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Sample records for gynecologic cancer research

  1. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:25872896

  2. About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. |

  3. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  4. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  5. Social Representations of Gynecologic Cancer Screening Assessment a Qualitative research on Ecuadorian women.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Yolanda; Godoy, Clara; Reyes, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding gynecologic cancer screening on Ecuadorian women users of primary care facilities, to identify the social representations that users of health services make about these programs and their influence on the decision to undergo a screening. An exploratory and qualitative research design was held using focus groups and in-depth interviews for data collection. A narrative content analysis of the results was conducted. Women's knowledge on gynecological cancer screening was confusing. Most frequent misconceptions related to the pap smear were: the belief that it could be useful for detecting pregnancy, ovarian cysts or infections. Most of the participants stated that the pap smear procedure is a traumatic and painful experience. Regarding to mammography women said it was used for sick woman and this procedure by itself may cause cancer. El propósito de esta investigación fue explorar los conocimientos, actitudes y creencias respecto a los programas de detección del cáncer ginecológico entre usuarias de centros de atención primaria de salud para identificar las representaciones sociales que las usuarias de los servicios de salud elaboran acerca de estos programas y de los diferentes procedimientos que comprenden. El diseño de la investigación fue exploratorio y cualitativo, mediante grupos focales y entrevistas a profundidad, con el respectivo análisis narrativo e interpretativo del contenido. Se encontró conocimiento confuso acerca de los programas de tamizaje de cáncer ginecológico y dificultades asociadas a la realización de los procedimientos. Los significados más frecuentes acerca de los programas fueron: el uso de la citología cérvico-vaginal para detectar embarazo, quistes ováricos o infecciones. La mayoría de los participantes asociaba este procedimiento con una experiencia dolorosa y traumática. Respecto al autoexamen de mamas, lo calificaron como un masaje

  6. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  7. A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Leeya F; Nelson, Brett D; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

    2016-01-01

    African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population's high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population. PMID:27499654

  8. A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Leeya F.; Nelson, Brett D.; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

    2016-01-01

    African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population’s high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population. PMID:27499654

  9. Replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Kim, M

    2016-01-01

    Despite advanced therapeutic treatments, gynecologic malignancies such as cervical and ovarian cancers are still the top ten leading cause of cancer death among women in South Korea. Thus a novel and innovative approach is urgently needed. Naturally occurring viruses are live, replication-proficient viruses that specifically infect human cancer cells while sparing normal cell counterparts. Since the serendipitous discovery of the naturally oncotropic virus targeting gynecologic cancer in 1920s, various replicating viruses have shown various degrees of safety and efficacy in preclinical or clinical applications for gynecologic cancer therapy. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are frequently dysregulated in gynecologic malignancies, play an important role in determining viral oncotropism. Published articles describing replicating, oncolytic viruses for gynecologic cancers are thoroughly reviewed. This review outlines the discovery of replication-proficient virus strains for targeting gynecologic malignancies, recent progresses elucidating molecular connections between oncogene/tumor suppressor gene abnormalities and viral oncotropism, and the associated preclinical/clinical implications. The authors would also like to propose future directions in the utility of the replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy. PMID:27352554

  10. Stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    comes at the expense of decreased dose uniformity in the SBRT cancer target. This may have implications for both subsequent tumor control in the SBRT target and normal tissue tolerance of organs at-risk. Due to the sharp dose falloff in SBRT, the possibility of occult disease escaping ablative radiation dose occurs when cancer targets are not fully recognized and inadequate SBRT dose margins are applied. Clinical target volume (CTV) expansion by 0.5 cm, resulting in a larger planning target volume (PTV), is associated with increased target control without undue normal tissue injury.(7,8) Further reduction in the probability of geographic miss may be achieved by incorporation of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET).(8) Use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in SBRT treatment planning is only the beginning of attempts to discover new imaging target molecular signatures for gynecologic cancers. PMID:22546879

  11. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  12. Treatment-related cancers after gynecologic malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1987-10-15

    Second malignancies are one of the known complications of cancer treatment. Several recent studies which have quantified the risk of treatment-induced cancers following gynecologic malignancies are reviewed. After cervical cancer, there is a 9% excess risk of second cancers, of which only 5% could be attributed to radiation therapy. Most of the treatment-related malignancies after cervical or endometrial cancer are solid tumors occurring within the radiation field. Following both cervical and endometrial cancer, there is a small increased risk of leukemia associated with radiation therapy. In contrast, after ovarian cancer, there is significantly increased risk of leukemia related to treatment with alkylating agents, which varies by drug type and total dose. The cumulative risk of leukemia and preleukemia following single agent melphalan is 11.2% +/- 2.6% at ten years; the risk after cyclophosphamide is 5.4% +/- 3.2%. Overall, the risk of second malignancies following treatment of gynecologic cancers is small. 38 references.

  13. Quality of life for women living with a gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, F Beryl; Mitchell, Gail J

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this research study was to enhance understanding about quality of life from the perspective of women living with a gynecologic cancer. Parse's human becoming theory provided the theoretical perspective and guided the descriptive exploratory methodology that was used. Participants were 14 women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer. Through analysis-synthesis processes, four themes were identified, which provide the following unified description: Quality of life is treasuring loving expressions while affirming personal worth, as consoling immersions amid torment emerge with expanding fortitude for enduring. The findings suggest implications for quality care that honors persons' experiences. PMID:15090091

  14. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers. PMID:27606294

  15. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers. PMID:27606294

  16. Synchronous gynecologic cancer and the use of imaging for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Galvão, José Lucas Scarpinetti; Soares, Giovanna Milanes Bego; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Chojniak, Rubens; Bringel, Shenia Lauanna Rezende; Brot, Louise De

    2016-04-01

    Endometrial and cervical cancers are the most prevalent gynecologic neoplasms. While endometrial cancer occurs in older women, cervical cancer is more prevalente in young subjects. The most common clinical manifestation in these two gynecological cancers is vaginal bleeding. In the first case, diagnosis is made based on histological and imaging evaluation of the endometrium, while cervical cancers are diagnosed clinically, according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). The authors present a case of synchronous gynecological cancer of the endometrium and cervix diagnosed during staging on MRI and confirmed by histological analysis of the surgical specimen. PMID:27167539

  17. Inside Knowledge about Gynecologic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Among Mexican-American Women Preventing Skin Cancer by Reducing Indoor Tanning Cervical Cancer Rates Among Young Women in the U.S. Increased ... We Know What States Can Do Case Study: Reducing Radon in Illinois What Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs Can Do Resources Guide to Promoting ...

  18. The Relevance of Gynecologic Oncologists to Provide High-Quality of Care to Women with Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minig, Lucas; Padilla-Iserte, Pablo; Zorrero, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gynecologic oncologists have an essential role to treat women with gynecological cancer. It has been demonstrated that specialized physicians who work in multidisciplinary teams to treat women with gynecological cancers are able to obtain the best clinical and oncological outcomes. However, the access to gynecologic oncologists for women with suspected gynecological cancer is scarce. Therefore, this review analyzes the importance of specialized care of women with ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancer. In addition, the role of gynecologic oncologists who offer fertility-sparing treatment as well as their role in assisting general gynecologists and obstetricians is also reviewed. PMID:26835417

  19. Intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy in advanced gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, S; Railsback, L D; Buchsbaum, H J

    1978-10-01

    Fourteen patients with advanced localized gynecologic cancer were treated with 44 courses of intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy. All patients received methotrexate with folinic acid rescue; 9 patients also received vincristine. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 14 patients (21.4%). In 5 patients there were major complications related to 28 intraarterial catheter placements. Two patients developed leukopenia following chemotherapy. The value of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in gynecologic cancer is limited. Its use in gynecologic oncology is discussed. PMID:309571

  20. Fertility preservation in gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Shakuntala; Kutchi, Imran

    2013-03-21

    For cancers of reproductive system in women, fertility preservation is complex. Fertility is also affected by therapies, however prevention is possible. Radiotherapy affects gonads, uterus, and subsequent pregnancy outcomes in all ages. However, degree and damage depend on dose, irradiation field, and age at the time of exposure. Ovarian transposition is considered if ovarian involvement is unlikely. Gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy are related to agent's type, cumulative doses, age, and ovarian reserve. Some agents are highly toxic. Rendering follicular development quiescent by suppression of gonadotropins does reduce the ovarian damage. Simple or radical trachelectomy can be used in early cervical cancer. Fertility saving surgery is possible only in early stage low grade epithelial cancers of the ovary, however, in germ cell tumors even in advanced stages it may be possible to preserve fertility. There are no standard recommendations for endometrial cancer. Embryo, oocyte, and ovarian tissue cryopreservation are possible. The human embryo is very resistant to damage. In view of these possibilities, it is advocated that attention to long term health and quality of life in gonadotoxic therapy must be incorporated into plans as early as possible. PMID:24453519

  1. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  2. Tumor-Associated Glycans and Their Role in Gynecological Cancers: Accelerating Translational Research by Novel High-Throughput Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Jacob, Francis; Fedier, Andre; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2012-01-01

    Glycans are important partners in many biological processes, including carcinogenesis. The rapidly developing field of functional glycomics becomes one of the frontiers of biology and biomedicine. Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids occurs commonly during malignant transformation and leads to the expression of specific tumor-associated glycans. The appearance of aberrant glycans on carcinoma cells is typically associated with grade, invasion, metastasis and overall poor prognosis. Cancer-associated carbohydrates are mostly located on the surface of cancer cells and are therefore potential diagnostic biomarkers. Currently, there is increasing interest in cancer-associated aberrant glycosylation, with growing numbers of characteristic cancer targets being detected every day. Breast and ovarian cancer are the most common and lethal malignancies in women, respectively, and potential glycan biomarkers hold promise for early detection and targeted therapies. However, the acceleration of research and comprehensive multi-target investigation of cancer-specific glycans could only be successfully achieved with the help of a combination of novel high-throughput glycomic approaches. PMID:24957768

  3. EMT-Inducing Molecular Factors in Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Loredana; Zhang, Catherine; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers are the unregulated growth of neoplastic cells that arise in the cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vagina, and vulva. Although gynecologic cancers are characterized by different signs and symptoms, studies have shown that they share common risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, age, exposure to certain chemicals, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). Despite recent advancements in the preventative, diagnostic, and therapeutic interventions for gynecologic cancers, many patients still die as a result of metastasis and recurrence. Since mounting evidence indicates that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process plays an essential role in metastatic relapse of cancer, understanding the molecular aberrations responsible for the EMT and its underlying signaling should be given high priority in order to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:26356073

  4. Physical Sequelae and Depressive Symptoms in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors: Meaning in Life as a Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Laura E.; Fowler, Jeffrey; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Continuing symptoms and poor health following cancer treatments may alter meaning in life for cancer survivors. Gynecologic cancer survivors are particularly troubled with physical sequelae. In addition, for the most common sites of disease, such as breast and gynecologic cancers, the prevalence of depression is also high. Purpose This study tests meaning in life as a mechanism for the relationship between physical symptoms and depressive symptoms. Methods Gynecologic cancer survivors (N=260) participated. Measures of physical sequelae (nurse rated symptoms/signs, patient-reported gynecologic symptoms), meaning in life (harmony, life purpose, spirituality, and conversely, confusion and loss), and depressive symptoms were obtained at the time of a routine clinical follow-up visit 2–10 years following the completion of treatment. Latent variables were defined, and structural equation modeling tested a mediator model. Results Analyses support partial mediation. That is, survivors with more physical sequelae also reported lower levels of meaning in life, which was associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusions Gynecologic cancer patients have been neglected in psychosocial research, and findings highlight the importance of existential issues in their lives. While many adjust well, those with persistent physical functioning deficits may experience depressive symptoms. By appreciating the role of meaning in their experience, we may help survivors foster their own growth and perspectives important for their future. PMID:18386113

  5. Next-Generation Sequencing: Role in Gynecologic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tarra; Matulonis, Ursula

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has risen to the forefront of tumor analysis and has enabled unprecedented advances in the molecular profiling of solid tumors. Through massively parallel sequencing, previously unrecognized genomic alterations have been unveiled in many malignancies, including gynecologic cancers, thus expanding the potential repertoire for the use of targeted therapies. NGS has expanded the understanding of the genomic foundation of gynecologic malignancies and has allowed identification of germline and somatic mutations associated with cancer development, enabled tumor reclassification, and helped determine mechanisms of treatment resistance. NGS has also facilitated rationale therapeutic strategies based on actionable molecular aberrations. However, issues remain regarding cost and clinical utility. This review covers NGS analysis of and its impact thus far on gynecologic cancers, specifically ovarian, endometrial, cervical, and vulvar cancers. PMID:27587626

  6. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis: A rare manifestation of gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Sultanik, Elliot; Shell, Roger; Gibbon, Darlene

    2016-08-01

    •Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is a rare complication of cancer.•NBTE may precede the diagnosis of an occult gynecologic malignancy.•Malignancy-induced NBTE must be considered in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism.•The most effective treatment is anticoagulation and treatment of the underlying cancer. PMID:27453927

  7. FDG PET-CT of gynecologic cancers: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Hima B; Kraeft, Jessica J; Schorge, John O; Scott, James A; Lee, Susanna I

    2015-10-01

    FDG PET-CT plays an important role in treatment planning and in prognosis assessment of gynecologic cancer patients. Detection of hypermetabolic tissue with FDG PET, when combined with the high spatial resolution of CT, results in improved cancer detection and localization not afforded by either modality independently. This article is a primer for a radiologist performing PET-CT on gynecologic cancer patients and includes the imaging protocol, normal pattern of FDG distribution in the female pelvis and the lymph node drainage pathways from the gynecologic organs. Clinically relevant imaging findings that should be included in the report are discussed. Case examples illustrate how potential errors in exam interpretation can be avoided by concurrently performing a high-quality diagnostic CT with the FDG PET scan and by analyzing both the stand-alone and the fusion images. PMID:25680500

  8. Obstetrics and gynecology between clinics and research.

    PubMed

    Eskes, T

    2003-01-01

    An evaluation of a 25-year chairmanship at the University of Nijmegen is given. The main tasks were patient care, teaching and research. Patient care was influenced by new techniques later introduced into the various subdisciplines of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Evaluation of patient care was guaranteed by annual reports focussing on avoidable factors for morbidity or mortality. Furthermore the department was visited every five years by a hospital recognition committee for specialist training. There were just two juridical complaints that finally were denied. Clinical teaching involved medical students, interns and residents. The changes in teaching followed an international change from one-person lectures to student study groups. Efficacy of teaching was evaluated by an inter-university comparison of study duration. Nijmegen scored high. The evaluation of teaching for residents was done by the yearly one-day participation in the American CREOG (Council Resident Examination Obstetrics and Gynecology) multiple choice examination. The level of final positions of trained residents can also be seen as a partial result of the quality of training. Twenty out of 128 (15.6%) were nominated as professors. The Ph.D. residents were all working in major teaching hospitals. Research efforts were evaluated by the number of Ph.D.'s acquired by residents. Fifty-three percent of the residents accomplished a Ph.D. thesis. This was ten times the mean of the country. Several new techniques were introduced by the department in the Netherlands: amniotic fluid analysis, chromosomal investigations, fetal monitoring, animal studies, laparoscopy, ultrasound, radio-immuno-assay, gasanalysis of cord blood, genetic counseling, monoclonal antibodies and prolactin-agonists. Four research lines could be considered as an international breakthrough: the silent fetal heart rate pattern, dopamine-agonists, fetal behavioural states and homocysteine metabolism associated with neural tube defects. The

  9. Other Gynecologic Cancers: endometrial, ovarian, vulvar and vaginal cancers.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Franco, Eliane; Franco, Eduardo L

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: In Canada, cancers of the endometrium, ovaries, vulva, vagina, placenta and adnexa account for 11% of all malignant neoplasms in women and 81% of all genital cancers. Although the incidence and mortality from vulvar and vaginal cancers are very low, endometrium and ovarian cancer are important public health problems. KEY FINDINGS: In Canada, there has been no appreciable improvement in survival for women with advanced endometrial (EC) or ovarian cancer (OC) over the past 30 years. The prognosis of EC is good for most patients because diagnosis is made at early stages. However, survival of OC is poor; more than 70% of cases are diagnosed at late stages. Up to 10% of OCs is linked to familial aggregation. Cancers of the vulva and of the vagina are very rare. The survival experience for women with the latter is worse than for those with the former. Both share many risk factors with cervical cancer and the recent developments in the study of HPV infection should be applicable to these diseases as well. Of particular interest will be the advent of vaccines for the primary prevention of HPV infection. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: At present, the best available means to diagnose gynecologic malignancies is a detailed clinical examination, considering the totality of information on potential and proven risk factors, such as age, reproductive health, sexual practices, use unopposed estrogens or of oral contraceptives or tubal ligation, obesity, diet, smoking, and the familial clustering of some of these cancers. PMID:15345077

  10. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1980-07-15

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified.

  11. The Lymphedema and Gynecologic Cancer (LEG) Study: Incidence, Risk Factors, and | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The proposed study, "Lymphedema and Gynecologic cancer (LEG): Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact", will innovatively utilize the cooperative group setting of the GOG (Gynecologic Oncology Group) to prospectively study 1300 women newly diagnosed with cervical, endometrial, or vulvar cancer to determine the incidence and impact of lower extremity lymphedema following surgical treatment of these diseases. |

  12. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1981-07-15

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. Care must be exercised in associating previous therapy and a subsequent malignancy. Naturally occurring second cancers must be separated from those which are iatrogenic. Associations in the literature have been made involving malignancies as a sequelae of prior gynecologic therapy. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. Irradiation therapy, however, has not yet been shown to be related to leukemia in cervical cancer patients. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified.

  13. Contemporary Quality of Life Issues Affecting Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Penson, Richard; Barakat, Richard; Wenzel, Lari

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers account for approximately 11% of the newly diagnosed cancers in women in the United States and 18% in the world.1 The most common gynecologic malignancies occur in the uterus and endometrium (53%), ovary (25%), and cervix (14%).2 Cervical cancer is most prevalent in premenopausal women, during their childbearing years, whereas uterine and ovarian cancers tend to present in the perimenopausal or menopausal period. Vaginal and vulvar cancers and malignancies arising from gestation, or gestational trophoblastic neoplasms, occur to a lesser extent. Regardless of cancer origin or age of onset, the disease and its treatment can produce short- and long-term sequelae (ie, sexual dysfunction, infertility, or lymphedema) that adversely affect quality of life (QOL). This article outlines the primary contemporary issues or concerns that may affect QOL and offers strategies to offset or mitigate QOL disruption. These contemporary issues are identified within the domains of sexual functioning, reproductive issues, lymphedema, and the contribution of health-related QOL (HRQOL) in influential gynecologic cancer clinical trials. PMID:22244668

  14. Strategies for the modification of risk factors in gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Benedet, J L; Cabero-Roura, L

    2002-01-01

    Strategies to modify risk for female or gynecological cancers will vary with our knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, and specific molecular mechanisms for each individual cancer. In general, cancer preventive strategies have been divided into primary and secondary prevention with primary prevention directed toward the causative factors for a disease. Secondary prevention is classically used in cervical cancer cytology screening programs and is essentially an attempt to identify individuals in a population with preclinical phases of the disease where intervention will impact mortality the most. A vast literature has evolved regarding the epidemiology of most of the common cancers in women. While the specific molecular mechanisms are not completely understood at this time knowledge of contributing factors for many of these tumors is well known. The association of cigarette smoking with lung cancer has been well established and the increasing rates of lung cancer, particularly in women, are directly linked to the increasing number of female smokers in the population. Indeed in many western countries lung cancer deaths have overtaken breast cancer as the most common cause of death from malignant disease in women. Excessive sun exposure without adequate skin protection is another lifestyle activity that is related to the high incidence of skin cancer in certain areas. Epidemiologically, cervical cancer has been studied extensively with the current data indicating a causal role of exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly at an early age in this disease. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndromes are well understood and as more information on human genomics becomes available a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of these diseases will be possible and hopefully will result in effective strategies for their control. Unfortunately, in spite of the vast knowledge that is available regarding risk factors for many of these

  15. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  16. Active Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  17. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  18. Gynecologic cancer: Diagnosis and treatment strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, F.N.; Freedman, R.S.; Gershenson, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 36 chapters divided into seven sections. The section headings are: Heath Memorial Award Lecture; Ovarian Cancer; Cervical and Vulvar Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Trophoblastic Disease; Diagnostic Procedures; and New Treatment Modalities.

  19. Hypertension and Subsequent Genitourinary and Gynecologic Cancers Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Kuo, Huang-Tsung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although a relationship between hypertension and the development of renal cancer and other types of cancer have been proposed for decades, the results of epidemiologic studies remain inconclusive. This study was conducted to evaluate the association between hypertension and genitourinary and gynecologic cancers in Taiwan. In this study, we conducted a populated-based retrospective cohort study by using data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance program. The study period was from 2000 to 2011, and the cohort comprised 111,704 insurants: 57,961 patients with hypertension and 53,743 patients without hypertension. A Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to estimate the effects of hypertension on genitourinary and gynecologic cancers risk. Among the patients with hypertension, the risks of developing renal and uterine corpus cancers were significantly higher in the hypertension group than they were in the nonhypertension group. Further stratified analyses by sex, age, and hypertension duration revealed distinct cancer-specific patterns. Higher cancer risk appears to be more obvious among younger hypertensive patients with longer follow-up time. The results of this study indicate that Taiwanese patients with hypertension have higher risks for some types of cancer, and cancer-specific patterns vary by sex, age, and hypertension duration. PMID:25906108

  20. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  1. [Comparison of robotic surgery documentary in gynecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a surgical technique recently introduced, with major expansion and acceptance among the medical community is currently performed in over 1,000 hospitals around the world and in the management of gynecological cancer are being developed comprehensive programs for implementation. The objectives of this paper are to review the scientific literature on robotic surgery and its application in gynecological cancer to verify its safety, feasibility and efficacy when compared with laparoscopic surgery or surgery classical major surgical complications, infections are more common in traditional radical surgery compared with laparoscopic or robotic surgery and with these new techniques surgical and staying hospital are lesser than the former however, the disadvantages are the limited number of robot systems, their high cost and applies only in specialized centers that have with equipment and skilled surgeons. In conclusion robotic surgery represents a major scientific breakthrough and surgical management of gynecological cancer with better results to other types of conventional surgery and is likely in the coming years is become its worldwide. PMID:23336154

  2. Advances in clinical research in gynecologic radiation oncology: an RTOG symposium.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, David; Mundt, Arno; Schwarz, Julie; Eifel, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    There have been inexorable improvements in gynecologic radiation oncology through technologically advances, 3-dimensional imaging, and clinical research. Investment in these 3 critical areas has improved, and will continue to improve, the lives of patients with gynecologic cancer. Advanced technology delivery in gynecologic radiation oncology is challenging owing to the following: (1) setup difficulties, (2) managing considerable internal organ motion, and (3) responding to tumor volume reduction during treatment. Image guidance is a potential route to solve these problems and improve delivery to tumor and sparing organs at risk. Imaging with positron emission tomography-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are contributing significantly to improved accuracy in diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in cancer of the cervix. Functional imaging by exploiting tumor biology may improve prognosis and treatment. Clinical trials have been the greatest mechanism to improve and establish standards of care in women with vulvar, endometrial, and cervical cancer. There have been multiple technological advances and practice changing trials within the past several decades. Many important questions remain in optimizing care for women with gynecologic malignancies. The performance of clinical trials will be advanced with the use of consistent language (ie, similar staging system and criteria), eligibility criteria that fit the research question, end points that matter, adequate statistical power, complete follow-up, and prompt publication of mature results. PMID:22398709

  3. Oncofertility for gynecologic and non-gynecologic cancers: fertility sparing in young women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Polat; Doğan, N Utku; Ayhan, Ali

    2014-12-01

    About ten percent of all female cancer survivors is younger than 40 years of age. For these young women the primary goal is to ensure the highest possibility of cure and to maintain the reproductive functions as well. Oncofertility is a new concept including both oncology and reproductive medicine. By this recently defined concept young women will have maximal chance to make an optimal decision without any significant impact and delay in oncologic outcome. Oncofertility concept could be applied for genital cancer as well as non-genital cancer of reproductive age. Currently sperm and embryo banking are the standard methods used for young patients with cancer whose future fertility is under risk. In contrary oocyte banking, ovarian tissue cryopreservation are all controversial procedures and still accepted as experimental by many authors although American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) consideres oocyte cryopreservation "no longer experimental". For genital cancers procedures for oncofertility depends on the type of the cancer and the treatment of choice. In this review the current data and concepts regarding oncofertility concept including the gynecologic oncologic perspective is reviewed. PMID:25090914

  4. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  5. Reducing Overtreatment in Gynecologic Oncology: The Case for Less in Endometrial and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Sarah M.; Tanner, Edward J.; Dewdney, Summer B.; Minasian, Lori M.

    2016-01-01

    A growing awareness of the harms of overtreatment in cancer care has reached physicians, patients, health policy makers, and medical researchers. Overtreatment exposes patients to the risk of adverse events from procedures or medications that were not necessary. This review examines common practices in gynecologic malignancies that are unlikely to produce direct benefit to patients with these malignancies, but are likely to produce harms. Specifically, we will explore the utility of lymphadenectomy and adjuvant radiation for women with early-stage endometrial cancer; and screening for recurrence and continuous chemotherapy for advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27242958

  6. Cancer and the world's poor: What's a gynecologic cancer specialist to do?

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Goodman, AnneKathryn; Schmeler, Kathleen; Durfee, John; Pareja, Rene; Munkarah, Adnan; Rulisa, Stephen; Ghebre, Rahel; Trimble, Edward L; Chuang, Linus

    2016-07-01

    Women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a drastically increased burden of cervical cancer and the same burden of other gynecologic cancers as do women in high-income countries, yet there are few resources or specialists to meet their needs. 85% of deaths from cervical cancer occur in LMICs. As the population of these regions age, and as death from infectious diseases decrease, this burden will increase further without strong intervention. There are few cancer specialists in LMICs and training in gynecologic cancer care is rare. Gynecologic cancer specialists are uniquely positioned to meet this challenge as advocates, educators and experts. On behalf of the SGO International Committee, we call on our colleagues to meet this historic challenge. PMID:27210817

  7. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Yeol; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Park, Won; Cao, Zeyi; Wu, Xiaohua; Ju, Woong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Chang, Suk Joon; Park, Sang Yoon; Ryu, Sang Young; Kim, Jae Hoon; Cho, Chi Heum; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Jeong Won; Kumarasamy, Suresh; Kim, Jae Weon; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Kim, Byoung Gie; Kim, Dae Yeon; Konishi, Ikuo; Lee, Jae Kwan; Wang, Kung Liahng; Nam, Joo Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014 on gynecologic oncology was held in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea on the 23rd to 24th August 2014. A total of 179 participants from 17 countries participated in the workshop, and the up-to-date findings on the management of gynecologic cancers were presented and discussed. This meeting focused on the new trends in the management of cervical cancer, fertility-sparing management of gynecologic cancers, surgical management of gynecologic cancers, and recent advances in translational research on gynecologic cancers. PMID:25609163

  8. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Yeol; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Park, Won; Cao, Zeyi; Wu, Xiaohua; Ju, Woong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Chang, Suk-Joon; Park, Sang-Yoon; Ryu, Sang-Young; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Chi-Heum; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kumarasamy, Suresh; Kim, Jae-Weon; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Konishi, Ikuo; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Wang, Kung-Liahng

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014 on gynecologic oncology was held in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea on the 23rd to 24th August 2014. A total of 179 participants from 17 countries participated in the workshop, and the up-to-date findings on the management of gynecologic cancers were presented and discussed. This meeting focused on the new trends in the management of cervical cancer, fertility-sparing management of gynecologic cancers, surgical management of gynecologic cancers, and recent advances in translational research on gynecologic cancers. PMID:25609163

  9. Clinical practice recommendations for quality of life assessment in patients with gynecological cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, Leszek; Forycka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a multidimensional concept regarding self-assessment of patients’ situation. Quality of life has not been clearly defined up to date, although it is clear that it is a subjective self-assessment that to a significant extent is determined by individual needs, beliefs, values, attitudes, which are changing with time. Health-related QoL comprises basic dimensions such as patients’ performance status, physical, emotional, and social functioning, symptoms of the disease and adverse effects of treatment, spiritual (God and existential) and other dimensions. In women, the ovary, cervical, corpus uterus, vagina and vulva cancers deteriorate QoL by disease progression and consequences of treatment, also in cancer survivors. Common symptoms include the genito-urinary system, the lower gastrointestinal tract and peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy. In young women, QoL is impaired by infertility, sexual problems and menopause symptoms. An overview of QoL questionnaires used in oncology with special regard to patients with gynecological tumors was conducted. A screening tool for psychological state assessment of oncology patients (distress thermometer), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and modular approach of QoL assessment recommended by the EORTC (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) were presented. Practical guidelines were proposed to assess appropriately QoL in patients with gynecological cancers who stay at in-patient gynecology units and those treated at home and in an ambulatory care setting. PMID:26848300

  10. Clinical practice recommendations for quality of life assessment in patients with gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Forycka, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a multidimensional concept regarding self-assessment of patients' situation. Quality of life has not been clearly defined up to date, although it is clear that it is a subjective self-assessment that to a significant extent is determined by individual needs, beliefs, values, attitudes, which are changing with time. Health-related QoL comprises basic dimensions such as patients' performance status, physical, emotional, and social functioning, symptoms of the disease and adverse effects of treatment, spiritual (God and existential) and other dimensions. In women, the ovary, cervical, corpus uterus, vagina and vulva cancers deteriorate QoL by disease progression and consequences of treatment, also in cancer survivors. Common symptoms include the genito-urinary system, the lower gastrointestinal tract and peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy. In young women, QoL is impaired by infertility, sexual problems and menopause symptoms. An overview of QoL questionnaires used in oncology with special regard to patients with gynecological tumors was conducted. A screening tool for psychological state assessment of oncology patients (distress thermometer), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and modular approach of QoL assessment recommended by the EORTC (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) were presented. Practical guidelines were proposed to assess appropriately QoL in patients with gynecological cancers who stay at in-patient gynecology units and those treated at home and in an ambulatory care setting. PMID:26848300

  11. Handling Sexuality Concerns in Women with Gynecological Cancer: Egyptian Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Suzan E.; Mohamed, Hanan E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of normal human functioning. Gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment has devastating effect on Sexual issues. Study aim was to investigate Oncology Nurses knowledge and attitudes in Relation to Provision of Sexual Health Care to Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancer. The study setting was conducted at…

  12. Genetic screening for gynecological cancer: where are we heading?

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Jacobs, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of cancer genetics in gynecological oncology is rapidly changing. The traditional family history-based approach has limitations and misses >50% mutation carriers. This is now being replaced by population-based approaches. The need for changing the clinical paradigm from family history-based to population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing in Ashkenazi Jews is supported by data that demonstrate population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing does not cause psychological harm and is cost effective. This article covers various genetic testing strategies for gynecological cancers, including population-based approaches, panel and direct-to-consumer testing as well as the need for innovative approaches to genetic counseling. Advances in genetic testing technology and computational analytics have facilitated an integrated systems medicine approach, providing increasing potential for population-based genetic testing, risk stratification, and cancer prevention. Genomic information along-with biological/computational tools will be used to deliver predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) and precision medicine in the future. PMID:26638726

  13. Hormonal replacement therapy and gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The problem of quality of life and lifestyle in elderly women is today a very important social problem all over the world but particularly in rich western countries. Life expectancy of the population will be longer and longer in the future and for both females and males the biological involution correlated with the aging process must be delayed. The gonadal hormones stimulate the healthy state of the entire body (heart, skin, brain, bones, urogenital apparatus and so on) and consequently hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) is mandatory. In women the biological clock of menopause allows us to intervene at the right time, with personalized estrogenic, estroprogestinic or estroandrogenic treatments. Health benefits and groundless risks allow today a careful hormonal management even in women treated for gynaecological cancers (breast and endometrium as well). PMID:10412612

  14. Treatment for Gynecologic Cancer: A Review of the Effects on Female Sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Barbara L.; Hacker, Neville F.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 75,000 new cases of gynecologic cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year. Since few women can be treated by chemotherapy alone, most undergo extensive treatments that directly alter their sexuality either by causing specific anatomic changes or by generating concerns about continued responsiveness or activity. The major treatments for gynecologic malignancies including radiation therapy or radical hysterectomy for cervical carcinoma, radical vulvectomy for vulvar carcinoma, and pelvic exenteration for recurrent disease, are outlined. Research relating to their effects on female sexuality is critically reviewed. Also discussed are the relevant domains of treatment and patient characteristics that need assessment and investigation in this new and important research area. PMID:20631850

  15. Supportive care for women with gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dana M; Monk, Bradley J; Wenzel, Lari B; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2008-02-01

    Supportive care is a multidimensional field, that involves caring for a patient's symptoms either during and/or after treatment. Ideally, once these supportive care needs are met, patients can enjoy an improved quality of life. Supportive care needs include all body systems, and are, therefore, difficult to manage, secondary to the fact that they require collaboration among multiple medical specialties. In this review, several components of supportive care are separated into two categories: tumor-related morbidities and treatment-related morbidities. Some of the themes discussed include nausea and vomiting, cancer pain, psychological distress, fatigue and anemia, small bowel obstruction and peripheral neuropathy. While all of these components are challenging to manage, it is perhaps the psychosocial realm that remains the most unmet need. Regardless, the oncologist must act as a facilitator who addresses these needs and, if unable to address the issue alone, knows how to steer the patient toward the appropriate provider. As these needs are met, the goal is for quality of life to improve; and with the improvement in quality of life we may expect to see improved survival outcomes. PMID:18279064

  16. Sleep quality of women with gynecological and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlani, Renata; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2006-01-01

    Subjective sleep quality has been recognized as a valuable indicator of health and quality of life. This exploratory and descriptive study aimed at describing habitual sleep quality of women suffering from gynecological and breast cancer and comparing habitual versus sleep quality during hospitalization. Twenty-five women admitted in hospital for clinical treatment of cancer completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) within 72 hours after admission and again just before discharge. Fifty-two percent of subjects reported habitual bad sleep quality, and this proportion increased to 80% of subjects during hospital stay. Subjects indicated the following most frequent causes of night sleep disturbance: need to go to the toilet, waking up early and receiving nursing care during the night. Results point to the importance of including careful assessment of sleep quality and environment in nursing care planning for oncology patients, mainly during hospitalization. PMID:17294020

  17. Phytochemicals: A Multitargeted Approach to Gynecologic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Woong; Song, Yong Sang; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers constitute the fourth most common cancer type in women. Treatment outcomes are dictated by a multitude of factors, including stage at diagnosis, tissue type, and overall health of the patient. Current therapeutic options include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, although significant unmet medical needs remain in regard to side effects and long-term survival. The efficacy of chemotherapy is influenced by cellular events such as the overexpression of oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressors, which together determine apoptotic responses. Phytochemicals are a broad class of natural compounds derived from plants, a number of which exhibit useful bioactive effects toward these pathways. High-throughput screening methods, rational modification, and developments in regulatory policies will accelerate the development of novel therapeutics based on these compounds, which will likely improve overall survival and quality of life for patients. PMID:25093186

  18. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Shigenobu; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nakazono, Takahiko; Kamura, Toshiharu; Kudo, Sho

    2011-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) reflects changes in proton mobility caused by pathological alterations of tissue cellularity, cellular membrane integrity, extracellular space perfusion, and fluid viscosity. Functional imaging is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of cancer patients because of the limitations of morphologic imaging. DWI is being applied to the detection and characterization of tumors and the evaluation of treatment response in patients with cancer. The advantages of DWI include its cost-effectiveness and brevity of execution, its complete noninvasiveness, its lack of ionizing radiation, and the fact that it does not require injection of contrast material, thus enabling its use in patients with renal dysfunction. In this article, we describe the clinical application of DWI to gynecological disorders and its diagnostic efficacy therein. PMID:22247805

  19. Women with gynecologic malignancies have a greater incidence of suicide than women with other cancer types.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kristy K; Roncancio, Angelica M; Plaxe, Steven C

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973-2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with gynecologic malignancies. Most suicides occurred within 4 years of diagnosis. Better understanding of the descriptive epidemiology of suicide among women with gynecologic malignancies could lead to improved risk assessment, screening, and prevention of this potentially avoidable cause of death. PMID:23278597

  20. Women with Gynecologic Malignancies Have a Greater Incidence of Suicide than Women with Other Cancer Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristy K.; Roncancio, Angelica M.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973-2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with…

  1. Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yordy, John S.; Almond, Peter R.; Delclos, Luis

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

  2. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... this country this year from cancers of the female reproductive system. To avoid these cancers, it's important to understand ... more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system and is the leading cause of death from ...

  3. A National Initiative for Women and Healthcare Providers: CDC’s Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Sun Hee; Polonec, Lindsey; Stewart, Sherri L.; Gelb, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    The Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. It encourages women to pay attention to their bodies and know what is normal for them so they can recognize the warning signs of gynecologic cancers and seek medical care. This report provides an overview of the development of this national campaign. PMID:21933006

  4. A Study to Evaluate the Cause of Bone Demineralization in Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Stavraka, Chara; Maclaran, Kate; Gabra, Hani; Agarwal, Roshan; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Taylor, Alexandra; Dhillo, Waljit S.; Panay, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Background. An association between treatment for gynecological cancers and risk of osteoporosis has never been formally evaluated. Women treated for these cancers are now living longer than ever before, and prevention of treatment-induced morbidities is important. We aimed to distinguish, in gynecological cancer survivors, whether cancer therapy has additional detrimental effects on bone health above those attributable to hormone withdrawal. Methods. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan results from 105 women; 64 had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) followed by chemotherapy or radiotherapy for gynecological malignancies, and 41 age-matched women had undergone BSO for benign etiologies. All were premenopausal prior to surgery. Results. The median age at DEXA scan for the cancer group was 42 years, and 66% had received hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) following their cancer treatment. For the benign group, the median age was 40 years, and 87% had received HRT. Thirty-nine percent of cancer survivors had abnormal DEXA scan results compared to 15% of the control group, with the majority demonstrating osteopenia. The mean lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral densities (BMDs) were significantly lower in cancer patients. A history of gynecological cancer treatment was associated with significantly lower BMD in a multivariate logistic regression. Conclusions. Women treated for gynecological malignancies with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy have significantly lower BMDs than age-matched women who have undergone oophorectomy for noncancer indications. Prospective evaluation of BMD in gynecological cancer patients is recommended to facilitate interventions that will reduce the risk of subsequent fragility fractures. PMID:23363808

  5. Coping and Communication-Enhancing Intervention versus Supportive Counseling for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Rosenblum, Norman; Bergman, Cynthia; Hernandez, Enrique; Carlson, John; Rocereto, Thomas; Winkel, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of 2 psychological interventions, a coping and communication-enhancing intervention (CCI) and supportive counseling (SC), in reducing depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress of women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Demographic, medical, and psychological moderators of intervention effects were…

  6. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation.

  7. The Emerging Role of PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Ponisio, Maria Rosana; Fowler, Kathryn J; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-10-01

    This article summarizes recent advances in PET/MR imaging in gynecologic cancers and the emerging clinical value of PET/MR imaging in the management of the 3 most common gynecologic malignancies: cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PET/MR imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast, improved assessment of primary tumor involvement because of high-resolution multiplanar reformats, and functional MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. This article discusses the challenges, future directions, and technical advances of PET/MR imaging, and the emerging new multimodality, multiparametric imaging techniques for integrating morphologic, functional, and molecular imaging data. PMID:27593247

  8. Pelvic irradiation does not increase the risk of hip replacement in patients with gynecological cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dybvik, Eva; Furnes, Ove; D. Fosså, Sophie; Trovik, Clement; Lie, Stein Atle

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Long-term survivors of cancer can develop adverse effects of the treatment. 60% of cancer patients survive for at least 5 years after diagnosis. Pelvic irradiation can cause bone damage in these long-term survivors, with increased risk of fracture and degeneration of the hip. Patients and methods — Analyses were based on linkage between the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN) and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR). All women who had been exposed to radiation for curative radiotherapy of gynecological cancer (40–60 Gy for at least 28 days) were identified in the CRN. Radiotherapy had been given between 1998 and 2006 and only patients who were irradiated within 6 months of diagnosis were included. The control group contained women with breast cancer who had also undergone radiotherapy, but not to the pelvic area. Fine and Gray competing-risk analysis was used to calculate subhazard-rate ratios (subHRRs) and cumulative incidence functions (CIFs) for the risk of having a prosthesis accounting for differences in mortality. Results — Of 962 eligible patients with gynecological cancer, 26 (3%) had received a total hip replacement. In the control group without exposure, 253 (3%) of 7,545 patients with breast cancer had undergone total hip replacement. The 8-year CIF for receiving a total hip replacement was 2.7% (95% CI: 2.6–2.8) for gynecological cancer patients and 3.0% (95% CI: 2.95–3.03) for breast cancer patients; subHRR was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.53–1.22; p = 0.3). In both groups, the most common reason for hip replacement was idiopathic osteoarthritis. Interpretation — We did not find any statistically significantly higher risk of undergoing total hip replacement in patients with gynecological cancer who had had pelvic radiotherapy than in women with breast cancer who had not had pelvic radiotherapy. PMID:25238432

  9. Reliability and Validity of Amharic Version of EORTC QLQ-C 30 Questionnaire among Gynecological Cancer Patients in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ayana, Birhanu Abera; Negash, Shiferaw; Yusuf, Lukman; Tigeneh, Wendemagegnhu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer is a growing public health problem worldwide. The focus of cancer treatment, in addition to curation, is improving the quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to assess the reliability and validity of Amharic version of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) among gynecological cancer patients in Ethiopia. Methods A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted using the Amharic version of EORTC QLQ-C30 on 153 gynecological cancer patients in Tikur Anbassa Specialized Hospital (TASH), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and multivariable linear regression were employed in statistical analysis. Results The Amharic version of EORTC QLQ-C30 had a Cronbach’s α value of 0.81. The internal consistency for each domain of EORTC QLQ-C30 was also acceptable (Cronbach’s α >0.7) except for cognitive function domain (Cronbach’s α = 0.29). Stepwise multivariable linear regression analysis showed that emotional functioning (p<0.001), fatigue (p<0.001) and social functioning (p = 0.004) were the determinative scales of EORTC QLQ-C30 on global health status (GHS). The clinical validity test (Known group validity) showed that there were significant differences in score for twelve out of 15 domains, between surgery and radiation scheduled patients. All items of emotional function, role function, fatigue, and GHS meet the discriminate validity criterion. Conclusion The Amharic version of EORTC QLQ-C30 found to be reliable and had an acceptable validity to assess the QOL for gynecological cancer patients. We recommend further work on the validity and responsiveness of the EORTC QLQ-C30 with stronger design. PMID:27304066

  10. Can we maximize both value and quality in gynecologic cancer care? A work in progress.

    PubMed

    Havrilesky, Laura J; Fountain, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Value is defined as desirable health outcomes achieved per monetary unit spent. Comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness research are methods that have been developed to quantify effectiveness and value to inform management decisions. In this article we review the comparative and cost-effectiveness literature in the field of ovarian cancer treatment. Studies have shown that improved ovarian cancer survival is associated with complete primary surgical cytoreduction, with treatment at high volume facilities by subspecialist providers (gynecologic oncologists) and with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline-adherent care in both surgical staging and chemotherapy regimens. Intraperitoneal/intravenous chemotherapy (compared with intravenous alone) has been associated with improved survival and cost-effectiveness. Bevacizumab for primary and maintenance therapy has been found to not be cost-effective (even in selective subsets) despite a small progression-free survival (PFS) advantage. For platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, secondary cytoreduction and platinum-based combinations are associated with improved overall survival (OS); several platinum-based combinations have also been found cost-effective. For platinum-resistant recurrence, single agent therapy and supportive care are cost-effective compared with combination therapies. Although little prospective clinical research has been done around end-of-life care, one study reported that for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, palliative intervention would potentially reduce costs and increase quality adjusted life years compared with usual care (based on improvement in quality of life [QOL]). Overall, cost comparisons of individual chemotherapy regimens are highly dependent on market prices of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24857112

  11. Gynecologic cancer screening and communication with health care providers in women with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burton-Chase, AM; Hovick, SR; Sun, CC; Boyd-Rogers, S; Lynch, PM; Lu, KH; Peterson, SK

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated knowledge of gynecologic cancer screening recommendations, screening behaviors, and communication with providers among women with Lynch syndrome (LS). Women aged ≥25 years who were at risk for LS-associated cancers completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire. Of 74 participants (mean age 40 years), 61% knew the appropriate age to begin screening, 75–80% correctly identified the recommended screening frequency, and 84% reported no previous screening endometrial biopsy. Women initiated discussions with their providers about their LS cancer risks, but many used nonspecific terms or relied on family history. Most were not offered high-risk screening options. While many women were aware of risk-appropriate LS screening guidelines, adherence was suboptimal. Improving communication between women and their providers regarding LS-related gynecologic cancer risk and screening options may help improve adherence. PMID:23906188

  12. [Clinical study of recombinant interferon alpha-2 (Sch 30500) in advanced gynecological cancers].

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, T; Ohmi, K; Takeuchi, S; Takamizawa, H; Matsuzawa, M; Kawana, T; Ueda, K; Kubo, H; Tsumuji, Y; Kawashima, Y

    1985-08-01

    Recombinant interferon alpha-2 (Sch 30500) was administered to 29 patients with advanced gynecological cancers (14 patients with cancer of the cervix, 8 with ovarian cancer, 4 with uterine sarcoma, 2 with endometrial cancer and 1 with unclassified cancer). No antitumor effects (CR and PR) were noted in 23 evaluable patients. Side effects observed were fever, tachycardia, diarrhea, chills, general fatigue, anorexia, nausea and vomiting. In some patients, leukopenia, decrease of hemoglobin and elevation of SGOT and SGPT were observed. No production of antibody for Sch 30500 was noted. PMID:3896157

  13. Physician pain and discomfort during minimally invasive gynecologic cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Megan E.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Munsell, Mark F.; Greer, Marilyn; Burke, William M.; Naumann, Wendell T.; Frumovitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite increasing awareness of physical strain to surgeons associated with minimally invasive surgery (MIS), its use continues to expand. We sought to gather information from gynecologic oncologists regarding physical discomfort due to MIS. Methods Anonymous surveys were e-mailed to 1,279 Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) members. Physical symptoms (numbness, pain, stiffness, and fatigue) and surgical and demographic factors were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine risk factors for physical symptoms. Results We analyzed responses of 350 SGO members who completed the survey and currently performed >50% of procedures robotically (n=122), laparoscopically (n=67), or abdominally (n=61). Sixty-one percent of members reported physical symptoms related to MIS. The rate of symptoms was higher in the robotic group (72%) than the laparoscopic (57%) or abdominal group (49%) (p=0.0052). Stiffness (p=0.0373) and fatigue (p=0.0125) were more common in the robotic group. Female sex (p<0.0001), higher caseload, (p=0.0007) and academic practice (p=0.0186) were associated with increased symptoms. On multivariate analysis, robotic surgery (odds ratio [OR] 2.38, 95% CI 1.20-4.69) and female sex (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.13-8.29) were significant predictors of symptoms. There was no correlation between seeking treatment and surgical modality (laparotomy 11%, robotic 20%, laparoscopy 25%, p= 0.12). Conclusions Gynecologic oncologists report physical symptoms due to MIS at an alarming rate. Robotic surgery and female sex appear to be risk factors for physical discomfort. As we strive to improve patient outcomes and decrease patient morbidity with MIS, we must also work to improve the ergonomics of MIS for surgeons. PMID:24887354

  14. A Pilot Study Using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a Clinical Care Tool to Identify Lower Extremity Lymphedema in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Raviv, Leigh; Appollo, Kathleen; Baser, Raymond E.; Iasonos, Alexia; Barakat, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and efficacy of using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a symptom scale for lymphedema of the lower extremity (LLE). Methods Twenty-eight gynecologic cancer survivors with documented LLE and 30 without a history or presence of lymphedema completed the GCLQ and provided feedback about their satisfaction with and feasibility of using the GCLQ at their oncology follow-ups. The study survey took approximately 5–10 minutes to complete, and it was easily understood by the majority of the sample. Results Participants had a mean age of 59.6 years (range, 28–80 years). Twenty-eight women (48%) had LLE and 30 (52%) had no history or presence of LLE (confirmed by limb volume [LV] measurements at assessment). Type of cancer history included: endometrial, 38 (66%); cervical, 13 (22%); and vulvar, 7 (12%). GCLQ scores differed significantly by lymphedema diagnosis; LLE patients had higher scores (P<0.01). The large area under the curve (AUC) of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–1.000) suggests that the GCLQ can distinguish between patients with and without LLE. Although all 28 (100%) of the LLE patients were aware of their LLE diagnosis, only 23 (82%) underwent treatment. The GCLQ was easily understood by most (55/58, 95%); and overall, patients showed a high willingness (56/58, 96%) to complete the questionnaire at future appointments. Twenty-five (88%) of the LLE patients found the GCLQ to be helpful in identifying symptoms of lymphedema. Conclusions The GCLQ effectively distinguished between gynecologic cancer survivors with and those without LLE, with good sensitivity and specificity. The patients, particularly those with LLE, showed high confidence in the GCLQ’s ability to detect LLE symptoms. PMID:20163847

  15. Challenges in the Gynecologic Care of Premenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Laughlin, Shannon K.; Jensen, Jani R.; Akogyeram, Clement O.; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2011-01-01

    Premenopausal women with a new diagnosis of breast cancer are faced with many challenges. Providing health care for issues such as gynecologic comorbidities, reproductive health concerns, and vasomotor symptom control can be complicated because of the risks of hormone treatments and the adverse effects of adjuvant therapies. It is paramount that health care professionals understand and be knowledgeable about hormonal and nonhormonal treatments and their pharmacological parameters so they can offer appropriate care to women who have breast cancer, with the goal of improving quality of life. Articles for this review were identified by searching the PubMed database with no date limitations. The following search terms were used: abnormal uterine bleeding, physiologic sex steroids, endometrial ablation, hysteroscopic sterilization, fertility preservation in endometrial cancer, tranexamic acid and breast cancer, menorrhagia treatment and breast cancer, abnormal uterine bleeding and premenopausal breast cancer, levonorgestrel IUD and breast cancer, tamoxifen and gynecologic abnormalities, tamoxifen metabolism, hormones and breast cancer risk, contraception and breast cancer, pregnancy and breast cancer, and breast cancer and infertility treatment. PMID:21307388

  16. Impact of Nutrition on Non-Coding RNA Epigenetics in Breast and Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krakowsky, Rosanna H. E.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in females. According to the American Cancer Society, there are 327,660 new cases in breast and gynecological cancers estimated in 2014, placing emphasis on the need for cancer prevention and new cancer treatment strategies. One important approach to cancer prevention involves phytochemicals, biologically active compounds derived from plants. A variety of studies on the impact of dietary compounds found in cruciferous vegetables, green tea, and spices like curry and black pepper have revealed epigenetic changes in female cancers. Thus, an important emerging topic comprises epigenetic changes due to the modulation of non-coding RNA levels. Since it has been shown that non-coding RNAs such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer, and furthermore are linked to distinct cancer phenotypes, understanding the effects of dietary compounds and supplements on the epigenetic modulator non-coding RNA is of great interest. This article reviews the current findings on nutrition-induced changes in breast and gynecological cancers at the non-coding RNA level. PMID:26075205

  17. Gynecological cancer patients’ differentiated use of help from a nurse navigator: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fragmentation in healthcare can present challenges for patients with suspected cancer. It can add to existing anxiety, fear, despair and confusion during disease trajectory. In some circumstances patients are offered help from an extra contact person, a Nurse Navigator (NN). Scientific studies showing who will benefit from the extra help offered are missing. This study aims to explore who could benefit from the help on offer from a nurse appointed as NN in the early part of a cancer trajectory, and what would be meaningful experiences in this context. Methods A longitudinal study with a basis in phenomenology and hermeneutics was performed among Danish women with gynecological cancer. Semi-structured interviews provided data for the analysis, and comprehensive understanding was arrived at by first adopting an open-minded approach to the transcripts and by working at three analytical levels. Results Prior experience of trust, guarded trust or distrust of physicians in advance of encountering the NN was of importance in determining whether or not to accept help from the NN. For those lacking trust in physicians and without a close relationship to a healthcare professional, the NN offered a new trusting relationship and they felt reassured by her help. Conclusions Not everyone could use the help offered by the NN. This knowledge is vital both to healthcare practitioners and to administrators, who want to do their best for cancer patients but who are obliged to consider financial consequences. Moreover patients’ guarded trust or distrust in physicians established prior to meeting the NN showed possible importance for choosing extra help from the NN. These findings suggest increased focus on patients’ trust in healthcare professionals. How to find the most reliable method to identify those who can use the help is still a question for further debate and research. PMID:22721253

  18. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanya; Sebra, Robert; Catalina Camacho, Sandra; Garnar-Wortzel, Leopold; Nair, Navya; Moshier, Erin; Wooten, Melissa; Uzilov, Andrew; Chen, Rong; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Zakashansky, Konstantin; Beddoe, Ann Marie; Schadt, Eric; Dottino, Peter; Martignetti, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools. Methods and Findings Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT) scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival. Conclusions Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic

  19. Altered Sexuality and Body Image after Gynecological Cancer Treatment: How Can Psychologists Help?

    PubMed Central

    Sacerdoti, Rebecca Caldwell; Lagana’, Luciana; Koopman, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Once medical treatment for gynecological cancer is completed, what happens to patients’ sexuality and body image? Due to the delicate nature of the cancer site, treating this cancer typically affects sexual functioning and body image adversely, making it critical to identify the concerns of these patients and do so in a manner less restrictive than paper-and-pencil assessment. To gain a deeper understanding of the phenomenological experiences in question, we interviewed nine gynecological cancer patients and seven cancer-free women. After implementing a relaxation protocol, we asked each woman to describe her feelings and thoughts on her sexuality and body image in one-on-one interviews. A variety of themes emerged on patients' attitudes and perspectives concerning sexuality and body image following diagnosis and treatment of the cancer. The themes that were considerably different from those of the cancer-free women included decreased sexual functioning and body image, abrupt shifts in self-identity due to loss of physical integrity, and distancing in intimate relationships. Several implications of these findings for clinical practice are discussed, as well as the need to train medical professionals to properly assess these patients’ alterations in sexuality. PMID:21572538

  20. Photodynamic Therapy for Gynecological Diseases and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shishkova, Natashis; Kuznetsova, Olga; Berezov, Temirbolat

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive and promising new method in cancer treatment. Cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by the tissue-localized non-toxic sensitizer upon illumination and in the presence of oxygen. Thus, selective destruction of a targeted tumor may be achieved. Compared with traditional cancer treatment, PDI has advantages including higher selectivity and lower rate of toxicity. The high degree of selectivity of the proposed method was applied to cancer diagnosis using fluorescence. This article reviews previous studies done on PDT treatment and photodetection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, ovarian and breast cancer, and PDT application in treating non-cancer lesions. The article also highlights the clinical responses to PDT, and discusses the possibility of enhancing treatment efficacy by combination with immunotherapy and targeted therapy. PMID:23691448

  1. [Bringing gender sensitivity into sexual health care for women with gynecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Lee, Tao Jian

    2015-02-01

    Quality of sexual of life is a vital component of wellbeing for cancer survivors and their partners that may affect the disease prognosis. However, the experience of cancer and its treatments significantly challenge sexual expression and partner relationships and often require health professionals to help partners adapt the many physical, psychological, social / relational, and cultural factors that impact psychosexual functioning. However, an appropriate approach to providing sexual health education for gynecological cancer women and their partners has yet to be established. Additionally, nurses and health professionals have limited relevant professional knowledge and lack the communication skills to respond effectively to the sexual concerns of patients. Further, these professionals frequently hold the incorrect perspective that sexual matters are not relevant to the treatment process. Furthermore, the dominant biomedical culture of the clinic holds that health professionals determine the construction of female sexuality after cancer treatment. This precept turns the nature and scope of the discussion toward dysfunction and/or morbidity, while inherently constraining the integration of psychological and relational elements of sexual recovery for women and their partners. The dominant model constructs gender-blind circumstances and inappropriate standards for the clinical assessment and treatment of women's sexual health. Therefore, this article examines the current clinical practice for the sexual health care of gynecological cancer patients under the dominant biomedical model through the lens of gender-sensitivity and proposes gender-sensitive sexual guidelines as a reference for health professionals. PMID:25631180

  2. Fertility drugs and the risk of breast and gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Louise A; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Scoccia, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The evaluation of cancer risk among patients treated for infertility is complex, given the need to consider indications for use, treatment details, and the effects of other factors (including parity status) that independently affect cancer risk. Many studies have had methodologic limitations. Recent studies that have overcome some of these limitations have not confirmed a link between drug use and invasive ovarian cancers, although there is still a lingering question as to whether borderline tumors might be increased. It is unclear whether this merely reflects increased surveillance. Investigations regarding breast cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. In contrast, an increasing number of studies suggest that fertility drugs may have a special predisposition for the development of uterine cancers, of interest given that these tumors are recognized as particularly hormonally responsive. Additional studies are needed to clarify the effects on cancer risk of fertility drugs, especially those used in conjunction with in vitro fertilization. Because many women who have received such treatments are still relatively young, further monitoring should be pursued in large well-designed studies that enable assessment of effects within a variety of subgroups defined by both patient and disease characteristics. PMID:22549713

  3. Practice Patterns of Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer Among Member Groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, David K. . E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu; Du Bois, Andreas; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nick; Toita, Takafumi; Pignata, Sandro; Blake, Peter; Portelance, Lorraine; Sadoyze, Azmat; Poetter, Richard; Colombo, Alessandro; Randall, Marcus; Mirza, Mansoor R.; Trimble, Edward L.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Methods and Materials: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph node cases. Items focused on indications for radiation therapy, radiation fields, dose, use of chemotherapy, brachytherapy and others. The cooperative groups from North America were compared with the other groups to evaluate potential differences in radiotherapy doses. Results: A total of 39 surveys were returned from 13 different cooperative groups. For the treatment of advanced cervical cancer, external beam pelvic doses and total doses to point A were 47 + 3.5 Gy (mean + SD) and 79.1 + 7.9 Gy, respectively. Point A doses were not different between the North American cooperative groups compared with the others (p = 0.103). All groups used concomitant chemotherapy, with 30 of 36 respondents using weekly cisplatin. Of 33 respondents, 31 intervened for a low hemoglobin level. For a para-aortic field, the upper border was most commonly (15 of 24) at the T12-L1 interspace. Maintenance chemotherapy (after radiotherapy) was not performed by 68% of respondents. For vaginal brachytherapy after hysterectomy, 23 groups performed HDR brachytherapy and four groups used LDR brachytherapy. In the use of brachytherapy, there was no uniformity in dose prescription. Conclusions: Radiotherapy practices among member groups of the GCIG are similar in terms of both doses and use of chemotherapy.

  4. Antibodies to the neutral glycolipid asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide: association with gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Witkin, S S; Bongiovanni, A M; Birnbaum, S; Caputo, T; Ledger, W J

    1985-03-01

    As part of our efforts to define subpopulations at increased risk for gynecologic malignancies, sera from 145 women were obtained prior to diagnosis and analyzed for antibody to asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide. This neutral glycolipid is present on the surface of thymocytes and natural killer cells, and asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibody has been shown in animals to block natural killer cell activity and promote tumor cell proliferation. With the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with a value of 2 SD above the mean for healthy women designated as the boundary for a positive response, antibody to asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide was detected in only one of 30 (3%) healthy women, none of 16 pregnant women, none of 18 women with benign masses, and two of 24 (8%) women with microbial infections. All of the above samples that contained antibodies were barely over the 2 SD limit. In marked contrast, 19 of 35 (54%) women with gynecologic malignancies had asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibodies, with positive values ranging to greater than 10 SD above the control mean. Asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibody was found in six of eight (75%) patients with cervical cancer, five of eight (63%) with endometrial cancer, and seven of 15 (47%) with ovarian cancer. Of the eight patients with Stage I gynecologic cancer at any site, five (62%) had asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibodies. Four of 22 (18%) women with Hodgkin's disease also had antibodies, with values just exceeding 2 SD above control levels. The presence of these antibodies may contribute to an impaired immune surveillance system in these women and so increase their susceptibility to malignancy. PMID:3976767

  5. Smoking, earlier menarche and low parity as independent risk factors for gynecologic cancers in Japanese: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Megumi; Tase, Toru; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Hoshi, Shigeko; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Nagase, Satoru; Ito, Kiyoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Minami, Yuko

    2008-12-01

    During recent decades, the incidence of gynecologic cancers, i.e., cancers of the cervix, endometrium and ovary, has increased in Japan. However, risk factors of gynecologic cancers have not been fully clarified in Japan. To investigate common and site-specific risk factors among gynecologic cancers, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study. The cases, i.e., 151 cervical, 103 endometrial and 141 ovarian cancer cases and the controls (n = 2016) were selected from female patients aged 30 and over, who were admitted to a single hospital in Miyagi Prefecture from 1997 to 2003. Information on reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use, and lifestyles including smoking was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. A dose-response relationship with the number of cigarettes per day was also observed (p for trend = 0.004). Older age at menarche was associated with a decreased risk of endometrial and ovarian cancers. For these cancers, the decreased risk was detected with increasing parity number (endometrium, p for trend = 0.0001; ovary, p = 0.0002). There was no significant association between exogenous hormone use and gynecologic cancer risk. The results indicate that smoking is a major risk factor of cervical cancer. In addition, hormonal factors, which are related to early onset of menarche and low parity, are common risk factors for endometrial and ovarian cancers. The increase in female smokers and the decrease in fertility rate may contribute to the increase in gynecologic cancer incidence in Japan. PMID:19060444

  6. Drug Repositioning for Gynecologic Tumors: A New Therapeutic Strategy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Irie, Haruko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    The goals of drug repositioning are to find a new pharmacological effect of a drug for which human safety and pharmacokinetics are established and to expand the therapeutic range of the drug to another disease. Such drug discovery can be performed at low cost and in the short term based on the results of previous clinical trials. New drugs for gynecologic tumors may be found by drug repositioning. For example, PPAR ligands may be effective against ovarian cancer, since PPAR activation eliminates COX-2 expression, arrests the cell cycle, and induces apoptosis. Metformin, an antidiabetic drug, is effective for endometrial cancer through inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway by activating LKB1-AMPK and reduction of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 due to AMPK activation. COX-2 inhibitors for cervical cancer may also be examples of drug repositioning. PGE2 is induced in the arachidonate cascade by COX-2. PGE2 maintains high expression of COX-2 and induces angiogenic factors including VEGF and bFGF, causing carcinogenesis. COX-2 inhibitors suppress these actions and inhibit carcinogenesis. Combination therapy using drugs found by drug repositioning and current anticancer drugs may increase efficacy and reduce adverse drug reactions. Thus, drug repositioning may become a key approach for gynecologic cancer in drug discovery. PMID:25734181

  7. Metformin use and gynecological cancers: A novel treatment option emerging from drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Gadducci, Angiolo; Biglia, Nicoletta; Tana, Roberta; Cosio, Stefania; Gallo, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Metformin exerts antitumor effects mainly through AMP-activated protein kinase [AMPK] activation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3K]-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibition. This drug leads to activation of the cellular energy-sensing liver kinase B1 [LKB1]/AMPK pathway. LKB1 is implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in molecular pathogenesis of different malignancies. AMPK is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as an ultra-sensitive cellular energy sensor maintaining the energy balance within the cell. AMPK activation inhibits mRNA translation and proliferation in cancer cells via down-regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, metformin decreases the production of insulin, insulin-like growth factor, inflammatory cytokines and vascular endothelial growth factor, and therefore it exerts anti-mitotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenetic effects. Recent in vitro and experimental data suggest that metformin electively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth in different cancers. Several epidemiological studies and meta-analysis have shown that metformin use is associated with decreased cancer risk and/or reduced cancer mortality for different malignancies. The present review analyzes the recent biological and clinical data suggesting a possible growth-static effect of metformin also in gynecological cancers. The large majority of available clinical data on the anti-cancer potential of metformin are based on observational studies. Therefore long-term phase II-III clinical trials are strongly warranted to further investigate metformin activity in gynecological cancers. PMID:27378194

  8. Pain and Mean Absorbed Dose to the Pubic Bone After Radiotherapy Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Al-Abany, Massoud; Palm, Asa; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between mean absorbed dose to the pubic bone after pelvic radiotherapy for gynecological cancer and occurrence of pubic bone pain among long-term survivors. Methods and Materials: In an unselected, population-based study, we identified 823 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy during 1991-2003. For comparison, we used a non-radiation-treated control population of 478 matched women from the Swedish Population Register. Pain, intensity of pain, and functional impairment due to pain in the pubic bone were assessed with a study-specific postal questionnaire. Results: We analyzed data from 650 survivors (participation rate 79%) with median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2.3-15.0 years) along with 344 control women (participation rate, 72 %). Ten percent of the survivors were treated with radiotherapy; ninety percent with surgery plus radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was added in 81%. Complete treatment records were recovered for 538/650 survivors, with dose distribution data including dose-volume histograms over the pubic bone. Pubic bone pain was reported by 73 survivors (11%); 59/517 (11%) had been exposed to mean absorbed external beam doses <52.5 Gy to the pubic bone and 5/12 (42%) to mean absorbed external beam doses {>=}52.5 Gy. Thirty-three survivors reported pain affecting sleep, a 13-fold increased prevalence compared with control women. Forty-nine survivors reported functional impairment measured as pain walking indoors, a 10-fold increased prevalence. Conclusions: Mean absorbed external beam dose above 52.5 Gy to the pubic bone increases the occurrence of pain in the pubic bone and may affect daily life of long-term survivors treated with radiotherapy for gynecological cancer.

  9. Emotional and sexual concerns in women undergoing pelvic surgery and associated treatment for gynecologic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Cara; Gunn, Abigail; Sonoda, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of gynecologic cancer can cause short- and long-term effects on sexuality, emotional well being, reproductive function, and overall quality of life (QoL). Fortunately, innovative approaches developed over the past several decades have improved oncologic outcomes and reduced treatment sequelae; however, these side effects of treatment are still prevalent. In this article, we provide an overview of the various standard-of-care pelvic surgeries and multimodality cancer treatments (chemotherapy and radiation therapy) by anatomic site and highlight the potential emotional and sexual consequences that can influence cancer survivorship and QoL. Potential screening tools that can be used in clinical practice to identify some of these concerns and treatment side effects and possible solutions are also provided. These screening tools include brief assessments that can be used in the clinical care setting to assist in the identification of problematic issues throughout the continuum of care. This optimizes quality of care, and ultimately, QoL in these women. Prospective clinical trials with gynecologic oncology populations should include patient-reported outcomes to identify subgroups at risk for difficulties during and following treatment for early intervention. PMID:26816823

  10. Insights into preferences for psycho-oncology services among women with gynecologic cancer following distress screening.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sylvie D; Kelly, Brian; Boyes, Allison; Cameron, Alexander; Adams, Catherine; Proietto, Anthony; Girgis, Afaf

    2014-06-01

    Much attention has been given to implementing routine screening programs in cancer care to improve the management of distress following diagnosis. Although patients might screen positive for distress, several studies have found that most then refuse additional psychosocial support. To inform the development of successful models of distress screening, this qualitative study explored preferences for psychosocial care among 18 women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer who scored at least 4 on the Distress Thermometer (DT). Participants were recruited from a gynecologic oncology outpatient clinic in Newcastle, Australia, and interviewed. Unanimously, participants felt that completing the DT was an integral part of their cancer care. However, half then refused the referral to see a psychologist. These women typically reported that a referral was not needed, because their rating on the DT reflected transient stressors or physical distress. Many also spoke about their need to cope with the challenges they were facing on their own and the extensive social support they already had in place to help them overcome these challenges. In contrast, women who accepted referral to the psychologist often struggled to cope with several losses they felt had existential and long-term effects. Commonly, these women reported not having the social support they needed, managing several concurrent life stressors, and/or not having the repertoire of coping skills they required to "remain afloat." Findings from this study begin to bridge the gap between clinicians' and patients' expectations of how psychosocial services should be used in response to distress screening. PMID:24925200

  11. Gynecologic Cancer Information on YouTube: Will Women Watch Advertisements to Learn More?

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Chu, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The quality and accuracy of health content posted on YouTube varies widely. To increase dissemination of evidence-based gynecologic cancer information to US YouTube users, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sponsored two types of advertisements: (1) pre-roll videos that users had to watch for at least 5 s before seeing a video they selected and (2) keyword-targeted listings that appeared in search results when users entered terms related to gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to November 2013, pre-roll videos were shown 9.2 million times, viewed (watched longer than the mandatory 5 s) 1.6 million times (17.6%), and cost $0.09 per view. Keyword-targeted listings were displayed 15.3 million times, viewed (activated by users) 59,766 times (0.4%), and cost $0.31 per view. CDC videos in advertisements played completely in 17.0% of pre-roll video views and 44.4% of keyword-targeted listing views. Advertisements on YouTube can disseminate evidence-based cancer information broadly with minimal cost. PMID:25877466

  12. Gynecologic Cancer Information on YouTube: Will Women Watch Advertisements to Learn More?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    The quality and accuracy of health content posted on YouTube varies widely. To increase dissemination of evidence-based gynecologic cancer information to US YouTube users, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sponsored two types of advertisements: (1) pre-roll videos that users had to watch for at least 5 s before seeing a video they selected and (2) keyword-targeted listings that appeared in search results when users entered terms related to gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to November 2013, pre-roll videos were shown 9.2 million times, viewed (watched longer than the mandatory 5 s) 1.6 million times (17.6 %), and cost $0.09 per view. Keyword-targeted listings were displayed 15.3 million times, viewed (activated by users) 59,766 times (0.4 %), and cost $0.31 per view. CDC videos in advertisements played completely in 17.0 % of pre-roll video views and 44.4 % of keyword-targeted listing views. Advertisements on YouTube can disseminate evidence-based cancer information broadly with minimal cost. PMID:25877466

  13. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  14. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  15. OncoLink: a cancer information resource for gynecologic oncologists and the public on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, I; Goldwein, J W; Rubin, S C; McKenna, W G

    1996-01-01

    The Internet is a computer network accessible to over 30 million computers users worldwide. By default, it has become the "information superhighway" that is growing at an explosive rate of between 1 and 2 million new users per month. Internet contains thousands of information of interest to cancer patients and healthcare professionals. Identifying the outstanding "golden" resources from the chaos is difficult. To address this problem and to provide information specific to gynecologic oncology, we developed a cancer information server called "OncoLink" at our institution that is available at no cost 24 hr per day, 7 days per week to all Internet users. OncoLink has two major goals: (1) To provide quality, original content for cancer patients and healthcare professionals and (2) to provide well-organized, consistent access to existing Internet cancer resources. This service may be used by anyone with a Microsoft Windows, Apple Macintosh, or UNIX computer. The service is rich in multimedia content containing text, pictures, illustrations, sound, and video. The information includes (1) original content written by authors at our institution, (2) original content submitted by authors from other institutions and, (3) publicly available information from other resources. Patient-oriented articles, physician-oriented review articles, and NIH, NCI, and FDA documents are available. All content is reviewed by an Editorial Board prior to posting. We have kept a detailed log file of each time the system has been accessed by an Internet user. OncoLink went online in March 1994. During the first 18 months (542 days) of operation, the service received 4,051,901 request for information from 105,589 unique Internet addresses worldwide. There is tremendous public and professional demand for online cancer information via the Internet. We feel that the Internet is an outstanding vehicle for providing quality cancer information for gynecologic oncologist other healthcare professionals

  16. Scientific research in obstetrics and gynecology: changes in the trends over three decades

    PubMed Central

    Kassem, Gamal A

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of this work was to assess scientific research of master’s and doctoral theses and essays in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zagazig University, Egypt. Materials and methods All master’s and doctoral theses and essays since the foundation of Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Zagazig University, Egypt, in 1975 till end of 2012 were reviewed. Results A total of 703 theses and essays were reviewed. The important topics in the specialty of obstetrics and gynecology were covered and updated. Infertility, in vitro fertilization–embryo transfer (IVF-ET) and related techniques, and polycystic ovarian disease were the most common gynecologic topics (27.2%), followed by gynecologic oncology (18.5%). Preeclampsia was the most common obstetrics topic (18.8%), followed by issues of high-risk pregnancy, fetal growth restriction, and fetal well-being (11.6%). The number of researches that allow the candidates to learn skills was 183 and it was increased from 4.4% of all research in the period 1979–1988 to 33.2% in period 1989–2000 then slightly decreased to 31.2% in period 2001–2012. Ultrasonography was on the top and was present in 99 out of 183 (54.1%) followed by laparoscopy (30, 16.4%), hysteroscopy (25, 13.7%), IVF-ET and related techniques (16, 8.7%) and colposcopy (13, 7.1%) researches. Multi-disciplinary research was decreased by 61.7% in the period 2001–2012. Researches in academic fields were abandoned and in some clinically important areas like preeclampsia were decreased. Conclusion Scientific research of master’s and doctoral theses and essays was comprehensive, updated, and had some autonomy independent of plans. Research which enable the candidate to learn skills were increased on the expense of academic, clinical and multidisciplinary research. It could be recommended that plans for scientific research should be flexible and should leave a space for local departmental views. Proper training of residents during their

  17. Pelvic exenterations for gynecological malignancies: twenty-year experience at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Odunsi, K; Driscoll, D; Lele, S

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review the experience with pelvic exenterations for gynecological malignancies at our cancer institute. Charts of 48 women who underwent a pelvic exenteration between January 1980 and December 1999 were reviewed, and several outcomes were analyzed. Majority of patients had received prior radiation therapy. The median survival was 35 months, and the disease-free survival was 32 months. Mortality from the procedure was 4.2%. Early and late postoperative complication rates were 27% and 75%, respectively. Recurrence rate was 60%. Eight patients received intraoperative radiation. Median survival in this group was 11.3 vs 35 months (P = 0.003). Univariate analysis failed to show an association between type of pelvic exenteration, type of fecal and urinary diversion, outcome, need for reoperation, and recurrence. Contemporary pelvic exenterations are associated with a low mortality and a potential for long-term survival in a subset of patients who historically have been given a poor prognosis. In patients with recurrent gynecological cancer confined centrally to the pelvis, pelvic exenteration still remains the choice of therapy as response to chemotherapy to a centrally recurrent tumor in radiated area continues to be poor. Intraoperative radiation in select few patients needs to be further studied. PMID:15882172

  18. Etiologic Heterogeneity in Endometrial Cancer: Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Louise A.; Felix, Ashley S.; McMeekin, D. Scott; Creasman, William T.; Sherman, Mark E.; Mutch, David; Cohn, David E.; Walker, Joan L.; Moore, Richard G.; Downs, Levi S.; Soslow, Robert A.; Zaino, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although the epidemiology of typical endometrial carcinomas (grades 1–2 endometrioid or Type I) is well established, less is known regarding higher grade endometrioid or non-endometrioid carcinomas (Type II). Within a large Gynecologic Oncology Group trial (GOG-210), which included central pathology review, we investigated the etiologic heterogeneity of endometrial cancers by comparing risk factors for different histologic categories. Methods Based on epidemiologic questionnaire data, risk factor associations, expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were estimated comparing grade 3 endometrioid and Type II cancers (including histologic subtypes) to grades 1–2 endometrioid cancers. Results Compared with 2,244 grades 1–2 endometrioid cancers, women with Type II cancers (321 serous, 141 carcinosarcomas, 77 clear cell, 42 mixed epithelial with serous or clear cell components) were older; more often non-white, multiparous, current smokers; and less often obese. Risk factors for grade 3 endometrioid carcinomas (n=354) were generally similar to those identified for Type II cancers, although patients with grade 3 endometrioid tumors more often had histories of breast cancer without tamoxifen exposure while those with Type II tumors were more frequently treated with tamoxifen. Patients with serous cancers and carcinosarcomas more frequently had breast cancer histories with tamoxifen treatment compared to patients with other tumors. Conclusions Risk factors for aggressive endometrial cancers, including grade 3 endometrioid and non-endometrioid tumors, appear to differ from lower grade endometrioid carcinomas. Our findings support etiologic differences between Type I and II endometrial cancers as well as additional heterogeneity within Type II cancers. PMID:23485770

  19. Controversies in the management of endometrial cancer: a survey of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom; Seong, Seok Ju; Kim, Jae Weon; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify current practice patterns for unresolved issues in the surgical and adjuvant management of endometrial cancer in Korea. Methods We designed and conducted a survey of all 218 active members of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group to try to identify how they would manage various case scenarios for endometrial cancer. Data were collected using an Internet survey database. Results A total of 108 members (49.5%) responded to the survey. Laparoscopy (81.6%) was the most commonly used mode of surgery in early-stage endometrial cancer. Of all the respondents, 19.8% stated that lymphadenectomy could be omitted and 21.7% recommended selective lymphadenectomy based on sentinel biopsy or frozen results for patients with presumed stage IA/grade 1 disease. On the other hand, 71.9% of respondents recommended para-aortic lymphadenectomy for patients with presumed stage IB/grade 1 disease and 86.4% recommended this treatment for presumed stage IB/grade 3 disease. The majority of respondents performed adjuvant therapy for stage IB/grade 2 (91.7%), IB/grade 3 (99.0%), and stage II (89.6%). Whole pelvic radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy were the most frequently used options among these patients. All respondents administered adjuvant therapy when node metastasis was found, and concurrent chemoradiotherapy (53.2%) was the most preferred option for stage IIIC1 disease. Conclusion There is broad variation in both the surgical and adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer among Korean gynecologic oncologists. PMID:26404123

  20. Types of Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) describing the four broad categories of cancer research: basic research, clinical research, population-based research, and translational research.

  1. Increased nephrotoxicity of combination taxol and cisplatin chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Davidson, S A; Schrier, R W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the increased nephrotoxicity of taxol and cisplatin combination chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone, the medical records of 25 patients with gynecological cancers were reviewed for evaluation of nephrotoxicity after chemotherapy treatment. The data included age, serum creatinine, calculated creatinine clearance, initial and cumulative dose of cisplatin and taxol, primary site of the cancer, renal ultrasound and hydration protocols. Renal function was evaluated before, during and 6 months after chemotherapy. Renal dysfunction was defined as a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance. Comparing 11 patients treated with taxol and cisplatin versus 14 treated with cisplatin alone, there was a significant difference in effect on renal function. Nine of 11 patients (81%) treated with the combination chemotherapy had a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance while only 4 of the 14 patients (29%) treated with cisplatin alone had such a decrease in creatinine clearance (p < 0.004). The patients treated with the combination chemotherapy, however, received a higher dose of cisplatin (80.4 vs. 66.4 mg/m2, p < 0.02) and were treated longer (6.7 vs. 4.3 months, p < 0.002). Nevertheless, when the patients were matched for age, initial dose and cumulative dose of cisplatin, a higher frequency of nephrotoxicity persisted in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin as compared to cisplatin alone (72 as compared to 20%, p < 0.02). The patients in both groups were comparably hydrated; prerenal failure and urinary tract obstruction were excluded in all patients. Six months after completion of chemotherapy, a significantly lower creatinine clearance was still observed in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin combination therapy (46 vs. 76 ml/min, p < 0.01). In summary, a retrospective analysis of renal function in patients with gynecological cancers showed an increased nephrotoxicity in patients treated with taxol and

  2. Therapist and Patient Perceptions of Alliance and Progress in Psychological Therapy for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; Kashy, Deborah A.; Rubin, Stephen; Hernandez, Enrique; Bergman, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal was to understand both therapist and patient perspectives on alliance and session progress for women in treatment for gynecological cancer. We used a longitudinal version of the one-with-many design to partition variation in alliance and progress ratings into therapist, patient/dyad, and time-specific components. We also…

  3. Impact of the care provided by gynecologic oncologists on outcomes of cervical cancer patients treated with radical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miao-fang; Li, Jing; Lu, Huai-wu; Wang, Li-juan; Zhang, Bing-zhong; Lin, Zhong-qiu

    2016-01-01

    For many malignant diseases, specialized care has been reported to be associated with better outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of gynecologic oncologists on treatment outcomes for cervical cancer patients treated by radical hysterectomy. Records of patients who received radical hysterectomy between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. Perioperative morbidity, recurrence-free survival, and cancer-specific survival were assessed. Cox regression model was used to evaluate gynecologic oncologists as an independent predictor of survival. A total of 839 patients were included. Of these patients, 553 were treated by gynecologic oncologists, while 286 were treated by other subspecialties. With regard to operative outcomes, significant differences in favor of operation by gynecologic oncologists were found in number of patients receiving para-aortic node sampling and dissection (P=0.038), compliance with surgical guidelines (P=0.003), operative time (P<0.0001), estimated blood loss (P<0.0001), transfusion rate (P=0.046), number of removed nodes (P=0.033), and incidences of ureteric injury (P=0.027), cystotomy (P=0.038), and fistula formation (P=0.002). Patients who were operated on by gynecologic oncologists had longer recurrence-free survival (P=0.001; hazard ratio [HR] =0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.48, 0.84]) and cancer-specific survival (P=0.005; HR=0.64; 95% CI [0.47, 0.87]), and this association remained significant in patients with locally advanced disease. Care by gynecologic oncologists was an independent predictor for improved recurrence-free survival (P<0.0001; HR=0.57; 95% CI [0.42, 0.76]) and cancer-specific survival (P=0.001; HR=0.58; 95% CI [0.42, 0.81]), which was still significant among patients with locally advanced cancer. Given the results, we believe for cervical cancer patients receiving radical hysterectomy, operation by gynecologic oncologists results in significantly improved surgical and survival

  4. The association between the SNP rs763110 and the risk of gynecological cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingling; Zhang, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoguang; Li, Jun

    2015-02-01

    FAS and FAS ligand (FASL) are the principal genes of the apoptosis pathway, which play a vital role in the etiology of various gynecological cancers. Studies have revealed that polymorphism of FASL promoter -844C>T (rs763110) influences FASL transcription process, which involving in cancer risk. Moreover, estrogen has been proved to trigger T-cell apoptosis by up-regulating FAS/FASL system in cancer cells. However, results from the published studies on the association between FASL -844C>T polymorphism and risk of gynecological cancer are conflicting. We performed a meta-analysis based on 13 case-control studies, including a total of 6256 cancer cases and 5573 controls. We used odd ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association strength. Overall, the FASL -844CT and TT genotypes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of gynecological cancer types in homozygote comparison (OR=0.80, 95% CI=0.64-0.99), heterozygote comparison (OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.67-0.98), and dominant model (OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.67-0.98). In the stratified analyses, we observed a similar association among Asian population (heterozygote comparison: OR=0.73, 95% CI=0.56-0.95; dominant model: OR=0.75, 95% CI=0.57-0.98) and hospital-based studies (homozygote comparison: OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.43-0.86). When stratified by cancer type, there was also a significantly lower risk of the ovarian cancer in different genetic models except the recessive one. The results suggested that the FASL -844C>T polymorphism may reduce the risk of gynecological cancer. PMID:25661359

  5. [A trial of biweekly paclitaxel administration in consideration of QOL for advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer].

    PubMed

    Fushiki, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Hideo; Ikoma, Tomomi; Ota, Satoru

    2005-05-01

    At present there is no oral medicine available which is effective for advanced or recurrent case of elderly patients with gynecologic cancer. We report that a low-dose biweekly paclitaxel administration preserves quality of life (QOL) and seems to be "tumor dormancy like" therapy of good compliance with few side effects. A total of 11 cases were in ovarian cancer (5), uterine cancer (3), cervical cancer (2), and uterine sarcoma (1). The median age was 68 years old and the age range was 50 to 79 years old. We performed a standard treatment as a first time treatment. Afterwards, we obtained complete informed consent from the patients for progressive or recurrent cancer and administered biweekly paclitaxel 70 mg/m2 (80-100 mg/body) on an outpatient basis. We reviewed the effect, side effect and compliance of the medication. We judged the side effect based on the Japanese cancer treatment society common toxicity criteria. The result was only one patient death from PD and the other 10 patients were PR or a state of NC without side effect. An ovary cancer case patient lived for 67 months at best, an endometrial cancer case patient lived for 62 months at best, a cervical cancer case patient lived for 74 months at best, and a recurrent uterine sarcoma case patient lived for 76 months after recurrence and the QOL was good. In addition, there was no onset of side effect more than grade 2 in all of the cases and a compliance of medical administration was good. In these cases, we thought that a low-dose of biweekly paclitaxel administration was regarded as a therapy to preserve QOL without a serious side effect and a good compliance of medication. Furthermore, we intend to increase more cases and would like to report them in the future. PMID:15918575

  6. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  7. Growth Inhibition of Human Gynecologic and Colon Cancer Cells by Phyllanthus watsonii through Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Sujatha; Abdul Wahab, Norhanom; Zainal Abidin, Nurhayati; Manickam, Sugumaran; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2012-01-01

    Phyllanthus watsonii Airy Shaw is an endemic plant found in Peninsular Malaysia. Although there are numerous reports on the anti cancer properties of other Phyllanthus species, published information on the cytotoxicity of P. watsonii are very limited. The present study was carried out with bioassay-guided fractionation approach to evaluate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction capability of the P. watsonii extracts and fractions on human gynecologic (SKOV-3 and Ca Ski) and colon (HT-29) cancer cells. P. watsonii extracts exhibited strong cytotoxicity on all the cancer cells studied with IC50 values of ≤ 20.0 µg/mL. Hexane extract of P. watsonii was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and yielded 10 fractions (PW-1→PW-10). PW-4→PW-8 portrayed stronger cytotoxic activity and was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and resulted with 8 sub-fractions (PPWH-1→PPWH-8). PPWH-7 possessed greatest cytotoxicity (IC50 values ranged from 0.66 – 0.83 µg/mL) and was selective on the cancer cells studied. LC-MS/MS analysis of PPWH-7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid, geranic acid, glochidone, betulin, phyllanthin and sterol glucoside. Marked morphological changes, ladder-like appearance of DNA and increment in caspase-3 activity indicating apoptosis were clearly observed in both human gynecologic and colon cancer cells treated with P. watsonii especially with PPWH-7. The study also indicated that P. watsonii extracts arrested cell cycle at different growth phases in SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells. Cytotoxic and apoptotic potential of the endemic P. watsonii was investigated for the first time by bioassay-guided approach. These results demonstrated that P. watsonii selectively inhibits the growth of SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells through apoptosis induction and cell cycle modulation. Hence, P. watsonii has the potential to be further exploited for the discovery and development of new anti cancer drugs. PMID:22536331

  8. Validation of Catheter Segmentation for MR-guided Gynecologic Cancer Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pernelle, Guillaume; Mehrtash, Alireza; Barber, Lauren; Damato, Antonio; Wang, Wei; Seethamraju, Ravi Teja; Schmidt, Ehud; Cormack, Robert; Wells, Williams; Viswanathan, Akila; Kapur, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of interstitial catheters from MRI needs to be addressed in order for MRI-based brachytherapy treatment planning to become part of the clinical practice of gynecologic cancer radiotherapy. This paper presents a validation study of a novel image-processing method for catheter segmentation. The method extends the distal catheter tip, interactively provided by the physician, to its proximal end, using knowledge of catheter geometry and appearance in MRI sequences. The validation study consisted of comparison of the algorithm results to expert manual segmentations, first on images of a phantom, and then on patient MRI images obtained during MRI-guided insertion of brachytherapy catheters for the treatment of gynecologic cancer. In the phantom experiment, the maximum disagreement between automatic and manual segmentation of the same MRI image, as computed using the Hausdorf distance, was 1.5 mm, which is of the same order as the MR image spatial resolution, while the disagreement between automatic segmentation of MR images and “ground truth”, manual segmentation of CT images, was 3.5 mm. The segmentation method was applied to an IRB-approved retrospective database of 10 interstitial brachytherapy patients which included a total of 101 catheters. Compared with manual expert segmentations, the automatic method correctly segmented 93 out of 101 catheters, at an average rate of 0.3 seconds per catheter using a 3GHz Intel Core i7 computer with 16 GB RAM and running Mac OS X 10.7. These results suggest that the proposed catheter segmentation is both technically and clinically feasible. PMID:24505784

  9. Consequences of gynecological cancer in patients and their partners from the sexual and psychological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Katarzyna; Iżycka, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of gynecological cancer and the following consequences of the treatment radically change the lives of cancer patients and their partners. Women experience negative consequences in terms of sexual, psychological and social functioning. Surgical treatment may result in a decrease in sexual pleasure and pain during intercourse. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause a loss of libido and negatively affect the capacity to experience pleasure or orgasm. Treatment-related changes may include the occurrence of body image disorders, decreased quality of life as well as depressive and anxiety disorders among patients. Furthermore, a negative influence on the relationship between the affected women and their partners, as well as an adverse effect on the social activity, can be observed. Cancer is not an individual experience. It also affects partners of the sick women in terms of psychological and sexual functioning. This article depicts possible problems encountered by cancer patients and their partners from the psychological and sexual perspective. The emphasis is put on understanding sexuality not only in the context of sexual performance, but also in a wider perspective. PMID:27582686

  10. Consequences of gynecological cancer in patients and their partners from the sexual and psychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Iżycki, Dariusz; Woźniak, Katarzyna; Iżycka, Natalia

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis of gynecological cancer and the following consequences of the treatment radically change the lives of cancer patients and their partners. Women experience negative consequences in terms of sexual, psychological and social functioning. Surgical treatment may result in a decrease in sexual pleasure and pain during intercourse. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause a loss of libido and negatively affect the capacity to experience pleasure or orgasm. Treatment-related changes may include the occurrence of body image disorders, decreased quality of life as well as depressive and anxiety disorders among patients. Furthermore, a negative influence on the relationship between the affected women and their partners, as well as an adverse effect on the social activity, can be observed. Cancer is not an individual experience. It also affects partners of the sick women in terms of psychological and sexual functioning. This article depicts possible problems encountered by cancer patients and their partners from the psychological and sexual perspective. The emphasis is put on understanding sexuality not only in the context of sexual performance, but also in a wider perspective. PMID:27582686

  11. Profiling of Discrete Gynecological Cancers Reveals Novel Transcriptional Modules and Common Features Shared by Other Cancer Types and Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Amariglio, Ninette; Vlachos, George D.; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Anagnou, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on individual types of gynecological cancers (GCs), utilizing novel expression technologies, have revealed specific pathogenetic patterns and gene markers for cervical (CC), endometrial (EC) and vulvar cancer (VC). Although the clinical phenotypes of the three types of gynecological cancers are discrete, the fact they originate from a common embryological origin, has led to the hypothesis that they might share common features reflecting regression to early embryogenesis. To address this question, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of their profiles. Our data identified both common features (pathways and networks) and novel distinct modules controlling the same deregulated biological processes in all three types. Specifically, four novel transcriptional modules were discovered regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Integration and comparison of our data with other databases, led to the identification of common features among cancer types, embryonic stem (ES) cells and the newly discovered cell population of squamocolumnar (SC) junction of the cervix, considered to host the early cancer events. Conclusively, these data lead us to propose the presence of common features among gynecological cancers, other types of cancers, ES cells and the pre-malignant SC junction cells, where the novel E2F/NFY and MAX/CEBP modules play an important role for the pathogenesis of gynecological carcinomas. PMID:26559525

  12. Investigating micronucleus assay applicability for prediction of normal tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity in gynecological cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Encheva, Elitsa; Deleva, Sofia; Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hadjieva, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Background Pelvic organs morbidity after irradiation of cancer patients remains a major problem although new technologies have been developed and implemented. A relatively simple and suitable method for routine clinical practice is needed for preliminary assessment of normal tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity. The micronucleus test (MNT) determines the frequency of the radiation induced micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood lymphocytes, which could serve as an indicator of intrinsic cell radiosensitivity. Aim To investigate a possible use of the micronucleus test (MNT) for acute radiation morbidity prediction in gynecological cancer patients. Materials and methods Forty gynecological cancer patients received 50 Gy conventional external pelvic irradiation after radical surgery. A four-field “box” technique was applied with 2D planning. The control group included 10 healthy females. Acute normal tissue reactions were graded according to NCI CTCAE v.3.0. From all reaction scores, the highest score named “summarized clinical radiosensitivity” was selected for a statistical analysis. MNT was performed before and after in vitro irradiation with 1.5 Gy. The mean radiation induced frequency of micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells (MN/1000) and lymphocytes containing micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells (cells with MN/1000) were evaluated for both patients and controls. An arbitrary cut off value was created to pick up a radiosensitive individual: the mean value of spontaneous frequency of cells with MN/1000 ± 2SD, found in the control group. Results Both mean spontaneous frequency of cells with MN/1000 and MN/1000 were registered to be significantly higher in cancer patients compared to the control group (t = 2.46, p = 0.02 and t = 2.51, p = 0.02). No statistical difference was registered when comparing radiation induced MN frequencies between those groups. Eighty percent (32) of patients developed grade 2 summarized clinical radiosensitivity, with

  13. Gynecologic examination and cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients eligible for salvage surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Hout, Bertha A. in 't; Boomgaard, Jantine J.; Hullu, Joanne A. de; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Aalders, Jan G.; Nijman, Hans W.; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Mourits, Marian J.E. . E-mail: m.j.e.mourits@og.umcg.nl

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of gynecologic examination under general anesthesia with cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients with residual disease who may benefit from salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort study data of all cervical cancer patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1 to IVA treated with (chemo) radiation between 1994 and 2001 were analyzed. Patients underwent gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after completion of treatment. Cervical biopsy samples were taken from patients judged to be operable. In case of residual cancer, salvage surgery was performed. Results: Between 1994 and 2001, 169 consecutive cervical cancer patients received primary (chemo) radiation, of whom 4 were lost to follow-up. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 44-71) and median follow-up was 3.5 years (IQR, 1.5-5.9). In each of 111 patients a biopsy sample was taken, of which 90 (81%) showed no residual tumor. Vital tumor cells were found in 21 of 111 patients (19%). Salvage surgery was performed in 13 of 21 (62%) patients; of these patients, 5 (38%) achieved long-term, complete remission after salvage surgery (median follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 3.9-8.8 years). All patients with residual disease who did not undergo operation (8/21) died of progressive disease. Locoregional control was more often obtained in patients who underwent operation (7 of 13) than in patients who were not selected for salvage surgery (0 of 8 patients) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after (chemo) radiation with cervical biopsies allows identification of those cervical cancer patients who have residual local disease, of whom a small but significant proportion may be salvaged by surgery.

  14. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Craighead, Peter; McCormack, Mary; Toita, Takafumi; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nicholas; Long, Harry; Kim, Hak-Jae; Marth, Christian; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Cerrotta, Annmarie; Small, William; Trimble, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E) and North America (NAm). Materials and Methods A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) utilized HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for 5 fractions (18%), 6 Gy × 4 (15%), 7 Gy × 3 (11%), and for Stage IIB-IVA patients were 6 Gy for 5 fractions (19%), 7 Gy × 4 (8%), and 7 Gy × 3 (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD], 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD, 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD, 11.2) (p=0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD, 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD, 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD, 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p=0.02 for Asia vs. other regions). The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p=0.0002). Conclusion Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean dose administered for cervical cancer is similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials. PMID:21183288

  15. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Craighead, Peter; McCormack, Mary; Toita, Takafumi; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nicholas; Long, Harry; Kim, Hak-Jae; Marth, Christian; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Cerrotta, Annmarie; Small, William; Trimble, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB-IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  16. Palonosetron versus granisetron in combination with aprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with gynecologic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Satoe; Tsunetoh, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Masanori; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is no research regarding the appropriate antiemetic agents for female patients, especially those receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). We evaluated the antiemetic efficacy of a combination of 5-HT3 receptor with/without aprepitant in patients with gynecological cancer treated with the TC (paclitaxel and carboplatin) regimen of MEC. Methods We enrolled 38 patients diagnosed with gynecologic cancer and scheduled to receive the TC regimen. The patients were randomly assigned to receive a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, either palonosetron in the first cycle followed by granisetron in the second cycle or vice versa. In the third cycle, all patients received a combination of the 5-HT3 receptor and dexamethasone with/without aprepitant. Results When three drugs were administered, palonosetron consistently produced an equivalent complete response (CR) rate to granisetron in the acute phase (89.5% vs. 86.8%, p=0.87) and delayed phase (60.5% vs. 65.8%, p=0.79). With regard to the change in dietary intake, palonosetron exhibited similar efficacy to granisetron in the acute phase (92.1% vs. 89.4%, p=0.19) and delayed phase (65.7% vs. 68.4%, p=0.14). However, in the delayed phase, the addition of aprepitant therapy with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone produced a higher CR rate than a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with dexamethasone (93.3% vs. 47.8%, p<0.001) and allowed the patients to maintain a higher level of dietary intake (93.3% vs. 56.5%, p<0.001). Conclusion The addition of aprepitant therapy was more effective than the control therapy of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone in gynecological cancer patients treated with the TC regimen. PMID:26197776

  17. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  18. Estimation of the Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Gynecological Cancers and Comparison With Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Stephen R.; Delaney, Geoff P.; Gabriel, Gabriel S.; Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir; Barton, Michael B.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We aimed to estimate the optimal proportion of all gynecological cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT)-the optimal brachytherapy utilization rate (BTU)-to compare this with actual gynecological BTU and to assess the effects of nonmedical factors on access to BT. Methods and Materials: The previously constructed inter/multinational guideline-based peer-reviewed models of optimal BTU for cancers of the uterine cervix, uterine corpus, and vagina were combined to estimate optimal BTU for all gynecological cancers. The robustness of the model was tested by univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. The resulting model was applied to New South Wales (NSW), the United States, and Western Europe. Actual BTU was determined for NSW by a retrospective patterns-of-care study of BT; for Western Europe from published reports; and for the United States from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. The effect of nonmedical factors on access to BT in NSW were analyzed. Results: Gynecological BTU was as follows: NSW 28% optimal (95% confidence interval [CI] 26%-33%) compared with 14% actual; United States 30% optimal (95% CI 26%-34%) and 10% actual; and Western Europe 27% optimal (95% CI 25%-32%) and 16% actual. On multivariate analysis, NSW patients were more likely to undergo gynecological BT if residing in Area Health Service equipped with BT (odds ratio 1.76, P=.008) and if residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged postcodes (odds ratio 1.12, P=.05), but remoteness of residence was not significant. Conclusions: Gynecological BT is underutilized in NSW, Western Europe, and the United States given evidence-based guidelines. Access to BT equipment in NSW was significantly associated with higher utilization rates. Causes of underutilization elsewhere were undetermined. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against

  19. MAPK13 is preferentially expressed in gynecological cancer stem cells and has a role in the tumor-initiation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuyo; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kuroda, Takafumi; Takaya, Akari; Kubo, Terufumi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as small subpopulation of cancer cells that are endowed with higher tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs are resistant to standard cancer therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and they are thus thought to be responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms of CSCs/CICs is essential to cure cancer. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of gynecological CSCs/CICs isolated as aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDH(high)) cells, and found that MAPK13, PTTG1IP, CAPN1 and UBQLN2 were preferentially expressed in CSCs/CICs. MAPK13 is expressed in uterine, ovary, stomach, colon, liver and kidney cancer tissues at higher levels compared with adjacent normal tissues. MAPK13 gene knockdown using siRNA reduced the ALDH(high) population and abrogated the tumor-initiating ability. These results indicate that MAPK13 is expressed in gynecological CSCs/CICs and has roles in the maintenance of CSCs/CICs and tumor-initiating ability, and MAPK13 might be a novel molecular target for treatment-resistant CSCs/CICs. PMID:26969274

  20. Holding Back Sharing Concerns, Dispositional Emotional Expressivity, Perceived Unsupportive Responses, and Distress Among Women Newly-Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Myers, Shannon; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Kashy, Debby; Rubin, Stephen; Heckman, Carolyn; Rosenblum, Norm

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little attention has been paid to the role of holding back sharing concerns in the psychological adaptation of women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of holding back concerns in psychosocial adjustment and quality of life, as well as a possible moderating role for emotional expressivity and perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends. Method Two hundred forty four women diagnosed with gynecological cancer in the past eight months completed measures of holding back, dispositional emotional expressivity, perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends, cancer-specific distress, depressive symptoms, and quality of life. Results Emotional expressivity moderated the association between holding back and cancer- specific distress and quality of life, but not depressive symptoms. Greater holding back was more strongly associated with higher levels of cancer-related distress among women who were more emotionally expressive than among women who were less expressive. Perceived unsupportive responses did not moderate the associations between holding back and psychosocial outcomes. Conclusion Holding back sharing concerns was more common in this patient population than other cancer populations. Dispositional expressivity played a role in how harmful holding back concerns was for women, while unsupportive responses from family and friends did not. PMID:24211156

  1. [Anesthetic management of a patient with Trousseau's syndrome and ovarian cancer who underwent gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Saho, Mayu; Ito, Asuka; Hiraki, Teruyuki; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2014-11-01

    Trousseau's syndrome, a complex paraneoplastic disease, is characterized by the occurrence of thromboembolic disorders such as brain infarctions in patients with malignant neoplasms. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with ovarian cancer who had suffered cerebral infarctions and presented with left hemiplegia, aphasia, and atypical genital bleeding. She suffered multiple right brain infarctions, a pulmonary embolism, a right renal infarction with bilateral hydronephrosis and deep venous thromboses and exhibited increased D-dimer and fibrinogen levels and so was administered heparin (10,000 U x day(-1)). She had no other underlying diseases such as coagulopathy, cardiovascular disease, collagen disease, or angiitis. Therefore, we were able to diagnose her with Trousseau's syndrome. She was scheduled to undergo total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomies, and omentectomy. Preoperatively, an inferior vena cava filter was temporarily installed to prevent the development of further pulmonary thromboses. General anesthesia was uneventfully maintained by inhalation of oxygen, air, and sevoflurane and the continuous infusion of remifentanil whilst regional cerebral oxygen saturation and transesophageal echocardiography monitoring were performed. Postoperatively, she received heparin-based anticoagulant therapy (10,000 U x day(-1)) and did not exhibit bleeding diathesis or thrombosis. It is of great importance that anesthesiologists are aware of the thromboembolic status of patients with malignant neoplasms, especially those with gynecological tumors. PMID:25731059

  2. [ADHERING TO MEDICAL STANDARTS, EVIDENCE-BASED STAGING IN GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    Among the key factors that influence the survival of patients is adherence to medical treatment standards. Indicators are assessing the degree of adherence to medical standards and represent the relative shares (%) of patients who fulfilled the relevant aspect of any subject. Data from the BNCR of 9842 cases of patients with malignant diseases of the female reproductive diagnosed in 2011-2013 in Bulgaria has been analyzed. Patients with tumors of the vulva were incorrectly staged in 15% to 30% of the cases, and those with vaginal tumors were incorrectly staged in 20% to 23% of cases. In patients with malignant tumors of the cervix incorrect staging was established in 19% to 47% of the cases. Patients with tumors of the uterus were incorrectly staged in 6% to 26% of the cases. Among the patients with ovarian tumors were incorrectly staged in 18% to 43%. Our results show that one in three patients with gynecological cancer in Bulgaria was incorrectly staged. We recommend using the current TNM and FIGO systems. PMID:27514165

  3. Development of an 241Am applicator for intracavitary irradiation of gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Peschel, R E; Park, C H; Fischer, J J

    1988-05-01

    Sealed sources of 241Am that emit primarily 60 keV photons produce relative dose distributions in water comparable to those from 137Cs or 226Ra sources and can produce dose rates of up to 100 cGy/hr at 1 cm in water. Also, 241Am gamma rays can be effectively shielded by thin layers of high atomic number materials (HVL is 1/8th mm of lead) placed on the applicator or inside some body cavities (for example, hypaque in bladder, barium sulphate in rectum). These properties of 241Am sources open a new approach to optimizing intracavitary irradiation of various cancers by allowing a reduction in dose and volume of irradiated critical organs or by increasing tumor doses. The relative ease with which highly effective shielding is achievable with 241Am sources would allow the design and fabrication of partially shielded applicators which can produce asymmetric dose distributions to allow unidirectional irradiation of localized lesions. Design and dosimetry characteristics of a gynecological applicator containing 241Am sources are presented. The applicator consists of a 2, 3, or 4 segment vaginal plaque (loaded with 2 and 5 Ci 241Am sources) and a tandem made up of a single 8 Ci 241Am source. Dose rates at 2 cm from the plaques are 42.0, 47.4, 58.3 and 56.7 cGy/hr for 5-5, 5-4-5, 5-5-5, and 5-4-4-5 Ci plaques, respectively. The 5-4-5 Ci plaque in combination with the 8 Ci tandem produces dose rates of 60.0 and 22.8 cGy/hr to points A and B, respectively. Surface dose rates on the plaque applicators are 143, 124, 142 and 132 cGy/hr for 5-5, 5-4-5, 5-5-5 and 5-4-4-5 Ci applicators, respectively. The shielding effect of a 0.5 mm thick lead foil on one side of the 5-4-5 Ci applicator is found to be a factor of 16.8; for example, the dose rate at 2 cm from the unshielded side is 42.0 cGy/hr compared to a dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr at 2 cm from the shielded side. Initial clinical experience with this applicator in the treatment of recurrent gynecological lesions is also presented

  4. Taxanes: Their Impact on Gynecologic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L.; English, Diana P.; Roque, Dana M.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of taxanes in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies expanded tremendously over the past 30 years. Both paclitaxel and docetaxel have unique microtubule stabilizing, antiangiogenic and radiation sensitizing properties that endow them with remarkable activity as chemotherapeutic agents. As research into the appropriate dose, timing, treatment interval and response rates have been studied, they emerged as one of the most active agents available in the treatment of gynecologic cancer. The body of research on taxanes continues to expand especially in regard to the use of taxanes in alternative formulations and in combination with newer treatments or routes of treatment. This review focuses on the development of taxanes as an effective therapy in the treatment of gynecologic cancers and data currently available in the literature regarding their efficacy. Future directions of taxane based chemotherapy in regards to ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers are also addressed. There is little doubt that taxane based chemotherapy will remain an integral part of the treatment of gynecologic cancer for the foreseeable future. PMID:24300913

  5. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  6. Escalation of Oncologic Services at the End of Life Among Patients With Gynecologic Cancer at an Urban, Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Eijean; Rogers, Anna; Ji, Lingyun; Sposto, Richard; Church, Terry; Roman, Lynda; Tripathy, Debu; Lin, Yvonne G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Use of oncology-related services is increasingly scrutinized, yet precisely which services are actually rendered to patients, particularly at the end of life, is unknown. This study characterizes the end-of-life use of medical services by patients with gynecologic cancer at a safety-net hospital. Methods: Oncologic history and metrics of medical use (eg, hospitalizations, chemotherapy infusions, procedures) for patients with gynecologic oncology who died between December 2006 and February 2012 were evaluated. Mixed-effect regression models were used to test time effects and construct usage summaries. Results: Among 116 subjects, cervical cancer accounted for the most deaths (42%). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years; 63% were Hispanic, and 65% had advanced disease. Only 34% died in hospice care. The median times from do not resuscitate/do not intubate documentation and from last therapeutic intervention to death were 9 days and 55 days, respectively. Significant time effects for all services (eg, hospitalizations, diagnostics, procedures, treatments, clinic appointments) were detected during the patient's final year (P < .001), with the most dramatic changes occurring during the last 2 months. Patients with longer duration of continuity of care used significantly fewer resources toward the end of life. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report enumerating medical services obtained by patients with gynecologic cancer in a large, public hospital during the end of life. Marked changes in interventions in the patient's final 2 months highlight the need for cost-effective, evidence-based metrics for delivering cancer care. Our data emphasize continuity of care as a significant determinant of oncologic resource use during this critical period. PMID:25604595

  7. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  8. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  9. Cryopreservation of in vitro matured oocytes after ex vivo oocyte retrieval from gynecologic cancer patients undergoing radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Sun Hee; Yang, Kwang Moon; Lee, In Ho; Lim, Kyung Teak; Lee, Ki Heon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to report a case series of in vitro matured (IVM) oocyte freezing in gynecologic cancer patients undergoing radical surgery under time constraints as an option for fertility preservation (FP). Methods Case series report. University-based in vitro fertilization center. Six gynecologic cancer patients who were scheduled to undergo radical surgery the next day were referred for FP. The patients had endometrial (n=2), ovarian (n=3), and double primary endometrial and ovarian (n=1) cancer. Ex vivo retrieval of immature oocytes from macroscopically normal ovarian tissue was followed by mature oocyte freezing after IVM or embryo freezing with intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Results A total of 53 oocytes were retrieved from five patients, with a mean of 10.6 oocytes per patient. After IVM, a total of 36 mature oocytes were obtained, demonstrating a 67.9% maturation rate. With regard to the ovarian cancer patients, seven IVM oocytes were frozen from patient 3, who had stage IC cancer, whereas one IVM oocyte was frozen from patient 4, who had stage IV cancer despite being of a similar age. With regard to the endometrial cancer patients, 15 IVM oocytes from patient 1 were frozen. Five embryos were frozen after the fertilization of IVM oocytes from patient 6. Conclusion Immature oocytes can be successfully retrieved ex vivo from macroscopically normal ovarian tissue before radical surgery. IVM oocyte freezing provides a possible FP option in patients with advanced-stage endometrial or ovarian cancer without the risk of cancer cell spillage or time delays. PMID:27358831

  10. Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of BRCA1- and BRCA2-Associated Breast and Gynecologic Cancer: A Multicenter, Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kauff, Noah D.; Domchek, Susan M.; Friebel, Tara M.; Robson, Mark E.; Lee, Johanna; Garber, Judy E.; Isaacs, Claudine; Evans, D. Gareth; Lynch, Henry; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Daly, Mary B.; Matloff, Ellen; Blum, Joanne L.; Sabbatini, Paul; Barakat, Richard R.; Hudis, Clifford; Norton, Larry; Offit, Kenneth; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) has been widely adopted as a key component of breast and gynecologic cancer risk-reduction for women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Despite 17% to 39% of all BRCA mutation carriers having a mutation in BRCA2, no prospective study to date has evaluated the efficacy of RRSO for the prevention of breast and BRCA-associated gynecologic (ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal) cancer when BRCA2 mutation carriers are analyzed separately from BRCA1 mutation carriers. Patients and Methods A total of 1,079 women 30 years of age and older with ovaries in situ and a deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were enrolled onto prospective follow-up studies at one of 11 centers from November 1, 1994 to December 1, 2004. Women self-selected RRSO or observation. Follow-up information through November 30, 2005, was collected by questionnaire and medical record review. The effect of RRSO on time to diagnosis of breast or BRCA-associated gynecologic cancer was analyzed using a Cox proportional-hazards model. Results During 3-year follow-up, RRSO was associated with an 85% reduction in BRCA1-associated gynecologic cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.15; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.56) and a 72% reduction in BRCA2-associated breast cancer risk (HR = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.92). While protection against BRCA1-associated breast cancer (HR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.30 to 1.22) and BRCA2-associated gynecologic cancer (HR = 0.00; 95% CI, not estimable) was suggested, neither effect reached statistical significance. Conclusion The protection conferred by RRSO against breast and gynecologic cancers may differ between carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Further studies evaluating the efficacy of risk-reduction strategies in BRCA mutation carriers should stratify by the specific gene mutated. PMID:18268356

  11. [Textual research on Huang shinüke (Huang's Obstetrics and Gynecology)].

    PubMed

    Wen, Jianfang; Wu, Tong

    2015-07-01

    Huang shi nü ke (Huang's Obstetrics and Gynecology), a handwritten copy of the Ming Dynasty passed on by Huang Xiaoyou, Yuanyi and Huang Dongjiu, and sorted out by Huang Yanrong, was a family medical book of Huang's obstetrics and gynecology in Xin'an, being a summary of their clinical experience.There were altogether 44 chapters divided into 4 parts, including general introduction, general principle of treatment, discussions on prenatal conditions and qi acquired from the mother, and gynecological diseases in sequence, with the appendixes of pulse diagnostics for differentiating male and female, and the 10-month methods of protecting the fetus. PMID:26815029

  12. Simultaneous integrated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost for locally advanced gynecological cancer: Radiobiological and dosimetric considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Mariana; Li, X. Allen . E-mail: ali@radonc.mcw.edu; Ma Lijun; Linder, Jeanette; Deyoung, Chad; Erickson, Beth

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: Whole-pelvis irradiation (WPI) followed by a boost to the tumor site is the standard of practice for the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced gynecologic cancers. The boost is frequently administered by use of brachytherapy or, occasionally, external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) when brachytherapy does not provide sufficient coverage because of the size of the tumor or the geometry of the patient. In this work, we propose using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), which is a single-phase process, to replace the conventional two-phase process involving WPI plus a boost. Radiobiological modeling is used to design appropriate regimens for the IMRT SIB. To demonstrate feasibility, a dosimetric study is carried out on an example patient. Methods and Materials: The standard linear-quadratic (LQ) model is used to calculate the biologically effective dose (BED) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD). A series of regimens that are biologically equivalent to those conventional two-phase treatments is calculated for the proposed SIB. A commercial inverse planning system (Corvus) was used to generate IMRT SIB plans for a sample patient case that used the newly designed fractionations. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) and EUD of both the target and normal structures for conventional treatments and the SIB are compared. A sparing factor was introduced to characterize the sparing of normal structures. Results: Fractionation regimes that are equivalent to the conventional treatments and are suitable for the IMRT SIB are deduced. For example, a SIB plan with 25 x 3.1 Gy (77.5 Gy) to a tumor is equivalent to a conventional treatment of EBRT of 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in 25 fractions plus a high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost with 30 Gy in 5 fractions. The normal tissue BED is found to be lower for the SIB plan than for the whole-pelvis plus HDR scheme when a sparing factor for the critical structures is considered. This

  13. Scripted Sexual Health Informational Intervention in Improving Sexual Function in Patients With Gynecologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Anxiety Disorder; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Sexual Dysfunction; Uterine Sarcoma; Vaginal Cancer; Vulvar Cancer

  14. A Prospective Study of Gynecological Cancer Risk in Relation to Adiposity Factors: Cumulative Incidence and Association with Plasma Adipokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meei-Maan; You, San-Lin; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Chen, Chi-An; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background Associations of obesity and obesity-related metabolic factors (adiposity factors) with uterine corpus cancer (UCC) and ovarian cancer (OVC) risk have been described. Still, a cause-effect relationship and the underlying mediators remain unclear, particularly for low-incidence populations. We aimed to prospectively determine whether adiposity factors could predict the development of UCC and OVC in Taiwanese women. To explore the biological mediators linking adiposity factors to cancer risk, we examined the association of two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, with the gynecological cancers. Methods Totally, 11,258 women, aged 30–65, were recruited into the Community-Based Cancer Screening Program (CBCSP) study during 1991–1993, and were followed for UCC and OVC cases until December 31, 2011. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs). Adiposity factors and risk covariates were assessed at recruitment. Newly-developed cancer cases were determined from data in the government’s National Cancer Registry and Death Certification System. For adipokienes study, a nested case-control study was conducted within the cohort. Baseline plasma samples of 40 incident gynecological cancer cases and 240 age-menopause-matched controls were assayed for adipokines levels. Findings There were 38 and 30 incident cases of UCC and OVC, respectively, diagnosed during a median 19.9 years of follow-up. Multivariate analysis showed that alcohol intake (HR = 16.00, 95% = 4.83–53.00), high triglyceride levels (HR = 2.58, 95% = 1.28–5.17), and years of endogenous estrogen exposure per 5-year increment (HR = 1.91, 95% = 1.08–3.38) were associated with increased UCC risk. High body mass index (BMI≥27 kg/m2, HR = 2.90, 95% = 1.30–6.46) was associated with increased OVC risk. Analysis further showed an independent effect of adipokines on UCC and OVC risk after adjustment of the risk covariates. Conclusion We

  15. Part I: cancer in Sudan—burden, distribution, and trends breast, gynecological, and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Elamin, Amany; Ibrahim, Muntaser E; Abuidris, Dafalla; Mohamed, Kamal Eldin H; Mohammed, Sulma Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    Despite the growing burden of cancer worldwide, it continues to receive low priority in Africa, across the continent and specifically in Sudan. This is due to political unrest, limited health resources, and other pressing public health issues such as infectious diseases. Lack of awareness about the magnitude of the current and future cancer burden among policy makers play a major role as well. Although, the real scope of cancer in Sudan is not known, the reported cases have increased from 303 in 1967-6303 in 2010. According to Globocan estimates, the top most common cancers in both sexes are breast, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, esophagus, and colorectum. This review is the first of four papers that focuses on cancer, its distribution and trend as well as the risk factors most common in Sudan. It is expected that cancer will increase in Sudan as a result of migration of people from rural areas to urban cities in the pursuit of a better standard of living, which has resulted in lifestyle and behavioral changes that include tobacco chewing and smoking, unhealthy dieting, and a lack of physical activity. These changes are further exacerbated by the aging population and have made the country vulnerable to many diseases including cancer. These reviews are meant to provide a better understanding and knowledge required to plan appropriate cancer-control and prevention strategies in the country. PMID:25641872

  16. Part I: cancer in Sudan—burden, distribution, and trends breast, gynecological, and prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Amany; Ibrahim, Muntaser E; Abuidris, Dafalla; Mohamed, Kamal Eldin H; Mohammed, Sulma Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing burden of cancer worldwide, it continues to receive low priority in Africa, across the continent and specifically in Sudan. This is due to political unrest, limited health resources, and other pressing public health issues such as infectious diseases. Lack of awareness about the magnitude of the current and future cancer burden among policy makers play a major role as well. Although, the real scope of cancer in Sudan is not known, the reported cases have increased from 303 in 1967–6303 in 2010. According to Globocan estimates, the top most common cancers in both sexes are breast, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, esophagus, and colorectum. This review is the first of four papers that focuses on cancer, its distribution and trend as well as the risk factors most common in Sudan. It is expected that cancer will increase in Sudan as a result of migration of people from rural areas to urban cities in the pursuit of a better standard of living, which has resulted in lifestyle and behavioral changes that include tobacco chewing and smoking, unhealthy dieting, and a lack of physical activity. These changes are further exacerbated by the aging population and have made the country vulnerable to many diseases including cancer. These reviews are meant to provide a better understanding and knowledge required to plan appropriate cancer-control and prevention strategies in the country. PMID:25641872

  17. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2015 for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Shinichi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Okamoto, Aikou; Ito, Kiyoshi; Morishige, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Nao; Kaneuchi, Masanori; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The fourth edition of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer was published in 2015. The guidelines contain seven chapters and six flow charts. The major changes in this new edition are as follows-(1) the format has been changed from reviews to clinical questions (CQ), and the guidelines for optimal clinical practice in Japan are now shown as 41 CQs and answers; (2) the 'flow charts' have been improved and placed near the beginning of the guidelines; (3) the 'basic points', including tumor staging, histological classification, surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and palliative care, are described before the chapter; (4) the FIGO surgical staging of ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, and primary peritoneal cancer was revised in 2014 and the guideline has been revised accordingly to take the updated version of this classification into account; (5) the procedures for examination and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are described; (6) information on molecular targeting therapy has been added; (7) guidelines for the treatment of recurrent cancer based on tumor markers alone are described, as well as guidelines for providing hormone replacement therapy after treatment. PMID:27142770

  18. Metformin and breast and gynecological cancer risk among women with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Diana; Shi, Jiaxiao; Chung, Joanie; Schottinger, Joanne E; Wallner, Lauren P; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Lentz, Scott E; Haque, Reina

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated if metformin lowers breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared with women who used other antidiabetic medications. Research design and methods We followed a cohort of 66 778 female patients with diabetes for a maximum of 12 years (median 6 years). We examined breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk, and the composite cancer risk. We examined drug categories using pharmacy records: metformin only; metformin combination regimens; non-metformin regimens; and non-users. We used χ2 analyses to examine categorical variables. We conducted multivariable Cox regression models with time-dependent drug use status. Results Women who used metformin combination regimens versus metformin only had a 15% lower breast cancer risk (adjusted HR=0.85, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.04). After stratifying by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), the association attenuated in those who had poorly controlled HbA1c (adjusted HR=1.06, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.55). Given the small numbers of ovarian and endometrial cancer outcomes, we examined these as a composite. The risk of all cancers combined was similar in those who used metformin combination regimens versus metformin only (adjusted HR=0.92, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.10). We found no significant differences for breast cancer or all cancers combined when we compared risks in non-metformin users versus metformin only users. Conclusions Women who used metformin and other antidiabetic drugs had a lower breast cancer risk compared with women who used metformin only, but the results were not significant. We also found no difference in overall cancer risks when we compared women who used other antidiabetic drugs (no metformin) versus metformin users. PMID:25664181

  19. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  1. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  2. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  3. [Hereditary predisposition to cancers of the digestive tract, breast, gynecological and gonadal: focus on the Peutz-Jeghers].

    PubMed

    Turpin, Anthony; Cattan, Stéphane; Leclerc, Julie; Wacrenier, Agnès; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Lejeune-Dumoulin, Sophie

    2014-09-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene STK11. PJS is characterized by periorificial hyperpigmented macules (lentiginosis) and hamartomatous polyposis. Polyps can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract, but are preferably observed in the small bowel (70-90%), the colon (50%) and the stomach (25%). They tend to be cancerous in a particular sequence hamartoma-dysplasia-cancer. The diagnosis is often made in the first or second decade following the appearance of lentigines or upon the occurrence of complications due to polyps (obstruction, intussusception, occult bleeding responsible for anemia). Furthermore PJS is associated with a significant increase in cancer risk (relative risk of 89% over the life according to the most recent series). Digestive cancers are the more frequent with cumulative incidences of 55% for gastro-intestinal cancer (39% for colorectal cancer, 13% for small bowel cancer and between 11 and 36% for pancreatic cancer, respectively). There is also an increased risk of non digestive cancers. In particular the risk of breast cancer is similar to that of patients carrying deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (cumulative incidence of 45%). Gynecological and gonadal tumors are frequent as well and can be more (adenoma malignum) or less aggressive (ovarian sex cord tumors with annular tubules and testicular tumors with calcified Sertoli cells). Finally the frequency of lung cancer is moderately increased. Recommendations for screening and management based on retrospective series in the literature have led to various strategies. The aim of this paper is to summarize the clinical and molecular diagnostic criteria of PJS as well as recommendations on screening strategies, management and monitoring. PMID:25036236

  4. RTOG Gynecologic Oncology Working Group: Comprehensive Results

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, David K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Viswanathan, Akila; Schefter, Tracey; Weidhaas, Joanne; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to comprehensively describe the activities of the Gynecologic Oncology Working Group within the RTOG. Clinical trials will be reviewed as well as translational science and ancillary activities. Over the past 40 years, a myriad of clinical trials have been performed within the RTOG with the aim of improving overall survival and decreasing morbidity in women with cervical or endometrial cancer. Major study questions have included hyperbaric oxygen, neutron radiotherapy, altered fractionation, hypoxic cell sensitization, chemosensitization, and volume directed radiotherapy. RTOG 7920 demonstrated improvement in overall survival in patients with stages IB through IIB cervical carcinoma receiving prophylactic paraaortic irradiation compared to pelvic radiation alone. RTOG 9001 demonstrated that cisplatin and 5-FU chemoradiotherapy to the pelvis for advanced cervix cancer markedly improved overall survival compared to extended field radiotherapy alone. More recent trials have employed radioprotectors, molecular targeted therapy, and intensity modulated radiation therapy. Ancillary studies have developed CTV atlases for research protocols and routine clinical use. Worldwide practice patterns have been investigated in cervix, endometrial, and vulvar cancer thru the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Translational studies have focused on immunohistochemical markers, changes in gene expression, and miRNA patterns impacting prognosis. The RTOG gynecologic working group has performed clinical trials that have defined the standard of care, improved survival, and added to our understanding of the biology of cervical and endometrial cancers. PMID:24819663

  5. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  6. Breast and gynecologic cancer-related extremity lymphedema: a review of diagnostic modalities and management options

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lymphedema remains a poorly understood entity that can occur after lymphadenectomy. Herein, we will review the pathogenesis of lymphedema, diagnostic modalities and the natural history of extremity involvement. We will review the incidence of upper extremity lymphedema in patients treated for breast malignancies and lower extremity lymphedema in those treated for gynecologic malignancy. Finally, we will review traditional treatment modalities for lymphedema, as well as introduce new surgical treatment modalities that are under active investigation. PMID:24053624

  7. Obstetrics and gynecology outpatient scenario of an Indian homeopathic hospital: A prospective, research-targeted study

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Subhranil; Koley, Munmun; Saha, Sangita; Singh, Rakesh; Hossain, Md. Monowar; Pramanik, Indrani

    2015-01-01

    The authors aimed to document prescriptions and clinical outcomes in routine homeopathic practice to short list promising areas of targeted research and efficacy trials of homeopathy in obstetrics and gynecology (O&G). Three homeopathic physicians participated in methodical data collection over a 3-month period in the O&G outpatient setting of The Calcutta Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, West Bengal, India. A specifically designed Excel spreadsheet was used to record data on consecutive appointments, including date, patient identity, socioeconomic status, place of abode, religion, medical condition/complaint, whether chronic/acute, new/follow-up case, patient-assessed outcome (7-point Likert scale: −3 to +3), prescribed homeopathic medication, and whether other medication/s was being taken for the condition. These spreadsheets were submitted monthly for data synthesis and analysis. Data on 878 appointments (429 patients) were collected, of which 61% were positive, 20.8% negative, and 18.2% showed no change. Chronic conditions (93.2%) were chiefly encountered. A total of 434 medical conditions and 52 varieties were reported overall. The most frequently treated conditions were leucorrhea (20.5%), irregular menses (13.3%), dysmenorrhea (10%), menorrhagia (7.5%), and hypomenorrhea (6.3%). Strongly positive outcomes (+3/+2) were mostly recorded in oligomenorrhea (41.7%), leucorrhea (34.1%), polycystic ovary (33.3%), dysmenorrhea (28%), and irregular menses (22.2%). Individualized prescriptions predominated (95.6%). A total of 122 different medicines were prescribed in decimal (2.9%), centesimal (87.9%), and 50 millesimal potencies (4.9%). Mother tinctures and placebo were prescribed in 3.4% and 30.4% instances, respectively. Several instances of medicine-condition pairings were detected. This systematic recording cataloged the frequency and success rate of treating O&G conditions using homeopathy. PMID:27114940

  8. Obstetrics and gynecology outpatient scenario of an Indian homeopathic hospital: A prospective, research-targeted study.

    PubMed

    Saha, Subhranil; Koley, Munmun; Saha, Sangita; Singh, Rakesh; Hossain, Md Monowar; Pramanik, Indrani

    2016-04-01

    The authors aimed to document prescriptions and clinical outcomes in routine homeopathic practice to short list promising areas of targeted research and efficacy trials of homeopathy in obstetrics and gynecology (O&G). Three homeopathic physicians participated in methodical data collection over a 3-month period in the O&G outpatient setting of The Calcutta Homeopathic Medical College and Hospital, West Bengal, India. A specifically designed Excel spreadsheet was used to record data on consecutive appointments, including date, patient identity, socioeconomic status, place of abode, religion, medical condition/complaint, whether chronic/acute, new/follow-up case, patient-assessed outcome (7-point Likert scale: -3 to +3), prescribed homeopathic medication, and whether other medication/s was being taken for the condition. These spreadsheets were submitted monthly for data synthesis and analysis. Data on 878 appointments (429 patients) were collected, of which 61% were positive, 20.8% negative, and 18.2% showed no change. Chronic conditions (93.2%) were chiefly encountered. A total of 434 medical conditions and 52 varieties were reported overall. The most frequently treated conditions were leucorrhea (20.5%), irregular menses (13.3%), dysmenorrhea (10%), menorrhagia (7.5%), and hypomenorrhea (6.3%). Strongly positive outcomes (+3/+2) were mostly recorded in oligomenorrhea (41.7%), leucorrhea (34.1%), polycystic ovary (33.3%), dysmenorrhea (28%), and irregular menses (22.2%). Individualized prescriptions predominated (95.6%). A total of 122 different medicines were prescribed in decimal (2.9%), centesimal (87.9%), and 50 millesimal potencies (4.9%). Mother tinctures and placebo were prescribed in 3.4% and 30.4% instances, respectively. Several instances of medicine-condition pairings were detected. This systematic recording cataloged the frequency and success rate of treating O&G conditions using homeopathy. PMID:27114940

  9. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  10. Comprehensive Patient Questionnaires in Predicting Complications in Older Patients With Gynecologic Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  11. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Gynecological Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-03

    Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  12. Preventive vaccination against cervical cancer: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Seong, Seok Ju; Shin, Jin Woo; Ju, Woong; Hong, Jin Hwa; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2016-01-01

    After human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine guidelines published by Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology (KSGO) in 2011, new studies have been published, leading to additional data regarding efficacy, safety, number of vaccination rounds, and ideal age of vaccine administration. We searched and reviewed the literatures focused on the efficacy of 2-dose schedule vaccination, the efficacy of 3-dose schedule vaccination in middle-aged women, the ideal age of 3-dose schedule vaccination, the safety of HPV preventive vaccine, and the ability of cross-protection of each HPV preventive vaccine. The KSGO has revised the previous guideline based on the results of the above studies. PMID:27029751

  13. [A Case of Extrahepatic Hepatocellular Cancer Discovered during Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Koga, Chikato; Murakami, Masayuki; Shimizu, Junzo; Yasuyama, Akinobu; Hitora, Toshiki; Oda, Naofumi; Kawabata, Ryohei; Hirota, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masato; Morishima, Hirotaka; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Matsunami, Nobuki; Miwa, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    Recently, laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly popular because of its lesser invasiveness, including smaller incisions, and fewer post-operative complications. It is also possible to observe the abdominal cavity by laparoscopy. We report a hepatocellular carcinoma arising in an accessory liver lobe detected during gynecological laparoscopic surgery. A 48-year-old woman who was undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy for uterine fibroids was found to have a protruding, extrahepatic pedunculated tumor by intraoperative observation of the abdominal cavity during the fibroid procedure. We suspected FNH based on preoperative imaging findings, including abdominal ultrasound, computed tomographic scanning, and magnetic resonance imaging. We performed a laparoscopic partial hepatectomy. The cut surface of the tumor was similar to normal liver tissue. The pathological findings identified normal liver tissue and vessels, suggesting it was the accessory liver lobe. It also included a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. The final diagnosis was hepatocellular carcinoma arising in the accessory liver lobe. There have been no prior reports of extrahepatic liver tissue detected during gynecological surgery. This case reminded us of the importance of intra-abdominal observation during laparoscopic procedures. The opportunities to discover other cases of extrahepatic liver tissue by laparoscopy will increase. PMID:26805199

  14. Inflammation: its role and interplay in the development of cancer, with special focus on gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Goswami, B; Rajappa, M; Sharma, M; Sharma, A

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between inflammation and cancer is intriguing. Mechanisms contributing to the pathobiology of carcinogenesis are multiple and complex. Many aspects still elude researchers and are subjects of intense speculation and debate, for example, the triggering factor for malignant transformation in inflammation. A comprehensive literature search was conducted from the Web sites of the National Library of Medicine and Pubmed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's digital archive of life sciences literature. The data were accessed from books and journals that published recent articles in this field. Several recent studies have identified nuclear factor-kappa B as a key modulator in driving inflammation to cancers. An inflammatory microenvironment inhabiting various inflammatory cells and a network of signaling molecules is essential for the malignant progression of transformed cells. This is attributed to the mutagenic predisposition of persistent infection-fighting agents at sites of chronic inflammation. The appreciation of the role of inflammation in carcinogenesis provides a mechanistic framework to understand clinical benefits of newer therapeutic strategies An in-depth knowledge about various pathogenic mechanisms involved in cancer will help clinicians in better management of the disease. PMID:17944921

  15. Association between the low-dose irinotecan regimen-induced occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and genetic variants of UGT1A1 in patients with gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Hiroyuki; Saito, Katsuhiko; Helsby, Nuala; Sugino, Shigekazu; Yamakage, Michiaki; Sawaguchi, Takeru; Takasaki, Masahiko; Kato, Hidenori; Kurosawa, Nahoko

    2014-06-01

    The occurrence of severe neutropenia during treatment with irinotecan (CPT-11) is associated with the *6 and *28 alleles of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1). However, the correlation between these variants and the occurrence of severe neutropenia in a low-dose CPT-11 regimen for the treatment of gynecological cancers has not been extensively studied. There are also no studies regarding the association between the 421C>A mutation in ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) and the occurrence of severe neutropenia in CPT-11-treated patients with gynecological cancers. The present study was designed to determine the factors associated with the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia during chemotherapy for gynecological cancers with combinations of CPT-11 and cisplatin or mitomycin C. In total, 44 patients with gynecological cancer were enrolled in the study. The association between the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir values, the total dose of CPT-11 and the genotypes of UGT1A1 or ABCG2 was studied. No correlation was observed between the ANC nadir values and the total dose of CPT-11. The ANC nadir values in the UGT1A1*6/*28 and *6/*6 groups were significantly lower compared with those in the *1/*1 group (P<0.01). Univariate analysis showed no association between the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and the ABCG2 421C>A mutation. Subsequent to narrowing the factors by univariate analysis, multivariate logistic regression analysis only detected significant correlations between the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and the UGT1A1*6/*6 and *6/*28 groups (P=0.029; odds ratio, 6.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-38.99). No associations were detected between the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and the heterozygous variant (*1/*6 or *1/*28) genotype, type of regimen or age. In conclusion, the UGT1A1*6/*28 and *6/*6 genotypes were found to be associated with the occurrence of severe neutropenia in the low-dose CPT-11 regimen for

  16. Clinical Outcomes of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer : Prognostic Factors in Local Treatment Failure and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Do Heui; Cho, Young Hyun; Roh, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain metastases in gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer) patients are rare, and the efficacy of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) to treat these had not been evaluated. We assessed the efficacy of GKRS and prognostic factors for tumor control and survival in brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. From May 1995 to October 2012, 26 women (mean age 51.3 years, range 27–70 years) with metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer were treated with GKRS. We reviewed their outcomes, radiological responses, and clinical status. Results In total 24 patients (59 lesions) were available for follow-up imaging. The median follow-up time was 9 months. The mean treated tumor volume at the time of GKRS was 8185 mm3 (range 10–19500 mm3), and the median dose delivered to the tumor margin was 25 Gy (range, 10–30 Gy). A local tumor control rate was 89.8% (53 of 59 tumors). The median overall survival was 9.5 months after GKRS (range, 1–102 months). Age-associated multivariate analysis indicated that the Karnofsky performance status (KPS), the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification, and the number of treated lesions were significant prognostic factors for overall survival (HR=0.162, p=0.008, HR=0.107, p=0.038, and HR=2.897, p=0.045, respectively). Conclusion GKRS is safe and effective for the management of brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. The clinical status of the patient is important in determining the overall survival time. PMID:27446522

  17. [Examples of textual research on gynecological literature included in Yong le da dian (Yongle's Great Canon)].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-dan; Zhang, Ru-qing

    2010-07-01

    Yongle's Great Canon is a series of books to be read exclusively by the emperors of the Ming Dynasty, so all of the books included are from many rare books collected in Wen Yuan Ge of early Ming Dynasty. These rare books, ranging from Song, Jin, and Yuan Dynasties or from folk sources preserve the original appearance of the ancient books almost without any changes. From a philological viewpoint, the gynecological books included in Yong le da dian are studied, proof-read and checked for its lost texts and different texts. This can serve as a basis for the reprinting and re-publishing of ancient TCM books. PMID:21122346

  18. Profiles in Cancer Research

    Cancer.gov

    These articles put a face to some of the thousands of individuals who contribute to NCI’s cancer research efforts. The profiles highlight the work of scientists and clinicians and describe the circumstances and motivation behind their work.

  19. Therapist and Patient Perceptions of Alliance and Progress In Psychological Therapy for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Kashy, Deborah A.; Rubin, Stephen; Hernandez, Enrique; Bergman, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal was to understand both therapist and patient perspectives on alliance and session progress for women in treatment for gynecological cancer. We used a longitudinal version of the one-with-many design to partition variation in alliance and progress ratings into therapist, patient/dyad, and time-specific components. We also evaluated therapist and patient characteristics that predict alliance and session progress. Methods Two hundred and three women and their therapists completed measures of alliance and session progress across a 6-session course of treatment. Participants also completed pre-intervention measures of self-esteem, depression, cancer-specific distress, emotional expressivity, and use of protective buffering. Results Patients reported higher alliance and greater progress than therapists. When therapists reported particularly strong alliance with particular patients, those patients concurred. More experienced therapists reported higher alliances and more progress but their patients did not agree. Patients who began treatment in more difficult psychosocial circumstances tended to have less positive session outcomes on average but evidenced more improvement across therapy sessions. Conclusions Patients rated their alliance and progress more positively than their therapists, although there was substantial relative agreement between therapists and patients. Alliance and progress improved over time, particularly among patients who evidenced higher levels of distress and poorer physical functioning. More experienced therapists were more confident in their abilities but their patients did not share this perception. PMID:22746145

  20. Barriers for the inclusion of sexuality in nursing care for women with gynecological and breast cancer: perspective of professionals 1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Simone Mara de Araújo; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira; Panobianco, Marislei Sanches; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; de Almeida, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    AIM: qualitative study, which aimed to identify the barriers that influence nursing care practices related to the sexuality of women with gynecological and breast cancer. METHODS: the study was conducted with 16 professionals of the nursing area (nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants) from two sectors of a university hospital situated in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The data was collected using semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews. All the interviews were recorded and the participants' responses were identified and categorized using Content Analysis. RESULTS: three major themes were identified. These are as follows: 1) barriers related to the biomedical model; 2) barriers related to institutional dynamics and 3) barriers related to the social interpretations of sexuality. CONCLUSIONS: the results of this study showed that the systematized inclusion of this issue in nursing care routines requires changes in the health paradigm and in the work dynamic, as well as reflection on the personal values and social interpretations related to the topic. A major challenge is to divest sexuality of the taboos and prejudices which accompany it, as well as to contribute to the nursing team being more aware of the difficulties faced by women with gynaecological and breast cancer. PMID:25806635

  1. Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer Past ... Prostate Cancer" Articles Progress Against Prostate Cancer / Prostate Cancer Research Trial Helps John Spencer Treat His Cancer / Prostate ...

  2. Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecologic Cancer Foundation wins The 2001 Associations Advance America “Award of Excellence” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation Named One of “America’s Best 100 Charities” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation ...

  3. Cancer and Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecologic Cancer Foundation wins The 2001 Associations Advance America “Award of Excellence” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation Named One of “America’s Best 100 Charities” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation ...

  4. Changing state of gynecologic oncologist specialty in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takuma

    2016-05-01

    Gynecologic oncologists must have extensive knowledge regarding the methods of treating a diverse range of gynecologic cancers as well as the ability to perform cutting-edge multidisciplinary treatments that frequently involve surgery. Given that coordination with other medical departments is vital for treatment, a high level of interpersonal and technical skills needs to be demonstrated to form the axis for medical treatment. One objective of the specialist certification system is the grooming of leaders as gynecologic oncologists while instructing trainees. The most distinguishing feature of Japanese gynecologic oncologists is that they need experience in more than 150 invasive cancer treatments, including more than 100 operations within the last 3-5 years. As for performance of surgery, at least 30 operations, including 15 radical hysterectomies, are required. Since surgical methods, including laparoscopic surgery, are undergoing a radical change, and increasing numbers of patients are undergoing radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer, a review of the necessary requirements is critical. It is important to foster new leaders who are research-oriented. Now is the time for marked reform with the new specialist certification system being introduced by the Japanese Medical Specialty Board. Japan has the advantage of offering medical services at a much lower cost because of its national health insurance system. However, specialists are currently not receiving clear benefits befitting their efforts, and the question of how to maintain their motivation is an issue for the future. For these purposes, I believe securing incentives is a critical issue for specialists. PMID:26988808

  5. Survey on gynecological cancer treatment by Piedmont, Liguria, and Valle d'Aosta group of AIRO (Italian Association of Radiation Oncology)

    PubMed Central

    Cattari, Gabriella; Delmastro, Elena; Bresciani, Sara; Gribaudo, Sergio; Melano, Antonella; Giannelli, Flavio; Tessa, Maria; Chiarlone, Renato; Scolaro, Tindaro; Krengli, Marco; Urgesi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We focused the attention on radiation therapy practices about the gynecological malignancies in Piedmont, Liguria, and Valle d'Aosta to know the current treatment practice and to improve the quality of care. Material and methods We proposed a cognitive survey to evaluate the standard practice patterns for gynecological cancer management, adopted from 2012 to 2014 by radiotherapy (RT) centers with a large amount of gynecological cancer cases. There were three topics: 1. Taking care and multidisciplinary approach, 2. Radiotherapy treatment and brachytherapy, 3. Follow-up. Results Nineteen centers treated gynecological malignancies and 12 of these had a multidisciplinary dedicated team. Radiotherapy option has been used in all clinical setting: definitive, adjuvant, and palliative. In general, 1978 patients were treated. There were 834 brachytherapy (BRT) treatments. The fusion between diagnostic imaging (magnetic resonance imaging – MRI, positron emission tomography – PET) and computed tomography (CT) simulation was used for contouring in all centers. Conformal RT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were the most frequent techniques. The image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was used in 10/19 centers. There were 8 active BRT centers. Brachytherapy was performed both with radical intent and as boost, mostly by HDR (6/8 centers). The doses for exclusive BRT were between 20 to 30 Gy. The doses for BRT boost were between 10 and 20 Gy. Four centers used CT-MRI compatible applicators but only one used MRI for planning. The BRT plans on vaginal cuff were still performed on traditional radiographies in 2 centers. The plan sum was evaluated in only 1 center. Only 1 center performed in vivo dosimetry. Conclusions In the last three years, multidisciplinary approach, contouring, treatment techniques, doses, and control systems were similar in Liguria-Piedmont and Valle d'Aosta. However, the technology implementation didn't translate in a real treatment

  6. [Infertility treatments after gynecologic cancers and indications of ovarian tissue cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle; Bringer-Deutch, Sophie

    2010-03-01

    Increasing numbers of young people are surviving cancer, but treatment can affect their reproductive function. Female fertility is more difficult to preserve than male fertility. Fertility-sparing treatments may be possible for some women. For others, embryo cryopreservation is the only established option, provided cancer therapy can be postponed. However, cryopreservation of eggs or ovarian tissue is now becoming a real possibility. Medically assisted reproductive options for cancers survivors include ovarian stimulation, IVF and oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy and adoption are other possibilities. PMID:21171244

  7. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Moughan, Jennifer; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte E.; Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny; D'Souza, David; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Gaur, Rakesh; Jhingran, Anuja

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is

  8. Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) proposals for changes of the current FIGO staging system.

    PubMed

    Petru, Edgar; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Stuart, Gavin; Gaffney, David; Millan, David; Vergote, Ignace

    2009-04-01

    The FIGO has invited the GCIG to make contributions for possible changes of the FIGO staging system. We report on the consensus within the GCIG committee to propose the following changes in the current FIGO classification. Cervical cancer: Since fertility-preserving surgery is increasingly used in early disease, stage IB1-A may include tumors of up to 2 cm in diameter. Endometrial cancer: Positive peritoneal cytology alone should not classify this patient to be allotted to stage IIIA disease. Lymphadenectomy should be recommended in high-risk clinical stage I patients and in those with adverse histologies. Ovarian cancer: In early stage disease, grading and in advanced disease, the amount of residual disease should be reported. Vulvar cancer: The lymph node status should always be reported. In the case of enlarged inguinal nodes, histology should be obtained by any means. Vaginal cancer: Besides bladder and rectal tumor involvement urethral mucosal involvement should be added. Gestational trophoblastic disease: The modified WHO scoring system which is widely accepted should be adopted. PMID:19195765

  9. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  10. Adolescent gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Joseph S; Lara-Torre, Eduardo

    2009-04-01

    Given new developments in the field of adolescent reproductive health, this review focuses on highlighting new guidelines and practice patterns in evaluation and management of adolescent gynecologic problems. First, understanding the proper techniques for the initial examination is key to establishing a long-term relationship with this age group. Reservations about the first gynecologic examination are common, and the practitioner's goal is foremost to make the patient as comfortable as possible. Preventive health in this patient population is key, and practitioners should become comfortable with providing education about topics as diverse as sexuality, eating disorders, and dating violence. Furthermore, the frequency with which teenagers report sexual activity and the high unintended pregnancy rate in this age group makes counseling regarding effective contraception essential. Additionally, practitioners are encouraged to take the opportunity to discuss the availability of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with adolescents. In 2007, adolescents were designated as a special population, given the frequency with which they acquire and clear mild HPV-related cervical dysplasia. More conservative treatment in this population is generally favored. During their transition through puberty, disorders of menstruation become the most common complaint requiring the attention of the gynecologist. Most commonly, anovulation serves as the cause behind such abnormal bleeding. Polycystic ovarian syndrome can develop in early puberty and carry its consequences into adulthood. Infertility, diabetes, and hirsutism mark the most important components of the syndrome and require age-appropriate management. Finally, the consequences of endometriosis on the future fertility of adolescents have brought early intervention to light. Recognition and prompt treatment are advocated to prevent the future implications of this disease. PMID:19305342

  11. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) consensus review for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Luvero, Daniela; Shafer, Aaron; O'Connor, Dennis; Mangili, Giorgia; Friedlander, Michael; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Mirza, Mansoor R; Kim, Jae-Weon; Alexandre, Jerome; Oza, Amit; Brown, Jubilee

    2014-11-01

    Mucinous carcinomas of the ovary can be primary or metastatic in origin. Improvements in the pathological diagnosis have increased the ability to distinguish between primary and metastatic ovarian cancers and shown that primary mucinous carcinomas are a rare subtype of ovarian cancer. Most tumors are diagnosed at an early stage, and the prognosis after surgery is good. Advanced or recurrent mucinous carcinoma of the ovary responds poorly to current cytotoxic treatments, and the prognosis is poor. Here, we review the guidelines for surgery and the results of treatment of advanced and recurrent disease. Chemotherapy with platinum and paclitaxel is currently used to treat advanced disease, but the effect of these drugs is modest, and new treatments are needed. PMID:25341574

  12. HER2 Expression Beyond Breast Cancer: Therapeutic Implications for Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    English, Diana P.; Roque, Dana M.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    HER2 or ErbB2 is a member of the epidermal growth factor family and is overexpressed in subsets of breast, ovarian, gastric, colorectal, pancreatic and endometrial cancers. HER2 regulates signaling through several pathways (Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase-B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways) associated with cell survival and proliferation. HER2 overexpressed and/or gene amplified tumors are generally regarded as biologically aggressive neoplasms. In breast, cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancer, there have been several studies linking the amplification of the c-erbB2 gene with chemo-resistance and overall poor survival. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 holds promise for patients harboring these aggressive neoplasms. Trastuzumab combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents or conjugated with radioactive isotopes is currently being investigated in clinical trials of several tumor types. PMID:23529353

  13. Factors Affecting Gynecologic and Sexual Assessment in Older Women: A Lesson for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Ayasha; Capps, Natalie; Lefler, Leanne; Richard-Davis, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines for screening of cervical cancer and pelvic exams for older women have recently changed. These changes may have unexpected sequelae in women over 65 years of age. This manuscript provides a review of gynecologic screening recommendations for older women in the U.S. and potential ramifications of these recent changes. Peer reviewed guidelines from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, U.S. Preventative Task Force Services, the American Cancer Society, The Centers for Disease Control, and multiple original research articles and reviews were reviewed for this manuscript. Women over 65 are at greatest risk to develop late stage diagnoses of cancers, pelvic organ disease, incontinence, and infections. Clinicians will need to acutely consider this fact when communicating and screening this population. We conclude that practitioners should be aware of the new guidelines and should consider including gynecologic health history and symptom analysis as part of annual exams in women of all ages.

  14. Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Al-Abany, Massoud; Tucker, Susan; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

  15. Ovarian Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Gynecologic Cancers Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gynecologic Cancers Basic Information What Is Gynecologic Cancer? What Are ...

  16. Possible relationship between endocrine disrupting chemicals and hormone dependent gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Selen; Simsek, Tayup

    2016-07-01

    The effects of the natural and synthetic estrogens have been studied for a long time but the data regarding estrogen related chemicals (endocrine disrupting chemicals, EDCs) and their effects on reproductive system are scarce. EDCs are hormone like agents that are readily present in the environment, which may alter the endocrine system of humans and animals. Approximately 800 chemicals are known or suspected to have the potential to function as EDC. Potential role of EDCs on reproductive disease has gained attention in medical literature in recent years. We hypothesize that exposure to low doses of EDCs in a chronic manner could cause hormone dependent genital cancers including ovarian and endometrial cancer. Long term exposure to low concentrations of EDCs may exert potentiation effect with each other and even with endogenous estrogens and could inhibit enzymes responsible for estrogen metabolism. Exposure time to these EDCs is essential as we have seen from Diethylstilbestrol experience. Dose-response curves of EDCs are also unpredictable. Hence mode of action of EDCs are more complex than previously thought. In the light of these controversies lower doses of EDCs in long term exposure is not harmless. Possibility of this relationship and this hypothesis merit further investigation especially through in vivo studies that could better show the realistic environmental exposure. With the confirmation of our hypothesis, possible EDCs could be identified and eliminated from general use as a public health measure. PMID:27241264

  17. OCT in Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Irina A.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Belinson, Jerome L.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    Timely and efficient diagnosis of diseases of the female reproductivesystem is very important from the social viewpoint [1, 2]. Diagnosticefficacy of the existing techniques still needs improvement sincemalignant neoplasms of the female reproductive system organs are stableleaders among causes of death (over 35.9 %) [3]. Each year, 851.9 thousand genital cancer cases are recorded worldwide [1, 2]. However, the diagnostic efficacy of the visual examination with biopsy is limited. Correct interpretation of colposcopic features requires high skills and long-term clinical experience, which makes colposcopy very subjective and limits interobserver agreement [8-10]. OCT is known to visualize in vivo and noninvasively tissue microstructure with spatial resolution approaching the histologic level and therefore can be expected to guide biopsies and to provide real-time tissue structure information when biopsies are contraindicated or impractical. Although thorough clinical studies are required to determine if OCT can be suitable for this purpose in gynecology in general and for cervical cancer in particular, the early results look encouraging. In this chapter, we present a wide spectrum of the OCT studies of different partsof the female reproductive system and demonstrate the potential of the clinical use of this new visualization method in gynecological practice.

  18. Beneficial effects of sucralphate in radiation induced diarrhea. An open randomized study in gynecological cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, R; Arevärn, M; Franzén, L; Persson, H; Stendahl, U

    1990-01-01

    In an open randomized study including 51 consecutive patients with gynaecological malignancies sucralphate was daily administered to patients receiving pelvic irradiation. Sucralphate, an aluminium hydroxide complex of sulphated sucrose used in the treatment of gastric ulcer, seems to be of value in preventing radiation-induced bowel discomfort. The most objective parameter, frequency of diarrhoea was almost 50% less in the sucralphate groups as compared to the controls. The patients receiving sucralphate in general displayed only minor alterations in bowel habits even at the end of the radiation treatment. The number of patients requiring symptomatic therapy with loperamide were markedly lower in the sucralphate group. Subjective discomfort such as nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite were also less common. A reduction in acute reactions to irradiation increases the possibility of carrying through planned treatment and avoids unfavourable intermissions, and thus curing the patient with cancer in the pelvis by means of radiotherapy. PMID:2245814

  19. Short-term morbidity in transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection for advanced stage gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    LaFargue, C J; Sawyer, B T; Bristow, R E

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is commonly diagnosed at an advanced stage, with disease involving the upper abdomen. The finding of enlarged cardiophrenic lymph nodes (CPLNs) on pre-operative imaging often indicates the presence of malignant spread to the mediastinum. Surgical resection of CPLN through a transdiaphragmatic approach can help to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients who underwent transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection from 8/1/11 through 2/1/15. All relevant pre-, intra-, and post-operative characteristics and findings were recorded. A brief description of the surgical technique is included for reference. Eleven patients were identified who had undergone transdiaphragmatic resection of cardiophrenic lymph nodes. Malignancy was identified in 18/21 (86%) of total lymph nodes submitted. The median number of post-operative days was 7. The overall post-operative morbidity associated with CPLN resection was low, with the most common finding being a small pleural effusion present on chest x-ray between POD# 3-5 (55%). Transdiaphragmatic CPLN resection is a feasible procedure with relatively minor short-term post-operative morbidities that can be used to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual disease. PMID:27354998

  20. The Annual Gynecologic Examination Updated for the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Joyce; Levi, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The concept of an annual gynecologic screening visit to identify disease at an early stage has long been an established component of women's health care. Women and their health care providers have historically accepted the schedule of an annual gynecologic examination with cervical cancer screening and a pelvic examination. Recently, researchers questioned the value of the annual breast and pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women and re-established the intervals for Pap test screening with the addition of human papillomavirus co-testing to establish cervical cancer risk. The updated well woman examination is now an opportunity to engage women in health education, screening for chronic disease risks, and health care concerns such as depression and violence. PMID:27287359

  1. Hope, quality of life, and benefit from treatment in women having chemotherapy for platinum-resistant/refractory recurrent ovarian cancer: the gynecologic cancer intergroup symptom benefit study.

    PubMed

    Sjoquist, Katrin M; Friedlander, Michael L; O'Connell, Rachel L; Voysey, Merryn; King, Madeleine T; Stockler, Martin R; Oza, Amit M; Gillies, Kim; Martyn, Julie K; Butow, Phyllis N

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy for platinum-resistant/refractory ovarian cancer is motivated by the hope of benefit. We sought to determine the relationships between: (a) trait hope, expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy, and anxiety and depression; (b) hope and perceived efficacy of chemotherapy; and (c) unfulfilled hope (where expectations for benefit are not fulfilled) and depression. Methods. Adult patients enrolled within stage 1 of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Symptom Benefit Study were included. Patient. Reported outcomes were collected from 126 women with predominantly platinum-resistant ovarian cancer at baseline, prior to the first four treatment cycles (12-16 weeks), and four weeks after completing chemotherapy or at disease progression, whichever came first. Associations were assessed with Spearman rank correlation coefficient (r) and odds ratio. Results. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy were weakly correlated with each other (r = 0.25). Trait hope, but not expectation of symptom benefit, was negatively correlated with anxiety (r = -0.43) and depression (r = -0.50). The smaller the discrepancy between perceived and expected symptom benefit, the less likely the patient was to have scores indicative of depression (odds ratio: 0.68; 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.96; p = .026). Conclusion. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy appear to be distinct and independent of the aspects of quality of life and scores for depression. Hope did not appear to affect perceived efficacy of chemotherapy in alleviating symptoms, but women whose expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy was not fulfilled were more likely to have scores indicative of depression. It may be preferable to encourage hope toward achievable goals rather than toward benefits from chemotherapy. PMID:24107972

  2. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references.

  3. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices. PMID:26942370

  4. Relevance of Health Economics in the Medical Treatment of Breast Cancer: The View of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO)

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Georg; Hans-Joachim, Hindenburg; Schilling, Jörg; Klare, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this article, the position of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO) on the health economics of medical breast cancer therapy is presented. The BNGO unites professionals and employees whose principal activity lies in highly specialized gynecologic oncology. In Germany, 139 specialists are united in 128 professional practices. According to § 12 of the Social Code, the oncological services provided by members must be ‘sufficient, effective and economical; they must not exceed what is necessary’. People who are covered by statutory health insurance in Germany are entitled to sufficient benefits. Sufficient measures are measures that benefit the patient with breast cancer and have a positive effect on the course of the disease. In § 35b of the Social Code, the benefit of the patient is defined as ‘improvement in health, shortening of the duration of illness, lengthening of lifespan, reduction of side effects and an improvement in the quality of life’. In the adjuvant situation, the ideal goal is healing; in the palliative situation, the most basic marker is overall survival, while surrogate markers are the progression-free interval, improved quality of life, or diminished symptoms. At the same time, the law on economic assessment stipulates ‘appropriateness and reasonableness of reimbursement by the insured community’. PMID:24715840

  5. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Postoperative Gynecologic Cancer: Are They Covering the Same Planning Target Volume?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Nikhilesh; D'souza, David; Millman, Barbara; Yaremko, Brian P; Leung, Eric; Whiston, Frances; Hajdok, George; Wong, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: This study compares dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing when postoperative radiotherapy for gynecologic cancers is delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus a four-field (4FLD) box technique. Material and Methods: From July to December 2012, women requiring postoperative radiation for gynecologic cancers were treated with a standardized VMAT protocol. Two sets of optimized 4FLD plans were retrospectively generated: one based on standard anatomical borders (4FLD) and one based on the clinical target volume (CTV) created for VMAT with a 2 cm expansion guiding field border placement (4FLD+2). Ninety-five percent isodose curves were generated to evaluate PTV coverage. Results: VMAT significantly improved dose conformity compared with 4FLD and 4FLD+2 plans (p < 0.001) and provided additional coverage of the PTV posteriorly and superiorly, corresponding to coverage of the presacral and proximal iliac vessels. There was a significant reduction in dose to all OARs with VMAT, including a 58% reduction in the volume of the small bowel receiving more than 45 Gy (p=0.005). Conclusions: Despite treating a larger volume, radiotherapy using a 4FLD technique is less homogenous and provides inferior coverage of the PTV compared with VMAT. With meticulous treatment planning and delivery, VMAT effectively encompasses the PTV and minimizes dose to OARs. PMID:26973802

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  7. Definitions for response and progression in ovarian cancer clinical trials incorporating RECIST 1.1 and CA 125 agreed by the Gynecological Cancer Intergroup (GCIG).

    PubMed

    Rustin, Gordon John Sampson; Vergote, Ignace; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Quinn, Michael; Thigpen, Tate; du Bois, Andreas; Kristensen, Gunnar; Jakobsen, Anders; Sagae, Satoru; Greven, Kathryn; Parmar, Mahesh; Friedlander, Michael; Cervantes, Andres; Vermorken, Jan

    2011-02-01

    The Gynecological Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) has previously reached consensus regarding the criteria that should be used in clinical trial protocols to define progression-free survival after first-line therapy as well as the criteria to define response to treatment in recurrent disease using the serum marker CA 125 and has specified the situations where these criteria should be used. However, the publications did not include detailed definitions, nor were they written to accommodate the new version of Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria (version 1.1) now available. Thus, we recommend that the definitions described later in detail are incorporated into clinical trial protocols to maintain consistency. The criteria for defining progression are now acceptable in clinical trials of recurrent disease as they have since been validated (Pujade-Lauraine, personal communication, 2010). The GCIG requests that data from all clinical trials using these definitions are made available to GCIG trial centers so that continual validation and improvement can be accomplished. These definitions were developed from analyzing patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy and have not yet been validated in patients receiving molecular targeting agents. PMID:21270624

  8. Hereditary non-BRCA gynecological tumors.

    PubMed

    Vellone, Valerio G; Paudice, Michele; Varesco, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    Early diagnosis and proper management of gynecologic malignancies represent a challenge in modern oncology. A growing interest has arisen around the gynecological manifestations of hereditary cancer syndromes. In particular, the discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in ovarian cancer and the mismatch repair genes (MMR) in endometrial carcinoma has revolutionized our approach to the diagnosis and screening of women for ovarian and uterine cancers. The clinical, genetic and pathological features of hereditary cancer syndromes with gynecological manifestations are reviewed focusing on Lynch Syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC), Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS), Cowden Syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome or nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and Reed's Syndrome or hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). PMID:26930387

  9. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, and Urologic Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal

  10. The role of routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy.

    PubMed

    Kew, F M; Roberts, A P; Cruickshank, D J

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this article was to determine the evidence base for routine follow-up after gynecological malignancy. Only articles with a survival analysis were included. Relevant articles were identified by a comprehensive literature search of the main biomedical databases, hand searching of references of selected articles, and expert spotting of relevant journals and proceedings of international meetings. A two-stage extraction of data was undertaken. No prospective trials were identified. Twenty-nine retrospective case series analyses and one poster presentation met the inclusion criteria. Eight articles and one letter on endometrial cancer, six articles and one poster presentation on cervical cancer, and two articles in vulval cancer were reviewed. Only one article in endometrial cancer showed any survival benefit from routine follow-up, but it was of very poor methodologic quality. Two articles found a survival benefit from routine follow-up after cervical cancer. The two articles on vulval cancer did not find any survival benefit from routine review. There is no prospective research on the benefits of routine follow-up after gynecological cancer. Retrospective evidence calls in to question the benefit of universal follow-up. Prospective research is urgently needed. PMID:15882163

  11. Symptoms of Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Gynecologic Cancers Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gynecologic Cancers Basic Information What Is Gynecologic Cancer? What Are ...

  12. Cervical cancer: the Indian perspective. FIGO 26th Annual Report on the Results of Treatment in Gynecological Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vallikad, E

    2006-11-01

    Cancer of the uterine cervix is the commonest gynaecologic cancer in India, with most women presenting with disease extending beyond the cervix. The majority of women belong to the lower socioeconomic status, are rural, aged between 35 and 64 years and highly noncompliant for complete treatment and follow-up. Opportunistic screening with cytology, colposcopy and test for Human Papilloma Virus and appropriate treatment are available on payment at urban private medical centres but are not available at urban and rural government health centres that are accessed by women of the lower socioeconomic status. The Government's investment in health is 0.9% of the GDP. Thus cytology screening as a government health measure is not feasible. The 'social vaccine' of health empowerment along with visual inspection and appropriate referral by the rural and urban health personnel (Department of Health and Family Welfare); with an additional input of health awareness and motivation by Anganwadi Workers (Department of Women and Child Development), elected women representatives in the Panchayats (Department of Rural Development and Panchayati Raj) and non-governmental development agencies could be a collaborative effort towards "downstaging" cervical cancer. This could lay the foundation for the introduction of cytology screening when resources are available. PMID:17161161

  13. A Phase I Clinical Trial of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD, a Novel Infectivity-Enhanced Bicistronic Adenovirus, in Patients with Recurrent Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kenneth H.; Dmitriev, Igor; O’Malley, Janis P.; Wang, Minghui; Saddekni, Souheil; You, Zhiying; Preuss, Meredith A.; Harris, Raymond D.; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Siegal, Gene P.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Curiel, David T.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD is an infectivity-enhanced adenovirus expressing a therapeutic thymidine kinase suicide gene and a somatostatin receptor that allows for noninvasive gene transfer imaging. The purpose of this study was to identify the MTD, toxicities, clinical efficacy and biologic effects of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Experimental Design Eligible patients were treated intraperitoneally (IP) for 3 days with 1×109 to 1×1012 vp/dose of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD followed by intravenous ganciclovir for 14 days. Toxicity and clinical efficacy were assessed utilizing CTC Adverse Events grading and RECIST criteria. Imaging utilizing In-111 pentetreotide was obtained before and after treatment. Tissue samples were obtained to evaluate for gene transfer, generation of wild-type virus, viral shedding and antibody response. Results Twelve patients were treated in three cohorts. The most common vector-related clinical toxicities were grade 1–2 constitutional or pain symptoms, experienced most often in patients treated at the highest dose. MTD was not identified. Five patients demonstrated stable disease; all others experienced progressive disease. One patient with stable disease experienced complete resolution of disease and normalization of CA125 on further follow-up. Imaging detected increased In-111 pentetreotide retention in patients treated at the highest dose. Ancillary studies demonstrated presence of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD virus and HSV1-tk expression in ascites samples collected at various time points in most patients treated within the higher dose cohorts. Conclusions This study demonstrates the safety, potential efficacy, and possible gene transfer imaging capacity of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Further development of this novel gene therapeutic appears to be warranted. PMID:22510347

  14. Risk factor analysis for massive lymphatic ascites after laparoscopic retroperitonal lymphadenectomy in gynecologic cancers and treatment using intranodal lymphangiography with glue embolization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate risk factors for massive lymphatic ascites after laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy in gynecologic cancer and the feasibility of treatments using intranodal lymphangiography (INLAG) with glue embolization. Methods A retrospective analysis of 234 patients with gynecologic cancer who received laparoscopic retroperitonal lymphadenectomy between April 2006 and November 2015 was done. In June 2014, INLAG with glue embolization was initiated to manage massive lymphatic ascites. All possible clinicopathologic factors related to massive lymphatic ascites were determined in the pre-INLAG group (n=163). Clinical courses between pre-INLAG group and post-INLAG group (n=71) were compared. Results In the pre-INLAG group (n=163), four patients (2.5%) developed massive lymphatic ascites postoperatively. Postoperative lymphatic ascites was associated with liver cirrhosis (three cirrhotic patients, p<0.001). In the post-INLAG group, one patient with massive lymphatic ascites had a congestive heart failure and first received INLAG with glue embolization. She had pelvic drain removed within 7 days after INLAG. The mean duration of pelvic drain and hospital stay decreased after the introduction of INLAG (13.2 days vs. 10.9 days, p=0.001; 15.2 days vs. 12.6 days, p=0.001). There was no evidence of recurrence after this procedure. Conclusion Underlying medical conditions related to the reduced effective circulating volume, such as liver cirrhosis and heart failure, may be associated with massive lymphatic ascites after retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy. INLAG with glue embolization can be an alternative treatment options to treat leaking lymphatic channels in patients with massive lymphatic leakage. PMID:27171674

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  16. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  17. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  18. Triple simultaneous primary invasive gynecological malignancies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Miura, Yuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Sugiyama, Toru

    2014-02-01

    Double gynecologic cancer (primary cancers in two organs) is relatively rare. However, triple gynecologic cancer (primary cancers in three organs) is extremely rare. We experienced a case of triple cancer, with primary cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, each showing different histopathological features. A 50-year-old woman with a preoperative diagnosis of cervical cancer stage Ib1 with a pathological diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma underwent radical hysterectomy. The pathological diagnoses of the extracted masses were endometrioid adenocarcinoma in the uterine corpus and serous adenocarcinoma in the left ovary. Consequently, triple cancer was diagnosed. After the operation, six cycles of a paclitaxel/carboplatin regimen were administered, and no relapse of the cancers has been observed to date. To our knowledge, this is only the second case report in the international literature of concurrent gynecologic triple cancers of epithelial origin; that is, invasive cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, each with different histopathological features. PMID:24147606

  19. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  20. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  1. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  2. Mediators of a Coping and Communication-Enhancing Intervention and a Supportive Counseling Intervention among Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon L.; Winkel, Gary; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Rosenblum, Norman; Bergman, Cynthia; Hernandez, Enrique; Carlson, John; Rocereto, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated mechanisms of change for a Coping and Communication-enhancing Intervention (CCI) and Supportive Counseling (SC). We proposed that the effects of CCI on depressive symptoms would be mediated by psychological processes targeted by CCI: increased positive reappraisal, acceptance, planful problem solving, attempts to understand emotional reactions to cancer, increased emotional expression, increased seeking of emotional and instrumental support, and improved self-esteem. We hypothesized that the effects of SC on depressive symptoms would be mediated by the processes encouraged by SC: increasing the expression of emotions, attempts to understand emotional reactions to cancer, and self-esteem. Three hundred and fifty three women were randomized to CCI, SC, or a usual care control and completed measures at pre-intervention, 3, 6, and 9 months later. The effects of CCI were fully mediated by positive reappraisal, problem solving, and self-esteem, and partially mediated by emotional expression. The effects of SC were partially mediated by positive reappraisal. These findings provide support for hypothesized mediators for CCI. We were less able to identify of mediators for SC. Future research might benefit from identifying SC mediators. PMID:19045971

  3. Cancer Research Center Hotline

    PubMed Central

    Cassel, Kevin D

    2010-01-01

    The rates of melanomas and skin cancers are increasing in the United States. Children attending elementary schools are in the most danger of acquiring these diseases later in life, and elementary school children in Hawai‘i have the greatest risk of all children in the United States. The parents and educators of Hawai‘i's elementary school age children are unaware of the potential risks for cancer that young children experience every day at school. Effective sun protection policies have been implemented in other jurisdictions, including Australia, that have similar risks for over-exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation in children. These proven policy models can inform sun protection practices in Hawai‘i. A simple policy whereby public elementary schools require that children wear ordinary long sleeves shirts and hats during the school's outdoor activities will protect Hawai‘i's children from overexposure to sun's ultraviolet radiation. Establishment of a state law codifying the implementation of this simple, yet scientifically proven strategy into the policies of Hawai‘i's public elementary schools can significantly reduce the incidence and deaths from melanoma and skin cancer in the state. PMID:21218379

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  7. Acute Gynecologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Carolyn K

    2015-11-01

    Premenopausal women with acute pelvic pain comprise a significant percentage of patients who present to the emergency room. Etiologies can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, or vascular. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific and overlapping. The choice of imaging modality is determined by the clinically suspected differential diagnosis. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for suspected obstetric or gynecologic disorders. CT is more useful when gastrointestinal or urinary tract pathology is likely. MR imaging is rarely used in the emergent setting, except to exclude appendicitis in pregnant women. This article presents a comprehensive review of imaging of acute gynecologic disorders. PMID:26526439

  8. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) consensus review for high-grade undifferentiated sarcomas of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Pautier, Patricia; Nam, Eun Ji; Provencher, Diane M; Hamilton, Anne L; Mangili, Giorgia; Siddiqui, Nadeem Ahmad; Westermann, Anneke M; Reed, Nicholas Simon; Harter, Philipp; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    High-grade undifferentiated sarcomas (HGUSs) are rare uterine malignancies arising from the endometrial stroma. They are poorly differentiated sarcomas composed of cells that do not resemble proliferative-phase endometrial stroma. High-grade undifferentiated sarcomas are characterized by aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. Cyclin D1 has been reported as a diagnostic immunomarker for high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma with an YWHAE-FAM22 rearrangement. YWHAE-FAM22 endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) represent a clinically aggressive subtype of ESS classified as high-grade endometrial sarcomas, and its distinction from the usual low-grade ESS with JAZF1 rearrangement and from HGUS with no identifiable molecular aberration may be important in guiding clinical management. Median age of the patients is between 55 and 60 years. The most common symptoms are vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, and increasing abdominal girth.Disease is usually advanced with approximately 70% of the patients staged III to IV according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics classification. Preferential metastatic locations include peritoneum, lungs, intra-abdominal lymph nodes, and bone. Median progression-free survival ranged from 7 to 10 months, and median overall survival ranged from 11 to 23 months. There is no clear prognostic factor identified for HGUS, not even stage. The standard management for HGUS consists of total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Systematic lymphadenectomy is not recommended. Adjuvant therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have to be discussed in multidisciplinary staff meetings. PMID:25341584

  9. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Moreno, Elena; Jimenez de la Peña, Mar; Cano Alonso, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI) including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume. PMID:22315683

  10. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  11. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  12. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  13. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... optional skills stations for laparoscopic suturing, hysteroscopy and robotic simulation . Due to space constraints of the cadaver ... for March 2015 article in Obstetrics & Gynecology on “Robotic Surgery in Gynecology”. Mentors Honored by their Mentees ...

  14. Innovative techniques in radiation oncology. Clinical research programs to improve local and regional control in cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, L.W.; Markoe, A.M.; Micaily, B.; Fisher, S.A.; Lamm, F.R. )

    1990-02-01

    There is a growing importance in failure analysis in cancer management. In these analyses locoregional failure as the cause of death emerges as a significant problem in many tumor sites, e.g., head and neck cancer, gynecologic cancer, genitourinary cancer. Because of these data, the radiation oncology community has attributed high priority to research efforts to improve locoregional control. These efforts include the following: (1) brachytherapy alone or with external beam radiation therapy or surgery; (2) intraoperative radiation therapy; (3) hyperthermia with radiation therapy; (4) particle irradiation (protons, neutrons, stripped nuclei, and pions); and (5) routes of administration of the treatment, including infusional (intravenous) chemotherapy with radiation therapy, intraarterial monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides, and intraarterial chemotherapy with radiation therapy. Each area of investigation is discussed.

  15. American Institute for Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... CancerResource Where to Find Help Food for the Fight DVD Estate Planner Publications Reduce Your Cancer Risk ... By Cancer Site What Is Cancer Foods That Fight Cancer Tools You Can Use Cancer Infographics & Multimedia ...

  16. A quantitative analysis of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans and comparison of homogeneity indices for the treatment of gynecological cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Pushpraj; Vashisht, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans using different homogeneity and conformity indices in gynecological cancers, as well as to compare and find out the most reliable and accurate measure of the dose homogeneity among the available indices. In this study, a cohort of 12 patients were registered for evaluation, those receiving dynamic IMRT treatment on Clinac-2300C/D linear accelerator with 15-Mega Voltage (MV) photon beam. Dynamic IMRT plans were created on Eclipse treatment planning system with Helios dose volume optimization software. Homogeneity indices (HI) such as H index, modified H index, HI index, modified HI index, and S-index (sigma-index) proposed by M Yoon et al. (2007) were calculated and compared. The values of S-index vary from 1.63 to 2.99. The results indicate that the H and HI indices and their modified versions may not provide the correct dose homogeneity information, but the S-index provides accurate information about the dose homogeneity in the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Each plan was compared with 6-MV photon energy on the basis of S-index and conformity index (CI). Organs at risk (OAR) doses with 6-MV and 15-MV beams were also reported. PMID:23776309

  17. United We Stand? The Effects of a Couple-Coping Intervention on Adjustment to Early Stage Breast or Gynecological Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jennifer L.; Halford, W. Kim; Ward, Bruce G.

    2004-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis affects the psychological well-being of both patients and their partners, and effective coping has been suggested to be a conjoint process of mutual support. Ninety-four married women with early stage cancer and their partners were randomly assigned to couples-based coping training (CanCOPE), individual coping training for the…

  18. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods. PMID:22714030

  19. SU-E-J-124: FDG PET Metrics Analysis in the Context of An Adaptive PET Protocol for Node Positive Gynecologic Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, J; Chino, J; Light, K; Vergalasova, I; Craciunescu, O

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare PET extracted metrics and investigate the role of a gradient-based PET segmentation tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH), in the context of an adaptive PET protocol for node positive gynecologic cancer patients. Methods: An IRB approved protocol enrolled women with gynecological, PET visible malignancies. A PET-CT was obtained for treatment planning prescribed to 45–50.4Gy with a 55– 70Gy boost to the PET positive nodes. An intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained between 30–36Gy, and all volumes re-contoured. Standard uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVmedian) and GTV volumes were extracted from the clinician contoured GTVs on the pre- and intra-treament PET-CT for primaries and nodes and compared with a two tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences between primary and node GTV volumes contoured in the treatment planning system and those volumes generated using PET Edge were also investigated. Bland-Altman plots were used to describe significant differences between the two contouring methods. Results: Thirteen women were enrolled in this study. The median baseline/intra-treatment primary (SUVmax, mean, median) were (30.5, 9.09, 7.83)/( 16.6, 4.35, 3.74), and nodes were (20.1, 4.64, 3.93)/( 6.78, 3.13, 3.26). The p values were all < 0.001. The clinical contours were all larger than the PET Edge generated ones, with mean difference of +20.6 ml for primary, and +23.5 ml for nodes. The Bland-Altman revealed changes between clinician/PET Edge contours to be mostly within the margins of the coefficient of variability. However, there was a proportional trend, i.e. the larger the GTV, the larger the clinical contours as compared to PET Edge contours. Conclusion: Primary and node SUV values taken from the intratreament PET-CT can be used to assess the disease response and to design an adaptive plan. The PET Edge tool can streamline the contouring process and lead to smaller, less user-dependent contours.

  20. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiosurgery in oligometastatic breast and gynecological cancers: feasibility and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Torre, Gabriella; Corrado, Giacomo; Legge, Francesco; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Tagliaferri, Luca; Mignogna, Samantha; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the preliminary results of the first stereotactic body radiosurgery (SRS) experience with volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in oligometastatic breast and recurrent gynecological tumors (OBRGT) are reported in terms of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. Patients were treated in a head-first supine treatment position on a customized body frame immobilization shell. SRS-VMAT treatment plans were optimized using the ERGO++ treatment planning system. Response assessment was performed 8-12 weeks after treatment by morphologic imaging modalities, or if feasible, also by functional imaging. Thirty-six lesions in 24 consecutive patients (median age, 63 years; range, 40-81) were treated: 13.9% had primary or metastatic lung lesions, 30.5% had liver metastases, 36.1% had bone lesions, 16.7% had lymph node metastases and 2.8% had a primary vulvar melanoma. The median dose was 18 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=50.4 Gy), the minimal dose was 12 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=26.4 Gy) and the maximal dose was 28 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=106.4 Gy). Seven patients (29.2%) experienced acute toxicity, which however was grade 2 in only 1 case. Moreover, only 3 patients (12.5%) developed late toxicity of which only 1 was grade 2. Objective response rate was 77.7% including 16 lesions achieving complete response (44.4%) and 12 lesions achieving partial response (33.3%). The median duration of follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 6-50). Recurrence/progression within the SRS-VMAT treated field was observed in 6 patients (total lesions=7) with a 2-year inside SRS-VMAT field disease control expressed on a per lesion basis of 69%. Recurrence/progression of disease outside the SRS-VMAT field was documented in 15 patients; the 2-year outside SRS-VMAT field metastasis‑free survival, expressed on a per patient basis, was 35%. Death due to disease was documented in 6 patients and the 2-year overall survival was 58%. Although the maximum tolerated dose was

  1. About the Cancer Biomarkers Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Biomarkers Research Group promotes research to identify, develop, and validate biological markers for early cancer detection and cancer risk assessment. Activities include development and validation of promising cancer biomarkers, collaborative databases and informatics systems, and new technologies or the refinement of existing technologies. NCI DCP News Note Consortium on Imaging and Biomarkers (CIB) Created: Eight Grants Awarded to Improve Accuracy of Cancer Screening, Detection, and Diagnosis |

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  3. Laser treatment in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  4. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  5. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... the Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In ...

  6. Basic Research and Progress against Pediatric Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An infographic about the importance of basic research for making progress against childhood cancers. The graphic shows the research milestones that led to the development and approval of Unituxin to treat neuroblastoma, a cancer seen mainly in children.

  7. Gene-Environment Research and Cancer Epidemiology

    Cancer.gov

    The Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program supports extramural research that investigates both genetic and environmental factors that may contribute to the etiology of cancer and/or impact cancer outcomes.

  8. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  9. Why Invest in Basic Cancer Research?

    Cancer.gov

    Image Description: An infographic about the importance of basic research for making progress against childhood cancers. The graphic shows the research milestones that led to the development and approval of the pediatric cancer treatment, Unituxin.

  10. Phosphoproteomics and Lung Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    López, Elena; Cho, William C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Massive evidence suggests that genetic abnormalities contribute to the development of lung cancer. These molecular abnormalities may serve as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for this deadly disease. It is imperative to search these biomarkers in different tumorigenesis pathways so as to provide the most appropriate therapy for each individual patient with lung malignancy. Phosphoproteomics is a promising technology for the identification of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cancer. Thousands of proteins interact via physical and chemical association. Moreover, some proteins can covalently modify other proteins post-translationally. These post-translational modifications ultimately give rise to the emergent functions of cells in sequence, space and time. Phosphoproteomics clinical researches imply the comprehensive analysis of the proteins that are expressed in cells or tissues and can be employed at different stages. In addition, understanding the functions of phosphorylated proteins requires the study of proteomes as linked systems rather than collections of individual protein molecules. In fact, proteomics approaches coupled with affinity chromatography strategies followed by mass spectrometry have been used to elucidate relevant biological questions. This article will discuss the relevant clues of post-translational modifications, phosphorylated proteins, and useful proteomics approaches to identify molecular cancer signatures. The recent progress in phosphoproteomics research in lung cancer will be also discussed. PMID:23202899

  11. What's New in Vulvar Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... resources for vulvar cancer What`s new in vulvar cancer research and treatment? Research is being done to find ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Vulvar Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  12. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  13. HLA-E expression by gynecological cancers restrains tumor-infiltrating CD8⁺ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gooden, Marloes; Lampen, Margit; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; Leffers, Ninke; Trimbos, J Baptist; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Nijman, Hans; van Hall, Thorbald

    2011-06-28

    HLA-E is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule, which differs from classical HLA molecules by its nonpolymorphic, conserved nature. Expression and function of HLA-E in normal tissues and solid tumors is not fully understood. We investigated HLA-E protein expression on tissue sections of 420 ovarian and cervical cancers and found equal or higher levels than normal counterpart epithelia in 80% of the tumors. Expression was strongly associated with components of the antigen presentation pathway, e.g., transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptide (ERAP), β2 microglobulin (β2m), HLA classes I and II, and for ovarian cancer with tumor infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs). This association argues against the idea that HLA-E would compensate for the loss of classical HLA in tumors. In situ detection of HLA-E interacting receptors revealed a very low infiltrate of natural killer (NK) cells, but up to 50% of intraepithelial CTLs expressed the inhibiting CD94/NKG2A receptor. In cervical cancer, HLA-E expression did not alter the prognostic effect of CTLs, most likely due to very high infiltrating CTL numbers in this virus-induced tumor. Overall survival of ovarian cancer patients, however, was strongly influenced by HLA-E, because the beneficial effect of high CTL infiltration was completely neutralized in the subpopulation with strong HLA-E expression. Interestingly, these results indicate that CTL infiltration in ovarian cancer is associated with better survival only when HLA-E expression is low and that intratumoral CTLs are inhibited by CD94/NKG2A receptors on CTLs in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:21670276

  14. Long-Term Survival Advantage and Prognostic Factors Associated With Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Treatment in Advanced Ovarian Cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Devansu; Java, James J.; Salani, Ritu; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Markman, Maurie; Herzog, Thomas; Monk, Bradley J.; Chan, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine long-term survival and associated prognostic factors after intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods Data from Gynecologic Oncology Group protocols 114 and 172 were retrospectively analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for statistical analyses. Results In 876 patients, median follow-up was 10.7 years. Median survival with IP therapy was 61.8 months (95% CI, 55.5 to 69.5), compared with 51.4 months (95% CI, 46.0 to 58.2) for intravenous therapy. IP therapy was associated with a 23% decreased risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.90; P = .002). IP therapy improved survival of those with gross residual (≤ 1 cm) disease (AHR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.92; P = .006). Risk of death decreased by 12% for each cycle of IP chemotherapy completed (AHR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.94; P < .001). Factors associated with poorer survival included: clear/mucinous versus serous histology (AHR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.83 to 4.24; P < .001), gross residual versus no visible disease (AHR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.48 to 2.43; P < .001), and fewer versus more cycles of IP chemotherapy (AHR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.94; P < .001). Younger patients were more likely to complete the IP regimen, with a 5% decrease in probability of completion with each year of age (odds ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93 to 0.96; P < .001). Conclusion The advantage of IP over intravenous chemotherapy extends beyond 10 years. IP therapy enhanced survival of those with gross residual disease. Survival improved with increasing number of IP cycles. PMID:25800756

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue; A: Duct element recovered from breast tissue digest. B: Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneousely die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. C: Isolate of long-term frowth HMEC from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and in early full-cell contact growth in culture in a dish. D: same long-term growth HMEC, but after 3 weeks in late full-cell contact growth in a continuous culture in a dish. Note attempts to reform duct elements but this in two demensions in a dish rather than in three dimensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  16. The Cervix Cancer Research Network: Increasing Access to Cancer Clinical Trials in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Suneja, Gita; Bacon, Monica; Small, William; Ryu, Sang Y.; Kitchener, Henry C.; Gaffney, David K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The burden of cervical cancer is large and growing in developing countries, due in large part to limited access to screening services and lack of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination. In spite of modern advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities, outcomes from cervical cancer have not markedly improved in recent years. Novel clinical trials are urgently needed to improve outcomes from cervical cancer worldwide. Methods: The Cervix Cancer Research Network (CCRN), a subsidiary of the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup, is a multi-national, multi-institutional consortium of physicians and scientists focused on improving cervical cancer outcomes worldwide by making cancer clinical trials available in low-, middle-, and high-income countries. Standard operating procedures for participation in CCRN include a pre-qualifying questionnaire to evaluate clinical activities and research infrastructure, followed by a site visit. Once a site is approved, they may choose to participate in one of four currently accruing clinical trials. Results: To date, 13 different CCRN site visits have been performed. Of these 13 sites visited, 10 have been approved as CCRN sites including Tata Memorial Hospital, India; Bangalore, India; Trivandrum, India; Ramathibodi, Thailand; Siriaj, Thailand; Pramongkutklao, Thailand; Ho Chi Minh, Vietnam; Blokhin Russian Cancer Research Center; the Hertzen Moscow Cancer Research Institute; and the Russian Scientific Center of Roentgenoradiology. The four currently accruing clinical trials are TACO, OUTBACK, INTERLACE, and SHAPE. Discussion: The CCRN has successfully enrolled eight sites in developing countries to participate in four randomized clinical trials. The primary objectives are to provide novel therapeutics to regions with the greatest need and to improve the validity and generalizability of clinical trial results by enrolling a diverse sample of patients. PMID:25745604

  17. Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  18. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  19. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  20. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B.; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  1. A Sexuality Curriculum for Gynecology Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Stephen B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    The summary report of an educational research program conducted with the obstetrics and gynecology residents at University Hospitals of Cleveland in 1976 is presented. The goals were to provide residents with basic knowledge about female sexual problems, assess skill and comfort in interviewing patients with sexual problems, document the effects…

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial cell monoculture: Long-term growth of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) grown in monoculture as 3-dimensional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical construct about 3.5 mm (less than 1/8th inch) in diameter with slightly dehydrted, crinkled beads contained on the surface as well as within the 3-dimensional structure. B: The center of these constructs is hollow. Crinkling of the beads causes a few to fall out, leaving crater-like impressiions in the construct. The central impression shows a small hole that accesses the hollow center of the construct. C: A closeup view of the cells and the hole the central impression. D: Closer views of cells in the construct showing sell-to-cell interactions. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Epithelial and fibroblast cell coculture: Long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) admixed in coculture with fibroblast from the same initial breast tissue grown as 3-dimenstional constructions in the presence of attachment beads in the NASA Bioreactor. A: A typical constrct about 2.0 mm in diameter without beads on the surface. The center of these constrcts is hollow, and beads are organized about the irner surface. Although the coculture provides smaller constructs than the monoculture, the metabolic of the organized cells is about the same. B, C, D: Closer views of cells showing that the shape of cells and cell-to-cell interactions apprear different in the coculture than in the monoculture constructs. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Richmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  4. A Phase II Evaluation of Gefitinib in the Treatment of Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Kimberly K.; Sill, Michael W.; Fischer, Edgar; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Mannel, Robert S.; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Hanjani, Parviz; Wilken, Jason A.; Baron, Andre T.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schilder, Russell J.; Singh, Meenakshi; Maihle, Nita J.

    2013-01-01

    Background A phase II trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gefitinib in patients with persistent/recurrent endometrial cancer. Methods Women with histologically confirmed persistent/recurrent endometrial cancer were treated with 500 mg oral gefitinib daily until progression or severe toxicity, with progression-free survival (PFS) at six months as the primary endpoint. Tumor expression of total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor A (PRA) and B (PRB), Ki67, pEGFR and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) were examined pre- and post-treatment. EGFR was sequenced, and serum concentrations of soluble EGFR (sEGFR) at baseline also were examined. Results Of 29 patients enrolled, 26 were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity. Four patients experienced PFS ≥6 months, and one had a complete response which was not associated with an EGFR mutation. The concentration of sEGFR in pretreatment serum was positively correlated with overall survival (OS), but not with responsiveness to gefitinib in this small patient cohort. Expression of tumor biomarkers was not associated with PFS or OS. Co-expression of ER with PRA in primary and recurrent tumors, and pEGFR with pERK in primary tumors was observed. Conclusions This treatment regimen was tolerable but lacked sufficient efficacy to warrant further evaluation in this setting. The possible association between serum sEGFR concentrations and OS, and temporal changes in expression of pEGFR and pERK and the documented CR of one patient are interesting and warrant additional investigation. PMID:23438670

  5. What's New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... resources for cervical cancer What`s new in cervical cancer research and treatment? New ways to prevent and treat ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Cervical Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  6. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  7. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Sexually Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents ... in women, the cause of the majority of cervical cancers. Photo courtesy of Judy Folkenberg, NLM Writer By ...

  8. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  9. Collaborations in Proteomics Research - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), through the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR), has signed two Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) in the sharing of proteomics reagents and protocols

  10. Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kristina M.; Neubauer, Nikki L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been utilized in the field of obstetrics and gynecology as far back as the 1940s when culdoscopy was first introduced as a visualization tool. Gynecologists then began to employ minimally invasive surgery for adhesiolysis and obtaining biopsies but then expanded its use to include procedures such as tubal sterilization (Clyman (1963), L. E. Smale and M. L. Smale (1973), Thompson and Wheeless (1971), Peterson and Behrman (1971)). With advances in instrumentation, the first laparoscopic hysterectomy was successfully performed in 1989 by Reich et al. At the same time, minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology was being developed alongside its benign counterpart. In the 1975s, Rosenoff et al. reported using peritoneoscopy for pretreatment evaluation in ovarian cancer, and Spinelli et al. reported on using laparoscopy for the staging of ovarian cancer. In 1993, Nichols used operative laparoscopy to perform pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients. The initial goals of minimally invasive surgery, not dissimilar to those of modern medicine, were to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery and therefore improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. This review will summarize the history and use of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology and also highlight new minimally invasive surgical approaches currently in development. PMID:23997959