicled TRAM flaps: the safer alternative?

    PubMed

    Clugston, P A; Gingrass, M K; Azurin, D; Fisher, J; Maxwell, G P

    2000-01-01

    Transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction has become a commonly performed procedure in the 1990s. The original description of the procedure was that of an ipsilaterally based pedicle procedure. Concerns about potential folding of the pedicle with possible compromise of the vascular supply led many surgeons to prefer the contralateral pedicle. Subsequently, there have been several large clinical series of pedicled TRAM flaps showing a relatively high complication rate related to flap vascularity problems. Partial flap necrosis rates in pedicled TRAM series range from 5 to 44 percent. These findings resulted in many centers favoring free TRAM flap breast reconstruction, despite an increase in resource use and negligible differences in complication rates. Ipsilateral pedicle TRAM flap breast reconstruction is not a commonly reported procedure and is reserved for cases for which scars preclude use of the contralateral pedicle. Simplicity and versatility of flap shaping, improved maintenance of the inframammary fold, and lack of disruption of the natural xiphoid hollow give ipsilateral TRAM flaps further advantages. This study reports on a series of 252 consecutive ipsilateral TRAM flap reconstructions in 190 patients. The majority of patients underwent muscle-sparing procedures with preservation of a medial and a lateral strip of rectus muscle. Immediate reconstruction was done in 104 of the 190 patients. Skin-sparing (69 patients) or skin-reduction procedures (21 patients) were used in 90 of the 104 patients (87 percent) undergoing immediate reconstruction. Complication rates were comparable to those of series reported for contralateral TRAM flaps, except that partial flap necrosis (2.0 percent) was less in this series. Risk factors were analyzed with regard to the most common complications seen in this study. Ipsilateral TRAM flap breast reconstruction is our preferred method, if available, because we believe that it has several advantages over the contralateral pedicled TRAM and this report suggests a lower partial flap necrosis rate than previously reported. PMID:10626973

  17. Respiratory failure after superior-based pharyngeal flap for velopharyngeal insufficiency: A rare complication.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, Claire M; Riley, Charles A; Hildrew, Douglas M; Guarisco, J Lindhe

    2015-07-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) is an uncommon pediatric disorder often associated with congenital syndromes. After speech therapy, surgery is the standard management. Many surgical approaches to VPI repair have been reported and the complications of these procedures are well documented. To date, there have been no published cases of respiratory failure secondary to pneumomediastinum, pneumopericardium, and bilateral pneumothoraces with associated subcutaneous emphysema after superior-based pharyngeal flap. We present the first case in the literature. Our proposed etiology for the respiratory failure is air tracking from the flap donor site to the pleural spaces of the thoracic cavity via the visceral or prevertebral fascia following positive pressure ventilation. PMID:25953454

  18. Bilateral Breast Reconstruction with Extended Thoracodorsal Artery Perforator Propeller Flaps and Implants

    PubMed Central

    Gunnarsson, Gudjon L.; Brsen-Koch, Mikkel; Nielsen, Henrik T.; Salzberg, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Summary: We present our experience of bilateral total breast reconstruction using a double-sided extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap in a case series of 10 patients. Reconstruction was successfully achieved in all cases with few complications. The median time for surgery was 275 minutes (200330), and the average implant size used was 350 cm3 (195650). We demonstrate how the extended thoracodorsal artery perforator propeller flap allows for a swift and reliable direct to implant bilateral total breast reconstruction in a simple setting and is a valuable adjunct to our armamentarium of techniques for single-stage bilateral breast reconstruction. PMID:26180736

  19. Reconstruction after resection of a lower lip squamous cell carcinoma with a submental island flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Pyeong; Park, Hyun Woo; Park, Jung Je; Woo, Seung Hoon

    2015-12-01

    Lip cancer is the most common malignancy of the oral cavity and the second most common cancer in the head and neck. Typically, squamous cell carcinoma of the lower lip is an ulcerated lesion with raised margins. Surgery is the best treatment for lower lip cancer. The lips are important aesthetically because of their prominent location on the face and functionally because of the essential mechanism of the sphincter in assisting mastication, swallowing, phonation, and expressing emotions. Depending on the location and size of a lip tumor, different types of reconstructive flaps are used. We describe our technique for reconstructing the lower lip with a submental island flap. PMID:26670761

  20. Combined anterolateral thigh flap and vascularized fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap in reconstruction of extensive composite mandibular defects.

    PubMed

    Wei, Fu-Chan; Celik, Naci; Chen, Hung-Chi; Cheng, Ming-Huei; Huang, Wei-Chao

    2002-01-01

    Extensive composite defects of the oromandibular area are usually created after the surgical treatment of T3 and T4 cancers, requiring complex reconstructive plastic surgical procedures. The preferred treatment method for this type of defect is reconstruction with two free flaps. The use of the vascularized fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap for the bone and inner lining defect is well known and accepted. Among the flaps that can be used for the outer lining and soft-tissue reconstruction, the two most commonly used have been the forearm flap and the rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap. However, these flaps have some disadvantages that restrict their use for this purpose. The forearm flap is usually too thin to cover the fibular bone and reconstruction plate, and the rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap can cause a subclinical reduction in abdominal strength. Both radial forearm and rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps are difficult to harvest during tumor excision. Because of these drawbacks, over the past several years the authors have preferred to use the anterolateral thigh flap for outer face, neck, and submandibular region reconstructions. From October of 1998 to June of 2000, 22 extensive composite mandibular defect reconstructions using the free anterolateral thigh flap, combined with the vascularized free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap, were performed at the Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Complete flap survival was 90.9 percent (40 of 44 flaps). Complete loss was seen in an anterolateral thigh flap, which was then reconstructed with a pectoralis major myocutaneous pedicled flap (2.3 percent). There were five venous problems: three in osteoseptocutaneous free fibula flaps, the other two in anterolateral thigh flaps; all were revised immediately. However, the skin islands of two osteoseptocutaneous free fibula flaps and one anterolateral thigh flap developed partial necrosis (6.8 percent). The other complications were compartment syndrome in the leg in one patient, external carotid artery rupture in one patient, three donor-site infections in two patients, three neck wound infections, and one myocardial insufficiency; all were treated properly. Thirteen patients underwent revision procedures 6 months after the first operation. These procedures included debulking of the flap or revision of the mouth angle or both. Trismus or intraoral contraction was noted in none of these patients. In conclusion, the free anterolateral thigh flap combined with the vascularized fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap seems to be a good choice in the reconstruction of the extensive composite defects of the oromandibular region aesthetically and functionally. PMID:11786790

  1. Simplified technique without skin flap for the bone-anchored hearing aid (BAHA) implant

    PubMed Central

    Bovo, R

    2008-01-01

    Summary Aim of this report is to present a new surgical technique for the BAHA system implant and to discuss the operational techniques and complications related to this type of surgery. The common technique for the positioning of the Bone-Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA, Cochlear Limited, Englewood, CO, USA) titanium implant into the temporal bone is based on the use of either a free or a pedunculated skin flap. Reported complications of this type of surgery include skin flap necrosis with healing by second intention, infection of the flap, skin growth over the abutment, failure of osseointegration and implant extrusion. In order to reduce the incidence of these problems, different types of surgery have already been presented over the years. Herewith, a new technique is proposed for implanting a BAHA screw in the temporal bone, that is simple, rapid to perform, and does not require the use of a flap. This technique appears to offer two main advantages: i) the speeding up of the procedure; ii) the low risk of complications, such as infection and necrosis, within the skin surrounding the implant. PMID:19186455

  2. Surgical treatment of low rectal cancers with APER and IGAP flap.

    PubMed

    Fulham, Juliette

    This article describes current treatments for individuals with a low rectal cancer. It examines the rationale for surgical treatment involving abdominoperineal excision of the anus and rectum (APER) and outlines how surgery for rectal cancer has evolved over recent years. Surgical advances mean the use of regional flaps is advocated to overcome the common problem of impaired perineal wound healing and the principles of this surgery are summarised. Postoperative nursing considerations relating to the inferior gluteal artery perforator (IGAP) flap will be discussed, as well as the importance of scrupulous wound care and patient education. The implications of this form of surgery on a patient's recovery and discharge planning are also explored. PMID:26067789

  3. [Transanal rectal advancement flap versus mucosa flap with internal suture in management of complicated fistulas of the anorectum].

    PubMed

    Athanasiadis, S; Nafe, M; Köhler, A

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study was carried out on 55 patients with complicated anal fistulas (41 transsphincteric, 5 suprasphincteric and 9 rectovaginal) to evaluate the value of two sphincter-conserving techniques with primary occlusion of the internal ostium and endorectal advancement flap (group A, n = 34) or mucosal flap (group B, n = 21). Ten of the patients had Crohn's disease. Both techniques consist in one-stage fistulectomy without drainage of the intersphincteric space. The inflamed proctodeal and granulation tissue was carefully cleared. The site of the former primary orifice of the fistula was adapted by means of two or three peranally performed single stitches. The peranally applied suture included the layers of the internal anal sphincter muscle only. A mobilized flap of rectal wall (group A) and rectal mucosa and submucosa (group B) about 4 cm x 3 cm in size was stitched below the muscular sphincter. The perianal part of the wound was left to heal by second intention. Postoperatively there were 16 cases of suture leakage (23.5% in group A, and 38% in group B), and 19 patients (26% or 47% in both groups) had to have revision surgery because of recurrent fistula or sutur leakage; 2 patients (3.6%) developed incontinence with intermittent fecal soiling. Complete incontinence was not observed in any patient. No significant difference in clinical and functional results was determined between the two groups. PMID:7707848

  4. The Use of Composite Flaps in the Management of Large Full-Thickness Defects of the Lower Eyelid.

    PubMed

    Fang, Shuo; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Yuntong; Xue, Chunyu; Bi, Hongda; Dai, Haiying; Xing, Xin

    2016-01-01

    To describe a modified surgical procedure that uses a combination of the tarsoconjunctival flap, orbicularis myocutaneous advancement flap, and paranasal-island flap to correct extensive full-thickness lower eyelid defects in functioning eyes.From May 2010 to December 2013, a total of 15 patients had reconstructive surgeries of large to giant lower eyelid defect, with an average 19-month follow-up. The musculocutaneous flaps were harvested from both orbicularis and paranasal regions and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed.No major complications were observed in any of the patients. All the patients showed aesthetic eyelid contour, good color, and texture match as well as no obvious scar formation. The mean Marginal Reflex Distance-2 measured 4 months after surgery was 4.9??0.4?mm.Reconstruction of a large defect in the lower eyelid with a tarsoconjunctival flap and the composite neighboring musculocutaneous flaps is a reliable and reproducible method. With proper design and well-executed precision, excellent functional and aesthetic results can be achieved by this elegant procedure without any major complications. PMID:26765467

  5. The Use of Composite Flaps in the Management of Large Full-Thickness Defects of the Lower Eyelid

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shuo; Yang, Chao; Zhang, Yuntong; Xue, Chunyu; Bi, Hongda; Dai, Haiying; Xing, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe a modified surgical procedure that uses a combination of the tarsoconjunctival flap, orbicularis myocutaneous advancement flap, and paranasal-island flap to correct extensive full-thickness lower eyelid defects in functioning eyes. From May 2010 to December 2013, a total of 15 patients had reconstructive surgeries of large to giant lower eyelid defect, with an average 19-month follow-up. The musculocutaneous flaps were harvested from both orbicularis and paranasal regions and clinical outcomes were recorded and analyzed. No major complications were observed in any of the patients. All the patients showed aesthetic eyelid contour, good color, and texture match as well as no obvious scar formation. The mean Marginal Reflex Distance-2 measured 4 months after surgery was 4.9??0.4?mm. Reconstruction of a large defect in the lower eyelid with a tarsoconjunctival flap and the composite neighboring musculocutaneous flaps is a reliable and reproducible method. With proper design and well-executed precision, excellent functional and aesthetic results can be achieved by this elegant procedure without any major complications. PMID:26765467

  6. Four Flaps Technique for Neoumbilicoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Taek; Kwon, Chan; Rhee, Seung Chul; Cho, Sang Hun

    2015-01-01

    The absence or disfigurement of the umbilicus is both cosmetically and psychologically distressing to patients. The goal of aesthetically pleasing umbilical reconstruction is to create a neoumbilicus with sufficient depth and good morphology, with natural-looking superior hooding and minimal scarring. Although many reports have presented techniques for creating new and attractive umbilici, we developed a technique that we term the "four flaps technique" for creating a neoumbilicus in circumstances such as the congenital absence of the umbilicus or the lack of remaining umbilical tissue following the excision of a hypertrophic or scarred umbilicus. This method uses the neighboring tissue by simply elevating four flaps and can yield sufficient depth and an aesthetically pleasing shape with appropriate superior hooding. PMID:26015893

  7. Comparison of the Complications in Vertical Rectus Abdominis Musculocutaneous Flap with Non-Reconstructed Cases after Pelvic Exenteration

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Heechang; You, Hi-Jin; Kim, Hyon-Surk; Lee, Byung-Il; Park, Seung Ha

    2014-01-01

    Background Perineal reconstruction following pelvic exenteration is a challenging area in plastic surgery. Its advantages include preventing complications by obliterating the pelvic dead space and minimizing the scar by using the previous abdominal incision and a vertical rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (VRAM) flap. However, only a few studies have compared the complications and the outcomes following pelvic exenteration between cases with and without a VRAM flap. In this study, we aimed to compare the complications and the outcomes following pelvic exenteration with or without VRAM flap coverage. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of nine patients for whom transpelvic VRAM flaps were created following pelvic exenteration due to pelvic malignancy. The complications and outcomes in these patients were compared with those of another nine patients who did not undergo such reconstruction. Results Flap reconstruction was successful in eight cases, with minor complications such as wound infection and dehiscence. In all cases in the reconstructed group (n=9), structural integrity was maintained and major complications including bowel obstruction and infection were prevented by obliterating the pelvic dead space. In contrast, in the control group (n=9), peritonitis and bowel obstruction occurred in 1 case (11%). Conclusions Despite the possibility of flap failure and minor complications, a VRAM flap can result in adequate perineal reconstruction to prevent major complications of pelvic exenteration. PMID:25396186

  8. Microsurgical reconstruction of noma-related facial defects with folded free flaps: an overview of 31 cases.

    PubMed

    Giessler, Goetz A; Fieger, Alexander; Cornelius, Carl-Peter; Schmidt, Andreas B

    2005-08-01

    Noma is primarily affecting children in underprivileged countries and results in disfiguring facial defects, loss of mandibular movement, and subsequent social disintegration. Plastic surgery in West Africa traditionally uses pedicled flaps. In large, complex, or central facial defects, though, pedicled flaps are apt to be too small or have a significant donor site morbidity. Since 1999, we have been using free microvascular flaps in Nigeria. In 5 Interplast missions, 31 patients (age 5-45 years, median 20 years, female to male ratio 18:13) underwent 31 free flap procedures in Nigeria, 27 of them for primary treatment. The operative time ranged from 3.75-8.75 hours (mean 5.5 hours). An external distractor/fixator to maintain mouth opening was mounted in 13 cases. All anastomoses were done with loupe magnification. Three flaps failed completely, 1 partly, and 4 patients showed minor wound infections. No donor-site complications occurred. Free flaps can be a suitable and safe closure for complex noma defects even in underprivileged circumstances, if patient profile and own microsurgical routine allows it. Patient disfigurement can be less than in pedicled flaps regarding the donor sites. PMID:16034240

  9. [Inguinal island flap for covering trochanteric bedsores].

    PubMed

    Chavoin, J P; Belhaouari, L; Horvath, Y; Micheau, P; Costagliola, M

    1982-10-01

    Trochanteric bedsores are a serious condition because of the danger of osteoarthritis of the coxofemoral joint, which is a source of septicemia, and also because of the difficulty of covering them with skin owing to the mobility of the bone and the absence of skin laxity in the area. The authors suggest a new technique of closure after local preparation providing a clean "surgical" defect. They use a groin island flap raised in the Japanese "retrograde" manner (i.e. laterally to medially). This technique is of course the fruit of the authors' experience of the microsurgery. The distal portion of the flap is drawn, corresponding to the size of the defect (round shape). The proximal portion contains the vessels surrounded by subcutaneous and protected by a de-epithelialized triangle of skin with a distal base. The flap is passed through a subcutaneous tunnel between the femoral trigone and the trochanteric area to be covered. The donor site is closed by approximation of the edges after they have been undermined. The authors discuss the others possible surgical managements: 1) local flaps (transposition flap, Z plasties, are unsuitable; 2) the double S-rotation flap had the drawback of creating a large undermined area and leaving a scar on the trochanteric region; 3) simple GER-type muscle flaps are not advisable because the transposed muscle always indergoes a fibrous involution so that the graft provides insufficient protection; 4) myocutaneous flaps, and especially fascia lata myocutaneous flap, offer better indication, because of muscle only acts as a vascular pedicle for the skin flap. The only drawback is the relative defect resulting from raising the flap. The authors conclude that the groin island flap offers the following advantages; a skin material which is more than efficient; ideal vascularization; perfect corverage without undue tension of the trochanteric surface; an interesting training for the plastic surgeon performing microsurgical reconstruction. PMID:6294839

  10. Second intercostal internal mammary artery perforator (IMAP) fasciocutaneous flap as an alternative choice for the treatment of deep sternal wound infections (DSWI).

    PubMed

    Koulaxouzidis, Georgios; Orhun, Arzu; Stavrakis, Themistoklis; Witzel, Christian

    2015-09-01

    Sternal wound infections after sternotomy are associated with high morbidity, high mortality and escalating treatment costs. Repeated radical debridement - with the removal of any hardware - and wound conditioning are the prerequisites for reconstruction. Muscle and, less frequently, omentum flaps are usually used for reconstruction. However, these flaps are associated with considerable donor-site morbidity, long operation times and aesthetic impairment. Fasciocutaneous flaps seem to be an alternative. This study presents our experience of using the second intercostal mammary artery fasciocutaneous perforator flap for defect closure in nine patients (mean age: 70.2 years). Following a retrospective chart review, we assessed data on patient demographics, the type of cardiac surgery, the prevalence of deep sternal wound infection (DSWI) risk factors, identified pathogens, surgery duration, hospitalization tim patients had undergone coronary artery bypass surgery, and two had valve replacements. The mean duration of surgery (121.4 ± 39 min) was short. The patients had a mean body mass index (BMI) of 32.8 ± 4.9 kg/m(2). An average flap size of 124 ± 22 cm(2) sufficiently covered and obliterated each defect. One mediastinal haematoma required revision surgery. One wound dehiscence at the flap and two at the donor site were managed conservatively. Our experience reveals that a fasciocutaneous flap based on the second intercostal perforator of the internal mammary artery can be an alternative, quick-to-prepare flap for covering sternal defects. In adipose patients, it has sufficient bulk, and it is large enough to cover common sternal wounds. It also has low complication and morbidity rates, and it achieves an aesthetically pleasing result. PMID:26113276

  11. Initial experience with breast reconstruction using the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap: a study of 45 patients.

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, E.; Bond, J.; Dolan, S.; Kirk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Breast conserving surgery for breast cancer has led to an increased interest in reconstruction following mastectomy. The transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap has been proven to give good results in terms of restoration of body symmetry with near normal contour and consistency. Furthermore, immediate reconstruction has the advantage of a single procedure with less psychological morbidity, and reduction in hospital stay and overall complication rate. The aim of this study was to review our experience with the transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous flap procedure an initial series of 45 patients. The overall complication rate of 27% is similar to that reported in the literature, with no total flap loss and nine patients with partial flap loss. There was no delay in commencement of adjuvant chemotherapy or radiotherapy and we believe our ability to detect local recurrence has not been compromised. We consider that immediate breast reconstruction is now an integral part of the surgical treatment of breast cancer. PMID:10489808

  12. [Plastic surgery of extended defects after exenteration of the pelvis].

    PubMed

    Abdou, A; Bruns, H; Troja, A; Antolovic, D; Li, L; Raab, H-R

    2015-04-01

    Extended resections of pelvic malignancies, especially in cases of recurrent malignancies, result in the formation of large tissue defects in the region of the pelvic floor and perineum, which are difficult to deal with. Both after extra levator rectal excision and pelvic exenteration, wound healing deficiencies and local infections of the perineal wound are frequent. Primary closure is often impossible due to a lack of tissue substance after resection and an additional previous radiotherapy in most cases. This can result in poor or non-healing wounds, a consecutive need of complex care and an increased risk of secondary problems including tumour recurrences. A permanent wound closure of good quality can therefore only be achieved by plastic surgery. This can be done by local or distant muscle flaps with or without skin, for example, the gluteus maximus flap, the vertical rectus abdominis muscle flap (VRAM) or free flaps such as the latissimus dorsi flap. PMID:25874472

  13. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control... must (1) Be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection between the movable flap surfaces that...

  14. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control... must (1) Be synchronized by a mechanical interconnection between the movable flap surfaces that...

  15. Optimal propulsive flapping in Stokes flows.

    PubMed

    Was, Loïc; Lauga, Eric

    2014-03-01

    Swimming fish and flying insects use the flapping of fins and wings to generate thrust. In contrast, microscopic organisms typically deform their appendages in a wavelike fashion. Since a flapping motion with two degrees of freedom is able, in theory, to produce net forces from a time-periodic actuation at all Reynolds numbers, we compute in this paper the optimal flapping kinematics of a rigid spheroid in a Stokes flow. The hydrodynamics for the force generation and energetics of the flapping motion is solved exactly. We then compute analytically the gradient of a flapping efficiency in the space of all flapping gaits and employ it to derive numerically the optimal flapping kinematics as a function of the shape of the flapper and the amplitude of the motion. The kinematics of optimal flapping are observed to depend weakly on the flapper shape and are very similar to the figure-eight motion observed in the motion of insect wings. Our results suggest that flapping could be a exploited experimentally as a propulsion mechanism valid across the whole range of Reynolds numbers. PMID:24343130

  16. An investigation of the flap edge flowfield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pye, John David

    To identify and understand the fluid dynamic processes associated with flow in the region of a flap side edge, a NACA 63-215 Mod B main element with a half-span Fowler flap was tested in the JIAA Low Speed Wind Tunnel at Stanford University. Measurements were made using a variety of techniques to capture the effects of the flap edge vortex. Pressure sensitive paint was applied to the upper surface of both the flap and main element, as well as to the flap side edge. Fast response pressure transducers were mounted interior to the model to measure surface pressure fluctuations on the flap side edge. Single component hotwire data was taken in the near wake region of the flap edge. In addition to the data experimentally obtained, a computational data set of a geometrically similar model at a flight Reynolds number was used for comparison. The data indicates the presence of a dual vortex structure along the flap side edge. This structure is seen to grow, merge, and ultimately become a single symmetric vortex as it progresses downstream. Surface pressure fluctuations on the side edge scale as three power laws with free stream velocity as different flow regions are encountered. By varying the model rigging, indications of a confined source region for the pressure fluctuations were observed. A spatial survey of the correlation between flap side edge surface pressure fluctuations and the near-wake fluctuating velocity field shows increased correlation coefficients for the region surrounding the vortex core.

  17. Refining the intrinsic chimera flap: a review.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Jayant P; Agarwal, Shailesh; Adler, Neta; Gottlieb, Lawrence J

    2009-10-01

    Reconstruction of complex tissue deficiencies in which each missing component is in a different spatial relationship to each other can be particularly challenging, especially in patients with limited recipient vessels. The chimera flap design is uniquely suited to reconstruct these deformities. Chimera flaps have been previously defined in many ways with 2 main categories: prefabricated or intrinsic. Herein we attempt to clarify the definition of a true intrinsic chimeric flap and provide examples of how these constructs provide a method for reconstruction of complex defects. The versatility of the intrinsic chimera flap and its procurement from 7 different vascular systems is described. A clarification of the definition of a true intrinsic chimera flap is described. In addition, construction of flaps from the lateral femoral circumflex, deep circumflex iliac, inferior gluteal, peroneal, subscapular, thoracodorsal, and radial arterial systems is described to showcase the versatility of these chimera flaps. A true intrinsic chimera flap must consist of more than a single tissue type. Each of the tissue components receives its blood flow from separate vascular branches or perforators that are connected to a single vascular source. These vascular branches must be of appropriate length to allow for insetting with 3-dimensional spatial freedom. There are a multitude of sites from which true intrinsic chimera flaps may be harvested. PMID:19745710

  18. Advanced Nail Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Haneke, Eckart

    2011-01-01

    Six techniques not yet widely known or used in the dermatologic surgery of the nails are briefly described. Small-to-medium-sized tumours of the proximal nail fold (PNF) can be excised and the defect repaired with advancement or rotation flaps. A superficial biopsy technique of the matrix for the diagnosis of longitudinal brown streaks in the nail, which allows rapid histological diagnosis of the melanocyte focus to be performed, is described here. Because the excision is very shallow and leaves the morphogenetic connective tissue of the matrix intact, the defect heals without scarring. Laterally positioned nail tumours can be excised in the manner of a wide lateral longitudinal nail biopsy. The defect repair is performed with a bipedicled flap from the lateral aspect of the distal phalanx. Malignant tumours of the nail organ often require its complete ablation. These defects can be covered by a full-thickness skin graft, reversed dermal graft, or cross-finger flap. The surgical correction of a split nail is often difficult. The cicatricial tissue of the matrix and PNF have to be excised and the re-attachment of these wounds prevented. The matrix defect has to be excised and sutured or covered with a free matrix graft taken either from the neighbouring area or from the big toe nail. PMID:22279381

  19. Resorbable Synthetic Mesh Supported With Omentum Flap in the Treatment of Giant Hiatal Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Prez Lara, F. J.; Marn, R.; del Rey, A.; Oliva, H.

    2014-01-01

    Covering a large hiatal hernia with a mesh has become a basic procedure in the last few years. However, mesh implants are associated with high complication rates (esophageal erosion, perforation, fistula, etc.). We propose using a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap as a possible solution to this problem. A 54-year-old female patient with a large hiatal defect (9 cm) was laparoscopically implanted with a synthetic resorbable mesh supported with an omental flap. The surgical procedure was successful and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 2. On a follow-up examination 6 months after surgery, she remained free of relapse or complication signs. Supporting an implanted resorbable mesh with an omental flap may be a solution to the problems posed by large esophageal hiatus defects. However, more studies based on larger patient samples and longer follow-up periods are necessary. PMID:25216419

  20. Course review: the 4th Bob Huffstadt upper and lower limb flap dissection course.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Jonathan A

    2014-12-01

    The Bob Huffstadt course is a 2-day upper and lower limb flap dissection course held in Groningen, the Netherlands. The course is in English, with an international faculty of senior consultants from the Netherlands, Belgium, and United Kingdom. Faculty to participant ratio is 2:1, with 2 participants at each dissection table. The course is aimed at trainees in plastic surgery of all levels, and a comprehensive DVD is provided before the course, which demonstrates dissection of 35 flaps, ensuring those with little experience to have an understanding before dissection.This course offered a comprehensive overview with plenty of practical application. The course can greatly develop operative and theoretical knowledge, while also demonstrating a commitment for those wishing to pursue a career in plastic surgery. Longer courses are available; however, the 2-day course can already provide an excellent introduction for junior trainees. There are few flap courses in the United Kingdom and senior trainees may have difficulty acquiring a place as they book up well in advance. With reductions in operating time, trainees may welcome further experience and development of techniques in the dissection room.Most of both days were spent in the dissection room, raising flaps and receiving teaching from the faculty. Dissections included Foucher, Moberg, Becker, radial forearm, anterolateral thigh, and fibula flaps. Dissection specimens were fresh-frozen preparation, and 9 upper limb flaps were raised on the first day and 5 lower limb flaps on the second day. The faculty provided live demonstrations of perforator dissection, use of the hand-held Doppler, and tips and tricks. The last 2 hours of each day were spent with 2 lectures, including topics from the history of flaps and developments to challenging cases and reconstructive options.The course fee was 1000 euros, including a 5-course dinner, lunch on both days, and a drinks reception on the final evening. I would recommend this course unreservedly to trainees new to flaps, or those with greater experience. The course was supportive, friendly, and provided an excellent basis to develop reconstructive skills. There is a world-class faculty who can improve the knowledge and techniques of any trainee in attendance. PMID:24135639

  1. Our Experiences in Nipple Reconstruction Using the Hammond flap

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Jeong Yeop; Ryu, Dong Wan; Kwon, O Hyun; Bae, Sung Gun; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Kang Young; Chung, Ho Yun; Cho, Byung Chae

    2014-01-01

    Background Nipple reconstruction following breast mound reconstruction is the final step in breast reconstruction. Although nipple reconstruction is a simple surgery, the psychological aspects of nipple reconstruction are thought to be important. Nipple projection is a key factor in determining patient satisfaction with the surgery. In the present study, the Hammond flap technique was introduced for nipple reconstruction. Methods Twenty-six patients who had undergone breast reconstruction from February 2008 to March 2012 were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients were evaluated based on preoperative photos, and their nipple diameters and heights were measured. Postoperative evaluation was conducted 3, 6, 9, and 12 months following nipple reconstruction. A questionnaire on patient satisfaction with the nipple reconstruction was administered 12 months after nipple reconstruction. Moreover, the same plastic surgeon scored nipple projection and overall cosmetic result of the new nipple. Results The mean projection was 4.4 mm (range, 3-6 mm), and it well matched the contralateral nipple. Twelve months following nipple reconstruction, the mean reduction rate in the nipple projection was 43.6%. Patients were satisfied or very satisfied with the nipple projection and the overall cosmetic result in 80.7% cases. Conclusions In the present study, compared with other techniques, the use of the Hammond flap technique in nipple reconstruction showed competitive results with regard to nipple projection and patient satisfaction. PMID:25276648

  2. The nasolabial musculocutaneous flap: clinical and anatomical correlations.

    PubMed

    Hagan, W E; Walker, L B

    1988-03-01

    The location of the facial artery beneath the facial mimetic muscles of the nasolabial groove allows surgical development of a true musculocutaneous flap. This report of 20 surgical flaps and six cadaveric dissections highlights the nasolabial musculocutaneous flap with its direct muscle perforating arteries which nourish the overlying skin. The absence of any flap's ischemic failure emphasizes the durability of the flap for various midface and oral reconstructive situations. Inferiorly-based flaps are preferable on the basis of discussed anatomical findings. The musculocutaneous flap is especially suited for circumferential interruption of cutaneous blood supply as in the "V-to-Y" and island pedicle flaps. PMID:3343884

  3. Salvage of Exposed Groin Vascular Grafts with Early Intervention Using Local Muscle Flaps

    PubMed Central

    May, Brian L.; Zelenski, Nicole A.; Daluvoy, Sanjay V.; Blanton, Matthew W.; Shortell, Cynthia K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Peripheral vascular surgery may be complicated by wound infection and potential graft exposure in the groin area. Muscle flap coverage of the graft has been promoted to address these wound complications. The authors present their findings regarding graft salvage rates and patient outcomes using local muscle flaps to address vascular graft complications of the groin. Methods: Data were obtained by retrospective cohort study of patients who underwent a local muscle flap procedure by a single surgeon following vascular graft complication in the groin. Results: Seventeen patients undergoing local muscle flap coverage of a vascular graft were reviewed. Six men and 9 women, 5180 years old, were included in the study. Wound complications in the groin occurred anywhere from 3 days to 3.5 years following graft placement. Graft exposure was the most common presenting complication (14 of 17 patients). Muscle flap coverage occurred within 15 days of complication presentation in all patients (average, 6.4 days). Seven of the 15 patients experienced postoperative complications within 6 months of the procedure, most commonly wound dehiscence. However, analysis demonstrated that vascular grafts were successfully salvaged in 10 of the 17 patients (59%) over the course of follow-up (range, 1041748 days). Average time to muscle flap coverage was 4.2 days in patients who retained the graft and 9.6 days in patients who ultimately lost their vascular graft. Conclusion: The authors demonstrate improved vascular graft salvage rate when local muscle flap procedure is performed early after initial wound complication presentation. PMID:26495227

  4. The effect of recombinant hirudin on rabbit ear flaps with venous insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Duzgun, Serdar; Nisanci, Mustafa; Unlu, Erkin

    2014-01-01

    The effect of recombinant hirudin, which is the most powerful antithrombotic agent, on flaps with venous insufficiency was investigated. Oedema and congestion are frequent on flaps, causing necrosis unpredictably. Venous insufficiency and thrombosis are experimentally and clinically more frequent than arterial occlusion. Twenty-one adult New Zealand rabbits were used in this study. Skin flaps (3 6 cm) were elevated on a 1-cm-wide pedicle on rabbit ears. The artery, nerve, and vein were exposed and examined with the aid of a surgical microscope. Venous insufficiency was established by cutting the vein and nerve. In the control group, no additional surgical or medical procedures were performed and the ear flap was inset to its original location. Subcutaneous low molecular weight heparin (LMWH; 320 IU/kg) was administered to a second group of rabbits after the same surgery, and recombinant hirudin (2 ?g) was administered via the pedicle artery 5 minutes after the vein and nerve were bound and cut in a third group of rabbits. Compared with control and LMWH groups on day 3 and 7, the hirudin-treated group had less hair loss, lower oedema scores and less haematoma formation. Furthermore, a lower size of necrotic areas and an increase in the circulating area on day 7 was found in the hirudin-treated group. In addition, angiography revealed new vessel development (neovascularisation) only in the hirudin group. On histologic sections, hirudin-treated animals had lower oedema, inflammation and congestion scores than animals in the other two groups. Thus, when administered into the ear flap through the pedicle as a pure recombinant preparation, hirudin increased flap survival by its antithrombotic effects and by accelerating neoangiogenesis. Recombinant hirudin may be used in clinical practice to treat flaps with venous problems and to increase survival rates. PMID:24987213

  5. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Body Looking and feeling your best Cosmetic surgery Cosmetic surgery Teens might have cosmetic surgery for a ... about my body? What are the risks of cosmetic surgery? top People who have cosmetic surgery face ...

  6. Intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis using two types of Moria microkeratomes.

    PubMed

    Karabela, Yunus; Muftuoglu, Orkun; Gulkilik, Ibrahim Gokhan; Kocabora, Mehmet Selim; Ozsutcu, Mustafa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the incidence, management, and visual outcomes of intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) surgery using two types of Moria M2 microkeratomes. This retrospective analysis was performed on 806 primary LASIK cases. The intraoperative and early postoperative flap-related complications were identified and categorized according to type of Moria microkeratome. There were 52 intraoperative and early postoperative complications--one case of partial flap (0.124 %), one case of free flap (0.124 %), one case of small flap (0.124 %), 13 cases of epithelial defect (1.61 %), 12 cases of flap striae (1.49 %), 10 cases of diffuse lamellar keratitis (1.24 %), 10 cases of interface debris (1.24 %), three cases of epithelial ingrowth (0.37 %), and one case of microbial infection (0.124 %). The overall incidence of flap complications was 6.45 %. There were 27 right eye (6.73 %) and 25 left eye (6.17 %) complications. The incidence of complications with the Moria automated metallic head 130 microkeratome was 4.22 % and with the Moria single-use head 90 microkeratome was 2.23 %. We observed one culture-negative interface abscess which was cured with surgical cleaning and intensive medical treatment. The most common complication encountered was epithelial defects, followed by flap striae. Our study showed that LASIK with a microkeratome has a relatively low incidence of intraoperative and early postoperative flap complications. The authors have no financial interest in any of the issues contained in this article and have no proprietary interest in the development of marketing of or materials used in this study. PMID:24531872

  7. Effective Use of a Silicone-induced Capsular Flap in Secondary Asian Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang-Ha; Suh, Man Koon; Kim, Chang Kyung; Kim, Kenneth K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Performing secondary rhinoplasty in patients who underwent primary rhinoplasty using a silicone implant is difficult due to thinning of nasal skin and formation of a capsule. Excess capsule formation can cause capsular contracture, resulting in short nose deformity or implant deviation, migration, or implant demarcation. Revision rhinoplasty using a capsular flap, dorsal silicone implant, and tip plasty was performed in 95 Korean patients (91 women and 4 men; mean age, 27 years) who previously underwent primary augmentation rhinoplasty using silicone implants. The capsular flap was composed by creating a dual plane above the anterior capsule and below the posterior capsule. The existing silicone implant was removed, and a new silicone implant was placed under the posterior capsule. The patients were followed up for 6 months to 4 years (mean, 31.7 months). Of the 95 patients who underwent secondary augmentation rhinoplasty using a capsular flap, 88 patients (92.6%) showed satisfactory results. There was no hematoma or nasal skin vascular compromise. There was no visible or palpable capsule resorption or recurrent capsular contracture. Early implant malpositioning (within 30 days postoperatively) was observed in 4 patients, and tip shape dissatisfaction (within 60 days postoperatively) was reported by 3 patients. Four patients underwent revision surgery and had successful outcomes. Nasal augmentation using a silicone implant and capsular flap in secondary rhinoplasty avoids complications caused by removal of the capsule. Recurrent capsule formation or clinically noticeable resorption of the capsular flap was not observed in this study. PMID:25289365

  8. Surgical Approach for Repair of Rectovaginal Fistula by Modified Martius Flap.

    PubMed

    Reichert, M; Schwandner, T; Hecker, A; Behnk, A; Baumgart-Vogt, E; Wagenlehner, F; Padberg, W

    2014-10-01

    Rectovaginal fistulas (RVF) are rare but represent a challenge for both patients and surgeons. The most common cause of RVF is obstetric trauma, and treatment is based on fistula classification and localization of the fistula in relation to the vagina and rectum. Conventional therapy frequently fails, making surgery the most viable approach for fistula repair. One surgical procedure which offers adequate repair of lower and middle rectovaginal fistulas consists of interposition of a bulbocavernosus fat flap also called modified Martius flap. First described by Heinrich Martius in 1928, this approach has been continuously modified and adjusted over time and is used in the repair of various pelvic floor disorders. Overall success rates reported in the literature of the interposition of a Martius flap as an adjunct procedure in the surgical management of RVF are 65-100?%. We present a detailed description of the operation technique together with a discussion of the use of a dorsal-flapped modified Martius flap in the treatment of RVF. PMID:25364031

  9. Surgical Approach for Repair of Rectovaginal Fistula by Modified Martius Flap

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, M.; Schwandner, T.; Hecker, A.; Behnk, A.; Baumgart-Vogt, E.; Wagenlehner, F.; Padberg, W.

    2014-01-01

    Rectovaginal fistulas (RVF) are rare but represent a challenge for both patients and surgeons. The most common cause of RVF is obstetric trauma, and treatment is based on fistula classification and localization of the fistula in relation to the vagina and rectum. Conventional therapy frequently fails, making surgery the most viable approach for fistula repair. One surgical procedure which offers adequate repair of lower and middle rectovaginal fistulas consists of interposition of a bulbocavernosus fat flap also called modified Martius flap. First described by Heinrich Martius in 1928, this approach has been continuously modified and adjusted over time and is used in the repair of various pelvic floor disorders. Overall success rates reported in the literature of the interposition of a Martius flap as an adjunct procedure in the surgical management of RVF are 65100?%. We present a detailed description of the operation technique together with a discussion of the use of a dorsal-flapped modified Martius flap in the treatment of RVF. PMID:25364031

  10. Use of buccal myomucosal flap for palatal lengthening in cleft palate patient: Experience of 20 cases

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Don; Datta, Shubharanjan; Varghese, Annie

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this review was to assess the effectiveness of the buccal myomucosal flap in secondary repairs of cleft palate in 20 patients. Patients and Methods: Totally, 20 patients, who underwent secondary palatoplasty between 5 years and 8 years in which a buccal myomucosal flap was used, were reviewed retrospectively. All patients had undergone at least one previous attempted repair at other institutions. Indications for the secondary repair included velopharyngeal incompetence and/or oronasal fistula. Patients were evaluated preoperatively for oronasal fistula status, velopharyngeal competence, nasal resonance, speech quality, and nasal escape. Results: The buccal myomucosal flap was used in all 20 patients, and there was marked increase in the quality of speech as well as nasal regurgitation decreased. In patients with levator dysfunction due to poor primary surgery and glottal speech the results were inconclusive Conclusion: Palate re-repair combined with a buccal myomucosal flap, occasionally in conjunction with other techniques, is an effective method for correcting failed cleft palate repairs. Minimum donor site morbidity and complication makes the buccal flap a useful armamentarium of a cleft surgeon. PMID:25821372

  11. Reliable harvest of a dorsal scapular artery perforator flap by augmenting its perfusion.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Young; Lee, Kyeong-Tae; Mun, Goo-Hyun

    2016-02-01

    Despite confirmation of a reliable perforasome in the dorsal scapular artery in an anatomic study, a true perforator flap has not been recommended in previous clinical studies because of concerns regarding insufficient perfusion in the distal region. In this report, we present two cases of reconstruction for occipital defects caused by tumor extirpation using pedicled dorsal scapular artery perforator flaps without a muscle component. To secure the perfusion of the dorsal scapular artery perforator flap, inclusion of an additional perforator was attempted for perfusion augmentation. The second dorsal scapular artery perforator was harvested in one case. In an additional case, the sixth dorsal intercostal artery perforator with a branch that directly connected with the dorsal scapular artery within the trapezius muscle was additionally harvested. The flaps survived without any perfusion-related complications, including tip necrosis, and no donor site morbidities were observed. We suggest that a perfusion augmented dorsal scapular artery perforator flap by harvesting multiple perforators could be a safe and useful alternative for reconstructive surgery of head and neck defects. 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:152-156, 2016. PMID:25382486

  12. Secondary onlay free flap reconstruction of glossectomy defects following initial successful flap restoration.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Jordan; Lee, Thomas; Ducic, Yadranko

    2013-08-01

    Patients who undergo tongue reconstruction over time may develop gradual worsening of dysarthria and dysphagia secondary to flap atrophy. At our institution, these patients undergo a secondary flap onlay procedure for augmentation of the neotongue. We review a total of 11 patients with total glossectomy defect who underwent secondary tongue augmentation with secondary onlay free flap consisting of radial forearm free flap (n = 6) and rectus free flap (n = 5). There was improvement in swallowing in 7 of 11 patients. Five (45.4%) patients achieved gastric tube independence. Seven (63.6%) patients achieved a varying degree of oral intake. All patients achieved tracheostomy independence. Dysarthria was improved in all patients. There were no flap failures. Therefore, a secondary onlay flap technique is feasible and may improve dysphagia and dysarthria to achieve gastric tube and tracheostomy independence in total glossectomy patients with delayed tongue atrophy. PMID:23625797

  13. Prevention of necrosis of adjacent expanded flaps by surgical delay.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hainan; Xie, Yun; Xie, Feng; Gu, Bin; Liu, Kai; Zan, Tao; Li, QingFeng

    2014-11-01

    Although expanded flaps have been shown to survive longer than unexpanded flaps, flap necrosis still occurs, particularly when a deep back cut has been made. Overcautious design can avoid necrosis but leads to inefficient usage of the expanded flap. In this study, we tested a surgical delay method to prevent partial necrosis and maximize the use of the expanded flap. Ten patients with 13 expanders were included in this series. The surgical delay was performed 2 weeks before the final flap transfer. The survival of the delayed flaps was compared with that in previous cases without surgical delay. All 13 expanded flaps exhibited complete survival, which was significantly better than the 27.5% partial flap necrosis observed in nondelayed cases. Surgical delay can decrease the risk of necrosis in an expanded flap caused by a back cut and can thus maximize flap use. PMID:23872964

  14. The Foreign Language Assistance Program (FLAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richey, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article features the Foreign Language Assistance Program, also known as FLAP, which holds the distinction as the only federally funded program that exclusively targets foreign language instruction in elementary and secondary schools. Funded under Title V of No Child Left Behind, FLAP provides 3-year grants to states and local school districts…

  15. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems 23.701 Flap...

  16. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems 23.701 Flap...

  17. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  18. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  19. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  20. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  1. 14 CFR 25.457 - Wing flaps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flaps. 25.457 Section 25.457 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Structure Control Surface and System Loads § 25.457 Wing flaps....

  2. Low level laser therapy increases angiogenesis in a model of ischemic skin flap in rats mediated by VEGF, HIF-1? and MMP-2*

    PubMed Central

    Cury, Vivian; Moretti, Ana Iochabel Soares; Assis, Lvia; Bossini, Paulo; de Souza Crusca, Jaqueline; Neto, Carlos Benatti; Fangel, Renan; de Souza, Heraldo Possolo; Hamblin, Michael R; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    It is known that low level laser therapy is able to improve skin flap viability by increasing angiogenesis. However, the mechanism for new blood vessel formation is not completely understood. Here, we investigated the effects of 660 nm and 780 nm lasers at fluences of 30 and 40 J/cm2 on three important mediators activated during angiogenesis. Sixty male Wistar rats were used and randomly divided into five groups with twelve animals each. Groups were distributed as follows: skin flap surgery non-irradiated group as a control; skin flap surgery irradiated with 660 nm laser at a fluence of 30 or 40 J/cm2 and skin flap surgery irradiated with 780 nm laser at a fluence of 30 or 40 J/cm2. The random skin flap was performed measuring 10 4 cm, with a plastic sheet interposed between the flap and the donor site. Laser irradiation was performed on 24 points covering the flap and surrounding skin immediately after the surgery and for 7 consecutive days thereafter. Tissues were collected, and the number of vessels, angiogenesis markers (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF and hypoxia inducible factor, HIF-1?) and a tissue remodeling marker (matrix metalloproteinase, MMP-2) were analyzed. LLLT increased an angiogenesis, HIF-1? and VEGF expression and decrease MMP-2 activity. These phenomena were dependent on the fluences, and wavelengths used. In this study we showed that LLLT may improve the healing of skin flaps by enhancing the amount of new vessels formed in the tissue. Both 660 nm and 780 nm lasers were able to modulate VEGF secretion, MMP-2 activity and HIF-1? expression in a dose dependent manner. PMID:23831843

  3. A flight control through unstable flapping flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iima, Makoto; Yokoyama, Naoto; Hirai, Norio; Senda, Kei

    2012-11-01

    We have studied a flight control in a two-dimensional flapping flight model for insects. In this model, the model of center-of-mass can move in both horizontal and vertical directions according to the hydrodynamic force generated by flapping. Under steady flapping, the model converges to steady flight states depending on initial conditions. We demonstrate that simple changes in flapping motion, a finite-time stop of flapping, results in changes in the vortex structures, and the separation of two steady flight state by a quasi-steady flight. The model's flight finally converges to one of the final states by way of the quasi-steady state, which is not observed as a (stable) steady flight. The flight dynamic has been also analyzed. KAKENHI (23540433, 22360105, 21340019) and CREST No. PJ74100011.

  4. The Clinical Application of Anterolateral Thigh Flap

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yao-Chou; Chiu, Haw-Yen; Shieh, Shyh-Jou

    2011-01-01

    The anterolateral thigh flap can provide a large skin paddle nourished by a long and large-caliber pedicle and can be harvested by two-team work. Most importantly, the donor-site morbidity is minimal. However, the anatomic variations decreased its popularity. By adapting free-style flap concepts, such as preoperative mapping of the perforators and being familiar with retrograde perforator dissection, this disadvantage had been overcome gradually. Furthermore, several modifications widen its clinical applications: the fascia lata can be included for sling or tendon reconstruction, the bulkiness could be created by including vastus lateralis muscle or deepithelization of skin flap, the pliability could be increased by suprafascial dissection or primary thinning, the pedicle length could be lengthening by proximally eccentric placement of the perforator, and so forth. Combined with these technical and conceptual advancements, the anterolateral thigh flap has become the workhorse flap for soft-tissue reconstructions from head to toe. PMID:22567234

  5. Fasciocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.N.; Whetzel, T.; Mathes, S.J.; Vasconez, L.O.

    1987-07-01

    A skin and fascia flap from the medial thigh is proposed for vaginal and perineal reconstruction. Dissection, vascular injection, and radiographs of 20 fresh cadaver limbs uniformly demonstrated the presence of a communicating suprafascial vascular plexus in the medial thigh. Three to four nonaxial vessels were consistently found to enter the proximal plexus from within 5 cm of the perineum. Preservation of these vessels permitted reliable elevation of a 9 X 20 cm fasciocutaneous flap without using the gracilis muscle as a vascular carrier. Fifteen flaps in 13 patients were used for vaginal replacement and coverage of vulvectomy, groin, and ischial defects. Depending on the magnitude of the defect, simultaneous and independent elevation of the gracilis muscle provided additional vascularized coverage as needed. Our experience indicates that the medial thigh fasciocutaneous flap is a durable, less bulky, and potentially sensate alternative to the gracilis musculocutaneous flap for vaginal and perineal reconstruction.

  6. First dorsal metacarpal artery adiposofascial flap for venous conduit and soft tissue cover in an avulsed thumb: case report.

    PubMed

    Dodakundi, Chaitanya; Hattori, Yasunori; Doi, Kazuteru

    2012-06-01

    Skin loss, need for vein grafts, and secondary surgeries are often encountered in avulsion injuries of the thumb. We report a case of successful salvage of an avulsion type of near total amputation of the thumb following a conveyor belt injury in which the first dorsal metacarpal artery adiposofascial flap was used for combined soft tissue cover and venous conduit. PMID:22517573

  7. Long-term complications of reconstruction of the heel using a digitorum brevis muscle flap.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, M; Nakagawa, K; Hamada, T

    1993-04-01

    Seven patients who had surgery for malignant skin tumors of the heel were followed up for several years. The reconstructive procedure performed was repair of the large skin defect after excision of a tumor, by using a flexor digitorum brevis muscle flap and an overlying free graft. Although this procedure is a good method without any serious complications, no long-term follow-up data supporting this opinion have been reported. In this study, plantar flexion of the toes and flattening of the plantar arch appeared 3 months after surgery and developed for 1 year, and the patients complained of easy fatigability in walking and difficulty in going up stairs. These sequelae were probably due to sacrifice of the flexor digitorum brevis muscle. We feel that this procedure should be replaced by another procedure that does not sacrifice any muscle, for example, that using a medial plantar flap. PMID:8512293

  8. Mediastinitis and sternal prosthesis infection successfully treated by minimally invasive omental flap transposition.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Valentina; Ceccarelli, Silvia; Vannucci, Jacopo; Puma, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Purulent mediastinitis is a possible serious complication after mediastinal surgery. We report the case of a localized sternal plasmocytoma treated by sternectomy and prosthetic repair, who needed a second surgery for a fistulizing mediastinitis. Five months earlier, in another Hospital, the patient underwent sternal resection and reconstruction with a "sandwich" prosthesis (Methyl-methacrylate and Marlex mesh). Suppurative mediastinitis occurred and septic shock resolution was observed after the spontaneous opening of a mediastinal cutaneous fistula. After referring to our Unit the patient underwent extensive local and systemic preparation and nutritional support; the infected prosthesis was then removed and the gap filled by a laparoscopically-prepared omental flap. Adequate preoperative management, removal of any infected material and minimally invasive omental flap transposition allowed the successful treatment of this life-threatening condition. PMID:23442807

  9. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in amore » group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.« less

  10. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups. PMID:26439509

  11. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  12. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers.

    PubMed

    Becker, Alexander D; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-01-01

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing-wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. These results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups. PMID:26439509

  13. Hydrodynamic schooling of flapping swimmers

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Alexander D.; Masoud, Hassan; Newbolt, Joel W.; Shelley, Michael; Ristroph, Leif

    2015-10-06

    Fish schools and bird flocks are fascinating examples of collective behaviours in which many individuals generate and interact with complex flows. Motivated by animal groups on the move, here we explore how the locomotion of many bodies emerges from their flow-mediated interactions. Through experiments and simulations of arrays of flapping wings that propel within a collective wake, we discover distinct modes characterized by the group swimming speed and the spatial phase shift between trajectories of neighbouring wings. For identical flapping motions, slow and fast modes coexist and correspond to constructive and destructive wing–wake interactions. Simulations show that swimming in a group can enhance speed and save power, and we capture the key phenomena in a mathematical model based on memory or the storage and recollection of information in the flow field. Lastly, these results also show that fluid dynamic interactions alone are sufficient to generate coherent collective locomotion, and thus might suggest new ways to characterize the role of flows in animal groups.

  14. The 3?-Flap Pocket of Human Flap Endonuclease 1 Is Critical for Substrate Binding and Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    David Finger, L.; Blanchard, M. Suzette; Theimer, Carla A.; Sengerov, Blanka; Singh, Purnima; Chavez, Valerie; Liu, Fei; Grasby, Jane A.; Shen, Binghui

    2009-01-01

    Flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) proteins, which are present in all kingdoms of life, catalyze the sequence-independent hydrolysis of the bifurcated nucleic acid intermediates formed during DNA replication and repair. How FEN1s have evolved to preferentially cleave flap structures is of great interest especially in light of studies wherein mice carrying a catalytically deficient FEN1 were predisposed to cancer. Structural studies of FEN1s from phage to human have shown that, although they share similar folds, the FEN1s of higher organisms contain a 3?-extrahelical nucleotide (3?-flap) binding pocket. When presented with 5?-flap substrates having a 3?-flap, archaeal and eukaryotic FEN1s display enhanced reaction rates and cleavage site specificity. To investigate the role of this interaction, a kinetic study of human FEN1 (hFEN1) employing well defined DNA substrates was conducted. The presence of a 3?-flap on substrates reduced Km and increased multiple- and single turnover rates of endonucleolytic hydrolysis at near physiological salt concentrations. Exonucleolytic and fork-gap-endonucleolytic reactions were also stimulated by the presence of a 3?-flap, and the absence of a 3?-flap from a 5?-flap substrate was more detrimental to hFEN1 activity than removal of the 5?-flap or introduction of a hairpin into the 5?-flap structure. hFEN1 reactions were predominantly rate-limited by product release regardless of the presence or absence of a 3?-flap. Furthermore, the identity of the stable enzyme product species was deduced from inhibition studies to be the 5?-phosphorylated product. Together the results indicate that the presence of a 3?-flap is the critical feature for efficient hFEN1 substrate recognition and catalysis. PMID:19525235

  15. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  17. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls. (a) Each wing flap control must be designed so that, when the flap... is based, the flap will not move from that position unless the control is adjusted or is moved by...

  18. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 25.1511 Section 25... Limitations 25.1511 Flap extended speed. The established flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it does not exceed the design flap speed V F chosen under 25.335(e) and 25.345, for...

  1. Delineation of LASIK flaps with prednisolone acetate eyedrops.

    PubMed

    Fahd, Daoud C; Fahed, Sharbel D

    2014-01-01

    We describe the use and safety of prednisolone acetate eyedrops at the end of laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to aid proper positioning of the corneal flap. The LASIK flap is created using the preferred technique. Following laser ablation and flap repositioning, one drop of prednisolone acetate is instilled on the eye. This delineates the flap "gutters" and allows perfect flap positioning and centration. We used this technique in 425 eyes undergoing LASIK for correction of spherocylindrical refractive errors. Flap margins were adequately delineated intraoperatively. The only complication related to the use of the steroid suspension was crystal deposition under the flap in one case which resolved completely in 48 hours. PMID:24982743

  2. Local Measurement of Flap Oxygen Saturation: An Application of Visible Light Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nasseri, Nassim; Kleiser, Stefan; Reidt, Sascha; Wolf, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to develop and test a new device (OxyVLS) to measure tissue oxygen saturation by visible light spectroscopy independently of the optical pathlength and scattering. Its local applicability provides the possibility of real time application in flap reconstruction surgery. We tested OxyVLS in a liquid phantom with optical properties similar to human tissue. Our results were in good agreement with a conventional near infrared spectroscopy device. PMID:26782237

  3. Wendell L. Hughes' life and contributions to plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    McClellan, W Thomas; Rawson, Ashley E

    2011-12-01

    Wendell L. Hughes was a pioneer in ophthalmic plastic surgery and best known for the "Hughes flap," a tarsoconjunctival flap used for lower eyelid reconstruction. In 1937, Wendell L. Hughes sought to achieve the criterion standard of replacing "like with like" in his development of the tarsoconjunctival flap for lower lid reconstruction. This work was published in his ground-breaking thesis, Reconstructive Surgery of the Eyelids, the most comprehensive book on ophthalmic plastic surgery of its time. Although this flap has undergone many modifications, it has stood the test of time and is still used today. In addition, Dr. Hughes was heavily involved in surgical education, a founding member of the American Board of Plastic Surgery, and a leader in the development of sutures and microneedles. More importantly, he was a gracious humanitarian and inspiring mentor loved by peers and patients alike. Other authors have reviewed the intricacies of the Hughes flap; however, little attention has been given to the contributions of its creator. PMID:22094777

  4. On the generation of side-edge flap noise. [part span trailing edge flaps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, M. S.

    1981-01-01

    A theory is proposed for estimating the noise generated at the side edges of part span trailing edge flaps in terms of pressure fluctuations measured just in-board of the side edge of the upper surface of the flap. Asymptotic formulae are developed in the opposite extremes of Lorentz contracted acoustic wavelength large/small compared with the chord of the flap. Interpolation between these limiting results enables the field shape and its dependence on subsonic forward flight speed to be predicted over the whole frequency range. It is shown that the mean width of the side edge gap between the flap and the undeflected portion of the airfoil has a significant influence on the intensity of the radiated sound. It is estimated that the noise generated at a single side edge of a full scale part span flap can exceed that produced along the whole of the trailing edge of the flap by 3 dB or more.

  5. An Island Flap Technique for Laryngeal Intracordal Mucous Retention Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Izadi, Farzad; Ghanbari, Hadi; Zahedi, Sahar; Pousti, Behzad; Maleki Delarestaghi, Mojtaba; Salehi, Abolfazl

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Mucous retention cysts are a subtype of intracordal vocal cysts that may occur spontaneously or may be associated with poor vocal hygiene, and which require optimal treatment. The objective of this study was to present a new laser-assisted microsurgery technique for treating intracordal mucous retention cysts and to describe the final outcomes. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, we assessed the pre-operative and post-operative acoustic analysis, maximum phonation time (MPT), and voice handicap index (VHI) of four patients with a diagnosis of mucous retention cyst. The island flap technique was applied to all patients without any complications. In this procedure, we favored the super-pulse mode using a 2-W power CO2 laser to remove the medial wall of the cyst, before clearing away the lateral wall margins of the cyst using repeat-pulse mode and a 2-W power CO2 laser. Indeed, we maintained the underlying epithelium and lamina propria, including the island flap attached to the vocal ligament. Results: There was a statistically significant improvement in the MPT (pre-op,11.05 s; post-op,15.85 s; P=0.002) and the VHI (pre-operative, 72/120; post-operative,27/120; P=0.001) in all patients. Moreover, jitter and shimmer were refined after surgery, but there was no statistically significant relationship between pre-operative and post-operative data (P=0.071) (P=0.622). In the follow-up period (median, 150 days), there was no report of recurrence or mucosal stiffness. Conclusion: The island flap procedure in association with CO2 laser microsurgery appears to be a safe and effective treatment option for intracordal mucous retention cysts, but needs further investigation to allow comparison with other methods. PMID:26568936

  6. Comparison of the femtosecond laser and mechanical microkeratome for flap cutting in LASIK

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Li-Kun; Yu, Jie; Chai, Guang-Rui; Wang, Dang; Li, Yang

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare refractive results, higher-order aberrations (HOAs), contrast sensitivity and dry eye after laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) performed with a femtosecond laser versus a mechanical microkeratome for myopia and astigmatism. METHODS In this prospective, non-randomized study, 120 eyes with myopia received a LASIK surgery with the VisuMax femtosecond laser for flap cutting, and 120 eyes received a conventional LASIK surgery with a mechanical microkeratome. Flap thickness, visual acuity, manifest refraction, contrast sensitivity function (CSF) curves, HOAs and dry-eye were measured at 1wk; 1, 3, 6mo after surgery. RESULTS At 6mo postoperatively, the mean central flap thickness in femtosecond laser procedure was 113.05±5.89 µm (attempted thickness 110 µm), and 148.36±21.24 µm (attempted thickness 140 µm) in mechanical microkeratome procedure. An uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) of 4.9 or better was obtained in more than 98% of eyes treated by both methods, a gain in logMAR lines of corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) occurred in more than 70% of eyes treated by both methods, and no eye lost ≥1 lines of CDVA in both groups. The difference of the mean UDVA and CDVA between two groups at any time post-surgery were not statistically significant (P>0.05). The postoperative changes of spherical equivalent occurred markedly during the first month in both groups. The total root mean square values of HOAs and spherical aberrations in the femtosecond treated eyes were markedly less than those in the microkeratome treated eyes during 6mo visit after surgery (P<0.01). The CSF values of the femtosecond treated eyes were also higher than those of the microkeratome treated eyes at all space frequency (P<0.01). The mean ocular surface disease index scores in both groups were increased at 1wk, and recovered to preoperative level at 1mo after surgery. The mean tear breakup time (TBUT) of the femtosecond treated eyes were markedly longer than those of the microkeratome treated eyes at postoperative 1, 3mo (P<0.01). CONCLUSION Both the femtosecond laser and the mechanical microkeratome for LASIK flap cutting are safe and effective to correct myopia, with no statistically significant difference in the UDVA, CDVA during 6mo follow-up. Refractive results remained stable after 1mo post-operation for both groups. The femtosecond laser may have advantages over the microkeratome in the flap thickness predictability, fewer induced HOAs, better CSF, and longer TBUT. PMID:26309880

  7. Flap-augmented shrouds for aerogenerators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seginer, A.

    1976-01-01

    Axisymmetrical shrouds for windmills are augmented by ring-shaped 'flaps' and their performance is studied experimentally. The concept of the shroud as an annular 'wing' is justified, leading to the conclusion that high-lift techniques should be used in shroud design, and that high-lift devices, such as flaps, would increase the power output of the windmill. It is shown experimentally that the ideal power output of a flap-augmented shrouded turbine can be more than 4 times the power of unshrouded turbines of the same diameter.

  8. The plane problem of the flapping wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, Walter

    1954-01-01

    In connection with an earlier report on the lifting vortex sheet which forms the basis of the following investigations this will show how the methods developed there are also suitable for dealing with the air forces for a wing with a circulation variable with time. The theory of a propulsive wing flapping up and down periodically in the manner of a bird's wing is developed. This study shows how the lift and its moment result as a function of the flapping motion, what thrust is attainable, and how high is the degree of efficiency of this flapping propulsion unit if the air friction is disregarded.

  9. Dynamic response of a piezoelectric flapping wing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Alok; Khandwekar, Gaurang; Venkatesh, S.; Mahapatra, D. R.; Dutta, S.

    2015-03-01

    Piezo-composite membranes have advantages over motorized flapping where frequencies are high and certain coupling between bending and twisting is useful to generate lift and forward flight. We draw examples of fruit fly and bumble bee. Wings with Piezo ceramic PZT coating are realized. The passive mechanical response of the wing is characterized experimentally and validated using finite element simulation. Piezoelectric actuation with uniform electrode coating is characterized and optimal frequencies for flapping are identified. The experimental data are used in an empirical model and advanced ratio for a flapping insect like condition for various angular orientations is estimated.

  10. Collective Flow Enhancement by Tandem Flapping Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravish, Nick; Peters, Jacob M.; Combes, Stacey A.; Wood, Robert J.

    2015-10-01

    We examine the fluid-mechanical interactions that occur between arrays of flapping wings when operating in close proximity at a moderate Reynolds number (Re ?100 - 1000 ). Pairs of flapping wings are oscillated sinusoidally at frequency f , amplitude ?M, phase offset ? , and wing separation distance D*, and outflow speed v* is measured. At a fixed separation distance, v* is sensitive to both f and ? , and we observe both constructive and destructive interference in airspeed. v* is maximized at an optimum phase offset, ?max, which varies with wing separation distance, D*. We propose a model of collective flow interactions between flapping wings based on vortex advection, which reproduces our experimental data.

  11. Blended Cutout Flap for Reduction of Jet-Flap Interaction Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Czech, Michael J (Inventor); Thomas, Russell H. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An aircraft system includes a wing and a trailing edge device coupled to the wing. The trailing edge device is movable relative to the wing, and includes a leading edge and a trailing edge having a center flap portion and a plurality of outer edge portions integrally combined with the center flap portion such that the center flap portion is shorter in width than that of outer edge portions.

  12. The Deep Inferior Epigastric Perforator and Pedicled Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous Flap in Breast Reconstruction: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shane; Yek, Jacklyn; Ong, Wei Chen; Hing, Chor Hoong; Lim, Thiam Chye

    2013-01-01

    Background Our objective was to compare the complication rates of two common breast reconstruction techniques performed at our hospital and the cost-effectiveness for each test group. Methods All patients who underwent deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap and transverse rectus abdominis myocutaneous (TRAM) flap by the same surgeon were selected and matched according to age and mastectomy with or without axillary clearance. Patients from each resultant group were selected, with the patients matched chronologically. The remainder were matched for by co-morbidities. Sixteen patients who underwent immediate breast reconstruction with pedicled TRAM flaps and 16 patients with DIEP flaps from 1999 to 2006 were accrued. The average total hospitalisation cost, length of hospitalisation, and complications in the 2 year duration after surgery for each group were compared. Results Complications arising from both the pedicled TRAM flaps and DIEP flaps included fat necrosis (TRAM, 3/16; DIEP, 4/16) and other minor complications (TRAM, 3/16; DIEP, 1/16). The mean hospital stay was 7.13 days (range, 4 to 12 days) for the pedicled TRAM group and 7.56 (range, 5 to 10 days) for the DIEP group. Neither the difference in complication rates nor in hospital stay duration were statistically significant. The total hospitalisation cost for the DIEP group was significantly higher than that of the pedicled TRAM group (P<0.001). Conclusions Based on our study, the pedicled TRAM flap remains a cost-effective technique in breast reconstruction when compared to the newer, more expensive and tedious DIEP flap. PMID:23730591

  13. Skin-sparing mastectomy and immediate reconstruction with DIEP flap after breast-conserving therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andree, Christoph; Munder, Beatrix; Seidenstuecker, Katrin; Richrath, Philipp; Behrendt, Philipp; Kppe, Tobias; Hagouan, Mazen; Audretsch, Werner; Nestle-Krmling, Carolin; Witzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Currently about 70% of women who suffer from breast cancer undergo breast-conserving therapy (BCT) without removing the entire breast. Thus, this surgical approach is the standard therapy for primary breast cancer. If corrections are necessary, the breast surgeon is faced with irritated skin and higher risks of complications in wound healing. After radiation, an implant-based reconstruction is only recommended in selected cases. Correction of a poor BCT outcome is often only solved with an additional extended operation using autologous reconstruction. Material/Methods In our plastic surgery unit, which focuses on breast reconstruction, we offer a skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomy, followed by primary breast reconstruction based on free autologous tissue transfer to correct poor BCT outcomes. Between July 2004 and May 2011 we performed 1068 deep inferior epigastric artery perforator (DIEP) flaps for breast reconstruction, including 64 skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomies, followed by primary DIEP breast reconstruction procedures after BCT procedures. Results In all free flap-based breast reconstruction procedures, we had a total flap loss in 0.8% (9 cases). Within the group of patients after BCT, we performed 41 DIEP flaps and 23 ms-2 TRAM flaps after skin-sparing or subcutaneous mastectomies to reconstruct the breast. Among this group we had of a total flap loss in 1.6% (1 case). Conclusions In cases of large tumour sizes and/or difficult tumour locations, the initial oncologic breast surgeon should inform the patients of a possibly poor cosmetic result after BCT and radiation. In our opinion a skin-sparing mastectomy with primary breast reconstruction should be discussed as a valid alternative. PMID:23197233

  14. Locoregional use of lateral thoracic artery perforator flap as a propeller flap.

    PubMed

    Baghaki, Semih; Cevirme, Mirza; Diyarbakirli, Murat; Tatar, Cihad; Aydin, Yagmur

    2015-05-01

    Although thoracodorsal system is a fundamental source of various flaps, lateral thoracic region has not been a popular flap donor area. There is limited data on the use of lateral intercostal artery perforator flap and lateral thoracic artery perforator flap. In this case series, lateral thoracic artery perforator flap has been used in locoregional (axilla, pectoral region, and arm) reconstruction as an island or propeller flap.Eighteen patients have been operated on between September 2010 and January 2013. The age of the patients ranged between 16 and 68 years with a median of 38 years. A thorough chart review has been performed with preoperative and postoperative photographs. Duration of hospitalization, complication rate and long term results have been documented.Nine patients had severe burn contracture of axilla, 7 patients had axillary hidradenitis suppurativa, 1 patient had giant neurofibroma of arm, and 1 patient had malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of pectoral area. Seventeen flaps survived totally, and in 1 flap, distal superficial slough of skin has been observed. No recurrence in hidradenitis or peripheral nerve sheath tumor has been observed. Donor site scar is well hidden in anatomical position. The range of motion of affected extremities returned to normal after reconstruction.Lateral thoracic area provides a reliable flap option with a wide arc of rotation when lateral thoracic artery perforators are used. PMID:25875722

  15. Route Flap Damping Made Usable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelsser, Cristel; Maennel, Olaf; Mohapatra, Pradosh; Bush, Randy; Patel, Keyur

    The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP), the de facto inter-domain routing protocol of the Internet, is known to be noisy. The protocol has two main mechanisms to ameliorate this, MinRouteAdvertisementInterval (MRAI), and Route Flap Damping (RFD). MRAI deals with very short bursts on the order of a few to 30 seconds. RFD deals with longer bursts, minutes to hours. Unfortunately, RFD was found to severely penalize sites for being well-connected because topological richness amplifies the number of update messages exchanged. So most operators have disabled it. Through measurement, this paper explores the avenue of absolutely minimal change to code, and shows that a few RFD algorithmic constants and limits can be trivially modified, with the result being damping a non-trivial amount of long term churn without penalizing well-behaved prefixes' normal convergence process.

  16. [Circulatory support by an electrically stimulated muscle flap. Experimental experiences].

    PubMed

    Girsch, W; Koller, R; Lanmller, H; Seitelberger, R; Rab, M; Huber, L; Schima, H; Sthr, H G; Losert, U M; Wolner, E

    1996-03-01

    Functional electrical stimulation of the latissimus dorsi muscle flap for circulatory assistance extends the traditional concept of using this flap for reconstructive procedures into the field of cardiac surgery. It requires a transformed muscle which is able to contract for long periods of time without fatigue. Two main groups of experiments have been carried out in sheep. In six sheep the latissimus dorsi muscle (MLD) was transformed into a fatigue-resistant muscle by the means of multichannel stimulation of the supplying motor nerve. After that, stimulation of MLD at a frequency of 70 contractions per minute could be performed continuously without significant muscle fatigue. The loss of maximal force caused by the conditioning procedure was about one third of the initial force. In a second series of acute experiments the MLD was used for cardiomyoplasty. The muscle was divided into two parts which were wrapped around the heart in two different forms. The resting tension of the muscle was preserved. EKG-synchronous stimulation resulted in an increase in left ventricular pressure between 12 and 53%. The increase in arterial pressure was between 10,6 and 58%. PMID:8647534

  17. Penile lengthening procedure with V-Y advancement flap and an interposing silicone sheath: A novel methodology

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B.V.; Vasan, S.S.; Mohammed, Sajid

    2012-01-01

    Surgery to augment penile length has become increasingly common. Lack of standardization of this controversial procedure has led to a wide variety of poorly documented surgical techniques, with unconvincing results. The most commonly used technique involves release of the suspensory ligament, with an advancement of an infrapubic skin flap onto the penis via a V-Y plasty. This technique has a major drawback of the possibility of reattachment of the penis to the pubis. We describe a new technique of interposing a silicone sheath along with V-Y advancement flap that overrides this drawback and minimizes the loss of the gained length. PMID:23204668

  18. Postirradiation flap infection about the oral cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Cabbabe, E.B.; Herbold, D.R.; Sunwoo, Y.C.; Baroudi, I.F.

    1983-06-01

    Postirradiation alteration of oral flora is well documented in the literature. Infection as a complication leading to partial or complete loss of a flap used to reconstruct a defect in the oral cavity is a worrisome outcome. We describe how a flap that was judged clinically to be viable became overwhelmingly infected with the Klebsiella oxytoca, an oral cavity pathogen encountered in this patient following irradiation. Local and systemic changes led to detachment of the flap. This complication may be explained, in view of the absence of venous congestion or arterial ischemia both clinically and pathologically, by the proven contamination of the flap by the Klebsiella pathogen. Local factors resulted in lower resistance and subsequent overwhelming infection. Discussion of the case, review of pertinent literature, and proposed solutions are presented.

  19. Long-term vocal outcomes of refined nerve-muscle pedicle flap implantation combined with arytenoid adduction.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Narihiro; Sanuki, Tetsuji; Kumai, Yoshihiko; Yumoto, Eiji

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate long-term efficacy of refined nerve-muscle pedicle (NMP) flap implantation combined with arytenoid adduction (AA) for treatment of unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP). The authors retrospectively reviewed 33 patients with UVFP who received refined NMP flap implantation with AA and were followed up over a 1-year period. Evaluation of vocal fold vibration (regularity, amplitude, and glottal gap), aerodynamic analysis (maximum phonation time [MPT] and mean airflow rate [MFR]), and perceptual evaluation (Grade and Breathiness) were performed preoperatively and at five different time points (1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months) postoperatively. All voice parameters improved significantly postoperatively. All parameters except MFR also continued to improve over the course of 24 months. In the videostroboscopic analysis, the parameter for regularity 24 months after surgery was significantly improved compared with that at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery. There were also significant improvements in amplitude and the glottal gap 24 months after surgery in comparison with values at 3 and 6 months after surgery and 3 months after surgery, respectively. Significant improvement in aerodynamic and perceptual measurements during the follow-up period together with near-normal vocal fold vibration was achieved by delayed reinnervation with refined NMP flap implantation and AA. The combined surgical technique is effective in the treatment of severe breathy dysphonia due to UVFP. Level of evidence 4. PMID:25502739

  20. Transplantation of a latissimus dorsi flap between identical twins.

    PubMed

    Banwell, M E; Clibbon, J J; Sassoon, E M

    2011-10-01

    We present a case of composite tissue transplantation of a latissimus dorsi flap between monozygotic twins. The recipient twin, a 19 year old male, suffered from a complex spinal kyphoscoliosis for which he had undergone multiple previous operations over many years. Soft tissue breakdown on his back causing metalwork exposure had necessitated the removal of his most recent spinal rod. This in turn led to rapid severe deterioration of his spinal deformity and consequent critical impairment of lung function. Robust soft tissue cover was required urgently in order to allow the insertion of a new spinal rod. His previous surgeries and body habitus precluded an adequate autologous reconstruction. Instead, reconstruction using composite tissue transplantation from his identical twin brother was successfully undertaken. We discuss the ethical, psychological and surgical issues involved in this case. PMID:21514914

  1. Ventral tongue myomucosal flap: a suitable choice for shaved lower vermilion border reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kheradmand, Ali A; Garajei, Ata

    2013-03-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) or verrocous carcinoma (VC) occurs frequently on the border of the lower lip and surgical excision is the mainstay of treatment. The vermilion border area is difficult to reconstruct and is very complex both morphologically and anatomically. Various reconstructive approaches for defects of the vermilion border have been described. However, for esthetics, reconstruction of the vermilion border defect by tissue of normal texture and color is paramount.We used a ventral myomucosal tongue flap for reconstruction of the vermilion border after radical excision of squamous cell carcinomas of the lip in 15 patients with labial carcinoma. The tumor was resected with a safe margin (1 cm in SCC and 0.5 cm in VC) in an approximately rectangular shape. Free-border confirmation was done using frozen section. A longitudinal strip of the free border of the tongue nonkeratinized mucosal layer with submucosal muscular layers of the tongue including the terminal branch of the lingual artery was raised. This strip extended to the angles of the mouth to cover the defect. The mucosal or myomucosal flap of the ventral tongue is designed according to the shape and size of a vermilion defect. The vermilion and subcutaneous tissue are incised, and the specimen is sent for histopathological free-border confirmation by frozen section. The flap is sutured in 2 layers, joining the mucosal border of the tongue and the upper border of the skin. The tongue flap pedicle was cut off after 3 weeks, and the oral side of the vermilion was sutured. The donor site of the tongue was closed primarily. Application of moisturizing cream for at least 2 months after surgery would be continued. In all 15 cases, the reconstructed vermilion with a tongue flap was ideal and with almost no disturbance in the patients' speaking, swallowing or taste with satisfactory cosmetic results. The ventral tongue flap is a suitable choice for vermilion border reconstruction. This flap is useful because the procedure does not require complicated surgery, and preservation of the orbicularis oris muscle and mental artery and nerve is possible. PMID:23524802

  2. Distal tibial fractures are a poorly recognised complication with fibula free flaps.

    PubMed

    Durst, A; Clibbon, J; Davis, B

    2015-09-01

    The fibula free flap is ideal for complex jaw reconstructions, with low reported donor and flap morbidity. We discuss a distal tibial stress fracture two months following a vascularised fibula free flap procedure. Despite being an unrecognised complication, a literature review produced 13 previous cases; only two were reported in the reconstructive surgery literature, with the most recent claiming to be the first. The majority of these studies treated this fracture non-operatively; none reported their patient follow-up. Each case presented with ipsilateral leg pain, which has been cited as an early donor site morbidity in as many as 40% of fibula free flap cases. It is known that the fibula absorbs at least 15% of leg load on weight bearing. Studies have shown severe valgus deformities in up to 25% of patients with fibulectomies. We treated our patient operatively, first correcting his worsening valgus deformity with an external fixator, then reinforcing his healed fracture with a long distal tibial plate. We believe that this complication is underreported, unexpected and not mentioned during the consenting process. By highlighting the management of our case and the literature, we aim to increase awareness (and thus further reporting and appropriate management) of this debilitating complication. PMID:26274757

  3. [Lower limb salvage with a free fillet fibula flap harvested from the contralateral amputated leg].

    PubMed

    Bouyer, M; Corcella, D; Forli, A; Mesquida, V; Semere, A; Moutet, F

    2015-06-01

    We report a unusual case of "fillet flap" to reconstruct the lower limb with the amputated contralateral leg. This kind of procedure was first described by Foucher et al. in 1980 for traumatic hand surgery as the "bank finger". A 34-year-old man suffered a microlight accident with bilateral open legs fractures. A large skin defect of the left leg exposed the ankle, the calcaneus and a non-vascularized part of the tibial nerve (10 cm). The patient came to the OR for surgical debridement and had massive bone resection of the left calcaneus. The right leg showed limited skin defect at the lower part, exposing the medial side of the ankle and a tibial bone defect, measuring 10 cm. Salvage the left leg was impossible due to complex nerve, bones and skin associated injuries, so this leg was sacrificed and used as a donor limb, to harvest a free fibula flap for contralateral tibial reconstruction. At 18 months of follow-up, the patient was very satisfied, the clinical result was very good on both lower limbs and X-rays showed excellent integration of the free fibula flap. The patient had normal dailies occupations, can run and have bicycle sport practice with a functional left leg fit prosthesis. This case showed an original application of the "fillet flap concept" to resolve complex and rare traumatic situations interesting the both lower limbs. In our opinion, this strategy must be a part of the plastic surgeon skills in uncommon situations. PMID:25069828

  4. Sectioned images and surface models of a cadaver for understanding the deep circumflex iliac artery flap.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Chul; Chung, Min Suk; Kim, Hyung Jun; Park, Jin Seo; Shin, Dong Sun

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap from sectioned images and stereoscopic anatomic models using Visible Korean, for the benefit of medical education and clinical training in the field of oromandibular reconstructive surgery. Serially sectioned images of the pelvic area were obtained from a cadaver. Outlines of significant structures in the sectioned images were drawn and stacked to build surface models. The PDF (portable document format) file (size, 30 MB) of the constructed models is available for free download on the Web site of the Department of Anatomy at Ajou University School of Medicine (http://anatomy.co.kr). In the PDF file, the relevant structures of the DCIA flap can be seen in the sectioned images. All surface models and stereoscopic structures associated with the DCIA flap are displayed in real time. We hope that these state-of-the-art sectioned images, outlined images, and surface models will help students and trainees better understand the anatomy associated with DCIA flap. PMID:24621709

  5. The dorsalis pedis free flap: technique of elevation, foot closure, and flap application.

    PubMed

    Zuker, R M; Manktelow, R T

    1986-01-01

    The dorsalis pedis free flap is an excellent reconstructive tool for thin remote mucosal defects, for heel and hand defects where innervation is critical, and as an osteocutaneous flap with unique application to mandibular and floor of mouth reconstruction. The major criticism with this flap is related to its uncertain vascularity and the donor defect. We have found in our series of 45 cases that the vascular anatomy is exceedingly reliable. Problems with the donor defects are all related to technique. With care in flap elevation and foot closure, which we describe in detail, an acceptable donor site with minimal complications can be achieved. The clinical applications of this flap are illustrated by three case reports. Our experience with the donor site has not been problem-free. However, we do believe that with meticulous technique primary healing will occur without functional disability and with minimal cosmetic deformity. PMID:3941854

  6. Revascularization following a combined gingival flap-split thickness flap procedure in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Kon, S; Caffesse, R G; Castelli, W A; Nasjleti, C E

    1984-06-01

    A combined technique (gingival flap-split thickness flap) was performed in monkeys. The clinical, histological and microvascular aspects of healing were studied, mainly focusing on the gingival flap, since some of the vessels supplying this area were severed during the second phase of the procedure. The animals were perfused with a combined solution of Pelikan carbon black and 10% formalin solution and killed from 1 to 35 days postoperatively. Cleared specimens and regular histology were obtained. It was concluded that: (1) the remaining periosteal vessels and surrounding structures provided enough nutrition for the survival of the gingival flap, (2) the microvascularization was normal at the 14 days postoperative period in both the gingival flap and the apically positioned split areas and (3) the exposed connective tissue remained narrow and exhibited an irregular vascular arrangement throughout the experiment. PMID:6588191

  7. Design and experimental results for a turbine with jet flap stator and jet flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bettner, J. L.; Blessing, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    The overall performance and detailed stator performance of a negative hub reaction turbine design featuring a moderately low solidity jet flap stator and a jet flap rotor were determined. Testing was conducted over a range of turbine expansion ratios at design speed. At each expansion ratio, the stator jet flow and rotor jet flow ranged up to about 7 and 8 percent, respectively, of the turbine inlet flow. The performance of the jet flap stator/jet flap rotor turbine was compared with that of a turbine which used the same jet flap rotor and a conventional, high solidity plan stator. The effect on performance of increased axial spacing between the jet stator and rotor was also investigated.

  8. Toward noninvasive assessment of flap viability with time-resolved diffuse optical tomography: a preclinical test on rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sieno, Laura; Bettega, Georges; Berger, Michel; Hamou, Cynthia; Aribert, Marion; Mora, Alberto Dalla; Puszka, Agathe; Grateau, Henri; Contini, Davide; Hervé, Lionel; Coll, Jean-Luc; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Pifferi, Antonio; Planat-Chrétien, Anne

    2016-02-01

    The noninvasive assessment of flap viability in autologous reconstruction surgery is still an unmet clinical need. To cope with this problem, we developed a proof-of-principle fully automatized setup for fast time-gated diffuse optical tomography exploiting Mellin-Laplace transform to obtain three-dimensional tomographic reconstructions of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentrations. We applied this method to perform preclinical tests on rats inducing total venous occlusion in the cutaneous abdominal flaps. Notwithstanding the use of just four source-detector couples, we could detect a spatially localized increase of deoxyhemoglobin following the occlusion (up to 550 μM in 54 min). Such capability to image spatio-temporal evolution of blood perfusion is a key issue for the noninvasive monitoring of flap viability.

  9. Intraoperative vascular monitoring of ipsilateral vs. contralateral TRAM flaps.

    PubMed

    Clugston, P A; Lennox, P A; Thompson, R P

    1998-12-01

    Transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous (TRAM) flap breast reconstruction has become an increasingly common procedure in the 1990s. The original description of the procedure was that of an ipsilaterally based pedicled procedure. However, because of concerns about potential folding of the pedicle with possible compromise of the vascular supply, with full muscle harvest the contralateral flap soon became the flap of choice. Subsequently there have been several large clinical series of pedicled TRAM flaps reported showing a relatively high complication rate related to problems with flap vascularity. These findings resulted in many centers favoring free TRAM flap breast reconstruction, despite an increased resource utilization and negligible differences in complication rates. Ipsilateral pedicled TRAM flap breast reconstruction is not a commonly reported procedure, and is reserved for patients in whom scars preclude use of the contralateral pedicle. The ease of flap shaping and lack of tension on the pedicle is recognized by some, and the ipsilateral procedure has become the flap of choice for these surgeons. The authors hypothesized that ipsilateral TRAM flaps have less compromise of venous outflow as a result of the rotational tension effect of transposing the flap to the mastectomy site. To determine if the vascularity of the pedicled TRAM procedure is influenced by pedicle choice, an intraoperative clinical study was designed to compare intravascular pressures in the deep inferior epigastric artery and vein pedicle at various times from pedicle division to flap insetting. Ten consecutive ipsilateral TRAM flaps were compared with eight contralateral flaps. The deep inferior epigastric pedicle was cannulated with both an arterial and venous catheter, and pressures were monitored from the time of division of the inferior pedicle through to the time of flap insetting. The venous pressures of the contralateral flaps were significantly higher at flap rotation and flap insetting compared with the ipsilateral group (p = 0.014 and p = 0.022 respectively). Perfusion pressures showed a greater decrease in the contralateral group from the time of pedicle division to the point of flap rotation and flap insetting compared with the ipsilateral group (p = 0.081 and p = 0.055). The authors conclude that pedicle tension in contralateral TRAM flaps is more common and results in greater venous resistance and decreased perfusion pressures. Versatility in flap shaping, improved maintenance of the IMF, and lack of disruption of the natural xyphoid hollow gives ipsilateral TRAM flaps additional advantages. PMID:9869135

  10. Autologous Advanced Tenon Grafting Combined with Conjunctival Flap in Scleromalacia after Pterygium Excision

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Soo; Shin, Min Kyu; Park, Jong Ho; Park, Young Min; Song, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy of autologous tenon grafting combined with conjunctival flap as a treatment for scleromalacia or scleral thinning after pterygium excision without any additional donor graft tissue. Methods. Twenty-six cases underwent autologous advanced tenon grafting combined with sliding or rotating conjunctival flap for scleromalacia after pterygium surgery ranging from 2 years to 30 years. The extent of scleral defect measured from 2.0?mm to 6.8?mm in diameter. The cosmetic outcome was defined as complete resolution of scleromalacia or completely conjunctival reepithelialization and firm adhesion between subtenon and scleral tissue over scleral thinning without significant complications. Results. All cases achieved the covering of conjunctival and tenon or subtenon tissue over scleromalacia or scleral thinning with this procedure. Preoperative pain, inflammation, and choroidal exposure disappeared after surgery. Immediate postoperative complications, such as large wound dehiscence or reopening of the scleral wound, did not occur in any of the patients. There were no significant clinical complications during the mean postoperative follow-up period of 14.17 months in all cases. Conclusions. We obtained excellent outcome with fewer complications after autologous advanced tenon graft and conjunctival flap, without an additional donor graft, in scleromalacia or scleral thinning caused by previous pterygium excision. PMID:25984368

  11. Flapping wing PIV and force measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, Benjamin H.

    Flapping wing aerodynamics has been of interest to engineers recently due in part to the DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency) MAV (Micro-Aerial Vehicle) initiative. MAVs are small unmanned aerial vehicles with length scales similar to birds and insects. Flapping wing MAVs would serve as mobile and stealthy sensing platforms capable of gathering intelligence in hazardous and physically inaccessible locations. Traditional means of lift and thrust generation become inefficient when scaled to these sizes, therefore a flapping wing propulsion system will be necessary. The design of a flapping wing MAV requires the ability to measure forces and velocities around the wing. Three components of velocity were measured in the wake of a two dimensional (2D) flapping airfoil model using a novel application of stereoscopic DPIV (Digital Particle Image Velocimetry). One component of force was measured using a newly proposed method outlined in the dissertation. The force measurement technique relies on a specific sequence of data acquisition, which has the benefit of reducing measurement uncertainty and noise. No experiments of this type have been conducted, and no direct aerodynamic force data exists for the low Reynolds numbers applicable to flapping wing MAVs. The well-established stereoscopic DPIV technique produces relatively low uncertainties while the new force measurement technique has not been previously tested. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that aerodynamic forces are attainable for chord Reynolds numbers as low as 1,000, which is significantly lower than previous studies. PIV measurements reveal symmetric and asymmetric wake topologies for a NACA 0012 and flat plate airfoil. A sinusoidally heaving flat plate airfoil produces highly deflected wakes for a wider range of flapping conditions than a NACA 0012 airfoil. Deflected wakes are of potentially interest since both lift and thrust components of force are developed. The flat plate also produces larger aerodynamic forces as measured perpendicularly to the free stream velocity. Experimental data for the NACA airfoil compares favorably with a computational fluid dynamics model of a 2D flapping airfoil at similar flapping conditions. Qualitative flow topologies and quantitative velocity and force magnitudes agree with a high degree of certainty.

  12. Flow field of flexible flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sallstrom, Erik

    The agility and maneuverability of natural fliers would be desirable to incorporate into engineered micro air vehicles (MAVs). However, there is still much for engineers to learn about flapping flight in order to understand how such vehicles can be built for efficient flying. The goal of this study is to develop a methodology for capturing high quality flow field data around flexible flapping wings in a hover environment and to interpret it to gain a better understanding of how aerodynamic forces are generated. The flow field data was captured using particle image velocimetry (PIV) and required that measurements be taken around a repeatable flapping motion to obtain phase-averaged data that could be studied throughout the flapping cycle. Therefore, the study includes the development of flapping devices with a simple repeatable single degree of freedom flapping motion. The acquired flow field data has been examined qualitatively and quantitatively to investigate the mechanisms behind force production in hovering flight and to relate it to observations in previous research. Specifically, the flow fields have been investigated around a rigid wing and several carbon fiber reinforced flexible membrane wings. Throughout the whole study the wings were actuated with either a sinusoidal or a semi-linear flapping motion. The semi-linear flapping motion holds the commanded angular velocity nearly constant through half of each half-stroke while the sinusoidal motion is always either accelerating or decelerating. The flow fields were investigated by examining vorticity and vortex structures, using the Q criterion as the definition for the latter, in two and three dimensions. The measurements were combined with wing deflection measurements to demonstrate some of the key links in how the fluid-structure interactions generated aerodynamic forces. The flow fields were also used to calculate the forces generated by the flapping wings using momentum balance methods which yielded details of where along the wing the forces were generated. As expected, these results indicated that the spanwise location of where the forces were generated depended upon the wings membrane material and reinforcement pattern, but in general it was in the outer third of the wing. (Full text of this dissertation may be available via the University of Florida Libraries web site. Please check http://www.uflib.ufl.edu/etd.html)

  13. The glabrous palmar flap: the new free or reversed pedicled palmar fasciocutaneous flap for volar hand reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Orbay, Jorge L; Rosen, Joseph Gregory; Khouri, Roger K; Indriago, Igor

    2009-09-01

    We devised a new flap using the palmar cutaneous branch of the superficial radial artery proximally and anastomosed with a cutaneous perforator of the superficial palmar arch distally. We named our flap "the volar glabrous palmar flap." The flap was used both as a free flap and as a reverse-flow island flap. Thirty-six patients with volar hand defects (24 digits, 7 palms, and 5 first web space) were reconstructed with this flap. The flap was used as a proximally based free flap in 15 patients and was used as a reverse-flow island flap based on distal communication in the remaining 21 patients. Free flaps were supplied by the palmar branch of the superficial radial artery and its fasciocutaneous extensions; reverse-flow island flaps were supplied by one of the perforating branches of the superficial palmar arch, which is connected to the proximal fasciocutaneous branches. Flaps extended from the wrist crease to the proximal palmar crease and were designed medially on the thenar crease, extending 2 to 2.5 cm laterally. Flap sizes ranged from 1.5 x 2.2 cm to 2.5 x 10 cm. The palmar cutaneous branch of the median nerve within the flap area was identified and then was sutured to the divided digital nerve in 6 cases of finger pulp defect. The donor sites were closed and repaired primarily in most cases. The postoperative course was uneventful, and all the flaps survived without major complications. Follow-up (minimum 6 mo, mean 24 mo) showed excellent functional and cosmetic results. Satisfactory sensory reinnervation was achieved in patients who underwent sensory flap transfer for pulp defects. At the same time, we studied 6 cadaver hands to understand the vascular anatomy of the thenar area of the hand. We also revised several published anatomic papers to obtain a refined and scrutinized understanding of the palmar anatomy. PMID:19730044

  14. Long-term survival after chest-wall reconstruction with musculocutaneous flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Kroll, S.S.; Schusterman, M.A.; Larson, D.L.; Fender, A. )

    1990-10-01

    Reconstruction of chest-wall defects with musculocutaneous flaps permits resection of advanced chest-wall tumors and of tissues severely damaged by radiotherapy in patients who in a previous era were not surgically treatable. To determine the long-term outcome from this surgery, the records of 96 patients who had undergone chest-wall resection with musculocutaneous flap reconstruction were reviewed. Median survival for the entire group was 20.5 months, but a more accurate prediction of outcome could be obtained by dividing the patients into three groups. In group I, patients free of known malignancy and undergoing resection of radionecrotic tissues, median survival was 60.0 months. In group II, patients with resectable disease and free of tumor following surgery, median survival was 31.1 months. In group III, patients incompletely resected or known to have metastatic disease following surgery, median survival was only 12.5 months. Even in group III, however, some individuals achieved prolonged survival and lasting benefits from the surgery, so these data should not be used to exclude patients from undergoing necessary palliative procedures.

  15. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the...

  16. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the...

  17. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the...

  18. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the...

  19. 14 CFR 25.701 - Flap and slat interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... equivalent means. (b) If a wing flap or slat interconnection or equivalent means is used, it must be designed... be designed for the loads imposed when the wing flaps or slats on one side are carrying the...

  20. Hemoglobin oxygenation of venous-perfused forearm flaps.

    PubMed

    Wolff, K D; Dollinger, P

    1998-12-01

    To understand how venous flaps function we investigated whether blood flowing via the venous network reaches the capillaries of the skin. While measuring spectrophotometrically intracapillary hemoglobin oxygenation of fasciocutaneous forearm flaps in 12 patients, flap perfusion was changed by manipulating nutrient vessels. Conventionally perfused radial forearm flaps had an intracapillary hemoglobin oxygenation of 51% to 74% but decreased to 6.9% to 12.2% within 90 to 120 minutes after arterial occlusion and perfusion only from the cephalic vein entering the flap cranially (type I venous flap). Radial forearm flaps without any vascular connection showed no oxygenated hemoglobin after 180 to 240 minutes in the capillary network. After microsurgical vein anastomosis and release of the blood flow only via the cephalic or accompanying veins, hemoglobin oxygenation returned immediately to about 10%. We conclude from our results that there is actual capillary perfusion, albeit very slight, in type I venous forearm island flaps. PMID:9869139

  1. Heinrich von Pfalzpaint, Pioneer of Arm Flap Nasal Reconstruction in 1460, More Than a Century Before Tagliacozzi.

    PubMed

    Greig, Aina; Gohritz, Andreas; Geishauser, Max; Mühlbauer, Wolfgang

    2015-06-01

    Heinrich von Pfalzpaint (circa 1415-1465) was a Bavarian military surgeon of the Teutonic Order who treated more than 4000 casualties during the siege of Marienberg Fortress (1454-1457). In 1460, he reported "How to create a new nose if it has been chopped off and the dogs have eaten it" in his treatise on wound care Bündt-Ertznei. He used opium-soaked sponges for anesthesia, described the surgical extraction of bullets and cleft lip repair. Pfalzpaint would have been the first author to describe nasal reconstruction in Europe if his treatise had not been lost. Only 5 copies of his manuscript existed. One was rediscovered and printed in 1868. Pfalzpaint's technique for nasal reconstruction was performed in 2 stages using an undelayed skin flap from the upper arm, which was sutured to the nasal defect and the arm was bandaged to the head. After 8 to 10 days, he divided the pedicle; inset the flap; and fashioned the nasal dorsum, alae, and columella. Tagliacozzi described arm flap nasal reconstruction more than a century later in 1597. He used delayed skin flaps, with at least 6 operative stages over 4 months. Pfalzpaint was ahead of his time regarding his knowledge of wounds, insistence on surgical cleanliness, and his technically easier arm flap rhinoplasty, compared with Tagliacozzi. Pfalzpaint, who is rarely referenced in the literature, should be remembered as a great pioneer of reconstructive surgery in Europe. PMID:26080150

  2. Saved by De-epithelialization: DIEP Flap Dermal Skin Regeneration Salvage after Mastectomy Skin Flap Loss

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Mansher; Carty, Matthew; Nuutila, Kristo; Ricci, Joseph A.; Caterson, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Wound re-epithelialization has been traditionally described to occur from the dermal appendages of the wound edges. As such, the role of the dermal wound bed in re-epithelialization has been questioned. In a patient undergoing breast reconstruction with free tissue transfer, the buried portions of the free flap skin paddle could be either de-epithelialized or deskinned. In case of mastectomy skin flap loss, the role of de-epithelialized skin in wound healing has not been described before. Methods: We report a patient with bilateral mastectomies and bilateral deep inferior epigastric perforator flaps whose postoperative course was complicated by bilateral full-thickness mastectomy skin flap loss. Multiple debridements of nonviable skin resulted in exposure of previously buried de-epithelialized skin paddle of the deep inferior epigastric perforator flap. Results: Our study demonstrates self re-epithelialization of the dermal wound bed from the dermal appendages. We noticed multiple noncontiguous neoepidermal islands in the dermal wound bed, which did not communicate with the wound edges. Conclusions: In case of full-thickness mastectomy skin flap loss, deep vascular plexus present in the dermal bed of the underlying de-epithelialized skin paddle of the free flap converts an otherwise full-thickness wound to a partial-thickness wound. Our study demonstrates the self-epithelialization potential of the de-epithelialized dermal wound bed from the dermal appendages when exposed to air and in the presence of wound healing elements. PMID:26495224

  3. Pre-programmed robotic osteotomies for fibula free flap mandible reconstruction: A preclinical investigation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Albert H; Weimer, Katie; Raczkowsky, Joerg; Zhang, Yaokun; Kunze, Mirko; Cody, Dianna; Selber, Jesse C; Hanasono, Matthew M; Skoracki, Roman J

    2016-03-01

    Bony free flap reconstruction of the facial skeleton remains a challenging area of reconstructive surgery. Despite technological advances that have aided planning and execution of these procedures, surgical inaccuracy is not insignificant. One source of error that has not been wholly addressed is that attributable to a human operator. In this study, we investigate the feasibility and accuracy of performing osteotomies robotically in pre-programmed fashion for fibula free flap mandible reconstruction as a method to reduce inaccuracies related to human error. A mandibular defect and corresponding free fibula flap reconstruction requiring six osteotomies were designed on a CAD platform. A methodology was developed to translate this virtual surgical plan data to a robot (KUKA, Augsburgs, Germany), which then executed osteotomies on three-dimensional (3D) printed fibula flaps with the aid of dynamic stereotactic navigation. Using high-resolution computed tomography, the osteotomized segments were compared to the virtually planned segments in order to measure linear and angular accuracy. A total of 18 robotic osteotomies were performed on three 3D printed fibulas. Compared to the virtual preoperative plan, the average linear variation of the osteotomized segments was 1.3 ± 0.4 mm, and the average angular variation was 4.2 ± 1.7°. This preclinical study demonstrates the feasibility of pre-programmed robotic osteotomies for free fibula flap mandible reconstruction. Preliminarily, this method exhibits high degrees of linear and angular accuracy, and may be of utility in the development of techniques to further improve surgical accuracy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:246-249, 2016. PMID:26663239

  4. The closure of postpalatoplasty fistula with local turn-down flap

    PubMed Central

    Erdenetsogt, J.; Ayanga, G. N.; Tserendulam, D.; Bayasgalan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The three common complications after cleft palate repair are velopharyngeal incompetence, delayed maxillary growth, and fistula formation. Fistula formation rates are reported 0–76% in the literature. Wider palatal defects are more challenging to avoid excess tension, and recent reports suggest defects >15 mm have a significantly higher risk of fistula formation. By localization, the fistulas are divided into seven groups with Pittsburgh fistula classification system (PFCS). The timing of treatment of fistula can vary considerably, and a recurrence rate after surgical correction ranges 10–37%. Materials and Methods: Three patients with fistula in the hard palate (PFCS-4) in size 7–12 mm, between 2010 and 2012, who underwent fistula repair with local turn-down flap. In two cases, surgery was the first fistula repair and was the second repair in one case. The incisions in the frontal and bilateral edges were made around the fistula, in the distal side of fistula incision was made 3–5 mm longer than fistula size in the oral mucosa, and separate oral and nasal mucosa was rendered by organizing flap. This flap was turn-down and closed nasal side of fistula. The oral side of fistula was closed with the two-flap procedure by Bardach technique. Results: The postoperative wound was covered initially in all cases. Conclusion: We believe this two layer method for correction big palatal fistula is simpler than tongue, and buccal flap and patients need only intervention in this case. In addition, this method involves more effective usage of mucosal tissues bilaterally for closure on the oral side of the defect.

  5. Epithelial ingrowth under a laser in situ keratomileusis flap after phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Braunstein, Richard E; Airiani, Suzanna; Chang, Stanley

    2003-11-01

    A 47-year-old man was referred to us for management of a cataract in the left eye. The patient had an ocular history of high myopia with anisometropia, amblyopia in the left eye, and stable myopic lattice degeneration in both eyes. The patient had successful bilateral laser in situ keratomileusis 3 years before and multiple retinal surgeries for treatment of a rhegmatogenous retinal detachment associated with a giant retinal tear in the temporal region of the retina with subsequent proliferative vitreoretinopathy. Phacoemulsification was performed uneventfully. A single interrupted 10-0 nylon suture was placed in the temporal clear corneal wound and removed 7 weeks postoperatively. One month later, slitlamp examination revealed a 1.5 mm tongue-like area of epithelial ingrowth under the corneal flap. The epithelial cells seemed to enter the flap-stroma interface through the previously placed suture tract and advanced centrally. PMID:14670441

  6. Using a Distant Abdominal Skin Flap to Treat Digital Constriction Bands

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mingzi; Song, Kexin; Ding, Ning; Shu, Chang; Wang, Youbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In this study, a Vohwinkel syndrome case is presented where in 5th digit constriction bands in the right hand were reconstructed using a distant abdominal skin flap. Vohwinkel syndrome, or keratoderma hereditarium mutilans, is a rare, autosomal dominant genetic skin condition that causes palmoplantar hyperkeratosis and constricts finger and/or toe bands. In a typical manifestation, the finger and toe constriction bands lead to progressive strangulation and autoamputation, which requires immediate clinical treatment. Topical keratolytics and systemic retinoids have been used to treat hyperkeratosis but without consistent results. Only 1 effective approach for autoamputation has been accepted, reconstructive surgery. Applying a distant abdominal skin flap produced satisfying postoperative effects at the 18-month follow-up. PMID:26871826

  7. Quantitative assessment of partial vascular occlusions in a swine pedicle flap model using spatial frequency domain imaging.

    PubMed

    Ponticorvo, Adrien; Taydas, Eren; Mazhar, Amaan; Scholz, Thomas; Kim, Hak-Su; Rimler, Jonathan; Evans, Gregory R D; Cuccia, David J; Durkin, Anthony J

    2013-02-01

    The use of tissue transfer flaps has become a common and effective technique for reconstructing or replacing damaged tissue. While the overall failure rate associated with these procedures is relatively low (5-10%), the failure rate of tissue flaps that require additional surgery is significantly higher (40-60%). The reason for this is largely due to the absence of a technique for objectively assessing tissue health after surgery. Here we have investigated spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) as a potential tool to do this. By projecting wide-field patterned illumination at multiple wavelengths onto a tissue surface, SFDI is able to quantify absolute concentrations of oxygenated and deoxygenated hemoglobin over a large field of view. We have assessed the sensitivity of SFDI in a swine pedicle flap model by using a controlled vascular occlusion system that reduced blood flow by 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% of the baseline values in either the vein or artery. SFDI was able to detect significant changes for oxygenated hemoglobin, deoxygenated hemoglobin, or tissue oxygen saturation in partial arterial occlusions of at least 50% and partial venous occlusions of at least 25%. This shows SFDI is sensitive enough to quantify changes in the tissue hemoglobin state during partial occlusions and thus has the potential to be a powerful tool for the early prediction of tissue flap failure. PMID:23412357

  8. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  9. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  10. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  11. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  12. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  13. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  14. 14 CFR 23.699 - Wing flap position indicator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wing flap position indicator. 23.699 Section 23.699 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... Construction Control Systems § 23.699 Wing flap position indicator. There must be a wing flap...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1511 - Flap extended speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Flap extended speed. 23.1511 Section 23.1511 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Information 23.1511 Flap extended speed. (a) The flap extended speed V FE must be established so that it...

  18. CHARACTERISTICS OF FLAP GATES AT THE END OF DRAIN PIPES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flap gates are commonly used at the end of pipe drains and pump outlets to prevent back flows of water and entry of small animals. Flap gates are relatively inexpensive, with low maintenance costs, but can trap debris in their hinge systems. Many texts refer to studies performed on flap gates at t...

  19. Extended thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rancati, Alberto; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo

    2015-01-01

    A total of 45 patients underwent partial or total autologous breast reconstruction after skin-sparing mastectomy, skin-reducing mastectomy, and quadrantectomy using a thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap. The detailed surgical technique with its variations is explained in this report. The propeller, flip-over, conventional perforator, and muscle-sparing flaps have been described and evaluated. The flaps were partially or completely de-epithelialized. The conventional TDAP can be enlarged or “extended” as the traditional latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous (LD-MC) flap by incorporating the superior and inferior fat compartments. It can be referred to as the “extended TDAP flap”. This technique augments the flap volume. In addition, this flap can serve as a scaffold for lipofilling to obtain autologous breast reconstruction in medium to large cases. There were two complete failures due to technical errors during flap elevation. Distal partial tissue suffering was observed in four flaps. These flaps were longer than usual; they reached the midline of the back. It is advisable to discard the distal medial quarter of the flap when it is designed up to the midline to avoid steatonecrosis or fibrosis. A retrospective analysis of the 39 flaps that survived completely revealed a satisfactory result in 82% of the cases. The main disadvantage of this procedure is the final scar. The TDAP flap is a reliable and safe method for partial or total breast autologous reconstruction. PMID:26645006

  20. Wound healing in the tissues of the periodontium following periradicular surgery. 2. The dissectional wound.

    PubMed

    Harrison, J W; Jurosky, K A

    1991-11-01

    Wound healing responses of the tissues of the periodontium following periradicular surgery in rhesus monkeys were evaluated by light microscopy. Part II of this investigation reports the responses of mucoperiosteal and osseous tissues to blunt dissectional wounding resulting from the reflection of triangular or submarginal rectangular flaps. Healing of the dissectional wound is rapid, although slower than the incisional wound. Granulation tissues replaces the fibrin clot in the wound site as early as 4 days after surgery, and is replaced by fibrous connective tissue by 14 days. Minimal differences were found in the temporal and qualitative dissectional wound-healing responses to the two types of flap designs. The periosteum does not survive the flap reflection procedure. The cells of the cambium layer are destroyed and the collagen of the fibrous layer undergoes depolymerization. It is postulated that the depolymerized periosteal collagen plays a role in rapid reattachment of flapped tissues to cortical bone. PMID:1812204

  1. Surgical Technique Refinements in Head and Neck Oncologic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jeffrey C.; Shah, Jatin P.

    2010-01-01

    The head and neck region poses a challenging arena for oncologic surgery. Diseases and their treatment can affect a myriad of functions, including sight, hearing, taste, smell, breathing, speaking, swallowing, facial expression and appearance. This review discusses several areas where refinements in surgical techniques have led to improved patient outcomes. This includes surgical incisions, neck lymphadenectomy, transoral laser microsurgery, minimally invasive thyroid surgery, and the use of vascularized free flaps for oromandibular reconstruction. PMID:20512941

  2. Functional Assessments in Patients Undergoing Radial Forearm Flap Following Hemiglossectomy.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangru; Sun, Qiang; Guo, Shu

    2016-03-01

    Our goal was to evaluate the functional outcomes following radial forearm free-flap reconstruction with a focus on radiotherapy. A 2-year prospective study was performed. A total of 47 patients were enrolled finally. They were asked to complete the swallowing, chewing, speech domains of the University of Washington Quality of Life questionnaire preoperatively and at 2 years postoperatively. Swallowing capacity was apparently affected after surgery, but no patients reported there was chokes cough during eating, the mean score was 51.1 (SD: 21.3). Most patients (70.2%) presented their articulation was good enough for everyday life, and the mean score was 60.0 (SD: 21.1). As for chewing, only 7 (14.9%) patients complained there was negative effect, and the mean score was as high as 92.6 (SD: 18.0). Compared to patients with surgery only, patients with postoperative radiotherapy only had significantly worse swallowing and speech capacity. Compared with patients with postoperative radiotherapy only, patients with both preoperative and postoperative radiotherapy tended to have better swallowing and speech. No significant differences were found between chewing and radiotherapy. In most patients, the results of swallowing, speech, and chewing are favorable. Postoperative radiotherapy has an apparent impact on functional impairment, but preoperative tends to preserve the original tongue function. PMID:26845095

  3. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady surface pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and surface roughness were successfully scaled by utilizing aerodynamic performance and boundary layer scaling methods developed herein.

  4. Flap Edge Aeroacoustic Measurements and Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a Small Aperture Directional Array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that much of the physics is captured by the prediction models. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define, the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and surface roughness were successfully scaled by utilizing aerodynamic performance and boundary layer scaling method developed herein.

  5. Flap-edge aeroacoustic measurements and predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.

    2003-03-01

    An aeroacoustic model test has been conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation on high-lift wing configurations. This paper presents an analysis of flap side-edge noise, which is often the most dominant source. A model of a main element wing section with a half-span flap was tested at low speeds of up to a Mach number of 0.17, corresponding to a wing chord Reynolds number of approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for flat (or blunt), flanged, and round flap-edge geometries, with and without boundary-layer tripping, deployed at both moderate and high flap angles. The acoustic database is obtained from a small aperture directional array (SADA) of microphones, which was constructed to electronically steer to different regions of the model and to obtain farfield noise spectra and directivity from these regions. The basic flap-edge aerodynamics is established by static surface pressure data, as well as by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations and simplified edge flow analyses. Distributions of unsteady pressure sensors over the flap allow the noise source regions to be defined and quantified via cross-spectral diagnostics using the SADA output. It is found that shear layer instability and related pressure scatter is the primary noise mechanism. For the flat edge flap, two noise prediction methods based on unsteady-surface-pressure measurements are evaluated and compared to measured noise. One is a new causality spectral approach developed here. The other is a new application of an edge-noise scatter prediction method. The good comparisons for both approaches suggest that the prediction models capture much of the physics. Areas of disagreement appear to reveal when the assumed edge noise mechanism does not fully define the noise production. For the different edge conditions, extensive spectra and directivity are presented. The complexity of the directivity results demonstrate the strong role of edge source geometry and frequency in the noise radiation. Significantly, for each edge configuration, the spectra for different flow speeds, flap angles, and surface roughness were successfully scaled by utilizing aerodynamic performance and boundary-layer scaling methods developed herein.

  6. Airplane wing leading edge variable camber flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    The invention and design of an aerodynamic high lift device which provided a solution to an aircraft performance problem are described. The performance problem of converting a high speed cruise airfoil into a low speed aerodynamic shape that would provide landing and take-off characteristics superior to those available with contemporary high lift devices are addressed. The need for an improved wing leading edge device that would complement the high lift performance of a triple slotted trailing edge flap is examined. The mechanical and structural aspects of the variable camber flap are discussed and the aerodynamic performance aspects only as they relate to the invention and design of the device are presented.

  7. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223Escape Opening and Flap...

  8. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES... MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223, Fig. 16 Figure 16 to Part 223Escape Opening and Flap...

  9. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE... the Double Cover Flap TED ER02JN04.003...

  10. Reconstruction of plantar heel defects with free gracilis musculocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Tamura, A; Takeuchi, Y; Yamakage, A

    1994-01-01

    Soft tissue defects of heel region are difficult to repair. The flaps taken from the nonweightbearing area of the sole produce good results. However, these flaps are limited in width and cannot always cover the large defects after excision of malignant tumors. The authors experienced two cases of plantar heel reconstruction with free gracilis musculocutaneous flap after wide excision of malignant skin tumors, and successfully covered the defects. The patients have been free of ulcer for 3 and 1.8 years respectively, after flap transfer. Free gracilis musculocutaneous flap should be added to the techniques for plantar heel reconstruction after wide excision of malignant skin tumors. PMID:8081335

  11. Preservation of craniotomy bone flaps under the scalp.

    PubMed

    Korfali, E; Aksoy, K

    1988-10-01

    Bone flaps are occasionally not replaced because of brain swelling or for other reasons. Various methods for preserving the free bone flaps have been described. Reimplantation of a free bone flap after a period of preservation outside the body, however, may be complicated by infection, and facilities for proper preservation under sterile conditions may not be available. We present a new technique for preserving the bone flap under the scalp until brain swelling has resolved. The bone flap is reimplanted 12-48 days later. No serious complications related to this technique have been encountered in the 37 patients in which it was used. PMID:3175835

  12. Multiple, synchronous ipsilateral soleus muscle flaps, including the Achilles' "wraparound" flap.

    PubMed

    Hallock, G G

    1998-07-01

    Versatility of the soleus muscle beyond its traditional role for the middle third of the leg is often overlooked. Substantial muscle bulk frequently extends even to the calcaneus, although this is quite variable. Its distal reach as a muscle flap then may potentially include encircling the Achilles' tendon itself as a local "wraparound" flap in an area otherwise notorious for requiring the complexity of a free tissue transfer. Since this maneuver only envelops the Achilles' tendon by stretching its own inserting soleus muscle, no muscle dissection per se is required, and nutrition from minor pedicles is sustained. Therefore, concomitant proximally based hemisoleus flaps can be utilized simultaneously and safely for more conventional coverage of midtibial defects. In this fashion, multiple, independent local flaps from a single soleus muscle can achieve coverage of disparate leg wounds, while sacrificing a minimum of donor site function. PMID:9678468

  13. Choice of Flap Affects Fistula Rate after Salvage Laryngopharyngectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wu, Chao-Min; Hung, Shao-Yu; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with pharyngocutaneous fistula in pharyngoesophageal reconstruction following cancer resection, the purpose of this retrospective study is to examine the selection of tubed skin flaps that impact anastomotic integrity. The flaps evaluated included radial forearm flap versus anterolateral thigh flap, and fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap versus chimeric anterolateral thigh flap. The outcome of interest is the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula. The radial forearm group had a significantly higher rate of fistula than the anterolateral thigh group (56.6% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.03). No significant difference in the incidence of fistula was demonstrated between fasciocutaneous and chimeric anterolateral thigh flap (36.8% vs. 25%, p = 0.51). The anastomotic integrity in pharyngoesopharyngeal reconstruction is affected by choice of skin flaps. Anterolateral thigh flap appears to be a viable option for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction. The more technical demand of the anterolateral thigh flap must be weighed against an easily harvested radial forearm flap. PMID:25776941

  14. Choice of flap affects fistula rate after salvage laryngopharyngectomy.

    PubMed

    Kao, Huang-Kai; Abdelrahman, Mohamed; Chang, Kai-Ping; Wu, Chao-Min; Hung, Shao-Yu; Shyu, Victor Bong-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Due to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with pharyngocutaneous fistula in pharyngoesophageal reconstruction following cancer resection, the purpose of this retrospective study is to examine the selection of tubed skin flaps that impact anastomotic integrity. The flaps evaluated included radial forearm flap versus anterolateral thigh flap, and fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flap versus chimeric anterolateral thigh flap. The outcome of interest is the incidence of pharyngocutaneous fistula. The radial forearm group had a significantly higher rate of fistula than the anterolateral thigh group (56.6% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.03). No significant difference in the incidence of fistula was demonstrated between fasciocutaneous and chimeric anterolateral thigh flap (36.8% vs. 25%, p = 0.51). The anastomotic integrity in pharyngoesopharyngeal reconstruction is affected by choice of skin flaps. Anterolateral thigh flap appears to be a viable option for pharyngoesophageal reconstruction. The more technical demand of the anterolateral thigh flap must be weighed against an easily harvested radial forearm flap. PMID:25776941

  15. Propeller thoracodorsal artery perforator flap for breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Angrigiani, Claudio; Escudero, Ezequiel; Artero, Guillermo; Gercovich, Gustavo; Deza, Ernesto Gil

    2014-01-01

    Background The thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flap has been described for breast reconstruction. This flap requires intramuscular dissection of the pedicle. A modification of the conventional TDAP surgical technique for breast reconstruction is described, utilizing instead a propeller TDAP flap. The authors present their clinical experience with the propeller TDAP flap in breast reconstruction alone or in combination with expanders or permanent implants. Methods From January 2009 to February 2013, sixteen patients had breast reconstruction utilizing a propeller TDAP flap. Retrospective analysis of patient characteristics, clinical indications, procedure and outcomes were performed. The follow-up period ranged from 4 to 48 months. Results Sixteen patients had breast reconstruction using a TDAP flap with or without simultaneous insertion of an expander or implant. All flaps survived, while two cases required minimal resection due to distal flap necrosis, healing by second intention. There were not donor-site seromas, while minimal wound dehiscence was detected in two cases. Conclusions The propeller TDAP flap appears to be safe and effective for breast reconstruction, resulting in minimal donor site morbidity. The use of this propeller flap emerges as a true alternative to the traditional TDAP flap. PMID:25207210

  16. Gurney flapLift enhancement, mechanisms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. J.; Li, Y. C.; Choi, K.-S.

    2008-01-01

    Since its invention by a race car driver Dan Gurney in 1960s, the Gurney flap has been used to enhance the aerodynamics performance of subsonic and supercritical airfoils, high-lift devices and delta wings. In order to take stock of recent research and development of Gurney flap, we have carried out a review of the characteristics and mechanisms of lift enhancement by the Gurney flap and its applications. Optimum design of the Gurney flap is also summarized in this paper. For the Gurney flap to be effective, it should be mounted at the trailing edge perpendicular to the chord line of airfoil or wing. The flap height must be of the order of local boundary layer thickness. For subsonic airfoils, an additional Gurney flap increases the pressure on the upstream surface of the Gurney flap, which increases the total pressure of the lower surface. At the same time, a long wake downstream of the flap containing a pair of counter-rotating vortices can delay or eliminate the flow separation near the trailing edge on the upper surface. Correspondingly, the total suction on the airfoil is increased. For supercritical airfoils, the lift enhancement of the Gurney flap mainly comes from its ability to shift the shock on the upper surface in the downstream. Applications of the Gurney flap to modern aircraft design are also discussed in this review.

  17. Repositioning of Cranial Bone Flaps Cut with a Diamond-Coated Threadwire Saw: 5-Year Experience with Cosmetic Cranioplasty without Fixation Devices.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Satoru; Kondo, Koji; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Nakayama, Kenji; Yamamoto, Isao; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2011-09-01

    Artificial fixation systems for cranial bone flaps have problems related to their materials and designs. We developed an alternative technique for supratentorial craniotomy that employs a diamond-coated threadwire saw (diamond T-saw), originally developed for spinal surgery, and reduces the bone gap for fitted bone flap fixation. The study subjects were 77 adults undergoing elective supratentorial craniotomy. After placing a burr hole at each corner of the craniotomy, we performed osteotomy between adjacent burr holes to approximately one-third of the length of the osteotomy with a craniotome; this leaves a bony bridge at each corner. The diamond T-saw was introduced between adjacent burr holes through the epidural space and a bridge was cut with reciprocating strokes. On closure, the bridge firmly supports the flap and only sutures are needed for fixation. Successful bone flap fixation was obtained in all followed-up cases. There were no technique-related complications such as dural laceration, flap displacement, or resorption. Our method is ideal for bone cuts in cosmetic cranioplasty; it is easy, safe, and inexpensive and avoids the need for flap fixation with artificial devices. PMID:22451833

  18. Improved viability of random pattern skin flaps with the use of bone marrow mesenchymal-derived stem cells and chicken embryo extract

    PubMed Central

    Chehelcheraghi, Farzaneh; Eimani, Hossein; Sadraie, Seyed Homayoon; Torkaman, Giti; Amini, Abdollah; Shemshadi, Hashem; Majd, Hamid Alavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Covering tissue defects using skin flaps is a basic surgical strategy for plastic and reconstructive surgery. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chicken embryo extract (CEE) and bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) on random skin flap survival (RSF) in rats. Using chicken embryo extract can be an ideal environment for the growth and proliferation of transplanted cells. Materials and Methods: Forty albino male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups; each group consisted of 10 rats. BM-MSCs and CEE were transplanted into subcutaneous tissue in the area, where the flap would be examined. On the 7th postoperative day, the survival areas of the flaps were measured by using digital imaging with software assistance, and tissue was collected for evaluation. Results: Survival area was 19.542 in the CEE group and 17.902 in the CEE/BM-MSC group when compared to the rates of the total skin flaps, which were significantly higher than the control group (13.472) (P<0.05). The biomechanical assessment showed a slight difference, although there was no statistically significant difference between the experimental groups and the control group (P>0.05). Conclusion: The findings from this study demonstrated that in operative treatment with BM-MSCs and CEE transplantation could promote flap survival, but the biomechanical parameters were not contrasted with a saline injection. PMID:26557965

  19. Femtosecond laser versus mechanical microkeratome-assisted flap creation for LASIK: a prospective, randomized, paired-eye study

    PubMed Central

    Pajic, Bojan; Vastardis, Iraklis; Pajic-Eggspuehler, Brigitte; Gatzioufas, Zisis; Hafezi, Farhad

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare a femtosecond laser with a microkeratome for flap creation during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) in terms of flap thickness predictability and visual outcomes. Patients and methods This was a prospective, randomized, masked, paired-eye study. Forty-four patients (34 females) who received bilateral LASIK were included. Patients were stratified by ocular dominance, and they then underwent randomization of flap creation using the femtosecond laser on one eye and undergoing the microkeratome procedure on the other one. The visual outcome differences between the corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA) at baseline and the uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) on the first day postoperatively were set as the efficiency index for both groups. All visual acuity outcome results and the deviation of flap thickness were evaluated. P-values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results The index of efficiency regarding the postoperative visual outcomes in the microkeratome group was lower (P<0.0001). This result was correlated with the difference between intended and achieved flap thickness (P=0.038; r=0.28), and a negative relationship in the regression analysis was confirmed (P<0.04; R2=0.1428). The UDVA in the microkeratome group improved significantly by the end of the first month (P<0.0271) in comparison to the baseline CDVA. The deviation between intended and postoperative flap thickness using either optical coherence pachymetry or Heidelberg Retinal Tomography II confocal microscopy was statistically significant (paired t-test; P<0.001) between the groups. The flap thickness deviation in the microkeratome group was higher. In the femtosecond laser group, the efficiency index was stable postoperatively (P=0.64) The UDVA improved significantly by the end of the first postoperative week (P=0.0043) in comparison to the baseline CDVA. Six months after surgery, improvement in the UDVA was significant in both groups (all P<0.001; one way analysis of variance). Conclusion Femtosecond laser was superior to microkeratome-assisted LASIK in terms of flap thickness predictability and the speed of visual acuity recovery. A negative relationship in the regression analysis between increasing flap thickness deviation and visual acuity recovery was confirmed. PMID:25284975

  20. The creation of new rotation arc to the rat latissimus dorsi musculo-cutaneous flap with delay procedures

    PubMed Central

    Copcu, Eray; Sivrioglu, Nazan; Aktas, Alper; Oztan, Yucel

    2003-01-01

    Background Latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is one of the most frequently performed reconstructive techniques in surgery. Latissimus dorsi muscle has two arcs of rotation. It is classified as type V muscle. This muscle can be elevated on the thoracodorsal artery to cover large defects in the anterior chest and also, the muscle can be elevated on the segmental vessels to cover midline defects posteriorly. The aim of this study was to create a new arc of rotation on a vertical axis for the muscle and investigate effectiveness of vascular and chemical delays on the latissimus dorsi muscle flap with an inferior pedicle in an experimental rat model. We hypothesized that the latissimus dorsi muscle would be based on inferior pedicle by delay procedures. Methods We tested two different types of delay: vascular and combination of vascular and chemical. We also tried to determine how many days of "delay" can elicit beneficial effects of vascular and combination delays in an inferior pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. To accomplish this, 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly subjected to vascular or combination delay (vascular and chemical). In addition, one ear of each rat was assigned into a delay procedure and the other ear was used as a control. Results were evaluated macroscopically, and micro-angiography and histological examinations were also performed. As a result, there was a significant difference in viable flap areas between vascular delay alone and control groups (p < 0.05). Results The higher rate of flap viability was obtained in seven-day vascular delay alone. However, there was no significant difference in the viability between seven-day vascular delay and five-day vascular delay (p < 0.05), so the earliest time when the flap viability could be obtained was at five days. The rate of flap viability was significantly higher in the vascular delay combined with chemical delay than the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion The combination of vascular and chemical delays increased the rate of viability. Nevertheless, there was no significant difference between vascular delay alone and combination of vascular and chemical delays. Chemical delay did not significantly decrease the delay period. Better histological and microangiographical results were achieved in delay groups compared to control groups. We concluded that the arch of the latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap can be changed and the flap can be used for various purposes with the delay procedures. PMID:14667248

  1. Correlation of Smart Active Flap Rotor Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi; Straub, Friedrich

    2009-01-01

    The ability to predict SMART active trailing edge flap rotor loads is explored in this study. Full-scale wind tunnel data recently acquired in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with analytical results from CAMRAD II. For the 5-bladed rotor, two high-speed forward flight cases are considered, namely, a 0 deg flap deflection case and a 5P, 2 deg flap deflection case. Overall, the correlation is reasonable, with the following exceptions: the torsion moment frequency and the chordwise bending moment are under predicted. In general, the effect of the 5P, 2 deg flap motion is captured by the analysis, though there is over prediction in the neighborhood of the 105 deg and 120 deg azimuthal locations. Changes to the flexbeam torsion stiffness are also briefly considered in this study, as this stiffness will be updated in the future. Finally, the indication is that compressibility effects are important, and this suggests that computational fluid dynamics might improve the current correlation.

  2. Computational Aerodynamics of Insects' Flapping Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kyung Dong; Kyung, Richard

    2011-11-01

    The kinematics of the Insects' flapping flight is modeled through mathematical and computational observations with commercial software. Recently, study on the insects' flapping flight became one of the challenging research subjects in the field of aeronautics because of its potential applicability to intelligent micro-robots capable of autonomous flight and the next generation aerial-vehicles. In order to uncover its curious unsteady characteristics, many researchers have conducted experimental and computational studies on the unsteady aerodynamics of insects' flapping flight. In the present paper, the unsteady flow physics around insect wings is carried out by utilizing computer software e-AIRS. The e-AIRS (e-Science Aerospace Integrated Research System) analyzes and models the results of computational and experimental aerodynamics, along with integrated research process of these two research activities. Stroke angles and phase angles, the important two factors in producing lift of the airfoils are set as main parameters to determine aerodynamic characteristics of the insects' flapping flight. As a result, the optimal phase angle to minimize the drag and to maximize the lift are found. Various simulations indicate that using proper value of variables produce greater thrust due to an optimal angle of attack at the initial position during down stroke motion.

  3. 14 CFR 23.701 - Flap interconnection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flap interconnection. 23.701 Section 23.701 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... on one side of the plane of symmetry inoperative and the remaining engines at takeoff power....

  4. Flapping wing aerodynamics: from insects to vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-04-01

    More than a million insects and approximately 11,000 vertebrates utilize flapping wings to fly. However, flapping flight has only been studied in a few of these species, so many challenges remain in understanding this form of locomotion. Five key aerodynamic mechanisms have been identified for insect flight. Among these is the leading edge vortex, which is a convergent solution to avoid stall for insects, bats and birds. The roles of the other mechanisms - added mass, clap and fling, rotational circulation and wing-wake interactions - have not yet been thoroughly studied in the context of vertebrate flight. Further challenges to understanding bat and bird flight are posed by the complex, dynamic wing morphologies of these species and the more turbulent airflow generated by their wings compared with that observed during insect flight. Nevertheless, three dimensionless numbers that combine key flow, morphological and kinematic parameters - the Reynolds number, Rossby number and advance ratio - govern flapping wing aerodynamics for both insects and vertebrates. These numbers can thus be used to organize an integrative framework for studying and comparing animal flapping flight. Here, we provide a roadmap for developing such a framework, highlighting the aerodynamic mechanisms that remain to be quantified and compared across species. Ultimately, incorporating complex flight maneuvers, environmental effects and developmental stages into this framework will also be essential to advancing our understanding of the biomechanics, movement ecology and evolution of animal flight. PMID:27030773

  5. Computation of Lifting Wing-Flap Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian; Kwak, Dochan

    1996-01-01

    Research has been carried out on the computation of lifting wing-flap configurations. The long term goal of the research is to develop improved computational tools for the analysis and design of high lift systems. Results show that state-of-the-art computational methods are sufficient to predict time-averaged lift and overall flow field characteristics on simple high-lift configurations. Recently there has been an increased interest in the problem of airframe generated noise and experiments carried out in the 7 x 10 wind tunnel at NASA Ames have identified the flap edge as an important source of noise. A follow-on set of experiments will be conducted toward the end of 1995. The computations being carried out under this project are coordinated with these experiments. In particular, the model geometry being used in the computations is the same as that in the experiments. The geometry consists of a NACA 63-215 Mod B airfoil section which spans the 7 x lO tunnel. The wing is unswept and has an aspect ratio of two. A 30% chord Fowler flap is deployed modifications of the flap edge geometry have been shown to be effective in reducing noise and the existing code is currently being used to compute the effect of a modified geometry on the edge flow.

  6. Periodic and chaotic flapping of insectile wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y.; Kanso, E.

    2015-11-01

    Insects use flight muscles attached at the base of the wings to produce impressive wing flapping frequencies. The maximum power output of these flight muscles is insufficient to maintain such wing oscillations unless there is good elastic storage of energy in the insect flight system. Here, we explore the intrinsic self-oscillatory behavior of an insectile wing model, consisting of two rigid wings connected at their base by an elastic torsional spring. We study the wings behavior as a function of the total energy and spring stiffness. Three types of behavior are identified: end-over-end rotation, chaotic motion, and periodic flapping. Interestingly, the region of periodic flapping decreases as energy increases but is favored as stiffness increases. These findings are consistent with the fact that insect wings and flight muscles are stiff. They further imply that, by adjusting their muscle stiffness to the energy level at which they are operating, insects can maintain periodic flapping mechanically for a range of operating conditions.

  7. Propulsion of a flapping and oscillating airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrick, I E

    1937-01-01

    Formulas are given for the propelling or drag force experience in a uniform air stream by an airfoil or an airfoil-aileron combination, oscillating in any of three degrees of freedom; vertical flapping, torsional oscillations about a fixed axis parallel to the span, and angular oscillations of the aileron about a hinge.

  8. Experience with the temporoparietal fascial free flap.

    PubMed

    Brent, B; Upton, J; Acland, R D; Shaw, W W; Finseth, F J; Rogers, C; Pearl, R M; Hentz, V R

    1985-08-01

    The temporoparietal fascia is an ideal tissue source for free transfer to distant sites where ultrathin coverage is either desirable or mandatory. The fascia's dependable vascular anatomy facilitates the technical aspects of microvascular transfer by means of its large vessels, ample pedicle, and ability to be grafted on either side. Furthermore, this highly vascular tissue is available in surprisingly large quantities, and its donor scar is hidden in the hair. The authors have found this flap useful (1) in covering exposed bone and tendon without adding unwanted bulk, (2) in providing thin flap coverage or lining in major facial reconstruction, (3) in covering vital structures such as exposed nerves and vessels, (4) in providing neovascularity both as a recipient graft bed and for control of chronic infection, and (5) in reestablishing gliding-tendon mechanisms. The authors have successfully employed this free flap in 15 cases which involved deformities of the ankle, foot, Achilles tendon, forearm, hand, nose, and contralateral ear and scalp. Seven cases are utilized to illustrate the broad application of this unique and versatile free flap. PMID:4023091

  9. A Miniature Controllable Flapping Wing Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arabagi, Veaceslav Gheorghe

    The agility and miniature size of nature's flapping wing fliers has long baffled researchers, inspiring biological studies, aerodynamic simulations, and attempts to engineer their robotic replicas. Flapping wing flight is characterized by complex reciprocating wing kinematics, transient aerodynamic effects, and very small body lengths. These characteristics render robotic flapping wing aerial vehicles ideal for surveillance and defense applications, search and rescue missions, and environment monitoring, where their ability to hover and high maneuverability is immensely beneficial. One of the many difficulties in creating flapping wing based miniature robotic aerial vehicles lies in generating a proper wing trajectory that would result in sufficient lift forces for hovering and maneuvering. Since design of a flapping wing system is a balance between overall weight and the number of actuated inputs, we take the approach of having minimal controlled inputs, allowing passive behavior wherever possible. Hence, we propose a completely passive wing pitch reversal design that relies on wing inertial dynamics, an elastic energy storage mechanism, and low Reynolds number aerodynamic effects. Theoretical models, compiling previous research on piezoelectric actuators, four-bar transmissions, and aerodynamics effects, are developed and used as basis for a complete numerical simulation. Limitations of the model are discussed in comparison to experimental results obtained from a working prototype of the proposed passive pitch reversal flapping wing mechanism. Given that the mechanism is under-actuated, methods to control lift force generation by actively varying system parameters are proposed, discussed, and tested experimentally. A dual wing aerial platform is developed based on the passive pitch reversal wing concept. Design considerations are presented, favoring controllability and structural rigidity of the final platform. Finite element analysis and experimental characterization is performed on the proposed design, yielding acceptable coupling and rigidity characteristics. A working prototype is manufactured from carbon composites and characterized for its lift production capabilities. A scaling law based on momentum flow theory and design scaling arguments is developed, predicting an increase of lift-to-weight ratio of the robot with decreasing size. Per the theoretical considerations, a scaled down prototype of the robot is manufactured and experimentally characterized. System geometry and parameters were optimized based on the developed full system theoretical model to yield maximum lift force. Finally, preliminary control is attempted on the flapping platform employing a decoupled methodology for the roll and pitch direction. A simple Proportional Integral Derivative controller is implemented on the experimental prototype mounted on a motion constraining rig, yielding acceptable trajectory tracking characteristics.

  10. Enhanced Correlation of SMART Active Flap Rotor Loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kottapalli, Sesi

    2011-01-01

    This is a follow-on study to a 2010 correlation effort. Measured data from the SMART rotor test in the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel are compared with CAMRAD II calculations. As background, during the wind tunnel test, unexpectedly high inboard loads were encountered, and it was hypothesized at that time that due to changes in the flexbeams over the years, the flexbeam properties used in the analysis needed updating. Boeing Mesa, recently updated these properties. This correlation study uses the updated flexbeam properties. Compared to earlier studies, the following two enhancements are implemented: i) the inboard loads (pitchcase and flexbeam loads) correlation is included for the first time (reliable prediction of the inboard loads is a prerequisite for any future anticipated flight-testing); ii) the number of blade modes is increased to better capture the flap dynamics and the pitchcase-flexbeam dynamics. Also, aerodynamically, both the rolled-up wake model and the more complex, multiple trailer wake model are used, with the latter slightly improving the blade chordwise moment correlation. This sensitivity to the wake model indicates that CFD is needed. Three high-speed experimental cases, one uncontrolled free flap case and two commanded flap cases, are considered. The two commanded flap cases include a 2o flap deflection at 5P case and a 0o flap deflection case. For the free flap case, selected modifications to the HH-06 section flap airfoil pitching moment table are implemented. For the commanded 2o flap case, the experimental flap variation is approximately matched by increasing the analytical flap hinge stiffness. This increased flap hinge stiffness is retained for the commanded 0o flap case also, which is treated as a free flap case, but with larger flap hinge stiffness. The change in the mid-span and outboard loads correlation due to the updating of the flexbeam properties is not significant. Increasing the number of blade modes results in an effective, commanded flap hinge stiffness of 4X baseline, not 3X as reported earlier. The inboard loads correlation is reasonable, but needs further study. Overall, the free flap case correlation is reasonable, thus confirming the basic correctness of the current semi-empirical modifications; the correlation for the commanded 2o flap at 5P case and the 0o flap case is also reasonable.

  11. The Retrograde Ulnar Dorsal Flap: Surgical Technique and Experience as Island Flap in Coverage of Hand Defects.

    PubMed

    Vergara-Amador, Enrique

    2015-09-01

    Flaps from the forearm are often used to reconstruct soft-tissue defects in the hand. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap has the advantage that it does not sacrifice a major vascular axis. The anatomic bases of this flap are the proximal and distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery. The distal branch is partially accompanied with the dorsal branch of the ulnar nerve, and arrives under the abductor digiti quinti muscle making anastomoses with the deep branch of the ulnar artery. The proximal branch reaching the proximal third of the forearm, and anastomose with perforating branches of the ulnar artery. I used this island flap in 12 patients with coverage defects on the hand. The biggest flap was 13×6 cm. Only 1 flap had partial necrosis which did not lead to problems. The retrograde ulnar dorsal flap is a flap designed with reverse flow from the distal branch of the ulnar dorsal artery, and which does not sacrifice the ulnar artery. The donor defect on the forearm ulnar side had a greater esthetic acceptance. Knowing other distal anastomoses, described by other authors later, dorsal at the base of the fourth interdigital space grant greater security to the retrograde ulnar dorsal flap. It is worth highlighting the importance of preserving the adipofascial tissue around the pedicle. Experience with this flap permits us to state that it is a safe and reproducible flap to cover any defect on the dorsal of the hand as well as the first web space. PMID:26079665

  12. [Erythropoietin in plastic surgery].

    PubMed

    Gnter, C I; Rezaeian, F; Harder, Y; Lohmeyer, J A; Egert, S; Bader, A; Schilling, A F; Machens, H-G

    2013-04-01

    EPO is an autologous hormone, which is known to regulate erythropoiesis. For 30 years it has been used for the therapy of diverse forms of anaemia, such as renal anaemia, tumour-related anaemias, etc. Meanwhile, a multitude of scientific publications were able to demonstrate its pro-regenerative effects after trauma. These include short-term effects such as the inhibition of the "primary injury response" or apoptosis, and mid- and long-term effects for example the stimulation of stem cell recruitment, growth factor production, angiogenesis and re-epithelialisation. Known adverse reactions are increases of thromboembolic events and blood pressure, as well as a higher mortality in patients with tumour anaemias treated with EPO. Scientific investigations of EPO in the field of plastic surgery included: free and local flaps, nerve regeneration, wound healing enhancement after dermal thermal injuries and in chronic wounds.Acute evidence for the clinical use of EPO in the field of plastic surgery is still not satisfactory, due to the insufficient number of Good Clinical Practice (GCP)-conform clinical trials. Thus, the initiation of more scientifically sound trials is indicated. PMID:23629685

  13. Urethroplasty by Use of Turnover Flaps (Modified Mathieu Procedure) for Distal Hypospadias Repair in Adolescents: Comparison With the Tubularized Incised Plate Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Seong Ho; Lee, Jun Nyung; Kim, Hyun Tae

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether urethroplasty with a turnover flap, as an alternative method of distal hypospadias repair in adolescents, improves the outcome of surgery. Materials and Methods Between January 2004 and December 2013, a total of 38 adolescents (aged 11-17 years) underwent distal hypospadias repair with either the tubularized incised plate (TIP) procedure (n=25) or the turnover flap procedure (n=13). The turnover flap procedure was performed with a proximal, ventral penile flap that was turned over to cover the urethral plate. Patient demographics, perioperative outcomes, complications, and postoperative uroflowmetry in each surgical group were analyzed retrospectively. Results The patient demographics were similar in the two groups. There were no significant differences in perioperative outcomes between the groups, including mean operative time, duration of hospital stay, and urethral catheterization. The number of patients with at least one complication, including wound dehiscence, urethrocutaneous fistula, meatal stenosis, and urethral stricture, was lower in the turnover flap group (1/13, 7.7%) than in the TIP group (11/25, 44%, p=0.030). The incidence of meatal stenosis was lower in the turnover flap group (0/12, 0%) than in the TIP group (6/25, 24%). In postoperative uroflowmetry, the plateau-shaped curve rate was lower in the turnover flap group (1/12, 8.3%) than in the TIP group (5/19, 26.3%); the peak flow was higher (p=0.030). Conclusions The turnover flap procedure is clinically useful for repairing adolescent distal hypospadias because it offers lower complication rates and better functional outcomes than TIP. PMID:25405018

  14. Effect of adrenergic stimulation on cutaneous microcirculation immediately after surgical adventitiectomy in a rat skin flap model.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, Jean-Pierre H; Joris, Jean L; Nelissen, Xavier P; Lamy, Maurice L; Heymans, Olivier Y

    2008-01-01

    Chronic sympathetic denervation leads to the development of supersentivity to adrenergic agents. Free flap surgery results in the disruption of the autonomic nerve fibers running along the anastomosed vessels. We therefore investigated the early effect of surgical sympathectomy on the reactivity of cutaneous microcirculation challenged to adrenergic agents. Two epigastric flaps were elevated and exposed in 15 rats. On the right flap (Side A), a circular adventitiectomy of the feeder vessels was realized to provide surgical sympathectomy. On the left flap (Side N), vessels were kept intact. The following drugs were then given intravenously successively: phenylephrine (10 and 15 microg kg(-1)), norepinephrine (10 microg kg(-1)), prazocin (1 mg kg(-1)) followed by norepinephrine (10 microg kg(-1)). Cutaneous microcirculation was assessed using Laser-Doppler Flowmeters simultaneously on the two flaps after each drug administration. Mean arterial pressure was also measured. On side N, phenylephrine and norepinephrine resulted in a transient increase in cutaneous microcirculation followed by a more prolonged reduction. On side A, only the initial increase was observed, which was greater and longer as compared with side N, and paralleled the increase in mean arterial pressure. After prazocin pre-treatment, norepinephrine produced a transient increase in cutaneous microcirculation similar on both sides, and parallel to the changes in arterial pressure. No decrease in cutaneous microcirculation was observed. Immediately after surgical adventitiectomy, the vasoconstriction produced by alpha-adrenergic agents is prevented. No denervation-induced hypersentivity is observed. Surgical sympathectomy might protect cutaneous flaps from vasoconstriction induced by endogenous catecholamines release. PMID:18623150

  15. Stein’s Double Cross-Lip Flaps Combined with Johanson’s Step Technique for Subtotal Lower Lip Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roldán, J. Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Background: In a previous study, a single cross-lip flap (Abbe flap) combined with Johanson’s step technique for repair of defects of more than 2/3 of the lower lip was superior, in terms of aesthetic and functional outcome, compared with Bernard Webster–related techniques (cheek advancement). Herewith, a double cross-lip flap (Stein procedure) is proposed for repair of subtotal lower lip defects. A systematic review of the Stein procedure is provided. Methods: Two patients underwent a paramedian double cross-lip flap, preserving the aesthetic subunit philtrum column combined with the Johanson’s step technique. The aesthetic and functional outcomes and the surgical steps are demonstrated in the videos. An electromyographic study was performed 6 months and 4 years after surgery. A PubMed and a Google Scholar search were performed for the Stein procedure published in 1848. Results: Lip competence was achieved directly after sectioning of the cross-lip pedicles in both patients. Lips progressivity expanded in the first 6 months. No microstomia was observed. Electromyography showed successful reinnervation of the transplanted muscles at 6 months. Four years after surgery, the electromyographic findings were consolidated. Since 1975, 7 articles on the double cross-lip procedure have been published: 4 in English, 1 in French, and 2 in Japanese. None of those articles reported on any supplemental lower lip advancement or on any electromyographic study. Conclusions: The rationale of using 2 cross-lip flaps and a lip-cheek advancement according to Johanson seems to achieve functionally and aesthetically superior results compared with other techniques described for subtotal lower lip reconstruction. PMID:27014544

  16. Scanning electron microscopy of irradiated recipient blood vessels in head and neck free flaps

    SciTech Connect

    Guelinckx, P.J.; Boeckx, W.D.; Fossion, E.; Gruwez, J.A.

    1984-08-01

    Irradiated and control recipient blood vessels in a similar patient population were studied with scanning electron microscopy. The vessels that were biopsied were then anastomosed to a free flap. Irradiated arteries display a significantly greater wall thickness and higher incidence of intimal dehiscence compared with control arteries. Fibrin deposition, microthrombi, and endothelium cell dehiscence are present more frequently in irradiated vessels than in control vessels. Details of the preparation and anastomotic technique for irradiated blood vessels are discussed. Microvascular surgery in irradiated human blood vessels carries with it a higher risk of thrombosis due to preexisting vessel wall damage. This risk can be minimized by experience and attention to detail.

  17. The "jigsaw puzzle" advancement flap for reconstruction of a retroauricular surgical defect.

    PubMed

    Alkalay, Ronen; Alcalay, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Repairing retroauricular defects is quite challenging. Although direct observation of the repaired defect is not possible, choosing the wrong reconstruction might result in serious deformity of the auricle that will be easily noticed. An 89-year-old man presented with a large basal cell carcinoma tumor on his right retroauricular area adjacent to the mastoid-auricle border. The clinical tumor size was 17 × 17 mm. The tumor was excised in one stage, using the Mohs micrographic surgery technique. The final defect size was 20 × 20 mm. The surgical defect was reconstructed by a "jigsaw puzzle"-like flap. PMID:23377339

  18. Forequarter Amputation and Immediate Reconstruction with a Free Extended Humeral-Radial Forearm Flap

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Absalon; Sanchez, Jair; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Eliseo; Tamez, Juan Carlos; Rangel, Jesus Mara

    2015-01-01

    A forequarter amputation is a radical ablative surgical procedure that includes the entire upper extremity with its shoulder girdle. We present a 53-year-old woman with a solid slow growing tumor in her right shoulder of 15 x 20 cm in diameter. Resection and immediate reconstruction with a free radial forearm flap extended from the distal third of the arm to the midpalmar region, taking the humeral artery and the cephalic vein as a main peddicle. The final outcome is shown at six weeks after the surgery.

  19. Glans reconstruction with the use of an inverted urethral flap after distal penile amputation for carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sansalone, Salvatore; Garaffa, Giulio; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Zucchi, Alessandro; Kuehhas, Franklin Emmanuel; Herwig, Ralf; Silvani, Mauro; Pecoraro, Stefano; Loreto, Carla; Leonardi, Rosario

    2013-03-01

    Restoration of adequate cosmesis and preservation of sexual and urinary function are the main goals of penile reconstructive surgery following amputation for carcinoma. Split thickness skin grafts and oral mucosa grafts have been widely used for the creation of a pseudoglans with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The main drawbacks associated with the use of grafts are donor site morbidity, the lack of engorgement of the pseudoglans and the risk of poor graft take, which may lead to contracture and poor cosmetic results. In the present series the long term cosmetic and functional outcomes of glans reconstruction with an inverted distal urethral flap are described. PMID:23695401

  20. Foot Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... not move. Fusions can be done with screws, plates or pins or a combination of these. Tendon Surgery: Surgery on the tendons can be performed for acute injuries such as ruptures but is also commonly done ...

  1. Turbinate surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Turbinectomy; Turbinoplasty; Turbinate reduction; Nasal airway surgery ... There are several types of turbinate surgery: Turbinectomy: All or part of the lower turbinate is taken out. This can be done in several different ways, but sometimes a ...

  2. After Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... side effects. There is usually some pain with surgery. There may also be swelling and soreness around ... the first few days, weeks, or months after surgery. Some other questions to ask are How long ...

  3. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Prevention News Ask an Eye M.D. Espaol Cataracts What Are Cataracts? Cataract Symptoms Who Is at ... Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery Cataract Vision Simulator Cataract Surgery Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Elena ...

  4. Cataract Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Ophthalmologist Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Cataracts Sections What Are Cataracts? Cataract Symptoms Who Is ... Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery Cataract Vision Simulator Cataract Surgery Written by: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed by: Elena ...

  5. Xenogeneic acellular dermal matrix in combination with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap reconstructs hypopharynx and cervical esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yin, Danhui; Tang, Qinglai; Wang, Shuang; Li, Shisheng; He, Xiangbo; Liu, Jiajia; Liu, Bingbing; Yang, Mi; Yang, Xinming

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore xenogeneic acellular dermal matrix (ADM) in combination with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap in hypopharynx and cervical esophagus reconstruction. A total of five patients were treated with this surgical method to reconstruct hypopharynx and cervical esophagus in Second Xiangya Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. Four of them had hypopharyngeal carcinoma with laryngeal and cervical esophageal invasion, while the fifth patient with hypopharyngeal cancer had developed scars and atresia after postoperative radiotherapy. The defect length after hypopharyngeal and cervical esophageal resection was 6-8 cm, and was repaired by a combination of ADM and pectoralis major myocutaneous flap by our team. Interestingly, the four patients had primary healing and regained their eating function about 2-3 weeks after surgery, the fifth individual suffered from pharyngeal fistula, but recovered after dressing change about 2 months. Postoperative esophageal barium meals revealed that the pharynx and esophagus were unobstructed in all five patients. Xenogeneic ADM in combination with pectoralis major myocutaneous flap for hypopharynx and cervical esophagus reconstruction is a simple, safe and effective method with fewer complications. Nevertheless, according to the defect length of the cervical esophagus, the patients need to strictly follow the medical advice. PMID:25355034

  6. RISK OF SEVERE AND REFRACTORY POSTOPERATIVE NAUSEA AND VOMITING IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING DIEP FLAP BREAST RECONSTRUCTION

    PubMed Central

    MANAHAN, MICHELE A.; BASDAG, BASAK; KALMAR, CHRISTOPHER L.; SHRIDHARANI, SACHIN M.; MAGARAKIS, MICHAEL; JACOBS, LISA K.; THOMSEN, ROBERT W.; ROSSON, GEDGE D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) are commonly feared after general anesthesia and can impact results. The primary aim of our study was to examine incidence and severity of PONV by investigating complete response, or absence of PONV, to prophylaxis used in patients undergoing DIEP flaps. Our secondary aims were definition of the magnitude of risk, state of the art of interventions, clinical sequelae of PONV, and interaction between these variables, specifically for DIEP patients. Methods A retrospective chart review occurred for 29 patients undergoing DIEP flap breast reconstruction from September 2007 to February 2008. We assessed known patient and procedure-specific risks for PONV after DIEPs, prophylactic antiemetic regimens, incidence, and severity of PONV, postoperative antiemetic rescues, and effects of risks and treatments on symptoms. Results Three or more established risks existed in all patients, with up to seven risks per patient. Although 90% of patients received diverse prophylaxis, 76% of patients experienced PONV, and 66% experienced its severe form, emesis. Early PONV (73%) was frequent; symptoms were long lasting (average 20 hours for nausea and emesis); and multiple rescue medications were frequently required (55% for nausea, 58% for emesis). Length of surgery and nonsmoking statistically significantly impacted PONV. Conclusion We identify previously undocumented high risks for PONV in DIEP patients. High frequency, severity, and refractoriness of PONV occur despite standard prophylaxis. Plastic surgeons and anesthesiologists should further investigate methods to optimize PONV prophylaxis and treatment in DIEP flap patients. PMID:24038427

  7. Penile reconstruction: combined use of an innervated forearm osteocutaneous flap and big toe pulp.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, K; Nozaki, M; Morioka, K; Huang, T T

    1999-09-01

    The use of a radial forearm flap has become the most popular method to reconstruct a phallus in recent years. This method of reconstruction, however, is plagued with problems such as urethral fistula and loss of phallic girth as a result of tissue atrophy, rendering a phallic contour that is cosmetically unsatisfactory. We had the opportunity of modifying the technique of penile reconstruction using a forearm osteocutaneous flap to minimize these problems. Specifically, a segment of the big toe pulp is used to reconstruct a glans penis. Sensory restoration in the "glans" and "penile shaft" is restored by coapting the digital and the antebrachial nerves to the penile nerve remnants. A segment of flexor carpi radialis muscle is included in the design of a forearm flap to reinforce the coaptation site of the urethral tract. An arteriovenous shunt is incorporated in the shaft as a mechanism to elicit erection of the penis by compressing the root of the neophallus. We had used these technical modifications in a 51-year-old man who had undergone penile amputation because of cancer. The cosmetic appearance and erotic and tactile sensation in the shaft and glans were proper and satisfactory at the end of fourth year after the surgery. The coital function was also satisfactory. PMID:10654748

  8. The lateral thoracodorsal flap in breast reconstruction: a comparison between two plastic surgical centres.

    PubMed

    Blomqvist, L; Malm, M; Holmstrm, H; Lossing, C

    2000-12-01

    In a retrospective study the results of breast reconstruction with 146 lateral thoracodorsal flaps operated on during the period 1991-94 at the Departments of Plastic Surgery at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital in Gteborg and the Stockholm Sder Hospital were evaluated. The median age of the 135 patients was 51 years (range 37-74). About two thirds of the patients were also operated on on the opposite side at the same time; and this was done more often in Stockholm, which partly explains the longer operating time in Stockholm. Perioperative bleeding (median 100 ml, range 25-400) was similar in both groups. Median postoperative bleeding, which was measured only in Stockholm, was 300 ml (range 30-1000). Seromas were seen only in Gteborg where postoperative drains were rarely used. The rate of early complications (infection and partial necrosis) were higher in Stockholm where more flaps were raised in irradiated tissue. We conclude that the results were similar in the two centres, and the thoracodorsal flap gives good results. The incidence of early morbidity could be reduced by excluding patients who had been irradiated, by inserting drains, and by giving antibiotic prophylaxis. PMID:11195870

  9. Ex Vivo Prefabricated Rat Skin Flap Using Cell Sheets and an Arteriovenous Vascular Bundle

    PubMed Central

    Fujisawa, Daisuke; Sekine, Hidekazu; Okano, Teruo; Sakurai, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, research on tissue-engineered skin substitutes have been active in plastic surgery, and significant development has been made in this area over the past several decades. However, a regenerative skin flap has not been developed that could provide immediate blood flow after transplantation. Here, we make a regenerative skin flap ex vivo that is potentially suitable for microsurgical transplantation in future clinical applications. Methods: In rats, for preparing a stable vascular carrier, a femoral vascular pedicle was sandwiched between collagen sponges and inserted into a porous chamber in the abdomen. The vascular bed was harvested 3 weeks later, and extracorporeal perfusion was performed. A green fluorescent protein positive epidermal cell sheet was placed on the vascular bed. After perfusion culture, the whole construct was harvested and fixed for morphological analyses. Results: After approximately 10 days perfusion, the epidermal cell sheet cornified sufficiently. The desquamated corneum was positive for filaggrin. The basement membrane protein laminin 332 and type 4 collagen were deposited on the interface area between the vascular bed and the epidermal cell sheet. Moreover, an electron microscopic image showed anchoring junctions and keratohyalin granules. These results show that we were able to produce native-like skin. Conclusions: We have succeeded in creating regenerative skin flap ex vivo that is similar to native skin, and this technique could be applied to create various tissues in the future. PMID:26180725

  10. Abductor digiti minimi muscle flap transfer to prevent wound healing complications after ORIF of calcaneal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chao-Liang; Huang, Su-Fang; Sun, Xue-Sheng; Zhu, Tao; Lin, Chu; Li, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the transfer of abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle flaps as a method for preventing wound healing complications in cases of closed calcaneal fractures treated with open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF). Method: Design: Retrospective review. Patients: Twenty-six cases of acute closed calcaneal fracture in patients at risk for serious wound complications or with serious fractures. Intervention: During the ORIF surgery, an ADM muscle flap was removed and used to cover the plate, filling the gap between the plate and skin. Main Outcome Measures: Wound healing rates, postoperative complications, and time to heal. Results: All wounds healed uneventfully, except for one case of minor superficial epithelial necrosis during the early postoperative period, which was treated conservatively. All patients regained ambulatory status with regular foot apparel. At last follow-up, the patients presented no clinical, laboratory, or radiological signs of complications. Conclusions: This ADM muscle flap transfer technique appeared to successfully prevent wound healing complications among patients undergoing ORIF for closed calcaneal fractures. This method offers a promising treatment option for calcaneal fractures in patients at high risk for serious wound complications, and future studies with greater numbers of cases are needed to further investigate its clinical application. PMID:26550221

  11. Microcirculatory Evaluation of the Abdominal Skin in Breast Reconstruction with Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator Flap

    PubMed Central

    Tønseth, Kim Alexander; Pripp, Are Hugo; Tindholdt, Tyge Tind

    2016-01-01

    Background: No studies have assessed the perfusion of the undermined abdominal skin in breast reconstruction with deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. A greater understanding of the procedure’s impact on the perfusion of the abdominal skin can be valuable in predicting areas susceptible to necrosis. Methods: Microcirculatory changes were monitored in the abdominal skin of 20 consecutive patients undergoing breast reconstruction with a deep inferior epigastric artery perforator flap. Quantitative mapping was performed with laser Doppler perfusion imaging at 7 set intervals. Measurements were taken and recorded within 4 standardized zones covering the skin between the xiphoid process and the upper incisional boundary of the flap (zones 1–4; cranial to caudal). Results: Before commencing surgery, a significantly higher perfusion was registered in zones 3 and 4 when compared with zone 1. After undermining the abdominal skin, the perfusion in zones 1–3 increased significantly. After the abdominal closure, the perfusion dropped in all 4 zones and only the perfusion level in zone 1 remained significantly higher than preoperative mean. Postoperatively, the perfusion of each zone stabilized at a significantly higher level compared with preoperative values. No tissue necrosis was observed in any of the zones. Conclusions: Although perforators are divided during undermining of the abdominal skin, there seems to be a reactive hyperemia that exceeds the blood supply delivered by the perforators. Thus, due to microcirculatory mechanisms, the undermining of the abdomen during the procedure does not seem to present any great risk of tissue necrosis. PMID:27014545

  12. Foot ischemia after a free fibula flap harvest: immediate salvage with an interpositional sapheneous vein graft.

    PubMed

    Saydam, Funda Akoz; Basaran, Karaca; Ceran, Fatih; Mert, Bulent

    2014-09-01

    The most dreaded major donor-site complication of free fibula flap is a foot ischemia, which is fortunately rare. Various authors have discussed the efficacy of the use of preoperative imaging methods including color Doppler, magnetic resonance angiography, and conventional angiography. A 25-year-old man presented with a 10-cm mandibular defect after a facial gunshot injury. Lower extremity color Doppler revealed triphasic peroneal, tibialis anterior, and posterior artery flows. A fibula osteocutaneous flap was harvested, and the mandible was reconstructed. However, the suture sites at the donor site began to demonstrate signs of necrosis, abscess formation, and widespread cellulitis beginning from postoperative day 9. Angiogram of the lower extremity on the 13th day demonstrated no flow in the right posterior tibial artery distal to the popliteal artery, whereas the anterior tibial artery had weak flow with collateral filling distally. An emergency bypass with a saphenous vein graft between the popliteal artery and the distal posterior tibial artery was performed. Repeated debridements, local wound care, and vacuum-assisted closure were applied. A skin graft was placed eventually. The extremity healed without severe functional disability. In conclusion, although the arterial anatomy is completely normal in preoperative evaluation, vascular complications may still ocur at the donor fibula free flap site. In addition, emergency cardiovascular bypass surgery, as we experienced, may be necessary for limb perfusion. PMID:25119400

  13. Results and Complications of 1104 Surgeries for Velopharyngeal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Hirschberg, Jen?

    2012-01-01

    Velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI) means that the velopharyngeal closure is inadequate or disturbed. VPI may be organic or functional, congenital or acquired and is caused by structural alterations or paresis. The symptoms are primarily to be found in speech (hypernasality), more rarely in swallowing and hearing. The management types are as follows: speech therapy, surgery, speech bulb, and others. Surgery is indicated if the symptoms of VPI cannot be improved by speech therapy. Among the operative methods, velopharyngoplasty constitutes the basis of the surgery. The pharyngeal flap was incorporated and survived in 98.1% of the cases, hyperrhinophony disappeared or became minimal in 90% after surgery in our material (1104 cases). The speech results seemed to be the same with superiorly or inferiorly based pharyngeal flap. The Furlow technique, push-back procedure, the sphincteroplasty, and the augmentation were indicated by us if the VP gap was less than 7?mm; these methods may also be used as secondary operation. We observed among 1104 various surgeries severe hemorrhage in 5 cases, aspiration in 2 cases, significant nasal obstruction in 68 patients, OSAS in 5 cases; tracheotomy was necessary in 2 cases. Although the complication rate is rare, it must always be considered that this is not a life-saving but a speech-correcting operation. A tailor-made superiorly based pharyngeal flap is suggested today, possibly in the age of 5 years. PMID:23724266

  14. Coverage of Amputation Stumps Using a Latissimus Dorsi Flap With a Serratus Anterior Muscle Flap: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Wha; Jeon, Seung Bae; Hwang, Kyu Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Amputation of the extremities is a definitive reconstructive option, and surgeons should aim to preserve maximum overall function. If the exposed bone cannot be adequately covered using local tissues, the stump can be reconstructed using a number of well-described free flap transfer techniques.Between January 2002 and December 2011, 31 patients with severe injuries to the lower extremities underwent above-the-knee, below-the-knee, and Chopart and Ray amputations. Bony stumps were covered using latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flaps alone (group 1), or together with serratus anterior muscle flaps (group 2). The groups were compared with respect to age, flap survival, skin flap size, immediate complications, wound sloughing, deep ulceration, need for bone amputation, limb visual analog scale score, time to prosthesis, and follow-up duration.The mean area of the latissimus dorsi skin flap was 255.9 cm, and immediate complications occurred in 8 (25.8%) patients. In the double-padding group, there were fewer cases of deep ulceration than in the single-flap group, and prostheses could be worn sooner. There were no statistically significant differences in other parameters.Successful reconstruction of amputation stumps requires an adequate, durable, weight-bearing, and well-contoured soft tissue cover. A latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap together with a serratus anterior muscle flap provides well-vascularized muscle tissue and a durable skin paddle, leading to less ulceration than conventional flap techniques. PMID:25003415

  15. [Minimally invasive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Mtrai, Zoltn; Gulys, Gusztv; Kunos, Csaba; Svolt, Akos; Farkas, Emil; Szollr, Andrs; Ksler, Mikls

    2014-02-01

    Due to the development in medical science and industrial technology, minimally invasive procedures have appeared in the surgery of benign and malignant breast diseases. In general , such interventions result in significantly reduced breast and chest wall scars, shorter hospitalization and less pain, but they require specific, expensive devices, longer surgical time compared to open surgery. Furthermore, indications or oncological safety have not been established yet. It is quite likely, that minimally invasive surgical procedures with high-tech devices - similar to other surgical subspecialties -, will gradually become popular and it may form part of routine breast surgery even. Vacuum-assisted core biopsy with a therapeutic indication is suitable for the removal of benign fibroadenomas leaving behind an almost invisible scar, while endoscopically assisted skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy, axillary staging and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap are all feasible through the same short axillary incision. Endoscopic techniques are also suitable for the diagnostics and treatment of intracapsular complications of implant-based breast reconstructions (intracapsular fluid, implant rupture, capsular contracture) and for the biopsy of intracapsular lesions with uncertain pathology. Perception of the role of radiofrequency ablation of breast tumors requires further hands-on experience, but it is likely that it can serve as a replacement of surgical removal in a portion of primary tumors in the future due to the development in functional imaging and anticancer drugs. With the reduction of the price of ductoscopes routine examination of the ductal branch system, guided microdochectomy and targeted surgical removal of terminal ducto-lobular units or a "sick lobe" as an anatomical unit may become feasible. The paper presents the experience of the authors and provides a literature review, for the first time in Hungarian language on the subject. Orv. Hetil., 2014, 155(5), 162-169. PMID:24463161

  16. Bipedicled Superthin Free Perforator Flaps for Facial Burn Scar Reconstruction: Expanded Scope of Superthin Flaps: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Van Anh, Tran; Tien, Nguyen Gia; Hyakusoku, Hiko; Ogawa, Rei

    2015-01-01

    Background: Superthin flap is a distinctively thin flap that is thinned primarily to the point that the subdermal vascular network can be seen through a minimal fat layer. Reconstruction of severely disfigured neck and face can be performed using the occipito-cervico-dorsal superthin flap that is harvested from the dorsal region and supercharged by the circumflex scapular vessels. We used bipedicled superthin free perforator flaps to reconstruct scar contractures on half of the face, whole face, or the whole chin-neck area in 17 postburn patients. Methods: This case series report includes all 17 cases. Flaps in the dorsal area were designed. In all cases, one pedicle consisted of the circumflex scapular vessels. In 11, 5, and 1 flaps, the second pedicle consisted of contralateral posterior intercostal perforators (type 1), ipsilateral posterior intercostal perforators (type 2), and ipsilateral circumflex scapular vessels (type 3), respectively. Four patients underwent whole-face reconstruction after acid burn with type 1 or type 3 perforator. The recipient vessels were the superficial temporal vessels and contralateral or ipsilateral facial vessels. Intraoperatively, all adipose tissue in the flap, including between the 2 pedicles, was thinned by scissors before the pedicles were detached from the donor sites. Maximum flap size was 35??15?cm. Donor sites were covered by a split full-thickness skin graft. Flap survival and functional and cosmetic results were assessed retrospectively. Results: Fifteen of the 17 flaps survived completely. Two developed partial necrosis due to perforator thrombosis. Some patients developed hypertrophic scars around the flap, but these improved naturally over time. All patients were satisfied with both the cosmetic and functional outcomes of the reconstruction. Conclusion: Bipedicled superthin free perforator flaps may be an excellent choice for reconstruction of severe neck scar contracture. This report expands the scope of previously used superthin flaps. PMID:26495206

  17. Unilobed Rotational Flap for Plantar Hallux Interphalangeal Joint Ulceration Complicated by Osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Boffeli, Troy J; Hyllengren, Shelby B

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes-related neuropathic ulcers located at the plantar aspect of the hallux interphalangeal joint are often chronic or recurrent and frequently become complicated by osteomyelitis. Once infected, treatment will typically involve hallux amputation. Although intended as a definitive procedure, amputation of the first toe is not desirable from a cosmetic or functional standpoint and often leads to transfer ulcers at adjacent locations of the foot. Reconstructive wound surgery, combined with limited bone resection, is possible if the infection is caught early before the local tissue and bone have become necrotic. In addition to neuropathy, biomechanical issues, including ankle equinus, hallux limitus, hallux extensus, and hallux valgus, predispose patients with diabetes mellitus to developing plantar hallux ulcers. We commonly employ a proximal based unilobed plantar rotational flap combined with hallux interphalangeal joint arthroplasty as an alternative to hallux amputation. We present a typical case with long-term follow-up to highlight our flap protocol, including patient selection criteria, flap design, surgical technique, bone resection and biopsy pearls, staging timeline, and a typical postoperative course. Periodic follow-up during the next 72months for unrelated conditions allowed long-term monitoring with no recurrence of osteomyelitis or subsequent amputation. The foot remained ulcer free 6 years later. The benefits of this surgical approach include complete excision of the ulcer, adequate exposure for bone resection, early bone biopsy before the spread of infection or necrosis of local tissue, flap coverage with viable soft tissue, and partial offloading of mechanical pressure at the plantar interphalangeal joint. PMID:25681281

  18. Use of Extraocular Muscle Flaps in the Correction of Orbital Implant Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Hsueh-Yen; Liao, Yi-Lin; Tsai, Yueh-Ju; Chu, Yen-Chang; Wu, Shu-Ya; Ma, Lih

    2013-01-01

    Purposes The study is to describe a new surgical technique for correcting large orbital implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps and to propose a treatment algorithm for orbital implant exposure. Methods In a retrospective study, seven patients with orbital implant exposure were treated with extraocular muscle flaps. All data were collected from patients in Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan during 2007–2012. All surgeries were performed by one surgeon (Y.J.T). Patient demographics, the original etiology, details of surgical procedures, implant types, and follow-up interval were recorded. Small exposure, defined as exposure area smaller than 3 mm in diameter, was treated conservatively first with topical lubricant and prophylactic antibiotics. Larger defects were managed surgically. Results Seven patients consisting of two males and five females were successfully treated for orbital implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps. The average age was 36.4 (range, 3–55) years old. Five patients were referred from other hospitals. One eye was enucleated for retinoblastoma. The other six eyes were eviscerated, including one for endophthalmitis and five for trauma. Mean follow-up time of all seven patients was 19.5 (range, 2–60) months. No patient developed recurrence of exposure during follow-up. All patients were fitted with an acceptable prosthesis and had satisfactory cosmetic and functional results. Conclusions The most common complication of orbital implant is exposure, caused by breakdown of the covering layers, leading to extrusion. Several methods were reported to manage the exposed implants. We report our experience of treating implant exposure with extraocular muscle flaps to establish a well-vascularized environment that supplies both the wrapping material and the overlying ocular surface tissue. We believe it can work as a good strategy to manage or to prevent orbital implant exposure. PMID:24086260

  19. Aerosound from corner flow and flap flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meecham, W. C.

    1982-01-01

    Noise generation at the edge of a wing flap is analyzed. The phenomenon as a single vortex moving around a corner in an incompressible, potential flow is modelled. Vortex image retarding effects are proposed as an explanation for small Strouhal numbers. The model surface pressures, sound pressures (using Curle's theory), and Mach number dependencies agree with wind tunnel experiments. A double pressure peak is found in the model (credited to image action) which is qualitatively similar to measured sound correlations. Incompressible flow aerosound calculations are discussed. The effects of a series of vortices moving in the same idealized potential flow are also studied. The vortices are assumed to be statistically independent so their intensities can be added. The frequency of appearance of the vortices are determined from measurements. Diffraction effects caused by the presence of the wing near the dipole sound radiators on the flap surfaces are included.

  20. Adjoint-based optimization for flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; Wei, Mingjun

    2012-11-01

    Adjoint-based methods show great potential in flow control and optimization of complex problems with high- or infinite-dimensional control space. It is attractive to solve an adjoint problem to understand the complex effects from multiple control parameters to a few performance indicators of the flight of birds or insects. However, the traditional approach to formulate the adjoint problem becomes either impossible or too complex when arbitrary moving boundary (e.g. flapping wings) and its perturbation is considered. Here, we use non-cylindrical calculus to define the perturbation. So that, a simple adjoint system can be derived directly in the inertial coordinate. The approach is first applied to the optimization of cylinder oscillation and later to flapping wings. Supported by AFOSR.

  1. Flap Necrosis after Palatoplasty in Patients with Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Rossell-Perry, Percy

    2015-01-01

    Palatal necrosis after palatoplasty in patients with cleft palate is a rare but significant problem encountered by any cleft surgeon. Few studies have addressed this disastrous complication and the prevalence of this problem remains unknown. Failure of a palatal flap may be attributed to different factors like kinking or section of the pedicle, anatomical variations, tension, vascular thrombosis, type of cleft, used surgical technique, surgeon's experience, infection, and malnutrition. Palatal flap necrosis can be prevented through identification of the risk factors and a careful surgical planning should be done before any palatoplasty. Management of severe fistulas observed as a consequence of palatal flap necrosis is a big challenge for any cleft surgeon. Different techniques as facial artery flaps, tongue flaps, and microvascular flaps have been described with this purpose. This review article discusses the current status of this serious complication in patients with cleft palate. PMID:26273624

  2. Application of Advancement Flap After Loose Seton Placement: A Modified Two-Stage Surgical Repair of a Transsphincteric Anal Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Ertem, Metin; Gok, Hakan; Ozveri, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A number of techniques have been described for the treatment of a transsphincteric anal fistula. In this report, we aimed to introduce a relatively new two-stage technique, application of advancement flap after loose seton placement, to present its technical aspects and to document our results. Methods Included in this retrospective study were 13 patients (10 males, 3 females) with a mean age of 42 years who underwent a two-stage seton and advancement flap surgery for transsphincteric anal fistula between June 2008 and June 2013. In the first stage, a loose seton was placed in the fistula tract, and in the second stage, which was performed three months later, the internal and external orifices were closed with advancement flaps. Results All the patients were discharged on the first postoperative day. The mean follow-up period was 34 months. Only one patient reported anal rigidity and intermittent pain, which was eventually resolved with conservative measures. The mean postoperative Wexner incontinence score was 1. No recurrence or complications were observed, and no further surgical intervention was required during follow-up. Conclusion The two-stage seton and advancement flap technique is very efficient and seems to be a good alternative for the treatment of a transsphincteric anal fistula. PMID:25210689

  3. Abdominal aorta as a recipient artery: Using a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap to close hip and pelvic defects

    PubMed Central

    Grieb, Gerrit; Alharbi, Ziyad; Simons, David; Tsolakidis, Savas; Stromps, Jan-Philipp; Piatkowski, Andrzej; Fuchs, Paul; Pallua, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Free tissue transfer (FTT) is now a common procedure in many surgical centres around the world and it has shown well established results especially in the field of reconstructive surgery. The choice of FTT depends on the size of defect, nature of tissue, length of pedicle and donor site morbidity. Notwithstanding, FTT is complex and always depending on a sufficient recipient vessel. PRESENTATION OF CASE Herein, we report a case in which the abdominal aorta was used as arterial recipient vessel for microvascular transfer of a free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. It was utilized to reconstruct an extensive pelvic and hip defect following a massive gas gangrene with a prior debridement of other potential recipient vessels. DISCUSSION In this case, the patient had a large defect that demanded a choice of a large flap such as the free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap. The iliac system has been sacrificed during the debridement procedure together with other potential recipient vessels. In the presented case, arterial anastomosis of the free latissimus dorsi myocutaneous flap was performed to the distal part of the aorta without complications. CONCLUSION Using the abdominal aorta as a recipient arterial vessel seems to be a reliable alternative that should be considered in difficult reconstructive scenarios such as the vessel-depleted pelvis. PMID:23103629

  4. Shape and Structural Optimization of Flapping Wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Eric Colby

    This dissertation presents shape and structural optimization studies on flapping wings for micro air vehicles. The design space of the optimization includes the wing planform and the structural properties that are relevant to the wing model being analyzed. The planform design is parameterized using a novel technique called modified Zimmerman, which extends the concept of Zimmerman planforms to include four ellipses rather than two. Three wing types are considered: rigid, plate-like deformable, and membrane. The rigid wing requires no structural design variables. The structural design variables for the plate-like wing are the thickness distribution polynomial coefficients. The structural variables for the membrane wing control the in-plane distributed forces which modulate the structural deformation of the wing. The rigid wing optimization is performed using the modified Zimmerman method to describe the wing. A quasi-steady aerodynamics model is used to calculate the thrust and input power required during the flapping cycle. An assumed inflow model is derived based on lifting-line theory and is used to better approximate the effects of the induced drag on the wing. A multi-objective optimization approach is used since more than one aspect is considered in flapping wing design. The the epsilon-constraint approach is used to calculate the Pareto optimal solutions that maximize the cycle-average thrust while minimizing the peak input power and the wing mass. An aeroelastic model is derived to calculate the aerodynamic performance and the structural response of the deformable wings. A linearized unsteady vortex lattice method is tightly coupled to a linear finite element model. The model is cost effective and the steady-state solution is solved by inverting a matrix. The aeroelastic model is used to maximize the thrust produced over one flapping cycle while minimizing the input power.

  5. [Technic of delayed skin flap transplantation].

    PubMed

    Aigner, K; Fraedrich, G; Dobroschke, J; Hundeiker, M

    1981-06-01

    In 38 patients a "delayed skin flap transplantation" was performed after excision of malignant melanomas. The skin graft can be stored in a refrigerator at 4 degrees C for 2 weeks without damage to the transplant. The transplantation was usually done 4 days postoperatively. Advantages of this method seem to be a decreased risk of local infection, early mobilisation of the patient, and generally good cosmetic results. PMID:7249854

  6. [Complications of corneal lamellar refractive surgery].

    PubMed

    Kohnen, T; Remy, M

    2015-12-01

    Techniques available for corneal lamellar refractive surgery are laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) using a microkeratome or femtosecond laser incision followed by excimer laser corneal ablation, and femtosecond laser-assisted refractive lenticule extraction (ReLEx). These treatments are nowadays considered to be safe and effective standard procedures for surgical correction of mild to moderate ametropia. Possible complications include too small or decentered optical zones, intraoperative flap cutting errors and postoperative inflammation (e.g. diffuse lamellar keratitis, DLK), epithelial or flap folds, epithelial ingrowths or iatrogenic ectasia. The occurrence of complications may be significantly reduced by compliance to corresponding standards of indication and treatment that are based on current scientific knowledge. PMID:26613941

  7. The distally based, venous supercharged anterolateral thigh flap.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Hung; Zelken, Jonathan; Hsu, Chung-Chen; Lin, Chih-Hung; Wei, Fu-Chan

    2016-01-01

    The distally-based anterolateral thigh flap is an attractive option for proximal leg and knee coverage but venous congestion is common. Restoration of antegrade venous drainage via great saphenous vein supercharge to the proximal flap vein is proposed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare outcomes of 18 large, distally-based anterolateral thigh flaps with and without venous augmentation on the basis of flap size, venous congestion, and clinical course. The average age of 12 men and 6 women was 35.9-year old (range, 16-50 years old). Wounds resulting from trauma, burn sequela, sarcoma, and infection were localized to the knee, proximal leg, knee stump and popliteal fossa. The mean defect was 17.6 9.4 cm(2) (range, 6 7 cm(2) to 22 20 cm(2) ). The mean flap size was 21.4 8.8 cm(2) (range, 12 6 to 27 12 cm(2) ). There were 14 cases in the venous supercharged group and 4 cases in the group without supercharge. The mean size of flaps in the venous supercharged group was significantly larger than that in the group without supercharge (22.6??3.8 9.1??1.7 cm vs. 17.5??4.4 7.8??1.7 cm, P?=?0.03). Venous congestion occurred in all four flaps without supercharge that lasted 3-7 days and partial flap loss occurred in two cases. There was no early venous congestion and partial flap loss in supercharged flaps but venous congestion secondary to anastomotic occlusion developed in two cases. Early exploration with vein grafting resolved venous congestion in one case. Late exploration in the other resulted in flap loss. Preventive venous supercharge is suggested for the large, distally-based anterolateral thigh flap. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 36:20-28, 2016. PMID:25653210

  8. Flapping inertia for selected rotor blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, John D.; May, Matthew J.

    1991-01-01

    Aerodynamics of helicopter rotor systems cannot be investigated without consideration for the dynamics of the rotor. One of the principal properties of the rotor which affects the rotor dynamics is the inertia of the rotor blade about its root attachment. Previous aerodynamic investigation have been performed on rotor blades with a variety of planforms to determine the performance differences due to blade planform. The blades tested for this investigation have been tested on the U.S. Army 2 meter rotor test system (2MRTS) in the NASA Langley 14 by 22 foot subsonic tunnel for hover performance. This investigation was intended to provide fundamental information on the flapping inertia of five rotor blades with differing planforms. The inertia of the bare cuff and the cuff with a blade extension were also measured for comparison with the inertia of the blades. Inertia was determined using a swing testing technique, using the period of oscillation to determine the effective flapping inertia. The effect of damping in the swing test was measured and described. A comparison of the flapping inertials for rectangular and tapered planform blades of approximately the same mass showed the tapered blades to have a lower inertia, as expected.

  9. Evaluation of flexible flapping wing concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakotomamonjy, Thomas; Le Moing, Thierry; Danet, Brieuc; Gadoullet, Xavier; Osmont, Daniel; Dupont, Marc

    2009-03-01

    ONERA - The French Aerospace Lab - has launched an internal program on biologically-inspired Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs), covering many research topics such as unsteady aerodynamics, actuation, structural dynamics or control. The aim is to better understand the flapping flight performed in nature by insects, and to control state of the art technologies and applications in this field. For that purpose, a flight-dynamics oriented simulation model of a flapping-wing concept has been developed. This model, called OSCAB, features a body and two wings along which the aerodynamics efforts are integrated, so as to determine the global motion of the MAV. The model has been improved by taking into account the flexibility of the wings (flexion of the leading edge and passive torsion of the wings, induced by the flapping motion itself under wing inertia). Thus, it becomes possible to estimate the coupling between flexibility and the aerodynamic forces. Furthermore, the model shows that using elastic properties of the wings allows a diminution of the mechanical energy needed for wings motion, and a reduction of the number of actuators to be implanted into the MAV.

  10. Global optimization of actively morphing flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghommem, Mehdi; Hajj, Muhammad R.; Mook, Dean T.; Stanford, Bret K.; Beran, Philip S.; Snyder, Richard D.; Watson, Layne T.

    2012-08-01

    We consider active shape morphing to optimize the flight performance of flapping wings. To this end, we combine a three-dimensional version of the unsteady vortex lattice method (UVLM) with a deterministic global optimization algorithm to identify the optimal kinematics that maximize the propulsive efficiency under lift and thrust constraints. The UVLM applies only to incompressible, inviscid flows where the separation lines are known a priori. Two types of morphing parameterization are investigated heretrigonometric and spline-based. The results show that the spline-based morphing, which requires specification of more design variables, yields a significant improvement in terms of propulsive efficiency. Furthermore, we remark that the average value of the lift coefficient in the optimized kinematics remained equal to the value in the baseline case (without morphing). This indicates that morphing is most efficiently used to generate thrust and not to increase lift beyond the basic value obtained by flapping only. Besides, our study gives comparable optimal efficiencies to those obtained from previous studies based on gradient-based optimization, but completely different design points (especially for the spline-based morphing), which would indicate that the design space associated with the flapping kinematics is very complex.

  11. Aerodynamics of high frequency flapping wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zheng; Roll, Jesse; Cheng, Bo; Deng, Xinyan

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the aerodynamic performance of high frequency flapping wings using a 2.5 gram robotic insect mechanism developed in our lab. The mechanism flaps up to 65Hz with a pair of man-made wing mounted with 10cm wingtip-to-wingtip span. The mean aerodynamic lift force was measured by a lever platform, and the flow velocity and vorticity were measured using a stereo DPIV system in the frontal, parasagittal, and horizontal planes. Both near field (leading edge vortex) and far field flow (induced flow) were measured with instantaneous and phase-averaged results. Systematic experiments were performed on the man-made wings, cicada and hawk moth wings due to their similar size, frequency and Reynolds number. For insect wings, we used both dry and freshly-cut wings. The aerodynamic force increase with flapping frequency and the man-made wing generates more than 4 grams of lift at 35Hz with 3 volt input. Here we present the experimental results and the major differences in their aerodynamic performances.

  12. Locomotion of a flapping flexible plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Ru-Nan; Zhu, Luoding; Lu, Xi-Yun

    2013-12-01

    The locomotion of a flapping flexible plate in a viscous incompressible stationary fluid is numerically studied by an immersed boundary-lattice Boltzmann method for the fluid and a finite element method for the plate. When the leading-edge of the flexible plate is forced to heave sinusoidally, the entire plate starts to move freely as a result of the fluid-structure interaction. Mechanisms underlying the dynamics of the plate are elucidated. Three distinct states of the plate motion are identified and can be described as forward, backward, and irregular. Which state to occur depends mainly on the heaving amplitude and the bending rigidity of the plate. In the forward motion regime, analysis of the dynamic behaviors of the flapping flexible plate indicates that a suitable degree of flexibility can improve the propulsive performance. Moreover, there exist two kinds of vortex streets in the downstream of the plate which are normal and deflected wake. Further the forward motion is compared with the flapping-based locomotion of swimming and flying animals. The results obtained in the present study are found to be consistent with the relevant observations and measurements and can provide some physical insights into the understanding of the propulsive mechanisms of swimming and flying animals.

  13. Managing Flap Vortices via Separation Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David

    2006-01-01

    A pilot study was conducted on a flapped semi-span model to investigate the concept and viability of near-wake vortex management by means of boundary layer separation control. Passive control was achieved using a simple fairing and active control was achieved via zero mass-flux blowing slots. Vortex sheet strength, estimated by integrating surface pressures, was used to predict vortex characteristics based on inviscid rollup relations and vortices trailing the flaps were mapped using a seven-hole probe. Separation control was found to have a marked effect on vortex location, strength, tangential velocity, axial velocity and size over a wide range of angles of attack and control conditions. In general, the vortex trends were well predicted by the inviscid rollup relations. Manipulation of the separated flow near the flap edges exerted significant control over either outboard or inboard edge vortices while producing small lift and moment excursions. Unsteady surface pressures indicated that dynamic separation and attachment control can be exploited to perturb vortices at wavelengths shorter than a typical wingspan. In summary, separation control has the potential for application to time-independent or time-dependent wake alleviation schemes, where the latter can be deployed to minimize adverse effects on ride-quality and dynamic structural loading.

  14. Pharyngeal Tube Flap and Palatoglossal Rotation Flap in Subtotal Soft Palate Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mai, Johnny P; Sadeghi, Nader

    2015-10-01

    Reconstruction of the soft plate after oncologic resection is complex owing to the palate's complex role in speech and swallow. This challenge becomes more complex as defects increase in size. Current management of soft plate reconstruction includes obturation as well as local or microvascular flaps. These methods, though, are limited by poor function and complexity. In regard to large subtotal central soft palate defects, we expand on previous descriptions of a tubed posterior pharyngeal constrictor flap to include a palatoglossal rotational flap that is facile and hardy and has a decreased recovery time. Furthermore, we present 2 representative cases, including 1 with previous radiation, in which our technique was utilized with successful closure of the defect and without subsequent breakdown. PMID:26354028

  15. Skew flap for staged below-knee amputation in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Christopher O; Williams, Ian M; Lewis, Peter; McLain, A David; Twine, Christopher P

    2016-04-01

    Skew flap amputation was first described in the 1980s but was never as popular as the long posterior flap amputation. This report describes a staged below-knee amputation in sepsis, with pus throughout the leg and a lack of skin coverage. One benefit of skew flaps never previously published is the fact that the suture line is not directly over the tibia. Therefore, an open wound or incomplete skin coverage is not as important as in long posterior flaps where it often leads to bone exposure and revision amputation. These benefits were utilized in this case leading to stump healing. PMID:26002782

  16. Current sheet bifurcations observed by Cluster during plasma sheet flapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runov, A.; Sergeev, V.; Baumjohann, W.; Nakamura, R.; Balogh, A.; Klecker, B.; Reme, H.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Andre, M.

    2003-04-01

    We examined the structure of the tail current sheet at XGSM-19~R_E using fast flapping oscillation. It was found that during 1055 -1107 UT on 29 August 2001 and 2220 - 2235 UT on 26 September 2001, following substorm intensifications, the flapping current sheet displayed a clearly bifurcated structure with current density peaks at |B_x|0.5~B_L and a pronounced broad current density minimum in between. In both cases the bifurcation was associated with the current sheet flapping in the Y-Z plane, with very large tilts (exceeding 45o). The origins of current bifurcation and of severe flapping motions are discussed.

  17. The usefulness of the bilobed flap for lateral cheek defects

    PubMed Central

    White, Colin P; Rosen, Nathan; Muhn, Channy Y

    2012-01-01

    The cheek and nose are common areas for skin cancers. There are multiple approaches to surgical excision and reconstruction, depending on the size of defect, tissue quality, adjacent cosmetic units and hairline. An effective solution to skin defects of the lateral cheek is the bilobed flap. This flap tends to be underused in the lateral cheek area because primary closure and skin grafts are perceived to be easier methods of reconstruction. However, the use of the bilobed flap for lateral cheek and other defect closures is encouraged. There are several basic principles that are key when performing this flap. These components of the procedure are highlighted. PMID:23598770

  18. Vortex leading edge flap assembly for supersonic airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudolph, Peter K. C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A leading edge flap (16) for supersonic transport airplanes is disclosed. In its stowed position, the leading edge flap forms the lower surface of the wing leading edge up to the horizontal center of the leading edge radius. For low speed operation, the vortex leading edge flap moves forward and rotates down. The upward curve of the flap leading edge triggers flow separation on the flap and rotational flow on the upper surface of the flap (vortex). The rounded shape of the upper fixed leading edge provides the conditions for a controlled reattachment of the flow on the upper wing surface and therefore a stable vortex. The vortex generates lift and a nose-up pitching moment. This improves maximum lift at low speed, reduces attitude for a given lift coefficient and improves lift to drag ratio. The mechanism (27) to move the vortex flap consists of two spanwise supports (24) with two diverging straight tracks (64 and 68) each and a screw drive mechanism (62) in the center of the flap panel (29). The flap motion is essentially normal to the airloads and therefore requires only low actuation forces.

  19. Effects of primary rotor parameters on flapping dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T. N.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of flapping dynamics of four main rotor design features that influence the agility, stability, and operational safety of helicopters are studied. The parameters include flapping hinge offset, flapping hinge restraint, pitch-flap coupling, and blade lock number. First, the flapping equations of motion are derived that explicitly contain the design parameters. The dynamic equations are then developed for the tip-path plane, and the influence of individual and combined variations in the design parameters determined. The steady state flapping response is examined with respect to control input and aircraft angular rate which leads to a feedforward control law for control decoupling through cross feed, and a feedback control law to decouple the steady state flapping response. The condition for achieving perfect decoupling of the flapping response due to aircraft pitch and roll rates without using feedback control is also found for the hover case. It is indicated that the frequency of the regressing flapping mode of the rotor system can become low enough to require consideration in the assessment of handling characteristics.

  20. Reconstructive versatility of the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Strelzow, V V; Finseth, F; Fee, W E

    1980-01-01

    The pectoralis major myocutaneous flap is presented in its two basic forms: a muscle flap carrying a skin paddle and the continuous skin-muscle flap technique. The pertinent anatomy of the enveloping fascial planes is reviewed, stressing the increased latitude of safety afforded by elevating the vascular pedicle from the undersurface of the lateral muscle edge. The advantages of a deltopectoral flap outline in approaching the formation of the skin-muscle paddle are introduced. Clinical applications, advantages, and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:6821417

  1. Long posterior flap amputation in geriatric patients with ischaemic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K. P.

    1976-01-01

    A series of 165 primary amputations performed on 148 patients at Queen Mary's Hospital, Roehampton, from 1967 to 1975 is reported. The average age of these patients was 70 years, the oldest being 95. Those aged 70 years and over are considered in special detail. The problems of management of these elderly patients are complex, involving medical, surgical, and social problems. The object of treatment is to restore these patients to their previous way of life with the shortest possible time in hospital. Every patient is assessed with a view to arterial surgery, and amputation is avoided where possible by a lumbar sympathetic block or direct arterial surgery. When amputation cannot be avoided a below-knee level is selected if possible. A long posterior flap technique is used which forms a myoplasty of the gastrocnemius muscle; thus the ischaemic anterior tibial skin is avoided. Before the operation the patient is assessed by a specialist team and the management is discussed in detail. Every patient is kept in hospital until rehabilitation is achieved to the point of independence inside the home. Of the 90 patients in the group aged 70 years and over, 22% had above-knee amputations and 75% had below-knee amputations, with the result that 69% of the latter were discharged home walking. This result is contrasted with the smaller number who had an above-knee amputation. Below-knee amputation gives the elderly patient a better chance of walking because of the use of the patellar tendon bearing prosthesis. When followed up 36% of those patients with below-knee amputation were fully independent for periods exceeding six months. The price of a below-knee level of amputation is a longer hospital stay, but the quality of function and mobility obtained by the patient makes this worth while. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:984688

  2. Fat Grafting as a Vehicle for the Delivery of Recombinant Adeno-Associated Viral Vectors to Achieve Gene-Modification of Muscle Flaps*

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Katherine H.; During, Matthew J.; Muravlev, Alexander; Wang, Chuansong; Kocak, Ergun

    2013-01-01

    Background The combination of gene therapy and plastic surgery may have the potential to improve the specificity that is needed to achieve clinically applicable treatment regimens. Our goal was to develop a method for gene-modification that would yield sustainable production of gene products but would be less time consuming than existing protocols. Methods An adeno-associated virus (AAV) was used to deliver gene products to pectoralis muscle flaps. Gene-modification was accomplished via either direct injection or novel fat grafting techniques. Results Gene product production was observable by both in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical staining. Gene products were not detected in tissues that were not in contact with the fat grafts that were incubated with the viral vector, indicating that the transduction stayed local to the flap. Conclusions Using novel recombinant AAV vectors, we have developed a method for gene delivery that is highly efficient and applicable to muscle flaps. PMID:23403543

  3. Reconstruction of Complex Total Parotidectomy Defect With a Chimeric Anterolateral Thigh Perforator Flap and Vascularized Motor Branch of Femoral Nerve Grafting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhong-Fei; Duan, Wei-Yi; Tan, Xue-Xin; Sun, Chang-Fu

    2015-12-01

    Reconstruction of complex total parotidectomy defects after ablation is always a challenge for surgeons. The surgical technique in reconstructing total parotidectomy defects using an anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap has not been described in detail. This report describes the treatment of a difficult case with a complex total parotidectomy defect. An ALT flap composed of a vascularized motor branch of the femoral nerve and a narrow portion of the vastus lateralis muscle was harvested. An 8-cm-long vascularized nerve was transplanted into the gap, which can be considered a cable transplant graft, and a myocutaneous paddle was used to cover and fill in the soft tissue defect. There were no complications after surgery, and the patient was satisfied with the reconstructed facial contours. This case shows that using a chimeric ALT flap for reconstruction is possible in a complex total parotidectomy defect. PMID:26342951

  4. Stereoscopic lithography: customized titanium implants in orofacial reconstruction. A new surgical technique without flap cover.

    PubMed

    Peckitt, N S

    1999-10-01

    Head and neck surgery may involve complex methods of composite reconstruction that do not replicate the volume and contour of the normal anatomy. 'Functional' reconstruction implies replication of the normal volume and contour of both hard and soft tissues to produce normal form and function of the face, mouth and jaws. Techniques such as stereoscopic lithography and computer-assisted design, and-manufacture (CAD-CAM) have been successfully used with computer-numerized control (CNC) milling to manufacture customized titanium implants for single-stage reconstruction of the maxilla, hemimandible and dentition without the use of composite flap cover after the removal of tumours. Reduction in theatre time and personnel, less need for intensive care, and earlier discharge from hospital, indicate possible savings of Pound Sterling 17,000-Pound Sterling 19,000 per patient. There are implications for surgery in general, and further research and development is advocated. PMID:10577749

  5. The use of rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps following excision of vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, J H; Van Dam, P A; Jobling, T W; Breach, N

    1990-11-01

    Rectus abdominis myocutaneous flaps have been used in 16 women following radical excision of extensive vulvar cancer. In two women the procedure was part of the primary surgery, in 11 for recurrence of vulvar cancer and in three for symptomatic palliation. Fifteen (94%) of the grafts took with primary healing. Thirteen of the 16 patients are alive 6-60 months (median 29 months) after surgery and the three who died benefited from symptomatic palliation. Simultaneous vulvar reconstruction allows good cosmetic rehabilitation and is an important part of the armamentarium for the management of patients with advanced primary or recurrent vulvar carcinoma. This technique offers excellent surgical clearance of massive offensive and painful vulvar tumors. PMID:2252868

  6. The value of perioperative antibiotics on the success of oral free flap reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Mcke, Thomas; Rohleder, Nils H; Rau, Andrea; Ritschl, Lucas M; Kesting, Marco; Wolff, Klaus-Dietrich; Mitchell, David A; Loeffelbein, Denys J

    2015-10-01

    The subject of the presented study was to monitor and compare problems and outcomes of reconstructive surgery with microvascular free flaps in the head and neck region between groups of patients treated with perioperative antibiotics and a group of patients without antibiotics. Patients requiring oral reconstructive surgery following cancer resections with microvascular free flaps were prospectively evaluated (2007-2012). Antibiotic therapy was started 30 min before the operation and administered for 10 days. Three hundred and fifty patients were included (208 male, 59.4%; 142 female, 40.6%; mean age 59.8??13.2 years). 330 patients received perioperative antibiotics. Twenty patients (5.7%) who received no antibiotics for specific reasons served as the control group. Wound infections developed in 33 of 122 patients (27%) who received benzylpenicillin, 17 of 88 patients (19.3%) who received amoxicillin combined with sulbactam and 25 of 120 patients (20.8%) who received cefuroxime. Ten patients (50%) who did not receive antibiotics developed wound infections. Receiving no antibiotics or penicillin showed no benefit (P?=?0.11). Those receiving cefuroxime showed significantly lower incidence of wound infections (P?=?0.034; risk decreased by the factor 2.88). The use of amoxicillin combined with sulbactam showed the lowest rate of wound infections (P?=?0.018; risk decreased by the factor 3.46). The use of amoxicillin combined with sulbactam appears to be the most appropriate prophylactic antibiotic followed by cefuroxime in oral microsurgical free flap reconstructions. These data may serve as a guide until a controlled multicenter prospective trial is performed comparing newer antibiotics against current standards. 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Microsurgery 35:507-511, 2015. PMID:26251066

  7. Aerodynamic characteristics of wings with cambered external airfoil flaps, including lateral control, with a full-span flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platt, Robert C

    1936-01-01

    The results of a wind-tunnel investigation of the NACA 23012, the NACA 23021, and the Clark Y airfoils, each equipped with a cambered external-airfoil flap, are presented in this report. The purpose of the research was to determine the relative merit of the various airfoils in combination with the cambered flap and to investigate the use of the flap as a combined lateral-control and high-lift device.

  8. Modern Perforator Flap Imaging with High-Resolution Blood Pool MR Angiography.

    PubMed

    Kagen, Alexander C; Hossain, Rydhwana; Dayan, Erez; Maddula, Soumya; Samson, William; Dayan, Joseph; Smith, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    Advances in microsurgical techniques have improved autologous reconstructions by providing new donor site options while decreasing donor site morbidity. Various preoperative imaging modalities have been studied to assess the relevant vascular anatomic structures, with magnetic resonance (MR) angiography traditionally lagging behind computed tomography (CT) with respect to spatial resolution. Blood pool MR angiography with gadofosveset trisodium, a gadolinium-based contrast agent with extended intravascular retention, has allowed longer multiplanar acquisitions with resultant voxel sizes similar to or smaller than those of CT and with improved signal-to-noise ratio and soft-tissue contrast while maintaining the ability to depict flow with time-resolved imaging. The resultant vascular detail enables precise evaluation of the relevant vascular anatomic structures, including the vessel course, size, and branching pattern, as well as the venous arborization pattern. In addition, any architectural distortion, vessel alteration, or injury from prior surgery can be depicted. The reporting radiologist should be aware of pertinent and incidental findings relevant to the planned surgery and the patient's disease so that he or she can assist the microsurgeon in flap design as a member of the multidisciplinary team. Given the lack of ionizing radiation exposure in patients who often have an elevated body mass index, high-spatial-resolution blood pool MR angiography has become the imaging reference standard for the preoperative assessment of perforator flap vascular and soft-tissue morphology in our practice. PMID:25884098

  9. Lateral eyelid rotation flap: a novel technique for reconstruction of full thickness eyelid defect.

    PubMed

    Pushker, Neelam; Batra, Jyoti; Meel, Rachna; Bajaj, Mandeep S; Chawla, Bhavna; Ghose, Supriyo

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to study anatomical, functional, and cosmetic outcomes of a novel technique, 'Lateral Eyelid Rotation Flap' for reconstruction of full thickness eyelid defect. In this prospective interventional study, 10 patients with full thickness eyelid defect measuring 1/2-2/3rd of eyelid width were included. Eyelid reconstruction was performed by single surgeon, using lateral eyelid rotation flap. Anatomic outcome was assessed by analyzing horizontal and vertical palpebral apertures (HPA and VPA), eyelid contour, and lateral canthus. Functional outcome was assessed by measuring tear film break-up time (TBUT) and Schirmer's test in both the eyes. Cosmetic outcome was evaluated by patients. Median age of patients was 56 years. Nine cases had full thickness defect following the excision of eyelid malignancy. The mean horizontal defect size was 17 4.2 mm. HPA did not change significantly after surgery. VPA was statistically comparable to contralateral eye at 1-month follow-up. Lateral canthus angle recovered by 3rd month after surgery. TBUT and Schirmer's tests were comparable to contralateral eye. Eight patients graded cosmetic outcome as good to excellent. This is a new, single-stage technique for reconstruction of full thickness eyelid defects, with full thickness eyelid tissue including margin. PMID:25673519

  10. Cortical tibial osteoperiosteal flap technique to achieve bony bridge in transtibial amputation: experience in nine adult patients.

    PubMed

    Mongon, Mauricio Leal; Piva, Felipe Alberto; Mistro Neto, Sylvio; Carvalho, Jose Andre; Belangero, William Dias; Livani, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Amputation, especially of the lower limbs, is a surgical procedure that gives excellent results when conducted under the appropriate conditions. In 1949 Ertl developed a technique for transtibial osteomyoplastic amputation which restored the intraosseous pressure through canal obliteration and expanded the area of terminal support through a bony bridge between the fibula and distal tibia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a modification of the original Ertl's technique in which a cortical osteoperiosteal flap created from the tibia is used to form a bony bridge during transtibial amputation in adults. Nine patients underwent leg amputations with the cortical tibial osteoperiosteal flap technique for reconstruction of the stump. The average duration of follow-up was 30.8 (range, 18-41) months. The post-surgery examination included a clinical examination and radiography. A 6-min walk test (Enright in Respir Care 48(8):783-785, 2003) was performed in the 32nd week after amputation. At 24th week post-surgery, all patients had stumps that were painless and able to bear full weight through the end. The creation of a cortical osteoperiosteal flap from the tibia to the fibula during transtibial amputation is a safe and effective technique that provides a strong and painless terminal weight-bearing stump. This constitutes a useful option for young patients, athletes, and patients with high physical demands. PMID:23371841

  11. The versatility of a glycerol-preserved skin allograft as an adjunctive treatment to free flap reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Mat Saad, A Z; Khoo, T L; Dorai, A A; Halim, A S

    2009-01-01

    Skin allografts have been used in medical practice for over a century owing to their unique composition as a biological dressing. Skin allografts can be obtained in several preparations such as cryopreserved, glycerol-preserved, and fresh allograft. A glycerol-preserved allograft (GPA) was introduced in the early 1980s. It has several advantages compared with other dressings such as ease of processing, storage and transport, lower cost, less antigenicity, antimicrobial properties, and neo-vascularisation promoting properties. Skin allografts are mainly used in the management of severe burn injuries, chronic ulcers, and complex, traumatic wounds. Published reports of the use of skin allografts in association with free flap surgery are few or non existent. We would like to share our experience of several cases of free tissue transfer that utilised GPA as a temporary wound dressing in multiple scenarios. On the basis of this case series, we would like to recommend that a GPA be used as a temporary dressing in conjunction with free flap surgery when required to protect the flap pedicle, allowing time for the edema to subside and the wound can then be closed for a better aesthetic outcome. PMID:19881027

  12. Navier-Stokes Computations of a Wing-Flap Model With Blowing Normal to the Flap Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, D. Douglas, Jr.

    2005-01-01

    A computational study of a generic wing with a half span flap shows the mean flow effects of several blown flap configurations. The effort compares and contrasts the thin-layer, Reynolds averaged, Navier-Stokes solutions of a baseline wing-flap configuration with configurations that have blowing normal to the flap surface through small slits near the flap side edge. Vorticity contours reveal a dual vortex structure at the flap side edge for all cases. The dual vortex merges into a single vortex at approximately the mid-flap chord location. Upper surface blowing reduces the strength of the merged vortex and moves the vortex away from the upper edge. Lower surface blowing thickens the lower shear layer and weakens the merged vortex, but not as much as upper surface blowing. Side surface blowing forces the lower surface vortex farther outboard of the flap edge by effectively increasing the aerodynamic span of the flap. It is seen that there is no global aerodynamic penalty or benefit from the particular blowing configurations examined.

  13. Effect of wing aspect ratio and flap span on aerodynamic characteristics of an externally blown jet-flap STOL model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, C. C., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted to determine the effects of flap span and wing aspect ratio on the static longitudinal aerodynamic characteristics and chordwise and spanwise pressure distributions on the wing and trailing-edge flap of a straight-wing STOL model having an externally blown jet flap without vertical and horizontal tail surfaces. The force tests were made over an angle-of-attack range for several thrust coefficients and two flap deflections. The pressure data are presented as tabulated and plotted chordwise pressure-distribution coefficients for angles of attack of 1 and 16. Pressure-distribution measurements were made at several spanwise stations.

  14. Folding in and out: passive morphing in flapping wings.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Amanda K; Lentink, David

    2015-04-01

    We present a new mechanism for passive wing morphing of flapping wings inspired by bat and bird wing morphology. The mechanism consists of an unactuated hand wing connected to the arm wing with a wrist joint. Flapping motion generates centrifugal accelerations in the hand wing, forcing it to unfold passively. Using a robotic model in hover, we made kinematic measurements of unfolding kinematics as functions of the non-dimensional wingspan fold ratio (2-2.5) and flapping frequency (5-17 Hz) using stereo high-speed cameras. We find that the wings unfold passively within one to two flaps and remain unfolded with only small amplitude oscillations. To better understand the passive dynamics, we constructed a computer model of the unfolding process based on rigid body dynamics, contact models, and aerodynamic correlations. This model predicts the measured passive unfolding within about one flap and shows that unfolding is driven by centrifugal acceleration induced by flapping. The simulations also predict that relative unfolding time only weakly depends on flapping frequency and can be reduced to less than half a wingbeat by increasing flapping amplitude. Subsequent dimensional analysis shows that the time required to unfold passively is of the same order of magnitude as the flapping period. This suggests that centrifugal acceleration can drive passive unfolding within approximately one wingbeat in small and large wings. Finally, we show experimentally that passive unfolding wings can withstand impact with a branch, by first folding and then unfolding passively. This mechanism enables flapping robots to squeeze through clutter without sophisticated control. Passive unfolding also provides a new avenue in morphing wing design that makes future flapping morphing wings possibly more energy efficient and light-weight. Simultaneously these results point to possible inertia driven, and therefore metabolically efficient, control strategies in bats and birds to morph or recover within a beat. PMID:25807583

  15. Quantifying Blood Flow in the DIEP Flap: An Ultrasonographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Pennington, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The maximum weight of tissue that a single perforator can perfuse remains an important question in reconstructive microsurgery. An empirically based equation, known as the flap viability index (FVI), has been established to determine what weight of tissue will survive on one or more perforators. The equation is FVI = Sum d(n)^4/W, where d is the internal diameter of each perforator and W is the final weight of the flap. It has been shown that if FVI exceeds 10, total flap survival is likely, but if under 10, partial flap necrosis is probable. The aim of this study was to measure absolute flow rates in deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap pedicles and assess correlation with the determinants of the FVI, perforator diameter and flap weight. Methods: Color Doppler ultrasound was used to quantify arterial flow in 10 consecutive DIEP flap pedicles 24 hours after anastomosis. Results: In single-perforator DIEP flaps, flow rate was highly correlated with perforator diameter (r = 0.82, P = 0.01). Mean arterial flow rate was significantly reduced in DIEP flaps with 2 or more perforators (6 vs 38 cm3/min; P < 0.05). Conclusions: This study confirms that perforator size is a critical factor in optimizing blood flow in perforator-based free tissue transfer. Further research is required to understand the flow dynamics of perforator flaps based on multiple perforators. However, surgeons should be cognizant that a single large perforator may have substantially higher flow rates than multiple small perforators. Routine FVI calculation is recommended to ensure complete flap survival. PMID:25426345

  16. Proangiogenic soluble factors from amniotic fluid stem cells mediate the recruitment of endothelial progenitors in a model of ischemic fasciocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Mirabella, Teodelinda; Hartinger, Joachim; Lorandi, Christian; Gentili, Chiara; van Griensven, Martijn; Cancedda, Ranieri

    2012-08-10

    Skin flaps are routinely used in surgery for the functional and cosmetic repair of wounds or disfiguring scars. The recent concept of therapeutic angiogenesis has emerged as an attractive approach to overcome the problem of blood supply deficiency, often resulting in the flap grafting failure. In the present study, we embedded a gelatin membrane with amniotic fluid stem cells (AFSC) derived conditioned media (ACM) to topically deliver angiogenic growth factors and cytokines into a rat model of ischemic full-thickness skin flap elevated in the epigastric region. AFSC secretome triggered the endogenous repair by the recruitment of endothelial progenitor cells. We studied the vascular perfusion rate, the vessel distribution, and the survival of ACM-treated flaps. In detail, the ischemic sectors of ACM-treated flaps showed at day 7 a perfusion level 50% higher than the preoperation baseline. The ensuing necrosis development was delayed and the histology analysis showed a normal arrangement of epidermal and dermal structures and a high density of vessels in subcutaneous tissues. Further, we found that ACM recruited CD31?/VEGFR2? and CD31?/CD34? cells into the ischemic subcutaneous tissues and that the isolated progenitors were capable to form clusters of von Willebrand factor-positive cells in culture. We propose ACM as a cell-free cocktail of chemokines and growth factors to be adopted for clinical applications. PMID:22225409

  17. Near-infrared spectroscopic assessment of oxygen delivery to free flaps on monkeys following vascular occlusions and inhalation of pure oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fenghua; Ding, Haishu; Cai, Zhigang; Wang, Guangzhi; Zhao, Fuyun

    2002-04-01

    In recent studies, near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) has been considered as a potentially ideal noninvasive technique for the postoperative monitoring of plastic surgery. In this study, free flaps were raised on rhesus monkeys' forearms and oxygen delivery to these flaps was monitored following vascular occlusions and inhalation of pure oxygen. Optical fibers were adopted in the probe of the oximeter so that the detection could be performed in reflectance mode. The distance between emitter and detector can be adjusted easily to achieve the best efficacy. Different and repeatable patterns of changes were measured following vascular occlusions (arterial occlusion, venous occlusion and total occlusion) on flaps. It is clear that the near-infrared spectroscopy is capable of postoperatively monitoring vascular problems in flaps. NIRS showed high sensitivity to detect the dynamic changes in flaps induced by inhalation of pure oxygen in this study. The experimental results indicated that it was potential to assess tissue viability utilizing the dynamic changes induced by a noninvasive stimulation. It may be a new assessing method that is rapid, little influenced by other factors and brings less discomfort to patients.

  18. Scintigraphic evaluation of lymphatic draining pathways in patients treated with pectoralis major (PM) and deltopectoralis (DP) myocutaneous flaps for oropharyngeal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Ulloa, M.; Silver, F.M.; Vasavada, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Oropharyngeal tumors are routinely treated with extensive surgical resection and radiotherapy followed by PM and DP myocutaneous flaps performed for reconstruction purposes. The lymph vessels are the main pathways of oropharyngeal tumor dissemination and play an important role in the development of local recurrences and regional tumor invasion. To evaluate the local and regional residual pathways of lymphatic drainage after flap reconstruction, 25 pts (pts) were imaged 2-3 hours post-administration of .5 mCi of Tc-99m antimony colloid in the flaps. All pts had extensive tumor resection and PM (21 pts) or DP (4 pts) flaps. Fifteen pts had neck radiotherapy prior to the scintigrams. Following are the scintigraphic findings: 1) eight pts showed no visualization of lymph nodes although 4 of these had radiocolloid accumulation within the liver; 2) contralateral or ipsilateral cervical lymph nodes were seen in 16 pts; 3) xyphoid or internal mammary nodes were seen in 4 pts; 4) axillary nodes were seen in 5 pts; 5) liver visualization was present in 12 pts. Findings indicate that pathways of lymph drainage re-establish following head and neck surgery and flap reconstruction in most pts. These pathways are variable and unpredictable and lymphoscintigraphy may therefore play a major role to predict sites of future metastases and in planning therapy.

  19. Repair of nostril stenosis using a triple flap combination: boomerang, nasolabial, and vestibular rotation flaps.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Mehmet; Kapi, Emin; Kuvat, Samet Vasfi; Seluk, Caferi Tayyar

    2012-11-01

    Tissue losses within the nose due to various reasons result in the loss of normal anatomy and function. The external nasal valve area is one of the most important functional components of the nose. The columella, lobule, nostril, and alar region are among the components forming the external nasal valve area. Deformities of the nostrils are among the most frequently observed features that interfere with the functional anatomy of the nose. Malformations of the nostrils often emerge subsequent to cleft lip repairs. Stenoses are a common type of pathology among nostril deformities. In cases where a stenosis has formed, breathing problems and developmental anomalies may occur. In the patient with nostril stenosis presented in this report, there was a serious alar collapse and contracture subsequent to a cleft lip repair. In order to repair the nostril stenosis, a "boomerang flap" was chosen. This boomerang flap was used in combination with a nasolabial flap, a vestibular rotation flap, and a conchal cartilage graft to achieve a satisfactory repair. PMID:21951167

  20. Complex technique of large sural flap: an alternative option for free flap in large defect of the traumatized foot.

    PubMed

    Mohammadkhah, Naser; Motamed, Sadrollah; Hosseini, Seyed Nejat; Hallajmofrad, Hamid Reza; Abdolzadeh, Madjid; Afzali Borujeni, Lotfallah; Mousavinasab, Seyednouraddin

    2011-01-01

    The distally based sural fasciocutaneous flap has become a main part of the reconstruction of the lower leg, heel and foot. However, perfusion problems and venous congestion have been reported. Over the past decade, several flap modifications have been reported to improve flap viability and to solve a myriad of reconstructive needs. The purpose of this paper is to describe our experience in harvesting the reversed large sural flap from the proximal and middle third of the leg for large defects on the foot. We applied the extended reversed sural flap from the proximal third of the leg in traumatized patients which had large defects on their foot. The technique was done in 3 parts: 1- the flaps were designed in the proximal third of the leg five centimeter lipofascial tissue was protected around the pedicle in distal part; 3- The pivot point was located in seven to eight cm proximal the lateral malleolus before the first fasciocutaneous perforators arising from the peroneal artery. Sural flaps from the proximal and middle third of the leg were designed in13 patients who had large defects on their foot. No flap necrosis or split thickness skin graft loss occurred. The flaps healed by the 3rd week excluding two patients. This study supports the application of our technique as a safe, easy and useable method in large defects of the foot. The results showed low rates of ischemia, venous congestion, dehiscence, infection and flap necrosis. Proximal extended and large distally based sural flap is an alternative to free tissue transfer for large defect reconstruction of the foot. PMID:21713727

  1. Free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous flap: The longest possible skin/myocutaneous free flap for soft tissue reconstruction of extremities

    PubMed Central

    Koul, Ashok R.; Nahar, Sushil; Prabhu, Jagdish; Kale, Subhash M.; Kumar, Praveen H. P.

    2011-01-01

    Background: A soft tissue defect requiring flap cover which is longer than that provided by the conventional long free flaps like latissimus dorsi (LD) and anterolateral thigh (ALT) flap is a challenging problem. Often, in such a situation, a combination of flaps is required. Over the last 3 years, we have managed nine such defects successfully with a free Boomerang-shaped Extended Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (BERAM) flap. This flap is the slightly modified and free version of a similar flap described by Ian Taylor in 1983. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent free BERAM flap reconstruction of soft tissue defects of extremity over the last 3 years. We also did a clinical study on 30 volunteers to compare the length of flap available using our design of BERAM flap with the maximum available flap length of LD and ALT flaps, using standard markings. Results: Our clinical experience of nine cases combined with the results of our clinical study has confirmed that our design of BERAM flap consistently provides a flap length which is 32.6% longer than the standard LD flap and 42.2% longer than the standard ALT flap in adults. The difference is even more marked in children. The BERAM flap is consistently reliable as long as the distal end is not extended beyond the mid-axillary line. Conclusion: BERAM flap is simple in design, easy to harvest, reliable and provides the longest possible free skin/myocutaneous flap in the body. It is a useful new alternative for covering long soft tissue defects in the limbs. PMID:22279271

  2. Reverse thenar perforator flap for volar hand reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Tamer

    2009-10-01

    The glabrous skin of the palm provides the best colour and texture match for reconstructing volar hand defects, but only a limited number of local axial pattern flaps of the palm have been described in the literature. This report describes a new reverse thenar perforator flap harvested from the midpalm and the thenar region. A total of 12 patients with volar hand defects of the index finger, palm, or first web space were reconstructed with this flap between August 2005 and August 2007. The causes of the defects were trauma (one patient), burn contracture release of the first web and index finger (four patients), and Dupuytren contracture release (seven patients). The flap was supplied from one or two of the perforating branches of the terminal branch of the superficial palmar arch or the superficial palmar branch of the radial artery. Flap sizes ranged from 1.5 x 3.0 cm to 2.5 x 6.5 cm. The donor sites were repaired primarily in all patients. There were no major postoperative problems: 11 flaps out of 12 survived completely with just one partial loss. Excellent functional and cosmetic results were observed during a mean follow up of 12.6 months. The reverse thenar perforator flap offers glabrous skin for defects of the palm, first web and index finger. Donor scarring of the flap is minimal and it is suitable for the 'replacement with similar tissue' concept. PMID:18667372

  3. 14 CFR 23.697 - Wing flap controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wing flap controls. 23.697 Section 23.697 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Design and Construction Control Systems § 23.697 Wing flap controls....

  4. Medial plantar artery island flap for heel reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard J; Negrini, Jean-Francois

    2006-12-01

    Coverage of soft tissue defects of the heel has been a challenge to reconstructive surgeons in the past. The medial plantar artery flap has facilitated heel coverage since its development in the 1980s. This was a prospective study in 2 centers assessing the complications and durability of this flap primarily in patients with sensory impairment. All patients but 1 had chronic plantar ulceration due to sensory loss, and 5 patients also had developed squamous cell carcinoma. Fifty-one flaps were carried out in 48 patients. One flap underwent necrosis, and delayed healing was seen in 4 cases. Total flap survival was 98%. Minor revision of the flap or its pedicle was required in 3 cases. With a mean follow-up of 14 months, there were recurrences of ulceration in 7 feet (14%). The relevant literature is reviewed. The medial plantar artery flap is a reliable flap for heel coverage in both our centers and others. It is durable and long lasting even in insensate. PMID:17122553

  5. Pectoralis myocutaneous flap for salvage of necrotic wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.C.; Davis, R.K.; Koltai, P.J.

    1985-02-01

    The authors have utilized six pectoralis major myocutaneous flaps in attempts to salvage extensive necrotic wounds of the pharynx and neck. The flap was employed in the following situations: massive necrosis of the entire neck skin with both carotid artery systems exposed, radiation necrosis of the neck skin with exposure of carotid artery, dehiscence of gastric pull-up from pharynx with resultant carotid exposure, failed trapezius flap in a radionecrotic oral cavity, and two cases of pharyngocutaneous fistula with extensive soft tissue necrosis. These flaps achieved healing in all cases. One death occurred 3 weeks following complete cutaneous healing secondary to a ruptured carotid pseudoaneurysm. One flap underwent total skin loss but the entirety of the muscle survived and the fistula was successfully closed with the back of the muscle being subsequently skin grafted. One case of dehiscence of the flap from oral mucosa resulted in a minor exposure of mandible with limited osteoradionecrosis controlled by topical means. This flap has performed extremely well in these precarious and difficult situations that previously may not have been salvageable. It has also been effective in abbreviating the required hospitalization and wound care. The authors conclude that the pectoralis myocutaneous flap should be the primary choice for the management of extensive postsurgical wound necrosis.

  6. Reconstruction of hypopharyngeal defects with submental flap after laryngopharyngectomy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jih-Chin; Chu, Yueng-Hsiang; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Kao, Chuan-Hsiang

    2013-01-01

    The submental flap has rekindled interest in using cervical flaps for reconstruction of head and neck defects. In this article, the authors present their experience of using this flap for hypopharyngeal defects after laryngopharyngectomy. This is a retrospective study of six patients who underwent hypopharyngeal defect reconstruction with submental flap from 2008 to 2011, operated upon by a single surgeon (JC Lee). The flap was used primarily to reconstruct defects after tumor extirpation. The maximum flap size was 12 7 cm and the minimum size was 9 4 cm (average, 10.5 5.3 cm). No flap failures were observed. All the donor site defects were closed primarily. Two patients developed a small pharyngocutaneous fistula that resolved spontaneously. No other complications were observed. After speech reeducation, all achieved a good-quality, understandable artificial voice. All patients were able to eat by mouth without the need for tube feeding. The submental flap is an excellent alternative in the reconstruction of hypopharyngeal defects because of its reliability, versatility, pliability, and relative ease of application. Our initial reports confirm that this kind of reconstruction is feasible and time-saving, and restored a good quality of life. PMID:22566180

  7. Investigation of a tone in flap tip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gioria, Rafael S.; Tsiloufas, Stergios P.; Klug, Francisco K.; Meneghini, Julio R.

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, we investigate numerically the noise generated by the flow around a high-lift configuration. The case studied is the noise generated by the flap tip of the MDA-30P30N high-lift geometry. We propose a cavity model as a simplification for the flap cove flow near the flap tip. The idea of representing the flap cove as a cavity is due to a tone in the spectrum from the numerical simulations of the full high lift geometry MDA-30P30N without spanwise gap between extended flap and the stowed flap. A high peak around 900Hz to 1000Hz was not expected and its source is not clear. The effort here is to investigate the source of frequencies around this value. There is a possibility of noise tones generated from the flap cove with frequencies around 900Hz according to the Rossiter model for the cavity. This mechanism of noise generation seems to be associated to the peak in the spectrum. Snapshot of instantaneous vorticity field near the flap tip supports that a mechanism of noise generation resembles the cavity mechanism. Further corroboration is presented through the Koopman modes (dynamic mode decomposition) of the pressure fields.

  8. Bifurcation to forward flapping flight at intermediate Reynolds number.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, Nicolas; Zhang, Jun; Childress, Stephen

    2003-11-01

    The locomotion of most fish and birds is realized by flapping wings or fins transverse to the direction of travel. According to early theoretical studies, a flapping wing translating at finite speed in an inviscid fluid experiences a propulsive force. In steady forward flight this thrust is balanced by drag. Such "lift-based mechanisms" of thrust production are characteristic of the Eulerian realm, where discrete vortical structures are shed. But, when the Reynolds number is small, viscous forces dominate and reciprocal flapping motions are ineffective. A flapping wing experiences a net drag and cannot be used to propel an organism. We have devised an experiment to bridge the two regimes, and to examine the transition to forward flight at intermediate Reynolds numbers. We study the dynamics of an horizontal wing that is flapped up and down and is free to move either forwards or backwards. This very simple kinematics emphasizes the demarcation between low and high Reynolds number because it is effective in the Eulerian realm but has no effect in the Stokesian realm. We show that flapping flight occurs abruptly as a symmetry breaking bifurcation at a critical flapping frequency. Beyond the bifurcation the forward speed increases linearly with the flapping frequency. The experiment establishes a clear demarcation between the different strategies of locomotion at large and small Reynolds number.

  9. Improving the donor site cosmesis of the latissimus dorsi flap.

    PubMed

    Kelly, M B; Searle, A

    1998-12-01

    A modification in the design of the pedicled latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap is described that aims to minimize the cosmetic morbidity of its donor site. The implications of this variation are discussed with particular reference to use of the flap in postmastectomy reconstruction. PMID:9869136

  10. Tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap for abdominal wall reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Peled, I.J.; Kaplan, H.Y.; Herson, M.; Wexler, M.R.

    1983-08-01

    We report a case of abdominal wall reconstruction following excision of irradiated skin and a ventral hernia. A very large tensor fascia lata musculocutaneous flap was used with good results. The anatomical features of this flap make it an excellent method of abdominal wall reconstruction.

  11. The use of free flaps in skull base reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Maca, G; Picn, M; Nuez, J; Almeida, F; Alvarez, I; Acero, J

    2016-02-01

    Skull base tumours are rare, comprising less than 1% of all tumours of the head and neck. Surgical treatment of these tumours involves the approach, the resection, and the reconstruction of the defect, which present a challenge due to the technical difficulty and anatomical complexity. A retrospective study of 17 patients with tumours involving the skull base, treated by resection and immediate reconstruction using microsurgical free flaps, is presented; 11 were men and six were women. The following types of flap were used: osteocutaneous fibula flaps, fasciocutaneous anterolateral thigh flaps, and myocutaneous latissimus dorsi flaps. The most common histology of the tumours was squamous cell carcinoma. The most frequent point of origin was the paranasal sinuses (58.8%). All of the free flaps used for reconstruction were viable. A cerebrospinal fluid fistula occurred in two patients, and in one of these cases, meningoencephalitis led to death. In conclusion, the reconstruction of large defects of the skull base after ablation requires a viable tissue that in many cases can be obtained only through the use of microvascular free flaps. The type of flap to be selected depends on the anatomical structures and size of the defect to be restored. PMID:26421478

  12. Active Flap Control of the SMART Rotor for Vibration Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Steven R.; Anand, R. Vaidyanathan; Straub, Friedrich K.; Lau, Benton H.

    2009-01-01

    Active control methodologies were applied to a full-scale active flap rotor obtained during a joint Boeing/ DARPA/NASA/Army test in the Air Force National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex 40- by 80-foot anechoic wind tunnel. The active flap rotor is a full-scale MD 900 helicopter main rotor with each of its five blades modified to include an on-blade piezoelectric actuator-driven flap with a span of 18% of radius, 25% of chord, and located at 83% radius. Vibration control demonstrated the potential of active flaps for effective control of vibratory loads, especially normal force loads. Active control of normal force vibratory loads using active flaps and a continuous-time higher harmonic control algorithm was very effective, reducing harmonic (1-5P) normal force vibratory loads by 95% in both cruise and approach conditions. Control of vibratory roll and pitch moments was also demonstrated, although moment control was less effective than normal force control. Finally, active control was used to precisely control blade flap position for correlation with pretest predictions of rotor aeroacoustics. Flap displacements were commanded to follow specific harmonic profiles of 2 deg or more in amplitude, and the flap deflection errors obtained were less than 0.2 deg r.m.s.

  13. External Dacryocystorhinostomy with and Without Suturing the Posterior Mucosal Flaps

    PubMed Central

    Kaçaniku, Gazmend; Begolli, Ilir

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of the external dacryocystorhinostomy with and without suturing the posterior mucosal flaps. Methods: This study included 106 patients with lacrimal drainage system disorders who underwent the external dacryocystorhinostomy. Fifty four patients (Group A) underwent external dacryocystorhinostomy with suturing anterior and posterior flaps of the lacrimal sac and nasal mucosa, and the results obtained were compared with those of another series of 52 patients (Group B) where dacryocystorhinostomy was performed with suturing only the anterior flaps, whereas posterior mucosal flaps were excised. Results: The success rate was evaluated by lacrimal patency to irrigation and relief of epiphora. Patency achieved in groups A and B was 94.4% and 96.2%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in success rate between the groups. Conclusion: Our study suggests that external dacryocystorhinostomy with suturing anterior and posterior flaps have no advantage over dacryocystorhinostomy with suturing only anterior flaps. Anastomosis by suturing only anterior flaps and excision of the posterior flaps is easier to perform and may improve the success rate of external dacryocystorhinostomy. PMID:24783915

  14. Use of Polymethyl Methacrylate-Based Cement for Cosmetic Correction of Donor-Site Defect following Transposition of Temporalis Myofascial Flap and Evaluation of Results after Adjuvant Radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mandlik, Dushyant; Gupta, Karan; Patel, Daxesh; Patel, Purvi; Toprani, Rajendra; Patel, Kaustubh

    2015-11-01

    Background?Temporalis myofascial flap is a versatile flap for reconstruction of the oral cavity defects, but results in an esthetically compromised deformity at the donor site. We used polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) cement to correct the volume loss defect caused by temporalis myofascial flap and evaluated its results before and after adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods?We discuss our experience of using PMMA cement to augment donor-site deformity in 25 patients (17 males, 8 females) between years 2005 and 2009. The primary defect was a result of the ablative surgery for squamous cell carcinoma of the upper alveolar and the buccoalveolar sulcus. A modified curved hemicoronal incision was used as an access for better cosmetic outcome. The volume of cement required was decided during the surgery. Results?All patients are in regular follow-up, alive and free of complications at implant site, except one patient who developed wound dehiscence. The condition of the implant was evaluated by postoperative computed tomographic scan, repeated after adjuvant radiotherapy in cases required. There were no radiation-induced changes in the contour and volume of the implants. Cosmetic result of the implant was reported satisfactory by the patients postoperatively. Conclusion?Restoration of the temporal area defect after the temporalis myofascial flap harvest with the use of PMMA cement is an easy and safe method, with excellent esthetic results. The implant is stable and resistant to any changes in contour and loss of volume even after adjuvant radiotherapy, with no added morbidity to the patients. PMID:26280521

  15. Unnecessary surgery.

    PubMed Central

    Leape, L L

    1989-01-01

    The extent of unnecessary surgery has been the object of considerable speculation and occasional wild accusation in recent years. Most evidence of the existence of unnecessary surgery, such as information from studies of geographic variations and the results of second surgical opinion programs, is circumstantial. However, results from the few studies that have measured unnecessary surgery directly indicate that for some highly controversial operations the fraction that are unwarranted could be as high as 30 percent. Most unnecessary surgery results from physician uncertainty about the effectiveness of an operation. Elimination of this uncertainty requires more efficient production and dissemination of scientific information about clinical effectiveness. In the absence of adequate data from scientific studies, the use of a consensus of expert opinion, disseminated by means of comprehensive practice guidelines, offers the best opportunity to identify and eliminate unnecessary surgery. PMID:2668237

  16. [Precise surgery].

    PubMed

    Dong, Jiahong; Zhang, Ning

    2015-05-01

    Surgery has passed through an intuitive and an empirical era and has now entered its modern phase. The enormous progress in biomedicine, the rise of evidence-based medicine and the consensus on the need for humanistic patient care, have laid a foundation for a new surgical paradigm. Based on a series of studies and practices, we advocated the concept of 'Precision Surgery'. It covers the entire operation-centered surgical practice. The strategy of precision surgery is to seek a balance of maximizing the removal of the target lesion, while maximizing the functional liver remnant and minimizing surgical invasiveness. We propose that the concept of precision surgery should be considered for wider application within liver surgery and various surgical fields, and finally realize the multi-objective optimization with certainty-based practice to ensure maximized recovery for each patient. PMID:26082243

  17. Course Review: The 16th Free Flap Harvesting Course in Living Tissue, Pius Branzeu Centre, Timisoara, Romania.

    PubMed

    Steele, Jessica E

    2016-03-01

    The Free Flap Harvesting Course in Living Tissue is a 3-day course at the Pius Branzeu Centre in Timisoara, Romania held twice a year. The course allows participants 30 hours of operating time and covers the dissection of 9 different free flaps on porcine living tissue. Each flap is demonstrated live before dissection and the experienced course instructors are available at all times to assist participants with their surgery. There are up to 10 course participants with 2 participants to each living porcine model. The course is instructed in English.The course is aimed at plastic surgeons of all levels and allows all participants to develop their skills, whether they are a junior trainee or senior consultant. The living porcine model gives excellent comparison to live operating with the direct feedback from living tissue allowing you to experience the same pressures as a real operating room and to learn quickly from your mistakes. This creates a training experience that is difficult to fault.The vast majority of each day of the course is spent operating, but each morning, there are also lectures given on the ethics and anesthesia of animal operating as well as guest lectures from invited speakers.The course fee is 890 Euros, which includes coffee breaks and lunch and a spectacular course dinner and wine tasting at a local award-winning vineyard. I would recommend this course to all plastic surgery trainees. The current reduction in working hours and surgical experience for trainees means that opportunities to develop operative skills in a simulated environment are extremely valuable. All participants on the course made significant improvements in their free flap raising techniques. PMID:26855032

  18. Inline Motion in Flapping Foils for Improved Force Vectoring Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izraelevitz, Jacob; Weymouth, Gabriel; Triantafyllou, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Flapping foils are a promising alternative actuation technique for aerial and underwater vehicles because they can drastically improve maneuverability by vectoring the actuator force. However, the standard implementation of a flapping foil motion, where the foil is oscillated exactly perpendicular to the free stream flow, does not fully develop this force vectoring capability. Many biological examples of flapping foil actuators include an additional degree of freedom, where the foil is allowed to translate parallel to the flow. This degree of freedom can either powerfully augment the mean lift, or mitigate oscillating lift forces for improved thrust efficiency. We develop a parameterization of this inline motion and outline various motion schemes to improve the force vectoring performance of a flapping foil actuator. We then investigate these motion schemes with both CFD solutions and towing tank experiments, thereby expanding the force vectoring options available for the flapping foil actuator.

  19. Postoperative leucocytoclastic vasculitis in free flap mimicking venous insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Pyon, Jai Kyong; Lee, Kyeong Tae; Lim, So Young; Bang, Sa Ik; Oh, Kap Sung; Mun, Goo-Hyun

    2011-12-01

    A 29-year-old man, who had been diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome 1 year before, developed a wound on his thigh and knee due to necrotising fasciitis. Forty h after a free thoracodorsal artery perforator flap transfer, the colour of the flap changed from pink to purple, starting from the peripheral margin and epitheliolysis proceeded. Within a week, the colour returned to normal spontaneously and the flap survived completely. On punch biopsy, the lesion was confirmed as leucocytoclastic vasculitis, necrotising inflammatory disease of the small vessels in the dermis. This case demonstrates that leucocytoclastic vasculitis mimics postoperative venous insufficiency of a free flap; hence, differential diagnosis by careful judgement of vascular status is required. This rare occurrence needs to be considered in free-flap monitoring, especially in immunosuppressed patients. PMID:21530432

  20. Acoustic characteristics of externally blown flap systems with mixer nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodykoontz, J. H.; Dorsch, R. G.; Wagner, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Noise tests were conducted on a large scale, cold flow model of an engine-under-the-wing externally blown flap lift augmentation system employing a mixer nozzle. The mixer nozzle was used to reduce the flap impingement velocity and, consequently, try to attenuate the additional noise caused by the interaction between the jet exhaust and the wing flap. Results from the mixer nozzle tests are summarized and compared with the results for a conical nozzle. The comparison showed that with the mixer nozzle, less noise was generated when the trailing flap was in a typical landing setting (e.g., 60 deg). However, for a takeoff flap setting (20 deg), there was little or no difference in the acoustic characteristics when either the mixer or conical nozzle was used.

  1. Works on theory of flapping wing. [considering boundary layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golubev, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown mathematically that taking account of the boundary layer is the only way to develop a theory of flapping wings without violating the basic observations and mathematics of hydromechanics. A theory of thrust generation by flapping wings can be developed if the conventional downstream velocity discontinuity surface is replaced with the observed Karman type vortex streets behind a flapping wing. Experiments show that the direction of such vortices is the reverse of that of conventional Karman streets. The streets form by breakdown of the boundary layer. Detailed analysis of the movements of certain birds and insects during flight 'in place' is fully consistent with this theory of the lift, thrust and drag of flapping wings. Further directions for research into flight with flapping wings are indicated.

  2. Distally based perforator sural flaps for foot and ankle reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shi-Min; Li, Xiao-Hua; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Distally based perforator sural flaps from the posterolateral or posteromedial lower leg aspect are initially a neurofasciocutaneous flap that can be transferred reversely to the foot and ankle region with no need to harvest and sacrifice the deep major artery. These flaps are supplied by a perforating artery issued from the deep peroneal artery or the posterior tibial artery, and the chain-linked adipofascial neurovascular axis around the sural/saphenous nerve. It is a versatile and reliable technique for soft-tissue reconstruction of the heel and ankle region with 180-degrees rotation. In this paper, we present its developing history, vascular basis, surgical techniques including flap design and elevation, flap variations in pedicle and component, surgical indications, and illustrative case reports with different perforating vessels as pivot points for foot and ankle coverage. PMID:25893175

  3. Vortex flaps - Advanced control devices for supercruise fighters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamar, J. E.; Campbell, J. F.

    1984-01-01

    Prompted by the extensive experience obtained with vortex lift-generating leading edges in the SR-71, Concorde and F-16 supersonic aircraft, development efforts have recently been made toward the use of variable incidence angle delta wing leading edge 'vortex flaps' for supersonic cruise and maneuvering performance improvements in fighter aircraft. Vortex lift flaps have been wind tunnel tested on scale models, and it has been noted that a variety of effects can be obtained through the use of folding, hinged, and tabbed flap designs. Flap planforms can, moreover, be varied in length and in total area, as well as segmented, to yield unique combinations of drag reduction, vortex generation, longitudinal stability, and vortex flow reattachment. It is speculated that the vortex flap may be applicable to multimission fighters, and promote STOL performance.

  4. Distally based perforator sural flaps for foot and ankle reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shi-Min; Li, Xiao-Hua; Gu, Yu-Dong

    2015-04-18

    Distally based perforator sural flaps from the posterolateral or posteromedial lower leg aspect are initially a neurofasciocutaneous flap that can be transferred reversely to the foot and ankle region with no need to harvest and sacrifice the deep major artery. These flaps are supplied by a perforating artery issued from the deep peroneal artery or the posterior tibial artery, and the chain-linked adipofascial neurovascular axis around the sural/saphenous nerve. It is a versatile and reliable technique for soft-tissue reconstruction of the heel and ankle region with 180-degrees rotation. In this paper, we present its developing history, vascular basis, surgical techniques including flap design and elevation, flap variations in pedicle and component, surgical indications, and illustrative case reports with different perforating vessels as pivot points for foot and ankle coverage. PMID:25893175

  5. Propeller flaps: a review of indications, technique, and results.

    PubMed

    D'Arpa, Salvatore; Toia, Francesca; Pirrello, Roberto; Moschella, Francesco; Cordova, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, propeller flaps have become an appealing option for coverage of a large range of defects. Besides having a more reliable vascular pedicle than traditional flap, propeller flaps allow for great freedom in design and for wide mobilization that extend the possibility of reconstructing difficult wounds with local tissues and minimal donor-site morbidity. They also allow one-stage reconstruction of defects that usually require multiple procedures. Harvesting of a propeller flap requires accurate patient selection, preoperative planning, and dissection technique. Complication rate can be kept low, provided that potential problems are prevented, promptly recognized, and adequately treated. This paper reviews current knowledge on propeller flaps. Definition, classification, and indications in the different body regions are discussed based on a review of the literature and on the authors' experience. Details about surgical technique are provided, together with tips to avoid and manage complications. PMID:24971367

  6. Propeller Flaps: A Review of Indications, Technique, and Results

    PubMed Central

    D'Arpa, Salvatore; Toia, Francesca; Pirrello, Roberto; Moschella, Francesco; Cordova, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    In the last years, propeller flaps have become an appealing option for coverage of a large range of defects. Besides having a more reliable vascular pedicle than traditional flap, propeller flaps allow for great freedom in design and for wide mobilization that extend the possibility of reconstructing difficult wounds with local tissues and minimal donor-site morbidity. They also allow one-stage reconstruction of defects that usually require multiple procedures. Harvesting of a propeller flap requires accurate patient selection, preoperative planning, and dissection technique. Complication rate can be kept low, provided that potential problems are prevented, promptly recognized, and adequately treated. This paper reviews current knowledge on propeller flaps. Definition, classification, and indications in the different body regions are discussed based on a review of the literature and on the authors' experience. Details about surgical technique are provided, together with tips to avoid and manage complications. PMID:24971367

  7. Sushruta: father of plastic surgery.

    PubMed

    Champaneria, Manish C; Workman, Adrienne D; Gupta, Subhas C

    2014-07-01

    Sushruta is considered the "Father of Plastic Surgery." He lived in India sometime between 1000 and 800 BC, and is responsible for the advancement of medicine in ancient India. His teaching of anatomy, pathophysiology, and therapeutic strategies were of unparalleled luminosity, especially considering his time in the historical record. He is notably famous for nasal reconstruction, which can be traced throughout the literature from his depiction within the Vedic period of Hindu medicine to the era of Tagliacozzi during Renaissance Italy to modern-day surgical practices. The primary focus of this historical review is centered on Sushruta's anatomical and surgical knowledge and his creation of the cheek flap for nasal reconstruction and its transition to the "Indian method." The influential nature of the Sushruta Samhita, the compendium documenting Sushruta's theories about medicine, is supported not only by anatomical knowledge and surgical procedural descriptions contained within its pages, but by the creative approaches that still hold true today. PMID:23788147

  8. Flow charts improve efficiency and education during bilateral complex reconstructive surgery of the breasts.

    PubMed

    Som, Robin; Fopp, Laura; Malata, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Free flap surgery for breast reconstruction using abdominal, gluteal and thigh perforator flaps is now routine. It has been extended to "challenging" groups of patients such as the obese, the elderly, and those with multiple scars. However, bilateral free flap reconstruction is still demanding, especially when performed at the same time as the mastectomy. For healthcare staff new to bilateral immediate reconstruction-be they scrub nurses, technicians, junior doctors, or anesthetists-the operative process is not only lengthy but also confusing because it involves multiple steps and operating theatre teams. To simplify the process, we have designed flow charts that map out the course of the operations. We have found that these pictorial representations not only educate staff but also increase the efficiency of the entire procedure. This general principle of utilizing a flow chart to outline complex surgery can be applied to many different types of operations besides breast reconstruction. PMID:21217368

  9. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED...

  10. 50 CFR Figure 16 to Part 223 - Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Escape Opening and Flap Dimensions for the Double Cover Flap TED 16 Figure 16 to Part 223 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS THREATENED MARINE AND ANADROMOUS SPECIES Pt. 223,...

  11. Experimental work with isoxuprine for prevention of skin flap necrosis and for treatment of the failing flap.

    PubMed

    Finseth, F; Adelberg, M G

    1979-01-01

    The administration of isoxuprine intraperitoneally resulted in the complete survival of abdominal island skin flaps in rats that otherwise underwent a standard pattern of necrosis. The drug was effective when administered for two weeks before and one week after raising the flap, or when administered afterwards alone. The mechanisms of its action were investigated and are described. PMID:372989

  12. Pressure Distributions for the GA(W)-2 Airfoil with 20% Aileron, 25% Slotted Flap and 30% Fowler Flap

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Fiscko, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    Surface pressure distributions were measured for the 13% thick GA(W)-2 airfoil section fitted with 20% aileron, 25% slotted flap and 30% Fowler flap. All tests were conducted at a Reynolds number of 2.2 x 10 to the 6th power and a Mach number of 0.13. Pressure distribution and force and moment coefficient measurements are compared with theoretical results for a number of cases. Agreement between theory and experiment is generally good for low angles of attack and small flap deflections. For high angles and large flap deflections where regions of separation are present, the theory is inadequate. Theoretical drag predictions are poor for all flap-extended cases.

  13. A new flap design for release of parallel contracture bands: dual opposing five-flap z-plasty.

    PubMed

    Ersoy, Burak

    2014-12-01

    Skin contractures secondary to burn and other types of trauma can be encountered on almost every part of human body, best addressed by a custom treatment protocol tailored for each patient. Skin graft, local flap as well as distant flap options are available, each with intrinsic advantages and disadvantages. In the presence of weblike contracture the utilization of local tissue, when available, is a prefered approach for a relatively better appearance through a reasonably simpler surgical intervention, compared to skin graft applications and distant flap options. Among many other techniques and modalities utilized for this purpose, the dual opposing five-flap z-plasty method which is a novel method designed as a modification of the paired five-flap z-plasty technique promises to be a useful treatment option for the release of parallel contracture bands with satisfactory results in selected patients. PMID:24931824

  14. [BIOMECHANICAL SUBSTANTIATION OF ONE-AXIS DEFORMITY OF ADIPOSE-CUTANEOUS FLAPS OF TEMPORAL AND ZYGOMATIC AREAS WHILE PERFORMANCE OF UPPER RHYTIDOPLASTY].

    PubMed

    Avetikov, D S; Gutnik, A A; Boyko, I V; Ivanytskaya, O S; Tsvetkova, N V

    2015-05-01

    The urgency of the problem of determining the biomechanical features adipose-cutaneous grafts due to a significant increase in the frequency of performing cosmetic surgery and the lack of a unified concept for such interventions. In 32 women aged 35 to 65 years, which will eliminate the excess soft tissues in the implementation ritidectomy and other surgical interventions, isolated patches of adipose-cutaneous flaps to determine the mechanisms of its plastic deformation. Based on the analysis of biomechanical research targeted the optimal stretching the boundaries of adipose-cutaneous flaps zygomatic--to (0.45 0.021) cm and temporal--by (0.0165 0.002) cm refer to areas that allowed to perform surgery with preservation of natural topographoanatomic relations persons in the performance of the upper ritidectomy. PMID:26419037

  15. [Development of DRGs in reconstructive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Lotter, O; Amr, A; Jaminet, P; Hoefert, S; Schaller, H-E; Stahl, S

    2012-04-01

    Diagnosis-Related Groups (DRG) were introduced in Germany in 2004 as a medico-economic classification system. In this analysis, we looked at reconstructive surgery after breast cancer, focusing on changes of the fee-per-case system in the last 6 years. Immediate, delayed, pedicle and free flaps as well as alloplastic reconstructive methods were analysed using data from German reference hospitals. We analysed the length of stay, reimbursements, costs and profits. The biggest profit margin was found in free perforator flaps. These were up to 3 times higher than in alloplastic reconstruction and pedicle flaps. Due to the fact that the underlying costs for the calculation of reimbursement are always retrospective, we accounted for the rate of price increase. In spite of increasing mean profits, foregone profits of up to €574 per case due to inflation were not taken into consideration. Contrary to actual guidelines, neither the immediate reconstruction of the breast by autologous tissue, nor the bilateral reconstruction is taken into account economically. Although a more differentiated reimbursement of breast reconstruction by DRG has taken place in the last years, the subject still remains a classical example for insufficient mapping of new medical standards in our DRG system. As the choice of surgical therapy is increasingly influenced by free market mechanisms, the risk for economic selection in contradiction to clinical recommendations becomes a real problem. Even 9 years after its introduction, the German DRG system is far from being a learning or quick adapting system. PMID:22495963

  16. Cornea surgery with nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Wang, Bagui; Riemann, Iris; Kobow, Jens

    2005-04-01

    We report on a novel optical method for (i) flap-generation in LASIK procedures as well as (ii) for flap-free intrastromal refractive surgery based on nanojoule femtosecond laser pulses. The near infrared 200 fs pulses for multiphoton ablation have been provided by ultracompact turn-key MHz laser resonators. LASIK flaps and intracorneal cavities have been realized with high precision within living New Zealand rabbits using the system FemtoCutO (JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany) at 800 nm laser wavelength. Using low-energy sub-2 nJ laser pulses, collateral damage due to photodisruptive and self-focusing effects was avoided. The laser ablation system consists of fast galvoscanners, focusing optics of high numerical aperture as well as a sensitive imaging system and provides also the possibility of 3D multiphoton imaging of fluorescent cellular organelles and SHG signals from collagen. Multiphoton tomography of the cornea was used to determine the exact intratissue beam position and to visualize intraocular post-laser effects. The wound healing process has been investigated up to 90 days after instrastromal laser ablation by histological analysis. Regeneration of damaged collagen structures and the migration of inflammation cells have been detected.

  17. Reconstructive Surgery for Head and Neck Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hanasono, Matthew M.

    2014-01-01

    The field of head and neck surgery has gone through numerous changes in the past two decades. Microvascular free flap reconstructions largely replaced other techniques. More importantly, there has been a paradigm shift toward seeking not only to achieve reliable wound closure to protect vital structures, but also to reestablish normal function and appearance. The present paper will present an algorithmic approach to head and neck reconstruction of various subsites, using an evidence-based approach wherever possible. PMID:26556426

  18. Uncertainty Analysis for a Jet Flap Airfoil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Cruz, Josue

    2006-01-01

    An analysis of variance (ANOVA) study was performed to quantify the potential uncertainties of lift and pitching moment coefficient calculations from a computational fluid dynamics code, relative to an experiment, for a jet flap airfoil configuration. Uncertainties due to a number of factors including grid density, angle of attack and jet flap blowing coefficient were examined. The ANOVA software produced a numerical model of the input coefficient data, as functions of the selected factors, to a user-specified order (linear, 2-factor interference, quadratic, or cubic). Residuals between the model and actual data were also produced at each of the input conditions, and uncertainty confidence intervals (in the form of Least Significant Differences or LSD) for experimental, computational, and combined experimental / computational data sets were computed. The LSD bars indicate the smallest resolvable differences in the functional values (lift or pitching moment coefficient) attributable solely to changes in independent variable, given just the input data points from selected data sets. The software also provided a collection of diagnostics which evaluate the suitability of the input data set for use within the ANOVA process, and which examine the behavior of the resultant data, possibly suggesting transformations which should be applied to the data to reduce the LSD. The results illustrate some of the key features of, and results from, the uncertainty analysis studies, including the use of both numerical (continuous) and categorical (discrete) factors, the effects of the number and range of the input data points, and the effects of the number of factors considered simultaneously.

  19. The value of systemically administered metronidazole in the modified Widman flap procedure.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, M M; Dolby, A E

    1987-03-01

    This double-blind cross-over study was undertaken to assess the effect of systemically administered metronidazole when used as an adjunct to periodontal surgery for the treatment of moderate and advanced periodontitis. The effect of metronidazole was compared with that of placebo in patients undergoing modified Widman flap procedures in two areas of the same jaw which could be matched for type of tooth and severity of the periodontal disease. Clinical and microbiological parameters were examined prior to surgery and then 7 days, 1 month, and 3 to 6 months, postoperatively. The clinical parameters recorded were pocket depth (PD), Sulcus Bleeding Index (SBI), probing attachment level (PAL), and patients' preference and pain score. Subgingival plaque samples were studied with dark-field microscopy for differential bacterial count. Pocket depths and SBIs were reduced significantly at all stages, in both groups. Probing attachment levels increased at 7 days, to significant levels only in the metronidazole group, subsequently PALs decreased in both groups with no significant differences between the groups. Although the differential bacterial count altered markedly in both groups at all times, only the straight rod count at 1 month was significantly (P less than 0.05) lower in the metronidazole group. Metronidazole with surgery did not exert a significantly greater beneficial effect than placebo with surgery. PMID:3470498

  20. Expanded retroauricular skin and fascial flap in congenital microtia reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingguo; Quan, Yuzhu; Su, Yuanda; Shi, Lei; Xie, Yangchun; Liu, Xinhai

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this article is to report the application of expanding retroauricular skin fascia flap, and autogenous costal cartilage for congenital microtia reconstruction. Microtia reconstruction was generally completed in 3 surgical stages. In the first surgical stage, a 50 or 80 mL kidney-shaped tissue expander was inserted subcutaneously in the retroauricular mastoid region. Inflation of saline volume increased up to 60 to 80 mL, and skin flap was expanded for 2 to 3 months postoperatively. In the second surgical stage, removal of tissue expander, formation of retroauricular skin flap, elevation of retroauricular fascia flap, and pedicles of both flaps in remnant ear side were performed. Costal cartilage was harvested from ipsilateral side chest to the ear for reconstruction. The 3D ear framework was sculpted with stabilization of structure, contour and erection. Simultaneously, intermediate full thickness skin graft of 4 x 8 cm was obtained from previous incision site from where costal cartilage was harvested. Cartilage ear framework was anchored between skin flap and fascia flap, and fixed it symmetrically to the opposite normal ear, inferior portion of the ear framework was wrapped by remnant ear lobule, expanded skin flap covered the anterior portion of the framework, fascial flap was draped to the posterior side of framework and helical rim, then fascial flap was surfaced by intermediate full thickness skin graft. Suction drain was inserted and coated between skin flap and framework, drain was removed fifth postoperative day. Tragus construction and conchal excavation with skin graft was performed in the third stage of microtia reconstruction. Between October 2000 and October 2007, 426 cases were diagnosed as unilateral microtia patients and 22 cases were bilateral microtia patients. Therefore, 448 microtia ears were treated with tissue expander and autogenous costal cartilage. In 262 cases, structure of the helix, tragus, conchal excavation, auriculocepahalic angle, and symmetry to opposite normal ear were satisfied in the follow-up period of 6 months to 4 years. Antihelix, triangular fossa, and scapha were prominent with good result in most of the patients. Expanded retroauricular skin flap combined with fascial flap can cover the different size and height of cartilage ear framework in single surgical stage. At the same time, on the basis of structure stability and contour reality of cartilage framework, we can achieve fine structure and erect stability of constructed auricle. This method affords ideal results in microtia reconstruction. PMID:20224343

  1. Aeroacoustic Measurements of a Wing-Flap Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Kristine R.; Brooks, Thomas F.; Humphreys, William M.; Hunter, William H.; Gerhold, Carl H.

    1997-01-01

    Aeroacoustic measurements are being conducted to investigate the mechanisms of sound generation in high-lift wing configurations, and initial results are presented. The model is approximately 6 percent of a full scale configuration, and consists of a main element NACA 63(sub 2) - 215 wing section and a 30 percent chord half-span flap. Flow speeds up to Mach 0.17 are tested at Reynolds number up to approximately 1.7 million. Results are presented for a main element at a 16 degree angle of attack, and flap deflection angles of 29 and 39 degrees. The measurement systems developed for this test include two directional arrays used to localize and characterize the noise sources, and an array of unsteady surface pressure transducers used to characterize wave number spectra and correlate with acoustic measurements. Sound source localization maps show that locally dominant noise sources exist on the flap-side edge. The spectral distribution of the noise sources along the flap-side edge shows a decrease in frequency of the locally dominant noise source with increasing distance downstream of the flap leading edge. Spectra are presented which show general spectral characteristics of Strouhal dependent flow-surface interaction noise. However, the appearance of multiple broadband tonal features at high frequency indicates the presence of aeroacoustic phenomenon following different scaling characteristics. The scaling of the high frequency aeroacoustic phenomenon is found to be different for the two flap deflection angles tested. Unsteady surface pressure measurements in the vicinity of the flap edge show high coherence levels between adjacent sensors on the flap-side edge and on the flap edge upper surface in a region which corresponds closely to where the flap-side edge vortex begins to spill over to the flap upper surface. The frequency ranges where these high levels of coherence occur on the flap surface are consistent with the frequency ranges in which dominant features appear in far field acoustic spectra. The consistency of strongly correlated unsteady surface pressures and far field pressure fluctuations suggests the importance of regions on the flap edge in generating sound.

  2. Use of Latissimus Dorsi Pedicled Myocutaneous Flap for Reconstruction in the Chest Area of an 8-Month-Old Female Infant with Ectopia Cordis

    PubMed Central

    Dastagir, Khaled; Breymann, Thomas; Heckmann, Andreas; Horke, Alexander; Vogt, Peter Maria

    2014-01-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is characterized by a complete or partial malposition of the heart outside the thorax. Despite the interdisciplinary treatment, the repair of EC is still very difficult and offers new surgical challenges because of its complexity and various combinations with other anomalies. We report the successful outcome after using a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap in reconstructive surgery in the setting of chronic wound dehiscence in an 8-month-old female infant born with a thoracic EC and omphalocele. PMID:25798359

  3. Use of latissimus dorsi pedicled myocutaneous flap for reconstruction in the chest area of an 8-month-old female infant with ectopia cordis.

    PubMed

    Dastagir, Khaled; Breymann, Thomas; Heckmann, Andreas; Horke, Alexander; Vogt, Peter Maria

    2014-12-01

    Ectopia cordis (EC) is characterized by a complete or partial malposition of the heart outside the thorax. Despite the interdisciplinary treatment, the repair of EC is still very difficult and offers new surgical challenges because of its complexity and various combinations with other anomalies. We report the successful outcome after using a pedicled latissimus dorsi flap in reconstructive surgery in the setting of chronic wound dehiscence in an 8-month-old female infant born with a thoracic EC and omphalocele. PMID:25798359

  4. Brain surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Craniotomy; Surgery - brain; Neurosurgery; Craniectomy; Stereotactic craniotomy; Stereotactic brain biopsy; Endoscopic craniotomy ... cut depends on where the problem in the brain is located. The surgeon creates a hole in ...

  5. Plastic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... procedure that can help smooth or camouflage severe acne scars) sometimes feel more comfortable with their appearance ... procedures teens choose include nose reshaping, ear surgery, acne and acne scar treatment, and breast reduction. previous ...

  6. Cosmetic Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... defect or cosmetic flaw that has diminished their self-esteem over time. It's important to remember that cosmetic ... can create both physical changes and changes in self-esteem. But if you are seeking surgery with the ...

  7. Rodding Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Rods can be made of stainless steel or titanium. Regular rods do not expand. They have many ... v regular), the rod materials (stainless steel v titanium) and the age for a first rodding surgery. ...

  8. Considering Surgery?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... I should know about this surgery? Choosing a Surgeon Your primary care doctor may suggest a surgeon to you. Your state or local medical society can tell you about your surgeon's training. Try to choose a surgeon who operates ...

  9. Thyroid Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... thyroid surgery, requiring treatment with thyroid hormone (see Hypothyroidism brochure ). This is especially true if you had ... Radioactive Iodine Low Iodine Diet Thyroid Function Tests Hypothyroidism Hyperthyroidism Thyroid Disease and Complementary and Alternative Medicine ...

  10. Heart Surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the Risks Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Aneurysm Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Heart Transplant Pacemakers Ventricular Assist Device Send a ... common type of heart surgery for adults is coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). During CABG, a healthy artery or vein ...

  11. Gluteus Maximus Turnover Flap for Sacral Osteomyelitis After Radiation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Sho; Yanagawa, Takashi; Saito, Kenichi; Takagishi, Kenji

    2015-07-01

    Developments in radiation therapy modalities offer alternative treatments for unresectable malignant tumors in the pelvis and trunk. However, poor vascularity as a result of radiation therapy makes the treated lesion susceptible to infection, and there are no established treatments for pelvic osteomyelitis with a large dead space after radiation therapy. The authors report 2 cases of sacral osteomyelitis after radiation therapy that were treated successfully with a gluteus maximus turnover flap. To create the flap, the distal portion of the lower third of the muscle was detached from the trochanter. The distal edge of the flap was turned toward the sacral defect and sewn to the remnant of the sacrum, which filled the dead space with the muscle bulk. A 68-year-old man with a recurrent sacral chordoma was treated with carbon ion radiation therapy; however, a sacral infection developed 5 months later. Debridement and a course of antibiotics could not control the infection and did not induce sufficient formation of granulation tissue in the large and deep dead space. The turnover flap with both gluteus maximus muscles cured the deep-seated infection and closed the wound. A 58-year-old woman had sacral osteoradionecrosis with infection. A turnover flap created with the left gluteus maximus muscle controlled the infection and closed the wound after the first operation, a V-Y flap, failed. This study showed that a gluteus maximus muscle turnover flap effectively controlled infectious lesions with large and deep dead space around the sacrum. PMID:26186331

  12. Bariatric surgery

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Shahzeer; Stoklossa, Carlene Johnson; Sharma, Arya; Stadnyk, Janet; Christiansen, Sandra; Cottreau, Danielle; Birch, Daniel W.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract OBJECTIVE To review the management of bariatric surgical patients. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched, as well as PubMed US National Library, from January 1950 to December 2009. Evidence was levels I, II, and III. MAIN MESSAGE Bariatric surgery should be considered for obese patients at high risk of morbidity and mortality who have not achieved adequate weight loss with lifestyle and medical management and who are suffering from the complications of obesity. Bariatric surgery can result in substantial weight loss, resolution of comorbid conditions, and improved quality of life. The patient’s weight-loss history; his or her personal accountability, responsibility, and comprehension; and the acceptable level of risk must be taken into account. Complications include technical failure, bleeding, abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting, excess loose skin, bowel obstruction, ulcers, and anastomotic stricture. Lifelong monitoring by a multidisciplinary team is essential. CONCLUSION Limited long-term success of behavioural and pharmacologic therapies in severe obesity has led to renewed interest in bariatric surgery. Success with bariatric surgery is more likely when multidisciplinary care providers, in conjunction with primary care providers, assess, treat, monitor, and evaluate patients before and after surgery. Family physicians will play a critical role in counseling patients about bariatric surgery and will need to develop skills in managing these patients in the long-term. PMID:20841586

  13. [Robotic surgery].

    PubMed

    Moreno-Portillo, Mucio; Valenzuela-Salazar, Carlos; Quiroz-Guadarrama, Csar David; Pachecho-Gahbler, Carlos; Rojano-Rodrguez, Martn

    2014-12-01

    Medicine has experienced greater scientific and technological advances in the last 50 years than in the rest of human history. The article describes relevant events, revises concepts and advantages and clinical applications, summarizes published clinical results, and presents some personal reflections without giving dogmatic conclusions about robotic surgery. The Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) defines robotic surgery as a surgical procedure using technology to aid the interaction between surgeon and patient. The objective of the surgical robot is to correct human deficiencies and improve surgical skills. The capacity of repeating tasks with precision and reproducibility has been the base of the robots success. Robotic technology offers objective and measurable advantages: -?Improving maneuverability and physical capacity during surgery. -?Correcting bad postural habits and tremor. -?Allowing depth perception (3D images). -?Magnifying strength and movement limits. -?Offering a platform for sensors, cameras, and instruments. Endoscopic surgery transformed conceptually the way of practicing surgery. Nevertheless in the last decade, robotic assisted surgery has become the next paradigm of our era. PMID:25643879

  14. Tennis elbow surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    Lateral epicondylitis - surgery; Lateral tendinosis - surgery; Lateral tennis elbow - surgery ... Surgery to repair tennis elbow is usually an outpatient surgery. This means you will not stay in the hospital overnight. You will be ...

  15. Preoperative color Doppler assessment in planning of gluteal perforator flaps.

    PubMed

    Isken, Tonguc; Alagoz, M Sahin; Onyedi, Murat; Izmirli, Hakki; Isil, Eda; Yurtseven, Nagehan

    2009-02-01

    Gluteal artery perforator flaps have gained popularity due to reliability, preservation of the muscle, versatility in flap design without restricting other flap options, and low donor-site morbidity in ambulatory patients and possibility of enabling future reconstruction in paraplegic patients. But the inconstant anatomy of the vascular plexus around the gluteal muscle makes it hard to predict how many perforators are present, what their volume of blood flow and size are, where they exit the overlying fascia, and what their course through the muscle will be. Without any prior investigations, the reconstructive surgeon could be surprised intraoperatively by previous surgical damage, scar formation, or anatomic variants.For these reasons, to confirm the presence and the location of gluteal perforators preoperatively we have used color Doppler ultrasonography. With the help of the color Doppler ultrasonography 26 patients, 21 men and 5 women, were operated between the years 2002 and 2007. The mean age of patients was 47.7 (age range: 7-77 years). All perforator vessels were marked preoperatively around the defect locations. The perforator based flap that will allow primary closure of the donor site and the defect without tension was planned choosing the perforator that showed the largest flow in color Doppler ultrasonography proximally. Perforators were found in the sites identified with color Doppler ultrasonography in all other flaps. In our study, 94.4% flap viability was ensured in 36 perforator-based gluteal area flaps. Mean flap elevation time was 31.9 minutes. We found that locating the perforators preoperatively helps to shorten the operation time without compromising a reliable viability of the perforator flaps, thus enabling the surgeon easier treatment of pressure sores. PMID:19158526

  16. Effects of Systemic Tadalafil on Skin Flap Survival in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Michael B.; Stump, Amy L.; Holton, Luther H.; Janes, Lindsay E.; Silverman, Ronald P.; Singh, Devinder P.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, used to increase penile blood flow in erectile dysfunction patients, have recently been postulated to increase blood flow and flap survival in cutaneous flaps based on random blood supply. This study aims to investigate the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor tadalafil, administered orally, on random flap survival. Methods: Modified McFarlane flaps measuring 8 cm 2.5 cm were raised on the backs of 37 male Sprague-Dawley rats. Rats received were divided into a control group, a low-dose group (10 mg/kg tadalafil), and a high-dose group (20 mg/kg tadalafil). Treatment doses were administered once preoperatively and every 24 hours postoperatively for a total of 7 doses. On postoperative day 7 and 14, the area of flap survival was calculated and compared. Results: All rats survived and thrived throughout the experimental period. Control group rats showed an average flap survival of 77% 11% at 7 days and 77% 9% at 14 days. Low-dose-group rats showed an average flap survival of 82% 10% at 7 days (P=0.21), and 81% 12% at 14 days (P=0.41). High-dose group rats showed an average flap survival of 81% 11% at 7 days (P = 0.45) and 80% 12% at 14 days (P = 0.53). Statistical analysis was performed using the Mann-Whitney test. Conclusions: Our results indicate a trend toward increased random-pattern flap survival with both high- and low-dose oral tadalafil in a rat model. Because this trend did not achieve statistical significance, further studies are warranted. PMID:22993643

  17. Significance of anatomical variations of the lateral circumflex femoral artery for the tensor fasciae latae flapping.

    PubMed

    Vuksanovic-Bozaric, A; Radojevic, N; Muhovic, D; Abramovic, M; Radunovic, M

    2015-01-01

    The tensor fasciae latae (TFL) muscle is commonly used in plastic and reconstructive surgery as a transpositional or a free flap, in order to repair different kinds of defects. In most cases its vascularisation is provided by an ascending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery (LCFA), which gives different numbers of branches and enters the TFL muscle in different manners. The represented study deals with the arterial vascularisation of the TFL muscle: the entrance of the vascular stalk branches; variations of the LCFA bifurcation's angle; and the skin area of vascularisation. The study was performed on both lower limbs of a 100 foetal and 10 adult cadavers. The LCFA was injected with micropaque solution, afterwards fixed and preserved in 10% formalin solution. Microdissection was performed under magnifying glass and surgical microscope. Analysis of adult cadavers was performed to determine the skin area vascularised by perforating blood vessels from the TFL muscle, by injecting methylene-blue dye into the artery, prior to which all branches of the LCFA, besides the ascending branch, were ligated. The research of a 100 foetal cadavers showed that the LCFA with its ascending branch ensured the blood supply to the muscle. In 85% it gave two branches, the ascending and the descending one, with the angle of bifurcation circa 90o in 73% of cases. The ascending branch can give 0 or more terminal branches, or even form an arterial net. Skin area affected with dye ranged from 18 22 cm to 23 28 cm and is in positive correlation with the LCFA length and diameter. The understanding of the presented variations have an exceptional significance in planning and applying the TFL flap, especially free flap, in successful repairing and covering the defects, as well as in preventing postoperative complications. PMID:26339822

  18. Design and Performance of Insect-Scale Flapping-Wing Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, John Peter

    Micro-air vehicles (MAVs)---small versions of full-scale aircraft---are the product of a continued path of miniaturization which extends across many fields of engineering. Increasingly, MAVs approach the scale of small birds, and most recently, their sizes have dipped into the realm of hummingbirds and flying insects. However, these non-traditional biologically-inspired designs are without well-established design methods, and manufacturing complex devices at these tiny scales is not feasible using conventional manufacturing methods. This thesis presents a comprehensive investigation of new MAV design and manufacturing methods, as applicable to insect-scale hovering flight. New design methods combine an energy-based accounting of propulsion and aerodynamics with a one degree-of-freedom dynamic flapping model. Important results include analytical expressions for maximum flight endurance and range, and predictions for maximum feasible wing size and body mass. To meet manufacturing constraints, the use of passive wing dynamics to simplify vehicle design and control was investigated; supporting tests included the first synchronized measurements of real-time forces and three-dimensional kinematics generated by insect-scale flapping wings. These experimental methods were then expanded to study optimal wing shapes and high-efficiency flapping kinematics. To support the development of high-fidelity test devices and fully-functional flight hardware, a new class of manufacturing methods was developed, combining elements of rigid-flex printed circuit board fabrication with "pop-up book" folding mechanisms. In addition to their current and future support of insect-scale MAV development, these new manufacturing techniques are likely to prove an essential element to future advances in micro-optomechanics, micro-surgery, and many other fields.

  19. Free Vascularized Medial Femoral Condyle Structural Flaps for Septic Terminal Digital Bone Loss.

    PubMed

    Henry, Mark

    2015-12-01

    A unique clinical problem exists when the majority of distal bone stock in a digit is destroyed by osteomyelitis, leaving a residual soft tissue envelope with tenuous, random perfusion surrounding a nidus of scar tissue. Pulp pinch is lost in the absence of bony support, and limited options exist. Apart from toe transfer or revision amputation with shortening, non-vascularized bone grafting inside the residual soft tissue envelope risks graft resorption and reactivation of infection. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the clinical outcomes of free vascularized medial femoral condyle structural bone flaps to restore lost pulp pinch in such cases. Nine patients (8 males, 1 female) with a mean age of 43years sustained extensive terminal bone loss near digital tips following osteomyelitis. The mean length of bone defect was 28mm ( 8.4). The patients were reconstructed at a mean of 12weeks from initial trauma/infection, having undergone a mean of two prior surgeries. A structural block of vascularized bone from the medial femoral condyle replaced the missing bone at the digital tip defect, temporarily fixed with K-wires. The bone flap was encased by the residual soft tissue envelope after removing scar tissue from the prior trauma and infection. All bone flaps incorporated fully, restoring pulp pinch function to the respective digits with a mean time to union of 8.6 ( 2.1) weeks; range 6-11weeks. With few alternative solutions able to address this unique and difficult problem, the structural block of vascularized bone proved able to resist resorption, nonunion, and reactivation of infection; the problems normally encountered under this scenario. PMID:26578834

  20. Conservative mastectomies and Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction: the DIEP flap

    PubMed Central

    Nestle-Krämling, Carolin; Fertsch, Sonia; Hagouan, Mazen; Munder, Beatrix; Richrath, Philip; Stambera, Peter; Abu-Ghazaleh, Alina; Andree, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Background With the development of conservative mastectomies, there are an increasing number of women seeking immediate implant based and autologous breast reconstruction. Despite the oncologic safety of the procedures, the focus will be on the timing of reconstruction. Methods Our plastic surgery unit is focused primarily on autologous breast reconstruction and is part of an interdisciplinary breast center. We offer immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) with autologous tissue for patients with positive BRCA 1 and 2, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), invasive cancer without margin problems to the skin, as well as to correct poor oncologic and aesthetic breast conserving therapy (BCT) outcomes. In the majority of cases we prefer an Immediate-DElayed AutoLogous (IDEAL) breast reconstruction concept with a two-stage procedure. Results Over the last 10 years we performed more than 1,600 breast reconstructions with free flaps, performing the deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap as our first choice for autologous tissue. We recommend IDEAL breast reconstruction, however approximately 15% of our cases are immediate one stage conservative mastectomies and breast reconstruction with the DIEP flap. Conclusions For immediate reconstruction, the aesthetic outcome should not take precedence over oncologic considerations. Immediate one-stage, breast reconstruction with autologous tissue can be offered to the suitable patients which is most likely a healthy women with a small-to-medium sized non ptotic breast receiving a conservative mastectomy. In all other cases, we recommend an IDEAL breast reconstruction approach in order to achieve a final result that is both satisfyingly pleasing and oncologically safe. PMID:26855905