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Sample records for gynecological cancer care

  1. Surveillance and Care of the Gynecologic Cancer Survivor

    PubMed Central

    MacLaughlin, Kathy L.; Long, Margaret E.; Pruthi, Sandhya; Casey, Petra M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Care of the gynecologic cancer survivor extends beyond cancer treatment to encompass promotion of sexual, cardiovascular, bone, and brain health; management of fertility, contraception, and vasomotor symptoms; and genetic counseling. Methods: This is a narrative review of the data and guidelines regarding care and surveillance of the gynecologic cancer survivor. We searched databases including PubMed, Cochrane, and Scopus using the search terms gynecologic cancer, cancer surveillance, and cancer survivor and reached a consensus for articles chosen for inclusion in the review based on availability in the English language and publication since 2001, as well as key older articles, consensus statements, and practice guidelines from professional societies. However, we did not undertake an extensive systematic search of the literature to identify all potentially relevant studies, nor did we utilize statistical methods to summarize data. We offer clinical recommendations for the management of gynecologic cancer survivors based on review of evidence and our collective clinical experience. Results: Key messages include the limitations of laboratory studies, including CA-125, and imaging in the setting of gynecologic cancer surveillance, hormonal and non-hormonal management of treatment-related vasomotor symptoms and genitourinary syndrome of menopause, as well as recommendations for general health screening, fertility preservation, and contraception. Conclusions: A holistic approach to care extending beyond cancer treatment alone benefits gynecologic cancer survivors. In addition to surveillance for cancer recurrence and late treatment side effects, survivors benefit from guidance on hormonal, contraceptive, and fertility management and promotion of cardiovascular, bone, brain, and sexual health. PMID:26208166

  2. The Relevance of Gynecologic Oncologists to Provide High-Quality of Care to Women with Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Minig, Lucas; Padilla-Iserte, Pablo; Zorrero, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Gynecologic oncologists have an essential role to treat women with gynecological cancer. It has been demonstrated that specialized physicians who work in multidisciplinary teams to treat women with gynecological cancers are able to obtain the best clinical and oncological outcomes. However, the access to gynecologic oncologists for women with suspected gynecological cancer is scarce. Therefore, this review analyzes the importance of specialized care of women with ovarian, cervical, and endometrial cancer. In addition, the role of gynecologic oncologists who offer fertility-sparing treatment as well as their role in assisting general gynecologists and obstetricians is also reviewed. PMID:26835417

  3. Supportive care for women with gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Chase, Dana M; Monk, Bradley J; Wenzel, Lari B; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2008-02-01

    Supportive care is a multidimensional field, that involves caring for a patient's symptoms either during and/or after treatment. Ideally, once these supportive care needs are met, patients can enjoy an improved quality of life. Supportive care needs include all body systems, and are, therefore, difficult to manage, secondary to the fact that they require collaboration among multiple medical specialties. In this review, several components of supportive care are separated into two categories: tumor-related morbidities and treatment-related morbidities. Some of the themes discussed include nausea and vomiting, cancer pain, psychological distress, fatigue and anemia, small bowel obstruction and peripheral neuropathy. While all of these components are challenging to manage, it is perhaps the psychosocial realm that remains the most unmet need. Regardless, the oncologist must act as a facilitator who addresses these needs and, if unable to address the issue alone, knows how to steer the patient toward the appropriate provider. As these needs are met, the goal is for quality of life to improve; and with the improvement in quality of life we may expect to see improved survival outcomes. PMID:18279064

  4. Challenges in the Gynecologic Care of Premenopausal Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bakkum-Gamez, Jamie N.; Laughlin, Shannon K.; Jensen, Jani R.; Akogyeram, Clement O.; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2011-01-01

    Premenopausal women with a new diagnosis of breast cancer are faced with many challenges. Providing health care for issues such as gynecologic comorbidities, reproductive health concerns, and vasomotor symptom control can be complicated because of the risks of hormone treatments and the adverse effects of adjuvant therapies. It is paramount that health care professionals understand and be knowledgeable about hormonal and nonhormonal treatments and their pharmacological parameters so they can offer appropriate care to women who have breast cancer, with the goal of improving quality of life. Articles for this review were identified by searching the PubMed database with no date limitations. The following search terms were used: abnormal uterine bleeding, physiologic sex steroids, endometrial ablation, hysteroscopic sterilization, fertility preservation in endometrial cancer, tranexamic acid and breast cancer, menorrhagia treatment and breast cancer, abnormal uterine bleeding and premenopausal breast cancer, levonorgestrel IUD and breast cancer, tamoxifen and gynecologic abnormalities, tamoxifen metabolism, hormones and breast cancer risk, contraception and breast cancer, pregnancy and breast cancer, and breast cancer and infertility treatment. PMID:21307388

  5. [Bringing gender sensitivity into sexual health care for women with gynecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Lee, Tao Jian

    2015-02-01

    Quality of sexual of life is a vital component of wellbeing for cancer survivors and their partners that may affect the disease prognosis. However, the experience of cancer and its treatments significantly challenge sexual expression and partner relationships and often require health professionals to help partners adapt the many physical, psychological, social / relational, and cultural factors that impact psychosexual functioning. However, an appropriate approach to providing sexual health education for gynecological cancer women and their partners has yet to be established. Additionally, nurses and health professionals have limited relevant professional knowledge and lack the communication skills to respond effectively to the sexual concerns of patients. Further, these professionals frequently hold the incorrect perspective that sexual matters are not relevant to the treatment process. Furthermore, the dominant biomedical culture of the clinic holds that health professionals determine the construction of female sexuality after cancer treatment. This precept turns the nature and scope of the discussion toward dysfunction and/or morbidity, while inherently constraining the integration of psychological and relational elements of sexual recovery for women and their partners. The dominant model constructs gender-blind circumstances and inappropriate standards for the clinical assessment and treatment of women's sexual health. Therefore, this article examines the current clinical practice for the sexual health care of gynecological cancer patients under the dominant biomedical model through the lens of gender-sensitivity and proposes gender-sensitive sexual guidelines as a reference for health professionals. PMID:25631180

  6. Can we maximize both value and quality in gynecologic cancer care? A work in progress.

    PubMed

    Havrilesky, Laura J; Fountain, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Value is defined as desirable health outcomes achieved per monetary unit spent. Comparative effectiveness research and cost-effectiveness research are methods that have been developed to quantify effectiveness and value to inform management decisions. In this article we review the comparative and cost-effectiveness literature in the field of ovarian cancer treatment. Studies have shown that improved ovarian cancer survival is associated with complete primary surgical cytoreduction, with treatment at high volume facilities by subspecialist providers (gynecologic oncologists) and with National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) guideline-adherent care in both surgical staging and chemotherapy regimens. Intraperitoneal/intravenous chemotherapy (compared with intravenous alone) has been associated with improved survival and cost-effectiveness. Bevacizumab for primary and maintenance therapy has been found to not be cost-effective (even in selective subsets) despite a small progression-free survival (PFS) advantage. For platinum-sensitive recurrent ovarian cancer, secondary cytoreduction and platinum-based combinations are associated with improved overall survival (OS); several platinum-based combinations have also been found cost-effective. For platinum-resistant recurrence, single agent therapy and supportive care are cost-effective compared with combination therapies. Although little prospective clinical research has been done around end-of-life care, one study reported that for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer, palliative intervention would potentially reduce costs and increase quality adjusted life years compared with usual care (based on improvement in quality of life [QOL]). Overall, cost comparisons of individual chemotherapy regimens are highly dependent on market prices of novel therapeutic agents. PMID:24857112

  7. Impact of the care provided by gynecologic oncologists on outcomes of cervical cancer patients treated with radical hysterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Miao-fang; Li, Jing; Lu, Huai-wu; Wang, Li-juan; Zhang, Bing-zhong; Lin, Zhong-qiu

    2016-01-01

    For many malignant diseases, specialized care has been reported to be associated with better outcomes. The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of gynecologic oncologists on treatment outcomes for cervical cancer patients treated by radical hysterectomy. Records of patients who received radical hysterectomy between January 2005 and June 2010 were reviewed. Perioperative morbidity, recurrence-free survival, and cancer-specific survival were assessed. Cox regression model was used to evaluate gynecologic oncologists as an independent predictor of survival. A total of 839 patients were included. Of these patients, 553 were treated by gynecologic oncologists, while 286 were treated by other subspecialties. With regard to operative outcomes, significant differences in favor of operation by gynecologic oncologists were found in number of patients receiving para-aortic node sampling and dissection (P=0.038), compliance with surgical guidelines (P=0.003), operative time (P<0.0001), estimated blood loss (P<0.0001), transfusion rate (P=0.046), number of removed nodes (P=0.033), and incidences of ureteric injury (P=0.027), cystotomy (P=0.038), and fistula formation (P=0.002). Patients who were operated on by gynecologic oncologists had longer recurrence-free survival (P=0.001; hazard ratio [HR] =0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.48, 0.84]) and cancer-specific survival (P=0.005; HR=0.64; 95% CI [0.47, 0.87]), and this association remained significant in patients with locally advanced disease. Care by gynecologic oncologists was an independent predictor for improved recurrence-free survival (P<0.0001; HR=0.57; 95% CI [0.42, 0.76]) and cancer-specific survival (P=0.001; HR=0.58; 95% CI [0.42, 0.81]), which was still significant among patients with locally advanced cancer. Given the results, we believe for cervical cancer patients receiving radical hysterectomy, operation by gynecologic oncologists results in significantly improved surgical and survival

  8. Gynecologic cancer screening and communication with health care providers in women with Lynch syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Burton-Chase, AM; Hovick, SR; Sun, CC; Boyd-Rogers, S; Lynch, PM; Lu, KH; Peterson, SK

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated knowledge of gynecologic cancer screening recommendations, screening behaviors, and communication with providers among women with Lynch syndrome (LS). Women aged ≥25 years who were at risk for LS-associated cancers completed a semi-structured interview and a questionnaire. Of 74 participants (mean age 40 years), 61% knew the appropriate age to begin screening, 75–80% correctly identified the recommended screening frequency, and 84% reported no previous screening endometrial biopsy. Women initiated discussions with their providers about their LS cancer risks, but many used nonspecific terms or relied on family history. Most were not offered high-risk screening options. While many women were aware of risk-appropriate LS screening guidelines, adherence was suboptimal. Improving communication between women and their providers regarding LS-related gynecologic cancer risk and screening options may help improve adherence. PMID:23906188

  9. Estimation of the Optimal Brachytherapy Utilization Rate in the Treatment of Gynecological Cancers and Comparison With Patterns of Care

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Stephen R.; Delaney, Geoff P.; Gabriel, Gabriel S.; Jacob, Susannah; Das, Prabir; Barton, Michael B.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: We aimed to estimate the optimal proportion of all gynecological cancers that should be treated with brachytherapy (BT)-the optimal brachytherapy utilization rate (BTU)-to compare this with actual gynecological BTU and to assess the effects of nonmedical factors on access to BT. Methods and Materials: The previously constructed inter/multinational guideline-based peer-reviewed models of optimal BTU for cancers of the uterine cervix, uterine corpus, and vagina were combined to estimate optimal BTU for all gynecological cancers. The robustness of the model was tested by univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses. The resulting model was applied to New South Wales (NSW), the United States, and Western Europe. Actual BTU was determined for NSW by a retrospective patterns-of-care study of BT; for Western Europe from published reports; and for the United States from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data. Differences between optimal and actual BTU were assessed. The effect of nonmedical factors on access to BT in NSW were analyzed. Results: Gynecological BTU was as follows: NSW 28% optimal (95% confidence interval [CI] 26%-33%) compared with 14% actual; United States 30% optimal (95% CI 26%-34%) and 10% actual; and Western Europe 27% optimal (95% CI 25%-32%) and 16% actual. On multivariate analysis, NSW patients were more likely to undergo gynecological BT if residing in Area Health Service equipped with BT (odds ratio 1.76, P=.008) and if residing in socioeconomically disadvantaged postcodes (odds ratio 1.12, P=.05), but remoteness of residence was not significant. Conclusions: Gynecological BT is underutilized in NSW, Western Europe, and the United States given evidence-based guidelines. Access to BT equipment in NSW was significantly associated with higher utilization rates. Causes of underutilization elsewhere were undetermined. Our model of optimal BTU can be used as a quality assurance tool, providing an evidence-based benchmark against

  10. A Pilot Study Using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a Clinical Care Tool to Identify Lower Extremity Lymphedema in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Raviv, Leigh; Appollo, Kathleen; Baser, Raymond E.; Iasonos, Alexia; Barakat, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the feasibility and efficacy of using the Gynecologic Cancer Lymphedema Questionnaire (GCLQ) as a symptom scale for lymphedema of the lower extremity (LLE). Methods Twenty-eight gynecologic cancer survivors with documented LLE and 30 without a history or presence of lymphedema completed the GCLQ and provided feedback about their satisfaction with and feasibility of using the GCLQ at their oncology follow-ups. The study survey took approximately 5–10 minutes to complete, and it was easily understood by the majority of the sample. Results Participants had a mean age of 59.6 years (range, 28–80 years). Twenty-eight women (48%) had LLE and 30 (52%) had no history or presence of LLE (confirmed by limb volume [LV] measurements at assessment). Type of cancer history included: endometrial, 38 (66%); cervical, 13 (22%); and vulvar, 7 (12%). GCLQ scores differed significantly by lymphedema diagnosis; LLE patients had higher scores (P<0.01). The large area under the curve (AUC) of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90–1.000) suggests that the GCLQ can distinguish between patients with and without LLE. Although all 28 (100%) of the LLE patients were aware of their LLE diagnosis, only 23 (82%) underwent treatment. The GCLQ was easily understood by most (55/58, 95%); and overall, patients showed a high willingness (56/58, 96%) to complete the questionnaire at future appointments. Twenty-five (88%) of the LLE patients found the GCLQ to be helpful in identifying symptoms of lymphedema. Conclusions The GCLQ effectively distinguished between gynecologic cancer survivors with and those without LLE, with good sensitivity and specificity. The patients, particularly those with LLE, showed high confidence in the GCLQ’s ability to detect LLE symptoms. PMID:20163847

  11. Barriers for the inclusion of sexuality in nursing care for women with gynecological and breast cancer: perspective of professionals 1

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Simone Mara de Araújo; Gozzo, Thais de Oliveira; Panobianco, Marislei Sanches; dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; de Almeida, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    AIM: qualitative study, which aimed to identify the barriers that influence nursing care practices related to the sexuality of women with gynecological and breast cancer. METHODS: the study was conducted with 16 professionals of the nursing area (nurses, nursing technicians and nursing assistants) from two sectors of a university hospital situated in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The data was collected using semi-structured, in-depth individual interviews. All the interviews were recorded and the participants' responses were identified and categorized using Content Analysis. RESULTS: three major themes were identified. These are as follows: 1) barriers related to the biomedical model; 2) barriers related to institutional dynamics and 3) barriers related to the social interpretations of sexuality. CONCLUSIONS: the results of this study showed that the systematized inclusion of this issue in nursing care routines requires changes in the health paradigm and in the work dynamic, as well as reflection on the personal values and social interpretations related to the topic. A major challenge is to divest sexuality of the taboos and prejudices which accompany it, as well as to contribute to the nursing team being more aware of the difficulties faced by women with gynaecological and breast cancer. PMID:25806635

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  13. Replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Park, J W; Kim, M

    2016-01-01

    Despite advanced therapeutic treatments, gynecologic malignancies such as cervical and ovarian cancers are still the top ten leading cause of cancer death among women in South Korea. Thus a novel and innovative approach is urgently needed. Naturally occurring viruses are live, replication-proficient viruses that specifically infect human cancer cells while sparing normal cell counterparts. Since the serendipitous discovery of the naturally oncotropic virus targeting gynecologic cancer in 1920s, various replicating viruses have shown various degrees of safety and efficacy in preclinical or clinical applications for gynecologic cancer therapy. Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, which are frequently dysregulated in gynecologic malignancies, play an important role in determining viral oncotropism. Published articles describing replicating, oncolytic viruses for gynecologic cancers are thoroughly reviewed. This review outlines the discovery of replication-proficient virus strains for targeting gynecologic malignancies, recent progresses elucidating molecular connections between oncogene/tumor suppressor gene abnormalities and viral oncotropism, and the associated preclinical/clinical implications. The authors would also like to propose future directions in the utility of the replicating viruses for gynecologic cancer therapy. PMID:27352554

  14. [Gynecological Care and Prevention of Gynecological Malignancies in BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutation Carriers].

    PubMed

    Zikán, M

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the current knowledge of gynecological care aspects in women with inherited predisposition to breast and ovarian cancer, i.e. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, and proposes guidelines for furher management of these women, addressing follow-up recommendations, prophylactic surgery indications and preimplantation genetic conseling. It evaluates cancer risk and severity of ovarian cancer in particular with regards to its high mortality resulting from aggressive biological behavior of the tumor and late detection rates. BRCA-positive women should be enrolled in prevention programs including carefull surveillance, prophylactic surgery or pre-implantation genetic counseling. Follow-up care consists of gynecological examination, expert oncogynecological ultrasound and tumor marker CA125 examination every six months. However, the most effective strategy for mortality reduction in ovarian cancer is prophylactic surgery--salpingo-oophorectomy (and hysterectomy). The optimal age for surgery is between 35 to 40 years. Prophylactic salpingo-oophorectomy performed in premenopausal women was proved to reduce the risk of ovarian as well as breast cancer. Symptoms of estrogen deficiency after prophylactic surgery can be suppressed by administration of hormone replacement therapy without increasing the risk of breast cancer. Preimplantation genetic diagnosis is an effective way to prevent the trans--mission of hereditary predisposition to the next generation. The management of patients with hereditary suspceptibility to ovarian cancer should be confined to specialized centres. PMID:26691939

  15. Quality of life for women living with a gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Pilkington, F Beryl; Mitchell, Gail J

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this research study was to enhance understanding about quality of life from the perspective of women living with a gynecologic cancer. Parse's human becoming theory provided the theoretical perspective and guided the descriptive exploratory methodology that was used. Participants were 14 women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer. Through analysis-synthesis processes, four themes were identified, which provide the following unified description: Quality of life is treasuring loving expressions while affirming personal worth, as consoling immersions amid torment emerge with expanding fortitude for enduring. The findings suggest implications for quality care that honors persons' experiences. PMID:15090091

  16. Handling Sexuality Concerns in Women with Gynecological Cancer: Egyptian Nurse's Knowledge and Attitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mansour, Suzan E.; Mohamed, Hanan E.

    2015-01-01

    Sexuality is an important part of normal human functioning. Gynecological cancer diagnosis and treatment has devastating effect on Sexual issues. Study aim was to investigate Oncology Nurses knowledge and attitudes in Relation to Provision of Sexual Health Care to Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancer. The study setting was conducted at…

  17. Stereotactic radiosurgery for gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Kunos, Charles; Brindle, James M; Debernardo, Robert

    2012-01-01

    comes at the expense of decreased dose uniformity in the SBRT cancer target. This may have implications for both subsequent tumor control in the SBRT target and normal tissue tolerance of organs at-risk. Due to the sharp dose falloff in SBRT, the possibility of occult disease escaping ablative radiation dose occurs when cancer targets are not fully recognized and inadequate SBRT dose margins are applied. Clinical target volume (CTV) expansion by 0.5 cm, resulting in a larger planning target volume (PTV), is associated with increased target control without undue normal tissue injury.(7,8) Further reduction in the probability of geographic miss may be achieved by incorporation of 2-[(18)F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET).(8) Use of (18)F-FDG PET/CT in SBRT treatment planning is only the beginning of attempts to discover new imaging target molecular signatures for gynecologic cancers. PMID:22546879

  18. Treatment-related cancers after gynecologic malignancy

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, M.A.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1987-10-15

    Second malignancies are one of the known complications of cancer treatment. Several recent studies which have quantified the risk of treatment-induced cancers following gynecologic malignancies are reviewed. After cervical cancer, there is a 9% excess risk of second cancers, of which only 5% could be attributed to radiation therapy. Most of the treatment-related malignancies after cervical or endometrial cancer are solid tumors occurring within the radiation field. Following both cervical and endometrial cancer, there is a small increased risk of leukemia associated with radiation therapy. In contrast, after ovarian cancer, there is significantly increased risk of leukemia related to treatment with alkylating agents, which varies by drug type and total dose. The cumulative risk of leukemia and preleukemia following single agent melphalan is 11.2% +/- 2.6% at ten years; the risk after cyclophosphamide is 5.4% +/- 3.2%. Overall, the risk of second malignancies following treatment of gynecologic cancers is small. 38 references.

  19. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1981-07-15

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. Care must be exercised in associating previous therapy and a subsequent malignancy. Naturally occurring second cancers must be separated from those which are iatrogenic. Associations in the literature have been made involving malignancies as a sequelae of prior gynecologic therapy. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. Irradiation therapy, however, has not yet been shown to be related to leukemia in cervical cancer patients. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified.

  20. Cancer and the world's poor: What's a gynecologic cancer specialist to do?

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Goodman, AnneKathryn; Schmeler, Kathleen; Durfee, John; Pareja, Rene; Munkarah, Adnan; Rulisa, Stephen; Ghebre, Rahel; Trimble, Edward L; Chuang, Linus

    2016-07-01

    Women in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) face a drastically increased burden of cervical cancer and the same burden of other gynecologic cancers as do women in high-income countries, yet there are few resources or specialists to meet their needs. 85% of deaths from cervical cancer occur in LMICs. As the population of these regions age, and as death from infectious diseases decrease, this burden will increase further without strong intervention. There are few cancer specialists in LMICs and training in gynecologic cancer care is rare. Gynecologic cancer specialists are uniquely positioned to meet this challenge as advocates, educators and experts. On behalf of the SGO International Committee, we call on our colleagues to meet this historic challenge. PMID:27210817

  1. A National Initiative for Women and Healthcare Providers: CDC’s Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer Campaign

    PubMed Central

    Rim, Sun Hee; Polonec, Lindsey; Stewart, Sherri L.; Gelb, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    The Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign raises awareness of the five main types of gynecologic cancer: cervical, ovarian, uterine, vaginal, and vulvar. It encourages women to pay attention to their bodies and know what is normal for them so they can recognize the warning signs of gynecologic cancers and seek medical care. This report provides an overview of the development of this national campaign. PMID:21933006

  2. Synchronous gynecologic cancer and the use of imaging for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Boaventura, Camila Silva; Galvão, José Lucas Scarpinetti; Soares, Giovanna Milanes Bego; Bitencourt, Almir Galvão Vieira; Chojniak, Rubens; Bringel, Shenia Lauanna Rezende; Brot, Louise De

    2016-04-01

    Endometrial and cervical cancers are the most prevalent gynecologic neoplasms. While endometrial cancer occurs in older women, cervical cancer is more prevalente in young subjects. The most common clinical manifestation in these two gynecological cancers is vaginal bleeding. In the first case, diagnosis is made based on histological and imaging evaluation of the endometrium, while cervical cancers are diagnosed clinically, according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO). The authors present a case of synchronous gynecological cancer of the endometrium and cervix diagnosed during staging on MRI and confirmed by histological analysis of the surgical specimen. PMID:27167539

  3. Family Caregiver Palliative Care Intervention in Supporting Caregivers of Patients With Stage II-IV Gastrointestinal, Gynecologic, and Urologic Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Localized Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Metastatic Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Psychosocial Effects of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Bladder Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Recurrent Urethral Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Transitional Cell Cancer of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter; Stage II Bladder Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Urethral Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage III Bladder Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Urethral Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Gastric Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal

  4. Inside Knowledge about Gynecologic Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Among Mexican-American Women Preventing Skin Cancer by Reducing Indoor Tanning Cervical Cancer Rates Among Young Women in the U.S. Increased ... We Know What States Can Do Case Study: Reducing Radon in Illinois What Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs Can Do Resources Guide to Promoting ...

  5. Intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy in advanced gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, S; Railsback, L D; Buchsbaum, H J

    1978-10-01

    Fourteen patients with advanced localized gynecologic cancer were treated with 44 courses of intraarterial pelvic infusion chemotherapy. All patients received methotrexate with folinic acid rescue; 9 patients also received vincristine. Tumor regression was observed in 3 of 14 patients (21.4%). In 5 patients there were major complications related to 28 intraarterial catheter placements. Two patients developed leukopenia following chemotherapy. The value of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in gynecologic cancer is limited. Its use in gynecologic oncology is discussed. PMID:309571

  6. Fertility preservation in gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Shakuntala; Kutchi, Imran

    2013-03-21

    For cancers of reproductive system in women, fertility preservation is complex. Fertility is also affected by therapies, however prevention is possible. Radiotherapy affects gonads, uterus, and subsequent pregnancy outcomes in all ages. However, degree and damage depend on dose, irradiation field, and age at the time of exposure. Ovarian transposition is considered if ovarian involvement is unlikely. Gonadotoxic effects of chemotherapy are related to agent's type, cumulative doses, age, and ovarian reserve. Some agents are highly toxic. Rendering follicular development quiescent by suppression of gonadotropins does reduce the ovarian damage. Simple or radical trachelectomy can be used in early cervical cancer. Fertility saving surgery is possible only in early stage low grade epithelial cancers of the ovary, however, in germ cell tumors even in advanced stages it may be possible to preserve fertility. There are no standard recommendations for endometrial cancer. Embryo, oocyte, and ovarian tissue cryopreservation are possible. The human embryo is very resistant to damage. In view of these possibilities, it is advocated that attention to long term health and quality of life in gonadotoxic therapy must be incorporated into plans as early as possible. PMID:24453519

  7. Sleep quality of women with gynecological and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Furlani, Renata; Ceolim, Maria Filomena

    2006-01-01

    Subjective sleep quality has been recognized as a valuable indicator of health and quality of life. This exploratory and descriptive study aimed at describing habitual sleep quality of women suffering from gynecological and breast cancer and comparing habitual versus sleep quality during hospitalization. Twenty-five women admitted in hospital for clinical treatment of cancer completed the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) within 72 hours after admission and again just before discharge. Fifty-two percent of subjects reported habitual bad sleep quality, and this proportion increased to 80% of subjects during hospital stay. Subjects indicated the following most frequent causes of night sleep disturbance: need to go to the toilet, waking up early and receiving nursing care during the night. Results point to the importance of including careful assessment of sleep quality and environment in nursing care planning for oncology patients, mainly during hospitalization. PMID:17294020

  8. Paper-Based Survivorship Care Plans May be Less Helpful for Cancer Patients Who Search for Disease-Related Information on the Internet: Results of the Registrationsystem Oncological Gynecology (ROGY) Care Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ezendam, Nicole PM; Pijnenborg, Johanna MA; Boll, Dorry; Vos, Maria Caroline; Kruitwagen, Roy FPM; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2016-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine recommends Survivorship Care Plans (SCPs) for all cancer survivors. However, it is unclear whether certain patient groups may or may not benefit from SCPs. Objective The aim was to assess whether the effects of an automatically generated paper SCP on patients’ satisfaction with information provision and care, illness perceptions, and health care utilization were moderated by disease-related Internet use. Methods Twelve hospitals were randomized to either SCP care or usual care in the pragmatic cluster randomized Registrationsystem Oncological GYnecology (ROGY) Care trial. Newly diagnosed endometrial cancer patients completed questionnaires after diagnosis (N=221; response: 74.7%, 221/296), 6 months (n=158), and 12 months (n=147), including patients’ satisfaction with information provision and care, illness perceptions, health care utilization (how many times patients visited a medical specialist or primary care physician about their cancer in the past 6 months), and disease-related Internet use (whether patients used the Internet to look for information about cancer). Results In total, 80 of 221 (36.2%) patients used the Internet to obtain disease-related information. Disease-related Internet use moderated the SCP care effect on the amount of information received about the disease (P=.03) and medical tests (P=.01), helpfulness of the information (P=.01), and how well patients understood their illness (P=.04). All stratified analyses were not statistically significant. However, it appeared that patients who did not seek disease-related information on the Internet in the SCP care arm reported receiving more information about their disease (mean 63.9, SD 20.1 vs mean 58.3, SD 23.7) and medical tests (mean 70.6, SD 23.5 vs mean 64.7, SD 24.9), finding the information more helpful (76.7, SD 22.9 vs mean 67.8, SD 27.2; scale 0-100), and understanding their illness better (mean 6.6, SD 3.0 vs mean 6.1, SD 3.2; scale 1-10) than

  9. Annual report of the Women's Health Care Committee, Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2015.

    PubMed

    Wakatsuki, Akihiko; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi

    2016-02-01

    The activity of the Women's Health Care Committee over a two year period up to June 2015 focused upon: (i) management of breast diseases in obstetrics and gynecology; (ii) investigation of lifestyle-related disease and bone mineral density after gynecologic cancer therapy; (iii) postoperative women's health care; (iv) current surgical treatment for pelvic organ prolapse among gynecologists in Japan; (v) cesarean indication for pregnant women with active/inactive genital viral lesions; (vi) health care of young female athletes concerned about menstrual cycle abnormalities, stress fractures and premenstrual syndrome/premenstrual dysphoric disorder; (vii) a training program for women's health care advisers; and (viii) a new edition of the oral contraceptive and low-dose estrogen-progestogen guideline. Detailed activities of the eight subcommittees are described in the text. PMID:26694692

  10. EMT-Inducing Molecular Factors in Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Campo, Loredana; Zhang, Catherine; Breuer, Eun-Kyoung

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers are the unregulated growth of neoplastic cells that arise in the cervix, ovaries, fallopian tubes, uterus, vagina, and vulva. Although gynecologic cancers are characterized by different signs and symptoms, studies have shown that they share common risk factors, such as smoking, obesity, age, exposure to certain chemicals, infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and infection with human papilloma virus (HPV). Despite recent advancements in the preventative, diagnostic, and therapeutic interventions for gynecologic cancers, many patients still die as a result of metastasis and recurrence. Since mounting evidence indicates that the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process plays an essential role in metastatic relapse of cancer, understanding the molecular aberrations responsible for the EMT and its underlying signaling should be given high priority in order to reduce cancer morbidity and mortality. PMID:26356073

  11. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: what every provider of gynecologic oncology care should know.

    PubMed

    Duska, Linda R; Engelhard, Carolyn L

    2013-06-01

    The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2010. While initial implementation of the law began shortly thereafter, the full implementation will take place over the next few years. With respect to cancer care, the act was intended to make care more accessible, affordable, and comprehensive across different parts of the country. For our cancer patients and our practices, the ACA has implications that are both positive and negative. The Medicaid expansion and access to insurance exchanges are intended to increase the number of insured patients and thus improve access to care, but many states have decided to opt out of the Medicaid program and in these states access problems will persist. Screening programs will be put in place for insured patients but may supplant federally funded programs that are currently in place for uninsured patients and may not follow current screening guidelines. Both hospice and home health providers will be asked to provide more services with less funding, and quality measures, including readmission rates, will factor into reimbursement. Insured patients will have access to all phases of clinical trial research. There is a need for us as providers of Gynecologic Oncology care to be active in the implementation of the ACA in order to ensure that our patients and our practices can survive and benefit from the changes in health care reimbursement, with the ultimate goals of improving access to care and quality while reducing unsustainable costs. PMID:23500090

  12. Next-Generation Sequencing: Role in Gynecologic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Evans, Tarra; Matulonis, Ursula

    2016-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has risen to the forefront of tumor analysis and has enabled unprecedented advances in the molecular profiling of solid tumors. Through massively parallel sequencing, previously unrecognized genomic alterations have been unveiled in many malignancies, including gynecologic cancers, thus expanding the potential repertoire for the use of targeted therapies. NGS has expanded the understanding of the genomic foundation of gynecologic malignancies and has allowed identification of germline and somatic mutations associated with cancer development, enabled tumor reclassification, and helped determine mechanisms of treatment resistance. NGS has also facilitated rationale therapeutic strategies based on actionable molecular aberrations. However, issues remain regarding cost and clinical utility. This review covers NGS analysis of and its impact thus far on gynecologic cancers, specifically ovarian, endometrial, cervical, and vulvar cancers. PMID:27587626

  13. Obstetric Outcomes in Non-Gynecologic Cancer Patients in Remission

    PubMed Central

    Timur, Hakan; Tokmak, Aytekin; Iskender, Cantekin; Yildiz, Elif Sumer; Inal, Hasan Ali; Uygur, Dilek; Danisman, Nuri

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the obstetric and perinatal outcomes in treated women who were diagnosed with non-gynecologic cancer and to compare these findings with pregnant women with no history of cancer. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on 21 pregnant women with non-gynecologic cancer who were in remission (study group) and 63 pregnant women with no history of cancer (control group). The women were admitted to the high-risk pregnancy clinic of Zekai Tahir Burak Women’s Health Training and Research Hospital with a diagnosis of pregnancy and cancer between January 2010 and January 2015. Obstetric outcomes and demographic characteristics of the patients were recorded. Age, gravida, parity, abortus, body mass index (BMI), gestational week, smoking, mode of delivery, gestational weight, and perinatal outcomes were examined for each woman. Results: The most common cancer types were thyroid (28.5%) and breast cancers (23.8%), which constituted just over half of the non-gynecologic cancer cases during pregnancy. The time elapsed after the diagnosis was 3.8±2.2 (1–9) years. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups with regard to age, obstetric history, BMI, gestational week, smoking, and obstetric and perinatal outcomes (p>0.05). Conclusion: Negative perinatal outcomes in non-gynecologic cancer patients in remission were found to be within acceptable levels. PMID:27551177

  14. Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis: A rare manifestation of gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    Orfanelli, Theofano; Sultanik, Elliot; Shell, Roger; Gibbon, Darlene

    2016-08-01

    •Nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis (NBTE) is a rare complication of cancer.•NBTE may precede the diagnosis of an occult gynecologic malignancy.•Malignancy-induced NBTE must be considered in patients with unprovoked venous thromboembolism.•The most effective treatment is anticoagulation and treatment of the underlying cancer. PMID:27453927

  15. FDG PET-CT of gynecologic cancers: pearls and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Hima B; Kraeft, Jessica J; Schorge, John O; Scott, James A; Lee, Susanna I

    2015-10-01

    FDG PET-CT plays an important role in treatment planning and in prognosis assessment of gynecologic cancer patients. Detection of hypermetabolic tissue with FDG PET, when combined with the high spatial resolution of CT, results in improved cancer detection and localization not afforded by either modality independently. This article is a primer for a radiologist performing PET-CT on gynecologic cancer patients and includes the imaging protocol, normal pattern of FDG distribution in the female pelvis and the lymph node drainage pathways from the gynecologic organs. Clinically relevant imaging findings that should be included in the report are discussed. Case examples illustrate how potential errors in exam interpretation can be avoided by concurrently performing a high-quality diagnostic CT with the FDG PET scan and by analyzing both the stand-alone and the fusion images. PMID:25680500

  16. Other Gynecologic Cancers: endometrial, ovarian, vulvar and vaginal cancers.

    PubMed

    Duarte-Franco, Eliane; Franco, Eduardo L

    2004-08-25

    HEALTH ISSUE: In Canada, cancers of the endometrium, ovaries, vulva, vagina, placenta and adnexa account for 11% of all malignant neoplasms in women and 81% of all genital cancers. Although the incidence and mortality from vulvar and vaginal cancers are very low, endometrium and ovarian cancer are important public health problems. KEY FINDINGS: In Canada, there has been no appreciable improvement in survival for women with advanced endometrial (EC) or ovarian cancer (OC) over the past 30 years. The prognosis of EC is good for most patients because diagnosis is made at early stages. However, survival of OC is poor; more than 70% of cases are diagnosed at late stages. Up to 10% of OCs is linked to familial aggregation. Cancers of the vulva and of the vagina are very rare. The survival experience for women with the latter is worse than for those with the former. Both share many risk factors with cervical cancer and the recent developments in the study of HPV infection should be applicable to these diseases as well. Of particular interest will be the advent of vaccines for the primary prevention of HPV infection. DATA GAPS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: At present, the best available means to diagnose gynecologic malignancies is a detailed clinical examination, considering the totality of information on potential and proven risk factors, such as age, reproductive health, sexual practices, use unopposed estrogens or of oral contraceptives or tubal ligation, obesity, diet, smoking, and the familial clustering of some of these cancers. PMID:15345077

  17. Gynecologic cancer treatment: risk factors for therapeutically induced neoplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Messerschmidt, G.L.; Hoover, R.; Young, R.C.

    1980-07-15

    Therapeutic intervention in a course of illness, while producing the desired result, also may have some adverse long-term effects on the patient. Second malignancies are one of the known complications of therapy. The treatments of gynecologic cancers by surgery, irradiation and chemotherapy have been associated with subsequent neoplasms. The use of normal skin from the thigh to fabricate an artificial vagina has resulted in more squamous cell carcinomas than expected. Alkylating agents used in the treatment of ovarian cancer and other diseases have been shown to lead to an increased risk of leukemia. The incidence of lymphoma and uterine, urinary bladder and colon carcinomas has been associated with prior irradiation for gynecologic disease. The literature regarding the therapeutically induced risk factors in gynecologic therapy is reviewed and areas of our knowledge that require more investigation are identified.

  18. The Lymphedema and Gynecologic Cancer (LEG) Study: Incidence, Risk Factors, and | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The proposed study, "Lymphedema and Gynecologic cancer (LEG): Incidence, Risk Factors and Impact", will innovatively utilize the cooperative group setting of the GOG (Gynecologic Oncology Group) to prospectively study 1300 women newly diagnosed with cervical, endometrial, or vulvar cancer to determine the incidence and impact of lower extremity lymphedema following surgical treatment of these diseases. |

  19. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data

    PubMed Central

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers. PMID:27606294

  20. Gynecological cancers: A summary of published Indian data.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Amita; Kumar, Neha; Mahantshetty, Umesh

    2016-01-01

    Gynecological cancers are among the most common cancers in women and hence an important public health issue. Due to the lack of cancer awareness, variable pathology, and dearth of proper screening facilities in developing countries such as India, most women report at advanced stages, adversely affecting the prognosis and clinical outcomes. Ovarian cancer has emerged as one of the most common malignancies affecting women in India and has shown an increase in the incidence rates over the years. Although cervical cancer is on a declining trend, it remains the second most common cancer in women after breast cancer. Many researchers in India have published important data in the field of gynecologic oncology, covering all domains such as basic sciences, preventive oncology, pathology, radiological imaging, and clinical outcomes. This work has given us an insight into the in-depth understanding of these cancers as well as the demographics and survival rates in the Indian population. This aim of this review is to discuss the important studies done in India for all gynecological cancers. PMID:27606294

  1. Contemporary Quality of Life Issues Affecting Gynecologic Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Jeanne; Penson, Richard; Barakat, Richard; Wenzel, Lari

    2015-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers account for approximately 11% of the newly diagnosed cancers in women in the United States and 18% in the world.1 The most common gynecologic malignancies occur in the uterus and endometrium (53%), ovary (25%), and cervix (14%).2 Cervical cancer is most prevalent in premenopausal women, during their childbearing years, whereas uterine and ovarian cancers tend to present in the perimenopausal or menopausal period. Vaginal and vulvar cancers and malignancies arising from gestation, or gestational trophoblastic neoplasms, occur to a lesser extent. Regardless of cancer origin or age of onset, the disease and its treatment can produce short- and long-term sequelae (ie, sexual dysfunction, infertility, or lymphedema) that adversely affect quality of life (QOL). This article outlines the primary contemporary issues or concerns that may affect QOL and offers strategies to offset or mitigate QOL disruption. These contemporary issues are identified within the domains of sexual functioning, reproductive issues, lymphedema, and the contribution of health-related QOL (HRQOL) in influential gynecologic cancer clinical trials. PMID:22244668

  2. Hormonal replacement therapy and gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M

    1999-01-01

    The problem of quality of life and lifestyle in elderly women is today a very important social problem all over the world but particularly in rich western countries. Life expectancy of the population will be longer and longer in the future and for both females and males the biological involution correlated with the aging process must be delayed. The gonadal hormones stimulate the healthy state of the entire body (heart, skin, brain, bones, urogenital apparatus and so on) and consequently hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) is mandatory. In women the biological clock of menopause allows us to intervene at the right time, with personalized estrogenic, estroprogestinic or estroandrogenic treatments. Health benefits and groundless risks allow today a careful hormonal management even in women treated for gynaecological cancers (breast and endometrium as well). PMID:10412612

  3. About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. |

  4. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 9 topics were selected as major advances in clinical research for gynecologic oncology: 2 each in cervical and corpus cancer, 4 in ovarian cancer, and 1 in breast cancer. For cervical cancer, several therapeutic agents showed viable antitumor clinical response in recurrent and metastatic disease: bevacizumab, cediranib, and immunotherapies including human papillomavirus (HPV)-tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and Z-100. The HPV test received FDA approval as the primary screening tool of cervical cancer in women aged 25 and older, based on the results of the ATHENA trial, which suggested that the HPV test was a more sensitive and efficient strategy for cervical cancer screening than methods based solely on cytology. For corpus cancers, results of a phase III Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 249 study of early-stage endometrial cancer with high-intermediate risk factors are followed by the controversial topic of uterine power morcellation in minimally invasive gynecologic surgery. Promising results of phase II studies regarding the effectiveness of olaparib in various ovarian cancer settings are summarized. After a brief review of results from a phase III study on pazopanib maintenance therapy in advanced ovarian cancer, 2 outstanding 2014 ASCO presentations cover the topic of using molecular subtypes in predicting response to bevacizumab. A review of the use of opportunistic bilateral salpingectomy as an ovarian cancer preventive strategy in the general population is presented. Two remarkable studies that discussed the effectiveness of adjuvant ovarian suppression in premenopausal early breast cancer have been selected as the last topics covered in this review. PMID:25872896

  5. Reducing Overtreatment in Gynecologic Oncology: The Case for Less in Endometrial and Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Temkin, Sarah M.; Tanner, Edward J.; Dewdney, Summer B.; Minasian, Lori M.

    2016-01-01

    A growing awareness of the harms of overtreatment in cancer care has reached physicians, patients, health policy makers, and medical researchers. Overtreatment exposes patients to the risk of adverse events from procedures or medications that were not necessary. This review examines common practices in gynecologic malignancies that are unlikely to produce direct benefit to patients with these malignancies, but are likely to produce harms. Specifically, we will explore the utility of lymphadenectomy and adjuvant radiation for women with early-stage endometrial cancer; and screening for recurrence and continuous chemotherapy for advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients. PMID:27242958

  6. Gynecologic cancer: Diagnosis and treatment strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Rutledge, F.N.; Freedman, R.S.; Gershenson, D.M.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 36 chapters divided into seven sections. The section headings are: Heath Memorial Award Lecture; Ovarian Cancer; Cervical and Vulvar Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Trophoblastic Disease; Diagnostic Procedures; and New Treatment Modalities.

  7. Hypertension and Subsequent Genitourinary and Gynecologic Cancers Risk

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Li-Min; Kuo, Huang-Tsung; Jeng, Long-Bin; Lin, Cheng-Li; Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although a relationship between hypertension and the development of renal cancer and other types of cancer have been proposed for decades, the results of epidemiologic studies remain inconclusive. This study was conducted to evaluate the association between hypertension and genitourinary and gynecologic cancers in Taiwan. In this study, we conducted a populated-based retrospective cohort study by using data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance program. The study period was from 2000 to 2011, and the cohort comprised 111,704 insurants: 57,961 patients with hypertension and 53,743 patients without hypertension. A Cox proportional hazard regression analysis was performed to estimate the effects of hypertension on genitourinary and gynecologic cancers risk. Among the patients with hypertension, the risks of developing renal and uterine corpus cancers were significantly higher in the hypertension group than they were in the nonhypertension group. Further stratified analyses by sex, age, and hypertension duration revealed distinct cancer-specific patterns. Higher cancer risk appears to be more obvious among younger hypertensive patients with longer follow-up time. The results of this study indicate that Taiwanese patients with hypertension have higher risks for some types of cancer, and cancer-specific patterns vary by sex, age, and hypertension duration. PMID:25906108

  8. [Comparison of robotic surgery documentary in gynecological cancer].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Robotic surgery is a surgical technique recently introduced, with major expansion and acceptance among the medical community is currently performed in over 1,000 hospitals around the world and in the management of gynecological cancer are being developed comprehensive programs for implementation. The objectives of this paper are to review the scientific literature on robotic surgery and its application in gynecological cancer to verify its safety, feasibility and efficacy when compared with laparoscopic surgery or surgery classical major surgical complications, infections are more common in traditional radical surgery compared with laparoscopic or robotic surgery and with these new techniques surgical and staying hospital are lesser than the former however, the disadvantages are the limited number of robot systems, their high cost and applies only in specialized centers that have with equipment and skilled surgeons. In conclusion robotic surgery represents a major scientific breakthrough and surgical management of gynecological cancer with better results to other types of conventional surgery and is likely in the coming years is become its worldwide. PMID:23336154

  9. Clinical practice recommendations for quality of life assessment in patients with gynecological cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gottwald, Leszek; Forycka, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a multidimensional concept regarding self-assessment of patients’ situation. Quality of life has not been clearly defined up to date, although it is clear that it is a subjective self-assessment that to a significant extent is determined by individual needs, beliefs, values, attitudes, which are changing with time. Health-related QoL comprises basic dimensions such as patients’ performance status, physical, emotional, and social functioning, symptoms of the disease and adverse effects of treatment, spiritual (God and existential) and other dimensions. In women, the ovary, cervical, corpus uterus, vagina and vulva cancers deteriorate QoL by disease progression and consequences of treatment, also in cancer survivors. Common symptoms include the genito-urinary system, the lower gastrointestinal tract and peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy. In young women, QoL is impaired by infertility, sexual problems and menopause symptoms. An overview of QoL questionnaires used in oncology with special regard to patients with gynecological tumors was conducted. A screening tool for psychological state assessment of oncology patients (distress thermometer), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and modular approach of QoL assessment recommended by the EORTC (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) were presented. Practical guidelines were proposed to assess appropriately QoL in patients with gynecological cancers who stay at in-patient gynecology units and those treated at home and in an ambulatory care setting. PMID:26848300

  10. Clinical practice recommendations for quality of life assessment in patients with gynecological cancer.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Wojciech; Gottwald, Leszek; Forycka, Maria

    2015-12-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a multidimensional concept regarding self-assessment of patients' situation. Quality of life has not been clearly defined up to date, although it is clear that it is a subjective self-assessment that to a significant extent is determined by individual needs, beliefs, values, attitudes, which are changing with time. Health-related QoL comprises basic dimensions such as patients' performance status, physical, emotional, and social functioning, symptoms of the disease and adverse effects of treatment, spiritual (God and existential) and other dimensions. In women, the ovary, cervical, corpus uterus, vagina and vulva cancers deteriorate QoL by disease progression and consequences of treatment, also in cancer survivors. Common symptoms include the genito-urinary system, the lower gastrointestinal tract and peripheral neuropathies induced by chemotherapy. In young women, QoL is impaired by infertility, sexual problems and menopause symptoms. An overview of QoL questionnaires used in oncology with special regard to patients with gynecological tumors was conducted. A screening tool for psychological state assessment of oncology patients (distress thermometer), the Edmonton Symptom Assessment System (ESAS) and modular approach of QoL assessment recommended by the EORTC (European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer) were presented. Practical guidelines were proposed to assess appropriately QoL in patients with gynecological cancers who stay at in-patient gynecology units and those treated at home and in an ambulatory care setting. PMID:26848300

  11. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012.

    PubMed

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae-Weon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  12. Major clinical research advances in gynecologic cancer in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Dong Hoon; Kim, Kidong; Kim, Hak Jae; Lee, Kyung-Hun

    2013-01-01

    Ten topics were chosen among major clinical research achievements in gynecologic oncology in 2012. For ovarian cancer, comprehensive review of the history of bevacizumab studies was followed by poly adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibitors and other molecular targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor and AMG 386. For the development of genomic study in gynecologic cancers, BRCA and DICER1 mutations were covered in epithelial and nonepithelial ovarian cancer, respectively. For endometrial cancer, targeted agents including mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors and bevacizumab were discussed. Radiation therapy "sandwiched" between combination chemotherapy schedules for the treatment of uterine papillary serous carcinoma was also reviewed. Preoperative prediction of lymph node metastasis, definition of low-risk group, and recurrence and survival outcomes of laparoscopic approaches were addressed. For cervical cancer, we reviewed long-term benefit of human papillomavirus test and efficacy of paclitaxel/carboplatin versus paclitaxel/cisplatin in stage IVB, persistent or recurrent disease. In addition, the effect of three dimensional image-based high-dose rate brachytherapy was also reviewed. For vulvar cancer, the diagnostic value of sentinel lymph node biopsy was discussed. For breast cancer, positive results of three outstanding phase III randomized clinical trials, CLEOPATRA, EMILIA, and BOLERO-2 were introduced. Lastly, updates of major practice guidelines were summarized. PMID:23346316

  13. Oncofertility for gynecologic and non-gynecologic cancers: fertility sparing in young women of reproductive age.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Polat; Doğan, N Utku; Ayhan, Ali

    2014-12-01

    About ten percent of all female cancer survivors is younger than 40 years of age. For these young women the primary goal is to ensure the highest possibility of cure and to maintain the reproductive functions as well. Oncofertility is a new concept including both oncology and reproductive medicine. By this recently defined concept young women will have maximal chance to make an optimal decision without any significant impact and delay in oncologic outcome. Oncofertility concept could be applied for genital cancer as well as non-genital cancer of reproductive age. Currently sperm and embryo banking are the standard methods used for young patients with cancer whose future fertility is under risk. In contrary oocyte banking, ovarian tissue cryopreservation are all controversial procedures and still accepted as experimental by many authors although American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) consideres oocyte cryopreservation "no longer experimental". For genital cancers procedures for oncofertility depends on the type of the cancer and the treatment of choice. In this review the current data and concepts regarding oncofertility concept including the gynecologic oncologic perspective is reviewed. PMID:25090914

  14. Genetics of Breast and Gynecologic Cancers (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the genetics of breast and gynecologic cancers, including information about specific genes and family cancer syndromes. The summary also contains information about interventions that may influence the risk of developing breast and gynecologic cancers in individuals who may be genetically susceptible to these diseases. Psychosocial issues associated with genetic testing are also discussed.

  15. Emotional and sexual concerns in women undergoing pelvic surgery and associated treatment for gynecologic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stabile, Cara; Gunn, Abigail; Sonoda, Yukio

    2015-01-01

    The surgical management of gynecologic cancer can cause short- and long-term effects on sexuality, emotional well being, reproductive function, and overall quality of life (QoL). Fortunately, innovative approaches developed over the past several decades have improved oncologic outcomes and reduced treatment sequelae; however, these side effects of treatment are still prevalent. In this article, we provide an overview of the various standard-of-care pelvic surgeries and multimodality cancer treatments (chemotherapy and radiation therapy) by anatomic site and highlight the potential emotional and sexual consequences that can influence cancer survivorship and QoL. Potential screening tools that can be used in clinical practice to identify some of these concerns and treatment side effects and possible solutions are also provided. These screening tools include brief assessments that can be used in the clinical care setting to assist in the identification of problematic issues throughout the continuum of care. This optimizes quality of care, and ultimately, QoL in these women. Prospective clinical trials with gynecologic oncology populations should include patient-reported outcomes to identify subgroups at risk for difficulties during and following treatment for early intervention. PMID:26816823

  16. Insights into preferences for psycho-oncology services among women with gynecologic cancer following distress screening.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Sylvie D; Kelly, Brian; Boyes, Allison; Cameron, Alexander; Adams, Catherine; Proietto, Anthony; Girgis, Afaf

    2014-06-01

    Much attention has been given to implementing routine screening programs in cancer care to improve the management of distress following diagnosis. Although patients might screen positive for distress, several studies have found that most then refuse additional psychosocial support. To inform the development of successful models of distress screening, this qualitative study explored preferences for psychosocial care among 18 women diagnosed with a gynecologic cancer who scored at least 4 on the Distress Thermometer (DT). Participants were recruited from a gynecologic oncology outpatient clinic in Newcastle, Australia, and interviewed. Unanimously, participants felt that completing the DT was an integral part of their cancer care. However, half then refused the referral to see a psychologist. These women typically reported that a referral was not needed, because their rating on the DT reflected transient stressors or physical distress. Many also spoke about their need to cope with the challenges they were facing on their own and the extensive social support they already had in place to help them overcome these challenges. In contrast, women who accepted referral to the psychologist often struggled to cope with several losses they felt had existential and long-term effects. Commonly, these women reported not having the social support they needed, managing several concurrent life stressors, and/or not having the repertoire of coping skills they required to "remain afloat." Findings from this study begin to bridge the gap between clinicians' and patients' expectations of how psychosocial services should be used in response to distress screening. PMID:24925200

  17. Genetic screening for gynecological cancer: where are we heading?

    PubMed

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Jacobs, Ian

    2016-01-01

    The landscape of cancer genetics in gynecological oncology is rapidly changing. The traditional family history-based approach has limitations and misses >50% mutation carriers. This is now being replaced by population-based approaches. The need for changing the clinical paradigm from family history-based to population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing in Ashkenazi Jews is supported by data that demonstrate population-based BRCA1/BRCA2 testing does not cause psychological harm and is cost effective. This article covers various genetic testing strategies for gynecological cancers, including population-based approaches, panel and direct-to-consumer testing as well as the need for innovative approaches to genetic counseling. Advances in genetic testing technology and computational analytics have facilitated an integrated systems medicine approach, providing increasing potential for population-based genetic testing, risk stratification, and cancer prevention. Genomic information along-with biological/computational tools will be used to deliver predictive, preventive, personalized and participatory (P4) and precision medicine in the future. PMID:26638726

  18. Phytochemicals: A Multitargeted Approach to Gynecologic Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Woong; Song, Yong Sang; Tsang, Benjamin K.

    2014-01-01

    Gynecologic cancers constitute the fourth most common cancer type in women. Treatment outcomes are dictated by a multitude of factors, including stage at diagnosis, tissue type, and overall health of the patient. Current therapeutic options include surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, although significant unmet medical needs remain in regard to side effects and long-term survival. The efficacy of chemotherapy is influenced by cellular events such as the overexpression of oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressors, which together determine apoptotic responses. Phytochemicals are a broad class of natural compounds derived from plants, a number of which exhibit useful bioactive effects toward these pathways. High-throughput screening methods, rational modification, and developments in regulatory policies will accelerate the development of novel therapeutics based on these compounds, which will likely improve overall survival and quality of life for patients. PMID:25093186

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Motoshima, Shigenobu; Irie, Hiroyuki; Nakazono, Takahiko; Kamura, Toshiharu; Kudo, Sho

    2011-12-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) reflects changes in proton mobility caused by pathological alterations of tissue cellularity, cellular membrane integrity, extracellular space perfusion, and fluid viscosity. Functional imaging is becoming increasingly important in the evaluation of cancer patients because of the limitations of morphologic imaging. DWI is being applied to the detection and characterization of tumors and the evaluation of treatment response in patients with cancer. The advantages of DWI include its cost-effectiveness and brevity of execution, its complete noninvasiveness, its lack of ionizing radiation, and the fact that it does not require injection of contrast material, thus enabling its use in patients with renal dysfunction. In this article, we describe the clinical application of DWI to gynecological disorders and its diagnostic efficacy therein. PMID:22247805

  20. Women with gynecologic malignancies have a greater incidence of suicide than women with other cancer types.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kristy K; Roncancio, Angelica M; Plaxe, Steven C

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973-2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with gynecologic malignancies. Most suicides occurred within 4 years of diagnosis. Better understanding of the descriptive epidemiology of suicide among women with gynecologic malignancies could lead to improved risk assessment, screening, and prevention of this potentially avoidable cause of death. PMID:23278597

  1. Women with Gynecologic Malignancies Have a Greater Incidence of Suicide than Women with Other Cancer Types

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Kristy K.; Roncancio, Angelica M.; Plaxe, Steven C.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate risk of suicide of women with invasive gynecologic malignancies, the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program (1973-2007) was queried. Suicide per 100,000 women with gynecologic malignancies was compared with that of women with other malignancies; suicide was 30% more likely in those with…

  2. No gynecologist in town: the gynecological care of women in rural Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Li-Jung; Chou, Chia-Lin; Su, H Irene; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chou, Li-Fang; Chou, Yueh-Ching; Hwang, Shinn-Jang; Yu, Hann-Chin

    2015-01-01

    Background A shortage of gynecologists exists in many countries. Even within an affluent country, gynecological clinics might not be evenly distributed. The purpose of the study was to investigate the disparity in gynecological care between adult women living in towns with and without gynecologists in Taiwan. Methods Data sources were the cohort datasets of the National Health Insurance Research Database, with claims data of 1 million beneficiaries in 2010. A woman’s residency was operationally inferred from the locations where she had most frequently visited physicians’ clinics or local community hospitals within the year. Results In Taiwan, 145 (39.4%) of 368 towns had no practicing gynecologist. Of 382,167 women with health care use in the datasets, 21,794 (5.7%) lived in towns without a gynecologist. The overwhelming majority of these towns lay in sparsely populated, rural areas. During the year, 132,702 women (34.7%) had sought medical help for gynecological diseases and 113,698 (29.8%) had visited gynecologists for gynecological diseases. Women in towns without a gynecologist were less likely to consult for gynecological diseases (23.8% versus 35.4%; P<0.001) and visit gynecologists (18.7% versus 30.4%; P<0.001) than women in towns with a gynecologist. The disparity existed in each age group. Among 5,189 adult women living in towns without a gynecologist and having gynecological diseases, 78.5% (number [n]=4,074) visited gynecologists out of town, especially for infertility, benign disorders of the uterus and ovaries, gynecological examinations, and contraceptive problems, and by contrast 23.3% (n=1,209) visited nongynecologists in town, most commonly for menopausal disorders, endometriosis and pelvic pain, menstrual disorders and hormonal dysfunction, and genital dysplasia. Conclusion Gynecological care of rural women was adversely affected by the shortage of gynecologists. The consequences of accessibility in underserved areas deserve further

  3. Factors Affecting Gynecologic and Sexual Assessment in Older Women: A Lesson for Primary Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Thomason, Ayasha; Capps, Natalie; Lefler, Leanne; Richard-Davis, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Guidelines for screening of cervical cancer and pelvic exams for older women have recently changed. These changes may have unexpected sequelae in women over 65 years of age. This manuscript provides a review of gynecologic screening recommendations for older women in the U.S. and potential ramifications of these recent changes. Peer reviewed guidelines from the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, U.S. Preventative Task Force Services, the American Cancer Society, The Centers for Disease Control, and multiple original research articles and reviews were reviewed for this manuscript. Women over 65 are at greatest risk to develop late stage diagnoses of cancers, pelvic organ disease, incontinence, and infections. Clinicians will need to acutely consider this fact when communicating and screening this population. We conclude that practitioners should be aware of the new guidelines and should consider including gynecologic health history and symptom analysis as part of annual exams in women of all ages.

  4. Strategies for the modification of risk factors in gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Benedet, J L; Cabero-Roura, L

    2002-01-01

    Strategies to modify risk for female or gynecological cancers will vary with our knowledge of the epidemiology, etiology, and specific molecular mechanisms for each individual cancer. In general, cancer preventive strategies have been divided into primary and secondary prevention with primary prevention directed toward the causative factors for a disease. Secondary prevention is classically used in cervical cancer cytology screening programs and is essentially an attempt to identify individuals in a population with preclinical phases of the disease where intervention will impact mortality the most. A vast literature has evolved regarding the epidemiology of most of the common cancers in women. While the specific molecular mechanisms are not completely understood at this time knowledge of contributing factors for many of these tumors is well known. The association of cigarette smoking with lung cancer has been well established and the increasing rates of lung cancer, particularly in women, are directly linked to the increasing number of female smokers in the population. Indeed in many western countries lung cancer deaths have overtaken breast cancer as the most common cause of death from malignant disease in women. Excessive sun exposure without adequate skin protection is another lifestyle activity that is related to the high incidence of skin cancer in certain areas. Epidemiologically, cervical cancer has been studied extensively with the current data indicating a causal role of exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV), particularly at an early age in this disease. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndromes are well understood and as more information on human genomics becomes available a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms of these diseases will be possible and hopefully will result in effective strategies for their control. Unfortunately, in spite of the vast knowledge that is available regarding risk factors for many of these

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... this country this year from cancers of the female reproductive system. To avoid these cancers, it's important to understand ... more deaths than any other cancer of the female reproductive system and is the leading cause of death from ...

  6. Active Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Grants | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  7. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Clinical Trials | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  8. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Staff | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Division of Cancer Prevention (DCP) conducts and supports research to determine a person's risk of cancer and to find ways to reduce the risk. This knowledge is critical to making progress against cancer because risk varies over the lifespan as genetic and epigenetic changes can transform healthy tissue into invasive cancer.

  9. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  10. Female Patient and Physician Communication and Discussion of Gynecological Health Care Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeless, Virginia Eman

    1987-01-01

    Indicates that a female patient's trust in, receptivity to, and communication apprehension regarding her physician constitute significant predictors of her (1) likelihood of discussing health care issues, (2) knowledge of gynecological health needs, and (3) feelings toward the gynecologist during examination. Finds that the physician's gender does…

  11. Escalation of Oncologic Services at the End of Life Among Patients With Gynecologic Cancer at an Urban, Public Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Eijean; Rogers, Anna; Ji, Lingyun; Sposto, Richard; Church, Terry; Roman, Lynda; Tripathy, Debu; Lin, Yvonne G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Use of oncology-related services is increasingly scrutinized, yet precisely which services are actually rendered to patients, particularly at the end of life, is unknown. This study characterizes the end-of-life use of medical services by patients with gynecologic cancer at a safety-net hospital. Methods: Oncologic history and metrics of medical use (eg, hospitalizations, chemotherapy infusions, procedures) for patients with gynecologic oncology who died between December 2006 and February 2012 were evaluated. Mixed-effect regression models were used to test time effects and construct usage summaries. Results: Among 116 subjects, cervical cancer accounted for the most deaths (42%). The median age at diagnosis was 55 years; 63% were Hispanic, and 65% had advanced disease. Only 34% died in hospice care. The median times from do not resuscitate/do not intubate documentation and from last therapeutic intervention to death were 9 days and 55 days, respectively. Significant time effects for all services (eg, hospitalizations, diagnostics, procedures, treatments, clinic appointments) were detected during the patient's final year (P < .001), with the most dramatic changes occurring during the last 2 months. Patients with longer duration of continuity of care used significantly fewer resources toward the end of life. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is the first report enumerating medical services obtained by patients with gynecologic cancer in a large, public hospital during the end of life. Marked changes in interventions in the patient's final 2 months highlight the need for cost-effective, evidence-based metrics for delivering cancer care. Our data emphasize continuity of care as a significant determinant of oncologic resource use during this critical period. PMID:25604595

  12. A Study to Evaluate the Cause of Bone Demineralization in Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Stavraka, Chara; Maclaran, Kate; Gabra, Hani; Agarwal, Roshan; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Taylor, Alexandra; Dhillo, Waljit S.; Panay, Nick

    2013-01-01

    Background. An association between treatment for gynecological cancers and risk of osteoporosis has never been formally evaluated. Women treated for these cancers are now living longer than ever before, and prevention of treatment-induced morbidities is important. We aimed to distinguish, in gynecological cancer survivors, whether cancer therapy has additional detrimental effects on bone health above those attributable to hormone withdrawal. Methods. We performed a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scan results from 105 women; 64 had undergone bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy (BSO) followed by chemotherapy or radiotherapy for gynecological malignancies, and 41 age-matched women had undergone BSO for benign etiologies. All were premenopausal prior to surgery. Results. The median age at DEXA scan for the cancer group was 42 years, and 66% had received hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) following their cancer treatment. For the benign group, the median age was 40 years, and 87% had received HRT. Thirty-nine percent of cancer survivors had abnormal DEXA scan results compared to 15% of the control group, with the majority demonstrating osteopenia. The mean lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral densities (BMDs) were significantly lower in cancer patients. A history of gynecological cancer treatment was associated with significantly lower BMD in a multivariate logistic regression. Conclusions. Women treated for gynecological malignancies with surgery and adjuvant chemotherapy have significantly lower BMDs than age-matched women who have undergone oophorectomy for noncancer indications. Prospective evaluation of BMD in gynecological cancer patients is recommended to facilitate interventions that will reduce the risk of subsequent fragility fractures. PMID:23363808

  13. Physical Sequelae and Depressive Symptoms in Gynecologic Cancer Survivors: Meaning in Life as a Mediator

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Laura E.; Fowler, Jeffrey; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2009-01-01

    Background Continuing symptoms and poor health following cancer treatments may alter meaning in life for cancer survivors. Gynecologic cancer survivors are particularly troubled with physical sequelae. In addition, for the most common sites of disease, such as breast and gynecologic cancers, the prevalence of depression is also high. Purpose This study tests meaning in life as a mechanism for the relationship between physical symptoms and depressive symptoms. Methods Gynecologic cancer survivors (N=260) participated. Measures of physical sequelae (nurse rated symptoms/signs, patient-reported gynecologic symptoms), meaning in life (harmony, life purpose, spirituality, and conversely, confusion and loss), and depressive symptoms were obtained at the time of a routine clinical follow-up visit 2–10 years following the completion of treatment. Latent variables were defined, and structural equation modeling tested a mediator model. Results Analyses support partial mediation. That is, survivors with more physical sequelae also reported lower levels of meaning in life, which was associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms. Conclusions Gynecologic cancer patients have been neglected in psychosocial research, and findings highlight the importance of existential issues in their lives. While many adjust well, those with persistent physical functioning deficits may experience depressive symptoms. By appreciating the role of meaning in their experience, we may help survivors foster their own growth and perspectives important for their future. PMID:18386113

  14. Coping and Communication-Enhancing Intervention versus Supportive Counseling for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Rosenblum, Norman; Bergman, Cynthia; Hernandez, Enrique; Carlson, John; Rocereto, Thomas; Winkel, Gary

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the efficacy of 2 psychological interventions, a coping and communication-enhancing intervention (CCI) and supportive counseling (SC), in reducing depressive symptoms and cancer-specific distress of women diagnosed with gynecological cancer. Demographic, medical, and psychological moderators of intervention effects were…

  15. Process of coping with intracavity radiation treatment for gynecologic cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Nail, L.M.D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the process of coping with the experience of receiving intracavity radiation treatment (ICR) for gynecologic cancer. Data were collected on the outcomes of coping, emotion (Profile of Mood States) and level of function (Sickness Impact Profile), and symptom severity and upset the evening before, during, the day after, and 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The subjects (N = 28) had a mean age of 52 years, 39% were employed full-time, 56% had occupations as manual workers, 57% had completed 12 or more years of education, and 68% were married or widowed. The treatment required the subjects to be hospitalized on complete bedrest with radiation precautions for an average of 48 hours. Intrauterine devices were used to treat 18 subjects and vaginal applications were used to treat 10 subjects. Negative mood and level of disruption in function were generally low. Repeated measures ANOVA showed no change in negative mood over time while the change in function was attributable to the increase in disruption during treatment. Utilization of affective coping strategies and problem-oriented coping strategies was positively correlated with negative mood and disruption in function over the points of measurement. The results indicate that subjects tolerated ICR well and rapidly resumed usual function following discharge from the hospital, despite the persistence of some symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after treatment. The positive association between the utilization of coping strategies and negative outcomes of coping suggests a need to examine the measurement of coping strategies and consider the possibility that these actions represent a response to a stressful situation rather than a method of dealing with the situation.

  16. Potential Impact of Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospitalists on Safety of Obstetric Care.

    PubMed

    Srinivas, Sindhu K

    2015-09-01

    Staffing models are critical aspects of care delivery. Provider staffing on the labor and delivery unit has recently received heightened attention. Based on the general medicine hospitalist model, the obstetrics and gynecology hospitalist or laborist model of obstetric care was introduced more than a decade ago as a plausible model-of-care delivery to improve provider satisfaction, with the goal of also improving safety and outcomes through continuous coverage by providers whose sole focus was on the labor and delivery unit without other competing clinical duties. It is plausible that this model of provider staffing and care delivery will increase safety. PMID:26333638

  17. The Emerging Role of PET/MR Imaging in Gynecologic Cancers.

    PubMed

    Ponisio, Maria Rosana; Fowler, Kathryn J; Dehdashti, Farrokh

    2016-10-01

    This article summarizes recent advances in PET/MR imaging in gynecologic cancers and the emerging clinical value of PET/MR imaging in the management of the 3 most common gynecologic malignancies: cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. PET/MR imaging offers superior soft tissue contrast, improved assessment of primary tumor involvement because of high-resolution multiplanar reformats, and functional MR techniques such as diffusion-weighted MR imaging and dynamic contrast-enhanced MR imaging. This article discusses the challenges, future directions, and technical advances of PET/MR imaging, and the emerging new multimodality, multiparametric imaging techniques for integrating morphologic, functional, and molecular imaging data. PMID:27593247

  18. Adherence of Primary Care Physicians to Evidence-Based Recommendations to Reduce Ovarian Cancer Mortality.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sherri L; Townsend, Julie S; Puckett, Mary C; Rim, Sun Hee

    2016-03-01

    Ovarian cancer is the deadliest gynecologic cancer. Receipt of treatment from a gynecologic oncologist is an evidence-based recommendation to reduce mortality from the disease. We examined knowledge and application of this evidence-based recommendation in primary care physicians as part of CDC gynecologic cancer awareness campaign efforts and discussed results in the context of CDC National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP). We analyzed primary care physician responses to questions about how often they refer patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer to gynecologic oncologists, and reasons for lack of referral. We also analyzed these physicians' knowledge of tests to help determine whether a gynecologic oncologist is needed for a planned surgery. The survey response rate was 52.2%. A total of 84% of primary care physicians (87% of family/general practitioners, 81% of internists and obstetrician/gynecologists) said they always referred patients to gynecologic oncologists for treatment. Common reasons for not always referring were patient preference or lack of gynecologic oncologists in the practice area. A total of 23% of primary care physicians had heard of the OVA1 test, which helps to determine whether gynecologic oncologist referral is needed. Although referral rates reported here are high, it is not clear whether ovarian cancer patients are actually seeing gynecologic oncologists for care. The NCCCP is undertaking several efforts to assist with this, including education of the recommendation among women and providers and assistance with treatment summaries and patient navigation toward appropriate treatment. Expansion of these efforts to all populations may help improve adherence to recommendations and reduce ovarian cancer mortality. PMID:26978124

  19. Pelvic irradiation does not increase the risk of hip replacement in patients with gynecological cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dybvik, Eva; Furnes, Ove; D. Fosså, Sophie; Trovik, Clement; Lie, Stein Atle

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose — Long-term survivors of cancer can develop adverse effects of the treatment. 60% of cancer patients survive for at least 5 years after diagnosis. Pelvic irradiation can cause bone damage in these long-term survivors, with increased risk of fracture and degeneration of the hip. Patients and methods — Analyses were based on linkage between the Cancer Registry of Norway (CRN) and the Norwegian Arthroplasty Register (NAR). All women who had been exposed to radiation for curative radiotherapy of gynecological cancer (40–60 Gy for at least 28 days) were identified in the CRN. Radiotherapy had been given between 1998 and 2006 and only patients who were irradiated within 6 months of diagnosis were included. The control group contained women with breast cancer who had also undergone radiotherapy, but not to the pelvic area. Fine and Gray competing-risk analysis was used to calculate subhazard-rate ratios (subHRRs) and cumulative incidence functions (CIFs) for the risk of having a prosthesis accounting for differences in mortality. Results — Of 962 eligible patients with gynecological cancer, 26 (3%) had received a total hip replacement. In the control group without exposure, 253 (3%) of 7,545 patients with breast cancer had undergone total hip replacement. The 8-year CIF for receiving a total hip replacement was 2.7% (95% CI: 2.6–2.8) for gynecological cancer patients and 3.0% (95% CI: 2.95–3.03) for breast cancer patients; subHRR was 0.80 (95% CI: 0.53–1.22; p = 0.3). In both groups, the most common reason for hip replacement was idiopathic osteoarthritis. Interpretation — We did not find any statistically significantly higher risk of undergoing total hip replacement in patients with gynecological cancer who had had pelvic radiotherapy than in women with breast cancer who had not had pelvic radiotherapy. PMID:25238432

  20. [Clinical study of recombinant interferon alpha-2 (Sch 30500) in advanced gynecological cancers].

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, T; Ohmi, K; Takeuchi, S; Takamizawa, H; Matsuzawa, M; Kawana, T; Ueda, K; Kubo, H; Tsumuji, Y; Kawashima, Y

    1985-08-01

    Recombinant interferon alpha-2 (Sch 30500) was administered to 29 patients with advanced gynecological cancers (14 patients with cancer of the cervix, 8 with ovarian cancer, 4 with uterine sarcoma, 2 with endometrial cancer and 1 with unclassified cancer). No antitumor effects (CR and PR) were noted in 23 evaluable patients. Side effects observed were fever, tachycardia, diarrhea, chills, general fatigue, anorexia, nausea and vomiting. In some patients, leukopenia, decrease of hemoglobin and elevation of SGOT and SGPT were observed. No production of antibody for Sch 30500 was noted. PMID:3896157

  1. Social Representations of Gynecologic Cancer Screening Assessment a Qualitative research on Ecuadorian women.

    PubMed

    Godoy, Yolanda; Godoy, Clara; Reyes, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this work was to explore: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding gynecologic cancer screening on Ecuadorian women users of primary care facilities, to identify the social representations that users of health services make about these programs and their influence on the decision to undergo a screening. An exploratory and qualitative research design was held using focus groups and in-depth interviews for data collection. A narrative content analysis of the results was conducted. Women's knowledge on gynecological cancer screening was confusing. Most frequent misconceptions related to the pap smear were: the belief that it could be useful for detecting pregnancy, ovarian cysts or infections. Most of the participants stated that the pap smear procedure is a traumatic and painful experience. Regarding to mammography women said it was used for sick woman and this procedure by itself may cause cancer. El propósito de esta investigación fue explorar los conocimientos, actitudes y creencias respecto a los programas de detección del cáncer ginecológico entre usuarias de centros de atención primaria de salud para identificar las representaciones sociales que las usuarias de los servicios de salud elaboran acerca de estos programas y de los diferentes procedimientos que comprenden. El diseño de la investigación fue exploratorio y cualitativo, mediante grupos focales y entrevistas a profundidad, con el respectivo análisis narrativo e interpretativo del contenido. Se encontró conocimiento confuso acerca de los programas de tamizaje de cáncer ginecológico y dificultades asociadas a la realización de los procedimientos. Los significados más frecuentes acerca de los programas fueron: el uso de la citología cérvico-vaginal para detectar embarazo, quistes ováricos o infecciones. La mayoría de los participantes asociaba este procedimiento con una experiencia dolorosa y traumática. Respecto al autoexamen de mamas, lo calificaron como un masaje

  2. A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States.

    PubMed

    Pinder, Leeya F; Nelson, Brett D; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

    2016-01-01

    African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population's high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population. PMID:27499654

  3. A Public Health Priority: Disparities in Gynecologic Cancer Research for African-Born Women in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Pinder, Leeya F.; Nelson, Brett D.; Eckardt, Melody; Goodman, Annekathryn

    2016-01-01

    African-born immigrants comprise one of the fastest growing populations in the U.S., nearly doubling its population size in recent years. However, it is also one of the most underrepresented groups in health-care research, especially research focused on gynecologic and breast malignancies. While the opportunity exists for access to an advanced health-care system, as immigrants migrate to the U.S., they encounter the same health-care inequalities that are faced by the native-born population based on ethnicity and social class, potentiated by limitations of health literacy and lack of familiarity with U.S. health systems. Given the continued influx of African-born immigrants in the U.S., we sought to understand the representation of this population in cervical and breast cancer research, recognizing the population’s high risk for these diseases at baseline while residing in their native countries. We determined that there is limited research in these diseases that disproportionately affect them; yet, there are identifiable and potentially modifiable factors that contribute to this paucity of evidence. This clinical commentary seeks to underscore the clear lack of research available involving African-born immigrants with respect to gynecologic and breast malignancies in the existing literature, demonstrate the need for more robust research in this population, and provide fundamental insights into barriers and solutions critical to the continued health of this growing population. PMID:27499654

  4. Physician pain and discomfort during minimally invasive gynecologic cancer surgery

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Megan E.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Munsell, Mark F.; Greer, Marilyn; Burke, William M.; Naumann, Wendell T.; Frumovitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objective Despite increasing awareness of physical strain to surgeons associated with minimally invasive surgery (MIS), its use continues to expand. We sought to gather information from gynecologic oncologists regarding physical discomfort due to MIS. Methods Anonymous surveys were e-mailed to 1,279 Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) members. Physical symptoms (numbness, pain, stiffness, and fatigue) and surgical and demographic factors were assessed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine risk factors for physical symptoms. Results We analyzed responses of 350 SGO members who completed the survey and currently performed >50% of procedures robotically (n=122), laparoscopically (n=67), or abdominally (n=61). Sixty-one percent of members reported physical symptoms related to MIS. The rate of symptoms was higher in the robotic group (72%) than the laparoscopic (57%) or abdominal group (49%) (p=0.0052). Stiffness (p=0.0373) and fatigue (p=0.0125) were more common in the robotic group. Female sex (p<0.0001), higher caseload, (p=0.0007) and academic practice (p=0.0186) were associated with increased symptoms. On multivariate analysis, robotic surgery (odds ratio [OR] 2.38, 95% CI 1.20-4.69) and female sex (OR 4.20, 95% CI 2.13-8.29) were significant predictors of symptoms. There was no correlation between seeking treatment and surgical modality (laparotomy 11%, robotic 20%, laparoscopy 25%, p= 0.12). Conclusions Gynecologic oncologists report physical symptoms due to MIS at an alarming rate. Robotic surgery and female sex appear to be risk factors for physical discomfort. As we strive to improve patient outcomes and decrease patient morbidity with MIS, we must also work to improve the ergonomics of MIS for surgeons. PMID:24887354

  5. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2015 for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Shinichi; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Okamoto, Aikou; Ito, Kiyoshi; Morishige, Kenichiro; Suzuki, Nao; Kaneuchi, Masanori; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The fourth edition of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of ovarian cancer including primary peritoneal cancer and fallopian tube cancer was published in 2015. The guidelines contain seven chapters and six flow charts. The major changes in this new edition are as follows-(1) the format has been changed from reviews to clinical questions (CQ), and the guidelines for optimal clinical practice in Japan are now shown as 41 CQs and answers; (2) the 'flow charts' have been improved and placed near the beginning of the guidelines; (3) the 'basic points', including tumor staging, histological classification, surgical procedures, chemotherapy, and palliative care, are described before the chapter; (4) the FIGO surgical staging of ovarian cancer, fallopian tube cancer, and primary peritoneal cancer was revised in 2014 and the guideline has been revised accordingly to take the updated version of this classification into account; (5) the procedures for examination and management of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer are described; (6) information on molecular targeting therapy has been added; (7) guidelines for the treatment of recurrent cancer based on tumor markers alone are described, as well as guidelines for providing hormone replacement therapy after treatment. PMID:27142770

  6. Improving Palliative Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Del Ferraro, Catherine; Ferrell, Betty; Van Zyl, Carin; Freeman, Bonnie; Klein, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Over a decade ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) presented Ensuring Quality Cancer Care in the United States, with recommendations for change (IOM, 1999). However, barriers to integrating palliative care (PC) to achieve high-quality care in cancer still remain. As novel therapeutic agents evolve, patients are living longer, and advanced cancer is now considered a chronic illness. In addition to complex symptom concerns, patients and family caregivers are burdened with psychological, social, and spiritual distress. Furthermore, data show that PC continues to be underutilized and inaccessible, and current innovative models of integrating PC into standard cancer care lack uniformity. The aim of this article is to address the existing barriers in implementing PC into our cancer care delivery system and discuss how the oncology advanced practice nurse plays an essential role in providing high-quality cancer care. We also review the IOM recommendations; highlight the work done by the National Consensus Project in promoting quality PC; and discuss a National Cancer Institute-funded program project currently conducted at a National Comprehensive Cancer Center, "Palliative Care for Quality of Life and Symptoms Concerns in Lung Cancer," which serves as a model to promote high-quality care for patients and their families. PMID:26114013

  7. Family planning, obstetrical and gynecological health care provision in the Soviet Far East.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, R J

    1992-01-01

    The Soviet model for both obstetrical and gynecological care and family planning provision seems entrenched in the Soviet Far East as found during a July 1991 visit to the Magadan and Chukotka Regions. Modern birth control is minimally practiced, but does include use of the older Soviet Loop intrauterine contraceptive device (IUD), recent introduction of the new Soviet Copper-T IUD and sporadic availability of condoms and foreign made birth control pills. Without male or female surgical sterilizations being performed, the consequence is that the major form of family planning is first trimester abortion. During this visit, I introduced the use of the NORPLANT Subdermal Contraceptive System and the Copper-T380A IUD to physicians at Anadry and Pevek regional hospitals. Gynecological surgery was also performed and fairly typical ob-gyn care units were toured. Ob-Gyn physicians in the Soviet Far East were found to be highly motivated. They look to the West for help in upgrading family planning and ob-gyn health care in the face of severe shortages after a half decade of perestroika. PMID:1605341

  8. Impact of Nutrition on Non-Coding RNA Epigenetics in Breast and Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krakowsky, Rosanna H. E.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in females. According to the American Cancer Society, there are 327,660 new cases in breast and gynecological cancers estimated in 2014, placing emphasis on the need for cancer prevention and new cancer treatment strategies. One important approach to cancer prevention involves phytochemicals, biologically active compounds derived from plants. A variety of studies on the impact of dietary compounds found in cruciferous vegetables, green tea, and spices like curry and black pepper have revealed epigenetic changes in female cancers. Thus, an important emerging topic comprises epigenetic changes due to the modulation of non-coding RNA levels. Since it has been shown that non-coding RNAs such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer, and furthermore are linked to distinct cancer phenotypes, understanding the effects of dietary compounds and supplements on the epigenetic modulator non-coding RNA is of great interest. This article reviews the current findings on nutrition-induced changes in breast and gynecological cancers at the non-coding RNA level. PMID:26075205

  9. CancerCare

    MedlinePlus

    ... social worker » Cancer Care ® E-News and E-Alerts Get news and updates from Cancer Care ® right ... Hope Video Library Blog E-News and E-Alerts Calendar Open Portals For Patients and Survivors For ...

  10. Your cancer survivorship care plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000822.htm Your cancer survivorship care plan To use the sharing features on this page, ... get one. What Is a Cancer Survivorship Care Plan? A cancer survivorship care plan is a document ...

  11. Personalized Circulating Tumor DNA Biomarkers Dynamically Predict Treatment Response and Survival In Gynecologic Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sanya; Sebra, Robert; Catalina Camacho, Sandra; Garnar-Wortzel, Leopold; Nair, Navya; Moshier, Erin; Wooten, Melissa; Uzilov, Andrew; Chen, Rong; Prasad-Hayes, Monica; Zakashansky, Konstantin; Beddoe, Ann Marie; Schadt, Eric; Dottino, Peter; Martignetti, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-grade serous ovarian and endometrial cancers are the most lethal female reproductive tract malignancies worldwide. In part, failure to treat these two aggressive cancers successfully centers on the fact that while the majority of patients are diagnosed based on current surveillance strategies as having a complete clinical response to their primary therapy, nearly half will develop disease recurrence within 18 months and the majority will die from disease recurrence within 5 years. Moreover, no currently used biomarkers or imaging studies can predict outcome following initial treatment. Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) represents a theoretically powerful biomarker for detecting otherwise occult disease. We therefore explored the use of personalized ctDNA markers as both a surveillance and prognostic biomarker in gynecologic cancers and compared this to current FDA-approved surveillance tools. Methods and Findings Tumor and serum samples were collected at time of surgery and then throughout treatment course for 44 patients with gynecologic cancers, representing 22 ovarian cancer cases, 17 uterine cancer cases, one peritoneal, three fallopian tube, and one patient with synchronous fallopian tube and uterine cancer. Patient/tumor-specific mutations were identified using whole-exome and targeted gene sequencing and ctDNA levels quantified using droplet digital PCR. CtDNA was detected in 93.8% of patients for whom probes were designed and levels were highly correlated with CA-125 serum and computed tomography (CT) scanning results. In six patients, ctDNA detected the presence of cancer even when CT scanning was negative and, on average, had a predictive lead time of seven months over CT imaging. Most notably, undetectable levels of ctDNA at six months following initial treatment was associated with markedly improved progression free and overall survival. Conclusions Detection of residual disease in gynecologic, and indeed all cancers, represents a diagnostic

  12. Altered Sexuality and Body Image after Gynecological Cancer Treatment: How Can Psychologists Help?

    PubMed Central

    Sacerdoti, Rebecca Caldwell; Lagana’, Luciana; Koopman, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    Once medical treatment for gynecological cancer is completed, what happens to patients’ sexuality and body image? Due to the delicate nature of the cancer site, treating this cancer typically affects sexual functioning and body image adversely, making it critical to identify the concerns of these patients and do so in a manner less restrictive than paper-and-pencil assessment. To gain a deeper understanding of the phenomenological experiences in question, we interviewed nine gynecological cancer patients and seven cancer-free women. After implementing a relaxation protocol, we asked each woman to describe her feelings and thoughts on her sexuality and body image in one-on-one interviews. A variety of themes emerged on patients' attitudes and perspectives concerning sexuality and body image following diagnosis and treatment of the cancer. The themes that were considerably different from those of the cancer-free women included decreased sexual functioning and body image, abrupt shifts in self-identity due to loss of physical integrity, and distancing in intimate relationships. Several implications of these findings for clinical practice are discussed, as well as the need to train medical professionals to properly assess these patients’ alterations in sexuality. PMID:21572538

  13. Photodynamic Therapy for Gynecological Diseases and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shishkova, Natashis; Kuznetsova, Olga; Berezov, Temirbolat

    2012-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a minimally invasive and promising new method in cancer treatment. Cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by the tissue-localized non-toxic sensitizer upon illumination and in the presence of oxygen. Thus, selective destruction of a targeted tumor may be achieved. Compared with traditional cancer treatment, PDI has advantages including higher selectivity and lower rate of toxicity. The high degree of selectivity of the proposed method was applied to cancer diagnosis using fluorescence. This article reviews previous studies done on PDT treatment and photodetection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, ovarian and breast cancer, and PDT application in treating non-cancer lesions. The article also highlights the clinical responses to PDT, and discusses the possibility of enhancing treatment efficacy by combination with immunotherapy and targeted therapy. PMID:23691448

  14. Treatment for Gynecologic Cancer: A Review of the Effects on Female Sexuality

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Barbara L.; Hacker, Neville F.

    2009-01-01

    Approximately 75,000 new cases of gynecologic cancer are diagnosed in the United States each year. Since few women can be treated by chemotherapy alone, most undergo extensive treatments that directly alter their sexuality either by causing specific anatomic changes or by generating concerns about continued responsiveness or activity. The major treatments for gynecologic malignancies including radiation therapy or radical hysterectomy for cervical carcinoma, radical vulvectomy for vulvar carcinoma, and pelvic exenteration for recurrent disease, are outlined. Research relating to their effects on female sexuality is critically reviewed. Also discussed are the relevant domains of treatment and patient characteristics that need assessment and investigation in this new and important research area. PMID:20631850

  15. Fertility drugs and the risk of breast and gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Brinton, Louise A; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V; Scoccia, Bert

    2012-04-01

    The evaluation of cancer risk among patients treated for infertility is complex, given the need to consider indications for use, treatment details, and the effects of other factors (including parity status) that independently affect cancer risk. Many studies have had methodologic limitations. Recent studies that have overcome some of these limitations have not confirmed a link between drug use and invasive ovarian cancers, although there is still a lingering question as to whether borderline tumors might be increased. It is unclear whether this merely reflects increased surveillance. Investigations regarding breast cancer risk have produced inconsistent results. In contrast, an increasing number of studies suggest that fertility drugs may have a special predisposition for the development of uterine cancers, of interest given that these tumors are recognized as particularly hormonally responsive. Additional studies are needed to clarify the effects on cancer risk of fertility drugs, especially those used in conjunction with in vitro fertilization. Because many women who have received such treatments are still relatively young, further monitoring should be pursued in large well-designed studies that enable assessment of effects within a variety of subgroups defined by both patient and disease characteristics. PMID:22549713

  16. Practice Patterns of Radiotherapy in Cervical Cancer Among Member Groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    SciTech Connect

    Gaffney, David K. . E-mail: david.gaffney@hci.utah.edu; Du Bois, Andreas; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nick; Toita, Takafumi; Pignata, Sandro; Blake, Peter; Portelance, Lorraine; Sadoyze, Azmat; Poetter, Richard; Colombo, Alessandro; Randall, Marcus; Mirza, Mansoor R.; Trimble, Edward L.

    2007-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to describe radiotherapeutic practice of the treatment of cervical cancer in member groups of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Methods and Materials: A survey was developed and distributed to the members of the GCIG focusing on details of radiotherapy practice. Different scenarios were queried including advanced cervical cancer, postoperative patients, and para-aortic-positive lymph node cases. Items focused on indications for radiation therapy, radiation fields, dose, use of chemotherapy, brachytherapy and others. The cooperative groups from North America were compared with the other groups to evaluate potential differences in radiotherapy doses. Results: A total of 39 surveys were returned from 13 different cooperative groups. For the treatment of advanced cervical cancer, external beam pelvic doses and total doses to point A were 47 + 3.5 Gy (mean + SD) and 79.1 + 7.9 Gy, respectively. Point A doses were not different between the North American cooperative groups compared with the others (p = 0.103). All groups used concomitant chemotherapy, with 30 of 36 respondents using weekly cisplatin. Of 33 respondents, 31 intervened for a low hemoglobin level. For a para-aortic field, the upper border was most commonly (15 of 24) at the T12-L1 interspace. Maintenance chemotherapy (after radiotherapy) was not performed by 68% of respondents. For vaginal brachytherapy after hysterectomy, 23 groups performed HDR brachytherapy and four groups used LDR brachytherapy. In the use of brachytherapy, there was no uniformity in dose prescription. Conclusions: Radiotherapy practices among member groups of the GCIG are similar in terms of both doses and use of chemotherapy.

  17. Antibodies to the neutral glycolipid asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide: association with gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Witkin, S S; Bongiovanni, A M; Birnbaum, S; Caputo, T; Ledger, W J

    1985-03-01

    As part of our efforts to define subpopulations at increased risk for gynecologic malignancies, sera from 145 women were obtained prior to diagnosis and analyzed for antibody to asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide. This neutral glycolipid is present on the surface of thymocytes and natural killer cells, and asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibody has been shown in animals to block natural killer cell activity and promote tumor cell proliferation. With the use of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with a value of 2 SD above the mean for healthy women designated as the boundary for a positive response, antibody to asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide was detected in only one of 30 (3%) healthy women, none of 16 pregnant women, none of 18 women with benign masses, and two of 24 (8%) women with microbial infections. All of the above samples that contained antibodies were barely over the 2 SD limit. In marked contrast, 19 of 35 (54%) women with gynecologic malignancies had asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibodies, with positive values ranging to greater than 10 SD above the control mean. Asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibody was found in six of eight (75%) patients with cervical cancer, five of eight (63%) with endometrial cancer, and seven of 15 (47%) with ovarian cancer. Of the eight patients with Stage I gynecologic cancer at any site, five (62%) had asialo ganglio-N-tetraosylceramide antibodies. Four of 22 (18%) women with Hodgkin's disease also had antibodies, with values just exceeding 2 SD above control levels. The presence of these antibodies may contribute to an impaired immune surveillance system in these women and so increase their susceptibility to malignancy. PMID:3976767

  18. Survey on gynecological cancer treatment by Piedmont, Liguria, and Valle d'Aosta group of AIRO (Italian Association of Radiation Oncology)

    PubMed Central

    Cattari, Gabriella; Delmastro, Elena; Bresciani, Sara; Gribaudo, Sergio; Melano, Antonella; Giannelli, Flavio; Tessa, Maria; Chiarlone, Renato; Scolaro, Tindaro; Krengli, Marco; Urgesi, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We focused the attention on radiation therapy practices about the gynecological malignancies in Piedmont, Liguria, and Valle d'Aosta to know the current treatment practice and to improve the quality of care. Material and methods We proposed a cognitive survey to evaluate the standard practice patterns for gynecological cancer management, adopted from 2012 to 2014 by radiotherapy (RT) centers with a large amount of gynecological cancer cases. There were three topics: 1. Taking care and multidisciplinary approach, 2. Radiotherapy treatment and brachytherapy, 3. Follow-up. Results Nineteen centers treated gynecological malignancies and 12 of these had a multidisciplinary dedicated team. Radiotherapy option has been used in all clinical setting: definitive, adjuvant, and palliative. In general, 1978 patients were treated. There were 834 brachytherapy (BRT) treatments. The fusion between diagnostic imaging (magnetic resonance imaging – MRI, positron emission tomography – PET) and computed tomography (CT) simulation was used for contouring in all centers. Conformal RT and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) were the most frequent techniques. The image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) was used in 10/19 centers. There were 8 active BRT centers. Brachytherapy was performed both with radical intent and as boost, mostly by HDR (6/8 centers). The doses for exclusive BRT were between 20 to 30 Gy. The doses for BRT boost were between 10 and 20 Gy. Four centers used CT-MRI compatible applicators but only one used MRI for planning. The BRT plans on vaginal cuff were still performed on traditional radiographies in 2 centers. The plan sum was evaluated in only 1 center. Only 1 center performed in vivo dosimetry. Conclusions In the last three years, multidisciplinary approach, contouring, treatment techniques, doses, and control systems were similar in Liguria-Piedmont and Valle d'Aosta. However, the technology implementation didn't translate in a real treatment

  19. Smoking, earlier menarche and low parity as independent risk factors for gynecologic cancers in Japanese: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Megumi; Tase, Toru; Kakugawa, Yoichiro; Hoshi, Shigeko; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Nagase, Satoru; Ito, Kiyoshi; Niikura, Hitoshi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Minami, Yuko

    2008-12-01

    During recent decades, the incidence of gynecologic cancers, i.e., cancers of the cervix, endometrium and ovary, has increased in Japan. However, risk factors of gynecologic cancers have not been fully clarified in Japan. To investigate common and site-specific risk factors among gynecologic cancers, we conducted a hospital-based case-control study. The cases, i.e., 151 cervical, 103 endometrial and 141 ovarian cancer cases and the controls (n = 2016) were selected from female patients aged 30 and over, who were admitted to a single hospital in Miyagi Prefecture from 1997 to 2003. Information on reproductive factors, exogenous hormone use, and lifestyles including smoking was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Smoking was significantly associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. A dose-response relationship with the number of cigarettes per day was also observed (p for trend = 0.004). Older age at menarche was associated with a decreased risk of endometrial and ovarian cancers. For these cancers, the decreased risk was detected with increasing parity number (endometrium, p for trend = 0.0001; ovary, p = 0.0002). There was no significant association between exogenous hormone use and gynecologic cancer risk. The results indicate that smoking is a major risk factor of cervical cancer. In addition, hormonal factors, which are related to early onset of menarche and low parity, are common risk factors for endometrial and ovarian cancers. The increase in female smokers and the decrease in fertility rate may contribute to the increase in gynecologic cancer incidence in Japan. PMID:19060444

  20. Drug Repositioning for Gynecologic Tumors: A New Therapeutic Strategy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Banno, Kouji; Yanokura, Megumi; Irie, Haruko; Masuda, Kenta; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2015-01-01

    The goals of drug repositioning are to find a new pharmacological effect of a drug for which human safety and pharmacokinetics are established and to expand the therapeutic range of the drug to another disease. Such drug discovery can be performed at low cost and in the short term based on the results of previous clinical trials. New drugs for gynecologic tumors may be found by drug repositioning. For example, PPAR ligands may be effective against ovarian cancer, since PPAR activation eliminates COX-2 expression, arrests the cell cycle, and induces apoptosis. Metformin, an antidiabetic drug, is effective for endometrial cancer through inhibition of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway by activating LKB1-AMPK and reduction of insulin and insulin-like growth factor-1 due to AMPK activation. COX-2 inhibitors for cervical cancer may also be examples of drug repositioning. PGE2 is induced in the arachidonate cascade by COX-2. PGE2 maintains high expression of COX-2 and induces angiogenic factors including VEGF and bFGF, causing carcinogenesis. COX-2 inhibitors suppress these actions and inhibit carcinogenesis. Combination therapy using drugs found by drug repositioning and current anticancer drugs may increase efficacy and reduce adverse drug reactions. Thus, drug repositioning may become a key approach for gynecologic cancer in drug discovery. PMID:25734181

  1. Development of the M. D. Anderson Cancer Center Gynecologic Applicators for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer: Historical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Yordy, John S.; Almond, Peter R.; Delclos, Luis

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To provide historical background on the development and initial studies of the gynecological (gyn) applicators developed by Dr. Gilbert H. Fletcher, a radiation oncologist and chairperson from 1948 to 1981 of the department at the M.D. Anderson Hospital (MDAH) for Cancer Research in Houston, TX, and to acknowledge the previously unrecognized contribution that Dr. Leonard G. Grimmett, a radiation physicist and chairperson from 1949 to 1951 of the physics department at MDAH, made to the development of the gynecological applicators. Methods and Materials: We reviewed archival materials from the Historical Resource Center and from the Department of Radiation Physics at University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, as well as contemporary published papers, to trace the history of the applicators. Conclusions: Dr. Fletcher's work was influenced by the work on gynecologic applicators in the 1940s in Europe, especially work done at the Royal Cancer Hospital in London. Those efforts influenced not only Dr. Fletcher's approach to the design of the applicators but also the methods used to perform in vivo measurements and determine the dose distribution. Much of the initial development of the dosimetry techniques and measurements at MDAH were carried out by Dr. Grimmett.

  2. Metformin use and gynecological cancers: A novel treatment option emerging from drug repositioning.

    PubMed

    Gadducci, Angiolo; Biglia, Nicoletta; Tana, Roberta; Cosio, Stefania; Gallo, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Metformin exerts antitumor effects mainly through AMP-activated protein kinase [AMPK] activation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3K]-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibition. This drug leads to activation of the cellular energy-sensing liver kinase B1 [LKB1]/AMPK pathway. LKB1 is implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in molecular pathogenesis of different malignancies. AMPK is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as an ultra-sensitive cellular energy sensor maintaining the energy balance within the cell. AMPK activation inhibits mRNA translation and proliferation in cancer cells via down-regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, metformin decreases the production of insulin, insulin-like growth factor, inflammatory cytokines and vascular endothelial growth factor, and therefore it exerts anti-mitotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenetic effects. Recent in vitro and experimental data suggest that metformin electively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth in different cancers. Several epidemiological studies and meta-analysis have shown that metformin use is associated with decreased cancer risk and/or reduced cancer mortality for different malignancies. The present review analyzes the recent biological and clinical data suggesting a possible growth-static effect of metformin also in gynecological cancers. The large majority of available clinical data on the anti-cancer potential of metformin are based on observational studies. Therefore long-term phase II-III clinical trials are strongly warranted to further investigate metformin activity in gynecological cancers. PMID:27378194

  3. Pain and Mean Absorbed Dose to the Pubic Bone After Radiotherapy Among Gynecological Cancer Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Al-Abany, Massoud; Palm, Asa; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: To analyze the relationship between mean absorbed dose to the pubic bone after pelvic radiotherapy for gynecological cancer and occurrence of pubic bone pain among long-term survivors. Methods and Materials: In an unselected, population-based study, we identified 823 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic radiotherapy during 1991-2003. For comparison, we used a non-radiation-treated control population of 478 matched women from the Swedish Population Register. Pain, intensity of pain, and functional impairment due to pain in the pubic bone were assessed with a study-specific postal questionnaire. Results: We analyzed data from 650 survivors (participation rate 79%) with median follow-up of 6.3 years (range, 2.3-15.0 years) along with 344 control women (participation rate, 72 %). Ten percent of the survivors were treated with radiotherapy; ninety percent with surgery plus radiotherapy. Brachytherapy was added in 81%. Complete treatment records were recovered for 538/650 survivors, with dose distribution data including dose-volume histograms over the pubic bone. Pubic bone pain was reported by 73 survivors (11%); 59/517 (11%) had been exposed to mean absorbed external beam doses <52.5 Gy to the pubic bone and 5/12 (42%) to mean absorbed external beam doses {>=}52.5 Gy. Thirty-three survivors reported pain affecting sleep, a 13-fold increased prevalence compared with control women. Forty-nine survivors reported functional impairment measured as pain walking indoors, a 10-fold increased prevalence. Conclusions: Mean absorbed external beam dose above 52.5 Gy to the pubic bone increases the occurrence of pain in the pubic bone and may affect daily life of long-term survivors treated with radiotherapy for gynecological cancer.

  4. Clinical guidelines for gynecologic care after hematopoietic SCT. Report from the international consensus project on clinical practice in chronic GVHD.

    PubMed

    Frey Tirri, B; Häusermann, P; Bertz, H; Greinix, H; Lawitschka, A; Schwarze, C-P; Wolff, D; Halter, J P; Dörfler, D; Moffat, R

    2015-01-01

    Despite similarities relevant age- and gender-specific issues exist in the care of patients after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HSCT). Female genital chronic GVHD (cGVHD) has been markedly underreported in the past but has a significant impact on the patients' health and quality of life. Data on prevention and treatment of this complication are still limited. Here we present a comprehensive review summarizing the current knowledge, which was discussed during several meetings of the German, Austrian and Swiss Consensus Project on clinical practice in cGVHD. In this report, we provide recommendations for post-transplant gynecological care of cGVHD manifestations agreed upon by all participants. This includes guidelines for diagnosis, prevention, and therapeutic options and topical treatments in female patients with genital cGVHD and hormonal replacement treatment of premature ovarian failure for adult and pediatric patients and underlines the necessity for regular gynecological care and screening programs for women after HSCT. PMID:25347009

  5. Gynecologic Cancer Information on YouTube: Will Women Watch Advertisements to Learn More?

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Chu, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The quality and accuracy of health content posted on YouTube varies widely. To increase dissemination of evidence-based gynecologic cancer information to US YouTube users, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sponsored two types of advertisements: (1) pre-roll videos that users had to watch for at least 5 s before seeing a video they selected and (2) keyword-targeted listings that appeared in search results when users entered terms related to gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to November 2013, pre-roll videos were shown 9.2 million times, viewed (watched longer than the mandatory 5 s) 1.6 million times (17.6%), and cost $0.09 per view. Keyword-targeted listings were displayed 15.3 million times, viewed (activated by users) 59,766 times (0.4%), and cost $0.31 per view. CDC videos in advertisements played completely in 17.0% of pre-roll video views and 44.4% of keyword-targeted listing views. Advertisements on YouTube can disseminate evidence-based cancer information broadly with minimal cost. PMID:25877466

  6. Gynecologic Cancer Information on YouTube: Will Women Watch Advertisements to Learn More?

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer

    2016-09-01

    The quality and accuracy of health content posted on YouTube varies widely. To increase dissemination of evidence-based gynecologic cancer information to US YouTube users, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) sponsored two types of advertisements: (1) pre-roll videos that users had to watch for at least 5 s before seeing a video they selected and (2) keyword-targeted listings that appeared in search results when users entered terms related to gynecologic cancer. From July 2012 to November 2013, pre-roll videos were shown 9.2 million times, viewed (watched longer than the mandatory 5 s) 1.6 million times (17.6 %), and cost $0.09 per view. Keyword-targeted listings were displayed 15.3 million times, viewed (activated by users) 59,766 times (0.4 %), and cost $0.31 per view. CDC videos in advertisements played completely in 17.0 % of pre-roll video views and 44.4 % of keyword-targeted listing views. Advertisements on YouTube can disseminate evidence-based cancer information broadly with minimal cost. PMID:25877466

  7. OncoLink: a cancer information resource for gynecologic oncologists and the public on the Internet.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, I; Goldwein, J W; Rubin, S C; McKenna, W G

    1996-01-01

    The Internet is a computer network accessible to over 30 million computers users worldwide. By default, it has become the "information superhighway" that is growing at an explosive rate of between 1 and 2 million new users per month. Internet contains thousands of information of interest to cancer patients and healthcare professionals. Identifying the outstanding "golden" resources from the chaos is difficult. To address this problem and to provide information specific to gynecologic oncology, we developed a cancer information server called "OncoLink" at our institution that is available at no cost 24 hr per day, 7 days per week to all Internet users. OncoLink has two major goals: (1) To provide quality, original content for cancer patients and healthcare professionals and (2) to provide well-organized, consistent access to existing Internet cancer resources. This service may be used by anyone with a Microsoft Windows, Apple Macintosh, or UNIX computer. The service is rich in multimedia content containing text, pictures, illustrations, sound, and video. The information includes (1) original content written by authors at our institution, (2) original content submitted by authors from other institutions and, (3) publicly available information from other resources. Patient-oriented articles, physician-oriented review articles, and NIH, NCI, and FDA documents are available. All content is reviewed by an Editorial Board prior to posting. We have kept a detailed log file of each time the system has been accessed by an Internet user. OncoLink went online in March 1994. During the first 18 months (542 days) of operation, the service received 4,051,901 request for information from 105,589 unique Internet addresses worldwide. There is tremendous public and professional demand for online cancer information via the Internet. We feel that the Internet is an outstanding vehicle for providing quality cancer information for gynecologic oncologist other healthcare professionals

  8. Improving Care for Depression in Obstetrics and Gynecology: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Melville, Jennifer L.; Reed, Susan D.; Russo, Joan; Croicu, Carmen A.; Ludman, Evette; LaRocco-Cockburn, Anna; Katon, Wayne

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate an evidence-based collaborative depression care intervention adapted to obstetrics and gynecology clinics compared with usual care. METHODS Two-site randomized controlled trial included screen-positive women (Patient Health Questionnaire-9 of at least 10) who then met criteria for major depression, dysthymia or both (Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview). Women were randomized to 12-months of collaborative depression management or usual care; 6, 12 and 18-month outcomes were compared. The primary outcomes were change from baseline to 12-months on depression symptoms and functional status. Secondary outcomes included at least 50% decrease and remission in depressive symptoms, global improvement, treatment satisfaction, and quality of care. RESULTS Participants were on average 39 years old, 44% were non-white and 56% had posttraumatic stress disorder. Intervention (n= 102) compared to usual care (n=103) patients had greater improvement in depressive symptoms at 12 months (P< .001) and 18 months (P=.004). The intervention group compared with usual care had improved functioning over 18 months (P< .05), were more likely to have an at least 50% decrease in depressive symptoms at 12 months (relative risk [RR]=1.74, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.11–2.73), greater likelihood of at least 4 specialty mental health visits (6 month RR=2.70, 95% CI1.73–4.20; 12 month RR=2.53, 95% CI 1.63–3.94), adequate dose of antidepressant (6-month RR=1.64, 95% CI 1.03–2.60; 12-month RR=1.71, 95%CI 1.08 2.73), and greater satisfaction with care (6-month RR=1.70, 95% CI 1.19–2.44; 12-month RR=2.26, 95% CI 1.52–3.36). CONCLUSION Collaborative depression care adapted to women’s health settings improved depressive and functional outcomes and quality of depression care. PMID:24807320

  9. First year participation in the affordable care act: costs and accessibility to gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Pavlik, Edward J; Ore, Robert; Toyama, Aimi; Woolum, Dylan; Pavlik, Thomas E; Baldwin, Lauren

    2015-11-01

    With the ending of the operational first year of the American Affordable Care Act, health insurance premiums were accessed online. For a US$50,000 income, the lowest premiums ranged from US$805 annually (age 20 years) to US$3802 (age 64 years), while the highest ranged from US$2186 (age 20 years) to US$10,326 (age 64 years). The lowest premiums at age 50 years were higher in rural areas in contrast to the highest premiums that were less expensive rurally. At age 64 years, the lowest premiums were 9-12.6% of a US$50,000 income, while the most expensive varied between 16.5 and 39%. Access to gynecologic oncologists was variable in different networks. Medicaid enrollment nationally was ∼6× higher than paid enrollment. Eligible participation in Affordable Care Act coverage exceeded expectations by >190%. Performance of four healthcare exchange traded funds indicated that investor confidence is high in the American healthcare sector. PMID:26387757

  10. A call for new standard of care in perioperative gynecologic oncology practice: Impact of enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs.

    PubMed

    Miralpeix, Ester; Nick, Alpa M; Meyer, Larissa A; Cata, Juan; Lasala, Javier; Mena, Gabriel E; Gottumukkala, Vijaya; Iniesta-Donate, Maria; Salvo, Gloria; Ramirez, Pedro T

    2016-05-01

    Enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) programs aim to hasten functional recovery and improve postoperative outcomes. However, there is a paucity of data on ERAS programs in gynecologic surgery. We reviewed the published literature on ERAS programs in colorectal surgery, general gynecologic surgery, and gynecologic oncology surgery to evaluate the impact of such programs on outcomes, and to identify key elements in establishing a successful ERAS program. ERAS programs are associated with shorter length of hospital stay, a reduction in overall health care costs, and improvements in patient satisfaction. We suggest an ERAS program for gynecologic oncology practice involving preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative strategies including; preadmission counseling, avoidance of preoperative bowel preparation, use of opioid-sparing multimodal perioperative analgesia (including loco-regional analgesia), intraoperative goal-directed fluid therapy (GDT), and use of minimally invasive surgical techniques with avoidance of routine use of nasogastric tube, drains and/or catheters. Postoperatively, it is important to encourage early feeding, early mobilization, timely removal of tubes and drains, if present, and function oriented multimodal analgesia regimens. Successful implementation of an ERAS program requires a multidisciplinary team effort and active participation of the patient in their goal-oriented functional recovery program. However, future outcome studies should evaluate the efficacy of an intervention within the pathway, include objective measures of symptom burden and control, study measures of functional recovery, and quantify outcomes of the program in relation to the rates of adherence to the key elements of care in gynecologic oncology such as oncologic outcomes and return to intended oncologic therapy (RIOT). PMID:26906066

  11. Mental health screening among newly arrived refugees seeking routine obstetric and gynecologic care.

    PubMed

    Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista E; Allen, Jennifer; Nizigiyimana, Jeanne F; Ramirez, Glenda; Hollifield, Michael

    2014-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression are common mental health disorders in the refugee population. High rates of violence, trauma, and PTSD among refugee women remain unaddressed. The process of implementing a mental health screening tool among multiethnic, newly arrived refugee women receiving routine obstetric and gynecologic care in a dedicated refugee women's health clinic is described. The Refugee Health Screener-15 (RHS-15) is a culturally responsive, efficient, validated screening instrument that detects symptoms of emotional distress across diverse refugee populations and languages. An interdisciplinary community partnership was established with a local behavioral health services agency to facilitate the referral of women scoring positive on the RHS-15. Staff and provider training sessions, as well as the incorporation of bicultural, multilingual cultural health navigators, greatly facilitated linguistically appropriate care coordination for refugee women in a culturally sensitive manner. Twenty-six (23.2%) of the 112 women who completed the RHS-15 scored positive, of which 14 (53.8%) were Iraqi, 1 (3.8%) was Burmese, and 3 (11.5%) were Somali. Among these 26 women, 8 (30.8%) are actively receiving mental health services and 5 (19.2%) have appointments scheduled. However, 13 (50%) are not enrolled in mental health care because of either declining services (46.2%) or a lack of insurance (53.8%). Screening for mental disorders among refugee women will promote greater awareness and identify those individuals who would benefit from further mental health evaluation and treatment. Sustainable interdisciplinary models of care are necessary to promote health education, dispel myths, and reduce the stigma of mental health. PMID:25383999

  12. Mental Health Screening Among Newly-Arrived Refugees Seeking Routine Obstetric and Gynecologic Care

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Agbakwu, Crista E.; Allen, Jennifer; Nizigiyimana, Jeanne F.; Ramirez, Glenda; Hollifield, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety, and depression are the most common mental health disorders in the refugee population. High rates of violence, trauma, and PTSD among refugee women remain unaddressed. The process of implementing a mental health screening tool among multi-ethnic, newly-arrived refugee women receiving routine obstetric and gynecologic care in a dedicated refugee women’s health clinic is described. The Refugee Health Screener-15 (RHS-15) is a culturally-responsive, efficient, validated screening instrument that detects symptoms of emotional distress across diverse refugee populations and languages. An interdisciplinary community partnership was established with a local behavioral health services agency to facilitate the referral of women scoring positive on the RHS-15. Staff and provider training sessions, as well as the incorporation of bi-cultural, multi-lingual Cultural Health Navigators, greatly facilitated linguistically-appropriate care coordination for refugee women in a culturally sensitive manner. Twenty-six (23.2%) of the 112 women who completed the RHS-15 scored positive; of which 14 (53.8%) were Iraqi, one (3.8%) was Burmese, and three (11.5%) were Somali. Among these 26 women, eight (30.8%) are actively receiving mental health services, and five (19.2%) have appointments scheduled. However 13 (50%) are not enrolled in mental health care due to either declining services (46.2%), or a lack of insurance (53.8%). Screening for mental disorders among refugee women will promote greater awareness and identify those individuals who would benefit from further mental health evaluation and treatment. Sustainable interdisciplinary models of care are necessary to promote health education, dispel myths and reduce the stigma of mental health. PMID:25383999

  13. Pelvic exenterations for gynecological malignancies: twenty-year experience at Roswell Park Cancer Institute.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S; Odunsi, K; Driscoll, D; Lele, S

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review the experience with pelvic exenterations for gynecological malignancies at our cancer institute. Charts of 48 women who underwent a pelvic exenteration between January 1980 and December 1999 were reviewed, and several outcomes were analyzed. Majority of patients had received prior radiation therapy. The median survival was 35 months, and the disease-free survival was 32 months. Mortality from the procedure was 4.2%. Early and late postoperative complication rates were 27% and 75%, respectively. Recurrence rate was 60%. Eight patients received intraoperative radiation. Median survival in this group was 11.3 vs 35 months (P = 0.003). Univariate analysis failed to show an association between type of pelvic exenteration, type of fecal and urinary diversion, outcome, need for reoperation, and recurrence. Contemporary pelvic exenterations are associated with a low mortality and a potential for long-term survival in a subset of patients who historically have been given a poor prognosis. In patients with recurrent gynecological cancer confined centrally to the pelvis, pelvic exenteration still remains the choice of therapy as response to chemotherapy to a centrally recurrent tumor in radiated area continues to be poor. Intraoperative radiation in select few patients needs to be further studied. PMID:15882172

  14. Etiologic Heterogeneity in Endometrial Cancer: Evidence from a Gynecologic Oncology Group Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brinton, Louise A.; Felix, Ashley S.; McMeekin, D. Scott; Creasman, William T.; Sherman, Mark E.; Mutch, David; Cohn, David E.; Walker, Joan L.; Moore, Richard G.; Downs, Levi S.; Soslow, Robert A.; Zaino, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although the epidemiology of typical endometrial carcinomas (grades 1–2 endometrioid or Type I) is well established, less is known regarding higher grade endometrioid or non-endometrioid carcinomas (Type II). Within a large Gynecologic Oncology Group trial (GOG-210), which included central pathology review, we investigated the etiologic heterogeneity of endometrial cancers by comparing risk factors for different histologic categories. Methods Based on epidemiologic questionnaire data, risk factor associations, expressed as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were estimated comparing grade 3 endometrioid and Type II cancers (including histologic subtypes) to grades 1–2 endometrioid cancers. Results Compared with 2,244 grades 1–2 endometrioid cancers, women with Type II cancers (321 serous, 141 carcinosarcomas, 77 clear cell, 42 mixed epithelial with serous or clear cell components) were older; more often non-white, multiparous, current smokers; and less often obese. Risk factors for grade 3 endometrioid carcinomas (n=354) were generally similar to those identified for Type II cancers, although patients with grade 3 endometrioid tumors more often had histories of breast cancer without tamoxifen exposure while those with Type II tumors were more frequently treated with tamoxifen. Patients with serous cancers and carcinosarcomas more frequently had breast cancer histories with tamoxifen treatment compared to patients with other tumors. Conclusions Risk factors for aggressive endometrial cancers, including grade 3 endometrioid and non-endometrioid tumors, appear to differ from lower grade endometrioid carcinomas. Our findings support etiologic differences between Type I and II endometrial cancers as well as additional heterogeneity within Type II cancers. PMID:23485770

  15. [Recommendations of Polish Gynecological Society concerning perinatal care in obese pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Wender-Ozegowska, Ewa; Bomba-Opoń, Dorota; Brazert, Jacek; Celewicz, Zbigniew; Czajkowski, Krzysztof; Karowicz-Bilińska, Agata; Malinowska-Polubiec, Aneta; Meczekalski, Błazej; Zawiejska, Agnieszka

    2012-10-01

    Maternal obesity (defined as prepregnancy maternal BMI> or = 30 kg/m2) is a risk factor strongly associated with serious perinatal complications and its prevalence has increased rapidly in a general population during the last decades. Therefore, following international approach to regulate perinatal care in this population, Group of Experts of Polish Gynecological Society developed these new guidelines concerning perinatal care in obese pregnant women, including women after bariatric surgery. The recommendations cover detailed information on specific needs and risks associated with obesity in women of reproductive age, pregnancy planning, antenatal care, screening, prophylaxis and treatment for other pregnancy complications characteristic for maternal obesity fetal surveillance, intrapartum care and post-partum follow-up. Pregnancy planning in these patients should involve dietary recommendations aiming at well balanced diet and daily caloric uptake below 2000 kcal and modest but regular physical activity with sessions every two days starting from 15 min and increased gradually to 40 min. Laboratory work-up should include tests recommended in general population plus fasting glycemia and oral glucose tolerance if necessary thyroid function, lipidprofile, blood pressure and ECG. Patients after bariatric surgery should allow at least one year before they conceive and have their diet fortified with iron, folic acid, calcium and vit. B12. Antenatal care should include monitoring body weight gain with a target increase in body weight less than 7 kg, thromboprophylaxis, strict monitoring of blood pressure and diagnostic for gestational diabetes in early pregnancy. Fetal ultrasonic scans should be arranged following protocols recommended by US section of Polish Gynaecological Society with additional scan assessing fetal growth performed within 7 days before delivery and aiming at assessing a risk for shoulder dystocia in a patient. Intrapartum care should be delivered in

  16. Management of gynecologic oncology emergencies

    SciTech Connect

    Harwood-Nuss, A.L.; Benrubi, G.I.; Nuss, R.C.

    1987-08-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are the third most common cancer among women in the United States. Because of often subtle early findings, the diagnosis may not be made before the widespread dissemination of the disease. The Emergency Department physician will commonly encounter a woman with vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain, or a symptomatic abdominal mass. In this article, we have described the epidemiology, recognized patterns of spread, and associated findings of gynecologic tumors. The proper Emergency Department evaluation and management of these problems is emphasized with guidelines for the timing of referrals and consultation with the gynecologic oncologist. The treatment of gynecologic malignancies is often complicated and responsible for Emergency Department visits. The various modalities are addressed according to the organ systems affected and include sections on postoperative problems, gastrointestinal complaints, urologic complications of therapy, radiation therapy and its complications, with an emphasis on the most serious complications necessitating either careful outpatient management or hospital admission. As cost-containment pressure grows, we have included sections on chemotherapy and total parenteral nutrition, both of which are becoming common outpatient events for the cancer patient. 28 references.

  17. Controversies in the management of endometrial cancer: a survey of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Kidong; Kang, Sokbom; Seong, Seok Ju; Kim, Jae Weon; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify current practice patterns for unresolved issues in the surgical and adjuvant management of endometrial cancer in Korea. Methods We designed and conducted a survey of all 218 active members of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group to try to identify how they would manage various case scenarios for endometrial cancer. Data were collected using an Internet survey database. Results A total of 108 members (49.5%) responded to the survey. Laparoscopy (81.6%) was the most commonly used mode of surgery in early-stage endometrial cancer. Of all the respondents, 19.8% stated that lymphadenectomy could be omitted and 21.7% recommended selective lymphadenectomy based on sentinel biopsy or frozen results for patients with presumed stage IA/grade 1 disease. On the other hand, 71.9% of respondents recommended para-aortic lymphadenectomy for patients with presumed stage IB/grade 1 disease and 86.4% recommended this treatment for presumed stage IB/grade 3 disease. The majority of respondents performed adjuvant therapy for stage IB/grade 2 (91.7%), IB/grade 3 (99.0%), and stage II (89.6%). Whole pelvic radiotherapy and vaginal brachytherapy were the most frequently used options among these patients. All respondents administered adjuvant therapy when node metastasis was found, and concurrent chemoradiotherapy (53.2%) was the most preferred option for stage IIIC1 disease. Conclusion There is broad variation in both the surgical and adjuvant treatment of endometrial cancer among Korean gynecologic oncologists. PMID:26404123

  18. Increased nephrotoxicity of combination taxol and cisplatin chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone.

    PubMed

    Merouani, A; Davidson, S A; Schrier, R W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the increased nephrotoxicity of taxol and cisplatin combination chemotherapy in gynecologic cancers as compared to cisplatin alone, the medical records of 25 patients with gynecological cancers were reviewed for evaluation of nephrotoxicity after chemotherapy treatment. The data included age, serum creatinine, calculated creatinine clearance, initial and cumulative dose of cisplatin and taxol, primary site of the cancer, renal ultrasound and hydration protocols. Renal function was evaluated before, during and 6 months after chemotherapy. Renal dysfunction was defined as a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance. Comparing 11 patients treated with taxol and cisplatin versus 14 treated with cisplatin alone, there was a significant difference in effect on renal function. Nine of 11 patients (81%) treated with the combination chemotherapy had a greater than 25% decrease in creatinine clearance while only 4 of the 14 patients (29%) treated with cisplatin alone had such a decrease in creatinine clearance (p < 0.004). The patients treated with the combination chemotherapy, however, received a higher dose of cisplatin (80.4 vs. 66.4 mg/m2, p < 0.02) and were treated longer (6.7 vs. 4.3 months, p < 0.002). Nevertheless, when the patients were matched for age, initial dose and cumulative dose of cisplatin, a higher frequency of nephrotoxicity persisted in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin as compared to cisplatin alone (72 as compared to 20%, p < 0.02). The patients in both groups were comparably hydrated; prerenal failure and urinary tract obstruction were excluded in all patients. Six months after completion of chemotherapy, a significantly lower creatinine clearance was still observed in patients treated with taxol and cisplatin combination therapy (46 vs. 76 ml/min, p < 0.01). In summary, a retrospective analysis of renal function in patients with gynecological cancers showed an increased nephrotoxicity in patients treated with taxol and

  19. Therapist and Patient Perceptions of Alliance and Progress in Psychological Therapy for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manne, Sharon L.; Kashy, Deborah A.; Rubin, Stephen; Hernandez, Enrique; Bergman, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The goal was to understand both therapist and patient perspectives on alliance and session progress for women in treatment for gynecological cancer. We used a longitudinal version of the one-with-many design to partition variation in alliance and progress ratings into therapist, patient/dyad, and time-specific components. We also…

  20. Intimate Partner Violence in a Lebanese Population Attending Gynecologic Care: A Cultural Perspective.

    PubMed

    Awwad, Johnny; Ghazeeri, Ghina; Nassar, Anwar H; Bazi, Tony; Fakih, Ahmad; Fares, Farah; Seoud, Muhieddine

    2014-02-12

    Occurrence of intimate partner violence (IPV) against women in the Lebanese society has been largely ignored by local legal and religious authorities. Our aim is to estimate the prevalence of IPV among married Lebanese women, and investigate perception of abuse, referral patterns, and measures taken to deal with abusive situations. In this cross-sectional study, married women aged 20 to 65 presenting to the American University of Beirut Medical Center for gynecological care were interviewed on various forms of IPV. Out of 100 women invited to participate, 91 consented to take part in the survey of whom 37 (40.67%) gave a history of physical abuse, 30 (33.0%) of sexual abuse, 59 (64.8%) of verbal abuse, and 17 (18.7%) of emotional abuse. Spouse-imposed social isolation was reported in 20 (22.0%) women, and economic abuse in 30 (33.0%). Reasons for deciding to stay in an abusive relationship were "lack of any family or social support" (40.5%), "lack of financial resources" (40.5%), and "fear that the partner may take away the children" (37.8%). Women expressed satisfaction with their spouse's treatment irrespective of the existence of various forms of violence. A significant increase in the risk of weapon use against wife was correlated with decreased monthly income of the household, whereas a protective effect was conferred by an increased number of children. This study highlights the need for routine screening in health care settings for better identification of victims of violence. The selective conventional perception of abuse and the reactive normalization of violence observed indicate the necessity for culturally informed interventional strategies to complement screening. PMID:24522858

  1. The association between the SNP rs763110 and the risk of gynecological cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Lingling; Zhang, Gang; Zhou, Xiaoguang; Li, Jun

    2015-02-01

    FAS and FAS ligand (FASL) are the principal genes of the apoptosis pathway, which play a vital role in the etiology of various gynecological cancers. Studies have revealed that polymorphism of FASL promoter -844C>T (rs763110) influences FASL transcription process, which involving in cancer risk. Moreover, estrogen has been proved to trigger T-cell apoptosis by up-regulating FAS/FASL system in cancer cells. However, results from the published studies on the association between FASL -844C>T polymorphism and risk of gynecological cancer are conflicting. We performed a meta-analysis based on 13 case-control studies, including a total of 6256 cancer cases and 5573 controls. We used odd ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to assess the association strength. Overall, the FASL -844CT and TT genotypes were associated with a significantly reduced risk of gynecological cancer types in homozygote comparison (OR=0.80, 95% CI=0.64-0.99), heterozygote comparison (OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.67-0.98), and dominant model (OR=0.81, 95% CI=0.67-0.98). In the stratified analyses, we observed a similar association among Asian population (heterozygote comparison: OR=0.73, 95% CI=0.56-0.95; dominant model: OR=0.75, 95% CI=0.57-0.98) and hospital-based studies (homozygote comparison: OR=0.61, 95% CI=0.43-0.86). When stratified by cancer type, there was also a significantly lower risk of the ovarian cancer in different genetic models except the recessive one. The results suggested that the FASL -844C>T polymorphism may reduce the risk of gynecological cancer. PMID:25661359

  2. [A trial of biweekly paclitaxel administration in consideration of QOL for advanced or recurrent gynecologic cancer].

    PubMed

    Fushiki, Hiroshi; Yoshimoto, Hideo; Ikoma, Tomomi; Ota, Satoru

    2005-05-01

    At present there is no oral medicine available which is effective for advanced or recurrent case of elderly patients with gynecologic cancer. We report that a low-dose biweekly paclitaxel administration preserves quality of life (QOL) and seems to be "tumor dormancy like" therapy of good compliance with few side effects. A total of 11 cases were in ovarian cancer (5), uterine cancer (3), cervical cancer (2), and uterine sarcoma (1). The median age was 68 years old and the age range was 50 to 79 years old. We performed a standard treatment as a first time treatment. Afterwards, we obtained complete informed consent from the patients for progressive or recurrent cancer and administered biweekly paclitaxel 70 mg/m2 (80-100 mg/body) on an outpatient basis. We reviewed the effect, side effect and compliance of the medication. We judged the side effect based on the Japanese cancer treatment society common toxicity criteria. The result was only one patient death from PD and the other 10 patients were PR or a state of NC without side effect. An ovary cancer case patient lived for 67 months at best, an endometrial cancer case patient lived for 62 months at best, a cervical cancer case patient lived for 74 months at best, and a recurrent uterine sarcoma case patient lived for 76 months after recurrence and the QOL was good. In addition, there was no onset of side effect more than grade 2 in all of the cases and a compliance of medical administration was good. In these cases, we thought that a low-dose of biweekly paclitaxel administration was regarded as a therapy to preserve QOL without a serious side effect and a good compliance of medication. Furthermore, we intend to increase more cases and would like to report them in the future. PMID:15918575

  3. Implementing personalized cancer care.

    PubMed

    Schilsky, Richard L

    2014-07-01

    Implementing personalized cancer care requires a sound understanding of cancer genomics, familiarity with the analytical methods used to study cancer, knowledge of the mechanisms of action of targeted drugs, and ways to assimilate and understand complex data sets. Perhaps the greatest challenge is obtaining the drugs predicted to be beneficial based on the genomic profile of a patient's tumour. A potential solution is creation of a national facilitated access programme and registry for off-label use of targeted anti-cancer drugs. Within such a programme, patients could receive the targeted agent matched to the genomic profile of their tumour. Physicians would receive guidance in interpretation of complex genomic tests and access to drugs. Pharmaceutical companies, payers and regulators would receive data on off-label drug and test use and clinical outcomes to inform their research and development plans and coverage decisions and to track real-world safety. Although recently launched prospective clinical trials will determine the true benefit of matching drugs to genomic alterations, the approach proposed here will facilitate delivery of personalized medicine services to participating patients while at the same time making observations that allow us to learn from each patient to inform clinical care and future research initiatives. PMID:24687035

  4. Ovarian cancer clinical trial endpoints: Society of Gynecologic Oncology white paper

    PubMed Central

    Herzog, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Brady, Mark F.; Coleman, Robert L.; Einstein, Mark H.; Monk, Bradley J.; Mannel, Robert S.; Thigpen, J. Tate; Umpierre, Sharee A.; Villella, Jeannine A.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the value of multiple clinical endpoints in the unique setting of ovarian cancer. Methods A clinical trial workgroup was established by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology to develop a consensus statement via multiple conference calls, meetings and white paper drafts. Results Clinical trial endpoints have profound effects on late phase clinical trial design, result interpretation, drug development, and regulatory approval of therapeutics. Selection of the optimal clinical trial endpoint is particularly provocative in ovarian cancer where long overall survival (OS) is observed. The lack of new regulatory approvals and the lack of harmony between regulatory bodies globally for ovarian cancer therapeutics are of concern. The advantages and disadvantages of the numerous endpoints available are herein discussed within the unique context of ovarian cancer where both crossover and post-progression therapies potentially uncouple surrogacy between progression-free survival (PFS) and OS, the two most widely supported and utilized endpoints. The roles of patient reported outcomes (PRO) and health related quality of life (HRQoL) are discussed, but even these widely supported parameters are affected by the unique characteristics of ovarian cancer where a significant percentage of patients may be asymptomatic. Original data regarding the endpoint preferences of ovarian cancer advocates is presented. Conclusions Endpoint selection in ovarian cancer clinical trials should reflect the impact on disease burden and unique characteristics of the treatment cohort while reflecting true patient benefit. Both OS and PFS have led to regulatory approvals and are clinically important. OS remains the most objective and accepted endpoint because it is least vulnerable to bias; however, the feasibility of OS in ovarian cancer is compromised by the requirement for large trial size, prolonged time-line for final analysis, and potential for unintended loss of treatment effect

  5. Growth Inhibition of Human Gynecologic and Colon Cancer Cells by Phyllanthus watsonii through Apoptosis Induction

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Sujatha; Abdul Wahab, Norhanom; Zainal Abidin, Nurhayati; Manickam, Sugumaran; Zakaria, Zubaidah

    2012-01-01

    Phyllanthus watsonii Airy Shaw is an endemic plant found in Peninsular Malaysia. Although there are numerous reports on the anti cancer properties of other Phyllanthus species, published information on the cytotoxicity of P. watsonii are very limited. The present study was carried out with bioassay-guided fractionation approach to evaluate the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induction capability of the P. watsonii extracts and fractions on human gynecologic (SKOV-3 and Ca Ski) and colon (HT-29) cancer cells. P. watsonii extracts exhibited strong cytotoxicity on all the cancer cells studied with IC50 values of ≤ 20.0 µg/mL. Hexane extract of P. watsonii was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and yielded 10 fractions (PW-1→PW-10). PW-4→PW-8 portrayed stronger cytotoxic activity and was further subjected to bioassay-guided fractionation and resulted with 8 sub-fractions (PPWH-1→PPWH-8). PPWH-7 possessed greatest cytotoxicity (IC50 values ranged from 0.66 – 0.83 µg/mL) and was selective on the cancer cells studied. LC-MS/MS analysis of PPWH-7 revealed the presence of ellagic acid, geranic acid, glochidone, betulin, phyllanthin and sterol glucoside. Marked morphological changes, ladder-like appearance of DNA and increment in caspase-3 activity indicating apoptosis were clearly observed in both human gynecologic and colon cancer cells treated with P. watsonii especially with PPWH-7. The study also indicated that P. watsonii extracts arrested cell cycle at different growth phases in SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells. Cytotoxic and apoptotic potential of the endemic P. watsonii was investigated for the first time by bioassay-guided approach. These results demonstrated that P. watsonii selectively inhibits the growth of SKOV-3, Ca Ski and HT-29 cells through apoptosis induction and cell cycle modulation. Hence, P. watsonii has the potential to be further exploited for the discovery and development of new anti cancer drugs. PMID:22536331

  6. Validation of Catheter Segmentation for MR-guided Gynecologic Cancer Brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pernelle, Guillaume; Mehrtash, Alireza; Barber, Lauren; Damato, Antonio; Wang, Wei; Seethamraju, Ravi Teja; Schmidt, Ehud; Cormack, Robert; Wells, Williams; Viswanathan, Akila; Kapur, Tina

    2014-01-01

    Segmentation of interstitial catheters from MRI needs to be addressed in order for MRI-based brachytherapy treatment planning to become part of the clinical practice of gynecologic cancer radiotherapy. This paper presents a validation study of a novel image-processing method for catheter segmentation. The method extends the distal catheter tip, interactively provided by the physician, to its proximal end, using knowledge of catheter geometry and appearance in MRI sequences. The validation study consisted of comparison of the algorithm results to expert manual segmentations, first on images of a phantom, and then on patient MRI images obtained during MRI-guided insertion of brachytherapy catheters for the treatment of gynecologic cancer. In the phantom experiment, the maximum disagreement between automatic and manual segmentation of the same MRI image, as computed using the Hausdorf distance, was 1.5 mm, which is of the same order as the MR image spatial resolution, while the disagreement between automatic segmentation of MR images and “ground truth”, manual segmentation of CT images, was 3.5 mm. The segmentation method was applied to an IRB-approved retrospective database of 10 interstitial brachytherapy patients which included a total of 101 catheters. Compared with manual expert segmentations, the automatic method correctly segmented 93 out of 101 catheters, at an average rate of 0.3 seconds per catheter using a 3GHz Intel Core i7 computer with 16 GB RAM and running Mac OS X 10.7. These results suggest that the proposed catheter segmentation is both technically and clinically feasible. PMID:24505784

  7. Consequences of gynecological cancer in patients and their partners from the sexual and psychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Iżycki, Dariusz; Woźniak, Katarzyna; Iżycka, Natalia

    2016-06-01

    The diagnosis of gynecological cancer and the following consequences of the treatment radically change the lives of cancer patients and their partners. Women experience negative consequences in terms of sexual, psychological and social functioning. Surgical treatment may result in a decrease in sexual pleasure and pain during intercourse. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause a loss of libido and negatively affect the capacity to experience pleasure or orgasm. Treatment-related changes may include the occurrence of body image disorders, decreased quality of life as well as depressive and anxiety disorders among patients. Furthermore, a negative influence on the relationship between the affected women and their partners, as well as an adverse effect on the social activity, can be observed. Cancer is not an individual experience. It also affects partners of the sick women in terms of psychological and sexual functioning. This article depicts possible problems encountered by cancer patients and their partners from the psychological and sexual perspective. The emphasis is put on understanding sexuality not only in the context of sexual performance, but also in a wider perspective. PMID:27582686

  8. Consequences of gynecological cancer in patients and their partners from the sexual and psychological perspective

    PubMed Central

    Woźniak, Katarzyna; Iżycka, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of gynecological cancer and the following consequences of the treatment radically change the lives of cancer patients and their partners. Women experience negative consequences in terms of sexual, psychological and social functioning. Surgical treatment may result in a decrease in sexual pleasure and pain during intercourse. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy can cause a loss of libido and negatively affect the capacity to experience pleasure or orgasm. Treatment-related changes may include the occurrence of body image disorders, decreased quality of life as well as depressive and anxiety disorders among patients. Furthermore, a negative influence on the relationship between the affected women and their partners, as well as an adverse effect on the social activity, can be observed. Cancer is not an individual experience. It also affects partners of the sick women in terms of psychological and sexual functioning. This article depicts possible problems encountered by cancer patients and their partners from the psychological and sexual perspective. The emphasis is put on understanding sexuality not only in the context of sexual performance, but also in a wider perspective. PMID:27582686

  9. A Randomized Trial of Collaborative Depression Care in Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics: Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Katon, Wayne; Russo, Joan; Reed, Susan D.; Croicu, Carmen A.; Ludman, Evette; LaRocco, Anna; Melville, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether an Obstetrics-Gynecology clinic-based collaborative depression care intervention is differentially effective compared to Usual Care for socially disadvantaged women with either no health insurance or public coverage compared to those with commercial insurance. Methods A two-site randomized, controlled trial with 18-month follow-up recruited women who screened positive (PHQ-9 ≥10) and met criteria for major depression and/or dysthymia. We tested whether insurance status modified Intervention versus Usual Care continuous depression outcomes over 18 months. We also describe Intervention versus Usual Care differences in quality of depression care and dichotomous clinical outcomes (≥ 50% decrease in depressive symptoms and Patient Global Improvement). Results There was a significant modification of the treatment effect by insurance status (p=0.05). Patients in the no insurance or public coverage group had greater recovery from depression symptoms with collaborative care versus Usual Care over the 18-month follow-up period compared to the commercial insurance group. At 12-month follow-up, women in the no insurance or public coverage group had an effect-size for depression improvement versus Usual Care of 0.81 (95% CI 0.41, 0.95), whereas women with commercial insurance had an effect size for Intervention versus Usual Care of 0.39 (95% CI-0.08, 0.84). Conclusion Collaborative depression care adapted to Obstetrics-Gynecology settings had greater impact on depression outcomes for socially disadvantaged women with no or public insurance compared to women with commercial insurance. PMID:25157500

  10. Profiling of Discrete Gynecological Cancers Reveals Novel Transcriptional Modules and Common Features Shared by Other Cancer Types and Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Amariglio, Ninette; Vlachos, George D.; Loutradis, Dimitrios; Anagnou, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Studies on individual types of gynecological cancers (GCs), utilizing novel expression technologies, have revealed specific pathogenetic patterns and gene markers for cervical (CC), endometrial (EC) and vulvar cancer (VC). Although the clinical phenotypes of the three types of gynecological cancers are discrete, the fact they originate from a common embryological origin, has led to the hypothesis that they might share common features reflecting regression to early embryogenesis. To address this question, we performed a comprehensive comparative analysis of their profiles. Our data identified both common features (pathways and networks) and novel distinct modules controlling the same deregulated biological processes in all three types. Specifically, four novel transcriptional modules were discovered regulating cell cycle and apoptosis. Integration and comparison of our data with other databases, led to the identification of common features among cancer types, embryonic stem (ES) cells and the newly discovered cell population of squamocolumnar (SC) junction of the cervix, considered to host the early cancer events. Conclusively, these data lead us to propose the presence of common features among gynecological cancers, other types of cancers, ES cells and the pre-malignant SC junction cells, where the novel E2F/NFY and MAX/CEBP modules play an important role for the pathogenesis of gynecological carcinomas. PMID:26559525

  11. Investigating micronucleus assay applicability for prediction of normal tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity in gynecological cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Encheva, Elitsa; Deleva, Sofia; Hristova, Rositsa; Hadjidekova, Valeria; Hadjieva, Tatiana

    2011-01-01

    Background Pelvic organs morbidity after irradiation of cancer patients remains a major problem although new technologies have been developed and implemented. A relatively simple and suitable method for routine clinical practice is needed for preliminary assessment of normal tissue intrinsic radiosensitivity. The micronucleus test (MNT) determines the frequency of the radiation induced micronuclei (MN) in peripheral blood lymphocytes, which could serve as an indicator of intrinsic cell radiosensitivity. Aim To investigate a possible use of the micronucleus test (MNT) for acute radiation morbidity prediction in gynecological cancer patients. Materials and methods Forty gynecological cancer patients received 50 Gy conventional external pelvic irradiation after radical surgery. A four-field “box” technique was applied with 2D planning. The control group included 10 healthy females. Acute normal tissue reactions were graded according to NCI CTCAE v.3.0. From all reaction scores, the highest score named “summarized clinical radiosensitivity” was selected for a statistical analysis. MNT was performed before and after in vitro irradiation with 1.5 Gy. The mean radiation induced frequency of micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells (MN/1000) and lymphocytes containing micronuclei per 1000 binucleated cells (cells with MN/1000) were evaluated for both patients and controls. An arbitrary cut off value was created to pick up a radiosensitive individual: the mean value of spontaneous frequency of cells with MN/1000 ± 2SD, found in the control group. Results Both mean spontaneous frequency of cells with MN/1000 and MN/1000 were registered to be significantly higher in cancer patients compared to the control group (t = 2.46, p = 0.02 and t = 2.51, p = 0.02). No statistical difference was registered when comparing radiation induced MN frequencies between those groups. Eighty percent (32) of patients developed grade 2 summarized clinical radiosensitivity, with

  12. Gynecologic examination and cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients eligible for salvage surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Hout, Bertha A. in 't; Boomgaard, Jantine J.; Hullu, Joanne A. de; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Aalders, Jan G.; Nijman, Hans W.; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Mourits, Marian J.E. . E-mail: m.j.e.mourits@og.umcg.nl

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of gynecologic examination under general anesthesia with cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients with residual disease who may benefit from salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort study data of all cervical cancer patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1 to IVA treated with (chemo) radiation between 1994 and 2001 were analyzed. Patients underwent gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after completion of treatment. Cervical biopsy samples were taken from patients judged to be operable. In case of residual cancer, salvage surgery was performed. Results: Between 1994 and 2001, 169 consecutive cervical cancer patients received primary (chemo) radiation, of whom 4 were lost to follow-up. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 44-71) and median follow-up was 3.5 years (IQR, 1.5-5.9). In each of 111 patients a biopsy sample was taken, of which 90 (81%) showed no residual tumor. Vital tumor cells were found in 21 of 111 patients (19%). Salvage surgery was performed in 13 of 21 (62%) patients; of these patients, 5 (38%) achieved long-term, complete remission after salvage surgery (median follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 3.9-8.8 years). All patients with residual disease who did not undergo operation (8/21) died of progressive disease. Locoregional control was more often obtained in patients who underwent operation (7 of 13) than in patients who were not selected for salvage surgery (0 of 8 patients) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after (chemo) radiation with cervical biopsies allows identification of those cervical cancer patients who have residual local disease, of whom a small but significant proportion may be salvaged by surgery.

  13. Personalized cancer care conference.

    PubMed

    Zänker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Huber, Hans-Peter; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise

    2013-01-01

    The Oslo University Hospital (Norway), the K.G. Jebsen Centre for Breast Cancer Research (Norway), The Radiumhospital Foundation (Norway) and the Fritz-Bender-Foundation (Germany) designed under the conference chairmen (E. Mihich, K.S. Zänker, A.L. Borresen-Dale) and advisory committee (A. Borg, Z. Szallasi, O. Kallioniemi, H.P. Huber) a program at the cutting edge of "PERSONALIZED CANCER CARE: Risk prediction, early diagnosis, progression and therapy resistance." The conference was held in Oslo from September 7 to 9, 2012 and the science-based presentations concerned six scientific areas: (1) Genetic profiling of patients, prediction of risk, late side effects; (2) Molecular profiling of tumors and metastases; (3) Tumor-host microenvironment interaction and metabolism; (4) Targeted therapy; (5) Translation and (6) Informed consent, ethical challenges and communication. Two satellite workshops on (i) Ion Ampliseq-a novel tool for large scale mutation detection; and (ii) Multiplex RNA ISH and tissue homogenate assays for cancer biomarker validation were additionally organized. The report concludes that individual risk prediction in carcinogenesis and/or metastatogenesis based on polygenic profiling may be useful for intervention strategies for health care and therapy planning in the future. To detect distinct and overlapping DNA sequence alterations in tumor samples and adjacent normal tissues, including point mutations, small insertions or deletions, copy number changes and chromosomal rearrangements will eventually make it possible to design personalized management plans for individualized patients. However, large individualized datasets need a new approach in bio-information technology to reduce this enormous data dimensionally to simply working hypotheses about health and disease for each individual. PMID:25562519

  14. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  15. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    SciTech Connect

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Craighead, Peter; McCormack, Mary; Toita, Takafumi; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nicholas; Long, Harry; Kim, Hak-Jae; Marth, Christian; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Cerrotta, Annmarie; Small, William; Trimble, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E), and North America (NAm). Methods and Materials: A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results: A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) used HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for five fractions (18%), 6 Gy for four fractions (15%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (11%); for Stage IIB-IVA patients they were 6 Gy for five fractions (19%), 7 Gy for four fractions (8%), and 7 Gy for three fractions (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD] 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD 11.2) (p = 0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was as follows: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p = 0.02 for Asia vs. other regions).The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p = 0.0002). Conclusion: Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean doses administered for cervical cancer are similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe, and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials.

  16. International Brachytherapy Practice Patterns: A Survey of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG)

    PubMed Central

    Viswanathan, Akila N.; Creutzberg, Carien L.; Craighead, Peter; McCormack, Mary; Toita, Takafumi; Narayan, Kailash; Reed, Nicholas; Long, Harry; Kim, Hak-Jae; Marth, Christian; Lindegaard, Jacob C.; Cerrotta, Annmarie; Small, William; Trimble, Edward

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To determine current practice patterns with regard to gynecologic high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy among international members of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) in Japan/Korea (Asia), Australia/New Zealand (ANZ), Europe (E) and North America (NAm). Materials and Methods A 32-item survey was developed requesting information on brachytherapy practice patterns and standard management for Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer. The chair of each GCIG member cooperative group selected radiation oncology members to receive the survey. Results A total of 72 responses were analyzed; 61 respondents (85%) utilized HDR. The three most common HDR brachytherapy fractionation regimens for Stage IB-IIA patients were 6 Gy for 5 fractions (18%), 6 Gy × 4 (15%), 7 Gy × 3 (11%), and for Stage IIB-IVA patients were 6 Gy for 5 fractions (19%), 7 Gy × 4 (8%), and 7 Gy × 3 (8%). Overall, the mean combined external-beam and brachytherapy equivalent dose (EQD2) was 81.1 (standard deviation [SD], 10.16). The mean EQD2 recommended for Stage IB-IIA patients was 78.9 Gy (SD, 10.7) and for Stage IIB-IVA was 83.3 Gy (SD, 11.2) (p=0.02). By region, the mean combined EQD2 was: Asia, 71.2 Gy (SD, 12.65); ANZ, 81.18 (SD, 4.96); E, 83.24 (SD, 10.75); and NAm, 81.66 (SD, 6.05; p=0.02 for Asia vs. other regions). The ratio of brachytherapy to total prescribed dose was significantly higher for Japan (p=0.0002). Conclusion Although fractionation patterns may vary, the overall mean dose administered for cervical cancer is similar in Australia/New Zealand, Europe and North America, with practitioners in Japan administering a significantly lower external-beam dose but higher brachytherapy dose to the cervix. Given common goals, standardization should be possible in future clinical trials. PMID:21183288

  17. [Advance Care Planning in Cancer Care].

    PubMed

    Kizawa, Yoshiyuki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Yotani, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    Advance care planning (ACP) is one of the most important issues to consider in providing quality end of life care for cancer patients. ACP has been described as a process whereby a patient, in consultation with health care providers, family members, and important others, makes decisions about his or her future health care, in the event he or she becomes incapable of participating in medical treatment decisions. ACP improves rates of following end of life wishes, increases patient and family satisfaction, and reduces family stress, anxiety, and depression. This article clarifies the differences among ACP, advance directives, and living wills. Additionally, we describe, based on clinical experience, how to introduce ACP most effectively for all stages of cancer care. PMID:27067841

  18. Gynecological cancer patients’ differentiated use of help from a nurse navigator: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fragmentation in healthcare can present challenges for patients with suspected cancer. It can add to existing anxiety, fear, despair and confusion during disease trajectory. In some circumstances patients are offered help from an extra contact person, a Nurse Navigator (NN). Scientific studies showing who will benefit from the extra help offered are missing. This study aims to explore who could benefit from the help on offer from a nurse appointed as NN in the early part of a cancer trajectory, and what would be meaningful experiences in this context. Methods A longitudinal study with a basis in phenomenology and hermeneutics was performed among Danish women with gynecological cancer. Semi-structured interviews provided data for the analysis, and comprehensive understanding was arrived at by first adopting an open-minded approach to the transcripts and by working at three analytical levels. Results Prior experience of trust, guarded trust or distrust of physicians in advance of encountering the NN was of importance in determining whether or not to accept help from the NN. For those lacking trust in physicians and without a close relationship to a healthcare professional, the NN offered a new trusting relationship and they felt reassured by her help. Conclusions Not everyone could use the help offered by the NN. This knowledge is vital both to healthcare practitioners and to administrators, who want to do their best for cancer patients but who are obliged to consider financial consequences. Moreover patients’ guarded trust or distrust in physicians established prior to meeting the NN showed possible importance for choosing extra help from the NN. These findings suggest increased focus on patients’ trust in healthcare professionals. How to find the most reliable method to identify those who can use the help is still a question for further debate and research. PMID:22721253

  19. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  20. Integrating palliative care into comprehensive cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrahm, Janet L

    2012-10-01

    While there are operational, financial, and workforce barriers to integrating oncology with palliative care, part of the problem lies in ourselves, not in our systems. First, there is oncologists' "learned helplessness" from years of practice without effective medications to manage symptoms or training in how to handle the tough communication challenges every oncologist faces. Unless they and the fellows they train have had the opportunity to work with a palliative care team, they are unlikely to be fully aware of what palliative care has to offer to their patients at the time of diagnosis, during active therapy, or after developing advanced disease, or may believe that, "I already do that." The second barrier to better integration is the compassion fatigue many oncologists develop from caring for so many years for patients who, despite the oncologists' best efforts, suffer and die. The cumulative grief oncologists experience may go unnamed and unacknowledged, contributing to this compassion fatigue and burnout, both of which inhibit the integration of oncology and palliative care. Solutions include training fellows and practicing oncologists in palliative care skills (eg, in symptom management, psychological disorders, communication), preventing and treating compassion fatigue, and enhancing collaboration with palliative care specialists in caring for patients with refractory distress at any stage of disease. As more oncologists develop these skills, process their grief, and recognize the breadth of additional expertise offered by their palliative care colleagues, palliative care will become integrated into comprehensive cancer care. PMID:23054873

  1. MAPK13 is preferentially expressed in gynecological cancer stem cells and has a role in the tumor-initiation.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Kazuyo; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kuroda, Takafumi; Takaya, Akari; Kubo, Terufumi; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Hasegawa, Tadashi; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-04-15

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs)/cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are defined as small subpopulation of cancer cells that are endowed with higher tumor-initiating ability. CSCs/CICs are resistant to standard cancer therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and they are thus thought to be responsible for cancer recurrence and metastasis. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms of CSCs/CICs is essential to cure cancer. In this study, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of gynecological CSCs/CICs isolated as aldehyde dehydrogenase high (ALDH(high)) cells, and found that MAPK13, PTTG1IP, CAPN1 and UBQLN2 were preferentially expressed in CSCs/CICs. MAPK13 is expressed in uterine, ovary, stomach, colon, liver and kidney cancer tissues at higher levels compared with adjacent normal tissues. MAPK13 gene knockdown using siRNA reduced the ALDH(high) population and abrogated the tumor-initiating ability. These results indicate that MAPK13 is expressed in gynecological CSCs/CICs and has roles in the maintenance of CSCs/CICs and tumor-initiating ability, and MAPK13 might be a novel molecular target for treatment-resistant CSCs/CICs. PMID:26969274

  2. Reliability and Validity of Amharic Version of EORTC QLQ-C 30 Questionnaire among Gynecological Cancer Patients in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Ayana, Birhanu Abera; Negash, Shiferaw; Yusuf, Lukman; Tigeneh, Wendemagegnhu

    2016-01-01

    Background Cancer is a growing public health problem worldwide. The focus of cancer treatment, in addition to curation, is improving the quality of life (QOL). This study aimed to assess the reliability and validity of Amharic version of European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Core Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) among gynecological cancer patients in Ethiopia. Methods A facility-based cross-sectional study was conducted using the Amharic version of EORTC QLQ-C30 on 153 gynecological cancer patients in Tikur Anbassa Specialized Hospital (TASH), Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Descriptive statistics, correlation analysis and multivariable linear regression were employed in statistical analysis. Results The Amharic version of EORTC QLQ-C30 had a Cronbach’s α value of 0.81. The internal consistency for each domain of EORTC QLQ-C30 was also acceptable (Cronbach’s α >0.7) except for cognitive function domain (Cronbach’s α = 0.29). Stepwise multivariable linear regression analysis showed that emotional functioning (p<0.001), fatigue (p<0.001) and social functioning (p = 0.004) were the determinative scales of EORTC QLQ-C30 on global health status (GHS). The clinical validity test (Known group validity) showed that there were significant differences in score for twelve out of 15 domains, between surgery and radiation scheduled patients. All items of emotional function, role function, fatigue, and GHS meet the discriminate validity criterion. Conclusion The Amharic version of EORTC QLQ-C30 found to be reliable and had an acceptable validity to assess the QOL for gynecological cancer patients. We recommend further work on the validity and responsiveness of the EORTC QLQ-C30 with stronger design. PMID:27304066

  3. Holding Back Sharing Concerns, Dispositional Emotional Expressivity, Perceived Unsupportive Responses, and Distress Among Women Newly-Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Myers, Shannon; Ozga, Melissa; Kissane, David; Kashy, Debby; Rubin, Stephen; Heckman, Carolyn; Rosenblum, Norm

    2013-01-01

    Objective Little attention has been paid to the role of holding back sharing concerns in the psychological adaptation of women newly diagnosed with gynecological cancers. The goal of the present study was to evaluate the role of holding back concerns in psychosocial adjustment and quality of life, as well as a possible moderating role for emotional expressivity and perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends. Method Two hundred forty four women diagnosed with gynecological cancer in the past eight months completed measures of holding back, dispositional emotional expressivity, perceived unsupportive responses from family and friends, cancer-specific distress, depressive symptoms, and quality of life. Results Emotional expressivity moderated the association between holding back and cancer- specific distress and quality of life, but not depressive symptoms. Greater holding back was more strongly associated with higher levels of cancer-related distress among women who were more emotionally expressive than among women who were less expressive. Perceived unsupportive responses did not moderate the associations between holding back and psychosocial outcomes. Conclusion Holding back sharing concerns was more common in this patient population than other cancer populations. Dispositional expressivity played a role in how harmful holding back concerns was for women, while unsupportive responses from family and friends did not. PMID:24211156

  4. [Anesthetic management of a patient with Trousseau's syndrome and ovarian cancer who underwent gynecological surgery].

    PubMed

    Saho, Mayu; Ito, Asuka; Hiraki, Teruyuki; Ushijima, Kazuo

    2014-11-01

    Trousseau's syndrome, a complex paraneoplastic disease, is characterized by the occurrence of thromboembolic disorders such as brain infarctions in patients with malignant neoplasms. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with ovarian cancer who had suffered cerebral infarctions and presented with left hemiplegia, aphasia, and atypical genital bleeding. She suffered multiple right brain infarctions, a pulmonary embolism, a right renal infarction with bilateral hydronephrosis and deep venous thromboses and exhibited increased D-dimer and fibrinogen levels and so was administered heparin (10,000 U x day(-1)). She had no other underlying diseases such as coagulopathy, cardiovascular disease, collagen disease, or angiitis. Therefore, we were able to diagnose her with Trousseau's syndrome. She was scheduled to undergo total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral oophorectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomies, and omentectomy. Preoperatively, an inferior vena cava filter was temporarily installed to prevent the development of further pulmonary thromboses. General anesthesia was uneventfully maintained by inhalation of oxygen, air, and sevoflurane and the continuous infusion of remifentanil whilst regional cerebral oxygen saturation and transesophageal echocardiography monitoring were performed. Postoperatively, she received heparin-based anticoagulant therapy (10,000 U x day(-1)) and did not exhibit bleeding diathesis or thrombosis. It is of great importance that anesthesiologists are aware of the thromboembolic status of patients with malignant neoplasms, especially those with gynecological tumors. PMID:25731059

  5. [ADHERING TO MEDICAL STANDARTS, EVIDENCE-BASED STAGING IN GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Chakalova, G

    2016-01-01

    Among the key factors that influence the survival of patients is adherence to medical treatment standards. Indicators are assessing the degree of adherence to medical standards and represent the relative shares (%) of patients who fulfilled the relevant aspect of any subject. Data from the BNCR of 9842 cases of patients with malignant diseases of the female reproductive diagnosed in 2011-2013 in Bulgaria has been analyzed. Patients with tumors of the vulva were incorrectly staged in 15% to 30% of the cases, and those with vaginal tumors were incorrectly staged in 20% to 23% of cases. In patients with malignant tumors of the cervix incorrect staging was established in 19% to 47% of the cases. Patients with tumors of the uterus were incorrectly staged in 6% to 26% of the cases. Among the patients with ovarian tumors were incorrectly staged in 18% to 43%. Our results show that one in three patients with gynecological cancer in Bulgaria was incorrectly staged. We recommend using the current TNM and FIGO systems. PMID:27514165

  6. Development of an 241Am applicator for intracavitary irradiation of gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Nath, R; Peschel, R E; Park, C H; Fischer, J J

    1988-05-01

    Sealed sources of 241Am that emit primarily 60 keV photons produce relative dose distributions in water comparable to those from 137Cs or 226Ra sources and can produce dose rates of up to 100 cGy/hr at 1 cm in water. Also, 241Am gamma rays can be effectively shielded by thin layers of high atomic number materials (HVL is 1/8th mm of lead) placed on the applicator or inside some body cavities (for example, hypaque in bladder, barium sulphate in rectum). These properties of 241Am sources open a new approach to optimizing intracavitary irradiation of various cancers by allowing a reduction in dose and volume of irradiated critical organs or by increasing tumor doses. The relative ease with which highly effective shielding is achievable with 241Am sources would allow the design and fabrication of partially shielded applicators which can produce asymmetric dose distributions to allow unidirectional irradiation of localized lesions. Design and dosimetry characteristics of a gynecological applicator containing 241Am sources are presented. The applicator consists of a 2, 3, or 4 segment vaginal plaque (loaded with 2 and 5 Ci 241Am sources) and a tandem made up of a single 8 Ci 241Am source. Dose rates at 2 cm from the plaques are 42.0, 47.4, 58.3 and 56.7 cGy/hr for 5-5, 5-4-5, 5-5-5, and 5-4-4-5 Ci plaques, respectively. The 5-4-5 Ci plaque in combination with the 8 Ci tandem produces dose rates of 60.0 and 22.8 cGy/hr to points A and B, respectively. Surface dose rates on the plaque applicators are 143, 124, 142 and 132 cGy/hr for 5-5, 5-4-5, 5-5-5 and 5-4-4-5 Ci applicators, respectively. The shielding effect of a 0.5 mm thick lead foil on one side of the 5-4-5 Ci applicator is found to be a factor of 16.8; for example, the dose rate at 2 cm from the unshielded side is 42.0 cGy/hr compared to a dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr at 2 cm from the shielded side. Initial clinical experience with this applicator in the treatment of recurrent gynecological lesions is also presented

  7. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-01-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made. PMID:26641959

  8. Ideal anesthetic agents for day-care gynecological procedures: A clinical trial comparing thiopentone with ketamine as adjuncts to propofol

    PubMed Central

    Ahuja, Hemani; Abraham, Valsamma; Abraham, John; Liddle, Dootika

    2015-01-01

    Background: Day-care gynecological procedures require the use of anesthetic agents, which ensure rapid induction and recovery. Although propofol is the gold standard drug in day-care procedures, it has its own side effects like apnea, cardiovascular instability, pain on injection, as well as its cost. The ideal drug combination to achieve this end remains elusive. Therefore, a combination of propofol, thiopentone, and ketamine may be a better alternative. Materials and Methods: This prospective, double-blind, randomized study was conducted on 60 women, aged 18-50 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status 1 and 2, undergoing day-care gynecological surgeries. The patients were allocated to two groups. Group T received an admixture containing 10 ml of 1% propofol and 10 ml of 1.25% thiopentone. Group K received an admixture containing 10 ml of 1% propofol and 10 ml of 0.5% ketamine. Results: There was less variation in the mean systolic blood pressure of patients in Group K as compared to patients in Group T. The mean total dose of propofol required in Group K (0.85 mg/kg) was significantly less than that required in Group T (1.12 mg/kg) (P = 0.0004). The mean recovery time in Group T (3.67 minutes) was significantly less than in Group K (6.27 minutes; P = 0.0001). However, the mean discharge time in both the groups was similar. (P = 0.7392). The results were analyzed statistically using the Student's t-test and the Fisher's exact test. Conclusions: Both the propofol-thiopentone and propofol-ketamine admixtures provided adequate anesthesia. Propofol-ketamine proved superior to propofol-thiopentone in terms of hemodynamic stability and requirement of a lesser total dose of propofol. However, the patients in the propofol-thiopentone group had faster recovery. PMID:26015907

  9. Communication in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help, they can give the patient better care. Language and culture can affect communication. Communication can be ... You Love Has Advanced Cancer: Support for Caregivers Current Clinical Trials Check the list of NCI-supported ...

  10. Cryopreservation of in vitro matured oocytes after ex vivo oocyte retrieval from gynecologic cancer patients undergoing radical surgery

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chan Woo; Lee, Sun Hee; Yang, Kwang Moon; Lee, In Ho; Lim, Kyung Teak; Lee, Ki Heon

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to report a case series of in vitro matured (IVM) oocyte freezing in gynecologic cancer patients undergoing radical surgery under time constraints as an option for fertility preservation (FP). Methods Case series report. University-based in vitro fertilization center. Six gynecologic cancer patients who were scheduled to undergo radical surgery the next day were referred for FP. The patients had endometrial (n=2), ovarian (n=3), and double primary endometrial and ovarian (n=1) cancer. Ex vivo retrieval of immature oocytes from macroscopically normal ovarian tissue was followed by mature oocyte freezing after IVM or embryo freezing with intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Results A total of 53 oocytes were retrieved from five patients, with a mean of 10.6 oocytes per patient. After IVM, a total of 36 mature oocytes were obtained, demonstrating a 67.9% maturation rate. With regard to the ovarian cancer patients, seven IVM oocytes were frozen from patient 3, who had stage IC cancer, whereas one IVM oocyte was frozen from patient 4, who had stage IV cancer despite being of a similar age. With regard to the endometrial cancer patients, 15 IVM oocytes from patient 1 were frozen. Five embryos were frozen after the fertilization of IVM oocytes from patient 6. Conclusion Immature oocytes can be successfully retrieved ex vivo from macroscopically normal ovarian tissue before radical surgery. IVM oocyte freezing provides a possible FP option in patients with advanced-stage endometrial or ovarian cancer without the risk of cancer cell spillage or time delays. PMID:27358831

  11. Risk-Reducing Salpingo-Oophorectomy for the Prevention of BRCA1- and BRCA2-Associated Breast and Gynecologic Cancer: A Multicenter, Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kauff, Noah D.; Domchek, Susan M.; Friebel, Tara M.; Robson, Mark E.; Lee, Johanna; Garber, Judy E.; Isaacs, Claudine; Evans, D. Gareth; Lynch, Henry; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Daly, Mary B.; Matloff, Ellen; Blum, Joanne L.; Sabbatini, Paul; Barakat, Richard R.; Hudis, Clifford; Norton, Larry; Offit, Kenneth; Rebbeck, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) has been widely adopted as a key component of breast and gynecologic cancer risk-reduction for women with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Despite 17% to 39% of all BRCA mutation carriers having a mutation in BRCA2, no prospective study to date has evaluated the efficacy of RRSO for the prevention of breast and BRCA-associated gynecologic (ovarian, fallopian tube or primary peritoneal) cancer when BRCA2 mutation carriers are analyzed separately from BRCA1 mutation carriers. Patients and Methods A total of 1,079 women 30 years of age and older with ovaries in situ and a deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation were enrolled onto prospective follow-up studies at one of 11 centers from November 1, 1994 to December 1, 2004. Women self-selected RRSO or observation. Follow-up information through November 30, 2005, was collected by questionnaire and medical record review. The effect of RRSO on time to diagnosis of breast or BRCA-associated gynecologic cancer was analyzed using a Cox proportional-hazards model. Results During 3-year follow-up, RRSO was associated with an 85% reduction in BRCA1-associated gynecologic cancer risk (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.15; 95% CI, 0.04 to 0.56) and a 72% reduction in BRCA2-associated breast cancer risk (HR = 0.28; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.92). While protection against BRCA1-associated breast cancer (HR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.30 to 1.22) and BRCA2-associated gynecologic cancer (HR = 0.00; 95% CI, not estimable) was suggested, neither effect reached statistical significance. Conclusion The protection conferred by RRSO against breast and gynecologic cancers may differ between carriers of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Further studies evaluating the efficacy of risk-reduction strategies in BRCA mutation carriers should stratify by the specific gene mutated. PMID:18268356

  12. Palliative Care in Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... palliative care is beneficial? Yes. Research shows that palliative care and its many components are beneficial to patient and family health and well-being. A number of studies in recent years have shown that patients who ...

  13. Simultaneous integrated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost for locally advanced gynecological cancer: Radiobiological and dosimetric considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrero, Mariana; Li, X. Allen . E-mail: ali@radonc.mcw.edu; Ma Lijun; Linder, Jeanette; Deyoung, Chad; Erickson, Beth

    2005-07-01

    Purpose: Whole-pelvis irradiation (WPI) followed by a boost to the tumor site is the standard of practice for the radiotherapeutic management of locally advanced gynecologic cancers. The boost is frequently administered by use of brachytherapy or, occasionally, external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) when brachytherapy does not provide sufficient coverage because of the size of the tumor or the geometry of the patient. In this work, we propose using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), which is a single-phase process, to replace the conventional two-phase process involving WPI plus a boost. Radiobiological modeling is used to design appropriate regimens for the IMRT SIB. To demonstrate feasibility, a dosimetric study is carried out on an example patient. Methods and Materials: The standard linear-quadratic (LQ) model is used to calculate the biologically effective dose (BED) and equivalent uniform dose (EUD). A series of regimens that are biologically equivalent to those conventional two-phase treatments is calculated for the proposed SIB. A commercial inverse planning system (Corvus) was used to generate IMRT SIB plans for a sample patient case that used the newly designed fractionations. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) and EUD of both the target and normal structures for conventional treatments and the SIB are compared. A sparing factor was introduced to characterize the sparing of normal structures. Results: Fractionation regimes that are equivalent to the conventional treatments and are suitable for the IMRT SIB are deduced. For example, a SIB plan with 25 x 3.1 Gy (77.5 Gy) to a tumor is equivalent to a conventional treatment of EBRT of 45 Gy to the whole pelvis in 25 fractions plus a high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost with 30 Gy in 5 fractions. The normal tissue BED is found to be lower for the SIB plan than for the whole-pelvis plus HDR scheme when a sparing factor for the critical structures is considered. This

  14. Critical care issues in cervical cancer management.

    PubMed

    Mirhashemi, R; Janicek, M F; Schoell, W M

    1999-01-01

    Radical pelvic surgery in gynecologic oncology patients poses a challenge to the surgeon and the ancillary team in charge of the peri-operative care. The high frequency of medical problems observed in this patient population, in conjunction with the stresses of radical surgery, necessitates careful monitoring of patients' medical status. A comprehensive team approach in the perioperative period is critical to patient care. Early intervention and anticipation of potential problems for the patient at risk in the postoperative period minimizes morbidity and mortality. This article will review the essentials of critical care as it relates to patients undergoing radical pelvic operations. PMID:10225307

  15. Scripted Sexual Health Informational Intervention in Improving Sexual Function in Patients With Gynecologic Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-10

    Anxiety Disorder; Cervical Cancer; Endometrial Cancer; Female Reproductive Cancer; Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Sexual Dysfunction; Uterine Sarcoma; Vaginal Cancer; Vulvar Cancer

  16. Fertility preserving options in patients with gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Eskander, Ramez N; Randall, Leslie M; Berman, Michael L; Tewari, Krishnansu S; Disaia, Philip J; Bristow, Robert E

    2011-08-01

    A proportion of reproductive age women are affected by gynecologic malignancies. This patient population is faced with difficult decisions, related to their cancer care and treatment, as well as future childbearing potential. Therefore, it is important for gynecologists to be familiar with fertility sparing management options in patients with cervical, ovarian, and endometrial cancer. In addition to understanding the surgical approaches available, providers should be able to counsel patients regarding their eligibility for and the indications and limitations of fertility sparing therapy for gynecologic cancer, allowing for appropriate referrals. A comprehensive PUBMED literature search was conducted using the key words "fertility preservation," "cervical cancer," "endometrial cancer," "ovarian cancer," "borderline tumor of the ovary," "germ cell tumor," "obstetrical outcomes," "chemotherapy," and "radiation." The following review summarizes fertility sparing options for patients with cervical, ovarian and endometrial cancer, with an emphasis on appropriate patient selection, oncologic, and obstetric outcomes. PMID:21411052

  17. A Prospective Study of Gynecological Cancer Risk in Relation to Adiposity Factors: Cumulative Incidence and Association with Plasma Adipokine Levels

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Meei-Maan; You, San-Lin; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Chen, Chi-An; Lee, Te-Chang; Chen, Chien-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Background Associations of obesity and obesity-related metabolic factors (adiposity factors) with uterine corpus cancer (UCC) and ovarian cancer (OVC) risk have been described. Still, a cause-effect relationship and the underlying mediators remain unclear, particularly for low-incidence populations. We aimed to prospectively determine whether adiposity factors could predict the development of UCC and OVC in Taiwanese women. To explore the biological mediators linking adiposity factors to cancer risk, we examined the association of two adipokines, leptin and adiponectin, with the gynecological cancers. Methods Totally, 11,258 women, aged 30–65, were recruited into the Community-Based Cancer Screening Program (CBCSP) study during 1991–1993, and were followed for UCC and OVC cases until December 31, 2011. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs). Adiposity factors and risk covariates were assessed at recruitment. Newly-developed cancer cases were determined from data in the government’s National Cancer Registry and Death Certification System. For adipokienes study, a nested case-control study was conducted within the cohort. Baseline plasma samples of 40 incident gynecological cancer cases and 240 age-menopause-matched controls were assayed for adipokines levels. Findings There were 38 and 30 incident cases of UCC and OVC, respectively, diagnosed during a median 19.9 years of follow-up. Multivariate analysis showed that alcohol intake (HR = 16.00, 95% = 4.83–53.00), high triglyceride levels (HR = 2.58, 95% = 1.28–5.17), and years of endogenous estrogen exposure per 5-year increment (HR = 1.91, 95% = 1.08–3.38) were associated with increased UCC risk. High body mass index (BMI≥27 kg/m2, HR = 2.90, 95% = 1.30–6.46) was associated with increased OVC risk. Analysis further showed an independent effect of adipokines on UCC and OVC risk after adjustment of the risk covariates. Conclusion We

  18. RTOG Gynecologic Oncology Working Group: Comprehensive Results

    PubMed Central

    Gaffney, David K.; Jhingran, Anuja; Portelance, Lorraine; Viswanathan, Akila; Schefter, Tracey; Weidhaas, Joanne; Small, William

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to comprehensively describe the activities of the Gynecologic Oncology Working Group within the RTOG. Clinical trials will be reviewed as well as translational science and ancillary activities. Over the past 40 years, a myriad of clinical trials have been performed within the RTOG with the aim of improving overall survival and decreasing morbidity in women with cervical or endometrial cancer. Major study questions have included hyperbaric oxygen, neutron radiotherapy, altered fractionation, hypoxic cell sensitization, chemosensitization, and volume directed radiotherapy. RTOG 7920 demonstrated improvement in overall survival in patients with stages IB through IIB cervical carcinoma receiving prophylactic paraaortic irradiation compared to pelvic radiation alone. RTOG 9001 demonstrated that cisplatin and 5-FU chemoradiotherapy to the pelvis for advanced cervix cancer markedly improved overall survival compared to extended field radiotherapy alone. More recent trials have employed radioprotectors, molecular targeted therapy, and intensity modulated radiation therapy. Ancillary studies have developed CTV atlases for research protocols and routine clinical use. Worldwide practice patterns have been investigated in cervix, endometrial, and vulvar cancer thru the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG). Translational studies have focused on immunohistochemical markers, changes in gene expression, and miRNA patterns impacting prognosis. The RTOG gynecologic working group has performed clinical trials that have defined the standard of care, improved survival, and added to our understanding of the biology of cervical and endometrial cancers. PMID:24819663

  19. Part I: cancer in Sudan—burden, distribution, and trends breast, gynecological, and prostate cancers.

    PubMed

    Elamin, Amany; Ibrahim, Muntaser E; Abuidris, Dafalla; Mohamed, Kamal Eldin H; Mohammed, Sulma Ibrahim

    2015-03-01

    Despite the growing burden of cancer worldwide, it continues to receive low priority in Africa, across the continent and specifically in Sudan. This is due to political unrest, limited health resources, and other pressing public health issues such as infectious diseases. Lack of awareness about the magnitude of the current and future cancer burden among policy makers play a major role as well. Although, the real scope of cancer in Sudan is not known, the reported cases have increased from 303 in 1967-6303 in 2010. According to Globocan estimates, the top most common cancers in both sexes are breast, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, esophagus, and colorectum. This review is the first of four papers that focuses on cancer, its distribution and trend as well as the risk factors most common in Sudan. It is expected that cancer will increase in Sudan as a result of migration of people from rural areas to urban cities in the pursuit of a better standard of living, which has resulted in lifestyle and behavioral changes that include tobacco chewing and smoking, unhealthy dieting, and a lack of physical activity. These changes are further exacerbated by the aging population and have made the country vulnerable to many diseases including cancer. These reviews are meant to provide a better understanding and knowledge required to plan appropriate cancer-control and prevention strategies in the country. PMID:25641872

  20. Part I: cancer in Sudan—burden, distribution, and trends breast, gynecological, and prostate cancers

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Amany; Ibrahim, Muntaser E; Abuidris, Dafalla; Mohamed, Kamal Eldin H; Mohammed, Sulma Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Despite the growing burden of cancer worldwide, it continues to receive low priority in Africa, across the continent and specifically in Sudan. This is due to political unrest, limited health resources, and other pressing public health issues such as infectious diseases. Lack of awareness about the magnitude of the current and future cancer burden among policy makers play a major role as well. Although, the real scope of cancer in Sudan is not known, the reported cases have increased from 303 in 1967–6303 in 2010. According to Globocan estimates, the top most common cancers in both sexes are breast, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, leukemia, esophagus, and colorectum. This review is the first of four papers that focuses on cancer, its distribution and trend as well as the risk factors most common in Sudan. It is expected that cancer will increase in Sudan as a result of migration of people from rural areas to urban cities in the pursuit of a better standard of living, which has resulted in lifestyle and behavioral changes that include tobacco chewing and smoking, unhealthy dieting, and a lack of physical activity. These changes are further exacerbated by the aging population and have made the country vulnerable to many diseases including cancer. These reviews are meant to provide a better understanding and knowledge required to plan appropriate cancer-control and prevention strategies in the country. PMID:25641872

  1. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong-Yeol; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Park, Won; Cao, Zeyi; Wu, Xiaohua; Ju, Woong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Chang, Suk-Joon; Park, Sang-Yoon; Ryu, Sang-Young; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Cho, Chi-Heum; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Jeong-Won; Kumarasamy, Suresh; Kim, Jae-Weon; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Konishi, Ikuo; Lee, Jae-Kwan; Wang, Kung-Liahng

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014 on gynecologic oncology was held in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea on the 23rd to 24th August 2014. A total of 179 participants from 17 countries participated in the workshop, and the up-to-date findings on the management of gynecologic cancers were presented and discussed. This meeting focused on the new trends in the management of cervical cancer, fertility-sparing management of gynecologic cancers, surgical management of gynecologic cancers, and recent advances in translational research on gynecologic cancers. PMID:25609163

  2. Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Yeol; Ngan, Hextan Yuen Sheung; Park, Won; Cao, Zeyi; Wu, Xiaohua; Ju, Woong; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Chang, Suk Joon; Park, Sang Yoon; Ryu, Sang Young; Kim, Jae Hoon; Cho, Chi Heum; Lee, Keun Ho; Lee, Jeong Won; Kumarasamy, Suresh; Kim, Jae Weon; Wilailak, Sarikapan; Kim, Byoung Gie; Kim, Dae Yeon; Konishi, Ikuo; Lee, Jae Kwan; Wang, Kung Liahng; Nam, Joo Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The Asian Society of Gynecologic Oncology International Workshop 2014 on gynecologic oncology was held in Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea on the 23rd to 24th August 2014. A total of 179 participants from 17 countries participated in the workshop, and the up-to-date findings on the management of gynecologic cancers were presented and discussed. This meeting focused on the new trends in the management of cervical cancer, fertility-sparing management of gynecologic cancers, surgical management of gynecologic cancers, and recent advances in translational research on gynecologic cancers. PMID:25609163

  3. Strategies for Sustainable Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Kerr, David J; Jani, Anant; Gray, Sir Muir

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing focus on the relative cost-effectiveness and sustainability of delivering high-quality cancer care, with most emphasis, debatably, given to cost control of innovative treatments. It is difficult to calculate all the direct and indirect contributors to the total cost of cancer treatment, but it is estimated that cancer drugs constitute 10% to 30% of the total cost of cancer care. A 2007 study in France showed the contribution of drug costs was less than 20%, with approximately 70% of the total expenditure on cancer accounted for by health care resource use, such as hospitalization. The U.K. government established the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE)-the dominant function of which is technology appraisal-to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of new pharmaceutical and biopharmaceutical products. This is to ensure that all National Health Service (NHS) patients have equitable access to the most clinically effective and cost-effective treatments that are viable. NICE has developed a transparent, public process to judge incremental cost-effectiveness using the quality-adjusted life year (QALY), which allows comparisons of cost-effectiveness across medical specialties. NICE has been both lauded and criticized-especially when it passes judgment on marginally effective but expensive anticancer drugs-but it provides a route to "rational rationing" and, therefore, may contribute to sustainable cancer care by highlighting the issue of affordable medicine. This implies a challenge to the wider oncology community as to how we might cooperate to introduce the concept of value-driven cancer care. PMID:27249712

  4. Bringing cancer care home.

    PubMed

    Treco-Jones, S

    1991-01-01

    Community hospitals in the South are seeing new and more cancer patients. Hospitals aggressively seeking new and faster methods to treat patients in their home towns bring benefits to both. PMID:10115667

  5. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nádia Nara Rolim; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; de Carvalho, Sionara Melo Figueiredo; Neto, Modesto Leite Rolim; Moreira, Marcial Moreno; Brasil, Aline Quental; Junior, Francisco Telésforo Celestino; de Oliveira, Gislene Farias; Reis, Alberto Olavo Advíncula

    2013-01-01

    To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS]) was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people’s welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers have been increasingly attentive to this dimension of care. However, it is necessary to improve their knowledge regarding the subject. The search highlighted that spirituality is considered a source of comfort and hope, contributing to a better acceptance of his/her chronic condition by the child with cancer, as well as by the family. Further up-to-date studies facing the subject are, thus, needed. It is also necessary to better train health care practitioners, so as to provide humanized care to the child with cancer. PMID:24133371

  6. Spirituality in childhood cancer care.

    PubMed

    Lima, Nádia Nara Rolim; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; de Carvalho, Sionara Melo Figueiredo; Neto, Modesto Leite Rolim; Moreira, Marcial Moreno; Brasil, Aline Quental; Junior, Francisco Telésforo Celestino; de Oliveira, Gislene Farias; Reis, Alberto Olavo Advíncula

    2013-01-01

    To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS]) was conducted using the search terms "spirituality," "child psychology," "child," and "cancer," as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people's welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers have been increasingly attentive to this dimension of care. However, it is necessary to improve their knowledge regarding the subject. The search highlighted that spirituality is considered a source of comfort and hope, contributing to a better acceptance of his/her chronic condition by the child with cancer, as well as by the family. Further up-to-date studies facing the subject are, thus, needed. It is also necessary to better train health care practitioners, so as to provide humanized care to the child with cancer. PMID:24133371

  7. Psychosomatic Primary Care in Gynecology–Assessment and Acceptance by Residents for Obstetrics and Gynecology in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Schott, S.; Lermann, J.; Rauchfuß, M.; Ortmann, O.; Ditz, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The course “Psychosomatic Primary Care” has been part of the training curriculum of obstetrics and gynecology in Germany since 2003. The aim of the course is to train up physicians, whose prior training primarily focussed on somatic care, to enable them to offer care also taking into account biopsychosocial aspects. Taking the guidelines for psychotherapy as a template, the aim of psychosomatic primary care is to recognize the etiological links between psychological and somatic factors which contribute to diseases. The necessity for a compulsory course as part of training in gynecology was recently critically discussed. Major points discussed included the question whether the current forms of teaching, consisting of courses, are outdated and whether the required skills should be part of regular daily training. Method: A 3-part online questionnaire consisting of 30 items was developed and sent to 2431 residents in the period from September to December 2012 through the online mailing list of the DGGG. Results: The 540 residents who responded to the questionnaire were predominantly female (83.3 %) with an average age of 30 years; 50.3 % were in their 1st to their 4th year of training. Over the longer term, the majority of respondents (56.1 %) hoped to continue working in a hospital and regularly (84.6 %) attended teaching courses voluntarily. 70.9 % of them had already attended the course “Psychosomatic Primary Care”. Of the group who had completed the course, 29.4 % were satisfied with the offer. The main criticism directed against the course was its scope which 24.1 % considered completely inadequate. 24.5 % considered the course to be an important part of training, while 16.5 % would have preferred that the course be abolished. 18 % of respondents reported that psychosomatic medicine did not feature regularly in their daily clinical routine. Perspective: Because of the huge gap between what is currently offered and the

  8. Reviewing Cancer Care Team Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Taplin, Stephen H.; Weaver, Sallie; Salas, Eduardo; Chollette, Veronica; Edwards, Heather M.; Bruinooge, Suanna S.; Kosty, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The management of cancer varies across its type, stage, and natural history. This necessitates involvement of a variety of individuals and groups across a number of provider types. Evidence from other fields suggests that a team-based approach helps organize and optimize tasks that involve individuals and groups, but team effectiveness has not been fully evaluated in oncology-related care. Methods: We undertook a systematic review of literature published between 2009 and 2014 to identify studies of all teams with clear membership, a comparator group, and patient-level metrics of cancer care. When those teams included two or more people with specialty training relevant to the care of patients with cancer, we called them multidisciplinary care teams (MDTs). After reviews and exclusions, 16 studies were thoroughly evaluated: two addressing screening and diagnosis, 11 addressing treatment, two addressing palliative care, and one addressing end-of-life care. The studies included a variety of end points (eg, adherence to quality indicators, patient satisfaction with care, mortality). Results: Teams for screening and its follow-up improved screening use and reduced time to follow-up colonoscopy after an abnormal screen. Discussion of cases within MDTs improved the planning of therapy, adherence to recommended preoperative assessment, pain control, and adherence to medications. We did not see convincing evidence that MDTs affect patient survival or cost of care, or studies of how or which MDT processes and structures were associated with success. Conclusion: Further research should focus on the association between team processes and structures, efficiency in delivery of care, and mortality. PMID:25873056

  9. [Hereditary predisposition to cancers of the digestive tract, breast, gynecological and gonadal: focus on the Peutz-Jeghers].

    PubMed

    Turpin, Anthony; Cattan, Stéphane; Leclerc, Julie; Wacrenier, Agnès; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Buisine, Marie-Pierre; Lejeune-Dumoulin, Sophie

    2014-09-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant disease due to mutations in the tumor suppressor gene STK11. PJS is characterized by periorificial hyperpigmented macules (lentiginosis) and hamartomatous polyposis. Polyps can be located anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract, but are preferably observed in the small bowel (70-90%), the colon (50%) and the stomach (25%). They tend to be cancerous in a particular sequence hamartoma-dysplasia-cancer. The diagnosis is often made in the first or second decade following the appearance of lentigines or upon the occurrence of complications due to polyps (obstruction, intussusception, occult bleeding responsible for anemia). Furthermore PJS is associated with a significant increase in cancer risk (relative risk of 89% over the life according to the most recent series). Digestive cancers are the more frequent with cumulative incidences of 55% for gastro-intestinal cancer (39% for colorectal cancer, 13% for small bowel cancer and between 11 and 36% for pancreatic cancer, respectively). There is also an increased risk of non digestive cancers. In particular the risk of breast cancer is similar to that of patients carrying deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations (cumulative incidence of 45%). Gynecological and gonadal tumors are frequent as well and can be more (adenoma malignum) or less aggressive (ovarian sex cord tumors with annular tubules and testicular tumors with calcified Sertoli cells). Finally the frequency of lung cancer is moderately increased. Recommendations for screening and management based on retrospective series in the literature have led to various strategies. The aim of this paper is to summarize the clinical and molecular diagnostic criteria of PJS as well as recommendations on screening strategies, management and monitoring. PMID:25036236

  10. Cancer Portal Project: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Cancer Care Among Hispanic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gany, Francesca; Ramirez, Julia; Nierodzick, Mary Lynn; McNish, Thelma; Lobach, Iryna; Leng, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the impact of a multilingual, multidisciplinary team targeting social and economic determinants of cancer treatment adherence among at-risk Hispanic immigrants. Methods: Patients were recruited at 10 hospital-based cancer clinics in New York City between December 2008 and November 2009. This is a nested cohort study of Hispanic patients and their sociodemographic characteristics, areas of needed assistance, and reported impact of meeting service needs on keeping appointments. At the core of the intervention is the trained, bilingual Portal Access Facilitator, who assesses needs and synchronizes an individualized set of transdisciplinary services for each patient. Results: A total of 328 Hispanic patients participated in the study. Of these, 89% preferred to speak Spanish in the health care setting, and 17% had no health insurance. The most common cancer diagnosis among participants was breast cancer (35%) followed by GI (17%) and gynecologic (16%) cancers. Patients most commonly requested financial support (59%), food support (37%), transportation assistance (21%), social work services (14%), psychosocial support (6%), help with health insurance issues (5%), and legal services (5%). In a follow-up assessment of high-need patients in urgent need of financial support, 86% reported that portal services helped them attend cancer care and treatment appointments, and 72% reported that portal services decreased worry about their care. Conclusion: Most patients reported that financial, social, and logistical support would help them attend their appointments for cancer care and treatment. Further multidisciplinary interventions should be implemented and evaluated to address social and economic determinants in cancer care for this population. PMID:21532808

  11. American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Runowicz, Carolyn D; Leach, Corinne R; Henry, N Lynn; Henry, Karen S; Mackey, Heather T; Cowens-Alvarado, Rebecca L; Cannady, Rachel S; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L; Edge, Stephen B; Jacobs, Linda A; Hurria, Arti; Marks, Lawrence B; LaMonte, Samuel J; Warner, Ellen; Lyman, Gary H; Ganz, Patricia A

    2016-02-20

    The purpose of the American Cancer Society/American Society of Clinical Oncology Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline is to provide recommendations to assist primary care and other clinicians in the care of female adult survivors of breast cancer. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015. A multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, gynecology, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, and nursing was formed and tasked with drafting the Breast Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline. A total of 1,073 articles met inclusion criteria; and, after full text review, 237 were included as the evidence base. Patients should undergo regular surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, including evaluation with a cancer-related history and physical examination, and should be screened for new primary breast cancer. Data do not support performing routine laboratory tests or imaging tests in asymptomatic patients to evaluate for breast cancer recurrence. Primary care clinicians should counsel patients about the importance of maintaining a healthy lifestyle, monitor for post-treatment symptoms that can adversely affect quality of life, and monitor for adherence to endocrine therapy. Recommendations provided in this guideline are based on current evidence in the literature and expert consensus opinion. Most of the evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong evidence-based recommendation. Recommendations on surveillance for breast cancer recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of physical and psychosocial long-term and late effects of breast cancer and its treatment, health promotion, and care coordination/practice implications are made.This guideline was developed through a collaboration between the American Cancer Society and the American Society of Clinical Oncology and has been published jointly by invitation and consent in both CA: A Cancer Journal for

  12. Stress Reduction in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With Recurrent Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-08

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Fatigue; Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pain; Peritoneal Carcinomatosis; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  13. Breast and gynecologic cancer-related extremity lymphedema: a review of diagnostic modalities and management options

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Lymphedema remains a poorly understood entity that can occur after lymphadenectomy. Herein, we will review the pathogenesis of lymphedema, diagnostic modalities and the natural history of extremity involvement. We will review the incidence of upper extremity lymphedema in patients treated for breast malignancies and lower extremity lymphedema in those treated for gynecologic malignancy. Finally, we will review traditional treatment modalities for lymphedema, as well as introduce new surgical treatment modalities that are under active investigation. PMID:24053624

  14. Psychosexual Intervention in Patients With Stage I-III Gynecologic or Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-02

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage III Gestational Trophoblastic Tumor; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage IIIC Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIIC Fallopian Tube Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell

  15. Comprehensive Patient Questionnaires in Predicting Complications in Older Patients With Gynecologic Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Endometrial Serous Adenocarcinoma; Fallopian Tube Carcinoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IIIC Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVB Uterine Corpus Cancer

  16. Women's Health Care Teams and the Future of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

    PubMed

    Hollier, Lisa M; Promecene, Pamela A; Owens, Michelle Y; Hampton, Moss; Gala, Rajiv; Kulbida, Nicholas; Tomich, Paul; Gregg, Laurie; Rothenberg, Jeffrey; Phelan, Sharon T; Jennings, John C

    2015-12-01

    Health care delivery is in a stage of transformation and a meaningful change in provision of care must also be accompanied by changes in the educational process of health care professionals. This article lays out a roadmap to better prepare obstetrician-gynecologists (ob-gyns) to succeed in interdisciplinary women's health care teams. Just as our current educational programs emphasize the development of competent surgical skills, our future programs must encourage and support the development of communication, teamwork, and leadership skills for ob-gyns. Formal integration of these fundamentals at all levels of the health care training continuum will create an educational system designed to equip all practitioners with a basic level of knowledge and provide opportunities to acquire additional knowledge and skills as needs and interest dictate. Integral to the implementation will be the evaluation of the effects of the contributions of interprofessional education on patient, practice, and health system outcomes. Successful demonstration of value will lead to the sustainability of the educational programs through recognition by physicians, health care teams, academia, health care systems, and payers. PMID:26551185

  17. Cannabis in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I; Guzman, M

    2015-06-01

    Cannabis has been used in medicine for thousands of years prior to achieving its current illicit substance status. Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, mimic the effects of the endogenous cannabinoids (endocannabinoids), activating specific cannabinoid receptors, particularly CB1 found predominantly in the central nervous system and CB2 found predominantly in cells involved with immune function. Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, the main bioactive cannabinoid in the plant, has been available as a prescription medication approved for treatment of cancer chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting and anorexia associated with the AIDS wasting syndrome. Cannabinoids may be of benefit in the treatment of cancer-related pain, possibly synergistic with opioid analgesics. Cannabinoids have been shown to be of benefit in the treatment of HIV-related peripheral neuropathy, suggesting that they may be worthy of study in patients with other neuropathic symptoms. Cannabinoids have a favorable drug safety profile, but their medical use is predominantly limited by their psychoactive effects and their limited bioavailability. PMID:25777363

  18. The Annual Gynecologic Examination Updated for the 21st Century.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Joyce; Levi, Amy

    2016-01-01

    The concept of an annual gynecologic screening visit to identify disease at an early stage has long been an established component of women's health care. Women and their health care providers have historically accepted the schedule of an annual gynecologic examination with cervical cancer screening and a pelvic examination. Recently, researchers questioned the value of the annual breast and pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women and re-established the intervals for Pap test screening with the addition of human papillomavirus co-testing to establish cervical cancer risk. The updated well woman examination is now an opportunity to engage women in health education, screening for chronic disease risks, and health care concerns such as depression and violence. PMID:27287359

  19. Carboplatin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Gynecological Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-03

    Leydig Cell Tumor; Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Pseudomyxoma Peritonei; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Fallopian Tube Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer

  20. Multidisciplinary Care of Laryngeal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Salvador-Coloma, Carmen; Cohen, Ezra

    2016-08-01

    Treatment of larynx cancer has changed dramatically over the past several years. Novel modalities of treatment have been introduced as organ preservation has been developed. In addition, new targeted therapies have appeared, and improvements in radiotherapeutic and surgical techniques have been introduced. Thus, a large variety of treatment options is increasing local control rates and overall survival; however, selecting the most appropriate treatment remains a challenging decision. This article focuses on the multidisciplinary care of early-stage and locally advanced larynx cancer and attempts to sum up different approaches. Moreover, it reviews state-of-the-art treatment in larynx preservation, which has been consolidated in recent years. PMID:27511718

  1. Preventive vaccination against cervical cancer: Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Seong, Seok Ju; Shin, Jin Woo; Ju, Woong; Hong, Jin Hwa; Bae, Duk-Soo

    2016-01-01

    After human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine guidelines published by Korean Society of Gynecologic Oncology (KSGO) in 2011, new studies have been published, leading to additional data regarding efficacy, safety, number of vaccination rounds, and ideal age of vaccine administration. We searched and reviewed the literatures focused on the efficacy of 2-dose schedule vaccination, the efficacy of 3-dose schedule vaccination in middle-aged women, the ideal age of 3-dose schedule vaccination, the safety of HPV preventive vaccine, and the ability of cross-protection of each HPV preventive vaccine. The KSGO has revised the previous guideline based on the results of the above studies. PMID:27029751

  2. Translating genomics in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Bombard, Yvonne; Bach, Peter B; Offit, Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    There is increasing enthusiasm for genomics and its promise in advancing personalized medicine. Genomic information has been used to personalize health care for decades, spanning the fields of cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, endocrinology, metabolic medicine, and hematology. However, oncology has often been the first test bed for the clinical translation of genomics for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic applications. Notable hereditary cancer examples include testing for mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2 in unaffected women to identify those at significantly elevated risk for developing breast and ovarian cancers, and screening patients with newly diagnosed colorectal cancer for mutations in 4 mismatch repair genes to reduce morbidity and mortality in their relatives. Somatic genomic testing is also increasingly used in oncology, with gene expression profiling of breast tumors and EGFR testing to predict treatment response representing commonly used examples. Health technology assessment provides a rigorous means to inform clinical and policy decision-making through systematic assessment of the evidentiary base, along with precepts of clinical effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, and consideration of risks and benefits for health care delivery and society. Although this evaluation is a fundamental step in the translation of any new therapeutic, procedure, or diagnostic test into clinical care, emerging developments may threaten this standard. These include "direct to consumer" genomic risk assessment services and the challenges posed by incidental results generated from next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. This article presents a review of the evidentiary standards and knowledge base supporting the translation of key cancer genomic technologies along the continuum of validity, utility, cost-effectiveness, health service impacts, and ethical and societal issues, and offers future research considerations to guide the responsible introduction of

  3. [A Case of Extrahepatic Hepatocellular Cancer Discovered during Gynecological Laparoscopic Surgery].

    PubMed

    Koga, Chikato; Murakami, Masayuki; Shimizu, Junzo; Yasuyama, Akinobu; Hitora, Toshiki; Oda, Naofumi; Kawabata, Ryohei; Hirota, Masaki; Yoshikawa, Masato; Morishima, Hirotaka; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Matsunami, Nobuki; Miwa, Hideaki; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    Recently, laparoscopic surgery has become increasingly popular because of its lesser invasiveness, including smaller incisions, and fewer post-operative complications. It is also possible to observe the abdominal cavity by laparoscopy. We report a hepatocellular carcinoma arising in an accessory liver lobe detected during gynecological laparoscopic surgery. A 48-year-old woman who was undergoing laparoscopic hysterectomy for uterine fibroids was found to have a protruding, extrahepatic pedunculated tumor by intraoperative observation of the abdominal cavity during the fibroid procedure. We suspected FNH based on preoperative imaging findings, including abdominal ultrasound, computed tomographic scanning, and magnetic resonance imaging. We performed a laparoscopic partial hepatectomy. The cut surface of the tumor was similar to normal liver tissue. The pathological findings identified normal liver tissue and vessels, suggesting it was the accessory liver lobe. It also included a well-differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. The final diagnosis was hepatocellular carcinoma arising in the accessory liver lobe. There have been no prior reports of extrahepatic liver tissue detected during gynecological surgery. This case reminded us of the importance of intra-abdominal observation during laparoscopic procedures. The opportunities to discover other cases of extrahepatic liver tissue by laparoscopy will increase. PMID:26805199

  4. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved. PMID:27446806

  5. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Thomas C.; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved. PMID:27446806

  6. Association between the low-dose irinotecan regimen-induced occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and genetic variants of UGT1A1 in patients with gynecological cancers.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Hiroyuki; Saito, Katsuhiko; Helsby, Nuala; Sugino, Shigekazu; Yamakage, Michiaki; Sawaguchi, Takeru; Takasaki, Masahiko; Kato, Hidenori; Kurosawa, Nahoko

    2014-06-01

    The occurrence of severe neutropenia during treatment with irinotecan (CPT-11) is associated with the *6 and *28 alleles of uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase 1A1 (UGT1A1). However, the correlation between these variants and the occurrence of severe neutropenia in a low-dose CPT-11 regimen for the treatment of gynecological cancers has not been extensively studied. There are also no studies regarding the association between the 421C>A mutation in ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2) and the occurrence of severe neutropenia in CPT-11-treated patients with gynecological cancers. The present study was designed to determine the factors associated with the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia during chemotherapy for gynecological cancers with combinations of CPT-11 and cisplatin or mitomycin C. In total, 44 patients with gynecological cancer were enrolled in the study. The association between the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir values, the total dose of CPT-11 and the genotypes of UGT1A1 or ABCG2 was studied. No correlation was observed between the ANC nadir values and the total dose of CPT-11. The ANC nadir values in the UGT1A1*6/*28 and *6/*6 groups were significantly lower compared with those in the *1/*1 group (P<0.01). Univariate analysis showed no association between the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and the ABCG2 421C>A mutation. Subsequent to narrowing the factors by univariate analysis, multivariate logistic regression analysis only detected significant correlations between the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and the UGT1A1*6/*6 and *6/*28 groups (P=0.029; odds ratio, 6.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.22-38.99). No associations were detected between the occurrence of grade 4 neutropenia and the heterozygous variant (*1/*6 or *1/*28) genotype, type of regimen or age. In conclusion, the UGT1A1*6/*28 and *6/*6 genotypes were found to be associated with the occurrence of severe neutropenia in the low-dose CPT-11 regimen for

  7. Clinical Outcomes of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery for Metastatic Brain Tumors from Gynecologic Cancer : Prognostic Factors in Local Treatment Failure and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hong Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Do Heui; Cho, Young Hyun; Roh, Sung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Brain metastases in gynecologic cancer (ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer) patients are rare, and the efficacy of Gamma Knife Radiosurgery (GKRS) to treat these had not been evaluated. We assessed the efficacy of GKRS and prognostic factors for tumor control and survival in brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. Methods This retrospective study was approved by the institutional review board. From May 1995 to October 2012, 26 women (mean age 51.3 years, range 27–70 years) with metastatic brain tumors from gynecologic cancer were treated with GKRS. We reviewed their outcomes, radiological responses, and clinical status. Results In total 24 patients (59 lesions) were available for follow-up imaging. The median follow-up time was 9 months. The mean treated tumor volume at the time of GKRS was 8185 mm3 (range 10–19500 mm3), and the median dose delivered to the tumor margin was 25 Gy (range, 10–30 Gy). A local tumor control rate was 89.8% (53 of 59 tumors). The median overall survival was 9.5 months after GKRS (range, 1–102 months). Age-associated multivariate analysis indicated that the Karnofsky performance status (KPS), the recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) classification, and the number of treated lesions were significant prognostic factors for overall survival (HR=0.162, p=0.008, HR=0.107, p=0.038, and HR=2.897, p=0.045, respectively). Conclusion GKRS is safe and effective for the management of brain metastasis from gynecologic cancers. The clinical status of the patient is important in determining the overall survival time. PMID:27446522

  8. Severe Obesity in Cancer Care.

    PubMed

    Streu, Erin

    2016-05-01

    Increasing weight and body fat composition has an impact on cancer detection and staging. Obese women are less likely to engage in breast and cervical screening practices. Excessive adipose tissue makes physical assessment more difficult, and patients with a BMI greater than 35 kg/m2 may have deeper and wider pelvic structures, which make internal examinations problematic. A retrospective review of 324 primary surgical patients found that patients with a BMI greater than 40 kg/m2 are seven times less likely to undergo complete surgical staging for endometrial cancer compared with individuals with a BMI less than 40 kg/m2. In addition, healthcare provider bias against the need for screening, feelings of discomfort and embarrassment, as well as patient's fears of guilt, humiliation, and shame pose significant barriers to addressing the issue of obesity in clinical care with patients and family members. 
. PMID:27105188

  9. Integrating yoga into cancer care.

    PubMed

    DiStasio, Susan A

    2008-02-01

    Although yoga has been practiced in Eastern culture for thousands of years as part of life philosophy, classes in the United States only recently have been offered to people with cancer. The word yoga is derived from the Sanskrit root yuj, meaning to bind, join, and yoke. This reflection of the union of the body, mind, and spirit is what differentiates yoga from general exercise programs. Yoga classes in the United States generally consist of asanas (postures), which are designed to exercise every muscle, nerve, and gland in the body. The postures are combined with pranayama, or rhythmic control of the breath. As a complementary therapy, yoga integrates awareness of breath, relaxation, exercise, and social support--elements that are key to enhancing quality of life in patients with cancer. Yoga practice may assist cancer survivors in managing symptoms such as depression, anxiety, insomnia, pain, and fatigue. As with all exercise programs, participants need to be aware of potential risks and their own limitations. The purpose of this article is to familiarize nurses with yoga as a complementary therapy, including current research findings, types of yoga, potential benefits, safety concerns, teacher training, and ways to integrate yoga into cancer care. PMID:18258582

  10. Intended care seeking for ovarian cancer symptoms among U.S. women.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Trivers, Katrina F; Stewart, Sherri L

    2016-06-01

    To investigate U.S. women's intended care seeking for symptoms associated with ovarian cancer, data from the 2012 HealthStyles Fall survey of U.S. adults were examined. Analyses were limited to women with no history of gynecologic cancer (N = 1726). Logistic regression models for intended care seeking within 2 weeks of symptom onset were developed. A minority of women recognized that unexplained pelvic or abdominal pain (29.9%), unexplained bloating (18.1%), and feeling full after eating a small amount of food (10.1%) can indicate ovarian cancer, and 31.1% mistakenly believed that the Papanicolaou (Pap) test screens for the disease. In the multivariate regression models, the most consistent, significant predictors (p < 0.01) of intended care seeking within 2 weeks of symptom onset were age (older women were more likely to seek care) and awareness that symptoms could signal ovarian cancer. Care seeking in response to ovarian cancer symptoms may be delayed among younger women and those who do not recognize the potential significance of symptoms. Raising awareness of ovarian cancer symptoms may promote early detection. However, educational efforts should emphasize that symptoms associated with ovarian cancer may also result from benign conditions. PMID:27419020

  11. Nursing care update: Internal radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lowdermilk, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    Internal radiation therapy has been used in treating gynecological cancers for over 100 years. A variety of radioactive sources are currently used alone and in combination with other cancer treatments. Nurses need to be able to provide safe, comprehensive care to patients receiving internal radiation therapy while using precautions to keep the risks of exposure to a minimum. This article discusses current trends and issues related to such treatment for gynecological cancers.20 references.

  12. Coping with Cancer - Survivorship Care for Children

    Cancer.gov

    Survivorship care for children who have been treated for cancer is important. Get your child's treatment summary, survivorship plan, and recommendation on follow-up care clinics. Learn about long-term and late effects.

  13. Therapist and Patient Perceptions of Alliance and Progress In Psychological Therapy for Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon; Kashy, Deborah A.; Rubin, Stephen; Hernandez, Enrique; Bergman, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal was to understand both therapist and patient perspectives on alliance and session progress for women in treatment for gynecological cancer. We used a longitudinal version of the one-with-many design to partition variation in alliance and progress ratings into therapist, patient/dyad, and time-specific components. We also evaluated therapist and patient characteristics that predict alliance and session progress. Methods Two hundred and three women and their therapists completed measures of alliance and session progress across a 6-session course of treatment. Participants also completed pre-intervention measures of self-esteem, depression, cancer-specific distress, emotional expressivity, and use of protective buffering. Results Patients reported higher alliance and greater progress than therapists. When therapists reported particularly strong alliance with particular patients, those patients concurred. More experienced therapists reported higher alliances and more progress but their patients did not agree. Patients who began treatment in more difficult psychosocial circumstances tended to have less positive session outcomes on average but evidenced more improvement across therapy sessions. Conclusions Patients rated their alliance and progress more positively than their therapists, although there was substantial relative agreement between therapists and patients. Alliance and progress improved over time, particularly among patients who evidenced higher levels of distress and poorer physical functioning. More experienced therapists were more confident in their abilities but their patients did not share this perception. PMID:22746145

  14. Improving Modern Cancer Care Through Information Technology

    PubMed Central

    Clauser, Steven B.; Wagner, Edward H.; Bowles, Erin J. Aiello; Tuzzio, Leah; Greene, Sarah M.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer care system is increasingly complex, marked by multiple hand-offs between primary care and specialty providers, inadequate communication among providers, and lack of clarity about a “medical home” (the ideal accountable care provider) for cancer patients. Patients and families often cite such difficulties as information deficits, uncoordinated care, and insufficient psychosocial support. This article presents a review of the challenges of delivering well coordinated, patient-centered cancer care in a complex modern healthcare system. An examination is made of the potential role of information technology (IT) advances to help both providers and patients. Using the published literature as background, a review is provided of selected work that is underway to improve communication, coordination, and quality of care. Also discussed are additional challenges and opportunities to advancing understanding of how patient data, provider and patient involvement, and informatics innovations can support high-quality cancer care. PMID:21521595

  15. Abnormal vaginal flora in low-risk pregnant women cared for by a public health service: prevalence and association with symptoms and findings from gynecological exams.

    PubMed

    Gondo, Danielle Cristina Alves Feitosa; Duarte, Marli Teresinha Cassamassimo; da Silva, Márcia Guimarães; de Lima Parada, Cristina Maria Garcia

    2010-01-01

    This study identifies the prevalence of vaginal flora alterations in low-risk pregnant women and their association with reported symptoms and gynecological exams. This quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in public primary care service units in Botucatu, SP, Brazil from 2006 to 2008 with 289 pregnant women from a stratified sample obtained by sampling by care unit. Tests of vaginal content were performed using Gram's method and testing for Trichomonas vaginalis using Diamond's medium. The prevalence of altered vaginal flora was 49.5%, of which bacterial vaginosis (20.7%), vaginal candidiasis (11.8%) and intermediate flora (11.1%) were the most frequent, not considering associations. Results revealed a high prevalence of vaginal flora alterations with little relation to symptoms, but in agreement with findings from the gynecological exams. Considering undesirable maternal and perinatal outcomes and feasible laboratory practices, the establishment of a routine for diagnosing vaginal flora alterations in low-risk pregnant women is suggested. PMID:21120411

  16. [Acute abdomen in gynecology].

    PubMed

    von Hugo, R; Meyer, B; Loos, W; Dirmeier, H

    1988-09-01

    The aim of the present study is, to describe the morbidity and mortality of 196 patients with an acute abdominal condition who underwent surgery at the Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics of the TU Munich between 1982 and 1986. This is a percentage of 2.7 of all 7,167 operations carried out during this period. 118 of these patients had an extrauterine pregnancy and were therefore excluded from the study. The second group of 79 patients, mostly with inflammatory diseases, were analyzed. In most of these cases the acute abdominal condition was caused by a tuboovarian abscess (48.1%), followed by peritonitis because of a bowel-disease (11.4%). 6 patients suffered from an abscessing endometritis due to a caesarean section with sepsis in 5 cases. A generalized peritonitis occurred in 5 cases and was treated with a planned relaparatomy with lavage. 63% of the patients had no complications within 28 days after operation, 13% developed a subileus; in 7% a relaparatomy was necessary. 6% of the patients had problems of wound-healing. One patient with stomach-cancer died 3 weeks after the operation because of a fulminant lung-embolism. Thus the mortality rate was 1.5%. A further 27% were treated at the intensive care-unit and 18% needed artificial respiration. The average postoperative period of hospitalisation was 15 days. In comparison, patients with elective operations remained 13 days. The morbidity and mortality of patients due to surgery of an acute abdominal condition was relatively small; postoperative complications could be well treated in all cases and is probably the result of a positive and early indication for surgical intervention. PMID:3181709

  17. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science.

    PubMed

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Greenberg, Caprice C; Neuman, Heather B

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force, and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high-quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and the application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high-quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women's health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:26858933

  18. Optimizing Cancer Care Delivery through Implementation Science

    PubMed Central

    Adesoye, Taiwo; Greenberg, Caprice C.; Neuman, Heather B.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Institute of Medicine report investigating cancer care concluded that the cancer care delivery system is in crisis due to an increased demand for care, increasing complexity of treatment, decreasing work force, and rising costs. Engaging patients and incorporating evidence-based care into routine clinical practice are essential components of a high-quality cancer delivery system. However, a gap currently exists between the identification of beneficial research findings and the application in clinical practice. Implementation research strives to address this gap. In this review, we discuss key components of high-quality implementation research. We then apply these concepts to a current cancer care delivery challenge in women’s health, specifically the implementation of a surgery decision aid for women newly diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:26858933

  19. Integrating cancer rehabilitation into medical care at a cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Grabois, M

    2001-08-15

    In spite of national health care legislative and model program initiatives, cancer rehabilitation has not kept pace with rehabilitation for patients with other medical problems. This article discusses, from a historical perspective, unsuccessful health care legislation related to cancer and problems in establishing and expanding cancer rehabilitation programs. The attempts to establish a cancer rehabilitation program at the Texas Medical Center and the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center are reviewed. Lessons learned over past 40 years and strategies for maintaining the success of a cancer rehabilitation program are discussed. PMID:11519034

  20. Coordinating care and treatment for cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Yip, Cheng Har; Samiei, Massoud; Cazap, Eduardo; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Datta, Niloy Ranjan; Camacho, Rolando; Weller, David; Pannarunothai, Supasit; Goh, Cynthia; Black, Fraser; Kaur, Ranjit; Fitch, Margaret; Sutcliffe, Catherine; Sutcliffe, Simon

    2012-01-01

    Survival following a diagnosis of cancer is contingent upon an interplay of factors, some non-modifiable (e.g., age, sex, genetics) and some modifiable (e.g., volitional choices) but the majority determined by circumstance (personal, social, health system context and capacity, and health policy). Accordingly, mortality and survival rates vary considerably as a function of geography, opportunity, wealth and development. Quality of life is impacted similarly, such that aspects of care related to coordination and integration of care across primary, community and specialist environments; symptom control, palliative and end-of-life care for those who will die of cancer; and survivorship challenges for those who will survive cancer, differs greatly across low, middle and high-income resource settings. Session 3 of the 4th International Cancer Control Congress (ICCC-4) focused on cancer care and treatment through three plenary presentations and five interactive workshop discussions: 1) establishing, implementing, operating and sustaining the capacity for quality cancer care; 2) the role of primary, community, and specialist care in cancer care and treatment; 3) the economics of affordable and sustainable cancer care; 4) issues around symptom control, support, and palliative/end-of-life care; and 5) issues around survivorship. A number of recommendations were proposed relating to capacity-building (standards and guidelines, protocols, new technologies and training and deployment) for safe, appropriate evidence-informed care; mapping and analysis of variations in primary, community and specialist care across countries with identification of models for effective, integrated clinical practice; the importance of considering the introduction, or expansion, of evidence-supported clinical practices from the perspectives of health economic impact, the value for health resources expended, and sustainability; capacity-building for palliative, end-of-life care and symptom control and

  1. Metformin and breast and gynecological cancer risk among women with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Soffer, Diana; Shi, Jiaxiao; Chung, Joanie; Schottinger, Joanne E; Wallner, Lauren P; Chlebowski, Rowan T; Lentz, Scott E; Haque, Reina

    2015-01-01

    Objective We investigated if metformin lowers breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk in women with type 2 diabetes mellitus compared with women who used other antidiabetic medications. Research design and methods We followed a cohort of 66 778 female patients with diabetes for a maximum of 12 years (median 6 years). We examined breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancer risk, and the composite cancer risk. We examined drug categories using pharmacy records: metformin only; metformin combination regimens; non-metformin regimens; and non-users. We used χ2 analyses to examine categorical variables. We conducted multivariable Cox regression models with time-dependent drug use status. Results Women who used metformin combination regimens versus metformin only had a 15% lower breast cancer risk (adjusted HR=0.85, 95% CI 0.69 to 1.04). After stratifying by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), the association attenuated in those who had poorly controlled HbA1c (adjusted HR=1.06, 95% CI 0.73 to 1.55). Given the small numbers of ovarian and endometrial cancer outcomes, we examined these as a composite. The risk of all cancers combined was similar in those who used metformin combination regimens versus metformin only (adjusted HR=0.92, 95% CI 0.78 to 1.10). We found no significant differences for breast cancer or all cancers combined when we compared risks in non-metformin users versus metformin only users. Conclusions Women who used metformin and other antidiabetic drugs had a lower breast cancer risk compared with women who used metformin only, but the results were not significant. We also found no difference in overall cancer risks when we compared women who used other antidiabetic drugs (no metformin) versus metformin users. PMID:25664181

  2. Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecologic Cancer Foundation wins The 2001 Associations Advance America “Award of Excellence” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation Named One of “America’s Best 100 Charities” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation ...

  3. Cancer and Stress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gynecologic Cancer Foundation wins The 2001 Associations Advance America “Award of Excellence” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation Named One of “America’s Best 100 Charities” Press Release: Gynecologic Cancer Foundation ...

  4. Cancer Survivorship for Primary Care Annotated Bibliography

    PubMed Central

    Westfall, Matthew Y.; Overholser, Linda; Zittleman, Linda; Westfall, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Long-term cancer survivorship care is a relatively new and rapidly advancing field of research. Increasing cancer survivorship rates have created a huge population of long-term cancer survivors whose cancer-specific needs challenge healthcare infrastructure and highlight a significant deficit of knowledge and guidelines in transitional care from treatment to normalcy/prolonged survivorship. As the paradigm of cancer care has changed from a fixation on the curative to the maintenance on long-term overall quality of life, so to, has the delineation of responsibility between oncologists and primary care physicians (PCPs). As more patients enjoy long-term survival, PCPs play a more comprehensive role in cancer care following acute treatment. To this end, this annotated bibliography was written to provide PCPs and other readers with an up-to-date and robust base of knowledge on long-term cancer survivorship, including definitions and epidemiological information as well as specific considerations and recommendations on physical, psychosocial, sexual, and comorbidity needs of survivors. Additionally, significant information is included on survivorship care, specifically Survivorship Care Plans (SPCs) and their evolution, utilization by oncologists and PCPs, and current gaps, as well as an introduction to patient navigation programs. Given rapid advancements in cancer research, this bibliography is meant to serve as current baseline reference outlining the state of the science. PMID:26114091

  5. [Infertility treatments after gynecologic cancers and indications of ovarian tissue cryopreservation].

    PubMed

    Belaisch-Allart, Joëlle; Bringer-Deutch, Sophie

    2010-03-01

    Increasing numbers of young people are surviving cancer, but treatment can affect their reproductive function. Female fertility is more difficult to preserve than male fertility. Fertility-sparing treatments may be possible for some women. For others, embryo cryopreservation is the only established option, provided cancer therapy can be postponed. However, cryopreservation of eggs or ovarian tissue is now becoming a real possibility. Medically assisted reproductive options for cancers survivors include ovarian stimulation, IVF and oocyte donation. Gestational surrogacy and adoption are other possibilities. PMID:21171244

  6. Hematologic Toxicity in RTOG 0418: A Phase 2 Study of Postoperative IMRT for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klopp, Ann H.; Moughan, Jennifer; Portelance, Lorraine; Miller, Brigitte E.; Salehpour, Mohammad R.; Hildebrandt, Evangeline; Nuanjing, Jenny; D'Souza, David; Souhami, Luis; Small, William; Gaur, Rakesh; Jhingran, Anuja

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), compared with conventional 4-field treatment, can reduce the volume of bone marrow irradiated. Pelvic bone marrow sparing has produced a clinically significant reduction in hematologic toxicity (HT). This analysis investigated HT in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0418, a prospective study to test the feasibility of delivering postoperative IMRT for cervical and endometrial cancer in a multiinstitutional setting. Methods and Materials: Patients in the RTOG 0418 study were treated with postoperative IMRT to 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics and vagina. Endometrial cancer patients received IMRT alone, whereas patients with cervical cancer received IMRT and weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}). Pelvic bone marrow was defined within the treatment field by using a computed tomography density-based autocontouring algorithm. The volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy and the median dose to bone marrow were correlated with HT, graded by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Results: Eighty-three patients were eligible for analysis (43 with endometrial cancer and 40 with cervical cancer). Patients with cervical cancer treated with weekly cisplatin and pelvic IMRT had grades 1-5 HT (23%, 33%, 25%, 0%, and 0% of patients, respectively). Among patients with cervical cancer, 83% received 5 or more cycles of cisplatin, and 90% received at least 4 cycles of cisplatin. The median percentage volume of bone marrow receiving 10, 20, 30, and 40 Gy in all 83 patients, respectively, was 96%, 84%, 61%, and 37%. Among cervical cancer patients with a V40 >37%, 75% had grade 2 or higher HT compared with 40% of patients with a V40 less than or equal to 37% (P =.025). Cervical cancer patients with a median bone marrow dose of >34.2 Gy also had higher rates of grade ≥2 HT than did those with a dose of ≤34.2 Gy (74% vs 43%, P=.049). Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT with weekly cisplatin is

  7. Cancer follow-up care. Patients' perspectives.

    PubMed Central

    Miedema, Baukje; MacDonald, Ian; Tatemichi, Sue

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess family physicians' and specialists' involvement in cancer follow-up care and how this involvement is perceived by cancer patients. DESIGN: Self-administered survey. SETTING: A health region in New Brunswick. PARTICIPANTS: A nonprobability cluster sample of 183 participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patients' perceptions of cancer follow-up care. RESULTS: More than a third of participants (36%) were not sure which physician was in charge of their cancer follow-up care. As part of follow-up care, 80% of participants wanted counseling from their family physicians, but only 20% received it. About a third of participants (32%) were not satisfied with the follow-up care provided by their family physicians. In contrast, only 18% of participants were dissatisfied with the follow-up care provided by specialists. Older participants were more satisfied with cancer follow-up care than younger participants. CONCLUSION: Cancer follow-up care is increasingly becoming part of family physicians' practices. Family physicians need to develop an approach that addresses patients' needs, particularly in the area of emotional support. PMID:12901486

  8. Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) proposals for changes of the current FIGO staging system.

    PubMed

    Petru, Edgar; Lück, Hans-Joachim; Stuart, Gavin; Gaffney, David; Millan, David; Vergote, Ignace

    2009-04-01

    The FIGO has invited the GCIG to make contributions for possible changes of the FIGO staging system. We report on the consensus within the GCIG committee to propose the following changes in the current FIGO classification. Cervical cancer: Since fertility-preserving surgery is increasingly used in early disease, stage IB1-A may include tumors of up to 2 cm in diameter. Endometrial cancer: Positive peritoneal cytology alone should not classify this patient to be allotted to stage IIIA disease. Lymphadenectomy should be recommended in high-risk clinical stage I patients and in those with adverse histologies. Ovarian cancer: In early stage disease, grading and in advanced disease, the amount of residual disease should be reported. Vulvar cancer: The lymph node status should always be reported. In the case of enlarged inguinal nodes, histology should be obtained by any means. Vaginal cancer: Besides bladder and rectal tumor involvement urethral mucosal involvement should be added. Gestational trophoblastic disease: The modified WHO scoring system which is widely accepted should be adopted. PMID:19195765

  9. Optimizing cancer care through mobile health.

    PubMed

    Odeh, Bassel; Kayyali, Reem; Nabhani-Gebara, Shereen; Philip, Nada

    2015-07-01

    The survival rates for patients living with cancer are increasing, due to recent advances in detection, prevention and treatment. It has been estimated that there were 28 million cancer survivors around the world in 2012. In the UK, for patients diagnosed in 2007, it is predicted that more than half of them will survive their cancer for 5 years or more. A large majority of cancer survivors report unmet supportive care needs and distressing symptoms and adverse long-term consequences related to their cancer. Cancer management could be optimized to better meet patients demand through technology, including mobile health (m-Health). m-Health is defined as the use of mobile communications and network technologies for health care. m-Health can help both patients and health-care professionals and play an important part in managing and delivering cancer care including managing side effects, supporting drug adherence, providing cancer information, planning and follow up and detecting and diagnosing cancer. Health authorities have already published guidelines regulating m-Health to insure patient safety and improve the accountability of its applications. PMID:25649121

  10. Integrated Molecular Profiling in Advanced Cancers Trial

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Breast Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Genitourinary Cancer; Pancreatobiliary Gastrointestinal Cancer; Upper Aerodigestive Tract Cancer; Gynecological Cancers; Melanoma Cancers; Rare Cancers; Unknown Primary Cancers

  11. Home Care Nursing Improves Cancer Symptom Management

    Cancer.gov

    Home care nursing (HCN) improves the management of symptoms in breast and colorectal cancer patients who take the oral chemotherapy drug capecitabine, according to a study published online November 16 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

  12. Adolescent gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Joseph S; Lara-Torre, Eduardo

    2009-04-01

    Given new developments in the field of adolescent reproductive health, this review focuses on highlighting new guidelines and practice patterns in evaluation and management of adolescent gynecologic problems. First, understanding the proper techniques for the initial examination is key to establishing a long-term relationship with this age group. Reservations about the first gynecologic examination are common, and the practitioner's goal is foremost to make the patient as comfortable as possible. Preventive health in this patient population is key, and practitioners should become comfortable with providing education about topics as diverse as sexuality, eating disorders, and dating violence. Furthermore, the frequency with which teenagers report sexual activity and the high unintended pregnancy rate in this age group makes counseling regarding effective contraception essential. Additionally, practitioners are encouraged to take the opportunity to discuss the availability of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine with adolescents. In 2007, adolescents were designated as a special population, given the frequency with which they acquire and clear mild HPV-related cervical dysplasia. More conservative treatment in this population is generally favored. During their transition through puberty, disorders of menstruation become the most common complaint requiring the attention of the gynecologist. Most commonly, anovulation serves as the cause behind such abnormal bleeding. Polycystic ovarian syndrome can develop in early puberty and carry its consequences into adulthood. Infertility, diabetes, and hirsutism mark the most important components of the syndrome and require age-appropriate management. Finally, the consequences of endometriosis on the future fertility of adolescents have brought early intervention to light. Recognition and prompt treatment are advocated to prevent the future implications of this disease. PMID:19305342

  13. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) consensus review for mucinous ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ledermann, Jonathan A; Luvero, Daniela; Shafer, Aaron; O'Connor, Dennis; Mangili, Giorgia; Friedlander, Michael; Pfisterer, Jacobus; Mirza, Mansoor R; Kim, Jae-Weon; Alexandre, Jerome; Oza, Amit; Brown, Jubilee

    2014-11-01

    Mucinous carcinomas of the ovary can be primary or metastatic in origin. Improvements in the pathological diagnosis have increased the ability to distinguish between primary and metastatic ovarian cancers and shown that primary mucinous carcinomas are a rare subtype of ovarian cancer. Most tumors are diagnosed at an early stage, and the prognosis after surgery is good. Advanced or recurrent mucinous carcinoma of the ovary responds poorly to current cytotoxic treatments, and the prognosis is poor. Here, we review the guidelines for surgery and the results of treatment of advanced and recurrent disease. Chemotherapy with platinum and paclitaxel is currently used to treat advanced disease, but the effect of these drugs is modest, and new treatments are needed. PMID:25341574

  14. HER2 Expression Beyond Breast Cancer: Therapeutic Implications for Gynecologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    English, Diana P.; Roque, Dana M.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    HER2 or ErbB2 is a member of the epidermal growth factor family and is overexpressed in subsets of breast, ovarian, gastric, colorectal, pancreatic and endometrial cancers. HER2 regulates signaling through several pathways (Ras/Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase/protein kinase-B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathways) associated with cell survival and proliferation. HER2 overexpressed and/or gene amplified tumors are generally regarded as biologically aggressive neoplasms. In breast, cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancer, there have been several studies linking the amplification of the c-erbB2 gene with chemo-resistance and overall poor survival. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting HER2 holds promise for patients harboring these aggressive neoplasms. Trastuzumab combined with cytotoxic chemotherapy agents or conjugated with radioactive isotopes is currently being investigated in clinical trials of several tumor types. PMID:23529353

  15. Inflammation: its role and interplay in the development of cancer, with special focus on gynecological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Goswami, B; Rajappa, M; Sharma, M; Sharma, A

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between inflammation and cancer is intriguing. Mechanisms contributing to the pathobiology of carcinogenesis are multiple and complex. Many aspects still elude researchers and are subjects of intense speculation and debate, for example, the triggering factor for malignant transformation in inflammation. A comprehensive literature search was conducted from the Web sites of the National Library of Medicine and Pubmed Central, the US National Library of Medicine's digital archive of life sciences literature. The data were accessed from books and journals that published recent articles in this field. Several recent studies have identified nuclear factor-kappa B as a key modulator in driving inflammation to cancers. An inflammatory microenvironment inhabiting various inflammatory cells and a network of signaling molecules is essential for the malignant progression of transformed cells. This is attributed to the mutagenic predisposition of persistent infection-fighting agents at sites of chronic inflammation. The appreciation of the role of inflammation in carcinogenesis provides a mechanistic framework to understand clinical benefits of newer therapeutic strategies An in-depth knowledge about various pathogenic mechanisms involved in cancer will help clinicians in better management of the disease. PMID:17944921

  16. The cost of cancer care: Part II.

    PubMed

    Eagle, David

    2012-11-01

    The rising cost of cancer treatment competes with the availability of effective therapy as a limiting factor in our war on cancer. Specific programs are being developed that have the potential to slow the growth in spending on oncology care. The Affordable Care Act includes provisions for containing healthcare costs, such as accountable care organizations and the Independent Payment Advisory Board. Within oncology, specific programs have emerged, including clinical pathways, episode-of-care based payment arrangements, and the oncology medical home. All models of cost containment have strengths and weaknesses. Outside of the United States, explicit rationing exists' through national health technology assessment organizations. Excessive demands on physicians to limit spending at the bedside could potentially create conflicts with their professional responsibility to patients. While spending for cancer care in the US is high, its "worth" is ultimately a societal decision. Recent economic modeling suggests that we may be achieving value for the money we spend. PMID:23330356

  17. Palonosetron versus granisetron in combination with aprepitant for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in patients with gynecologic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Satoe; Tsunetoh, Satoshi; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Kanemura, Masanori; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is no research regarding the appropriate antiemetic agents for female patients, especially those receiving moderately emetogenic chemotherapy (MEC). We evaluated the antiemetic efficacy of a combination of 5-HT3 receptor with/without aprepitant in patients with gynecological cancer treated with the TC (paclitaxel and carboplatin) regimen of MEC. Methods We enrolled 38 patients diagnosed with gynecologic cancer and scheduled to receive the TC regimen. The patients were randomly assigned to receive a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, either palonosetron in the first cycle followed by granisetron in the second cycle or vice versa. In the third cycle, all patients received a combination of the 5-HT3 receptor and dexamethasone with/without aprepitant. Results When three drugs were administered, palonosetron consistently produced an equivalent complete response (CR) rate to granisetron in the acute phase (89.5% vs. 86.8%, p=0.87) and delayed phase (60.5% vs. 65.8%, p=0.79). With regard to the change in dietary intake, palonosetron exhibited similar efficacy to granisetron in the acute phase (92.1% vs. 89.4%, p=0.19) and delayed phase (65.7% vs. 68.4%, p=0.14). However, in the delayed phase, the addition of aprepitant therapy with a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist and dexamethasone produced a higher CR rate than a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist with dexamethasone (93.3% vs. 47.8%, p<0.001) and allowed the patients to maintain a higher level of dietary intake (93.3% vs. 56.5%, p<0.001). Conclusion The addition of aprepitant therapy was more effective than the control therapy of a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist, and dexamethasone in gynecological cancer patients treated with the TC regimen. PMID:26197776

  18. Relative Importance of Hip and Sacral Pain Among Long-Term Gynecological Cancer Survivors Treated With Pelvic Radiotherapy and Their Relationships to Mean Absorbed Doses

    SciTech Connect

    Waldenstroem, Ann-Charlotte; Olsson, Caroline; Wilderaeng, Ulrica; Dunberger, Gail; Lind, Helena; Alevronta, Eleftheria; Al-Abany, Massoud; Tucker, Susan; Avall-Lundqvist, Elisabeth; Johansson, Karl-Axel; Steineck, Gunnar

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relative importance of patient-reported hip and sacral pain after pelvic radiotherapy (RT) for gynecological cancer and its relationship to the absorbed doses in these organs. Methods and Materials: We used data from a population-based study that included 650 long-term gynecological cancer survivors treated with pelvic RT in the Gothenburg and Stockholm areas in Sweden with a median follow-up of 6 years (range, 2-15) and 344 population controls. Symptoms were assessed through a study-specific postal questionnaire. We also analyzed the hip and sacral dose-volume histogram data for 358 of the survivors. Results: Of the survivors, one in three reported having or having had hip pain after completing RT. Daily pain when walking was four times as common among the survivors compared to controls. Symptoms increased in frequency with a mean absorbed dose >37.5 Gy. Also, two in five survivors reported pain in the sacrum. Sacral pain also affected their walking ability and tended to increase with a mean absorbed dose >42.5 Gy. Conclusions: Long-term survivors of gynecological cancer treated with pelvic RT experience hip and sacral pain when walking. The mean absorbed dose was significantly related to hip pain and was borderline significantly related to sacral pain. Keeping the total mean absorbed hip dose below 37.5 Gy during treatment might lower the occurrence of long-lasting pain. In relation to the controls, the survivors had a lower occurrence of pain and pain-related symptoms from the hips and sacrum compared with what has previously been reported for the pubic bone.

  19. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, may cause spiritual distress. Religious and spiritual values are important to patients coping with cancer. Studies have shown that religious and spiritual values are important to Americans. Most American adults say that they ...

  20. Nutrition in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... energy. Anorexia and cachexia are common causes of malnutrition in cancer patients. Anorexia (the loss of appetite ... anorexia. Anorexia is the most common cause of malnutrition in cancer patients. Cachexia is a condition marked ...

  1. Primary Care of the Prostate Cancer Survivor.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Erika M; Farrell, Timothy W

    2016-05-01

    This summary of the American Cancer Society Prostate Cancer Survivorship Care Guidelines targets primary care physicians who coordinate care of prostate cancer survivors with subspecialists. Prostate cancer survivors should undergo prostate-specific antigen screening every six to 12 months and digital rectal examination annually. Surveillance of patients who choose watchful waiting for their prostate cancer should be conducted by a subspecialist. Any hematuria or rectal bleeding must be thoroughly evaluated. Prostate cancer survivors should be screened regularly for urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction. Patients with predominant urge incontinence symptoms, which can occur after surgical and radiation treatments, may benefit from an anticholinergic agent. If there is difficulty with bladder emptying, a trial of an alpha blocker may be considered. A phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor can effectively treat sexual dysfunction following treatment for prostate cancer. Osteoporosis screening should occur before initiation of androgen deprivation therapy, and patients treated with androgen deprivation therapy should be monitored for anemia, metabolic syndrome, and vasomotor symptoms. Healthy lifestyle choices should be encouraged, including weight management, regular physical activity, proper nutrition, and smoking cessation. Primary care physicians should be vigilant for psychosocial distress, including depression, among prostate cancer survivors, as well as the potential impact of this distress on patients' family members and partners. PMID:27175954

  2. Smoking in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... keep smoking increase their risk of having a second cancer. You have a higher risk of a second cancer if you keep smoking, whether you have ... or not smoking-related. The risk of a second cancer may last for up to 20 years, ...

  3. Ovarian Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Gynecologic Cancers Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gynecologic Cancers Basic Information What Is Gynecologic Cancer? What Are ...

  4. Possible relationship between endocrine disrupting chemicals and hormone dependent gynecologic cancers.

    PubMed

    Dogan, Selen; Simsek, Tayup

    2016-07-01

    The effects of the natural and synthetic estrogens have been studied for a long time but the data regarding estrogen related chemicals (endocrine disrupting chemicals, EDCs) and their effects on reproductive system are scarce. EDCs are hormone like agents that are readily present in the environment, which may alter the endocrine system of humans and animals. Approximately 800 chemicals are known or suspected to have the potential to function as EDC. Potential role of EDCs on reproductive disease has gained attention in medical literature in recent years. We hypothesize that exposure to low doses of EDCs in a chronic manner could cause hormone dependent genital cancers including ovarian and endometrial cancer. Long term exposure to low concentrations of EDCs may exert potentiation effect with each other and even with endogenous estrogens and could inhibit enzymes responsible for estrogen metabolism. Exposure time to these EDCs is essential as we have seen from Diethylstilbestrol experience. Dose-response curves of EDCs are also unpredictable. Hence mode of action of EDCs are more complex than previously thought. In the light of these controversies lower doses of EDCs in long term exposure is not harmless. Possibility of this relationship and this hypothesis merit further investigation especially through in vivo studies that could better show the realistic environmental exposure. With the confirmation of our hypothesis, possible EDCs could be identified and eliminated from general use as a public health measure. PMID:27241264

  5. OCT in Gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Irina A.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Belinson, Jerome L.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    Timely and efficient diagnosis of diseases of the female reproductivesystem is very important from the social viewpoint [1, 2]. Diagnosticefficacy of the existing techniques still needs improvement sincemalignant neoplasms of the female reproductive system organs are stableleaders among causes of death (over 35.9 %) [3]. Each year, 851.9 thousand genital cancer cases are recorded worldwide [1, 2]. However, the diagnostic efficacy of the visual examination with biopsy is limited. Correct interpretation of colposcopic features requires high skills and long-term clinical experience, which makes colposcopy very subjective and limits interobserver agreement [8-10]. OCT is known to visualize in vivo and noninvasively tissue microstructure with spatial resolution approaching the histologic level and therefore can be expected to guide biopsies and to provide real-time tissue structure information when biopsies are contraindicated or impractical. Although thorough clinical studies are required to determine if OCT can be suitable for this purpose in gynecology in general and for cervical cancer in particular, the early results look encouraging. In this chapter, we present a wide spectrum of the OCT studies of different partsof the female reproductive system and demonstrate the potential of the clinical use of this new visualization method in gynecological practice.

  6. Beneficial effects of sucralphate in radiation induced diarrhea. An open randomized study in gynecological cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Henriksson, R; Arevärn, M; Franzén, L; Persson, H; Stendahl, U

    1990-01-01

    In an open randomized study including 51 consecutive patients with gynaecological malignancies sucralphate was daily administered to patients receiving pelvic irradiation. Sucralphate, an aluminium hydroxide complex of sulphated sucrose used in the treatment of gastric ulcer, seems to be of value in preventing radiation-induced bowel discomfort. The most objective parameter, frequency of diarrhoea was almost 50% less in the sucralphate groups as compared to the controls. The patients receiving sucralphate in general displayed only minor alterations in bowel habits even at the end of the radiation treatment. The number of patients requiring symptomatic therapy with loperamide were markedly lower in the sucralphate group. Subjective discomfort such as nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite were also less common. A reduction in acute reactions to irradiation increases the possibility of carrying through planned treatment and avoids unfavourable intermissions, and thus curing the patient with cancer in the pelvis by means of radiotherapy. PMID:2245814

  7. Quality of care indicators in rectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Demetter, P; Ceelen, W; Danse, E; Haustermans, K; Jouret-Mourin, A; Kartheuser, A; Laurent, S; Mollet, G; Nagy, N; Scalliet, P; Van Cutsem, E; Van Den Eynde, M; Van de Stadt, J; Van Eycken, E; Van Laethem, J L; Vindevoghel, K; Penninckx, F

    2011-09-01

    Quality of health care is a hot topic, especially with regard to cancer. Although rectal cancer is, in many aspects, a model oncologic entity, there seem to be substantial differences in quality of care between countries, hospitals and physicians. PROCARE, a Belgian multidisciplinary national project to improve outcome in all patients with rectum cancer, identified a set of quality of care indicators covering all aspects of the management of rectal cancer. This set should permit national and international benchmarking, i.e. comparing results from individual hospitals or teams with national and international performances with feedback to participating teams. Such comparison could indicate whether further improvement is possible and/or warranted. PMID:22103052

  8. Music therapy in supportive cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Stanczyk, Malgorzata Monika

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to show some aspects of music therapy application in cancer care and to present the integration of music therapy program into a continuous supportive cancer care for inpatients. A cancer diagnosis is one of the most feared and serious life events that causes stress in individuals and families. Cancer disrupts social, physical and emotional well-being and results in a range of emotions, including anger, fear, sadness, guilt, embarrassment and shame. Music therapy is a part of a complementary medicine program in supportive cancer care which accompanies medical treatment. There are many benefits of music therapy for cancer patients—interactive music therapy techniques (instrumental improvisation, singing) as well as receptive music therapy techniques (listening to recorded or live music, music and imaginary) can be used to improve mood, decrease stress, pain, anxiety level and enhance relaxation. Music therapy is an effective form of supporting cancer care for patients during the treatment process. It may be also basic for planning effective programs of rehabilitation to promote wellness, improve physical and emotional well-being and the quality of life. PMID:24376975

  9. Advances in clinical research in gynecologic radiation oncology: an RTOG symposium.

    PubMed

    Gaffney, David; Mundt, Arno; Schwarz, Julie; Eifel, Patricia

    2012-05-01

    There have been inexorable improvements in gynecologic radiation oncology through technologically advances, 3-dimensional imaging, and clinical research. Investment in these 3 critical areas has improved, and will continue to improve, the lives of patients with gynecologic cancer. Advanced technology delivery in gynecologic radiation oncology is challenging owing to the following: (1) setup difficulties, (2) managing considerable internal organ motion, and (3) responding to tumor volume reduction during treatment. Image guidance is a potential route to solve these problems and improve delivery to tumor and sparing organs at risk. Imaging with positron emission tomography-computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are contributing significantly to improved accuracy in diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in cancer of the cervix. Functional imaging by exploiting tumor biology may improve prognosis and treatment. Clinical trials have been the greatest mechanism to improve and establish standards of care in women with vulvar, endometrial, and cervical cancer. There have been multiple technological advances and practice changing trials within the past several decades. Many important questions remain in optimizing care for women with gynecologic malignancies. The performance of clinical trials will be advanced with the use of consistent language (ie, similar staging system and criteria), eligibility criteria that fit the research question, end points that matter, adequate statistical power, complete follow-up, and prompt publication of mature results. PMID:22398709

  10. Definitions of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists.

    PubMed

    McCue, Brigid; Fagnant, Robert; Townsend, Arthur; Morgan, Meredith; Gandhi-List, Shefali; Colegrove, Tanner; Stosur, Harriet; Olson, Rob; Meyer, Karenmarie; Lin, Andrew; Tessmer-Tuck, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    The obstetric hospitalist and the obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist evolved in response to diverse forces in medicine, including the need for leadership on labor and delivery units, an increasing emphasis on quality and safety in obstetrics and gynecology, the changing demographics of the obstetric and gynecologic workforce, and rising liability costs. Current (although limited) research suggests that obstetric and obstetric and gynecologic hospitalists may improve the quality and safety of obstetric care, including lower cesarean delivery rates and higher vaginal birth after cesarean delivery rates as well as lower liability costs and fewer liability events. This research is currently hampered by the use of varied terminology. The leadership of the Society of Obstetric and Gynecologic Hospitalists proposes standardized definitions of an obstetric hospitalist, an obstetric and gynecologic hospitalist, and obstetric and gynecologic hospital medicine practices to standardize communication and facilitate program implementation and research. Clinical investigations regarding obstetric and gynecologic practices (including hospitalist practices) should define inpatient coverage arrangements using these standardized definitions to allow for fair conclusions and comparisons between practices. PMID:26942370

  11. American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; LaMonte, Samuel J; Erb, Nicole L; Beckman, Kerry L; Sadeghi, Nader; Hutcheson, Katherine A; Stubblefield, Michael D; Abbott, Dennis M; Fisher, Penelope S; Stein, Kevin D; Lyman, Gary H; Pratt-Chapman, Mandi L

    2016-05-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care Guideline was developed to assist primary care clinicians and other health practitioners with the care of head and neck cancer survivors, including monitoring for recurrence, screening for second primary cancers, assessment and management of long-term and late effects, health promotion, and care coordination. A systematic review of the literature was conducted using PubMed through April 2015, and a multidisciplinary expert workgroup with expertise in primary care, dentistry, surgical oncology, medical oncology, radiation oncology, clinical psychology, speech-language pathology, physical medicine and rehabilitation, the patient perspective, and nursing was assembled. While the guideline is based on a systematic review of the current literature, most evidence is not sufficient to warrant a strong recommendation. Therefore, recommendations should be viewed as consensus-based management strategies for assisting patients with physical and psychosocial effects of head and neck cancer and its treatment. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:203-239. © 2016 American Cancer Society. PMID:27002678

  12. Short-term morbidity in transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection for advanced stage gynecologic cancer.

    PubMed

    LaFargue, C J; Sawyer, B T; Bristow, R E

    2016-08-01

    Ovarian cancer is commonly diagnosed at an advanced stage, with disease involving the upper abdomen. The finding of enlarged cardiophrenic lymph nodes (CPLNs) on pre-operative imaging often indicates the presence of malignant spread to the mediastinum. Surgical resection of CPLN through a transdiaphragmatic approach can help to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual. A retrospective chart review was conducted on all patients who underwent transdiaphragmatic cardiophrenic lymph node resection from 8/1/11 through 2/1/15. All relevant pre-, intra-, and post-operative characteristics and findings were recorded. A brief description of the surgical technique is included for reference. Eleven patients were identified who had undergone transdiaphragmatic resection of cardiophrenic lymph nodes. Malignancy was identified in 18/21 (86%) of total lymph nodes submitted. The median number of post-operative days was 7. The overall post-operative morbidity associated with CPLN resection was low, with the most common finding being a small pleural effusion present on chest x-ray between POD# 3-5 (55%). Transdiaphragmatic CPLN resection is a feasible procedure with relatively minor short-term post-operative morbidities that can be used to achieve cytoreduction to no gross residual disease. PMID:27354998

  13. The Cost Effectiveness of a Tailored, Web-Based Care Program to Enhance Postoperative Recovery in Gynecologic Patients in Comparison With Usual Care: Protocol of a Stepped Wedge Cluster Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Bouwsma, Esther VA; Anema, Johannes R; Vonk Noordegraaf, Antonie; Knol, Dirk L; Bosmans, Judith E; Schraffordt Koops, Steven E; van Kesteren, Paul JM; van Baal, W Marchien; Lips, Jos P; Emanuel, Mark H; Scholten, Petrus C; Mozes, Alexander; Adriaanse, Albert H; Brölmann, Hans AM

    2014-01-01

    Background The length of recovery after benign gynecological surgery and return to work frequently exceeds the period that is recommended or expected by specialists. A prolonged recovery is associated with a poorer quality of life. In addition, costs due to prolonged sick leave following gynecological surgery cause a significant financial burden on society. Objective The objective of our study was to present the protocol of a stepped wedge cluster randomized controlled trial to evaluate the cost effectiveness of a new care program for patients undergoing hysterectomy and/or adnexal surgery for benign disease, compared to the usual care. Methods The care program under study, designed to improve convalescence and to prevent delayed return to work, targets two levels. At the hospital level, guidelines will be distributed among clinical staff in order to stimulate evidence-based patient education. At the patient level, additional perioperative guidance is provided by means of an eHealth intervention, equipping patients with tailored convalescence advice, and an occupational intervention is available for those patients at risk of prolonged sick leave. Due to the stepped wedge design of the trial, the care program will be sequentially rolled out among the 9 participating hospitals, from which the patients are recruited. Eligible for this study are employed women, 18-65 years of age, who are scheduled for hysterectomy and/or laparoscopic adnexal surgery. The primary outcome is full sustainable return to work. The secondary outcomes include general recovery, quality of life, self-efficacy, coping, and pain. The data will be collected by means of self-reported electronic questionnaires before surgery and at 2, 6, 12, 26, and 52 weeks after surgery. Sick leave and cost data are measured by monthly sick leave calendars, and cost diaries during the 12 month follow-up period. The economic evaluation will be performed from the societal perspective. All statistical analyses will

  14. Hope, quality of life, and benefit from treatment in women having chemotherapy for platinum-resistant/refractory recurrent ovarian cancer: the gynecologic cancer intergroup symptom benefit study.

    PubMed

    Sjoquist, Katrin M; Friedlander, Michael L; O'Connell, Rachel L; Voysey, Merryn; King, Madeleine T; Stockler, Martin R; Oza, Amit M; Gillies, Kim; Martyn, Julie K; Butow, Phyllis N

    2013-01-01

    Chemotherapy for platinum-resistant/refractory ovarian cancer is motivated by the hope of benefit. We sought to determine the relationships between: (a) trait hope, expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy, and anxiety and depression; (b) hope and perceived efficacy of chemotherapy; and (c) unfulfilled hope (where expectations for benefit are not fulfilled) and depression. Methods. Adult patients enrolled within stage 1 of the Gynecologic Cancer Intergroup Symptom Benefit Study were included. Patient. Reported outcomes were collected from 126 women with predominantly platinum-resistant ovarian cancer at baseline, prior to the first four treatment cycles (12-16 weeks), and four weeks after completing chemotherapy or at disease progression, whichever came first. Associations were assessed with Spearman rank correlation coefficient (r) and odds ratio. Results. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy were weakly correlated with each other (r = 0.25). Trait hope, but not expectation of symptom benefit, was negatively correlated with anxiety (r = -0.43) and depression (r = -0.50). The smaller the discrepancy between perceived and expected symptom benefit, the less likely the patient was to have scores indicative of depression (odds ratio: 0.68; 95% confidence interval: 0.49-0.96; p = .026). Conclusion. Trait hope and expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy appear to be distinct and independent of the aspects of quality of life and scores for depression. Hope did not appear to affect perceived efficacy of chemotherapy in alleviating symptoms, but women whose expectation of symptom benefit from chemotherapy was not fulfilled were more likely to have scores indicative of depression. It may be preferable to encourage hope toward achievable goals rather than toward benefits from chemotherapy. PMID:24107972

  15. Relevance of Health Economics in the Medical Treatment of Breast Cancer: The View of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO)

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Georg; Hans-Joachim, Hindenburg; Schilling, Jörg; Klare, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this article, the position of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO) on the health economics of medical breast cancer therapy is presented. The BNGO unites professionals and employees whose principal activity lies in highly specialized gynecologic oncology. In Germany, 139 specialists are united in 128 professional practices. According to § 12 of the Social Code, the oncological services provided by members must be ‘sufficient, effective and economical; they must not exceed what is necessary’. People who are covered by statutory health insurance in Germany are entitled to sufficient benefits. Sufficient measures are measures that benefit the patient with breast cancer and have a positive effect on the course of the disease. In § 35b of the Social Code, the benefit of the patient is defined as ‘improvement in health, shortening of the duration of illness, lengthening of lifespan, reduction of side effects and an improvement in the quality of life’. In the adjuvant situation, the ideal goal is healing; in the palliative situation, the most basic marker is overall survival, while surrogate markers are the progression-free interval, improved quality of life, or diminished symptoms. At the same time, the law on economic assessment stipulates ‘appropriateness and reasonableness of reimbursement by the insured community’. PMID:24715840

  16. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Versus 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Postoperative Gynecologic Cancer: Are They Covering the Same Planning Target Volume?

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Nikhilesh; D'souza, David; Millman, Barbara; Yaremko, Brian P; Leung, Eric; Whiston, Frances; Hajdok, George; Wong, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose: This study compares dosimetric parameters of planning target volume (PTV) coverage and organs at risk (OAR) sparing when postoperative radiotherapy for gynecologic cancers is delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus a four-field (4FLD) box technique. Material and Methods: From July to December 2012, women requiring postoperative radiation for gynecologic cancers were treated with a standardized VMAT protocol. Two sets of optimized 4FLD plans were retrospectively generated: one based on standard anatomical borders (4FLD) and one based on the clinical target volume (CTV) created for VMAT with a 2 cm expansion guiding field border placement (4FLD+2). Ninety-five percent isodose curves were generated to evaluate PTV coverage. Results: VMAT significantly improved dose conformity compared with 4FLD and 4FLD+2 plans (p < 0.001) and provided additional coverage of the PTV posteriorly and superiorly, corresponding to coverage of the presacral and proximal iliac vessels. There was a significant reduction in dose to all OARs with VMAT, including a 58% reduction in the volume of the small bowel receiving more than 45 Gy (p=0.005). Conclusions: Despite treating a larger volume, radiotherapy using a 4FLD technique is less homogenous and provides inferior coverage of the PTV compared with VMAT. With meticulous treatment planning and delivery, VMAT effectively encompasses the PTV and minimizes dose to OARs. PMID:26973802

  17. Personalized Care in Uterine Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, David A.; Bodurka, Diane C.

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer typically presents at an early stage when surgery alone, with or without radiotherapy, is often curative. However, in women who present with advanced disease or who develop disease recurrence, long-term prognosis is poor. While surgical cytoreduction remains the mainstay of initial therapy, over the last several decades, the roles of cytotoxic chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy have been evaluated in both the adjuvant and recurrent setting in an attempt to improve long-term survival while also minimizing associated toxicities. Unfortunately, response rates remain poor and survival is limited in these settings. More recently, with the introduction of personalized cancer treatment, several biologic agents have been developed that target specific pathways critical to tumor initiation and growth. Molecular studies have found that many endometrial cancers are driven by some of these tumorigenic pathways, which has led to early clinical studies evaluating the role of these targeted agents in patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. This review describes existing treatment options for patients with early and advanced endometrioid endometrial cancer, as well as for patients with uterine serous cancers. Furthermore, this review examines the growing body of literature involving targeted biologic agents as treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. PMID:23271352

  18. Definitions for response and progression in ovarian cancer clinical trials incorporating RECIST 1.1 and CA 125 agreed by the Gynecological Cancer Intergroup (GCIG).

    PubMed

    Rustin, Gordon John Sampson; Vergote, Ignace; Eisenhauer, Elizabeth; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Quinn, Michael; Thigpen, Tate; du Bois, Andreas; Kristensen, Gunnar; Jakobsen, Anders; Sagae, Satoru; Greven, Kathryn; Parmar, Mahesh; Friedlander, Michael; Cervantes, Andres; Vermorken, Jan

    2011-02-01

    The Gynecological Cancer Intergroup (GCIG) has previously reached consensus regarding the criteria that should be used in clinical trial protocols to define progression-free survival after first-line therapy as well as the criteria to define response to treatment in recurrent disease using the serum marker CA 125 and has specified the situations where these criteria should be used. However, the publications did not include detailed definitions, nor were they written to accommodate the new version of Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria (version 1.1) now available. Thus, we recommend that the definitions described later in detail are incorporated into clinical trial protocols to maintain consistency. The criteria for defining progression are now acceptable in clinical trials of recurrent disease as they have since been validated (Pujade-Lauraine, personal communication, 2010). The GCIG requests that data from all clinical trials using these definitions are made available to GCIG trial centers so that continual validation and improvement can be accomplished. These definitions were developed from analyzing patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy and have not yet been validated in patients receiving molecular targeting agents. PMID:21270624

  19. Neonatal and Prepubertal Gynecologic Concerns.

    PubMed

    Merens, Teri A

    2015-10-01

    The role of the pediatrician in today's health care environment is one of constant evolution, as specialty care becomes more difficult to access for a growing number of young patients and their families. The primary care doctor will now have to offer more reassurance and follow-up that was once thought to be solely the role of the subspecialist. This article helps to define commonly seen entities in pediatric gynecology and offers the necessary background enabling the practitioner to provide a simple course of treatment, reassurance, or appropriate referral for specialty care. PMID:26473420

  20. Individualizing cancer care with interoperable information systems.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Kathleen A

    2009-01-01

    There are three levels of interoperable informatics that are co-occurring in the United States to link data to provide more comprehensive care to patients. One is the National Health Information Network (NHIN) that is establishing use case scenarios and standards for interoperability for patients with multiple conditions. The second is the National Cancer Institute's project that supports the enterprise work called the Cancer Bioinformatics Grid (caBIG) in linking clinical care with bioinformatics, tissue repositories, and imaging for patients with cancer. The third is in the area of translating the discoveries of biology to bedside care through the National Institutes of Health (NIH) translational research efforts to get these new biomedical and genomic discoveries in practice in multiple healthcare delivery environments. These developments are becoming global networks in the diagnosis and cure of cancer as the primary outcome. This paper describes the national efforts and the global connection to Europe through the caBIG program. The European program that is beginning to link to cancer research internationally is the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) in the United Kingdom. They are developing the NCRI Oncology Information Exchange (ONIX) to provide the cancer research community with the ability to share information. PMID:19592871

  1. An opportunity for coordinated cancer care: intersection of health care reform, primary care providers, and cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Collins, Lauren G; Wender, Richard; Altshuler, Marc

    2010-01-01

    The US health care system has become increasingly unsustainable, threatened by poor quality and spiraling costs. Many Americans are not receiving recommended preventive care, including cancer screening tests. Passage of the Affordable Care Act in March 2010 has the potential to reverse this course by increasing access to primary care providers, extending coverage and affordability of health insurance, and instituting proven quality measures. In order for health care reform to succeed, it will require a stronger primary care workforce, a new emphasis on patient-centered care, and payment incentives that reward quality over quantity. Innovations such as patient-centered medical homes, accountable care organizations, and improved quality reporting methods are central features of a redesigned health care delivery system and will ultimately change the face of cancer care in the United States. PMID:21131791

  2. Robotic-assisted surgery in gynecologic oncology.

    PubMed

    Sinno, Abdulrahman K; Fader, Amanda N

    2014-10-01

    The quest for improved patient outcomes has been a driving force for adoption of novel surgical innovations across surgical subspecialties. Gynecologic oncology is one such surgical discipline in which minimally invasive surgery has had a robust and evolving role in defining standards of care. Robotic-assisted surgery has developed during the past two decades as a more technologically advanced form of minimally invasive surgery in an effort to mitigate the limitations of conventional laparoscopy and improved patient outcomes. Robotically assisted technology offers potential advantages that include improved three-dimensional stereoscopic vision, wristed instruments that improve surgeon dexterity, and tremor canceling software that improves surgical precision. These technological advances may allow the gynecologic oncology surgeon to perform increasingly radical oncologic surgeries in complex patients. However, the platform is not without limitations, including high cost, lack of haptic feedback, and the requirement for additional training to achieve competence. This review describes the role of robotic-assisted surgery in the management of endometrial, cervical, and ovarian cancer, with an emphasis on comparison with laparotomy and conventional laparoscopy. The literature on novel robotic innovations, special patient populations, cost effectiveness, and fellowship training is also appraised critically in this regard. PMID:25274485

  3. Hereditary non-BRCA gynecological tumors.

    PubMed

    Vellone, Valerio G; Paudice, Michele; Varesco, Liliana

    2016-10-01

    Early diagnosis and proper management of gynecologic malignancies represent a challenge in modern oncology. A growing interest has arisen around the gynecological manifestations of hereditary cancer syndromes. In particular, the discovery of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes in ovarian cancer and the mismatch repair genes (MMR) in endometrial carcinoma has revolutionized our approach to the diagnosis and screening of women for ovarian and uterine cancers. The clinical, genetic and pathological features of hereditary cancer syndromes with gynecological manifestations are reviewed focusing on Lynch Syndrome, also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma (HNPCC), Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome (PJS), Cowden Syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome, Gorlin Syndrome or nevoid basal-cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) and Reed's Syndrome or hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC). PMID:26930387

  4. [Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Caminiti, Caterina

    2013-01-01

    Guidelines for psychosocial care of cancer patients. The Italian Association of Medical Oncologists published in 2013 the update of the first edition of the Psychosocial Guidelines for the care of cancer patients. The guidelines, produced by a multidisciplinary group (medical doctors, nurses, oncologists, psychologists and patients) aim at recognizing the importance of psychosocial care in helping the patients and their relatives to overcome the effects of the diagnosis and the treatments on mental health and emotional wellbeing. In some cases the evidences available are not as hard as those supporting drug treatments: many outcomes such as the effectiveness of educational interventions, the patients' wellbeing, thrust, perception of support, for their nature and complexity require both quantitative and qualitative measurements. Lack of robust evidences such as those obtained from clinical trials, does not necessarily correspond to lack of effectiveness of the intervention nor should make us forget that patients' rights (to good care, information and support) should be guaranteed. PMID:24441468

  5. [Palliative Care for Non-cancer Patients].

    PubMed

    Ikegaki, Junichi

    2016-03-01

    Although palliative care has been developed and implemented as care for cancer pain, it is holistic care for suffering that includes physical, psychosocial and spiritual pain of life-threatening illness. It turned out that non-cancer patients in the end-stage are also suffering from various pain that should be treated as cancer patients. Trajectories of illness in non-cancer patients are with more gradual decline than those of cancer patients with steady progression and it is often difficult to make decision about end-of-life. The purpose of advance care planning was originally to help describe legal documents. This process is proved to contribute to improving QOL of patients and their families to discuss preference, hope, economic problems, spiritual question as well as medical treatment In Japan guideline of decision making process in end-of-life stage has been established. A program of communication training in end-of-life discussion has been made. Under current situation some comments on the role of anesthesiologists are also mentioned. PMID:27097506

  6. Psychiatric care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, K B

    1999-10-01

    Psychiatric management of patients with breast cancer, as well as women's emotional reactions to all phases of breast cancer, were reviewed. These patients face two major losses; one is the physical loss of part of the body and a threat to life, and the other is the loss of femininity. The patients are also likely to suffer from various psychiatric problems including anxiety and depression. Oncologists should be alert to each patient's emotional reactions and potential psychiatric problems, and if necessary, should refer them to a psychiatrist. A combination of psychotherapeutic, behavioural, and pharmacologic techniques is available for the care of patients with breast cancer. Psychotherapeutic modalities include individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and self-help treatment. The author divided individual therapy into general and specific treatment. General treatment deals with a crisis-intervention and cognitive-behavioral approach, whereas specific treatment deals with issues relevant to patients with breast cancer. Some of the therapeutic processes were illustrated in a case report. These guidelines will contribute to the relief and prevention of emotional suffering stemming from an encounter with the most common form of cancer in women. Also, proper and effective care for patients with breast cancer requires combined use of a variety of therapeutic modalities as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatric care. PMID:10565263

  7. Patients' Experiences With Care for Lung Cancer and Colorectal Cancer: Findings From the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Ayanian, John Z.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Kahn, Katherine L.; Malin, Jennifer L.; Ganz, Patricia A.; van Ryn, Michelle; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; He, Yulei; Urmie, Julie M.; Weeks, Jane C.; Harrington, David P.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To assess patients' experiences with cancer care, ratings of their quality of care, and correlates of these assessments. Patients and Methods For 4,093 patients with lung cancer and 3,685 patients with colorectal cancer in multiple US regions and health care delivery systems, we conducted telephone surveys of patients or their surrogates in English, Spanish, or Chinese at 4 to 7 months after diagnosis. The surveys assessed ratings of the overall quality of cancer care and experiences with three domains of interpersonal care (physician communication, nursing care, and coordination and responsiveness of care). Results English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients and Chinese-speaking patients and those in worse health reported significantly worse adjusted experiences with all three domains of interpersonal care, whereas white, black, and Hispanic patients reported generally similar experiences with interpersonal care. The overall quality of cancer care was rated as excellent by 44.4% of patients with lung cancer and 53.0% of patients with colorectal cancer, and these ratings were most strongly correlated with positive experiences with coordination and responsiveness of care (Spearman rank coefficients of 0.49 and 0.42 for lung and colorectal cancer, respectively). After multivariate adjustment, excellent ratings were less common for each cancer among black patients, English-speaking Asian/Pacific Islander patients, Chinese-speaking patients, and patients reporting worse health status (all P ≤ .05). Conclusion Patients' reports and ratings of care differed significantly by race, language, and health status. Efforts to improve patients' experiences with cancer care should focus on problems affecting Asian and Pacific Islander patients and those in worse health. PMID:20713876

  8. Cancer care scenario in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, A. F. M. Kamal; Khan, Zohora Jameela; Islam, Johirul; Mahmud, AM

    2013-01-01

    Bangladesh is a developing country that is facing many challenges, especially in the health sector. Cancer management is a priority due to the current trend of increased incidence in this region. In this article, the current scenario of cancer in Bangladesh and its management with brief history is outlined. The combined effort of government and private sector is highlighted with the gradual progress in cancer management. Recent introduction of the state-of-the-art facilities and the training facilities for human resource development are also outlined. The existing challenges and cooperation from local NGOs and other overseas sources are also highlighted to provide an insight regarding possible ways to tackle these challenges to ensure a better future. PMID:24455570

  9. Outcome of the Gynecologic Oncology Patients Surveillance Network Program.

    PubMed

    Suprasert, Prapaporn; Suwansirikul, Songkiat; Charoenkwan, Kittipat; Cheewakriangkrai, Chalong; Suwansirikul, Songkiat

    2015-01-01

    The gynecologic oncology patients surveillance network program was conducted with the collaboration of 5 provincial hospitals located in the north of Thailand (Chiang Rai, Lamphun Nan, Phayao and Phrae). The aim was to identify ways of reducing the burden and the cost to the gynecologic cancer patients who needed to travel to the tertiary care hospital for follow up. The clinical data of each patient was transferred to the provincial hospital by the internet via the website www.gogcmu.or.th. All the general gynecologists who participated in this project attended the training course set up for the program. From January 2011 to February 2014, 854 patients who were willing to have their next follow-up at the network hospitals close to their home were enrolled this project. Almost of them were residents in Chiang Rai province and the most common disease was cervical cancer. After the project had been running for 1 year, 604 of the enrolled patients and 21 health-care personnel who had participated in this project were interviewed to assess its success. Some 85.3% of the patients and 100% of the health-care personnel were satisfied with this project. However, 60 patients had withdrawn, the most common reason being the lack of confidence in the follow up at the local provincial hospital. In conclusion, it is possible to initiate a gynecologic oncology patients' surveillance network program and the initiation could reduce the problems associated with and the cost the patients incurred as they journeyed to the tertiary care hospital. PMID:26163612

  10. Symptoms of Vaginal and Vulvar Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Gynecologic Cancers Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Gynecologic Cancers Basic Information What Is Gynecologic Cancer? What Are ...

  11. Palliative Care in Improving Quality of Life in Patients With High Risk Primary or Recurrent Gynecologic Malignancies

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-15

    Cervical Carcinoma; Ovarian Carcinoma; Primary Peritoneal Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Vulvar Carcinoma; Uterine Corpus Cancer; Vulvar Carcinoma; Peritoneal Neoplasms

  12. Cervical cancer: the Indian perspective. FIGO 26th Annual Report on the Results of Treatment in Gynecological Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vallikad, E

    2006-11-01

    Cancer of the uterine cervix is the commonest gynaecologic cancer in India, with most women presenting with disease extending beyond the cervix. The majority of women belong to the lower socioeconomic status, are rural, aged between 35 and 64 years and highly noncompliant for complete treatment and follow-up. Opportunistic screening with cytology, colposcopy and test for Human Papilloma Virus and appropriate treatment are available on payment at urban private medical centres but are not available at urban and rural government health centres that are accessed by women of the lower socioeconomic status. The Government's investment in health is 0.9% of the GDP. Thus cytology screening as a government health measure is not feasible. The 'social vaccine' of health empowerment along with visual inspection and appropriate referral by the rural and urban health personnel (Department of Health and Family Welfare); with an additional input of health awareness and motivation by Anganwadi Workers (Department of Women and Child Development), elected women representatives in the Panchayats (Department of Rural Development and Panchayati Raj) and non-governmental development agencies could be a collaborative effort towards "downstaging" cervical cancer. This could lay the foundation for the introduction of cytology screening when resources are available. PMID:17161161

  13. Ultrasound use in gynecologic brachytherapy: Time to focus the beam.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, Sylvia; Schneider, Michal; Kondalsamy-Chennakesavan, Srinivas; Bernshaw, David; Narayan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    There is wide disparity in the practice of brachytherapy for cervical cancer around the world. Although select well-resourced centers advocate use of MRI for all insertions, planar X-ray imaging remains the most commonly used imaging modality to assess intracavitary implants, particularly where the burden of cervical cancer is high. Incorporating soft tissue imaging into brachytherapy programs has been shown to improve the technical accuracy of implants, which in turn has led to improved local control and decreased toxicity. These improvements have a positive effect on the quality of life of patients undergoing brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Finding an accessible soft tissue imaging modality is essential to enable these improvements to be available to all patients. A modality that has good soft tissue imaging capabilities, is widely available, portable, and economical, is needed. Ultrasound fulfils these requirements and offers the potential of soft tissue image guidance to a much wider brachytherapy community. Although use of ultrasound is the standard of care in brachytherapy for prostate cancer, it only seems to have limited uptake in gynecologic brachytherapy. This article reviews the role of ultrasound in gynecologic brachytherapy and highlights the potential applications for use in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:25620161

  14. Preventive Care in Older Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Lisa M.; Ouellet, Jennifer Andreozzi; Dale, William; Fan, Lin; Mohile, Supriya Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study factors that influence receipt of preventive care in older cancer survivors. Methods We analyzed a nationally representative sample of 12,458 older adults from the 2003 Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey. Factors associated with non-receipt of preventive care were explored among cancer and non-cancer survivors, using logistic regression. Results Among cancer survivors, 1,883 were diagnosed >one year at survey completion. A cancer history was independently associated with receipt of mammogram (AOR=1.57, 95%CI=1.34–1.85), flu shot (AOR=1.33, 95%CI=1.16–1.53), measurement of total cholesterol in the previous six months (AOR=1.20, 95%CI=1.07–1.34), pneumonia vaccination (AOR=1.33, 95%CI=1.18–1.49), bone mineral density (BMD) testing (AOR=1.38, 95%CI=1.21–1.56) and lower endoscopy (AOR=1.46, 95%CI=1.29–1.65). However, receipt of preventive care was not optimal among older cancer survivors with only 51.2% of female cancer survivors received a mammogram, 63.8% of all cancer survivors received colonoscopy, and 42.5% had BMD testing. Among cancer survivors, factors associated with non-receipt of mammogram included age ≥85 years (AOR=0.43, 95%CI=0.26–0.74) and scoring ≥three points on the Vulnerable Elders Survey-13 (AOR=0.94, 95%CI=0.80–1.00). Factors associated with non-receipt of colonoscopy included low education (AOR=0.43, 95%CI=0.27–0.68) and rural residence (AOR=0.51, 95%CI=0.34–0.77). Factors associated with non-receipt of BMD testing included age ≥70 (AOR=0.59, 95%CI=0.39–0.90), African American race (AOR=0.51, 95%CI=0.27–0.95), low education (AOR=0.23, 95%CI=0.14–0.38) and rural residence (AOR=0.43, 95%CI=0.27–0.70). Conclusion Although older cancer survivors are more likely to receive preventive care services than other older adults, the prevalence of receipt of preventive care services is low. PMID:25547206

  15. Quicker cancer care: reshaping patient pathways.

    PubMed

    Towler, Lucy

    2009-07-01

    A new pathway has been devised for patients with ovarian cancer who attend a day-care unit for chemotherapy. This pathway, which is provided by nurses and doctors, has reduced patients' waiting time for treatment. Its implementation shows, therefore, that good clinical leadership can effect positive change. PMID:19639906

  16. Factors associated with quality of life of outpatients with breast cancer and gynecologic cancers and their family caregivers: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Awadalla, Abdel W; Ohaeri, Jude U; Gholoum, Abdullah; Khalid, Ahmed OA; Hamad, Hussein MA; Jacob, Anila

    2007-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QOL) issues are of interest in cancer because effective methods of treatment and detection have led to an increase in the number of long-term survivors. The objectives of the study were: to assess the subjective QOL of stable Sudanese women cancer outpatients and their family caregivers, using the WHO 26-item QOL Instrument; compare with matched general population groups, as well as diabetic and psychiatric patient groups; examine patient-caregiver concordance in ratings; and assess the variables associated with their QOL, with a view to identifying factors that can enhance quality of care. Methods Responses of oncology outpatients with breast cancer (117), cervical cancer (46) and ovarian cancer (18) (aged 44.6, SD 11.5) were compared with those of their family caregivers and matched general population groups. Data were analyzed by univariate and multivariate statistics. Results The cancer groups had similar QOL domain scores, which were significantly lower than those of their caregivers, but higher than the control group as well as those of psychiatric and diabetic patients studied previously. Patients who were married, with higher education, better employment, and with longer duration of illness had higher QOL. Patients on radiotherapy and their caregivers had higher QOL scores. Correlations between patient's ratings and caregiver impression of patient's QOL were high. Caregiver impression was a significant predictor of patient's and caregiver's QOL. Other predictors for the patient were: currently feeling sick and duration of illness; for the caregiver: feeling sick, relationship to patient, and age. Conclusion Cancer patients in stable condition and with psychosocial support can hope to enjoy good QOL with treatment. The findings constitute an evidence base for the country's cancer care program, to boost national health education about prognosis in cancer. Families living with women cancer patients are vulnerable and need support if

  17. Ovarian cancer standard of care: are there real alternatives?

    PubMed Central

    Pepa, Chiara Della; Tonini, Giuseppe; Pisano, Carmela; Di Napoli, Marilena; Cecere, Sabrina Chiara; Tambaro, Rosa; Facchini, Gaetano; Pignata, Sando

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer remains a major issue for gynecological oncologists, and most patients are diagnosed when the disease is already advanced with a poor chance of survival. Debulking surgery followed by platinum-taxane chemotherapy is the current standard of care, but based on several different strategies currently under evaluation, some encouraging data have been published in the last 4 to 5 years. This review provides a state-of-the-art overview of the available alternatives to conventional treatment and the most promising new combinations. For example, neoadjuvant chemotherapy does not seem to be inferior to primary debulking. Despite its outcome improvements, intraperitoneal chemotherapy struggles for acceptance due to the heavy toxicity. Dose-dense chemotherapy, after showing an impressive efficacy in Asian populations, has not produced equal results in a European cohort, and the results of alternative platinum doublets are not superior to those of carboplatin and paclitaxel. In this setting, adherence to a maintenance therapy after first-line treatment and multiple (primarily antiangiogenic) agents appears to be effective. Although many questions, including the duration of maintenance treatment and the use of bevacizumab beyond progression, remain unanswered, new biologic agents, such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors, nintedanib, and mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors, have emerged as potential therapeutic options in the very near future. Based on the multiplicity of available strategies, the histological and molecular features of the tumor, in addition to patient's clinical condition and disease state, continue to gain importance in guiding treatment choices. PMID:25556615

  18. Challenges of Rural Cancer Care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Mary; Schlichting, Jennifer; Chioreso, Catherine; Ward, Marcia; Vikas, Praveen

    2015-09-01

    Rural cancer patients face many challenges in receiving care, including limited availability of cancer treatments and cancer support providers (oncologists, social workers, mental healthcare providers, palliative care specialists, etc), transportation barriers, financial issues, and limited access to clinical trials. Oncologists and other cancer care providers experience parallel challenges in delivering care to their rural cancer patients. Although no one approach fully addresses the many challenges of rural cancer care, a number of promising strategies and interventions have been developed that transcend the issues associated with long travel distances. These include outreach clinics, virtual tumor boards, teleoncology and other telemedicine applications, workforce recruitment and retention initiatives, and provider and patient education programs. Given the projected increase in demand for cancer care due to the aging population and increasing number of Americans with health insurance through the Affordable Care Act, expansion of these efforts and development of new approaches are critical to ensure access to high-quality care. PMID:26384798

  19. Risk factor analysis for massive lymphatic ascites after laparoscopic retroperitonal lymphadenectomy in gynecologic cancers and treatment using intranodal lymphangiography with glue embolization

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate risk factors for massive lymphatic ascites after laparoscopic retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy in gynecologic cancer and the feasibility of treatments using intranodal lymphangiography (INLAG) with glue embolization. Methods A retrospective analysis of 234 patients with gynecologic cancer who received laparoscopic retroperitonal lymphadenectomy between April 2006 and November 2015 was done. In June 2014, INLAG with glue embolization was initiated to manage massive lymphatic ascites. All possible clinicopathologic factors related to massive lymphatic ascites were determined in the pre-INLAG group (n=163). Clinical courses between pre-INLAG group and post-INLAG group (n=71) were compared. Results In the pre-INLAG group (n=163), four patients (2.5%) developed massive lymphatic ascites postoperatively. Postoperative lymphatic ascites was associated with liver cirrhosis (three cirrhotic patients, p<0.001). In the post-INLAG group, one patient with massive lymphatic ascites had a congestive heart failure and first received INLAG with glue embolization. She had pelvic drain removed within 7 days after INLAG. The mean duration of pelvic drain and hospital stay decreased after the introduction of INLAG (13.2 days vs. 10.9 days, p=0.001; 15.2 days vs. 12.6 days, p=0.001). There was no evidence of recurrence after this procedure. Conclusion Underlying medical conditions related to the reduced effective circulating volume, such as liver cirrhosis and heart failure, may be associated with massive lymphatic ascites after retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy. INLAG with glue embolization can be an alternative treatment options to treat leaking lymphatic channels in patients with massive lymphatic leakage. PMID:27171674

  20. A Phase I Clinical Trial of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD, a Novel Infectivity-Enhanced Bicistronic Adenovirus, in Patients with Recurrent Gynecologic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kenneth H.; Dmitriev, Igor; O’Malley, Janis P.; Wang, Minghui; Saddekni, Souheil; You, Zhiying; Preuss, Meredith A.; Harris, Raymond D.; Aurigemma, Rosemarie; Siegal, Gene P.; Zinn, Kurt R.; Curiel, David T.; Alvarez, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD is an infectivity-enhanced adenovirus expressing a therapeutic thymidine kinase suicide gene and a somatostatin receptor that allows for noninvasive gene transfer imaging. The purpose of this study was to identify the MTD, toxicities, clinical efficacy and biologic effects of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Experimental Design Eligible patients were treated intraperitoneally (IP) for 3 days with 1×109 to 1×1012 vp/dose of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD followed by intravenous ganciclovir for 14 days. Toxicity and clinical efficacy were assessed utilizing CTC Adverse Events grading and RECIST criteria. Imaging utilizing In-111 pentetreotide was obtained before and after treatment. Tissue samples were obtained to evaluate for gene transfer, generation of wild-type virus, viral shedding and antibody response. Results Twelve patients were treated in three cohorts. The most common vector-related clinical toxicities were grade 1–2 constitutional or pain symptoms, experienced most often in patients treated at the highest dose. MTD was not identified. Five patients demonstrated stable disease; all others experienced progressive disease. One patient with stable disease experienced complete resolution of disease and normalization of CA125 on further follow-up. Imaging detected increased In-111 pentetreotide retention in patients treated at the highest dose. Ancillary studies demonstrated presence of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD virus and HSV1-tk expression in ascites samples collected at various time points in most patients treated within the higher dose cohorts. Conclusions This study demonstrates the safety, potential efficacy, and possible gene transfer imaging capacity of Ad5.SSTR/TK.RGD in patients with recurrent gynecologic cancer. Further development of this novel gene therapeutic appears to be warranted. PMID:22510347

  1. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Apte, Sachin M.; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  2. Payment Reform: Unprecedented and Evolving Impact on Gynecologic Oncology.

    PubMed

    Apte, Sachin M; Patel, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    With the signing of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act in April 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is now positioned to drive the development and implementation of sweeping changes to how physicians and hospitals are paid for the provision of oncology-related services. These changes will have a long-lasting impact on the sub-specialty of gynecologic oncology, regardless of practice structure, physician employment and compensation model, or local insurance market. Recently, commercial payers have piloted various models of payment reform via oncology-specific clinical pathways, oncology medical homes, episode payment arrangements, and accountable care organizations. Despite the positive results of some pilot programs, adoption remains limited. The goals are to eliminate unnecessary variation in cancer treatment, provide coordinated patient-centered care, while controlling costs. Yet, meaningful payment reform in oncology remains elusive. As the largest payer for oncology services in the United States, CMS has the leverage to make cancer services more value based. Thus far, the focus has been around pricing of physician-administered drugs with recent work in the area of the Oncology Medical Home. Gynecologic oncology is a unique sub-specialty that blends surgical and medical oncology, with treatment that often involves radiation therapy. This forward-thinking, multidisciplinary model works to keep the patient at the center of the care continuum and emphasizes care coordination. Because of the breadth and depth of gynecologic oncology, this sub-specialty has both the potential to be disrupted by payment reform as well as potentially benefit from the aspects of reform that can align incentives appropriately to improve coordination. Although the precise future payment models are unknown at this time, focused engagement of gynecologic oncologists and the full care team is imperative to assure that the practice remains patient centered

  3. Mediators of a Coping and Communication-Enhancing Intervention and a Supportive Counseling Intervention among Women Diagnosed with Gynecological Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Manne, Sharon L.; Winkel, Gary; Rubin, Stephen; Edelson, Mitchell; Rosenblum, Norman; Bergman, Cynthia; Hernandez, Enrique; Carlson, John; Rocereto, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated mechanisms of change for a Coping and Communication-enhancing Intervention (CCI) and Supportive Counseling (SC). We proposed that the effects of CCI on depressive symptoms would be mediated by psychological processes targeted by CCI: increased positive reappraisal, acceptance, planful problem solving, attempts to understand emotional reactions to cancer, increased emotional expression, increased seeking of emotional and instrumental support, and improved self-esteem. We hypothesized that the effects of SC on depressive symptoms would be mediated by the processes encouraged by SC: increasing the expression of emotions, attempts to understand emotional reactions to cancer, and self-esteem. Three hundred and fifty three women were randomized to CCI, SC, or a usual care control and completed measures at pre-intervention, 3, 6, and 9 months later. The effects of CCI were fully mediated by positive reappraisal, problem solving, and self-esteem, and partially mediated by emotional expression. The effects of SC were partially mediated by positive reappraisal. These findings provide support for hypothesized mediators for CCI. We were less able to identify of mediators for SC. Future research might benefit from identifying SC mediators. PMID:19045971

  4. Cancer patient supportive care and pain management. Special listing

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Special Listing of Current Cancer Research Projects is a publication of the International Cancer Research Data Bank (ICRDB) Program of the National Cancer Institute. Each Listing contains descriptions of ongoing projects in one selected cancer research area. The research areas include: Infectious disease in cancer patients; Immunological aspects of supportive care of cancer patients; Nutritional evaluation and support of cancer patients; Pain management of cancer patients.

  5. Robot-Assisted Gynecologic Surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... GYN oncologist is someone who specializes in the care of pre-cancerous and cancerous problems in of ... spectrum of viewers tonight. We probably have health care professionals, we’ve probably got lay people out ...

  6. Triple simultaneous primary invasive gynecological malignancies: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Eriko; Shoji, Tadahiro; Miura, Yuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Uesugi, Noriyuki; Sugiyama, Toru

    2014-02-01

    Double gynecologic cancer (primary cancers in two organs) is relatively rare. However, triple gynecologic cancer (primary cancers in three organs) is extremely rare. We experienced a case of triple cancer, with primary cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, each showing different histopathological features. A 50-year-old woman with a preoperative diagnosis of cervical cancer stage Ib1 with a pathological diagnosis of mucinous adenocarcinoma underwent radical hysterectomy. The pathological diagnoses of the extracted masses were endometrioid adenocarcinoma in the uterine corpus and serous adenocarcinoma in the left ovary. Consequently, triple cancer was diagnosed. After the operation, six cycles of a paclitaxel/carboplatin regimen were administered, and no relapse of the cancers has been observed to date. To our knowledge, this is only the second case report in the international literature of concurrent gynecologic triple cancers of epithelial origin; that is, invasive cervical, endometrial and ovarian cancers, each with different histopathological features. PMID:24147606

  7. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2008-03-01

    Cultural competence in oncology requires the acquisition of specific knowledge, clinical skills, and attitudes that facilitate effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting, thus, leading to improved therapeutic outcomes and decreased disparities in cancer care. Cultural competence in oncology entails a basic knowledge of different cultural attitudes and practices of communication of the truth and of decision-making styles throughout the world. Cultural competence always presupposes oncology professionals' awareness of their own cultural beliefs and values. To be able to communicate with cancer patients in culturally sensitive ways, oncologists should have knowledge of the concept of culture in its complexity and of the risks of racism, classism, sexism, ageism, and stereotyping that must be avoided in clinical practice. Oncologists should develop a sense of appreciation for differences in health care values, based on the recognition that no culture can claim hegemony over others and that cultures are evolving under their reciprocal influence on each other. Medical schools and oncology training can teach communication skills and cultural competence, while fostering in all students and young doctors those attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity, and awareness that are needed to deliver effective and culturally sensitive cancer care. PMID:18196291

  8. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  9. Uterine Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  10. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  11. The Value of Continuity between Primary Care and Surgical Care in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tanvir; Chang, Hsien-Yen; Luu, Ngoc-Phuong; Pollack, Craig Evan

    2016-01-01

    Background Improving continuity between primary care and cancer care is critical for improving cancer outcomes and curbing cancer costs. A dimension of continuity, we investigated how regularly patients receive their primary care and surgical care for colon cancer from the same hospital and whether this affects mortality and costs. Methods Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program Registry (SEER)-Medicare data, we performed a retrospective cohort study of stage I-III colon cancer patients diagnosed between 2000 and 2009. There were 23,305 stage I-III colon cancer patients who received primary care in the year prior to diagnosis and underwent operative care for colon cancer. Patients were assigned to the hospital where they had their surgery and to their primary care provider’s main hospital, and then classified according to whether these two hospitals were same or different. Outcomes examined were hazards for all-cause mortality, subhazard for colon cancer specific mortality, and generalized linear estimate for costs at 12 months, from propensity score matched models. Results Fifty-two percent of stage I-III colon patients received primary care and surgical care from the same hospital. Primary care and surgical care from the same hospital was not associated with reduced all-cause or colon cancer specific mortality, but was associated with lower inpatient, outpatient, and total costs of care. Total cost difference was $8,836 (95% CI $2,746–$14,577), a 20% reduction in total median cost of care at 12 months. Conclusions Receiving primary care and surgical care at the same hospital, compared to different hospitals, was associated with lower costs but still similar survival among stage I-III colon cancer patients. Nonetheless, health care policy which encourages further integration between primary care and cancer care in order to improve outcomes and decrease costs will need to address the significant proportion of patients receiving health care

  12. Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Pharmacogenomics: Integrating Discoveries in Basic, Clinical and Population Sciences to Advance Predictive Cancer Care, a 2010 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  13. Development and pilot of an advance care planning website for women with ovarian cancer: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Petzel, Sue V.; Cragg, Julie; McClellan, Molly; Chan, Daniel; Dickson, Elizabeth; Jacko, Julie A.; Sainfort, François; Geller, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Few available tools facilitate cancer patients and physicians' discussions of quality of life and end-of-life. Our objective was to develop a web-based tool to promote advance care planning for women with ovarian cancer. Methods Women with ovarian cancer, their families, clinicians and researchers met to identify ways to improve cancer care. A prototype website was created to address advance care planning, focusing on advance healthcare directives (AHD) and palliative care consultation. Patients were recruited from a gynecologic oncology clinic for a pilot randomized controlled trial. Primary outcomes included completion of an AHD and palliative care consultation. Results At study completion, 53 women with ovarian cancer were enrolled and 35 completed the study. The mean age at enrollment was 57.9 ± 9.5 years; most were newly diagnosed or at first recurrence. There were no statistical differences in completion of AHD (p = 0.220) or palliative care consultation (p = 0.440) between intervention and control groups. However, women in the intervention group showed evidence of moving toward decision making regarding AHD and palliative care and lower decisional conflict. Women assigned to the intervention, compared to control website, were highly satisfied with the amount (p = 0.054) and quality (p = 0.119) of information and when they accessed the website, used it longer (p = 0.049). Overall website use was lower than expected, resulting from several patient-related and design barriers. Conclusions A website providing information and decisional support for women with ovarian cancer is feasible. Increasing frequency of website use requires future research. PMID:23988413

  14. Cultural aspects of communication in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Surbone, A

    2006-01-01

    Cancer is increasing in incidence and prevalence worldwide, and the WHO has recently included cancer and its treatments as a health priority in developed and developing countries. The cultural diversity of oncology patients is bound to increase, and cultural sensitivity and competence are now required of all oncology professionals. A culturally competent cancer care leads to improved therapeutic outcome and it may decrease disparities in medical care. Cultural competence in medicine is a complex multilayered accomplishment, requiring knowledge, skills and attitudes whose acquisition is needed for effective cross-cultural negotiation in the clinical setting. Effective cultural competence is based on knowledge of the notion of culture; on awareness of possible biases and prejudices related to stereotyping, racism, classism, sexism; on nurturing appreciation for differences in health care values; and on fostering the attitudes of humility, empathy, curiosity, respect, sensitivity and awareness. Cultural competence in healthcare relates to individual professionals, but also to organizations and systems. A culturally competent healthcare system must consider in their separateness and yet in there reciprocal influences social, racial and cultural factors. By providing a framework of reference to interpret the external world and relate to it, culture affects patients' perceptions of disease, disability and suffering; degrees and expressions of concern about them; their responses to treatments and their relationship to individual physicians and to the healthcare system. Culture also influences the interpretation of ethical norms and principles, and especially of individual autonomy, which can be perceived either as synonymous with freedom or with isolation depending on the cultural context. This, in turn, determines the variability of truth-telling attitudes and practices worldwide as well as the different roles of family in the information and decision-making process of

  15. Prevention of Diseases in Gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Izetbegovic, Sebija; Alajbegovic, Jasmin; Mutevelic, Alma; Pasagic, Almir; Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prevention of diseases in gynecology can be improved by better understanding of health promotion and management of diseases. Management is “the art of performing jobs by or with other people” Mary Parker Follet. Methods: A descriptive analysis was performed on scientific studies in several published articles in medical journals and books. Results: There are five primary functions of management as: Anticipate and plan, organize, command, coordinate and control. If we introduce the following definition in the sense of medical science and apply it to the medical practice that would mean way of recognizing, managing and resolving issues of diagnosis and therapy of diseases (in this case gynecology diseases) according to certain guidelines and treatment algorithms. Treatment of family doctors is an important aspect in the quality-of-life of women and their reproductive health as well as a significant issue in public, environmental and social problems. Conclusions: It is very important to deal with it on the primary care level and in addition to promote the primary and secondary prevention of diseases, which is sometimes more important than the curative procedures. The primary prevention involves regular gynecological examinations and screening. The doctors have also a duty to educate women about the risk factors for malignant diseases, as well as proposing some of the qualitative preventive measures. PMID:24498489

  16. Pancreatic cancer-improved care achievable

    PubMed Central

    Buanes, Trond A

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic adenocarcinoma is one of the most aggressive cancers, and the decline in mortality observed in most other cancer diseases, has so far not taken place in pancreatic cancer. Complete tumor resection is a requirement for potential cure, and the reorganization of care in the direction of high patient-volume centers, offering multimodal treatment, has improved survival and Quality of Life. Also the rates and severity grade of complications are improving in high-volume pancreatic centers. One of the major problems worldwide is underutilization of surgery in resectable pancreatic cancer. Suboptimal investigation, follow up and oncological treatment outside specialized centers are additional key problems. New chemotherapeutic regimens like FOLFIRINOX have improved survival in patients with metastatic disease, and different adjuvant treatment options result in well documented survival benefit. Neoadjuvant treatment is highly relevant, but needs further evaluation. Also adjuvant immunotherapy, in the form of vaccination with synthetic K-Ras-peptides, has been shown to produce long term immunological memory in cytotoxic T-cells in long term survivors. Improvement in clinical outcome is already achievable and further progress is expected in the near future for patients treated with curative as well as palliative intention. PMID:25132756

  17. Mind-body practices in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Chaoul, Alejandro; Milbury, Kathrin; Sood, Anil K; Prinsloo, Sarah; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2014-12-01

    Being diagnosed with a life-threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item distress thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25325936

  18. Mind-Body Practices in Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Chaoul, Alejandro; Milbury, Kathrin; Sood, Anil K.; Prinsloo, Sarah; Cohen, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Being diagnosed with a life threatening disease such as cancer and undergoing treatment can cause unwanted distress and interferes with quality of life. Uncontrolled stress can have a negative effect on a number of biological systems and processes leading to negative health outcomes. While some distress is normal, it is not benign and must be addressed, as failure to do so may compromise health and QOL outcomes. We present the evidence for the role of stress in cancer biology and mechanisms demonstrating how distress is associated with worse clinical outcomes. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network states that all patients be screened with the single-item Distress Thermometer and to also indicate the source of distress and to get appropriate referral. In addition to the many conventional approaches for managing distress from the fields of psychology and psychiatry, many patients are seeking strategies to manage their distress that are outside conventional medicine such as mind-body techniques. Mind-body techniques such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, and qigong have been found to lower distress and lead to improvements in different aspects of quality of life. It is essential that the standard of care in oncology include distress screening and the delivery of different techniques to help patients manage the psychosocial challenges of diagnosis and treatment of cancer. PMID:25325936

  19. [Current perspectives on supportive care for lung cancer patients].

    PubMed

    Serena, A; Zurkinden, C; Castellani, P; Eicher, M

    2015-05-20

    The fight against cancer comprises not only survival of the disease but also survival with the highest possible quality of life. Thus, supportive care in cancer aims at reducing physical and psycho-emotional symptom burden. Furthermore, supportive care in cancer includes self-management-support for patients and their families/caregivers. Due to high symptom prevalence and poor prognosis, lung cancer patients express more unmet supportive care needs than other patient populations with cancer. Interventions to meet these needs have been developed in the last decade. They involve new models of care that incorporate the role of a lung cancer nurse in comprehensive cancer centers and eHealth-systems to support lung cancer patients and their families/caregivers. PMID:26152086

  20. Taxanes: Their Impact on Gynecologic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Carlton L.; English, Diana P.; Roque, Dana M.; Santin, Alessandro D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of taxanes in the treatment of gynecologic malignancies expanded tremendously over the past 30 years. Both paclitaxel and docetaxel have unique microtubule stabilizing, antiangiogenic and radiation sensitizing properties that endow them with remarkable activity as chemotherapeutic agents. As research into the appropriate dose, timing, treatment interval and response rates have been studied, they emerged as one of the most active agents available in the treatment of gynecologic cancer. The body of research on taxanes continues to expand especially in regard to the use of taxanes in alternative formulations and in combination with newer treatments or routes of treatment. This review focuses on the development of taxanes as an effective therapy in the treatment of gynecologic cancers and data currently available in the literature regarding their efficacy. Future directions of taxane based chemotherapy in regards to ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers are also addressed. There is little doubt that taxane based chemotherapy will remain an integral part of the treatment of gynecologic cancer for the foreseeable future. PMID:24300913

  1. Barriers to Cancer Screening by Rural Appalachian Primary Care Providers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Renee; Tudiver, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Rural Appalachia has significantly higher overall cancer mortality compared with national rates, and lack of cancer screening is believed to be one of the contributing factors. Reducing the cancer disparity in this region must include strategies to address suboptimal cancer screening practices by rural Appalachian primary care providers (PCPs). To…

  2. Acute Gynecologic Disorders.

    PubMed

    Donaldson, Carolyn K

    2015-11-01

    Premenopausal women with acute pelvic pain comprise a significant percentage of patients who present to the emergency room. Etiologies can be gynecologic, urologic, gastrointestinal, or vascular. Signs and symptoms are often nonspecific and overlapping. The choice of imaging modality is determined by the clinically suspected differential diagnosis. Ultrasound (US) is the preferred imaging modality for suspected obstetric or gynecologic disorders. CT is more useful when gastrointestinal or urinary tract pathology is likely. MR imaging is rarely used in the emergent setting, except to exclude appendicitis in pregnant women. This article presents a comprehensive review of imaging of acute gynecologic disorders. PMID:26526439

  3. Preparing for an epidemic: cancer care in an aging population.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine's (IOM) Committee on Improving the Quality of Cancer Care: Addressing the Challenges of an Aging Population was charged with evaluating and proposing recommendations on how to improve the quality of cancer care, with a specific focus on the aging population. Based on their findings, the IOM committee recently released a report highlighting their 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care. Based on those recommendations, this article highlights ways to improve evidence-based care and addresses rising costs in health care for older adults with cancer. The IOM highlighted three recommendations to address the current research gaps in providing evidence-based care in older adults with cancer, which included (1) studying populations which match the age and health-risk profile of the population with the disease, (2) legislative incentives for companies to include patients that are older or with multiple morbidities in new cancer drug trials, and (3) expansion of research that contributes to the depth and breadth of data available for assessing interventions. The recommendations also highlighted the need to maintain affordable and accessible care for older adults with cancer, with an emphasis on finding creative solutions within both the care delivery system and payment models in order to balance costs while preserving quality of care. The implementation of the IOM's recommendations will be a key step in moving closer to the goal of providing accessible, affordable, evidence-based, high-quality care to all patients with cancer. PMID:24857069

  4. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) consensus review for high-grade undifferentiated sarcomas of the uterus.

    PubMed

    Pautier, Patricia; Nam, Eun Ji; Provencher, Diane M; Hamilton, Anne L; Mangili, Giorgia; Siddiqui, Nadeem Ahmad; Westermann, Anneke M; Reed, Nicholas Simon; Harter, Philipp; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle

    2014-11-01

    High-grade undifferentiated sarcomas (HGUSs) are rare uterine malignancies arising from the endometrial stroma. They are poorly differentiated sarcomas composed of cells that do not resemble proliferative-phase endometrial stroma. High-grade undifferentiated sarcomas are characterized by aggressive behavior and poor prognosis. Cyclin D1 has been reported as a diagnostic immunomarker for high-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma with an YWHAE-FAM22 rearrangement. YWHAE-FAM22 endometrial stromal sarcomas (ESS) represent a clinically aggressive subtype of ESS classified as high-grade endometrial sarcomas, and its distinction from the usual low-grade ESS with JAZF1 rearrangement and from HGUS with no identifiable molecular aberration may be important in guiding clinical management. Median age of the patients is between 55 and 60 years. The most common symptoms are vaginal bleeding, abdominal pain, and increasing abdominal girth.Disease is usually advanced with approximately 70% of the patients staged III to IV according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics classification. Preferential metastatic locations include peritoneum, lungs, intra-abdominal lymph nodes, and bone. Median progression-free survival ranged from 7 to 10 months, and median overall survival ranged from 11 to 23 months. There is no clear prognostic factor identified for HGUS, not even stage. The standard management for HGUS consists of total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy. Systematic lymphadenectomy is not recommended. Adjuvant therapies, such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy, have to be discussed in multidisciplinary staff meetings. PMID:25341584

  5. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Moreno, Elena; Jimenez de la Peña, Mar; Cano Alonso, Raquel

    2012-01-01

    Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI) including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume. PMID:22315683

  6. Clinical nursing care for transgender patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Levitt, Nathan

    2015-06-01

    Transgender people often face barriers in their pursuit of receiving sensitive and informed health care, and many avoid preventive care and care for life threatening conditions because of those obstacles. This article focuses on cancer care of the transgender patient, as well as ways that nurses and other providers can help to create a transgender-sensitive healthcare environment. PMID:26000586

  7. Determinants of Quality Care and Mortality for Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Camacho, Fabian; Cantrell, Leigh A.; Anderson, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer are influenced by receipt of all indicated components of quality care: early diagnosis and receipt of external beam radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and brachytherapy. We performed an observational cohort study to evaluate receipt of quality cancer care and mortality after cancer diagnosis among patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in Virginia. We queried the Virginia state cancer registry to identify patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer who were diagnosed during 2002 to 2012. We evaluated the influence of tumor-related, demographic, and geospatial factors on the receipt of indicated therapies and mortality. Treatment quality score of 0 to 3 was defined based upon the extent of receipt of the components of indicated therapy. A total of 1048 patients were identified; 33.1% received all 3 components of treatment and only 54.0% received brachytherapy. Predictors of higher quality score included younger age group versus 66+ years at diagnosis (18–42 odds ratio [OR] = 12.3, 95% confidence interval: 6.6, 23.0; 42–53 OR = 5.6, CI: 3.3, 9.5; 53–66 OR = 5.5, CI: 3.3, 9.1), lower tumor stages versus IVA (IB2 OR = 3.3, CI: 1.8, 6.2; II OR = 2.7, CI: 1.6, 4.5; IIIx OR = 2.1, CI: 1.3, 3.6), and treatment at a high-volume facility (OR 2.2, CI: 1.2, 4.2). Predictors of increased mortality included earlier year of diagnosis, higher tumor stage, treatment at a lower volume facility, and lower treatment quality score. In a cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients in Virginia, we identified a low rate of receipt of complete quality care for cervical cancer and a strong effect of facility volume on quality treatment and survival. Further research is needed to develop strategies to improve access to quality treatment and outcomes for cervical cancer. PMID:26937934

  8. Society of Gynecologic Surgeons

    MedlinePlus

    ... optional skills stations for laparoscopic suturing, hysteroscopy and robotic simulation . Due to space constraints of the cadaver ... for March 2015 article in Obstetrics & Gynecology on “Robotic Surgery in Gynecology”. Mentors Honored by their Mentees ...

  9. [Breast cancer: patient care, rehabilitation, psychooncology].

    PubMed

    Kahán, Zsuzsanna; Szántó, István; Molnár, Mária; Rohánszky, Magda; Koncz, Zsuzsa; Mailáth, Mónika; Kapitány, Zsuzsanna; Dudás, Rita

    2016-09-01

    The development of a recommendation was intended for the follow-up of breast cancer patients treated with curative intent in Hungary. Follow-up includes the permanent contact with and health education of the patient, the surveillance and control of the adverse effects of oncological therapies or radiotherapy, the screening of metachron cancers, and the comprehensive (physical, psychological and social) rehabilitation of the patient. The early detection of local/regional tumor relapse is essential with careful follow-up, but there is no need for screening of distant metastases by means of imaging studies or tumor marker tests. If adjuvant endocrine therapy is needed, optimal adherence should be ensured with supportive therapy. In rare cases, special issues such as breast cancer risk/genetic mutation, pregnancy are raised, which should be thoughtfully discussed in view of recent advances in oncology. Follow-up is generally practised by the oncologist, however, in some cases the social worker, the physiotherapist, the psychooncologist, or in special cases, the lymphoedema expert is to be involved. The follow-up approach should be comprehensive and holistic. PMID:27579724

  10. A quantitative analysis of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans and comparison of homogeneity indices for the treatment of gynecological cancers

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Pushpraj; Vashisht, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans using different homogeneity and conformity indices in gynecological cancers, as well as to compare and find out the most reliable and accurate measure of the dose homogeneity among the available indices. In this study, a cohort of 12 patients were registered for evaluation, those receiving dynamic IMRT treatment on Clinac-2300C/D linear accelerator with 15-Mega Voltage (MV) photon beam. Dynamic IMRT plans were created on Eclipse treatment planning system with Helios dose volume optimization software. Homogeneity indices (HI) such as H index, modified H index, HI index, modified HI index, and S-index (sigma-index) proposed by M Yoon et al. (2007) were calculated and compared. The values of S-index vary from 1.63 to 2.99. The results indicate that the H and HI indices and their modified versions may not provide the correct dose homogeneity information, but the S-index provides accurate information about the dose homogeneity in the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Each plan was compared with 6-MV photon energy on the basis of S-index and conformity index (CI). Organs at risk (OAR) doses with 6-MV and 15-MV beams were also reported. PMID:23776309

  11. United We Stand? The Effects of a Couple-Coping Intervention on Adjustment to Early Stage Breast or Gynecological Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Jennifer L.; Halford, W. Kim; Ward, Bruce G.

    2004-01-01

    Cancer diagnosis affects the psychological well-being of both patients and their partners, and effective coping has been suggested to be a conjoint process of mutual support. Ninety-four married women with early stage cancer and their partners were randomly assigned to couples-based coping training (CanCOPE), individual coping training for the…

  12. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Csorba, Roland

    2012-06-24

    Minimally invasive surgery has revolutionized gynecological interventions over the past 30 years. The introduction of the da Vinci robotic surgery in 2005 has resulted in large changes in surgical management. The robotic platform allows less experienced laparoscopic surgeons to perform more complex procedures. It can be utilized mainly in general gynecology and reproductive gynecology. The robot is being increasingly used for procedures such as hysterectomy, myomectomy, adnexal surgery, and tubal anastomosis. In urogynecology, the robot is being utilized for sacrocolopexy as well. In the field of gynecologic oncology, the robot is being increasingly used for hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy in oncologic diseases. Despite the rapid and widespread adaption of robotic surgery in gynecology, there are no randomized trials comparing its efficacy and safety to other traditional surgical approaches. This article presents the development, technical aspects and indications of robotic surgery in gynecology, based on the previously published reviews. Robotic surgery can be highly advantageous with the right amount of training, along with appropriate patient selection. Patients will have less blood loss, less post-operative pain, faster recovery, and fewer complications compared to open surgery and laparoscopy. However, until larger randomized control trials are completed which report long-term outcomes, robotic surgery cannot be stated to have priority over other surgical methods. PMID:22714030

  13. Improving cancer patient care: development of a generic cancer consumer quality index questionnaire for cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To develop a Consumer Quality Index (CQI) Cancer Care questionnaire for measuring experiences with hospital care of patients with different types of cancer. Methods We derived quality aspects from focus group discussions, existing questionnaires and literature. We developed an experience questionnaire and sent it to 1,498 Dutch cancer patients. Another questionnaire measuring the importance of the quality aspects was sent to 600 cancer patients. Data were psychometrically analysed. Results The response to the experience questionnaire was 50 percent. Psychometric analysis revealed 12 reliable scales. Patients rated rapid and adequate referral, rapid start of the treatment after diagnosis, enough information and confidence in the healthcare professionals as most important themes. Hospitals received high scores for skills and cooperation of healthcare professionals and a patient-centered approach by doctors; and low scores for psychosocial guidance and information at completion of the treatment. Conclusions The CQI Cancer Care questionnaire is a valuable tool for the evaluation of the quality of cancer care from the patient’s perspective. Large scale implementation is necessary to determine the discriminatory powers of the questionnaire and may enable healthcare providers to improve the quality of cancer care. Preliminary results indicate that hospitals could improve their psychosocial guidance and information provision. PMID:23617741

  14. SU-E-J-124: FDG PET Metrics Analysis in the Context of An Adaptive PET Protocol for Node Positive Gynecologic Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nawrocki, J; Chino, J; Light, K; Vergalasova, I; Craciunescu, O

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare PET extracted metrics and investigate the role of a gradient-based PET segmentation tool, PET Edge (MIM Software Inc., Cleveland, OH), in the context of an adaptive PET protocol for node positive gynecologic cancer patients. Methods: An IRB approved protocol enrolled women with gynecological, PET visible malignancies. A PET-CT was obtained for treatment planning prescribed to 45–50.4Gy with a 55– 70Gy boost to the PET positive nodes. An intra-treatment PET-CT was obtained between 30–36Gy, and all volumes re-contoured. Standard uptake values (SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVmedian) and GTV volumes were extracted from the clinician contoured GTVs on the pre- and intra-treament PET-CT for primaries and nodes and compared with a two tailed Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The differences between primary and node GTV volumes contoured in the treatment planning system and those volumes generated using PET Edge were also investigated. Bland-Altman plots were used to describe significant differences between the two contouring methods. Results: Thirteen women were enrolled in this study. The median baseline/intra-treatment primary (SUVmax, mean, median) were (30.5, 9.09, 7.83)/( 16.6, 4.35, 3.74), and nodes were (20.1, 4.64, 3.93)/( 6.78, 3.13, 3.26). The p values were all < 0.001. The clinical contours were all larger than the PET Edge generated ones, with mean difference of +20.6 ml for primary, and +23.5 ml for nodes. The Bland-Altman revealed changes between clinician/PET Edge contours to be mostly within the margins of the coefficient of variability. However, there was a proportional trend, i.e. the larger the GTV, the larger the clinical contours as compared to PET Edge contours. Conclusion: Primary and node SUV values taken from the intratreament PET-CT can be used to assess the disease response and to design an adaptive plan. The PET Edge tool can streamline the contouring process and lead to smaller, less user-dependent contours.

  15. Dosimetric Predictors of Duodenal Toxicity After Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Treatment of the Para-aortic Nodes in Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Verma, Jonathan; Sulman, Erik P.; Jhingran, Anuja; Tucker, Susan L.; Rauch, Gaiane M.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Klopp, Ann H.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of duodenal toxicity in patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for treatment of para-aortic nodes and to identify dosimetric parameters predictive of late duodenal toxicity. Methods and Materials: We identified 105 eligible patients with gynecologic malignancies who were treated with IMRT for gross metastatic disease in the para-aortic nodes from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2009. Patients were treated to a nodal clinical target volume to 45 to 50.4 Gy with a boost to 60 to 66 Gy. The duodenum was contoured, and dosimetric data were exported for analysis. Duodenal toxicity was scored according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group criteria. Univariate Cox proportional hazards analysis and recursive partitioning analysis were used to determine associations between dosimetric variables and time to toxicity and to identify the optimal threshold that separated patients according to risk of toxicity. Results: Nine of the 105 patients experienced grade 2 to grade 5 duodenal toxicity, confirmed by endoscopy in all cases. The 3-year actuarial rate of any duodenal toxicity was 11.7%. A larger volume of the duodenum receiving 55 Gy (V55) was associated with higher rates of duodenal toxicity. The 3-year actuarial rates of duodenal toxicity with V55 above and below 15 cm{sup 3} were 48.6% and 7.4%, respectively (P<.01). In Cox univariate analysis of dosimetric variables, V55 was associated with duodenal toxicity (P=.029). In recursive partitioning analysis, V55 less than 13.94% segregated all patients with duodenal toxicity. Conclusions: Dose-escalated IMRT can safely and effectively treat para-aortic nodal disease in gynecologic malignancies, provided that care is taken to limit the dose to the duodenum to reduce the risk of late duodenal toxicity. Limiting V55 to below 15 cm{sup 3} may reduce the risk of duodenal complications. In cases where the treatment cannot be delivered within these constraints

  16. Public Perception of Cancer Care in Poland and Austria

    PubMed Central

    Jȩdrzejewski, Mariusz; Thallinger, Christiane; Mrozik, Magda; Kornek, Gabriela; Zielinski, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    Background. We compared the public perception of cancer care in Poland and Austria. Both countries are members of the European Union (EU) but reflect two extremes in health-related per capita spending. Recently, the EUROCARE-5 study reported on very discrepant cancer outcomes between the two countries. Methods. A one-time survey was conducted to compare the public perception of cancer treatment in Poland and Austria. In total, 3,649 subjects, representing the general population, cancer patients, and cancer patients’ family members, were surveyed. Results. In both countries, cancer was considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care was indicated as the most important issue influencing political election decisions. Polish compared with Austrian cancer patients gave a significantly lower positive assessment of overall cancer treatment efficacy and detection methods. Cancer cure rates estimated by Polish and Austrian citizens were 29% and 44%, respectively. The majority of all citizens interviewed thought that cancer patients should have access to all available registered cancer drugs. However, only 18% of Poles versus 62% of Austrians agreed with the notion that the available cancer treatment in their countries is of a standard comparable to that of other EU countries. Consequently, 24% of Poles and 7% of Austrians identified financial status, age, gender, and residence as factors influencing the availability of cancer treatments. Conclusion. In both countries, cancer is considered the most challenging problem of the health care system, and health care issues may strongly influence decisions for political elections. Vast differences in the two populations’ perceptions of cancer care reflect actual cancer outcomes and the national per capita spending on health-related issues. PMID:25520325

  17. Quality measurement and system change of cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Haggstrom, David A; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2011-12-01

    Cancer care quality measurement and system change may serve as a case example for larger possibilities in the health care system related to other diseases. Cancer care quality gaps and variation exist across both technical and patient-centered cancer quality measures, especially among vulnerable populations. There is a need to develop measures that address the following dimensions of quality and its context: disparities, overuse, patient-centeredness, and uncertainty. Developments that may promote system change in cancer care delivery include changes in the information market, organizational accountability, and consumer empowerment. Information market changes include public cancer care quality reporting, enabled by health information exchange, and incentivized by pay-for-performance. Moving organizational accountability, reimbursement, and quality measurement from individual episodes of care to multiple providers providing coordinated cancer care may address quality gaps associated with the fragmentation of care delivery. Consumer empowerment through new technologies, such as personal health records, may lead to the collection of patient-centered quality measures and promote patient self-management. Across all of these developments, leadership and ongoing research to guide informed system changes will be necessary to transform the cancer care delivery system. PMID:20940654

  18. Tumor-Associated Glycans and Their Role in Gynecological Cancers: Accelerating Translational Research by Novel High-Throughput Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Pochechueva, Tatiana; Jacob, Francis; Fedier, Andre; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola

    2012-01-01

    Glycans are important partners in many biological processes, including carcinogenesis. The rapidly developing field of functional glycomics becomes one of the frontiers of biology and biomedicine. Aberrant glycosylation of proteins and lipids occurs commonly during malignant transformation and leads to the expression of specific tumor-associated glycans. The appearance of aberrant glycans on carcinoma cells is typically associated with grade, invasion, metastasis and overall poor prognosis. Cancer-associated carbohydrates are mostly located on the surface of cancer cells and are therefore potential diagnostic biomarkers. Currently, there is increasing interest in cancer-associated aberrant glycosylation, with growing numbers of characteristic cancer targets being detected every day. Breast and ovarian cancer are the most common and lethal malignancies in women, respectively, and potential glycan biomarkers hold promise for early detection and targeted therapies. However, the acceleration of research and comprehensive multi-target investigation of cancer-specific glycans could only be successfully achieved with the help of a combination of novel high-throughput glycomic approaches. PMID:24957768

  19. Volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy for stereotactic body radiosurgery in oligometastatic breast and gynecological cancers: feasibility and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Cilla, Savino; Torre, Gabriella; Corrado, Giacomo; Legge, Francesco; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Tagliaferri, Luca; Mignogna, Samantha; Scambia, Giovanni; Valentini, Vincenzo; Morganti, Alessio G; Ferrandina, Gabriella

    2014-11-01

    In the present study, the preliminary results of the first stereotactic body radiosurgery (SRS) experience with volumetric intensity modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in oligometastatic breast and recurrent gynecological tumors (OBRGT) are reported in terms of feasibility, toxicity and efficacy. Patients were treated in a head-first supine treatment position on a customized body frame immobilization shell. SRS-VMAT treatment plans were optimized using the ERGO++ treatment planning system. Response assessment was performed 8-12 weeks after treatment by morphologic imaging modalities, or if feasible, also by functional imaging. Thirty-six lesions in 24 consecutive patients (median age, 63 years; range, 40-81) were treated: 13.9% had primary or metastatic lung lesions, 30.5% had liver metastases, 36.1% had bone lesions, 16.7% had lymph node metastases and 2.8% had a primary vulvar melanoma. The median dose was 18 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=50.4 Gy), the minimal dose was 12 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=26.4 Gy) and the maximal dose was 28 Gy (BED2 Gy, α/β: 10=106.4 Gy). Seven patients (29.2%) experienced acute toxicity, which however was grade 2 in only 1 case. Moreover, only 3 patients (12.5%) developed late toxicity of which only 1 was grade 2. Objective response rate was 77.7% including 16 lesions achieving complete response (44.4%) and 12 lesions achieving partial response (33.3%). The median duration of follow-up was 15.5 months (range, 6-50). Recurrence/progression within the SRS-VMAT treated field was observed in 6 patients (total lesions=7) with a 2-year inside SRS-VMAT field disease control expressed on a per lesion basis of 69%. Recurrence/progression of disease outside the SRS-VMAT field was documented in 15 patients; the 2-year outside SRS-VMAT field metastasis‑free survival, expressed on a per patient basis, was 35%. Death due to disease was documented in 6 patients and the 2-year overall survival was 58%. Although the maximum tolerated dose was

  20. Diet and Nutrition in Cancer Survivorship and Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Bazzan, Anthony J.; Newberg, Andrew B.; Cho, William C.; Monti, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    The primary goal of palliative cancer care is typically to relieve suffering and improve quality of life. Most approaches to diet in this setting have focused only on eating as many calories as possible to avoid cachexia. However, as the concept of palliative care has evolved to include all aspects of cancer survivorship and not just end of life care, there is an increasing need to thoughtfully consider diet and nutrition approaches that can impact not only quality of life but overall health outcomes and perhaps even positively affect cancer recurrence and progression. In this regard, there has been a recent emphasis in the literature on nutrition and cancer as an important factor in both quality of life and in the pathophysiology of cancer. Hence, the primary purpose of this paper is to review the current data on diet and nutrition as it pertains to a wide range of cancer patients in the palliative care setting. PMID:24288570

  1. [Palliative Care for Rectal Cancer Complicated with Gastric Cancer].

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Tanaka, Kei; Muto, Takaaki

    2015-11-01

    Medical advancements have led to an increase in the number of elderly people. However, standard treatments may sometimes be difficult to use in elderly people. Here, we report the case of an elderly patient with rectal and gastric cancer who refused radical surgery. The patient was an 83-year-old man who had type-2 diabetes, hypertension, hyperuricemia, mitral valve regurgitation, and mild dementia. Furthermore, he was blind in both eyes owing to glaucoma. He first visited our hospital in 2005. In 2010, he was diagnosed with anemia, but he refused a thorough examination; however, he did consent to take iron supplements. In July 2011, he consulted our hospital for symptoms of frequent diarrhea, and agreed to an examination. After colonoscopy, he was diagnosed with rectal cancer that was becoming obstructive. There were no metastases to other organs, but he was also diagnosed with gastric cancer. As he and his family refused radical surgery, a stoma was constructed. After the operation, he received palliative care but died in September 2013. PMID:26805335

  2. Detecting cancer: Pearls for the primary care physician.

    PubMed

    Zeichner, Simon B; Montero, Alberto J

    2016-07-01

    Five-year survival rates have improved over the past 40 years for nearly all types of cancer, partially thanks to early detection and prevention. Since patients typically present to their primary care physician with initial symptoms, it is vital for primary care physicians to accurately diagnose common cancers and to recognize unusual presentations of highly curable cancers such as Hodgkin lymphoma and testicular cancers, for which the 5-year overall survival rates are greater than 85%. This paper reviews these cancers and provides clinically relevant pearls from an oncologic perspective for physicians who are the first point of contact. PMID:27399864

  3. Cancer Risk Assessment for the Primary Care Physician

    PubMed Central

    Korde, Larissa A.; Gadalla, Shahinaz M.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. Cancer risk assessment can be divided into two major categories: assessment of familial or genetic risk and assessment of environmental factors that may be causally related to cancer. Identification of individuals with a suspected heritable cancer syndrome can lead to additional evaluation and to interventions that can substantially decrease cancer risk. Special attention should also be paid to potentially modifiable cancer risk factors in the course of advising primary care patients regarding a healthy lifestyle. Clinical guidelines targeting both genetic and modifiable cancer risk factors are available, and can facilitate applying these health care principles in the primary care setting. PMID:19616151

  4. Vietnam: integrating palliative care into HIV/AIDS and cancer care.

    PubMed

    Krakauer, Eric L; Ngoc, Nguyen Thi Minh; Green, Kimberly; Van Kham, Le; Khue, Luong Ngoc

    2007-05-01

    Vietnam is struggling to meet the growing need for both disease-modifying and palliative care for people with life-threatening chronic diseases such as HIV/AIDS and cancer. Recently, Vietnam initiated rapid development of a national palliative care program for HIV/AIDS and cancer patients that builds on existing palliative care programs and experience and integrates palliative care into standard HIV/AIDS and cancer care. National palliative care guidelines have been issued by the Ministry of Health based on a rapid situation analysis. Plans now call for review and revision of opioid laws and regulations to increase availability of opioids for medical use, training in palliative care for clinicians throughout the country, and development of palliative care programs both in the community and in inpatient referral centers. PMID:17482051

  5. Safety considerations for office-based obstetric and gynecologic procedures.

    PubMed

    Urman, Richard D; Punwani, Nathan; Bombaugh, Maryanne; Shapiro, Fred E

    2013-01-01

    The migration of gynecologic procedures to office-based settings provides numerous advantages for patients and providers alike, including reduced patient expenses, improved scheduling convenience, favorable provider reimbursement, and enhanced continuity of care and patient satisfaction. With rising health care costs-a major concern in health care-procedures will continue to shift to practice environments that optimize care, quality, value, and efficiency. It is imperative that gynecologic offices ensure that performance and quality variations are minimized across different sites of care; physicians should strive to provide care to patients that optimizes safety and is at least equivalent to that delivered at traditional sites. The gynecologic community should nonetheless heed the Institute of Medicine's recommendations and embrace continuous quality improvement. By exercising leadership, office-based gynecologists can forge a culture of competency, teamwork, communication, and performance measurement. PMID:23687556

  6. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-03-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, illness understanding, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We also discuss how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  7. Integrating palliative care into the trajectory of cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Over the past five decades, palliative care has evolved from serving patients at the end of life into a highly specialized discipline focused on delivering supportive care to patients with life-limiting illnesses throughout the disease trajectory. A growing body of evidence is now available to inform the key domains in the practice of palliative care, including symptom management, psychosocial care, communication, decision-making, and end-of-life care. Findings from multiple studies indicate that integrating palliative care early in the disease trajectory can result in improvements in quality of life, symptom control, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of end-of-life care, survival, and costs of care. In this narrative Review, we discuss various strategies to integrate oncology and palliative care by optimizing clinical infrastructures, processes, education, and research. The goal of integration is to maximize patient access to palliative care and, ultimately, to improve patient outcomes. We provide a conceptual model for the integration of supportive and/or palliative care with primary and oncological care. We end by discussing how health-care systems and institutions need to tailor integration based on their resources, size, and the level of primary palliative care available. PMID:26598947

  8. Socioeconomic Considerations and Shared-Care Models of Cancer Care for Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Dale, William; Chow, Selina; Sajid, Saleha

    2016-02-01

    Older adults with cancer require a geriatrics approach to treatment. Such an approach targets appropriate treatments based on physiologic, not chronologic, age. Patients older than 65 years of age constitute the largest group of patients with cancer, making them the most expensive group of patients with cancer, especially with the advent of expensive new treatments with minimal impact on overall survival. Geriatric assessment, combined with targeted inventions, can optimize the value propositions in caring for older patients with cancer. Over the past 20 years, geriatric oncology care models have emerged applying these care principles in clinical practice. PMID:26614859

  9. EM-navigated catheter placement for gynecologic brachytherapy: an accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrtash, Alireza; Damato, Antonio; Pernelle, Guillaume; Barber, Lauren; Farhat, Nabgha; Viswanathan, Akila; Cormack, Robert; Kapur, Tina

    2014-03-01

    Gynecologic malignancies, including cervical, endometrial, ovarian, vaginal and vulvar cancers, cause significant mortality in women worldwide. The standard care for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancers consists of chemoradiation followed by brachytherapy. In high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy, intracavitary applicators and /or interstitial needles are placed directly inside the cancerous tissue so as to provide catheters to deliver high doses of radiation. Although technology for the navigation of catheters and needles is well developed for procedures such as prostate biopsy, brain biopsy, and cardiac ablation, it is notably lacking for gynecologic HDR brachytherapy. Using a benchtop study that closely mimics the clinical interstitial gynecologic brachytherapy procedure, we developed a method for evaluating the accuracy of image-guided catheter placement. Future bedside translation of this technology offers the potential benefit of maximizing tumor coverage during catheter placement while avoiding damage to the adjacent organs, for example bladder, rectum and bowel. In the study, two independent experiments were performed on a phantom model to evaluate the targeting accuracy of an electromagnetic (EM) tracking system. The procedure was carried out using a laptop computer (2.1GHz Intel Core i7 computer, 8GB RAM, Windows 7 64-bit), an EM Aurora tracking system with a 1.3mm diameter 6 DOF sensor, and 6F (2 mm) brachytherapy catheters inserted through a Syed-Neblett applicator. The 3D Slicer and PLUS open source software were used to develop the system. The mean of the targeting error was less than 2.9mm, which is comparable to the targeting errors in commercial clinical navigation systems.

  10. Collection of Biospecimen & Clinical Information in Patients w/ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-05-24

    Gastrointestinal Neoplasms; Gynecologic Cancers; Gynecologic Cancers Cervical Cancer; Gastric (Stomach) Cancer; Gastro-Esophageal(GE) Junction Cancer; Gastrointenstinal Stromal Tumor (GIST); Colon/Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Colon Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Rectal Cancer; Colon/Rectal Cancer Anal Cancer; Anal Cancer; Hepatobiliary Cancers; Hepatobiliary Cancers Liver; Pancreatic Cancer

  11. HLA-E expression by gynecological cancers restrains tumor-infiltrating CD8⁺ T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gooden, Marloes; Lampen, Margit; Jordanova, Ekaterina S; Leffers, Ninke; Trimbos, J Baptist; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Nijman, Hans; van Hall, Thorbald

    2011-06-28

    HLA-E is a nonclassical HLA class I molecule, which differs from classical HLA molecules by its nonpolymorphic, conserved nature. Expression and function of HLA-E in normal tissues and solid tumors is not fully understood. We investigated HLA-E protein expression on tissue sections of 420 ovarian and cervical cancers and found equal or higher levels than normal counterpart epithelia in 80% of the tumors. Expression was strongly associated with components of the antigen presentation pathway, e.g., transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP), endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptide (ERAP), β2 microglobulin (β2m), HLA classes I and II, and for ovarian cancer with tumor infiltrating CD8(+) T lymphocytes (CTLs). This association argues against the idea that HLA-E would compensate for the loss of classical HLA in tumors. In situ detection of HLA-E interacting receptors revealed a very low infiltrate of natural killer (NK) cells, but up to 50% of intraepithelial CTLs expressed the inhibiting CD94/NKG2A receptor. In cervical cancer, HLA-E expression did not alter the prognostic effect of CTLs, most likely due to very high infiltrating CTL numbers in this virus-induced tumor. Overall survival of ovarian cancer patients, however, was strongly influenced by HLA-E, because the beneficial effect of high CTL infiltration was completely neutralized in the subpopulation with strong HLA-E expression. Interestingly, these results indicate that CTL infiltration in ovarian cancer is associated with better survival only when HLA-E expression is low and that intratumoral CTLs are inhibited by CD94/NKG2A receptors on CTLs in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:21670276

  12. The expanding role of primary care in cancer control.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Greg; Berendsen, Annette; Crawford, S Michael; Dommett, Rachel; Earle, Craig; Emery, Jon; Fahey, Tom; Grassi, Luigi; Grunfeld, Eva; Gupta, Sumit; Hamilton, Willie; Hiom, Sara; Hunter, David; Lyratzopoulos, Georgios; Macleod, Una; Mason, Robert; Mitchell, Geoffrey; Neal, Richard D; Peake, Michael; Roland, Martin; Seifert, Bohumil; Sisler, Jeff; Sussman, Jonathan; Taplin, Stephen; Vedsted, Peter; Voruganti, Teja; Walter, Fiona; Wardle, Jane; Watson, Eila; Weller, David; Wender, Richard; Whelan, Jeremy; Whitlock, James; Wilkinson, Clare; de Wit, Niek; Zimmermann, Camilla

    2015-09-01

    The nature of cancer control is changing, with an increasing emphasis, fuelled by public and political demand, on prevention, early diagnosis, and patient experience during and after treatment. At the same time, primary care is increasingly promoted, by governments and health funders worldwide, as the preferred setting for most health care for reasons of increasing need, to stabilise health-care costs, and to accommodate patient preference for care close to home. It is timely, then, to consider how this expanding role for primary care can work for cancer control, which has long been dominated by highly technical interventions centred on treatment, and in which the contribution of primary care has been largely perceived as marginal. In this Commission, expert opinion from primary care and public health professionals with academic and clinical cancer expertise—from epidemiologists, psychologists, policy makers, and cancer specialists—has contributed to a detailed consideration of the evidence for cancer control provided in primary care and community care settings. Ranging from primary prevention to end-of-life care, the scope for new models of care is explored, and the actions needed to effect change are outlined. The strengths of primary care—its continuous, coordinated, and comprehensive care for individuals and families—are particularly evident in prevention and diagnosis, in shared follow-up and survivorship care, and in end-of-life care. A strong theme of integration of care runs throughout, and its elements (clinical, vertical, and functional) and the tools needed for integrated working are described in detail. All of this change, as it evolves, will need to be underpinned by new research and by continuing and shared multiprofessional development. PMID:26431866

  13. Cancer Core Europe: a consortium to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum challenge.

    PubMed

    Eggermont, Alexander M M; Caldas, Carlos; Ringborg, Ulrik; Medema, René; Tabernero, Josep; Wiestler, Otmar

    2014-11-01

    European cancer research for a transformative initiative by creating a consortium of six leading excellent comprehensive cancer centres that will work together to address the cancer care-cancer research continuum. Prerequisites for joint translational and clinical research programs are very demanding. These require the creation of a virtual single 'e-hospital' and a powerful translational platform, inter-compatible clinical molecular profiling laboratories with a robust underlying computational biology pipeline, standardised functional and molecular imaging, commonly agreed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for liquid and tissue biopsy procurement, storage and processing, for molecular diagnostics, 'omics', functional genetics, immune-monitoring and other assessments. Importantly also it requires a culture of data collection and data storage that provides complete longitudinal data sets to allow for: effective data sharing and common database building, and to achieve a level of completeness of data that is required for conducting outcome research, taking into account our current understanding of cancers as communities of evolving clones. Cutting edge basic research and technology development serve as an important driving force for innovative translational and clinical studies. Given the excellent track records of the six participants in these areas, Cancer Core Europe will be able to support the full spectrum of research required to address the cancer research- cancer care continuum. Cancer Core Europe also constitutes a unique environment to train the next generation of talents in innovative translational and clinical oncology. PMID:25263570

  14. Patient Satisfaction With Breast and Colorectal Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Sprague, Brian L.; Dittus, Kim L.; Pace, Claire M.; Dulko, Dorothy; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer survivors face several challenges following the completion of active treatment, including uncertainty about late effects of treatment and confusion about coordination of follow-up care. The authors evaluated patient satisfaction with personalized survivorship care plans designed to clarify those issues. The authors enrolled 48 patients with breast cancer and 10 patients with colorectal cancer who had completed treatment in the previous two months from an urban academic medical center and a rural community hospital. Patient satisfaction with the care plan was assessed by telephone interview. Overall, about 80% of patients were very or completely satisfied with the care plan, and 90% or more agreed that it was useful, it was easy to understand, and the length was appropriate. Most patients reported that the care plan was very or critically important to understanding an array of survivorship issues. However, only about half felt that it helped them better understand the roles of primary care providers and oncologists in survivorship care. The results provide evidence that patients with cancer find high value in personalized survivorship care plans, but the plans do not eliminate confusion regarding the coordination of follow-up care. Future efforts to improve care plans should focus on better descriptions of how survivorship care will be coordinated. PMID:23722604

  15. Personalized prostate cancer care: from screening to treatment.

    PubMed

    Conran, Carly A; Brendler, Charles B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented progress has been made in genomic personalized medicine in the last several years, allowing for more individualized healthcare assessments and recommendations than ever before. However, most of this progress in prostate cancer (PCa) care has focused on developing and selecting therapies for late-stage disease. To address this issue of limited focus, we propose a model for incorporating genomic-based personalized medicine into all levels of PCa care, from prevention and screening to diagnosis, and ultimately to the treatment of both early-stage and late-stage cancers. We have termed this strategy the "Pyramid Model" of personalized cancer care. In this perspective paper, our objective is to demonstrate the potential application of the Pyramid Model to PCa care. This proactive and comprehensive personalized cancer care approach has the potential to achieve three important medical goals: reducing mortality, improving quality of life and decreasing both individual and societal healthcare costs. PMID:27184548

  16. Personalized prostate cancer care: from screening to treatment

    PubMed Central

    Conran, Carly A; Brendler, Charles B; Xu, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Unprecedented progress has been made in genomic personalized medicine in the last several years, allowing for more individualized healthcare assessments and recommendations than ever before. However, most of this progress in prostate cancer (PCa) care has focused on developing and selecting therapies for late-stage disease. To address this issue of limited focus, we propose a model for incorporating genomic-based personalized medicine into all levels of PCa care, from prevention and screening to diagnosis, and ultimately to the treatment of both early-stage and late-stage cancers. We have termed this strategy the “Pyramid Model” of personalized cancer care. In this perspective paper, our objective is to demonstrate the potential application of the Pyramid Model to PCa care. This proactive and comprehensive personalized cancer care approach has the potential to achieve three important medical goals: reducing mortality, improving quality of life and decreasing both individual and societal healthcare costs. PMID:27184548

  17. Educating Health Care Professionals to Provide Institutional Changes in Cancer Survivorship Care

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Uman, Gwen

    2013-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine (IOM) 2006 report, From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor: Lost in Transition (In M. Hewitt, S. Greenfield and E. Stovall (Eds.), (pp. 9–186). Washington DC: The National Academies Press, 2006) identifies the key components of care that contribute to quality of life for the cancer survivor. As cancer survivorship care becomes an important part of quality cancer care oncology professionals need education to prepare themselves to provide this care. Survivorship care requires a varied approach depending on the survivor population, treatment regimens and care settings. The goal of this program was to encourage institutional changes that would integrate survivorship care into participating centers. An NCI-funded educational program: Survivorship Education for Quality Cancer Care provided multidiscipline two-person teams an opportunity to gain this important knowledge using a goal-directed, team approach. Educational programs were funded for yearly courses from 2006 to 2009. Survivorship care curriculum was developed using the Quality of Life Model as the core around the IOM recommendations. Baseline data was collected for all participants. Teams were followed-up at 6, 12 and 18 months postcourse for goal achievement and institutional evaluations. Comparison data from baseline to 18 months provided information on the 204 multidiscipline teams that participated over 4 years. Teams attended including administrators, social workers, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, physicians and others. Participating centers included primarily community cancer centers and academic centers followed by pediatric centers, ambulatory/physician offices and free standing cancer centers. Statistically significant changes at p=<0.05 levels were seen by 12 months postcourse related to the effectiveness, receptiveness and comfort of survivorship care in participant settings. Institutional assessments found improvement in seven domains of care that related to

  18. Long-Term Survival Advantage and Prognostic Factors Associated With Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Treatment in Advanced Ovarian Cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Devansu; Java, James J.; Salani, Ritu; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Markman, Maurie; Herzog, Thomas; Monk, Bradley J.; Chan, John K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine long-term survival and associated prognostic factors after intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy in patients with advanced ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods Data from Gynecologic Oncology Group protocols 114 and 172 were retrospectively analyzed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used for statistical analyses. Results In 876 patients, median follow-up was 10.7 years. Median survival with IP therapy was 61.8 months (95% CI, 55.5 to 69.5), compared with 51.4 months (95% CI, 46.0 to 58.2) for intravenous therapy. IP therapy was associated with a 23% decreased risk of death (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR], 0.77; 95% CI, 0.65 to 0.90; P = .002). IP therapy improved survival of those with gross residual (≤ 1 cm) disease (AHR, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.62 to 0.92; P = .006). Risk of death decreased by 12% for each cycle of IP chemotherapy completed (AHR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.94; P < .001). Factors associated with poorer survival included: clear/mucinous versus serous histology (AHR, 2.79; 95% CI, 1.83 to 4.24; P < .001), gross residual versus no visible disease (AHR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.48 to 2.43; P < .001), and fewer versus more cycles of IP chemotherapy (AHR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83 to 0.94; P < .001). Younger patients were more likely to complete the IP regimen, with a 5% decrease in probability of completion with each year of age (odds ratio, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.93 to 0.96; P < .001). Conclusion The advantage of IP over intravenous chemotherapy extends beyond 10 years. IP therapy enhanced survival of those with gross residual disease. Survival improved with increasing number of IP cycles. PMID:25800756

  19. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2012 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Beed, Gene; Owens, Gary M.; Benson, Al B.; Klein, Ira M.; Silver, Samuel M.; Beveridge, Roy A.; Malin, Jennifer; Sprandio, John D.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Mitchell, Matthew; Vogenberg, F. Randy; Fox, John; Newcomer, Lee N.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 200 oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, pharmacy benefit managers, and other healthcare stakeholders convened in Houston, TX, on March 28–31, 2012, for the Second Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The mission of the conference was to align the various perspectives around the growing need of defining value in cancer care and developing strategies to enhance patient outcomes. The AVBCC conference presented a forum for the various viewpoints from all the stakeholders across the cancer care continuum, featuring more than 20 sessions and symposia led by nearly 30 oncology leaders. The discussions focused on current trends and challenges in optimizing value in oncology by reducing or controlling cost while improving care quality and patient outcomes, introducing emerging approaches to management and tools that providers and payers are using to enhance cancer care collaboratively. The AVBCC Second Annual Conference was opened by a Steering Committee discussion of 11 panel members who attempted to define value in cancer care and articulated action steps that can help to implement value into cancer care delivery. The following summary represents highlights from the Steering Committee discussion, which was moderated by Gene Beed, MD, and Gary M. Owens, MD. PMID:24991320

  20. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2012 Steering Committee Report.

    PubMed

    Beed, Gene; Owens, Gary M; Benson, Al B; Klein, Ira M; Silver, Samuel M; Beveridge, Roy A; Malin, Jennifer; Sprandio, John D; Deligdish, Craig K; Mitchell, Matthew; Vogenberg, F Randy; Fox, John; Newcomer, Lee N

    2012-07-01

    Approximately 200 oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, pharmacy benefit managers, and other healthcare stakeholders convened in Houston, TX, on March 28-31, 2012, for the Second Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The mission of the conference was to align the various perspectives around the growing need of defining value in cancer care and developing strategies to enhance patient outcomes. The AVBCC conference presented a forum for the various viewpoints from all the stakeholders across the cancer care continuum, featuring more than 20 sessions and symposia led by nearly 30 oncology leaders. The discussions focused on current trends and challenges in optimizing value in oncology by reducing or controlling cost while improving care quality and patient outcomes, introducing emerging approaches to management and tools that providers and payers are using to enhance cancer care collaboratively. The AVBCC Second Annual Conference was opened by a Steering Committee discussion of 11 panel members who attempted to define value in cancer care and articulated action steps that can help to implement value into cancer care delivery. The following summary represents highlights from the Steering Committee discussion, which was moderated by Gene Beed, MD, and Gary M. Owens, MD. PMID:24991320

  1. Advanced lung cancer patients' experience with continuity of care and supportive care needs.

    PubMed

    Husain, Amna; Barbera, Lisa; Howell, Doris; Moineddin, Rahim; Bezjak, Andrea; Sussman, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    As cancer care becomes increasingly complex, the ability to coordinate this care is more difficult for health care providers, patients and their caregivers alike. Despite the widely recognized need for improving continuity and coordination of care, the relationship of continuity of care with patient outcomes has yet to be elucidated. Our study's main finding is that the Continuity and Coordination subscale of the widely used Picker System of Ambulatory Cancer Care Survey is able to distinguish between lung cancer patients with unmet supportive care needs and those without. Specifically, this study shows a new association between this widely implemented continuity and coordination survey and the 'psychological needs' domain, as well as the 'health system and information' domains of supportive care needs. The finding provides support for the idea that interventions to improve continuity may impact tangible indicators of patient care such as supportive care needs being met. The study focuses attention on continuity of care as an important aspect of optimizing outcomes in cancer care. PMID:23274923

  2. Integrating dietary supplements into cancer care.

    PubMed

    Frenkel, Moshe; Abrams, Donald I; Ladas, Elena J; Deng, Gary; Hardy, Mary; Capodice, Jillian L; Winegardner, Mary F; Gubili, J K; Yeung, K Simon; Kussmann, Heidi; Block, Keith I

    2013-09-01

    Many studies confirm that a majority of patients undergoing cancer therapy use self-selected forms of complementary therapies, mainly dietary supplements. Unfortunately, patients often do not report their use of supplements to their providers. The failure of physicians to communicate effectively with patients on this use may result in a loss of trust within the therapeutic relationship and in the selection by patients of harmful, useless, or ineffective and costly nonconventional therapies when effective integrative interventions may exist. Poor communication may also lead to diminishment of patient autonomy and self-efficacy and thereby interfere with the healing response. To be open to the patient's perspective, and sensitive to his or her need for autonomy and empowerment, physicians may need a shift in their own perspectives. Perhaps the optimal approach is to discuss both the facts and the uncertainty with the patient, in order to reach a mutually informed decision. Today's informed patients truly value physicians who appreciate them as equal participants in making their own health care choices. To reach a mutually informed decision about the use of these supplements, the Clinical Practice Committee of The Society of Integrative Oncology undertook the challenge of providing basic information to physicians who wish to discuss these issues with their patients. A list of leading supplements that have the best suggestions of benefit was constructed by leading researchers and clinicians who have experience in using these supplements. This list includes curcumin, glutamine, vitamin D, Maitake mushrooms, fish oil, green tea, milk thistle, Astragalus, melatonin, and probiotics. The list includes basic information on each supplement, such as evidence on effectiveness and clinical trials, adverse effects, and interactions with medications. The information was constructed to provide an up-to-date base of knowledge, so that physicians and other health care providers would

  3. An eHealth Application in Head and Neck Cancer Survivorship Care: Health Care Professionals' Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    van Uden-Kraan, Cornelia F; Peek, Niels; Cuijpers, Pim; Leemans, C René; Verdonck-de Leeuw, Irma M

    2015-01-01

    Background Although many cancer survivors could benefit from supportive care, they often do not utilize such services. Previous studies have shown that patient-reported outcomes (PROs) could be a solution to meet cancer survivors’ needs, for example through an eHealth application that monitors quality of life and provides personalized advice and supportive care options. In order to develop an effective application that can successfully be implemented in current health care, it is important to include health care professionals in the development process. Objective The aim of this study was to investigate health care professionals’ perspectives toward follow-up care and an eHealth application, OncoKompas, in follow-up cancer care that monitors quality of life via PROs, followed by automatically generated tailored feedback and personalized advice on supportive care. Methods Health care professionals involved in head and neck cancer care (N=11) were interviewed on current follow-up care and the anticipated value of the proposed eHealth application (Step 1). A prototype of the eHealth application, OncoKompas, was developed (Step 2). Cognitive walkthroughs were conducted among health care professionals (N=21) to investigate perceived usability (Step 3). Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by 2 coders. Results Health care professionals indicated several barriers in current follow-up care including difficulties in detecting symptoms, patients’ perceived need for supportive care, and a lack of time to encourage survivors to obtain supportive care. Health care professionals expected the eHealth application to be of added value. The cognitive walkthroughs demonstrated that health care professionals emphasized the importance of tailoring care. They considered the navigation structure of OncoKompas to be complex. Health care professionals differed in their opinion toward the best strategy to implement the application in clinical practice but

  4. Fluorescence diagnostics in oncological gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaeva, Ludmila A.; Adamyan, Leila V.; Kozachenko, Vladimir P.; Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Stranadko, Eugene F.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2003-10-01

    The method of fluorescent diagnostics (FD) of tumors is a promising tool that may allow to increase sensitivity of tumor detection especially at initial stages. One of the most promising photosensitizers today is 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) that, actually, is not photosensitizer itself but precursor of protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). This paper deals with cancer diagnostics in gynecology by means of ALA-induced Pp IX laser-fluorescence spectroscopy. The tissue fluorescence spectra in vivo were studied in patients with various pathologies of ovaries, uterine and vulva after 5-aminolevulinic acid administration. It was shown that different pathologies varies in accumulation of Pp IX. Coefficient of fluorescence kf for normal tissue is not high, but exceptions are endometrium and mucous membrane of uterine tubes. Benign tumors of uterus and ovary have low values of kf, but polyps of endometrium exhibit high kf. Optical express-biopsy is important for diagnosis of ovarian cancer and micrometastatic spread. Coefficients of diagnostic contrast were determined for cancer of endometrium, cervical cancer, vulvar cancer.

  5. Vaginal and Vulvar Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  6. Quality indicators in breast cancer care.

    PubMed

    Del Turco, M Rosselli; Ponti, A; Bick, U; Biganzoli, L; Cserni, G; Cutuli, B; Decker, T; Dietel, M; Gentilini, O; Kuehn, T; Mano, M P; Mantellini, P; Marotti, L; Poortmans, P; Rank, F; Roe, H; Scaffidi, E; van der Hage, J A; Viale, G; Wells, C; Welnicka-Jaskiewicz, M; Wengstöm, Y; Cataliotti, L

    2010-09-01

    To define a set of quality indicators that should be routinely measured and evaluated to confirm that the clinical outcome reaches the requested standards, Eusoma has organised a workshop during which twenty four experts from different disciplines have reviewed the international literature and selected the main process and outcome indicators available for quality assurance of breast cancer care. A review of the literature for evidence-based recommendations have been performed by the steering committee. The experts have identified the quality indicators also taking into account the usability and feasibility. For each of them it has been reported: definition, minimum and target standard, motivation for selection and level of evidence (graded according to AHRO). In overall 17 main quality indicators have been identified, respectively, 7 on diagnosis, 4 on surgery and loco-regional treatment, 2 on systemic treatment and 4 on staging, counselling, follow-up and rehabilitation. Breast Units in Europe are invited to comply with these indicators and monitor them during their periodic audit meetings. PMID:20675120

  7. The Organization of Multidisciplinary Care Teams: Modeling Internal and External Influences on Cancer Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu Das, Irene; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care. PMID:20386055

  8. Corruption in health-care systems and its effect on cancer care in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mostert, Saskia; Njuguna, Festus; Olbara, Gilbert; Sindano, Solomon; Sitaresmi, Mei Neni; Supriyadi, Eddy; Kaspers, Gertjan

    2015-08-01

    At the government, hospital, and health-care provider level, corruption plays a major role in health-care systems in Africa. The returns on health investments of international financial institutions, health organisations, and donors might be very low when mismanagement and dysfunctional structures of health-care systems are not addressed. More funding might even aggravate corruption. We discuss corruption and its effects on cancer care within the African health-care system in a sociocultural context. The contribution of high-income countries in stimulating corruption is also described. Corrupt African governments cannot be expected to take the initiative to eradicate corruption. Therefore, international financial institutions, health organisations, and financial donors should use their power to demand policy reforms of health-care systems in Africa troubled by the issue of corruption. These modifications will ameliorate the access and quality of cancer care for patients across the continent, and ultimately improve the outcome of health care to all patients. PMID:26248847

  9. Relevance of Health Economics in the Early Detection of Breast Cancer in Germany – the View of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO)

    PubMed Central

    Uleer, Christoph; Wagner, Joachim; Moisidis-Tesch, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Summary The introduction of the Mammography Screening Program (MSP) in 2005 has changed the early detection of breast cancer in Germany significantly. We analyzed the frequency and ensuing health care costs of mammograms performed for the early detection of breast cancer before and after the introduction of the MSP. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of the MSP on the demographics of physicians (gynecologists versus radiologists) performing mammograms in Germany. Whereas the number of ‘curative’ mammograms has decreased since the introduction of the MSP, 2 million ‘curative’ mammograms per year are still being performed in addition to the 4.6 million mammograms performed annually in the MSP at an additional health care cost of approximately €100 million per year. Only 12% of screening and ‘curative’ mammograms are being performed and evaluated by gynecologists. PMID:24715841

  10. Robotic surgery in gynecology

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B.; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  11. Robotic surgery in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Rooma; Sanjay, Madhumati; Rupa, B; Kumari, Samita

    2015-01-01

    FDA approved Da Vinci Surgical System in 2005 for gynecological surgery. It has been rapidly adopted and it has already assumed an important position at various centers where this is available. It comprises of three components: A surgeon's console, a patient-side cart with four robotic arms and a high-definition three-dimensional (3D) vision system. In this review we have discussed various robotic-assisted laparoscopic benign gynecological procedures like myomectomy, hysterectomy, endometriosis, tubal anastomosis and sacrocolpopexy. A PubMed search was done and relevant published studies were reviewed. Surgeries that can have future applications are also mentioned. At present most studies do not give significant advantage over conventional laparoscopic surgery in benign gynecological disease. However robotics do give an edge in more complex surgeries. The conversion rate to open surgery is lesser with robotic assistance when compared to laparoscopy. For myomectomy surgery, Endo wrist movement of robotic instrument allows better and precise suturing than conventional straight stick laparoscopy. The robotic platform is a logical step forward to laparoscopy and if cost considerations are addressed may become popular among gynecological surgeons world over. PMID:25598600

  12. The Role of Mobile Technologies in Health Care Processes: The Case of Cancer Supportive Care

    PubMed Central

    Cucciniello, Maria; Guerrazzi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Background Health care systems are gradually moving toward new models of care based on integrated care processes shared by different care givers and on an empowered role of the patient. Mobile technologies are assuming an emerging role in this scenario. This is particularly true in care processes where the patient has a particularly enhanced role, as is the case of cancer supportive care. Objective This paper aims to review existing studies on the actual role and use of mobile technology during the different stages of care processes, with particular reference to cancer supportive care. Methods We carried out a review of literature with the aim of identifying studies related to the use of mHealth in cancer care and cancer supportive care. The final sample size consists of 106 records. Results There is scant literature concerning the use of mHealth in cancer supportive care. Looking more generally at cancer care, we found that mHealth is mainly used for self-management activities carried out by patients. The main tools used are mobile devices like mobile phones and tablets, but remote monitoring devices also play an important role. Text messaging technologies (short message service, SMS) have a minor role, with the exception of middle income countries where text messaging plays a major role. Telehealth technologies are still rarely used in cancer care processes. If we look at the different stages of health care processes, we can see that mHealth is mainly used during the treatment of patients, especially for self-management activities. It is also used for prevention and diagnosis, although to a lesser extent, whereas it appears rarely used for decision-making and follow-up activities. Conclusions Since mHealth seems to be employed only for limited uses and during limited phases of the care process, it is unlikely that it can really contribute to the creation of new care models. This under-utilization may depend on many issues, including the need for it to be embedded

  13. Ensuring Quality Cancer Care: A Follow-Up Review of the Institute of Medicine’s Ten Recommendations for Improving the Quality of Cancer Care in America

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W.; Feeley, Thomas W.; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W.; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; DuBois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I.

    2011-01-01

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US healthcare system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a twenty-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system, where patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. This report outlined ten recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care; 2) increase our understanding of quality cancer care; and, 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating healthcare costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the healthcare system. These efforts by healthcare providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States. PMID:22045610

  14. Impact of obesity on chemotherapy management and outcomes in women with gynecologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Neil S.; Wright, Alexi A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the effects of obesity on the pharmacokinetics and dosing of chemotherapies and provide recommendations for chemotherapy management in obese women with gynecologic malignancies. Methods PubMEd and MEDLINE databases were searched for articles published before June 2014. Only English-language articles were considered. 84 manuscripts were reviewed and 66 were included. Search terms included: obesity, overweight, body mass index, body surface area, glomerular filtration rate, chemotherapy, ovarian cancer, endometrial cancer, inflammation, and pharmacokinetics, Results Obese cancer patients have worse clinical outcomes, compared with non-obese patients. This may be because of differences in pharmacokinetics, metabolic dysregulation, or physicians' decisions to reduce chemotherapy dose-intensity during treatment to minimize toxicities. A 2012 American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline recommends using actual body weight for chemotherapy dosing in all patients treated with curative intent, irrespective of obesity, to avoid compromising clinical outcomes, including progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In women with gynecologic cancers most studies demonstrate no difference in PFS or OS when obese patients receive the same chemotherapy dose intensity as non-obese patients, except perhaps with bevacizumab. Conclusions Chemotherapy dose-intensity is a critical determinant of cancer outcomes and should be maintained in all patients, irrespective of obesity. Future studies should prospectively examine the impact of obesity on clinical outcomes (adverse events, survival) to improve the care of this growing population of patients who are at risk for inferior clinical outcomes. PMID:25870918

  15. A Phase II Evaluation of Gefitinib in the Treatment of Persistent or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Kimberly K.; Sill, Michael W.; Fischer, Edgar; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Mannel, Robert S.; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; Hanjani, Parviz; Wilken, Jason A.; Baron, Andre T.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Schilder, Russell J.; Singh, Meenakshi; Maihle, Nita J.

    2013-01-01

    Background A phase II trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of gefitinib in patients with persistent/recurrent endometrial cancer. Methods Women with histologically confirmed persistent/recurrent endometrial cancer were treated with 500 mg oral gefitinib daily until progression or severe toxicity, with progression-free survival (PFS) at six months as the primary endpoint. Tumor expression of total epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor A (PRA) and B (PRB), Ki67, pEGFR and activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) were examined pre- and post-treatment. EGFR was sequenced, and serum concentrations of soluble EGFR (sEGFR) at baseline also were examined. Results Of 29 patients enrolled, 26 were evaluable for efficacy and toxicity. Four patients experienced PFS ≥6 months, and one had a complete response which was not associated with an EGFR mutation. The concentration of sEGFR in pretreatment serum was positively correlated with overall survival (OS), but not with responsiveness to gefitinib in this small patient cohort. Expression of tumor biomarkers was not associated with PFS or OS. Co-expression of ER with PRA in primary and recurrent tumors, and pEGFR with pERK in primary tumors was observed. Conclusions This treatment regimen was tolerable but lacked sufficient efficacy to warrant further evaluation in this setting. The possible association between serum sEGFR concentrations and OS, and temporal changes in expression of pEGFR and pERK and the documented CR of one patient are interesting and warrant additional investigation. PMID:23438670

  16. Developing a service model that integrates palliative care throughout cancer care: the time is now.

    PubMed

    Partridge, Ann H; Seah, Davinia S E; King, Tari; Leighl, Natasha B; Hauke, Ralph; Wollins, Dana S; Von Roenn, Jamie Hayden

    2014-10-10

    Palliative care is a fundamental component of cancer care. As part of the 2011 to 2012 Leadership Development Program (LDP) of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), a group of participants was charged with advising ASCO on how to develop a service model integrating palliative care throughout the continuum of cancer care. This article presents the findings of the LDP group. The group focused on the process of palliative care delivery in the oncology setting. We identified key elements for models of palliative care in various settings to be potentially equitable, sustainable, feasible, and acceptable, and here we describe a dynamic model for the integrated, simultaneous implementation of palliative care into oncology practice. We also discuss critical considerations to better integrate palliative care into oncology, including raising consciousness and educating both providers and the public about the importance of palliative care; coordinating palliative care efforts through strengthening affiliations and/or developing new partnerships; prospectively evaluating the impact of palliative care on patient and provider satisfaction, quality improvement, and cost savings; and ensuring sustainability through adequate reimbursement and incentives, including linkage of performance data to quality indicators, and coordination with training efforts and maintenance of certification requirements for providers. In light of these findings, we believe the confluence of increasing importance of incorporation of palliative care education in oncology education, emphasis on value-based care, growing use of technology, and potential cost savings makes developing and incorporating palliative care into current service models a meaningful goal. PMID:25199756

  17. Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kristina M.; Neubauer, Nikki L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been utilized in the field of obstetrics and gynecology as far back as the 1940s when culdoscopy was first introduced as a visualization tool. Gynecologists then began to employ minimally invasive surgery for adhesiolysis and obtaining biopsies but then expanded its use to include procedures such as tubal sterilization (Clyman (1963), L. E. Smale and M. L. Smale (1973), Thompson and Wheeless (1971), Peterson and Behrman (1971)). With advances in instrumentation, the first laparoscopic hysterectomy was successfully performed in 1989 by Reich et al. At the same time, minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology was being developed alongside its benign counterpart. In the 1975s, Rosenoff et al. reported using peritoneoscopy for pretreatment evaluation in ovarian cancer, and Spinelli et al. reported on using laparoscopy for the staging of ovarian cancer. In 1993, Nichols used operative laparoscopy to perform pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients. The initial goals of minimally invasive surgery, not dissimilar to those of modern medicine, were to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery and therefore improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. This review will summarize the history and use of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology and also highlight new minimally invasive surgical approaches currently in development. PMID:23997959

  18. WHEN DOES AN EPISODE OF CARE FOR CANCER BEGIN?

    PubMed Central

    Hornbrook, Mark C.; Fishman, Paul A.; Ritzwoller, Debra P.; Lafata, Jennifer Elston; O'Keeffe-Rosetti, Maureen C.; Salloum, Ramzi G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Little is known about the medical care resources devoted to diagnosing and treating cancer-related symptoms prior to a definitive cancer diagnosis. Previous research using SEER-Medicare data to measure incremental costs and utilization associated with cancer started with the date of diagnosis. We hypothesized that health care use increases prior to diagnosis of a new primary cancer. Methods We used a longitudinal case-control design to estimate incremental medical care utilization rates. Cases were 121,293 persons enrolled between January, 2000 and December, 2008 with one or more primary cancers. We selected 522,839 controls randomly from among all health plan members who had no tumor registry evidence of cancer prior to January, 2009, and we frequency matched controls to cancer cases on a five-to-one ratio by age group, gender, and having health plan eligibility in the year of diagnosis of the index cancer case. Utilization data were extracted for all cases and controls for the period 2000-2008 from standardized distributed data warehouses. To determine when and the extent to which patterns of medical care use change preceding a cancer diagnosis, we compute hospitalization rates, hospital days, emergency department visits, same-day surgical procedures, ambulatory medical office visits, imaging procedures, laboratory tests, and ambulatory prescription dispensings per 1,000 persons per month within integrated delivery systems. Results One- to three-fold increases in monthly utilization rates were observed during the three to five months prior to a cancer diagnosis, compared to matched non-cancer control groups. This pattern was consistent for both aged and non-aged cancer patients. Aged cancer patients had higher utilization rates than non-aged cancer patients throughout the year prior to a cancer diagnosis. Conclusion The pre-diagnosis phase is a resource-intensive component of cancer care episodes and should be included in cost of cancer estimates. More

  19. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    PubMed

    Provost, Sylvie; Pineault, Raynald; Tousignant, Pierre; Roberge, Danièle; Tremblay, Dominique; Breton, Mylaine; Benhadj, Lynda; Diop, Mamadou; Fournier, Michel; Brousselle, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the impact of patients' experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal) between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada). Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models) were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n = 307), 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06-1.46), as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p = 0.05), while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p < 0.01).  Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients' perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care. PMID:26504599

  20. Does the Primary Care Experience Influence the Cancer Diagnostic Process?

    PubMed Central

    Provost, Sylvie; Pineault, Raynald; Tousignant, Pierre; Roberge, Danièle; Tremblay, Dominique; Breton, Mylaine; Benhadj, Lynda; Diop, Mamadou; Fournier, Michel; Brousselle, Astrid

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To analyze the impact of patients' experience of care at their usual source of primary care on their choice of point of entry into cancer investigation process, time to diagnosis, and presence of metastatic cancer at time of diagnosis. Method. A questionnaire was administered to 438 patients with cancer (breast, lung, and colorectal) between 2011 and 2013 in four oncology clinics of Quebec (Canada). Multiple regression analyses (logistic and Cox models) were conducted. Results. Among patients with symptoms leading to investigation of cancer (n = 307), 47% used their usual source of primary care as the point of entry for investigation. Greater comprehensiveness of care was associated with the decision to use this source as point of entry (OR = 1.25; CI 90% = 1.06–1.46), as well as with shorter times between first symptoms and investigation (HR = 1.11; p = 0.05), while greater accessibility was associated with shorter times between investigation and diagnosis (HR = 1.13; p < 0.01).  Conclusion. Experience of care at the usual source of primary care has a slight influence on the choice of point of entry for cancer investigation and on time to diagnosis. This influence appears to be more related to patients' perceptions of the accessibility and comprehensiveness of their usual source of primary care. PMID:26504599

  1. Delayed Presentation of Vaginal Cuff Dehiscence after Robotic Hysterectomy for Gynecologic Cancer: A Case Series and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Escobar, Pamela A.; Gressel, Gregory M.; Goldberg, Gary L.; Kuo, Dennis Yi-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Background. Vaginal cuff dehiscence after hysterectomy has varying incidence according to surgical approach, with highest rates associated with laparoscopic surgery. Comparative data on timing of diagnosis describe a wide range of clinical presentation from weeks to years after hysterectomy. Limited reports have focused specifically on delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Cases. All cases of vaginal cuff dehiscence at our institution between 2005 and 2015 were collectively reviewed and three cases were identified of women who presented with cuff dehiscence greater than 180 days from index surgery. Diagnosis occurred at 342 to 461 days after operation. One patient presented with abdominal pain, a second case presented with vaginal discharge, and the third case lacked clinical symptoms altogether. Prior to diagnosis, one case received chemotherapy and external beam radiation for Stage IB1 cervical cancer and another case received external beam radiation alone for Stage II endometrioid adenocarcinoma. All cuffs were repaired vaginally with interrupted, early absorbable suture. Conclusion. Robotic total laparoscopic hysterectomy may be associated with increased risk of vaginal cuff dehiscence. Further studies are needed to determine risk factors and patient characteristics associated with delayed presentation of vaginal cuff dehiscence in robotic total hysterectomy as well as all surgical approaches. PMID:27110413

  2. African Americans’ and Hispanics’ Information Needs About Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F. Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations’ informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N=45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation. PMID:25189798

  3. African Americans' and Hispanics' information needs about cancer care.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Antonia, Teresita; Ung, Danielle; Montiel-Ishino, F Alejandro; Nelson, Alison; Canales, Jorge; Quinn, Gwendolyn P

    2015-06-01

    Few studies have reported on African American and Hispanic (AA and H) populations' informational needs when seeking cancer care at an institution that offers clinical trials. Moffitt Cancer Center (MCC) sought to identify and examine the decision making process, the perceptions, and the preferred channels of communication about cancer care services for AA and H communities in order to develop a list of marketing recommendations. Five focus groups (N = 45) consisting of two AA and three H were conducted in four counties of the MCC catchment area in Tampa, FL. Participants were asked about their perceptions, knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about cancer care and MCC. Focus groups were audio-recorded and verbatim transcripts were analyzed using content analysis. Similarities in responses were found between AA and H participants. Participants received general health and cancer information from media sources and word of mouth and preferred to hear patient testimonials. There were concerns about costs, insurance coverage, and the actual geographic location of the cancer center. In general, H participants were not opposed to participating in cancer clinical trials/research, whereas, AA participants were more hesitant. A majority of participants highly favored an institution that offered standard care and clinical trials. AA and H participants shared similar concerns and preferences in communication channels, but each group had specific informational needs. The perceptions and preferences of AA and H must be explored in order to successfully and efficiently increase cancer clinical trial participation. PMID:25189798

  4. Supportive and Palliative Care Research | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Supportive and palliative care research includes studies to prevent or treat the acute and chronic symptoms and morbidities related to cancer and its treatment, and to examine the effects of cancer and its treatment on quality of life and psychosocial issues and treatment strategies at the end of life. Active Projects can range from caregiver issues to geriatrics, physical functioning to cognitive dysfunction.  | Examining symptoms and morbidities related to cancer, its treatment, quality of life and end of life.

  5. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: Improvements on Colorectal Cancer Quality of Care Indicators during a 3-Year Interval

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M; Jacobsen, Paul B; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Malafa, Mokenge; Fulp, William; Fletcher, Michelle; Smith, Jesusa Corazon R; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Philip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The quality of cancer care has become a national priority; however, there are few ongoing efforts to assist medical oncology practices in identifying areas for improvement. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care is a consortium of 11 medical oncology practices that evaluates the quality of cancer care across Florida. Within this practice-based system of self-assessment, we determined adherence to colorectal cancer quality of care indicators (QCIs) in 2006, disseminated results to each practice and reassessed adherence in 2009. The current report focuses on evaluating the direction and magnitude of change in adherence to QCIs for colorectal cancer patients between the 2 assessments. STUDY DESIGN Medical records were reviewed for all colorectal cancer patients seen by a medical oncologist in 2006 (n = 489) and 2009 (n = 511) at 10 participating practices. Thirty-five indicators were evaluated individually and changes in QCI adherence over time and by site were examined. RESULTS Significant improvements were noted from 2006 to 2009, with large gains in surgical/pathological QCIs (eg, documenting rectal radial margin status, lymphovascular invasion, and the review of ≥12 lymph nodes) and medical oncology QCIs (documenting planned treatment regimen and providing recommended neoadjuvant regimens). Documentation of perineural invasion and radial margins significantly improved; however, adherence remained low (47% and 71%, respectively). There was significant variability in adherence for some QCIs across institutions at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care practices conducted self-directed quality-improvement efforts during a 3-year interval and overall adherence to QCIs improved. However, adherence remained low for several indicators, suggesting that organized improvement efforts might be needed for QCIs that remained consistently low over time. Findings demonstrate how efforts such as the Florida Initiative for

  6. The global state of palliative care-progress and challenges in cancer care.

    PubMed

    Reville, Barbara; Foxwell, Anessa M

    2014-07-01

    All persons have a right to palliative care during cancer treatment and at the end-of-life. The World Health Organization (WHO) defines palliative care as a medical specialty that addresses physical, psychological, social, legal, and spiritual domains of care by an interdisciplinary team of professional and lay health care providers. Widespread adoption of this universal definition will aid policy development and educational initiatives on a national level. The need for palliative care is expanding due to the aging of the world's population and the increase in the rate of cancer in both developed and developing countries. However, in one third of the world there is no access to palliative care for persons with serious or terminal illness. Palliative care improves symptoms, most frequently pain, and improves quality of life for patients and their families, especially in the terminal disease phase. Accessibility to palliative care services, adequately trained health care professionals, availability of essential medicines, and gaps in education vary greatly throughout the world. Pain management is an integral concept in the practice of palliative care; however, opioiphobia, insufficient supply of opioids, and regulatory restrictions contribute to undue suffering for millions. Ongoing advocacy efforts call for increased awareness, palliative care integration with cancer care, and public and professional education. Enacting necessary change will require the engagement of health ministries and the recognition of the unique needs and resources of each country. The aim of this review is to examine progress in palliative care development and explore some of the barriers influencing cancer care across the globe. PMID:25841689

  7. Bringing PROMIS to practice: Brief and precise symptom screening in ambulatory cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Lynne I.; Schink, Julian; Bass, Michael; Patel, Shalini; Diaz, Maria Varela; Rothrock, Nan; Pearman, Timothy; Gershon, Richard; Penedo, Frank J.; Rosen, Steven; Cella, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Supportive oncology practice can be enhanced by integrating brief and validated electronic patient-reported outcome (ePRO) assessment into the electronic health record (EHR) and clinical workflow. Methods 636 women receiving gynecologic oncology outpatient care received instructions to complete clinical assessments through Epic MyChart, the EHR patient communication portal. PROMIS computer adaptive tests (CATs) were administered to assess fatigue, pain interference, physical function, depression, and anxiety. Checklists identified psychosocial concerns, informational and nutritional needs, and risk factors for inadequate nutrition. Assessment results, including PROMIS T-scores with documented severity thresholds, were immediately populated in the EHR. Clinicians were notified of clinically elevated symptoms through EHR messages. EHR integration was designed to provide automated triage to social work providers for psychosocial concerns, health educators for information, and dietitians for nutrition-related concerns. Results Of 4,042 MyChart messages sent, 3,203 (79%) were reviewed by patients. The assessment was started by 1,493 (37%) patients, and once started 93% completed (1,386 patients). Using first assessments only, 49.8% of patients who reviewed the MyChart message completed the assessment. Mean PROMIS CAT T-scores indicated a lower level of physical function and elevated anxiety compared to the general population. Fatigue, pain, and depression scores were comparable to the general population. Impaired physical functioning was the most common basis for clinical alerts, occurring in 4% of patients. Conclusions We used PROMIS CATs to measure common cancer symptoms in routine oncology outpatient care. Immediate EHR integration facilitated the use of symptom reporting as the basis for referral to psychosocial and supportive care. PMID:25376427

  8. The role of racial genetic admixture with endometrial cancer outcomes: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study

    PubMed Central

    Rocconi, Rodney P.; Lankes, Heather A.; Brady, William E.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Ramirez, Nilsa C.; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Creasman, William; Fernández, José R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Racial genetic admixture (RGA), a measure to account for ancestral genetic background that correlates with individual's racial classification, could provide insights on causation of racial disparity in endometrial cancer (EC). Our objective is to evaluate the association of RGA with EC outcomes. Methods EC patients enrolled onto the GOG-210 protocol were eligible. A randomized subcohort stratified by stage and self-reported race/ethnicity of black or white was used. Genotyping was performed using custom-selected Ancestry Informative Markers to calculate individual admixture estimates of African and European ancestral background. Results A total of 149 patients were evaluated (self-reported race: 70 black & 79 white). Mean RGA for African ancestry for self-reported black patients was 0.65 (range 0.04–0.86); while mean RGA for European ancestry for self-reported white patients was 0.77 (range 0.12–0.88). Progression-free survival (PFS) analysis using proportional hazards models stratified by stage and race revealed that each 0.10 increase in African ancestry was associated with worse PFS with hazard ratio (HR) of 1.11 (95% CI 0.90–1.37). Each 0.10 increase in European RGA was associated with improved PFS with HR of 0.86 (95% CI 0.69–1.07). Using tertiles of African RGA showed increasing risk of progression of death with increasing African RGA (with 0–5% as reference), HR (95% CIs) for top two tertiles are: 6%–66%: 1.38 (0.64, 2.97), and 67%–86%: 2.27 (0.74, 6.95). Conclusion RGA demonstrated a trend with PFS in self-reported black and white patients with EC. Patients with increased levels of African ancestry showed a trend towards worse survival after stratifying by stage/race. PMID:26603970

  9. A Phase II Trial of Brivanib in Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Matthew A.; Sill, Michael W.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Benbrook, Doris M.; Lankes, Heather A.; Leslie, Kimberly K.; Jeske, Yvette; Mannel, Robert S.; Spillman, Monique A; Lee, Paula S.; Hoffman, James S.; McMeekin, D. Scott; Pollock, Pamela M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Brivanib, an oral, multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor with activity against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) was investigated as a single agent in a phase II trial to assess the activity and tolerability in recurrent or persistent endometrial cancer (EMC). Patients and Methods Eligible patients had persistent or recurrent EMC after receiving one to two prior cytotoxic regimens, measurable disease, and performance status of ≤2. Treatment consisted of brivanib 800 mg orally every day until disease progression or prohibitive toxicity. Primary endpoints were progression-free survival (PFS) at six months and objective tumor response. Expression of multiple angiogenic proteins and FGFR2 mutation status was assessed. Results Forty-five patients were enrolled. Forty-three patients were eligible and evaluable. Median age was 64 years. Twenty-four patients (55.8%) received prior radiation. Median number of cycles was two (range 1–24). No GI perforations but one rectal fistula were seen. Nine patients had grade 3 hypertension, with one experiencing grade 4 confusion. Eight patients (18.6%; 90% CI 9.6–31.7%) had responses (one CR and seven PRs), and 13 patients (30.2%; 90% CI 18.9–43.9%) were PFS at six months. Median PFS and overall survival (OS) were 3.3 and 10.7 months, respectively. When modeled jointly, VEGF and Angiopoietin-2 expression may diametrically predict PFS. Estrogen receptor-α (ER) expression was positively correlated with OS. Conclusion Brivanib is reasonably well tolerated and worthy of further investigation based on PFS at six months in recurrent or persistent EMC. PMID:25019571

  10. Cancer of the Uterus (Endometrial Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Home For Patients Search FAQs Cancer of the ... Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] FAQ097, May 2011 PDF Format Cancer of the Uterus [Endometrial Cancer] Gynecologic Problems What ...

  11. Integrating Palliative Care Into the Care of Patients With Advanced Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kapo, Jennifer M; Akgün, Kathleen M

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to malignancy. Although lung cancer mortality has been decreasing in recent years, it remains substantially higher than other causes of cancer death. Median survival for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, defined as lung cancer involving regional lymph nodes, is estimated to be approximately 10 to 17 months, and median survival for patients with metastatic disease is only 6 to 9 months. In addition, patients with advanced lung cancer often experience debilitating symptoms and poor quality of life. Pain, dyspnea, and fatigue are most frequently reported and affect at least 65% of patients with advanced lung cancer. Given this burden of symptoms and high mortality, patients and their families facing a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer are in need of support. Palliative care, with its focus on addressing the emotional, physical, and spiritual sources of suffering utilizing the expertise of an interdisciplinary team, can provide this comprehensive support. This review describes the role of supportive and palliative care integrated into the treatment of patients with a diagnosis of advanced lung cancer with sections focused on the evaluation and treatment of pain and dyspnea, approaches to challenging communication tasks, and the support of caregivers who care for patients with advanced lung cancer. PMID:26389769

  12. Delivering affordable cancer care in high-income countries.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Richard; Peppercorn, Jeffrey; Sikora, Karol; Zalcberg, John; Meropol, Neal J; Amir, Eitan; Khayat, David; Boyle, Peter; Autier, Philippe; Tannock, Ian F; Fojo, Tito; Siderov, Jim; Williamson, Steve; Camporesi, Silvia; McVie, J Gordon; Purushotham, Arnie D; Naredi, Peter; Eggermont, Alexander; Brennan, Murray F; Steinberg, Michael L; De Ridder, Mark; McCloskey, Susan A; Verellen, Dirk; Roberts, Terence; Storme, Guy; Hicks, Rodney J; Ell, Peter J; Hirsch, Bradford R; Carbone, David P; Schulman, Kevin A; Catchpole, Paul; Taylor, David; Geissler, Jan; Brinker, Nancy G; Meltzer, David; Kerr, David; Aapro, Matti

    2011-09-01

    The burden of cancer is growing, and the disease is becoming a major economic expenditure for all developed countries. In 2008, the worldwide cost of cancer due to premature death and disability (not including direct medical costs) was estimated to be US$895 billion. This is not simply due to an increase in absolute numbers, but also the rate of increase of expenditure on cancer. What are the drivers and solutions to the so-called cancer-cost curve in developed countries? How are we going to afford to deliver high quality and equitable care? Here, expert opinion from health-care professionals, policy makers, and cancer survivors has been gathered to address the barriers and solutions to delivering affordable cancer care. Although many of the drivers and themes are specific to a particular field-eg, the huge development costs for cancer medicines-there is strong concordance running through each contribution. Several drivers of cost, such as over-use, rapid expansion, and shortening life cycles of cancer technologies (such as medicines and imaging modalities), and the lack of suitable clinical research and integrated health economic studies, have converged with more defensive medical practice, a less informed regulatory system, a lack of evidence-based sociopolitical debate, and a declining degree of fairness for all patients with cancer. Urgent solutions range from re-engineering of the macroeconomic basis of cancer costs (eg, value-based approaches to bend the cost curve and allow cost-saving technologies), greater education of policy makers, and an informed and transparent regulatory system. A radical shift in cancer policy is also required. Political toleration of unfairness in access to affordable cancer treatment is unacceptable. The cancer profession and industry should take responsibility and not accept a substandard evidence base and an ethos of very small benefit at whatever cost; rather, we need delivery of fair prices and real value from new technologies

  13. Are Primary Care Providers Prepared To Care For Breast Cancer Survivors In The Safety Net?

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron J.; Hemmelgarn, Marian; Nguyen, David K.; Sacks, Greg D.; Clayton, Sheilah; Cope, Jacqueline; Ganz, Patricia A.; Maggard-Gibbons, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Introduction With the growing number of breast cancer survivors outpacing the capacity of oncology providers, there is pressure to transition patients back to primary care. Primary care providers (PCPs) working in safety-net settings may have less experience treating survivors, and little is known about their knowledge and views on survivorship care. Objective To determine the knowledge, attitudes, and confidence of PCPs in the safety net at delivering care to breast cancer survivors. Participants A modified version of the National Cancer Institute’s Survey of Physician Attitudes Regarding Care of Cancer Survivors (SPARCCS) was given to providers at 2 county hospitals and 5 associated clinics (n=59). Focus groups were held to understand barriers to survivorship care. Results While most providers believed PCPs have the skills necessary to provide cancer-related follow-up, the vast majority were not comfortable providing these services themselves. Providers were adherent to American Society of Clinical Oncology recommendations for mammography (98%) and physical exam (87%); less than 1/3 were guideline-concordant for lab testing and only 6 providers (10%) met all recommendations. PCPs universally requested additional training on clinical guidelines and the provision of written survivorship care plans prior to transfer. Concerns voiced in qualitative sessions included unfamiliarity with the management of endocrine therapy and confusion regarding who would be responsible for certain aspects of care. Conclusion Safety-net providers currently lack knowledge and confidence at providing survivorship care to breast cancer patients. Opportunities exist for additional training in evidence-based guidelines and improved coordination of care between PCPs and oncology specialists. PMID:25536301

  14. Supportive Care in Older Adults with Cancer: Across the Continuum.

    PubMed

    Koll, Thuy; Pergolotti, Mackenzi; Holmes, Holly M; Pieters, Huibrie C; van Londen, G J; Marcum, Zachary A; MacKenzie, Amy R; Steer, Christopher B

    2016-08-01

    Supportive care is an essential component of anticancer treatment regardless of age or treatment intent. As the number of older adults with cancer increases, and supportive care strategies enable more patients to undergo treatment, greater numbers of older patients will become cancer survivors. These patients may have lingering adverse effects from treatment and will need continued supportive care interventions. Older adults with cancer benefit from geriatric assessment (GA)-guided supportive care interventions. This can occur at any stage across the cancer treatment continuum. As a GA commonly uncovers issues potentially unrelated to anticancer treatment, it could be argued that the assessment is essentially a supportive care strategy. Key aspects of a GA include identification of comorbidities, assessing for polypharmacy, screening for cognitive impairment and delirium, assessing functional status, and screening for psychosocial issues. Treatment-related issues of particular importance in older adults include recognition of increased bone marrow toxicity, management of nausea and vomiting, identification of anemia, and prevention of neurotoxicity. The role of physical therapy and cancer rehabilitation as a supportive care strategy in older adults is important regardless of treatment stage or intent. PMID:27342609

  15. Creating a continuum of care: integrating obstetricians and gynecologists in the care of young cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Betty Y.; Skory, Robin M.; Woodruff, Teresa K.

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapy can be lifesaving but significantly diminish female reproductive potential. This review provides an overview of the deleterious effects of cancer treatments on reproductive function, the fertility preservation options currently available for young women and the outcomes of pregnancy after cancer treatment. In addition, special considerations for women who are diagnosed with cancer during pregnancy are discussed. To optimize the continuum of care for the patient, new corridors of communication between obstetricians, gynecologists and oncology specialists must be developed to ensure the best outcomes for the patient, both in terms of cancer treatment and fertility preservation. PMID:22031251

  16. Breast Cancer Survivors' Perceptions of Survivorship Care Options

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Erica L.; Gropper, Adrienne B.; Neville, Bridget A.; Partridge, Ann H.; Cameron, Danielle B.; Winer, Eric P.; Earle, Craig C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose As the number of breast cancer survivors increases, a durable model of comprehensive survivor care is needed, incorporating providers and/or visit types both within and outside of oncology. The objective of this study was to explore survivors' comfort with different clinician types or with a telephone/Internet-based virtual visit as components of survivorship care. Methods Breast cancer survivors participating in a general survivorship survey completed an additional breast cancer–specific questionnaire evaluating the self-perceived impact of follow-up visits to various clinician types, or follow-up by a virtual visit, on survival, worrying, and stress related to cancer. Results A total of 218 breast cancer survivors completed the questionnaire. Most favored medical oncologist follow-up visits over those with primary care physicians (PCPs) or nurse practitioners (NPs) in terms of reduced worrying about cancer (odds ratio [OR], 2.21; P < .001), reduced stress around the visit (OR, 1.40; P = .002), and improved effect on cancer survival (OR, 2.38; P < .001). However, the majority also displayed substantial comfort with both PCPs and NPs in the same domains. Patients rated a virtual visit as having a less favorable impact on cancer survival and cancer-related worrying compared with in-person visits with clinicians. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors are comfortable with both PCPs and NPs providing follow-up care, although they indicate a preference for medical oncologists. Given patients' negative impressions of a virtual visit, increased familiarity with and research investigating this emerging concept are needed. The NP-led survivorship clinic model, with increased guidance for PCPs, offers a promising route for improving quality of and satisfaction with survivor care. PMID:22162585

  17. Lung Cancer Care Before and After Medicare Eligibility.

    PubMed

    Huesch, Marco D; Ong, Michael K

    2016-01-01

    Uninsured and underinsured near-elderly may not have timely investigation, diagnosis, or care of cancer. Prior studies suggest Medicare eligibility confers significant and substantial reductions in mortality and increases in health service utilization. We compared 2245 patients diagnosed with lung cancer at ages 64.5 to 65 years and 2512 patients aged 65 to 65.5 years, with 2492 patients aged 65.5 to 66 years (controls) in 2000 to 2005. Compared with controls, patients diagnosed with lung cancer before Medicare eligibility had no statistically significant differences in cancer stage, time to treatment, type of treatment, and survival. Study power was sufficient to exclude mortality reductions and health service utilization changes of the magnitude found in prior work, suggesting that typically, appropriate lung cancer care may be sought and delivered regardless of insurance status. PMID:27166413

  18. Patient-centred care: making cancer treatment centres accountable.

    PubMed

    Zucca, Alison; Sanson-Fisher, Rob; Waller, Amy; Carey, Mariko

    2014-07-01

    Patient-centred care is argued to be an essential component in the delivery of quality health and cancer care. This manuscript discusses the need to generate credible data which indicates the quality of patient-centred care provided by cancer treatment centres. Patient-centred care covers six domains including physical comfort; emotional support; respect for patients' preferences and values; integration and coordination; involvement of family and friends; and the provision of information, communication and education to enable patients to understand and make informed decisions about their care. First, we identify priority areas within each domain. Next, we propose three questions that should be asked of every patient across the six domains of patient-centred care. The first question explores whether patients were specifically asked by a healthcare provider at the cancer treatment centre about their concerns, values and preferences. Research indicates that it cannot be assumed that clinicians are aware of patient's needs or preferences in these six areas. Second, if the answer from the patient suggests that they would like assistance, then it would be expected that this would be offered. Thirdly, if the patient indicates that they would like such assistance and it is provided, then it might be expected that the patient would report that the provided assistance did relieve their suffering, or the assistance provided was consistent with their preferences, needs and values. Regular measurement and reporting of these aspects of patient-centred cancer care has the potential to identify deficits and inequities in care delivery, allow for comparisons across treatment centres and stimulate an improvement in the patient-centred care provided to cancer patients. PMID:24696084

  19. Multilevel factors affecting quality: examples from the cancer care continuum.

    PubMed

    Zapka, Jane; Taplin, Stephen H; Ganz, Patricia; Grunfeld, Eva; Sterba, Katherine

    2012-05-01

    The complex environmental context must be considered as we move forward to improve cancer care and, ultimately, patient and population outcomes. The cancer care continuum represents several care types, each of which includes multiple technical and communication steps and interfaces among patients, providers, and organizations. We use two case scenarios to 1) illustrate the variability, diversity, and interaction of factors from multiple levels that affect care quality and 2) discuss research implications and provide hypothetical examples of multilevel interventions. Each scenario includes a targeted literature review to illustrate contextual influences upon care and sets the stage for theory-informed interventions. The screening case highlights access issues in older women, and the survivorship case illustrates the multiple transition challenges faced by patients, families, and organizations. Example interventions show the potential gains of implementing intervention strategies that work synergistically at multiple levels. While research examining multilevel intervention is a priority, it presents numerous study design, measurement, and analytic challenges. PMID:22623591

  20. Caring and uncaring encounters within nursing and health care from the cancer patient's perspective.

    PubMed

    Halldórsdóttir, S; Hamrin, E

    1997-04-01

    The aim of this phenomenological study was to explore caring and uncaring encounters with nurses and other health professionals from the perspective of the person who has been diagnosed and treated for cancer. Through thematic analysis of in-depth dialogues with five women and four men in the remission or recovery phase of cancer, three major categories regarding caring and uncaring encounters were identified. The essential structure of a caring encounter was found to be threefold: 1. the nurse/health professional perceived as caring: an indispensable companion on the cancer trajectory; 2. the resulting mutual trust and caring connection; and 3. the perceived effect of the caring encounter: a sense of solidarity, empowerment, well-being, and healing. The essential structure of an uncaring encounter is also threefold: 1. the nurse/health professional perceived as uncaring: an unfortunate hindrance to the perception of well-being and healing; 2. the resulting sense of mistrust and disconnection; and 3. the perceived effect of the uncaring encounter: a sense of uneasiness, discouragement, and a sense of being broken down. The findings emphasize the primacy of competence in professional caring, as well as that of genuine concern, openness and a willingness to connect with others. The often devastating effects of uncaring encounters on the recipient of nursing and health care raises the question whether uncaring as an ethical and a professional problem should perhaps be dealt with as malpractice in nursing and health care. PMID:9145561

  1. Threading the cloak: palliative care education for care providers of adolescents and young adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wiener, Lori; Weaver, Meaghann Shaw; Bell, Cynthia J; Sansom-Daly, Ursula M

    2015-01-01

    Medical providers are trained to investigate, diagnose, and treat cancer. Their primary goal is to maximize the chances of curing the patient, with less training provided on palliative care concepts and the unique developmental needs inherent in this population. Early, systematic integration of palliative care into standard oncology practice represents a valuable, imperative approach to improving the overall cancer experience for adolescents and young adults (AYAs). The importance of competent, confident, and compassionate providers for AYAs warrants the development of effective educational strategies for teaching AYA palliative care. Just as palliative care should be integrated early in the disease trajectory of AYA patients, palliative care training should be integrated early in professional development of trainees. As the AYA age spectrum represents sequential transitions through developmental stages, trainees experience changes in their learning needs during their progression through sequential phases of training. This article reviews unique epidemiologic, developmental, and psychosocial factors that make the provision of palliative care especially challenging in AYAs. A conceptual framework is provided for AYA palliative care education. Critical instructional strategies including experiential learning, group didactic opportunity, shared learning among care disciplines, bereaved family members as educators, and online learning are reviewed. Educational issues for provider training are addressed from the perspective of the trainer, trainee, and AYA. Goals and objectives for an AYA palliative care cancer rotation are presented. Guidance is also provided on ways to support an AYA's quality of life as end of life nears. PMID:25750863

  2. Health care expenditures associated with depression in adults with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoyun; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2015-01-01

    Background The rates of depression in adults with cancer have been reported as high as 38%–58%. How depression affects overall health care expenditures in individuals with cancer is an under-researched area. Objective To estimate excess average total health care expenditures associated with depression in adults with cancer by comparing those with and without depression after controlling for demographic, socioeconomic, access to care, and other health status variables. Methods Cross-sectional data on 4,766 adult survivors of cancer from 2006–2009 of the nationally representative household survey, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (MEPS), were used. The patients were older than 21 years. Cancer and depression were identified from the patients’ medical conditions files. Dependent variables consisted of total, inpatient, outpatient, emergency department, prescription drugs, and other expenditures. Ordinary least square (OLS) on logged dollars and generalized linear models with log-link function were performed. All analyses (SAS 9.3 and STATA12) accounted for the complex survey design of the MEPS. Results Overall, 14% of individuals with cancer reported having depression. In those with cancer and depression, the average annual health care expenditures were $18,401 compared with $12,091 in those without depression. After adjusting for demographic, socio-economic, access to care, and other health status variables, those with depression had about 31.7% greater total expenditures compared with those without depression. Total, outpatient, and prescription expenditures were higher in individuals with depression than in those without depression. Individuals with cancer and depression were significantly more likely to use emergency departments (adjusted odds ratio, 1.46) compared with their counterparts without depression. Limitations Cancer patients who died during the reporting year were excluded. The financial burden of depression may have been underestimated because

  3. Assessing Patient-Centered Communication in Cancer Care: Stakeholder Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Mazor, Kathleen M.; Gaglio, Bridget; Nekhlyudov, Larissa; Alexander, Gwen L.; Stark, Azadeh; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Walsh, Kathleen; Boggs, Jennifer; Lemay, Celeste A.; Firneno, Cassandra; Biggins, Colleen; Blosky, Mary Ann; Arora, Neeraj K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Patient-centered communication is critical to quality cancer care. Effective communication can help patients and family members cope with cancer, make informed decisions, and effectively manage their care; suboptimal communication can contribute to care breakdowns and undermine clinician-patient relationships. The study purpose was to explore stakeholders' views on the feasibility and acceptability of collecting self-reported patient and family perceptions of communication experiences while receiving cancer care. The results were intended to inform the design, development, and implementation of a structured and generalizable patient-level reporting system. Methods: This was a formative, qualitative study that used semistructured interviews with cancer patients, family members, clinicians, and leaders of health care organizations. The constant comparative method was used to identify major themes in the interview transcripts. Results: A total of 106 stakeholders were interviewed. Thematic saturation was achieved. All stakeholders recognized the importance of communication and endorsed efforts to improve communication during cancer care. Patients, clinicians, and leaders expressed concerns about the potential consequences of reports of suboptimal communication experiences, such as damage to the clinician-patient relationship, and the need for effective improvement strategies. Patients and family members would report good communication experiences in order to encourage such practices. Practical and logistic issues were identified. Conclusion: Patient reports of their communication experiences during cancer care could increase understanding of the communication process, stimulate improvements, inform interventions, and provide a basis for evaluating changes in communication practices. This qualitative study provides a foundation for the design and pilot testing of such a patient reporting system. PMID:23943884

  4. Preparing professional staff to care for cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Economou, Denice; Ferrell, Betty; Bhatia, Smita

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Oncology health care professionals frequently lack the background to implement needed survivorship activities and follow-up care. The purpose of this project is to assist providers in the clarification and initiation of potentially durable changes in survivorship care by developing a health professional curriculum, recruiting participants, implementing the course, conducting course evaluation and following participants’ defined goals over time. Materials and methods The curriculum was developed based on recommendations from the Institute of Medicine Report-From Cancer Patient to Cancer Survivor—Lost in Transition. Three concepts were used to structure the course: cancer survivorship quality of life, changing practice via performance improvement, and principles of adult education. Expert faculty designed and implemented the curriculum and teaching methods using adult learning principles and an interactive approach. Competitively-selected, two-person interdisciplinary teams for the first course (July 12–15, 2006, Pasadena, California) were selected based on stated interests, three projected goals, and letters of commitment from administrators. Results Participants represented 52 cancer care settings from 28 states. Teams included Nurses (48.1%), Social Workers (20.7%), Physicians (18.8%), Directors/Administrators (6.6%), Psychologists (2.8%), and others (3%). The institutional barriers identified by teams were lack of survivorship knowledge (94 %), financial constraints (61%), lack of administrative support (6%), and staff philosophy that excluded survivorship (15%). Evaluation of content from the first course was consistently positive. Conclusions Dissemination of survivorship education for health care professionals stimulates participants to define and begin to implement goals for improving survivors’ care. Implications for cancer survivors A training program such as the one described provides professional knowledge regarding survivorship that

  5. Defining Value in Cancer Care: AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee Report

    PubMed Central

    Zweigenhaft, Burt; Bosserman, Linda; Kenney, James T.; Lawless, Grant D.; Marsland, Thomas A.; Deligdish, Craig K.; Burgoyne, Douglas S.; Knopf, Kevin B.; Long, Douglas M.; McKercher, Patrick; Owens, Gary M.; Hennessy, John E.; Lang, James R.; Malin, Jennifer; Natelson, Leonard; Palmgren, Matthew C.; Slotnik, Jayson; Shockney, Lillie D.; Vogenberg, F. Randy

    2013-01-01

    The AVBCC Annual Meeting experiences exponential growth in attendance and participation as oncologists, payers, employers, managed care executives, patient advocates, and drug manufacturers convened in Hollywood, FL, on May 2–5, 2013, for the Third Annual Conference of the Association for Value-Based Cancer Care (AVBCC). The conference presented an all-inclusive open forum for stakeholder dialogue and integration across the cancer care continuum, facilitating an open dialogue among the various healthcare stakeholders to align their perspectives around the urgent need to address value in cancer care, costs, patient education, safety, outcomes, and quality. The AVBCC 2013 Steering Committee was held on the first day of the conference to define value in cancer care. The committee was divided into 7 groups, each representing a key stakeholder in oncology. The goal of the Steering Committee was to define value from the particular point of view of each of the stakeholder groups and to suggest how that particular perspective can contribute to the value proposition in oncology, by balancing cost, quality, and access to care to improve overall patient outcomes. The following summary highlights the major points addressed by each group. PMID:24991360

  6. Sarah Temkin, MD | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Sarah Temkin is a program director in the Community Oncology and Prevention Trials Research Group of NCI's Division of Cancer Prevention. She works with the NCI Community Oncology Research Program, which conducts multi-site cancer clinical trials and cancer care delivery research studies in communities across the U.S. Dr. Temkin also serves as an adjunct associate professor in the Johns Hopkins Medicine Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics. |

  7. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  8. 75 FR 9913 - Request for Measures of Patient Experiences of Cancer Care

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... Cancer Care AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, HHS. ACTION: Notice of request. SUMMARY... respondents to assess the care delivered by cancer care providers. AHRQ is seeking these items and measures from researchers, survey firms, cancer care providers, patient advocacy groups, individual...

  9. 77 FR 64340 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Announcement of Requirements and Registration for Cancer Care Video Challenge AGENCY... Cancer Care Video Challenge is an opportunity for members of the public to create short, erin.poetter@hhs... ability manage care. The Cancer Care Video Challenge is an ] opportunity for members of the public...

  10. Follow-up Care After Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grants Management Contacts Training Cancer Training at NCI Funding for ... Closeout NCI Grants Management Legal Requirements NCI Grant Policies Grant Management Contacts Other Funding Find NCI funding for small ...

  11. Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... 66 4 46 _ 77 B 80 r __ e AA as SS t_ TT N RR e OO w __ . ... involves placing exible plastic tubes called INT c Aa E stm R he N atlel A , rrsa ... e e p llory on ewo ret au aa yrr rn eod tt un h o t ...

  12. [Ethics and palliative care in patients with advanced cancer].

    PubMed

    Tenorio-González, Francisco

    2005-01-01

    Recent research in both the biology of cancer and the treatment of patients has increased the life expectancy of cancer patients with recurrence and who have a longer survival rate. Cancer is no longer considered a lethal but a chronic disease. More patients survive, but above all there are more patients with recurrences thus increasing the need for physical or psychological treatment of patients with longer lives. The American Cancer Society reported in 1992 that in the U.S. more than 8 million people survived between 4 and 5 years. This produces both an ethical and medical challenge for treatment of cancer patients. This paper reviews the actual criteria for palliative care: treatment for pain and the ethical and psychological treatment of advanced cancer patients and their families. PMID:16454965

  13. [Execution of analgesia and anesthesia procedures in obstetrics : Second revised recommendations of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine and the Professional Association of German Anesthetists in cooperation with the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Wallenborn, J

    2010-03-01

    While guidelines represent systematically developed aids for decision-making on appropriate courses of action, recommendations should focus the attention of the medical profession on noteworthy circumstances which are in need of amendment. The new recommendations on the "Execution of analgesia and anesthesia procedures in obstetrics" of the German Society for Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Anästhesiologie und Intensivmedizin, DGAI) and the Professional Association of German Anesthetists (Berufsverband Deutscher Anästhesisten, BDA) in cooperation with the German Society for Gynecology and Obstetrics (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gynäkologie und Geburtshilfe, DGGG) comprehensively fulfill these requirements. The new recommendations include not only revisions in the form of updating but also supplementations in the form of the new chapters "Initial care of newborns", "Postpartum hemorrhaging" and "Morbid obesity". In the following article relevant alterations to newly formulated or completely amended sections with consequences for the clinical practice will be discussed. PMID:20155244

  14. Improving cancer care in India: prospects and challenges.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sanjoy Kumar; Mittal, Balraj

    2004-01-01

    The World Cancer Report, a 351 - page global report issued by International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) tells us that cancer rates are set to increase at an alarming rate globally (Stewart and Kleiues 2003). Cancer rates could increase by 50 % to 15 million new cases in the year 2020. This will be mainly due to steadily aging populations in both developed and developing countries and also to current trends in smoking prevalence and the growing adoption of unhealthy lifestyles. The report also reveals that cancer has emerged as a major public health problem in developing countries, matching its effect in industrialized nations. Healthy lifestyles and public health action by governments and health practitioners could stem this trend, and prevent as many as one third of cancers worldwide. In a developing country such as India there has been a steady increase in the Crude Incidence Rate (CIR) of all cancers affecting both men and women over the last 15 years. The increase reported by the cancer registries is nearly 12 per cent from 1985 to 2001, representing a 57 per cent rise in India's cancer burden. The total number of new cases, which stood at 5.3 lakhs Care lakh is 100,000 in 1985 has risen to over 8.3 lakhs today. The pattern of cancers has changed over the years, with a disturbing increase in cases that are linked to the use of tobacco. In 2003, there were 3.85 lakhs of cases coming under this category in comparison with 1.94 lakhs cases two decades ago. Lung cancer is now the second most common cancer among men. Earlier, it was in fifth place. Among women in urban areas, cancer of the uterine cervix had the highest incidence 15 years ago, but it has now been overtaken by breast cancer. In rural areas, cervical cancer remains the most common form of the disease (The Hindu 2004). PMID:15244530

  15. [Cervical cancer: integral care to the woman in health services].

    PubMed

    Soares, Marilu Correa; Mishima, Silvana Martins; da Silva, Renata Cunha; Ribeiro, Caroline Vargas; Meincke, Sonia Maria Könzgen; Corrêa, Ana Cândida Lopes

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to understand how the health services of the Brazilian Public Health System (BPHS) are organized to give an integral care to the woman with cervical cancer. This is a descriptive, qualitative research with 20 women. Semistructured interviews were coupled with participant observation in data collection. The thematic analysis revealed the theme: "The search for care: access to BPHS and use of health services in the search for integral care". In the use of health services, women have exposed their views on the received care, and on the potentialities and limits of integrality in this context. The conclusion is that the effectivation of health actions that aim at the integrality of care for women requires courage and the promotion of a dialogue between social actors as a way to build a health awareness that allows an ethical commitment pointing towards the necessary changes in care. PMID:22165396

  16. Cancer Care Ontario Colonoscopy Standards: Standards and evidentiary base

    PubMed Central

    Rabeneck, L; Rumble, RB; Axler, J; Smith, A; Armstrong, D; Vinden, C; Belliveau, P; Rhodes, K; Zwaal, C; Mai, V; Dixon, P

    2007-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common cause of non-tobacco-related cancer deaths in Canadian men and women, accounting for 10% of all cancer deaths. An estimated 7800 men and women will be diagnosed with CRC, and 3250 will die from the disease in Ontario in 2007. Given that CRC incidence and mortality rates in Ontario are among the highest in the world, the best opportunity to reduce this burden of disease would be through screening. The present report describes the findings and recommendations of Cancer Care Ontario’s Colonoscopy Standards Expert Panel, which was convened in March 2006 by the Program in Evidence-Based Care. The recommendations will form the basis of the quality assurance program for colonoscopy delivered in support of Ontario’s CRC screening program. PMID:18026582

  17. An Action Plan for Translating Cancer Survivorship Research Into Care

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tenbroeck; de Moor, Janet S.; Glasgow, Russell E.; Khoury, Muin J.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Stein, Kevin D.; Rechis, Ruth; Parry,, Carla; Leach, Corinne R.; Padgett, Lynne; Rowland, Julia H.

    2014-01-01

    To meet the complex needs of a growing number of cancer survivors, it is essential to accelerate the translation of survivorship research into evidence-based interventions and, as appropriate, recommendations for care that may be implemented in a wide variety of settings. Current progress in translating research into care is stymied, with results of many studies un- or underutilized. To better understand this problem and identify strategies to encourage the translation of survivorship research findings into practice, four agencies (American Cancer Society, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, LIVE STRONG Foundation, National Cancer Institute) hosted a meeting in June, 2012, titled: “Biennial Cancer Survivorship Research Conference: Translating Science to Care.” Meeting participants concluded that accelerating science into care will require a coordinated, collaborative effort by individuals from diverse settings, including researchers and clinicians, survivors and families, public health professionals, and policy makers. This commentary describes an approach stemming from that meeting to facilitate translating research into care by changing the process of conducting research—improving communication, collaboration, evaluation, and feedback through true and ongoing partnerships. We apply the T0-T4 translational process model to survivorship research and provide illustrations of its use. The resultant framework is intended to orient stakeholders to the role of their work in the translational process and facilitate the transdisciplinary collaboration needed to translate basic discoveries into best practices regarding clinical care, self-care/management, and community programs for cancer survivors. Finally, we discuss barriers to implementing translational survivorship science identified at the meeting, along with future directions to accelerate this process. PMID:25249551

  18. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications

    PubMed Central

    Jamwal, Nisha Rani; Kumar, Senthil P

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps) in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers’ necessities and patients’ biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care. PMID:26962291

  19. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care

    PubMed Central

    Ramphal, R.; Aubin, S.; Czaykowski, P.; De Pauw, S.; Johnson, A.; McKillop, S.; Szwajcer, D.; Wilkins, K.; Rogers, P.

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas—medical, psychosocial, and research—and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Many of the recommendations can nevertheless be applied universally. These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer and build on outcomes from two international workshops held by that group. PMID:27330350

  20. Smarter palliative care for cancer: Use of smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Jamwal, Nisha Rani; Kumar, Senthil P

    2016-01-01

    Smartphones are technologically advanced mobile phone devices which use software similar to computer-based devices as a user-friendly interface. This review article is aimed to inform the palliative care professionals, cancer patients and their caregivers about the role of smartphone applications (apps) in the delivery of palliative care services, through a brief review of existing literature on the development, feasibility, analysis, and effectiveness of such apps. There is a dearth need for sincere palliative care clinicians to work together with software professionals to develop the suitable smartphone apps in accordance with the family/caregivers' necessities and patients' biopsychosocial characteristics that influence the technology driven evidence informed palliative cancer care. PMID:26962291

  1. Adolescent and young adult cancer: principles of care.

    PubMed

    Ramphal, R; Aubin, S; Czaykowski, P; De Pauw, S; Johnson, A; McKillop, S; Szwajcer, D; Wilkins, K; Rogers, P

    2016-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (ayas) with cancer in active treatment face a number of barriers to optimal care. In the present article, we focus on the 3 critical domains of care for ayas-medical, psychosocial, and research-and how changes to the system could overcome barriers. We summarize the current literature, outline recommended principles of care, raise awareness of barriers to optimal care, and suggest specific changes to the system to overcome those barriers in the Canadian context. Many of the recommendations can nevertheless be applied universally. These recommendations are endorsed by the Canadian Task Force on Adolescents and Young Adults with Cancer and build on outcomes from two international workshops held by that group. PMID:27330350

  2. Financial Toxicity of Cancer Care: It's Time to Intervene.

    PubMed

    Zafar, S Yousuf

    2016-05-01

    Evidence suggests that a considerably large proportion of cancer patients are affected by treatment-related financial harm. As medical debt grows for some with cancer, the downstream effects can be catastrophic, with a recent study suggesting a link between extreme financial distress and worse mortality. At least three factors might explain the relationship between extreme financial distress and greater risk of mortality: 1) overall poorer well-being, 2) impaired health-related quality of life, and 3) sub-par quality of care. While research has described the financial harm associated with cancer treatment, little has been done to effectively intervene on the problem. Long-term solutions must focus on policy changes to reduce unsustainable drug prices and promote innovative insurance models. In the mean time, patients continue to struggle with high out-of-pocket costs. For more immediate solutions, we should look to the oncologist and patient. Oncologists should focus on the value of care delivered, encourage patient engagement on the topic of costs, and be better educated on financial resources available to patients. For their part, patients need improved cost-related health literacy so they are aware of potential costs and resources, and research should focus on how patients define high-value care. With a growing list of financial side effects induced by cancer treatment, the time has come to intervene on the "financial toxicity" of cancer care. PMID:26657334

  3. Breast Cancer Survivorship Care: Targeting a Colorectal Cancer Education Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Homan, Sherri G.; Yun, Shumei; Stewart, Bob R.; Armer, Jane M.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer survivors are at risk of developing a second primary cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading second primary cancers, and it is often preventable. We developed a multi-component educational tool to inform and encourage women breast cancer survivors to engage in CRC screening. To assess the strengths and weakness of the tool and to improve the relevancy to the target audience, we convened four focus groups of women breast cancer survivors in Missouri. We also assessed the potential impact of the tool on the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding CRC and collected information on the barriers to CRC screening through pre- and post-focus groups’ questionnaires. A total of 43 women breast cancer survivors participated and provided very valuable suggestions on design and content to update the tool. Through the process and comparing pre- and post-focus group assessments, a significantly higher proportion of breast cancer survivors strongly agreed or agreed that CRC is preventable (78.6% vs. 96.9%, p = 0.02) and became aware that they were at a slightly increased risk for CRC (18.6% vs. 51.7%, p = 0.003). The most cited barrier was the complexity of preparation for colonoscopy. PMID:26258794

  4. Pharmacopuncture for Cancer Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14–1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12–2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  5. Pharmacopuncture for cancer care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Soyeon; Zhang, Xiuyu; Lee, In-Seon; Cho, Seung-Hun; Chae, Younbyoung; Lee, Hyangsook

    2014-01-01

    Background. Pharmacopuncture, injection to acupoints with pharmacological medication or herbal medicine, is a new acupuncture therapy widely available in Korea and China for cancer-related symptoms. However, the evidence is yet to be clear. Objective. To determine pharmacopuncture's effectiveness on cancer-related symptoms. Methods. Eleven databases were searched for randomized controlled trials of pharmacopuncture in cancer patients. The Cochrane risk of bias (ROB) assessment tool was used for quality assessment. Results. Twenty-two studies involving 2,459 patients were included. Five trials of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) underwent meta-analysis. Pharmacopuncture significantly relieved severity of CINV compared with control group (3 trials, risk ratio (RR) 1.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.14-1.44). The frequency of CINV was also significantly reduced with pharmacopuncture (2 trials, RR 2.47, 95% CI = 2.12-2.89). Seventeen trials studied various symptoms, and in most studies, pharmacopuncture significantly relieved pain, ileus, hiccup, fever, and gastrointestinal symptoms and improved quality of life in various cancer patients. ROB was generally high. Conclusion. It may be suggested with caution that pharmacopuncture may help various symptom relief in cancer patients, but it is hard to draw a firm conclusion due to clinical heterogeneity and high ROB of the included studies, hence warranting further investigation. PMID:24899911

  6. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  7. [Operative risk related to tobacco in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Yaribakht, S; Malartic, C; Grange, G; Morel, O

    2014-05-01

    If tobacco has been recognized for many years as a major risk factor for cardiovascular, lung diseases and cancer in the general population, women are insufficiently aware of the consequences and the specific gynecological operative risks related to this intoxication. Thus, a regular tobacco consumption increases the risk for many gynecological conditions may require surgical treatment with in addition a significant negative impact on the healing process and the risk of postoperative complications. The operative risk must be explained by surgeons in daily practice gynecological, pelvic surgery or breast screening. The issue of smoking cessation should precede surgery has been established by a consensus conference of experts on perioperative smoking held in 2005. The implementation of these recommendations during the preoperative period requires improvement of staff training and better practices to allow smoking cessation effective and sustainable. It is lawful in this context to delay scheduled surgery of 6 to 8 weeks to allow an optimal smoking cessation and to continue smoking cessation for the time necessary for healing to reduce the excess operative risk associated with smoking. PMID:24787606

  8. Forces of change in the health care system. Implications for cancer care in the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, W H

    1991-03-15

    Dramatic changes will occur in the health care system during the 1990s which will profoundly affect the delivery of care for cancer. Perhaps the most important factor is the aging of the population. As the proportion of people who achieve old age increases, the absolute prevalence and incidence of cancer will increase despite improved treatment techniques. This phenomenon will increase health care expenditures despite ongoing efforts to control costs. Second, there will be continuing efforts at cost control and increased emphasis on quality assurance and outcomes by third party payers. Providers will be scrutinized and compared with one another. The large payers of the nation's health care bills will demand proof of outcome and cost leading to bidding by providers and payment only to those who have the best outcome for the least money. Third, there will be an increasing emphasis on prevention and screening, in public health policy, an approach that may conflict with personal freedom. Fourth, there will be increasing deliberations and questions about the ethics of the health care system and treatment decisions. There will be continuing debate about the need for a rationing of health care and the right of individual privacy versus the states' right to preserve life. These changes will impact on all health care professionals whose practice includes patients with cancer. PMID:2001566

  9. Patient-Derived Xenograft Models in Gynecological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Clare L.; Mackay, Helen J; Haluska, Paul

    2014-01-01

    OVERVIEW In the era of targeted therapies, patients with gynecological malignancies have not yet been major beneficiaries of this new class of agents. This may reflect the fact that the main tumor types, ovarian, uterine and cervical cancers, are a highly heterogeneous group of cancers, with variable response to standard chemotherapies. This is also likely due to poor model development in which to study the diversity of these cancers. Cancer-derived cell lines fail to adequately recapitulate molecular hallmarks of specific cancer subsets and complex microenvironments, which may be critical for sensitivity to targeted therapies. Patient derived xenografts (PDX), using fresh human tumor without prior in vitro culture, combined with whole genome expression, gene copy number and sequencing analyses, could dramatically aid novel therapy development in gynecological malignancies. Gynecological tumors can be engrafted in immunodeficient mice with a high rate of success and within a reasonable time frame. The resulting PDX accurately recapitulate the patient’s tumour in histological, molecular and in vivo treatment response characteristics. Orthotopic PDX develop complications relevant for the clinic, such as ascites and bowel obstruction, providing opportunities for understanding the biology of these clinical problems. Thus, PDX have great promise for delivering improved understanding of gynecological malignancies, serve as better models for designing novel therapies and clinical trials and could underpin individualized, directed therapy for patients from whom PDX models have been established. PMID:24857111

  10. Shared Decision Making in Cancer Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butow, Phyllis; Tattersall, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Cancer treatment outcomes have improved over the past 20 years, but treatment decision making in this context remains complex. There are often a number of reasonable treatment alternatives, including no treatment in some circumstances. Patients and doctors often have to weigh up uncertain benefits against uncertain costs. Shared decision making…

  11. Improving the care of cancer patients: holistic needs assessment.

    PubMed

    Young, Jenny; Cund, Audrey; Renshaw, Marian; Quigley, Angela; Snowden, Austyn

    This discussion paper presents a review of holistic needs assessments (HNAs) in the care of patients with cancer. HNAs entail a structured review of patient needs as articulated by the patient. This discussion then leads to a care plan grounded in issues pertinent to that patient. Despite policy guidance advocating its use, there are barriers to overcome in order to integrate HNAs into routine care. This article discusses what role communication skills and clinician confidence may have on the use of HNAs in practice, and suggests a strategy to support HNAs becoming the norm. PMID:25723367

  12. [Antibiotical prophylaxy in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Záhumenský, J; Menzlová, E; Zmrhal, J; Kučera, E

    2013-08-01

    Gynecological surgery is considered to be clear with possible contamination by gram-positive cocci from the skin, gram-negatives from the perineum or groins or polymicrobial biocenosis from vagina, depending on the surgical approach. Antibiotical prophylaxy enforces the natural mechanisms of immunity and helps to exclude present infection. There were presented many studies comparing useful effect of prophylaxis in gynecological surgery. The benefits of antibiotical prophylaxy before IUD insertion, before the cervical surgery and before hysteroscopies were not verified. On the other hand the prophylaxy of vaginal surgery including vaginal hysterectomy decreases the number of postoperative febrile complications. The positive influence of prophylaxis before the simple laparoscopy and laparoscopy without bowel injury or the opening of the vagina was not evidently verified. In abdominal hysterectomy the antibiotical prophylaxy decreases the incidence of postoperative complications significantly. The administration of 2 g of cefazolin can be recommended. In procedures taking more than 3 hours the repeated administration of cefazolin is suitable. New urogynecological procedures, using mesh implants, were not sufficiently evaluated as for postoperative infections and the posible antibiotical effect. The presence of implant in possibly non sterile area should be considered as high risc of postoperative complications. PMID:24040985

  13. Terminal Cancer and Suicide: The Health Care Professional's Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Leslie C.; McAleer, Charles A.

    1984-01-01

    Examined factors influencing the evaluation of a patient contemplating suicide, in a study of 138 health care professionals. Results showed subjects' evaluations, acceptance, and behavior were affected by their belief that the patient had cancer and/or was dying, and by their own degree of death anxiety. (JAC)

  14. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Pancreatic Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... pancreatic cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about pancreatic cancer? It’s important to have ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, can ...

  15. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Thyroid Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about thyroid cancer? As you deal with ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, may ...

  16. What Should You Ask Your Health Care Team About Endometrial Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... endometrial cancer survivor What should you ask your health care team about endometrial cancer? As you cope with ... only ones who can give you information. Other health care professionals, such as nurses and social workers, can ...

  17. Robotic surgery in cancer care: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh, Niloofar; Safdari, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Malignancy-associated mortality, decreased productivity, and spiritual, social and physical burden in cancer patients and their families impose heavy costs on communities. Therefore cancer prevention, early detection, rapid diagnosis and timely treatment are very important. Use of modern methods based on information technology in cancer can improve patient survival and increase patient and health care provider satisfaction. Robot technology is used in different areas of health care and applications in surgery have emerged affecting the cancer treatment domain. Computerized and robotic devices can offer enhanced dexterity by tremor abolition, motion scaling, high quality 3D vision for surgeons and decreased blood loss, significant reduction in narcotic use, and reduced hospital stay for patients. However, there are many challenges like lack of surgical community support, large size, high costs and absence of tactile and haptic feedback. A comprehensive view to identify all factors in different aspects such as technical, legal and ethical items that prevent robotic surgery adoption is thus very necessary. Also evidence must be presented to surgeons to achieve appropriate support from physicians. The aim of this review article is to survey applications, opportunities and barriers to this advanced technology in patients and surgeons as an approach to improve cancer care. PMID:24606422

  18. Problems faced by relatives caring for cancer patients at home.

    PubMed

    Tsigaroppoulos, Thomas; Mazaris, Evangelos; Chatzidarellis, Eleftherios; Skolarikos, Andreas; Varkarakis, Ioannis; Deliveliotis, Charalambos

    2009-02-01

    The care of patients suffering from advanced cancer is not limited in the hospital setting. It continues at home where the burden of care is borne by specific individuals. The aim of the present study was to survey and record the various problems faced by those who care for cancer patients at home. The study was conducted in our hospital during the summer of 2007. All participants completed, during a personal interview, a questionnaire which covered pathologic, social, psychological, spiritual/religious and financial problems. Seventy-six carers returned fully completed questionnaires. The most frequent problems reported were: anxiety regarding the patient's future (61.8%), troublesome symptoms such as pain (54%), increased economic burden-financial difficulty (51.3%), problems with patient's feeding (50%), unhappiness or depression (48,7%), emotional upset (47.4%), worsening of the patient's behaviour and personality (38.2%), difficulty of establishing a positive attitude regarding their current status (34.2%), transport to hospital (32.9%), assistance from the wider family circle (25%). Taking care of cancer patients at home creates several problems among carers. Many of them remain undetected. The acknowledgement and recognition of these problems by health-care professionals might contribute to finding solutions in order to assist the difficult task of these individuals. PMID:19187163

  19. Process of diffusing cancer survivorship care into oncology practice.

    PubMed

    Tessaro, Irene; Campbell, Marci K; Golden, Shannon; Gellin, Mindy; McCabe, Mary; Syrjala, Karen; Ganz, Patricia A; Jacobs, Linda; Baker, Scott; Miller, Kenneth D; Rosenstein, Donald L

    2013-06-01

    The LIVESTRONG Centers of Excellence were funded to increase the effectiveness of survivorship care in oncology practice. This study describes the ongoing process of adopting and implementing survivorship care using the framework of the diffusion of innovation theory of change. Primary data collection included telephone interviews with 39 members from the eight centers and site visits. Organizational characteristics, overall progress, and challenges for implementation were collected from proposals and annual reports. Creating an awareness of cancer survivorship care was a major accomplishment (relative advantage). Adoption depended on the fit within the cancer center (compatibility), and changed over time based on trial and error (trialability). Implementing survivorship care within the existing culture of oncology and breaking down resistance to change was a lengthy process (complexity). Survivorship care became sustainable as it became reimbursed, and more new patients were seen (observability). Innovators and early adopters were crucial to success. Diffusion of innovation theory can provide a strategy to evaluate adoption and implementation of cancer survivorship programs into clinical practice. PMID:24073165

  20. [Development and current utility of infobases in Czech cancer care].

    PubMed

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality and effectiveness of health care is an integral part of modern health care. It can only be performed with sufficiently detailed data sources describing each segment of care. In case of significant heterogeneity and lack of standardization of hospital information systems it is necessary to fully exploit existing parametric data sources. The valid systems for Czech cancer care: the National Cancer Registry, clinical registries of Czech Society for Oncology of the Czech Medical Association of J.E. Purkyne, registries of screening programs and administrative data form healthcare payers. From these registries we can obtain a very complex and detailed view on prevention, diagnosis and cancer treatment in the Czech Republic. To achieve this goal, which means more integrated and comprehensive utilization of national registries, surveys and administrative data, it is necessary to fully utilize and apply the current legislative framework, in particular provision of the Act no. 372/2011 Sb.Key words: clinical registry - evaluation of health care - information system - legislation - malignant tumor - population. PMID:25389092

  1. [Update of breast cancer in primary care (IV/V)].

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Hernández, C; Brusint, B; Vich, P; Díaz-García, N; Cuadrado-Rouco, C; Hernández-García, M

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians must thoroughly understand this pathology in order to optimize the health care services and make the best use of available resources, for these patients. A series of 5 articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last 10 years. This fourth article deals with the treatment of the disease, the role of the primary care physician, and management of major complications. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this problem, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to support their patients and care for them throughout their illness. PMID:24837185

  2. Psychosocial Assessment as a Standard of Care in Pediatric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kazak, Anne E; Abrams, Annah N; Banks, Jaime; Christofferson, Jennifer; DiDonato, Stephen; Grootenhuis, Martha A; Kabour, Marianne; Madan-Swain, Avi; Patel, Sunita K; Zadeh, Sima; Kupst, Mary Jo

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents the evidence for a standard of care for psychosocial assessment in pediatric cancer. An interdisciplinary group of investigators utilized EBSCO, PubMed, PsycINFO, Ovid, and Google Scholar search databases, focusing on five areas: youth/family psychosocial adjustment, family resources, family/social support, previous history/premorbid functioning, and family structure/function. Descriptive quantitative studies, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses (n = 149) were reviewed and evaluated using grading of recommendations, assessment development, and evaluation (GRADE) criteria. There is high quality evidence to support a strong recommendation for multifaceted, systematic assessments of psychosocial health care needs of youth with cancer and their families as a standard of care in pediatric oncology. PMID:26700916

  3. [Legal aspects in pediatric and adolescent gynecology].

    PubMed

    Sowińska-Przepiera, Elzbieta; Jarzabek-Bielecka, Grazyna; Andrysiak-Mamos, Elzbieta; Syrenicz, Anhelli; Friebe, Zbigniew; Kedzia, Witold; Pawlaczyk, Michał

    2013-02-01

    Childhood and adolescent gynecology is an emerging specialty at the intersection of pediatrics, pediatric endocrinology gynecology pediatric surgery dermatology psychiatry, public health medicine and genetics, and in fact addresses many legal issues. Poland lacks a uniform standing of medical and legal environments on how to deal with a juvenile patient who has become sexually active and seeks the advice of a gynecologist, gynecologic examination and requests to be prescribed contraceptives. It needs to be taken into account that in Poland a parent or a legal guardian has legal guardianship, custody and control of a child until 18 years of age but once a juvenile reaches the chronological age of 16 years, and is given full rights of a patient, both parties need to consent to medical care. According to the Act on Health Care Institutions, a patient has the right to self-determination, respect for physical and mental integrity as well as privacy whereas, after the patient reaches the age of 16 years, the legal representative becomes in practice a mere co-decision maker to have medical services performed. Therefore, information obtained from a juvenile patient during physical test and medical interview does not have to be revealed to a legal representative, if the patient requests confidentiality and on condition it does not affect patient health and/or the planned medical procedures (e.g. the need to perform an operation). Knowledge about procedures for juvenile patients shall enable doctors to make conscious choices about conduct and care or in most cases, only advice, without the risk of breaching the Polish law. PMID:23668060

  4. Comparison Of Methods To Estimate Health State Utilities For Ovarian Cancer Using Quality of Life Data: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Lisa M.; Brady, William E.; Havrilesky, Laura J.; Cohn, David E.; Monk, Bradley J.; Wenzel, Lari; Cella, David

    2012-01-01

    Background Cost-effectiveness/cost-utility analyses are increasingly needed to inform decisions about care. Algorithms have been developed using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT) quality of life instrument to estimate utility weights for cost analyses. This study was designed to compare these algorithms in the setting of ovarian cancer. Methods GOG-0152 was a 550-patient randomized phase III trial of interval cytoreduction, and GOG-0172 was a 415-patient randomized phase III trial comparing intravenous versus intraperitoneal therapy among women with advanced ovarian cancer. QOL data were collected via the FACT at four time points in each study. Two published mapping algorithms (Cheung and Dobrez) and a linear transformation method were applied to these data. The agreement between measures was assessed by the concordance correlation coefficient (rCCC), and paired t-tests were used to compare means. Results While agreement between the estimation algorithms was good (ranged from 0.72 to 0.81), there were statistically significant (p<0.001) and clinically meaningful differences between the scores: mean scores were higher with Dobrez than with Cheung or the linear transformation method.. Scores were also statistically significantly different (p<0.001) between studies. Conclusions In the absence of prospectively collected utility data, the use of mapping algorithms is feasible, however, the optimal algorithm is not clear. There were significant differences between studies, which highlights the need for validation of these algorithms in specific settings. If cost analyses incorporate mapping algorithms to obtain utility estimates, investigators should take the variability into account. PMID:23123576

  5. The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership: helping to establish multidisciplinary cancer care in Blantyre, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Brown, E; Gorman, D; Knowles, G; Taylor, F; Jere, Y; Bates, J; Masamba, L

    2016-12-01

    In response to the growing incidence of cancer in Malawi, a new oncology unit was established at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre. The unit opened in 2010, the first in the country, and is led by a single consultant oncologist. In 2012, a healthcare partnership was formed between the oncology and palliative care unit at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital and the Edinburgh Cancer Centre, UK. The principal objective of the partnership is to help develop high quality multidisciplinary cancer care in Malawi. Methods A needs assessment identified three priority areas for further improvement of cancer services: nurse-led treatment delivery; management of clinical data; and multidisciplinary working. The partnership received grant funding from the Scottish Government Malawi Development Programme in 2013 and a three year project plan was implemented. This has been conducted through a series of reciprocal training visits. Results Key achievements have been completion of a programme of oncology nursing education attended by 32 oncology nurses and other healthcare professionals, which has resulted in increased experience in cancer practice and standardisation of chemotherapy delivery procedures; development of a clinical database that enables prospective collection of data of all new patients with cancer and which links to the Malawi Cancer Registry; development of weekly multidisciplinary meetings involving oncology, gynaecology and surgery that has enabled a cross-specialty approach to patient care. Conclusion The Edinburgh Malawi Cancer Partnership is supporting nursing education, data use and cross-specialty collaboration that we are confident will improve cancer care in Malawi. Future work will focus on the further development of multidisciplinary breast cancer care and the development of a radiotherapy service for patients in Malawi. PMID:27092363

  6. Psychosexual care in prostate cancer survivorship: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Persad, Raj

    2015-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer (PC) is the most common cancer in men. Due to improvements in medical care, the number of PC survivors is increasing. Current literature demonstrates survivors have significant unmet needs including psychosexual care. We assess patients psychosexual needs by systematic review of literature over the past 20 years up to May 2015 in order to see what issues need to be addressed within psychosexual care. Methods A systematic review was conducted on PC survivorship and psychosexual care. The search strategy aimed to identify all references related to PC survivorship programme components (parts of survivorship programmes) AND survivorship AND psychosexual concerns. Search terms used were as follows: (PC OR prostate neoplasms) AND (survivorship OR survivor*) OR [psychosexual impairment or sexual dysfunction or erectile dysfunction (ED)] AND [comorbidity or quality of life (QoL)]. Results The systematic review identified 17 papers, examining unmet needs in psychosexual care post PC therapy. Conclusions These findings of this review may change psychosexual care of PC survivors, as national and international guidance is needed. PMID:26816840

  7. Cancer patients with oral mucositis: challenges for nursing care1

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Sarah Nilkece Mesquita; Luz, Maria Helena Barros Araújo; da Silva, Grazielle Roberta Freitas; Andrade, Elaine Maria Leite Rangel; Nunes, Lívio César Cunha; Moura, Renata Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to analyze nursing care provided to cancer patients with oral mucositis based on the Nursing Process (NP). METHOD: this exploratory, descriptive, cross-sectional and quantitative study was conducted with 213 patients undergoing chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in two cancer facilities: one philanthropic and one private service. RESULTS: the participants were mainly female, aged 45.8 years old on average, with up to 11 years of schooling and income of up to one times the minimum wage. Severe mucositis was related to chemotherapy associated with radiotherapy. Only 25.3% of the patients reported having received guidance from nurses during their treatment concerning self-care. The perceptions of patients regarding quality of care did not significantly differ between the private and public facilities. The basic human needs mainly affected were comfort, eating, and hygiene. Based on this finding, one NP was established listing the diagnoses, interventions and expected results to establish an ideal, though individualized, standard of nursing care to be provided to these patients. CONCLUSION: to understand oral mucositis is crucial to establish nursing care that includes prevention based on the implementation of an oral care plan. PMID:26039297

  8. American Society of Clinical Oncology policy statement: opportunities in the patient protection and affordable care act to reduce cancer care disparities.

    PubMed

    Moy, Beverly; Polite, Blase N; Halpern, Michael T; Stranne, Steven K; Winer, Eric P; Wollins, Dana S; Newman, Lisa A

    2011-10-01

    Patients in specific vulnerable population groups suffer disproportionately from cancer. The elimination of cancer disparities is critically important for lessening the burden of cancer. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides both opportunities and challenges for addressing cancer care disparities and access to care. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) advocates for policies that ensure access to cancer care for the underserved. Such policies include insurance reform and the reduction of economic barriers to quality health care. Building on ASCO's prior statement on disparities in cancer care (2009), this article summarizes elements of the health care law that are relevant to cancer disparities and provides recommendations for addressing major provisions in the law. It outlines specific strategies to address insurance reform, access to care, quality of care, prevention and wellness, research on health care disparities, and diversity in the health care workforce. ASCO is committed to leading efforts toward the improvement of cancer care among the most vulnerable patients. PMID:21810680

  9. Free-standing cancer centers: rationale for improving cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lokich, J J; Silvers, S; Brereton, H; Byfield, J; Bick, R

    1989-10-01

    Free-standing cancer centers (FSCC) represent a growing trend in cancer care delivery within community practice. The critical components to FSCC are multidisciplinary cancer care, a complete menu of direct care and support services, a commitment to clinical trials and clinical investigation, and a comprehensive program for quality assurance. The advantages of FSCC to the community, to hospital programs, to the practicing surgical, medical, and radiation oncologists, and to the third-party carriers, including health maintenance organizations, are detailed. The development of an FSCC depends on the resolution of issues of (a) competition (between hospitals, hospitals and physicians, therapeutic disciplines, regional comprehensive cancer centers and FSCCs) and (b) concerns about conflict of interest. The ideal model of FSCC may well be represented by the joint venture of community hospital(s) and the community oncologists. PMID:2801600

  10. Barriers and Facilitators to Implementing Cancer Survivorship Care Plans

    PubMed Central

    Dulko, Dorothy; Pace, Claire M.; Dittus, Kim L.; Sprague, Brian L.; Pollack, Lori A.; Hawkins, Nikki A.; Geller, Berta M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives To evaluate the process of survivorship care plan (SCP) completion and to survey oncology staff and primary care physicians (PCPs) regarding challenges of implementing SCPs. Design Descriptive pilot study. Setting Two facilities in Vermont, an urban academic medical center and a rural community academic cancer center. Sample 17 oncology clinical staff created SCPs, 39 PCPs completed surveys, and 58 patients (breast or colorectal cancer) participated in a telephone survey. Methods Using Journey Forward tools, SCPs were created and presented to patients. PCPs received the SCP with a survey assessing its usefulness and barriers to delivery. Oncology staff were interviewed to assess perceived challenges and benefits of SCPs. Qualitative and quantitative data were used to identify challenges to the development and implementation process as well as patient perceptions of the SCP visit. Main Research Variables SCP, healthcare provider perception of barriers to completion and implementation, and patient perception of SCP visit. Findings Oncology staff cited the time required to obtain information for SCPs as a challenge. Completing SCPs 3–6 months after treatment ended was optimal. All participants felt advanced practice professionals should complete and review SCPs with patients. The most common challenge for PCPs to implement SCP recommendations was insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues. Most patients found the care plan visit very useful, particularly within six months of diagnosis. Conclusions Creation time may be a barrier to widespread SCP implementation. Cancer survivors find SCPs useful, but PCPs feel insufficient knowledge of cancer survivor issues is a barrier to providing best follow-up care. Incorporating SCPs in electronic medical records may facilitate patient identification, appropriate staff scheduling, and timely SCP creation. Implications for Nursing Oncology nurse practitioners are well positioned to create and deliver

  11. [Robotic surgery in gynecology].

    PubMed

    Hibner, Michał; Marianowski, Piotr; Szymusik, Iwona; Wielgós, Mirosław

    2012-12-01

    Introduction of robotic surgery in the first decade of the 21 century was one of the biggest breakthroughs in surgery since the introduction of anesthesia. For the first time in history the surgeon was placed remotely from the patient and was able to operate with the device that has more degrees of freedom than human hand. Initially developed for the US Military in order to allow surgeons to be removed from the battlefield, surgical robots quickly made a leap to the mainstream medicine. One of the first surgical uses for the robot was cardiac surgery but it is urology and prostate surgery that gave it a widespread popularity Gynecologic surgeons caught on very quickly and it is estimated that 31% of hysterectomies done in the United States in 2012 will be done robotically. With over half a million hysterectomies done each year in the US alone, gynecologic surgery is one of the main driving forces behind the growth of robotic surgery Other applications in gynecology include myomectomy oophorectomy and ovarian cystectomy resection of endometriosis and lymphadenectomy Advantages of the surgical robot are clearly seen in myomectomy The wrist motion allows for better more precise suturing than conventional "straight stick" laparoscopy The strength of the arms allow for better pulling of the suture and the third arm for holding the suture on tension. Other advantage of the robot is scaling of the movements when big movement on the outside translates to very fine movement on the inside. This enables much more precise surgery and may be important in the procedures like tubal anastomosis and implantation of the ureter Three-dimensional vision provides excellent depth of field perception. It is important for surgeons who are switching from open surgeries and preliminary evidence shows that it may allow for better identification of lesions like endometriosis. Another big advantage of robotics is that the surgeon sits comfortably with his/her arms and head supported. This

  12. Gynecologic malignancy in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yong Il

    2013-01-01

    Gynecologic malignancy during pregnancy is a stressful problem. For the diagnosis and treatment of malignancy during pregnancy, a multidisciplinary approach is needed. Patients should be advised about the benefits and risk of treatment. When selecting a treatment for malignancy during pregnancy, the physiologic changes that occur with the pregnancy should be considered. Various diagnostic procedures that do not harm the fetus can be used. Laparoscopic surgery or laparotomy may be safely performed. The staging approach and treatment should be standard. Systemic chemotherapy during the first trimester should be delayed if possible. Radiation therapy should preferably start postpartum. Although delivery should be delayed preferably until after 35 weeks of gestation, termination of pregnancy may be considered when immediate treatment is required. Subsequent pregnancies do not increase the risk of malignancy recurrence. PMID:24328018

  13. Liver cancer: Approaching a personalized care

    PubMed Central

    Bruix, Jordi; Han, Kwang-Hyub; Gores, Gregory; Llovet, Josep Maria; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Summary The knowledge and understanding of all aspects of liver cancer [this including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (iCCA)] have experienced a major improvement in the last decades. New laboratory technologies have identified several molecular abnormalities that, at the very end, should provide an accurate stratification and optimal treatment of patients diagnosed with liver cancer. The seminal discovery of the TP53 hotspot mutation [1,2] was an initial landmark step for the future classification and treatment decision using conventional clinical criteria blended with molecular data. At the same time, the development of ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) has been instrumental for earlier diagnosis, accurate staging and treatment advances. Several treatment options with proven survival benefit if properly applied are now available. Major highlights include: i) acceptance of liver transplantation for HCC if within the Milan criteria [3], ii) recognition of ablation as a potentially curative option [4,5], iii) proof of benefit of chemoembolization (TACE), [6] and iv) incorporation of sorafenib as an effective systemic therapy [7]. These options are part of the widely endorsed BCLC staging and treatment model (Fig. 1) [8,9]. This is clinically useful and it will certainly keep evolving to accommodate new scientific evidence. This review summarises the data which are the basis for the current recommendations for clinical practice, while simultaneously exposes the areas where more research is needed to fulfil the still unmet needs (Table 1). PMID:25920083

  14. [Breast cancer update in primary care: (V/V)].

    PubMed

    Díaz García, Noiva; Cuadrado Rouco, Carmen; Vich, Pilar; Alvarez-Hernandez, Cristina; Brusint, Begoña; Redondo Margüello, Esther

    2015-03-01

    Breast cancer is a prevalent disease affecting all areas of patients' lives. Therefore, family physicians ought to know thoroughly this pathology to optimize the health care services for these patients making the best use of available resources. A series of five articles on breast cancer is presented below. It is based on a review of the scientific literature over the last ten years. In this final section, the social, psychological, occupational and family issues related to the disease will be reviewed, as well as presenting some special situations of breast cancer, including breast cancer in men, during pregnancy and last stages of life. This summary report aims to provide a current and practical review about this disease, providing answers to family doctors and helping them to be by the patients for their benefit throughout their illness. PMID:25002350

  15. Lung cancer care: the impact of facilities and area measures

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the US, and while treatment disparities by race and class have been well described in the literature, the impact of social determinates of health, and specific characteristics of the treatment centers have been less well characterized. As the treatment of lung cancer relies more upon a precision and personalized medicine approach, where patients obtain treatment has an impact on outcomes and could be a major factor in treatment disparities. The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss the manner in which lung cancer care can be impacted by poor access to high quality treatment centers, and how the built environment can be a mitigating factor in the pursuit of treatment equity. PMID:26380179

  16. Lung cancer care: the impact of facilities and area measures.

    PubMed

    Lathan, Christopher S

    2015-08-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related mortality in the US, and while treatment disparities by race and class have been well described in the literature, the impact of social determinates of health, and specific characteristics of the treatment centers have been less well characterized. As the treatment of lung cancer relies more upon a precision and personalized medicine approach, where patients obtain treatment has an impact on outcomes and could be a major factor in treatment disparities. The purpose of this manuscript is to discuss the manner in which lung cancer care can be impacted by poor access to high quality treatment centers, and how the built environment can be a mitigating factor in the pursuit of treatment equity. PMID:26380179

  17. Cancer Phenotype Diagnosis and Drug Efficacy within Japanese Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Toshihide; Kato, Harubumi; Ikeda, Norihiko; Kihara, Makoto; Nomura, Masaharu; Kato, Yasufumi; Marko-Varga, György

    2012-01-01

    An overview on targeted personalized medicine is given describing the developments in Japan of lung cancer patients. These new targeted therapies with novel personalized medicine drugs require new implementations, in order to follow and monitor drug efficacy and outcome. Examples from IRESSA (Gefitinib) and TARCEVA (Erlotinib) treatments used in medication of lung cancer patients are presented. Lung cancer is one of the most common causes of cancer mortality in the world. The importance of both the quantification of disease progression, where diagnostic-related biomarkers are being implemented, in addition to the actual measurement of disease-specific mechanisms relating to pathway signalling activation of disease-progressive protein targets is summarised. An outline is also presented, describing changes and adaptations in Japan, meeting the rising costs and challenges. Today, urgent implementation of programs to address these needs has led to a rebuilding of the entire approach of medical evaluation and clinical care. PMID:22685658

  18. Breast cancer in young women: special considerations in multidisciplinary care

    PubMed Central

    Reyna, Chantal; Lee, Marie Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most prevalent cancers in females, and 5%–7% of breast cancer cases occur in women under 40 years of age. Breast cancer in the young has gained increased attention with an attempt to improve diagnosis and prognosis. Young patients tend to have different epidemiology, presenting with later stages and more aggressive phenotypes. Diagnostic imaging is also more difficult in this age group. Multidisciplinary care generally encompasses surgeons, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, radiologists, and social workers. Other special considerations include reconstruction options, fertility, genetics, and psychosocial issues. These concerns enlarge the already diverse multidisciplinary team to incorporate new expertise, such as reproductive specialists and genetic counselors. This review encompasses an overview of the current multimodal treatment regimens and the unique challenges in treating this special population. Integration of diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life issues should be addressed and understood by each member in the interdisciplinary team in order to optimize outcomes. PMID:25300196

  19. Health professional's perspectives of the barriers and enablers to cancer care for Indigenous Australians.

    PubMed

    Meiklejohn, J A; Adams, J; Valery, P C; Walpole, E T; Martin, J H; Williams, H M; Garvey, G

    2016-03-01

    To investigate health professionals' perspectives about factors that impede or facilitate cancer care for Indigenous people. Semi-structured interviews with 22 health professionals involved in Indigenous cancer care. Data were interpreted using an inductive thematic analysis approach. Participants presented their perspectives on a number of barriers and enablers to Indigenous cancer care. Barriers were related to challenges with communication, the health system and coordination of care, issues around individual and community priorities and views of cancer treatment and health professional judgement. Enablers to cancer care were related to the importance of trust and rapport as well as health care system and support factors. The findings highlighted the need for recording of Indigenous status in medical records and a coordinated approach to the provision of evidence-based and culturally appropriate cancer care. This could go some way to improving Indigenous patient's engagement with tertiary cancer care services. PMID:26918690

  20. Education on breast disease in an obstetrics and gynecology training program: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Rosa, C; Kiley, K C; Reeves, T A; McPhail, J F; Morgenstern, L L

    1990-04-01

    Breast cancer affects one in ten women during their lifetime. Recognizing the importance of early detection in the prognosis of this condition, the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology has stated guidelines encouraging breast disease education in obstetrics and gynecology training programs. To fulfill this academic responsibility, we have organized a multidisciplinary Breast Disease Detection and Treatment Clinic where patients with abnormal mammograms or any breast-related complaints are evaluated and managed. In cooperation with the radiology department and general surgery service, a mammogram review conference has been instituted. Abnormal mammograms are reviewed with a radiologist. Our activities have been coordinated such that a general surgery staff member and resident are present during the breast clinic hours to review mammograms and to examine the patients with the gynecologist, providing immediate consultation. Needle aspiration of breast cysts, repeat imaging studies, and general surgery referrals for breast biopsies are performed as indicated. The patient receives integrated care of her breast problem in one visit, and our residents gain the experience of diagnosing and managing breast problems which, before establishment of this clinic, were referred to the general surgery department. This multidisciplinary approach developed in our institution helps us provide the most efficient care to our patients, while providing our residents with integrated teaching and training concerning the diagnosis and management of breast disease. PMID:2314793

  1. A value framework in head and neck cancer care.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Jonas A; Seiwert, Tanguy Y

    2014-01-01

    The care of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma has greatly evolved over the past 30 years. From single modality to a multidisciplinary care, there has also been a concurrent increase in treatment intensity, resulting, at many times, in more zealous regimens that patients must endure. In this article, we apply Porter's value model as a framework to balance survival, toxicities, cost, and trade-offs from a patient's perspective in head and neck cancer. This model defines value as the health outcome per dollar achieved. Domains and outcomes that are important to patients, including not only survival or short-term quality of life, but also functional outcomes, recovery, sustainability of recovery, and the lasting consequences of therapy are included in this framework. Other outcomes that are seldom measured in head and neck cancer, such as work disability and financial toxicities, are also included and further discussed. Within this value model and based on evidence, we further discuss de-escalation of care, intensity-modulated radiation therapy, newer surgical methods, and enhancements in the process of care as potential approaches to add value for patients. Finally, we argue that knowing the patient's preferences is essential in the value discussion, as the attribute that will ultimately provide the most value to the individual patient with head and neck cancer. PMID:24857117

  2. Improving Goals of Care Discussion in Advanced Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Primary Stage IV Hepatobiliary; Esophageal; Colorectal Cancer; Glioblastoma; Cancer of Stomach; Cancer of Pancreas; Melanoma; Head or Neck Cancer; Stage III; Stage IV; Lung Cancers; Pancreatic Cancers

  3. Chinese Herbal Medicine for Symptom Management in Cancer Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Vincent C.H.; Wu, Xinyin; Lu, Ping; Hui, Edwin P.; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Anthony L.; Lau, Alexander Y.L.; Zhao, Junkai; Fan, Min; Ziea, Eric T.C.; Ng, Bacon F.L.; Wong, Samuel Y.S.; Wu, Justin C.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Use of Chinese herbal medicines (CHM) in symptom management for cancer palliative care is very common in Chinese populations but clinical evidence on their effectiveness is yet to be synthesized. To conduct a systematic review with meta-analysis to summarize results from CHM randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on symptoms that are undertreated in conventional cancer palliative care. Five international and 3 Chinese databases were searched. RCTs evaluating CHM, either in combination with conventional treatments or used alone, in managing cancer-related symptoms were considered eligible. Effectiveness was quantified by using weighted mean difference (WMD) using random effect model meta-analysis. Fourteen RCTs were included. Compared with conventional intervention alone, meta-analysis showed that combined CHM and conventional treatment significantly reduced pain (3 studies, pooled WMD: −0.90, 95% CI: −1.69 to −0.11). Six trials comparing CHM with conventional medications demonstrated similar effect in reducing constipation. One RCT showed significant positive effect of CHM plus chemotherapy for managing fatigue, but not in the remaining 3 RCTs. The additional use of CHM to chemotherapy does not improve anorexia when compared to chemotherapy alone, but the result was concluded from 2 small trials only. Adverse events were infrequent and mild. CHM may be considered as an add-on to conventional care in the management of pain in cancer patients. CHM could also be considered as an alternative to conventional care for reducing constipation. Evidence on the use of CHM for treating anorexia and fatigue in cancer patients is uncertain, warranting further research. PMID:26886628

  4. Evaluation of the impact of interdisciplinarity in cancer care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Teamwork is a key component of the health care renewal strategy emphasized in Quebec, elsewhere in Canada and in other countries to enhance the quality of oncology services. While this innovation would appear beneficial in theory, empirical evidences of its impact are limited. Current efforts in Quebec to encourage the development of local interdisciplinary teams in all hospitals offer a unique opportunity to assess the anticipated benefits. These teams working in hospital outpatient clinics are responsible for treatment, follow-up and patient support. The study objective is to assess the impact of interdisciplinarity on cancer patients and health professionals. Methods/Design This is a quasi-experimental study with three comparison groups distinguished by intensity of interdisciplinarity: strong, moderate and weak. The study will use a random sample of 12 local teams in Quebec, stratified by intensity of interdisciplinarity. The instrument to measure the intensity of the interdisciplinarity, developed in collaboration with experts, encompasses five dimensions referring to aspects of team structure and process. Self-administered questionnaires will be used to measure the impact of interdisciplinarity on patients (health care utilization, continuity of care and cancer services responsiveness) and on professionals (professional well-being, assessment of teamwork and perception of teamwork climate). Approximately 100 health professionals working on the selected teams and 2000 patients will be recruited. Statistical analyses will include descriptive statistics and comparative analysis of the impact observed according to the strata of interdisciplinarity. Fixed and random multivariate statistical models (multilevel analyses) will also be used. Discussion This study will pinpoint to what extent interdisciplinarity is linked to quality of care and meets the complex and varied needs of cancer patients. It will ascertain to what extent interdisciplinary teamwork

  5. Improving access to cancer guidelines: feedback from health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Sahota, I.S.; Kostaras, X.; Hagen, N.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We examined access to locally developed and other available clinical practice guidelines (cpgs) for the management of cancer and evaluated how to improve uptake. Methods A 12-question online survey was administered to 772 members of 12 multidisciplinary tumour teams in a Canadian provincial oncology program. The teams are composed of physicians, surgeons, nurses, allied health professionals, and researchers involved in the provision of cancer care across the province. Many of these individuals construct or provide input into the provincial cpgs. The questionnaires were administered online and were completed voluntarily. Results Responses were received from 232 individuals, a response rate of 30.1%. Most respondents (75.1%) indicated they actively referenced cpgs for cancer treatment. Of the 177 respondents who identified barriers to cpg access, 24.9% said that the cause was being too busy; 24.3% and 22.6% cited the user-unfriendliness of the Web site and a lack of awareness about the cpgs. When asked about innovative changes that could be made to improve access, the creation of cpg summary documents was identified as the most effective change (46.3%). The creation of summary documents was ranked highest by physicians, surgeons, and nurses. Conclusions Clinical practice guidelines are important tools for standardizing treatment protocols and improving outcomes in health care systems, but support for their use is variable among health care professionals. We have identified barriers to—and potential mitigating strategies for—more widespread access to cpgs by the various health professions involved in cancer care. Local creation of succinct and easily accessible cpgs was identified as the single most effective way to enhance access by health care professionals. PMID:26715871

  6. Photodynamic therapy in patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetzel, Heinz; Mueller, Elisabeth; Kostron, Herwig

    1993-03-01

    Patients with recurrent gynecological carcinomas have a poor prognosis with a median survival time of 3 - 6 months. Four patients with recurrent vulva carcinomas, one patient with a recurrent breast cancer, and one with a recurrent cervical carcinoma underwent PDT after parenteral or topical sensitization with Photosan 3. Of those patients two women made a complete recovery with no evidence of disease 27 and 24 months after. One patient responded partially with two recurrences which were retreated twice after topical sensitization, she has survived 16 months. The remaining patients showed partial response and died 3 and 8 months after PDT. The energy delivered by an argon-dye-laser ranged between 225 and 750 J/cm2. Photosan 3 was given intravenously at a dose of 2.5 mg/kg body weight and was tolerated without any allergic reaction. A response rate of nearly 50% in recurrent gynecological malignancies encourages us to pursue PDT in gynecological diseases.

  7. Fertility-sparing options for patients with gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Leitao, Mario M; Chi, Dennis S

    2005-09-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are most often diagnosed in postmenopausal women, but these malignancies also arise in premenopausal women, in whom issues of fertility can be a major concern. An increasing number of women are delaying childbearing. This has led to a significant increase in the number of women diagnosed with a gynecologic malignancy before desired completion of childbearing. Many of the standard treatments for these malignancies result in permanent sterility; however, there are now options for select young women who desire to preserve fertility. Patients should be told that data on fertility-sparing procedures are limited and that many of these options are of an experimental, nonstandard nature. The care of these patients is challenging and complex and requires a multidisciplinary approach, which should include gynecologic oncologists, reproductive endocrinologists, and perinatologists. PMID:16177285

  8. Changing state of gynecologic oncologist specialty in Japan.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Takuma

    2016-05-01

    Gynecologic oncologists must have extensive knowledge regarding the methods of treating a diverse range of gynecologic cancers as well as the ability to perform cutting-edge multidisciplinary treatments that frequently involve surgery. Given that coordination with other medical departments is vital for treatment, a high level of interpersonal and technical skills needs to be demonstrated to form the axis for medical treatment. One objective of the specialist certification system is the grooming of leaders as gynecologic oncologists while instructing trainees. The most distinguishing feature of Japanese gynecologic oncologists is that they need experience in more than 150 invasive cancer treatments, including more than 100 operations within the last 3-5 years. As for performance of surgery, at least 30 operations, including 15 radical hysterectomies, are required. Since surgical methods, including laparoscopic surgery, are undergoing a radical change, and increasing numbers of patients are undergoing radiotherapy for invasive cervical cancer, a review of the necessary requirements is critical. It is important to foster new leaders who are research-oriented. Now is the time for marked reform with the new specialist certification system being introduced by the Japanese Medical Specialty Board. Japan has the advantage of offering medical services at a much lower cost because of its national health insurance system. However, specialists are currently not receiving clear benefits befitting their efforts, and the question of how to maintain their motivation is an issue for the future. For these purposes, I believe securing incentives is a critical issue for specialists. PMID:26988808

  9. Improving Cancer Care Through Nursing Research.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Deborah K

    2015-09-01

    Nursing research and nurse researchers have been an integral and significant part of the Oncology Nursing Society's (ONS's) history, as evidenced by the development of the Nursing Research Committee within a few years of ONS's establishment. Ruth McCorkle, PhD, RN, FAAN, was the committee's first chairperson in 1979. This was followed by the creation of the Advanced Nursing Research Special Interest Group in 1989 under the leadership of Jean Brown, PhD, RN, FAAN. ONS also began to recognize nurse researchers in 1994 by creating the annual ONS Distinguished Researcher Award to recognize the contributions of a member who has conducted or promoted research that has enhanced the science and practice of oncology nursing. The list of recipients and of their work is impressive and reflects the wide range of our practice areas (see http://bit.ly/1MTC5cp for the recipient list). In addition, the ONS Foundation began funding research in 1981 and has distributed more than $24 million in research grants, research fellowships, and other scholarships, lectures, public education projects, and career development awards (ONS Foundation, 2015). And, in 2006, the Putting Evidence Into Practice resource was unveiled, which provides evidence-based intervention reviews for the 20 most common problems experienced by patients with cancer and their caregivers (www.ons
.org/practice-resources/pep)
. PMID:26302272

  10. Holistic care of the patient with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    McMullin, M

    1992-12-01

    Participation by women in screening programs for cervical cancer is far from optimal, and many lives are lost because of this. Cervical cancer is common, and is easily detected and treated. It has a good prognosis for cure if detected early in its course. Effective screening has been shown to have a major role in decreasing the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. Therefore, there is a need for increased public health education and availability of screening programs for women. It is particularly important that public health efforts reach women in the lower socioeconomic groups who are less apt to exhibit health promotive behaviors. Women of Latin American heritage are at particularly high risk because of cultural barriers to the discussion of sexual practices. Until public health interventions are more successful, cervical cancer will continue to pose a major threat to women who are either too embarrassed or too misinformed to understand that prevention is an integral part of women's health care. Nurses view patients in a holistic way. It is this philosophy of care that offers women who are diagnosed with cervical cancer a means to adapt successfully to the psychologic and physiologic stresses associated with the diagnosis. Nurses need to recognize this strength and to offer holistic approaches to women in crisis. No two patients deal with a diagnosis of cancer in the same manner. A major challenge to nurses across a hospital community continuum is to provide comprehensive psychologic and physiologic assessment of a women's response to a diagnosis of cervical cancer and to provide effective and holistic intervention when necessary. PMID:1448360

  11. "It's Not Like You Need to Live 10 or 20 Years": Challenges to Patient-Centered Care in Gynecologic Oncologist-Patient Interactions.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Elaine; Bruscella, Jacqueline; Zanin, Alaina; Kramer, Eric M

    2016-07-01

    The literature suggests that the patient-perspective approach (i.e., eliciting and responding to patients' perspectives, including beliefs, preferences, values, and attitudes) to patient-centered care (PCC) is not a reliable predictor of positive outcomes; however, little is known about why the patient-perspective approach does not necessarily lead to positive outcomes. By using discourse analysis to examine 44 segments of oncologist-patient interactions, we found that providers' use of patient-perspective contextualization can affect the quality of care through (a) constructing the meanings of patient conditions, (b) controlling interpreting frames for patient conditions, and (c) manipulating patient preferences through strategic information sharing. We concluded that providers' use of patient-perspective contextualization is an insufficient indicator of PCC because these discursive strategies can be used to control and manipulate patient preferences and perspectives. At times, providers' patient-perspective contextualization can silence patients' voice and appear discriminatory. PMID:26078327

  12. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D I

    2016-03-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  13. Integrating cannabis into clinical cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, D.I.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis species have been used as medicine for thousands of years; only since the 1940s has the plant not been widely available for medical use. However, an increasing number of jurisdictions are making it possible for patients to obtain the botanical for medicinal use. For the cancer patient, cannabis has a number of potential benefits, especially in the management of symptoms. Cannabis is useful in combatting anorexia, chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, pain, insomnia, and depression. Cannabis might be less potent than other available antiemetics, but for some patients, it is the only agent that works, and it is the only antiemetic that also increases appetite. Inhaled cannabis is more effective than placebo in ameliorating peripheral neuropathy in a number of conditions, and it could prove useful in chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. A pharmacokinetic interaction study of vaporized cannabis in patients with chronic pain on stable doses of sustained-release opioids demonstrated no clinically significant change in plasma opiates, while suggesting the possibility of synergistic analgesia. Aside from symptom management, an increasing body of in vitro and animal-model studies supports a possible direct anticancer effect of cannabinoids by way of a number of different mechanisms involving apoptosis, angiogenesis, and inhibition of metastasis. Despite an absence of clinical trials, abundant anecdotal reports that describe patients having remarkable responses to cannabis as an anticancer agent, especially when taken as a high-potency orally ingested concentrate, are circulating. Human studies should be conducted to address critical questions related to the foregoing effects. PMID:27022315

  14. The global cancer genomics consortium's third annual symposium: from oncogenomics to cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Luis; Casimiro, Sandra; Gupta, Sudeep; Knapp, Stefan; Pillai, M.Radhakrishna; Toi, Masakazu; Badwe, Rajendra; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Kumar, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    The Global Cancer Genomics Consortium (GCGC) is a cohesive network of oncologists, cancer biologists and structural and genomic experts residing in six institutions from Portugal, United Kingdom, Japan, India, and United States. The team is using its combined resources and infrastructures to address carefully selected, shared, burning questions in cancer medicine. The Third Annual Symposium was organized by the Institute of Molecular Medicine, Lisbon Medical School, Lisbon, Portugal, from September 18 to 20, 2013. To highlight the benefits and limitations of recent advances in cancer genomics, the meeting focused on how to better translate our gains in oncogenomics to cancer patients while engaging our younger colleagues in cancer medicine at-large. Over two hundreds participants actively discussed some of the most recent advances in the areas cancer genomics, transcriptomics and cancer system biology and how to best apply such knowledge to cancer therapeutics, biomarkers discovery and drug development, and an essential role played by bio-banking throughout the process. In brief, the GCGC symposium provided a platform for students and translational cancer researchers to share their excitement and worries as we are beginning to translate the gains in oncogenomics to a better cancer patient treatment.

  15. Piloting cross-boundary training to develop cancer care nursing.

    PubMed

    Lawther, Christine; Taylor, Sue; Bell, Ann; White, Helen

    Flexible approaches to lifelong learning have the potential to increase motivation and influence recruitment and retention. This paper explores how the introduction of a collaborative rotational placement programme between the NHS and the voluntary sector helped qualified staff to develop their practice in caring for patients with cancer from diagnosis through to bereavement. Staff experienced an increase in their personal motivation, confidence and enthusiasm. PMID:14768152

  16. Core communication components along the cancer care process: the perspective of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Prades, Joan; Ferro, Tàrsila; Gil, Francisco; Borras, Josep M

    2014-10-01

    This study sought to assess the impact of health care professional (HCP) communication on breast cancer patients across the acute care process as perceived by patients. Methodological approach was based on eight focus groups conducted with a sample of patients (n = 37) drawn from 15 Spanish Regions; thematic analysis was undertaken using the National Cancer Institute (NCI) framework of HCP communication as the theoretical basis. Relevant results of this study were the identification of four main communication components: (1) reassurance in coping with uncertainty after symptom detection and prompt access until confirmed diagnosis; (2) fostering involvement before delivering treatments, by anticipating information on practical and emotional illness-related issues; (3) guidance on the different therapeutic options, through use of clinical scenarios; and, (4) eliciting the feeling of emotional exhaustion after ending treatments and addressing the management of potential treatment-related effects. These communication-related components highlighted the need for a comprehensive approach in this area of cancer care. PMID:24980292

  17. Outpatient treatment costs and their potential impact on cancer care.

    PubMed

    Isshiki, Takahiro

    2014-12-01

    Cancer creates a tremendous financial burden. Cancer-related costs are categorized into direct, indirect, and psychosocial costs. Although there have been many reports on medical care costs, which are direct, those on other costs are extremely scarce. We estimated travel time and costs required for cancer patients to receive outpatient treatment. We studied 521 cancer patients receiving anti-cancer treatment between February 2009 and December 2012 at the Outpatient Chemotherapy Center of Teikyo University Chiba Medical Center. Address data were extracted from Data Warehouse electronic medical records, and travel distance and time required for outpatient treatment were calculated via MapInfo and ACT Distance Calculator Package. Transportation costs were estimated on the basis of ¥274 (=$3.00) per kilometer. The study design was approved by an ethics review board of Teikyo University (12-851). Average round-trip travel distance, time, and cost for all patients were 26.7 km, 72.5 min, and ¥7,303 ($79.99), respectively. Cancer patients incurred a travel cost of ¥4000-¥9000 ($40.00 to $100.00) for each outpatient treatment. With population aging, seniors living alone and senior households are increasing, and outpatient visits are becoming a common burden. PMID:25060622

  18. Inoperable esophageal cancer and outcome of palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Besharat, Sima; Jabbari, Ali; Semnani, Shahryar; Keshtkar, Abbasali; Marjani, Jeran

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To determine the outcome of esophageal cancer patients referred for palliative care, in Gorgan and Gonbad gastrointestinal clinics, northeast of Iran. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was done on inoperable esophageal cancer cases referred to gastrointestinal clinics in Gorgan and Gonbad city (2005-2006). Demographic data were collected during the procedure and cases were followed up every one month. Improvement proportion was calculated with 95% confidence interval, to determine the rate of improvement. Survival analysis and Kaplan-Meier methods were used to estimate the duration of palliative care effectiveness. RESULTS: We recruited 39 cases into the study. Squamous cell carcinoma was the most prevalent (92.3%). The middle third of the esophagus was involved predominantly (51.3%). Dilation was the most preferred method (89.7%) and stenting was done in 4 cases. Decreasing dysphagia score was not related to palliation method or pathology type of carcinoma. Age of the patients was significantly related to the improvement of dysphagia score. Mean survival time was 137.6 d and median was 103 d. CONCLUSION: Results of this study showed a low survival rate after palliative care in esophageal cancer cases despite dysphagia scores’ improvement after dilating or stenting. PMID:18595139

  19. Uterine/Endometrial Cancer: Chemotherapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wellness Forum Announcement: GCF Surgeons Raise Awareness through Rock Announcement: GCF is proud to introduce the Gynecologic ... The Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Movement Weekend Press Release: Rock & Roll Doctors to Release Debut CD “No Evidence ...

  20. Clinical benefits of metformin in gynecologic oncology

    PubMed Central

    IMAI, ATSUSHI; ICHIGO, SATOSHI; MATSUNAMI, KAZUTOSHI; TAKAGI, HIROSHI; YASUDA, KEIGO

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has suggested that diabetes may contribute to the initiation and progression of specific types of cancer. Metformin, a biguanide, has become the preferred first-line therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Metformin is inexpensive, has a proven safety profile and is able to be safely combined with additional antidiabetic agents. In addition to the well-established antidiabetic effects of metformin, there has also been notable interest in its antitumor properties. The present review discusses the emerging role of metformin as an example of an existing drug, used worldwide in the treatment of diabetes, which has been demonstrated to exert significant in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities and has thus been investigated in clinical trials. In gynecologic oncology, metformin has been suggested to exhibit significant treatment efficacy against endometrial cancer. Three studies have demonstrated the potential therapeutic effects of metformin on the survival outcome of patients with ovarian cancer and in ovarian cancer prevention. However, this evidence was based on observational studies. Metformin has been shown to exert no statistically significant beneficial effect on cervical cancer incidence or mortality. By cancer site, the current limited insights highlight the need for clinical investigations and better-designed studies, along with evaluation of the effects of metformin on cancer at other sites. PMID:26622536

  1. Caring and curing: paediatric cancer services since 1960.

    PubMed

    Barnes, E

    2005-09-01

    This paper traces the history of the specialist meanings of 'cure' in paediatric oncology in the UK, how they have changed with increasing organization of the discipline, ever-rising survival rates for all childhood cancers, and with feedback from patients and families. It examines the differing ways in which those involved in researching, treating, and raising funds for work on childhood cancers have understood and used the language of cure, and speculates as to why talking about the 'cure' of survivors of childhood cancers is so problematic. The paper discusses the particular importance of holistic care in the development of paediatric oncology. Psychosocial support is delivered alongside surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The focus for support is the patient's whole family, building a tenet of palliative care into curative treatment. The concept of the 'truly cured child' is argued to have been crucial in the discipline's decision in the 1970s and 1980s to make the psychosocial needs of patients and their families central in the programme of curing children with cancer. PMID:16098123

  2. Fighting Global Disparities in Cancer Care: A Surgical Oncology View.

    PubMed

    Hoekstra, Harald J; Wobbes, Theo; Heineman, Erik; Haryono, Samuel; Aryandono, Teguh; Balch, Charles M

    2016-07-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death globally after cardiovascular disease. Long-term cancer survival has improved in the Western world due to early detection and the use of effective combined treatment modalities, as well as the development of effective immunotherapy and drug-targeted therapy. Surgery is still the mainstay for most solid tumors; however, low- and middle-income countries are facing an increasing lack of primary surgical care for easily treatable conditions, including breast, colon, and head and neck cancers. In this paper, a surgical oncology view is presented to elaborate how the Western surgical oncologist can take part in the 'surgical fight' against global disparities in cancer care, and a plea is made to strive for structural solutions, such as a partnership in surgical oncology training. The pros and cons of the use of eHealth and mHealth technologies and education programs for schools and the community are discussed as these create an opportunity to reach a large portion of the population in these countries, at low cost and with high impact. PMID:27038459

  3. Spirituality and care of prostate cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, Janice; Sydnor, Kim Dobson; Granot, Michal

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: To explore the integration of spirituality into medical care for African-American men coping with prostate cancer. PROCEDURES: A total of 14 African-American prostate cancer patients completed a self-administered quantitative survey examining the dimension of spirituality as a resource for coping. FINDINGS: A high proportion of survivors reported a general religious orientation as expressed through church affiliation and frequent church attendance. A majority (67%) had spoken with their doctors about their spiritual and religious beliefs and more than half the physicians had solicited their patients' spiritual beliefs as part of their handling of prostate cancer. While one-third of the men reported their doctors had been in contact with their clergy, two-thirds would like their doctor and clergy to be in contact with one another. CONCLUSIONS: This is a pilot study that incorporated both qualitative and quantitative data collection but with the small sample, has limited generalizability. However, this work does suggest that integrating spirituality and religion into medical care may be beneficial to prostate cancer patients. Physicians and physician organizations should engage in future research in this area. PMID:14620707

  4. Professionalism in global, personalized cancer care: restoring authenticity and integrity.

    PubMed

    Surbone, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    Personalized medicine is revolutionizing cancer care and creating new expectations among oncologists and patients. At present the benefit is still marginal, however, and must be understood as incremental. In addition, cultural and resource disparities limit the sustainability of new cancer therapies on a global scale. Adequate instruments are needed to enable our exercise of sound and honest judgment in distinguishing breakthrough treatments from those that yield only marginal or doubtful improvements, and to develop strategies for formulation and correct application of balanced guidelines for sustainable cancer care. Professionalism requires that the acquisition of knowledge and skills go hand in hand with moral education in the intellectual virtues of humility, perseverance, adaptability, communicativeness, and commitment to resist self-deception or conflicts of interest. Hidden curricula undermine the moral values of medicine: these must be understood and uncovered. We should possess a special body of knowledge, skills, and values that allow us to change our practices when appropriate and to be stewards of society's limited resources through proper communication with our patients and families. In the era of personalized oncology and global issues of sustainability, professional authenticity and integrity in cancer clinical practice are key to bridging the gaps between true and false expectations of patients and the public. PMID:23714485

  5. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Hanbyoul; Nam, Byung-Ho; Kim, Seok Mo; Cho, Chi-Heum; Kim, Byoung Gie; Ryu, Hee-Sug; Kang, Soon Beom; Kim, Jae-Hoon

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  6. Laser treatment in gynecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Riese, Cornelia

    2004-07-01

    This presentation is designed as a brief overview of laser use in gynecology, for non-medical researchers involved in development of new laser techniques. The literature of the past decade is reviewed. Differences in penetration, absorption, and suitable delivery media for the beams dictate clinical application. The use of CO2 laser in the treatment of uterine cervical intraepithelial lesions is well established and indications as well as techniques have not changed over 30 years. The Cochrane Systematic Review from 2000 suggests no obviously superior technique. CO2 laser ablation of the vagina is also established as a safe treatment modality for VAIN. CO2 laser permits treatment of lesions with excellent cosmetic and functional results. The treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding by destruction of the endometrial lining using various techniques has been the subject of a 2002 Cochran Database Review. Among the compared treatment modalities are newer and modified laser techniques. Conclusion by reviewers is that outcomes and complication profiles of newer techniques compare favorably with the gold standard of endometrial resection. The ELITT diode laser system is one of the new successful additions. CO2 laser is also the dominant laser type used with laparoscopy for ablation of endometriotic implants. Myoma coagulation or myolysis with Nd:Yag laser through the laparoscope or hysteroscope is a conservative treatment option. Even MRI guided percutaneous approaches have been described. No long-term data are available.

  7. Gynecologic electrical impedance tomograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korjenevsky, A.; Cherepenin, V.; Trokhanova, O.; Tuykin, T.

    2010-04-01

    Electrical impedance tomography extends to the new and new areas of the medical diagnostics: lungs, breast, prostate, etc. The feedback from the doctors who use our breast EIT diagnostic system has induced us to develop the 3D electrical impedance imaging device for diagnostics of the cervix of the uterus - gynecologic impedance tomograph (GIT). The device uses the same measuring approach as the breast imaging system: 2D flat array of the electrodes arranged on the probe with handle is placed against the body. Each of the 32 electrodes of the array is connected in turn to the current source while the rest electrodes acquire the potentials on the surface. The current flows through the electrode of the array and returns through the remote electrode placed on the patient's limb. The voltages are measured relative to another remote electrode. The 3D backprojection along equipotential surfaces is used to reconstruct conductivity distribution up to approximately 1 cm in depth. Small number of electrodes enables us to implement real time imaging with a few frames per sec. rate. The device is under initial testing and evaluation of the imaging capabilities and suitability of usage.

  8. Erbium laser in gynecology.

    PubMed

    Vizintin, Z; Lukac, M; Kazic, M; Tettamanti, M

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a novel laser technology utilizing the erbium YAG laser for various minimally invasive, non-surgical procedures in gynecology. Non-ablative, thermal-only SMOOTH-mode erbium pulses are used to produce vaginal collagen hyperthermia, followed by collagen remodeling and the synthesis of new collagen fibers, resulting in improved vaginal tissue tightness and elasticity. This erbium laser technology is used for treatments of vaginal laxity, stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and vaginal atrophy. In the period from 2010 to 2014, several clinical studies covering all four indications were conducted with the aim to prove the efficacy and safety of this novel technology. An overview is presented of the results of these studies where several objective as well as subjective assessment tools were used. The results have shown that SMOOTH-mode erbium laser seems to be an effective and safe method for treating vaginal laxity, stress urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapses and vaginal atrophy. PMID:26366793

  9. Improving outcomes in lung cancer: the value of the multidisciplinary health care team

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Eve; Conron, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a major worldwide health burden, with high disease-related morbidity and mortality. Unlike other major cancers, there has been little improvement in lung cancer outcomes over the past few decades, and survival remains disturbingly low. Multidisciplinary care is the cornerstone of lung cancer treatment in the developed world, despite a relative lack of evidence that this model of care improves outcomes. In this article, the available literature concerning the impact of multidisciplinary care on key measures of lung cancer outcomes is reviewed. This includes the limited observational data supporting improved survival with multidisciplinary care. The impact of multidisciplinary care on other benchmark measures of quality lung cancer treatment is also examined, including staging accuracy, access to diagnostic investigations, improvements in clinical decision making, better utilization of radiotherapy and palliative care services, and improved quality of life for patients. Health service research suggests that multidisciplinary care improves care coordination, leading to a better patient experience, and reduces variation in care, a problem in lung cancer management that has been identified worldwide. Furthermore, evidence suggests that the multidisciplinary model of care overcomes barriers to treatment, promotes standardized treatment through adherence to guidelines, and allows audit of clinical services and for these reasons is more likely to provide quality care for lung cancer patients. While there is strengthening evidence suggesting that the multidisciplinary model of care contributes to improvements in lung cancer outcomes, more quality studies are needed. PMID:27099511

  10. Integrative cancer care in a US academic cancer centre: The Memorial Sloan-Kettering Experience.

    PubMed

    Deng, G

    2008-08-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many CAM modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer "cures," targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of CAM from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient's overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of CAM modalities. PMID:18769574

  11. Integrative Cancer Care in a US Academic Cancer Centre: The Memorial Sloan–Kettering Experience

    PubMed Central

    Deng, G.

    2008-01-01

    Various surveys show that interest in complementary and alternative medicine (cam) is high among cancer patients. Patients want to explore all options that may help their treatment. Many cam modalities offer patients an active role in their self-care, and the resulting sense of empowerment is very appealing. On the other hand, many unscrupulous marketeers promote alternative cancer “cures,” targeting cancer patients who are particularly vulnerable. Some alternative therapies can hurt patients by delaying effective treatment or by causing adverse effects or detrimental interactions with other medications. It is not in the best interest of cancer patients if they cannot get appropriate guidance on the use of cam from the health care professionals who are part of their cancer care team. The Integrative Medicine Service at Memorial Sloan–Kettering Cancer Center in New York was established in 1999 to address patient interest in cam, to incorporate helpful complementary therapies into each patient’s overall treatment management, to guide patients in avoiding harmful alternative therapies, and to develop prospective research to evaluate the efficacy of cam modalities. PMID:18769574

  12. Perceptions of lung cancer and potential impacts on funding and patient care: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Tran, Kim; Delicaet, Kendra; Tang, Theresa; Ashley, Leslie Beard; Morra, Dante; Abrams, Howard

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to explore health-care professionals', health administrators', and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives' perceptions of lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and the perceived impacts on funding and patient care. This is a qualitative descriptive study using semi-structured interviews, which was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Seventy-four individuals from medical oncology, radiation oncology, thoracic surgery, respirology, pathology, radiology, primary care, palliative care, nursing, pharmacy, social work, genetics, health administration, and not-for-profit cancer organizations participated in this study. Participants described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism and its negative impact on patients' psychological health, lung cancer funding, and patient care. The feeling of guilt and shame experienced by lung cancer patients as a result of the stigma associated with the disease was described. In terms of lung cancer funding, stigma was described as a reason lung cancer receives significantly less research funding compared to other cancers. In terms of patient care, lung cancer-related nihilism was credited with negatively impacting physician referral patterns with the belief that lung cancer patients were less likely to receive referrals for medical treatment. Health-care professionals, health administrators, and not-for-profit cancer organization representatives described lung cancer-related stigma and nihilism with far-reaching consequences. Further work is needed to increase education and awareness about lung cancer to reduce the stigma and nihilism associated with the disease. PMID:24882441

  13. Emotions and social relationships for breast and gynecologic patients: A qualitative study of coping with recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Lisa M.; Levin, Anna O.; Dorfman, Caroline S.; Godiwala, Neha; Heitzmann, Carolyn; Andersen, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to the large literature on patients’ coping with an initial diagnosis of cancer, there have been few quantitative or qualitative studies of patients coping with recurrence. A qualitative study was undertaken to aide in the development of a tailored intervention for these patients. Individuals (N=35) receiving follow-up care for recurrent breast or gynecologic cancer at a university-affiliated cancer center participated in an individual or a group interview. Transcripts of interviews were analyzed using a coding format with two areas of emphasis. First, we focused on patients’ emotions, as there is specificity between emotions and the corresponding ways in which individuals choose to manage them. Secondly, we considered the patients’ social environments and relationships, as they too appear key in the adjustment to, and survival from, cancer. Patients identified notable differences in their responses to an initial diagnosis of cancer and their current ones to recurrence, including the following: 1) depressive symptoms being problematic; 2) with the passing years and the women’s own aging, there is shrinkage in the size of social networks; and, 3) additional losses come from social support erosion, arising from a) an intentional distancing by social contacts; b) friends and family not understanding that cancer recurrence is a chronic illness, and/or c) patients’ stemming their support requests across time. The contribution of these findings to the selection of intervention strategies is discussed. PMID:24123502

  14. Technology Diffusion and Prostate Cancer Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Schroeck, Florian R.; Kaufman, Samuel R.; Jacobs, Bruce L.; Skolarus, Ted A.; Zhang, Yun; Hollenbeck, Brent K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the association of technological capacity with prostate cancer quality of care. Technological capacity was conceptualized as a market’s ability to provide prostate cancer treatment with new technology, including robotic prostatectomy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we used data from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) – Medicare linked database from 2004–2009 to identify men with newly diagnosed prostate cancer (n=46,274). We measured technological capacity as the number of providers performing robotic prostatectomy or IMRT per population in a healthcare market. We used multilevel logistic regression to assess the association of technological capacity with receiving quality care according to a set of nationally endorsed quality measures, while adjusting for patient and market characteristics. Results Overall, our findings were mixed with only subtle differences in quality of care when comparing high-tech to low-tech markets. High robotic prostatectomy capacity was associated with better adherence to some quality measures, such as avoiding unnecessary bone scans (79.8% vs. 73.0%, p=0.003) and having follow-up with urologists (67.7% vs. 62.6%, p=0.023). However, for most measures, neither high robotic prostatectomy nor high IMRT capacity were associated with significant increases in adherence rates. In fact, for one measure (treatment by a high-volume provider), high IMRT capacity was associated with lower performance (23.4% vs. 28.5%, p<0.001). Conclusion Our findings suggest that new technology is not clearly associated with higher quality of care. To improve quality, more specific efforts will be needed. PMID:25443905

  15. Robot-Assisted Gynecologic Oncology Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ROBOTIC-ASSISTED GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY PROCEDURE HALIFAX HEALTH DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA April 24, 2008 00:00:11 KELLY ... You're just minutes away from seeing a robotic-assisted laparoscopic gynecological case live. This very progressive ...

  16. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the body, such as the lymph nodes, lung, liver, intestine, or bone. Stage IVB cervical cancer. Topics/Categories: Anatomy -- Gynecologic Cancer Types -- Cervical Cancer Staging Type: Color, Medical Illustration Source: National Cancer Institute ...

  17. Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Informed Cancer Home What Are the Symptoms of Ovarian Cancer? Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Gynecologic cancer symptoms diaries Ovarian cancer may cause one or more of these signs ...

  18. The Inclusion of the Care of the Cancer Survivor in Undergraduate Nursing Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dietmann, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    As the number of individuals surviving cancer continues to rise, short and long term effects of cancer and its treatment that result in physical, psychosocial, and spiritual needs unique to the care of the cancer survivor has not been addressed in nursing curricula. The Institute of Medicine (IOM, 2005) recommends that all health care providers…

  19. Place of death: hospital-based advanced home care versus conventional care. A prospective study in palliative cancer care.

    PubMed

    Ahlner-Elmqvist, Marianne; Jordhøy, Marit S; Jannert, Magnus; Fayers, Peter; Kaasa, Stein

    2004-10-01

    The purpose of this prospective nonrandomized study was to evaluate time spent at home, place of death and differences in sociodemographic and medical characteristics of patients, with cancer in palliative stage, receiving either hospital-based advanced home care (AHC), including 24-hour service by a multidisciplinary palliative care team or conventional hospital care (CC). Recruitment to the AHC group and to the study was a two-step procedure. The patients were assigned to either hospital-based AHC or CC according to their preferences. Following this, the patients were asked to participate in the study. Patients were eligible for the study if they had malignant disease, were older than 18 years and had a survival expectancy of 2-12 months. A total of 297 patients entered the study and 280 died during the study period of two and a half years, 117 in the AHC group and 163 in the CC group. Significantly more patients died at home in the AHC group (45%) compared with the CC group (10%). Preference for and referral to hospital-based AHC were not related to sociodemographic or medical characteristics. However, death at home was associated with living together with someone. Advanced hospital-based home care targeting seriously ill cancer patients with a wish to remain at home enable a substantial number of patients to die in the place they desire. PMID:15540666

  20. A comprehensive review of palliative care in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Reena; Alici, Yesne; Breitbart, William

    2014-02-01

    One of the most challenging roles for the psychiatrist is to help guide terminally ill patients physically, psychologically and spiritually through the dying process. Patients with advanced cancer, and other life-threatening medical illnesses are at increased risk for developing major psychiatric complications and have an enormous burden of both physical as well as psychological symptoms. In fact, surveys suggest that psychological symptoms such as depression, anxiety, and hopelessness are as frequent, if not more so, than pain and other physical symptoms in palliative care settings. Psychiatrists have a unique role and opportunity to offer competent and compassionate palliative care to those with life-threatening illness. In this article we provide a comprehensive review of basic concepts and definitions of palliative care and the experience of dying, and the role of the psychiatrist in palliative care including assessment and management of common psychiatric disorders in the terminally ill, with an emphasis on suicide and desire for hastened death. Psychotherapies developed for use in palliative care settings, and management of grief and bereavement are also reviewed. PMID:24716503

  1. Cancer patient-centered home care: a new model for health care in oncology

    PubMed Central

    Tralongo, Paolo; Ferraù, Francesco; Borsellino, Nicolò; Verderame, Francesco; Caruso, Michele; Giuffrida, Dario; Butera, Alfredo; Gebbia, Vittorio

    2011-01-01

    Patient-centered home care is a new model of assistance, which may be integrated with more traditional hospital-centered care especially in selected groups of informed and trained patients. Patient-centered care is based on patients’ needs rather than on prognosis, and takes into account the emotional and psychosocial aspects of the disease. This model may be applied to elderly patients, who present comorbid diseases, but it also fits with the needs of younger fit patients. A specialized multidisciplinary team coordinated by experienced medical oncologists and including pharmacists, psychologists, nurses, and social assistance providers should carry out home care. Other professional figures may be required depending on patients’ needs. Every effort should be made to achieve optimal coordination between the health professionals and the reference hospital and to employ shared evidence-based guidelines, which in turn guarantee safety and efficacy. Comprehensive care has to be easily accessible and requires a high level of education and knowledge of the disease for both the patients and their caregivers. Patient-centered home care represents an important tool to improve quality of life and help cancer patients while also being cost effective. PMID:21941445

  2. [Psychosocial care of children with a parent having cancer--an appraisal of specific care services in Germany].

    PubMed

    Ernst, Johanna Christine; Beierlein, Volker; Romer, Georg; Möller, Birgit; Koch, Uwe; Bergelt, Corinna

    2011-09-01

    Children of a parent having cancer are at greater risk to develop mental health problems. Aim is to investigate specific psychosocial care for children having a parent with cancer, as well as to characterize and assess utilization and needs of affected minor children. Employees of institutions in Germany supplying psychosocial care to families with a parent having cancer were surveyed, using a semi-structured interview (n = 29). Specific psychosocial care for affected children is limited and heterogeneous in Germany. Regarding different distress stages of those families, the situation could be interpreted as eligible. However, this primarily reflects the low quality assurance of care. Results suggest that in addition to preventive care needs of children having a parent with cancer, increased needs exist in specific risk constellations, like in single parent families. PMID:21969141

  3. [Laparoscopy in the gynecologic clinic].

    PubMed

    Palatyński, A

    1992-11-01

    Three thousand and twelve (3012) diagnostic laparoscopies in children, girls and women were carried out during the period 1970--1992. The age of the patients was between 6--49 years. The present studies show that laparoscopy fills up the space between the clinical investigation and laparotomy probatoria. It helps to solve in a clear way, a lot of diagnostic problems in gynecology in adult women, in gynecology of developmental age and gynecological endocrinology. There were the following indications to laparoscopy: 1. Adnexitis chronica 2. Infertility-primary and secondary. 3. Unclear tumor and pelvic infections in adolescence. 4. Primary and secondary failure of ovaries. 5. Suspicion of polycystic ovaries. 6. Second look laparoscopy. 7. Suspicion of endometriosis. 8. Suspicion of ectopic pregnancy. 9. Developmental faults of sexual organs. 10. Pubertas praecox. PMID:1305570

  4. Patient and oncologist discussions about cancer care costs

    PubMed Central

    Henrikson, Nora B.; Tuzzio, Leah; Loggers, Elizabeth Trice; Miyoshi, Janice; Buist, Diana SM

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Patient out of pocket costs are higher for cancer care than for any other health care sector. Oncologist-patient discussions of costs are not well understood. We conducted an exploratory interview study to examine the frequency, patterns, attitudes, and preferences of both patients and providers on discussion of treatment costs. Methods We conducted semi-structured telephone interviews with oncology clinicians and people receiving chemotherapy at a large nonprofit health system. Multiple investigators conducted thematic analysis using modified content analysis, grounded theory, and interaction analysis methods. Results Patient themes included the relevance of cost to their experience, preference for the doctor to be the starting point of cost discussions, but relative infrequency of discussions with doctors or other care team member. Provider themes were an emphasis on clinical benefit above costs, conviction that cost-related decisions should rest with patients, and lack of access to treatment costs. Interest in discussing costs and barriers accessing cost information were common themes from both patients and providers. Conclusions Doctors and patients want to discuss treatment costs but lack access to them. These data support growing evidence for a provider role in discussions of cost during cancer treatment planning. PMID:24276955

  5. Common problems in pediatric gynecology: new developments.

    PubMed

    Mroueh, J; Muram, D

    1999-10-01

    Physicians, particularly gynecologists, pediatricians and family practitioners, are often called upon to perform a gynecological evaluation of a child. The following article is a review of current developments in the area of pediatric and adolescent gynecology. It outlines the recent clinical information and offers a review of common gynecological disorders among children and adolescent girls. PMID:10526922

  6. Patient-Reported Quality of Supportive Care Among Patients With Colorectal Cancer in the Veterans Affairs Health Care System

    PubMed Central

    van Ryn, Michelle; Phelan, Sean M.; Arora, Neeraj K.; Haggstrom, David A.; Jackson, George L.; Zafar, S. Yousuf; Griffin, Joan M.; Zullig, Leah L.; Provenzale, Dawn; Yeazel, Mark W.; Jindal, Rahul M.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-quality supportive care is an essential component of comprehensive cancer care. We implemented a patient-centered quality of cancer care survey to examine and identify predictors of quality of supportive care for bowel problems, pain, fatigue, depression, and other symptoms among 1,109 patients with colorectal cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with new diagnosis of colorectal cancer at any Veterans Health Administration medical center nationwide in 2008 were ascertained through the Veterans Affairs Central Cancer Registry and sent questionnaires assessing a variety of aspects of patient-centered cancer care. We received questionnaires from 63% of eligible patients (N = 1,109). Descriptive analyses characterizing patient experiences with supportive care and binary logistic regression models were used to examine predictors of receipt of help wanted for each of the five symptom categories. Results There were significant gaps in patient-centered quality of supportive care, beginning with symptom assessment. In multivariable modeling, the impact of clinical factors and patient race on odds of receiving wanted help varied by symptom. Coordination of care quality predicted receipt of wanted help for all symptoms, independent of patient demographic or clinical characteristics. Conclusion This study revealed substantial gaps in patient-centered quality of care, difficult to characterize through quality measurement relying on medical record review alone. It established the feasibility of collecting patient-reported quality measures. Improving quality measurement of supportive care and implementing patient-reported outcomes in quality-measurement systems are high priorities for improving the processes and outcomes of care for patients with cancer. PMID:24493712

  7. Cancer Screening: Should Cancer Screening be Essential Component of Primary Health Care in Developing Countries?

    PubMed Central

    Bobdey, Saurabh; Balasubramanium, Ganesh; Kumar, Abhinendra; Jain, Aanchal

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a fatal disease and is on the rise across the globe. In India, breast, cervix and the oral cavity are the leading cancer sites, but, unfortunately, in-spite of availability of screening tools, there is no organized cancer screening program in India. The main objective of this study was to review the performance of various cancer screening modalities in a resource poor setting. Methods: MEDLINE and web of science electronic database was searched from January 1990 to December 2013, using keywords such as “breast cancer, cervical cancer, oral cancer and their corresponding mesh terms were also used in combination with Boolean operators OR, AND.” Two authors independently selected studies published in English and conducted in India. A total of 16 studies was found relevant and eligible for the review. The data on sensitivity and specificity of various screening tool was extracted and analyzed. Results: Most of the reported screening trails in India are on cervical cancer and few on breast and oral cancer screening. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity of cervical cancer screening test such as visual inspection with acetic acid, magnified visual inspection with acetic acid, visual inspection with Lugol's iodine, cytology (Papanicolaou smear) and human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid was found to be 68.76% and 84.02%, 63.27% and 85.43%, 81.86% and 87.03%, 63.25% and 93.17% and 75.04% and 91.66%, respectively. Sensitivity and specificity of clinical breast examination was found to be 94.30% and 94.30%, respectively. Oral cancer screening through visual inspection by trained health care worker was found to have 87.90% sensitivity and 92.05% specificity. Conclusions: Our study highlights the availability and success of visual screening tools in early detection and mortality reduction of major neoplasia in resource-poor health care settings and recommends implementation of oral and cervical cancer screening as part of assured

  8. Incorporating Geriatric Medicine Providers into the Care of the Older Adult with Cancer.

    PubMed

    Magnuson, Allison; Canin, Beverly; van Londen, G J; Edwards, Beatrice; Bakalarski, Pamela; Parker, Ira

    2016-11-01

    A significant proportion of cancer patients and survivors are age 65 and over. Older adults with cancer often have more complex medical and social needs than their younger counterparts. Geriatric medicine providers (GMPs) such as geriatricians, geriatric-trained advanced practice providers, and geriatric certified registered nurses have expertise in caring for older adults, managing complex medical situations, and optimizing function and independence for this population. GMPs are not routinely incorporated into cancer care for older adults; however, their particular skill set may add benefit at many points along the cancer care continuum. In this article, we review the role of geriatric assessment in the care of older cancer patients, highlight specific case scenarios in which GMPs may offer additional understanding and insight in the care of older adults with cancer, and discuss specific mechanisms for incorporating GMPs into oncology care. PMID:27613166

  9. [Anemia caused by cancer in the context of palliative care].

    PubMed

    Altinger, Marion; Strasser, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Tumor anemia is very common in patients with cancer. The causes are very diverse and the parameter value depends on several factors. If this however develops to be symptomatic it may adversely impact health related quality of life. Erythropoietin or blood transfusion provides options for treatment. However, these are not always uneventful. There could also be a lack of response to Erythropoietin. This case report describes the complexity of tumor anemia. It also includes a more detailed discussion on the Fatigue Syndrome, which is one of the most common symptoms of patients with cancer. In the context of palliative care there is often the question of alternatives for improving the quality of patients life. Some kinds of treatment may also cause the opposite effect. A multidimensional assessment should help to approach this difficult issue and to find ways for a meaningful treatment of the symptoms of anemia. PMID:22328049

  10. Care for the cancer caregiver: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    APPLEBAUM, ALLISON J.; BREITBART, WILLIAM

    2016-01-01

    Objective Informal caregivers (ICs) are relatives, friends, and partners who have a significant relationship with and provide assistance (i.e., physical, emotional) to a patient with a life-threatening, incurable illness. The multidimensional burden that results from providing care to a patient with cancer is well documented, and as a result, a growing number of psychosocial interventions have been developed specifically to address this burden. The purpose of the present study was to characterize the state of the science of psychosocial interventions for informal cancer caregivers. Method A comprehensive systematic review of interventions for cancer caregivers was conducted via an electronic literature search of publications between 1980 and January 13, 2011. A final sample of 49 interventions was reviewed in detail. Results The interventions, which varied in terms of modality and patient population, fell into the following eight categories: psychoeducation, problem-solving/skills building interventions, supportive therapy, family/couples therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal therapy, complementary and alternative medicine interventions, and existential therapy. Benefits and disadvantages of each of the categories are discussed, with special attention given to studies that produced null findings. Significance of results Beyond specific techniques, structured, goal-oriented, and time-limited interventions that are integrative appear to be the most feasible and offer the greatest benefits for ICs of cancer patients. Future studies are needed to examine the specific benefits and challenges of delivering interventions in alternative modalities (Internet, Skype) so that the needs of a greater number of ICs may be addressed. PMID:23046977

  11. Clinical Guidelines for the Care of Childhood Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Tonorezos, Emily S.; Henderson, Tara O.

    2014-01-01

    The Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancers are evidence- and consensus-based guidelines that have been developed and published by the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Late Effects Committee, Nursing Discipline, and the Patient Advocacy Committee. Originally published in 2004, the guidelines are currently in version 3.0. While the COG guidelines have been praised as a model for providing risk-based survivorship care, adherence has not been uniform. Reasons for this gap include unawareness on the part of the survivor and/or care team as well as disagreement about the individual recommendations. In some cases, the burden of testing (such as annual echocardiography or repeat pulmonary function testing) may be too great. A small number of intervention studies have documented improved adherence to guideline recommendations with dissemination of informational material. Future studies should focus on individualizing screening recommendations, as well as identifying unnecessary testing.

  12. Interpersonal complaints regarding cancer care through a gender lens.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Erik Masao

    2016-07-11

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to investigate healthcare customer complaints concerning interpersonal matters in cancer care. Design/methodology/approach - Complaints from cancer patients and their relatives (n=116) that dealt with interpersonal matters registered between 2009 and 2011 at four local Patients' Advisory Committees in Western Sweden were sampled and analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Findings - Complaints concerned lack of information and consideration from healthcare providers. Lack of empathy and civility also caused dissatisfaction, the latter particularly for women. Relatives complained that they did not feel included in the care process or were not offered proper support. Most complaints by relatives were filed by a female relative and concerned a male patient. Research limitations/implications - Information about patient demographics other than gender could not be investigated due to database limitations. Hence, factors such as age, country of birth, and geographical residence were not included for analysis. In addition, neither the type nor stage of cancer among the sampled patients was able to be addressed. Practical implications - Patient complaints should not only be viewed as a post-consumption judgment, but also as a service interaction activity. This may require healthcare providers to enhance their interpersonal skills, allowing patients and relatives to provide feedback during service interaction to satisfactorily address dissatisfaction. Visualizing gender disparities may help healthcare providers prevent stereotypical encounters. In addition, the provider should be invited to participate in the customer's value creating network, which may also include knowledge and skills from other sources, such as relatives. Originality/value - Value co-creation offers a different view on patient complaints. Incorporating social construction into value co-creation may reveal socially constructed disparities. The paper provides

  13. 3-T MR-guided brachytherapy for gynecologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kapur, Tina; Egger, Jan; Damato, Antonio; Schmidt, Ehud J; Viswanathan, Akila N

    2012-11-01

    Gynecologic malignancies are a leading cause of death in women worldwide. Standard treatment for many primary and recurrent gynecologic cancer cases includes external-beam radiation followed by brachytherapy. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is beneficial in diagnostic evaluation, in mapping the tumor location to tailor radiation dose and in monitoring the tumor response to treatment. Initial studies of MR guidance in gynecologic brachytherapy demonstrate the ability to optimize tumor coverage and reduce radiation dose to normal tissues, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. In this article, we describe a methodology to aid applicator placement and treatment planning for 3 Tesla (3-T) MR-guided brachytherapy that was developed specifically for gynecologic cancers. This methodology has been used in 18 cases from September 2011 to May 2012 in the Advanced Multimodality Image Guided Operating (AMIGO) suite at Brigham and Women's Hospital. AMIGO comprises state-of-the-art tools for MR imaging, image analysis and treatment planning. An MR sequence using three-dimensional (3D)-balanced steady-state free precession in a 3-T MR scanner was identified as the best sequence for catheter identification with ballooning artifact at the tip. 3D treatment planning was performed using MR images. Items in development include software designed to support virtual needle trajectory planning that uses probabilistic bias correction, graph-based segmentation and image registration algorithms. The results demonstrate that 3-T MR image guidance has a role in gynecologic brachytherapy. These novel developments have the potential to improve targeted treatment to the tumor while sparing the normal tissues. PMID:22898699

  14. U.S. Black Women Get Less Care to Prevent Breast Cancer Return

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159242.html U.S. Black Women Get Less Care to Prevent Breast Cancer ... 7, 2016 TUESDAY, June 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Black breast cancer survivors in the United States are ...

  15. From state care to self-care: cancer screening behaviours among Russian-speaking Australian women.

    PubMed

    Team, Victoria; Manderson, Lenore H; Markovic, Milica

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we report on a small qualitative scale study with immigrant Russian-speaking Australian women, carers of dependent family members. Drawing on in-depth interviews, we explore women's health-related behaviours, in particular their participation in breast and cervical cancer screening. Differences in preventive health care policies in country of origin and Australia explain their poor participation in cancer screening. Our participants had grown up in the former Soviet Union, where health checks were compulsory but where advice about frequency and timing was the responsibility of doctors. Following migration, women continued to believe that the responsibility for checks was their doctor's, and they maintained that, compared with their experience of preventive medicine in the former Soviet Union, Australian practice was poor. Women argued that if reproductive health screening were important in cancer prevention, then health care providers would take a lead role to ensure that all women participated. Data suggest how women's participation in screening may be improved. PMID:22951044

  16. Early Integration of Palliative Care for Children with High-Risk Cancer and Their Families.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Erica C; Friebert, Sarah; Baker, Justin N

    2016-04-01

    Despite increasing data to support pediatric palliative care (PPC) as an integral component of high-quality care for children with life-threatening conditions and their families, timely integration of PPC is offered inconsistently to children with high-risk cancer. In this review, we summarize the growing body of literature in support of early integration of PPC for children with high-risk cancer and their families, advocating that PPC principles and resources are imperative to holistic cancer-directed care and rooted in evidence-based medicine. Finally, we offer possible strategies for optimizing integration of PPC into holistic cancer care for children and families. PMID:26579997

  17. Medication risk communication with cancer patients in a Middle East cancer care setting

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, Kerry; Al-Okka, Maha; Jumaat, Ebaa; Eissa, Nesma; Elbashir, Merwa; Al-Yafei, Sumaya M Al Saadi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Cancer treatments are frequently associated with adverse effects, but there may be a cultural reluctance by care providers to be forthcoming with patients regarding these risks for fear of promoting nonadherence. Conversely, research in a number of countries indicates high levels of patient desire for this information. We sought to explore cancer patient experiences, satisfaction, and preferences for medication risk communication in a Middle East care setting. Methods We developed and administered a ten-item questionnaire (Arabic and English) to a convenience sample of consenting adult patients receiving treatment at the National Center for Cancer Care and Research in Qatar. Results One hundred and forty-three patients were interviewed. Most (88%) stated that the level of side effect information they received was sufficient, with physicians (86%) followed by pharmacists (39%) as the preferred sources. The majority (97%) agreed that knowing about possible side effects would help them recognize and manage the reaction, and 92% agreed that it would help them understand how to minimize or prevent the risks. Eighteen percent indicated that this information would make them not want to take treatment. Two-thirds (65%) had previously experienced intolerance to their cancer treatment regimen. Conclusion Most patients surveyed expressed preference for the details of possible side effects they may encounter in their treatment. However, one in five considered such information a factor for nonadherence, indicating the need for patient-specific approaches when communicating medication risks. PMID:27175061

  18. [Cryogenic technic in gynecological practice].

    PubMed

    Verkin, B I; Grishchenko, V I; Medvedev, E M; Murinets-Markevich, B N; Nosov, M E

    1978-01-01

    Two units with different refrigerants and cooling temperature are recommended for treating various gynecological affections by the method of cryodestruction of pathological changes in the cervical tissue and the uterine mucosa. In these liquid nitrogen, nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide are employed as refrigerants. PMID:651580

  19. [Oncologic gynecology and the Internet].

    PubMed

    Gizler, Robert; Bielanów, Tomasz; Kulikiewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-11-01

    The strategy of World Wide Web searching for medical sites was presented in this article. The "deep web" and "surface web" resources were searched. The 10 best sites connected with the gynecological oncology, according to authors' opinion, were presented. PMID:12722411

  20. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals

    PubMed Central

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-01-01

    Background. Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. Objectives. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Methods. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Results. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Conclusion. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients’ individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients’ entire pathway of care. PMID:26311705

  1. Robotics in Gynecology: Why is this Technology Worth Pursuing?

    PubMed Central

    Ayala-Yáñez, Rodrigo; Olaya-Guzmán, Emilio José; Haghenbeck-Altamirano, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Robotic laparoscopy in gynecology, which started in 2005 when the Da Vinci Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical Inc) was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in gynecologic procedures, represents today a modern, safe, and precise approach to pathology in this field. Since then, a great deal of experience has accumulated, and it has been shown that there is almost no gynecological surgery that cannot be approached with this technology, namely hysterectomy, myomectomy, sacrocolpopexia, and surgery for the treatment of endometriosis. Albeit no advantages have been observed over conventional laparoscopy and some open surgical procedures, robotics do seem to be advantageous in highly complicated procedures when extensive dissection and proper anatomy reestablishment is required, as in the case of oncologic surgery. There is no doubt that implementation of better logistics in finance, training, design, and application will exert a positive effect upon robotics expansion in gynecological medicine. Contrary to expectations, we estimate that a special impact is to be seen in emerging countries where novel technologies have resulted in benefits in the organization of health care systems. PMID:24453521

  2. A Review and Characterization of the Various Perceptions of Quality Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Colosia, Ann D; Peltz, Gerson; Pohl, Gerhardt; Liu, Esther; Copley-Merriman, Kati; Khan, Shahnaz; Kaye, James A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is important to maintain high-quality cancer care while reducing spending. This requires an understanding of how stakeholders define “quality.” The objective of this literature review was to understand the perceptions patients, physicians, and managed care professionals have about quality cancer care, especially chemotherapy. METHODS A computerized literature search was conducted for articles concerning